Page 1

OROVILLE FALLS TO REARDAN

OROVILLE WINTER MARKET

IN STATE FOOTBALL PLAYOFF

Saturday, May 23, 10 a.m. Oroville Library Community Room

See Pages A11

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

MISSOULA CHILDREN’S THEATER VISITS OROVILLE

Group demands Enloe Dam breach

PUD ratepayers could be stuck with the bill BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – While the Okanogan County PUD would like to generate power at Enloe Dam a group of opponents wants to breach the historic dam. The question is who would bear cost of a breach which could top $100 million. Rick and Jeré Gillespie’s opposition to relicensing Enloe, which is located near Oroville on the Similkameen River, stretches back a quarter century. They were instrumental in placing a poll in a mid-county newspaper asking people to vote on whether the PUD should continue their efforts to bring power generation back to the dam after more than 60 years, or whether the dam should be pulled out. Both could be pricey propositions, especially the clean-up of silt that has gathered behind the dam for most of the last century. However it looks like the option of the PUD just walking away and doing nothing has been taken off the table as federal agencies, such as the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and others have requested the dam be removed if it is no longer used for power generation. The question is who will pay for the removal and clean-up. Via the Facebook page “Friends of the Similkameen,” the Gillespies are urging people to vote

Alice in Wonderland was the theme of this year’s presentation by the Missoula Children’s Theatre at Oroville last Saturday at Coulton Auditorium. The cast was made up of students from Oroville and included three Alices as she grew -- small, middle and tall -- Kylie Acord, Hadley Blasey and Sheridan Blasey, respectively. The play included many of the familiar characters, including the caterpillar with segments played by six children, as well as March Hare (above), Humpty Dumpty (right), Queen of Hearts (below right), Alice (below) and the Mad Hatter, Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum.

BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Discussion about the future of the Tonasket Municipal Swimming pool continued at the Tuesday, Nov. 12, city council meeting after the council had had a chance to review a book-length report completed by Pool World of Spokane at its behest. With four options for an outdoor pool costing anywhere from $1.5 million to $2.5 million the council intends to host a town hall meeting (date still to be determined) to invite the public to share its thoughts and try to gauge how much material support there will be for the project. “We’d have all four alternatives posted,” said city planner Kurt Danison of Highlands Associates. “We’ll post the

Preliminary NVH budget approved BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The North Valley Hospital Board of Commissioners, with a healthy crowd in attendance, approved its 2014 preliminary budget at its Thursday, Nov. 14, meeting. As discussed at the Oct. 31 meeting, Chief Financial Officer Helen Verhasselt presented a budget designed to stem consistent financial losses in the districts Long Term Care divi-

SEE DAM | PG A4

Pool, infrastructure dominate council talk

Steffi Fuchs/submitted photos

CEO answers recent criticism of hospital district

for “Breach the dam and end debate.” They claim that the BLM, Bureau of Reclamation, NOAA, U.S. Fish and Wildlife and the Bonneville Power Administration will foot the bill for removal and clean up of sediment and that ratepayers would only be responsible of the PUD continues to pursue power generation. John Grubich, general manager of Okanogan County PUD isn’t so sure. “The opponents of the dam have made those assertions several times. However, we have been unable to get any federal agency (BLM, BPA, USF&W etc.) to indicate that they would pay for the cost of removal,” Grubich said. “Jeré has stated in our public meetings that Congress has allocated funds for dam removal about three decades ago and is certain those funds are still available. I have not been able to run that to ground either.” The PUD Manager agrees that someone will have to pay for removal and if it isn’t the federal government it will be Okanogan County PUD ratepayers. “The dam is physically located on BLM property and they have indicated that if we do not pursue power generation they want it removed. While they are soft pedaling that now a year and a half ago they were pretty insistent,” said Grubich, who adds the cost would be a

sion. NVH will, over time and as beds become available, trim the Extended Care facility’s number of beds from its current level of 58 down to 40, including 33 paid for by Medicaid, three through Medicare and four by private insurance. “This is something we will be working toward,” Verhasselt said. “A target to try to attain.” The rationale for those changes includes reducing the ratio of Medicaid patients to privately insured, since Medicaid reimbursements (locked in at the same rate since 2007) do not fully cover the cost of care, and to increase utilization of the hospital’s swing beds. “For the exact same care we give a Medicare resident on the

Extended Care side, as opposed to a swing bed patient on the hospital side, the reimbursement is much higher for the district as a whole,” Verhasselt said. “So we want to try to market the swing bed program going more and take care of as many patients there to help the district’s financial position overall.” The budget operates with a number of assumptions, including (but not limited to) patient volumes staying at approximately the same level, a five percent increase in hospital (though not Extended Care) room rates, a two percent step increase in wages and benefits, and an eight percent increase in employee insurance costs. Verhasselt said that changing

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

CONTACT US

Volume 109 No. 47

the way services purchased by the Long Term Care division from the hospital are allocated will help the overall bottom line. “I’ve been talking to our cost report preparers and auditors,” she said. “I have gotten the OK to move forward with changing our allocation method. It still needs to be approved by Medicare. That will decrease some of the expense on the Extended Care side and that is taken into consideration here as well.” The bottom line, Verhasselt said, is to continue to make progress on the hospital’s warrants while making it profitable enough to be on the razor’s edge of losing money. In the current year, the district is projected to finish with a total loss of about $86,000. The hospital division stands to land more than $859,000 in the black, with Long Term Care losing $945,000. The 2014 budget includes a $179,000 loss in Long Term Care and a $546,000 profit for the hospital, for a district-wide net income of about $368,000. “This is what we’re going to

Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

budget for each one, and I’ll spend time going through each one ... We’ll have time to answer some questions ... Then we basically would get colored dots and let people vote. “We’ll get some kind of idea of what people want,” he added, saying such a vote would be considered an expression of public opinion as opposed to committing the city to a particular course of action. “We’ll see what level of support the community wants to show. The council needs to make a decision on the direction we’re going to go, or more importantly, if we’re even going to go at all.” Still to be determined is whether or not the city is willing or able to pursue the project itself, or whether a recreation district for the pool would need to be

SEE TONASKET | PG A3

work toward,” Verhasselt said in response to a question by Don Atchison. “If there is something that happens in the middle of the year or a few months down the road, if something changes in our circumstances ... (for example) if the state changed the rates for Medicaid on the Extended Care side, we would re-look at the whole thing and potentially submit a revised budget.”

ACCUSATIONS ADDRESSED NVH Administrator Linda Michel defended the hospital against accusations that were made in local media outlets in recent weeks, including a radio broadcast and a letter in the Gazette-Tribune. She took issue with a number of points made during a radio discussion, including: • That the hospital is not respectful of its history. “ We certainly are,” Michel said. “We talk about our history all the time ... if you walk through our facility you see many historic items and pictures...” • That the senior leadership

and board had gotten stagnant. “This board and this leadership team are not stagnant,” Michel said. “They are constantly working on things ... to improve the district to keep it viable for years to come. Every employee is engaged in that, too.” • That the hospital is inconsiderate of its customers’ needs and experiences, including in the emergency room. “We get a lot of thank you,” she said. “Our Coast to Coast physicians (in the ER) are emergency certified. I can’t tell you how many lives they’ve saved this year... We do phenomenal work in our ER. I am very committed to having them here because they bring another level of service to our community that they don’t have elsewhere.” • That the board and administration were not transparent. “We have tried so hard this past year to get to the community the information they want,” Michel said. “We’ve published a newsletter, we’ve had more verbal

SEE HOSPITAL | PG A4

INSIDE THIS EDITION Valley Life A2 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9 Cops & Courts A10

Sports Obituaries

A11 A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 21, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Arrests made in fatal shooting of hunter

GRAND REOPENING PLANNED

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN – Two men were arrested in connection with the Sept. 2, 2013 fatal shooting of a grouse hunter on Cow Camp Road not far from Chesaw. Adam Shaun Jennings, 27, and John Wayne Jennings, 57, both of Pontiac Ridge Rd., about six miles from Chesaw, were each placed under arrest Tuesday for first degree murder. The younger Jennings was also charged with unlawful possession of firearms and the elder with delivery of a firearm to an ineligible person. They are accused of shooting Michael R. Carrigan, 52,

Hoquiam, Wash. while he was hunting not far from their residence. Carrigan was grouse hunting with George R. Stover, 65, also of Hoquiam. According to Stover, the two of them were driving around looking for grouse on Pontiac Ridge. Stover said that as they drove onto Cow Camp Road they saw a grouse in tree off the side of the road. Stover said that they stopped and Carrigan got out of the vehicle and walked into a field and shot at the grouse. Carrigan missed and shot again and according to Stover at this time he heard another shot come from somewhere else, according

to Sheriff Frank Rogers. “Stover, who was still sitting in the vehicle, said he saw Carrigan turn around and could see blood on him. Stover said that Carrigan then fell down and at that time Stover said he heard another shot, so he Stover drove out of the area to get help from law enforcement,” said Rogers at the time. The homicide investigation was carried out by the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office and the state Department of Fish and Wildlife. Law enforcement officials are still on scene executing a search warrant on the Jennings property/residence, according to Undersheriff Joe Somday.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Marylou’s Gifts and More has moved to its new location at 1400 Main Street in Oroville. It’s a great new location said Mary Lou Kriner, owner of the shop. “We are planning a Grand Reopening on Friday, Nov. 29, the day after Thanksgiving” said Kriner. “Come see what’s new. We have some great gift ideas.” For the Grand Opening she will have Judy Taber pouring some of her Copper Mountain wines, there will be snacks and door prizes and local artist Sam Bjelleand will be on hand. Several of the artist’s works are for sale at Marylou’s, she said.

Oroville Woman’s Group seeks gift donations BY KALLY BERLINGER OROVILLE WOMAN’S GROUP

OROVILLE – The Oroville Woman’s Group is gearing up for their annual Gifts for Kids program. The group is asking that unwrapped gifts for children between the ages of zero to 16 be dropped off at Sterling Bank

where they will be collected. The deadline for the gift drop is Monday, Dec. 11. Anyone wishing to donate cash can do so at Sterling Bank where there is an account set up for this event. “Every year is so special to have this program go forward. We are a non-profit organization and appreciate the support we get from our wonderful community,” said Woman’s Group members. The gifts will be given out

the Thursday before Christmas. Anyone wishing to help out is more than welcome, there is a lot of wrapping to do and the day of the distribution we always welcome more hands. For more information call Kally Berlinger at (509) 4763416 or Renee Ewalt at (509) 476-3286. Together we can make some special things happen for the children of our community.

Oroville Christmas Tree Lighting and Tractor Parade Akin’s Harvest Foods to sponsor prizes for parade winners OROVILLE - This year our annual Oroville Tree Lighting Ceremony will take place on Saturday, Dec. 7, at Centennial Park. It will be be preceded by a Christmas Tractor Parade down Main Street. “Akin’s Harvest Foods, in addition to providing the hot dogs and cocoa at the Tree Lighting in Centennial Park, will

also be providing $200 in prizes to the first and second place tractor entries, and five other honorable mention awards,” said Clyde Andrews, president of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. The Parade will start at 5 p.m. on Saturday at the High School and will conclude at Centennial Park (next to Sun Lakes Realty) on Main Street. Anyone that

would like to enter their tractor in the parade, should contact Sandy Andrews at the Camaray Motel , (509) 476-3684. The Tree Lighting Ceremony will include nearly 30 singers from the Okanagan International Chorus. And, of course, the event concludes with a visit from Santa as well as free hot dogs and hot cocoa.

Still looking for the right Medicare health plan? Get quality health care plus affordable premiums right here. $0

CTFW/submitted photo

Staff from the Colville Tribe’s Fish and Wildlife Department count chinook salmon on the Okanogan River after they have spawned. The count takes six to eight weeks to complete and this year appears to indicate a strong run for the chinooks.

Colville Tribes tally year’s Chinook Run Okanogan River counts Summer/ Fall Chinook run SUBMITTED BY MICHELLE CAMPOBASSO COLVILLE TRIBES FISH & WILDLIFE DEPT.

NESPELEM – The Colville Tribes’ Fish & Wildlife (CTFW) staff are completing this year’s count of Okanogan River Chinook salmon spawning this week. Biologists and fish technicians spend six to eight weeks each year conducting aerial and on-the-water surveys to document where, and how many fish are spawning in the Okanogan River. “This year’s run appears to be a strong return, at or slightly above recent averages,” said Keith Wolf, project leader for the Chief Joseph Hatchery Science Program. “It will take our staff several months to compile and analyze all the data we collect before we draw final conclusions.” Each spring, the Science Program hosts an annual threeday workshop to review all Anadromous Fish Division activities with a large group of scientists, and the public. Spawning is

one topic covered at the workshop. The monitoring of adult fish returns provides managers with key data on fish population status and trends. This information is broadly used for planning artificial production, habitat restoration and other projects. “These data are shared with state and federal Fish and Wildlife Programs and with Douglas, Chelan, and Grant County Public Utility Districts and their Natural Resource Programs. We communicate with partners throughout the region as part of multiple agreements, mitigation, recovery and conservation programs,” said Randy Friedlander, CTFW interim director. “We work with our management partners and area stakeholders to provide information on how fish are doing and work cooperatively with federal and state managers to manage fishing seasons for tribal members and the public,” he continued. Kirk Truscott, CTFW Anadromous Program manager explained, “Our professional staff conducts redd and carcass surveys in the Okanogan each year. They count redds (a spawning nest made by a fish) and examine carcasses (the expired parents of the next-generation) for a number of biological indicators such as

pre-spawning mortality, spatial distribution, abundance, age-atreturn and many other key data points.” Truscott continued, “These are intensive efforts aimed at assessing the efficacy of our hatchery, harvest, hydro and habitat programs. The combined results from these efforts safeguard the health of fish runs by facilitating good management decisions based on strong science.” Carcasses represent the end of life for adult male and female salmon. This is the natural life cycle for Pacific Salmon. The decomposition of these fish provides essential nutrients that support the health and vitality of near-shore vegetation, balance in water quality, food resources for all kinds of Okanogan basin wildlife, including juvenile offspring from these parents as they emerge from the gravel in early winter and spring each year. CTFW staff takes fish measurements and biological samples from fish that have died. Fisheries staff removes fish heads to retrieve coded wire tags and they remove their tails so they are not resampled. The carcasses are returned to the river as part of the natural cycle and in keeping with tribal cultural values and traditions.

a MONth OptiON*

When your doctors and your Medicare health plan work together, you’ll experience health care the way it was always meant to be. • Local doctors and hospitals you already know and trust • Integrated, consultative, patient-centered care •

Plus: $0 Preferred Generics at Walmart® and Sam’s Club**

Learn more at a FREE informational meeting† in your area.

Call NOW to reserve your seats: 1-877-561-1684 TTY/TDD: 711 or 1-800-833-6388 (Washington Relay), 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., 7 days a week. Brewster high School Library 503 S. 7th St. Brewster, WA Nov. 20 – 6 p.m.

Omak Clinic 916 Koala Dr. Omak, WA Nov. 21 – 1 p.m. Nov. 26 – 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 27 – 1 p.m.

the Winthrop Barn 51 N. Highway 20 Winthrop, WA Nov. 25 – 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & 12 p.m.

Health Alliance is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Health Alliance Medicare depends on contract renewal. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or copayments/coinsurance may change January 1 of each year. The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information, contact the plan. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply. Other providers are available in our network. * You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. ** Low copayments available at other pharmacies. † A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at a sales meeting call 1-877-561-1684 or TTY/TDD: 711 or 1-800-833-6388 (Washington Relay). H3471_14_10941 Accepted med-aepittWAROPT2-0813 3952_OkanoganValleyGazette-Tribune_TakesTwo_11-14.indd 1

11/14/13 3:34 PM

Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

www.gazette-tribune.com


NOVEMBER 21, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune You can still see the shadow of Prince’s Foods on the side of the building as the “Foods” in the new Akin’s Harvest Foods sign is raised into place last weekend. While the Prince family still owns the building, the grocery and department/hardware store businesses are owned and operated by Akins and Jack and Mary Hughes, respectively. The department/ hardware side of Prince’s Center still says Prince’s, but a panel truck with Hughes on the side can often be seen parked in the parking lot.

Page A3

SIGN OF CHANGE

Gary DeVon/staff photo

 33

TONASKET | FROM A1

Shopping Days Saturdays  5 Weekends 5

formed to increase the number we have done? of area residents supporting the “I still say it failed because peoproject. ple don’t understand where the “This goes back to the issue of money comes from and how it a recreation district or just with- can be spent,” said council memin the city limit who would be ber Jean Ramsey. “Water/sewer burdened,” said council member funds cannot just go anywhere. Jill Vugteveen. “There are people It’s not just one big pot.” outside the city that we charge The council did not set a date a very minimum rate to use the for its town hall meeting, but facility. We need to go back and it will likely take place in early look at drawing a boundary 5-10 January at a location other than miles outside the city limits to the council chambers. make it a pool district.” Danison pointed out that in Streets and sidewalks a survey taken at the time the Danison also said that the next decision was made to close the day (Nov. 13) he was fulfilling an pool, people indicated they were earlier directive from the council willing to pay a higher entry fee to apply to the Transportation than what was being asked but Alternatives Program for a were not willing to be taxed for a $91,000 grant that would be new pool. used to put in a sidewalk that “But they do want a new pool,” would extend from the corner he said. “Part of the decision is, of 6th and Whitcomb (US-97) what can we afford?” to the Bonaparte Creek Bridge. “Even if we get the pool for This would provide additional free,” said council member Scott infrastructure to support a proOlson, “if we can’t afford to run it, posed foot bridge that would we don’t want allow pedesit.” trians to cross Danison said the creek to it would cost at “We’re still being pres- the U.S. Armed least $25,000 Legacy sured to offer more Forces per year to Park instead open the pool services than we can of having to just during along the afford. And then, we’re walk the summer shoulder of months. asked not to raise taxes. US-97 to do so. “It may not Danison So we are in a conun- said he would be as grandiose as what people additionally drum...” might like to be applying Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb see,” he said. to the Service “But needs to Transportation be something Program for a that we can take care of in the grant for the bridge itself - as long run.” well as additional funding for the Mayor Patrick Plumb said that, sidewalk if the TAP grant was in light of the recent failure of denied. the criminal justice tax on the He also brought up the sore November ballot (which would subject of the condition of have added 0.1 percent to the Whitcomb Avenue itself through sales tax rate in the city), he won- the downtown business core. dered if the pool this year would “The crown is higher than have been able to stay open with some of the doorways to the busicurrent budget constraints. nesses,” Danison said, citing the “It is troubling to me,” he said. flooding that occurred during “It failed miserably, but we’re still heavy rains in September. “But being pressured to offer more any town under 5,000 (populaservices than we can afford. And tion), all DOT (Department of then, we’re asked not to raise Transportation) will do is chip taxes. So we are in a conundrum, seal. especially when there have been “What we decided to do, is choices made by multiple cus- that we are seriously going to our tomers of the area... that they are legislators and asking them to see shopping out of town. if they can get a reconstruction “When you don’t shop in town of Whitcomb from Bonaparte to (which sends sales tax dollars Siwash (creeks), including curbs, out of the community) you can’t sidewalks, ADA ramps, four trees afford the luxury of these services per block, street signs - complete available to the public without streets from wall to wall reducing services. That’s what has “We’ll go to the state legislators happened to our budget cycle this and seeing if we can get a line year. Imagine having a pool on item in the capital budget. Not top of that this year. What would the transportation budget. The

DOT won’t do it.” He pointed out that a chip seal would actually raise the elevation of the street, which would further increase the potential for flooding. “I don’t want to downplay the significance of our downtown core of being in the kind of danger it was,” Plumb said. “Regardless of whether it was a 100-year storm, 500-year, climate change, or whatever.”

Budget hearing The final hearing for the 2014 budget was held, though city clerk Alice Attwood said she wouldn’t be able to finalize the budget for a number of reasons. “I still don’t have numbers from the assessor’s office,” she said, adding that without that she can’t factor in how the annexation of the Mill Drive/Bonaparte Creek area (and its associated property taxes) would affect the budget, nor could she calculate the exact amount of the ad valorem tax increase approved last month. The council also directed her to include a cost of living adjustment for city employees (based on the Consumer Price Index) but opted not to include any extra funds for any meetings over the three per month for which the council gets paid.

GRAND OPENING Dec 6 & 7 11am to 6pm

Country Crazy Cowgirl Bling Now Open in II Sisters Video in Tonasket

Handbags Men’s & Women’s Wallets Stucker Bling Belts ~ Hats/Caps Karla Country Crazy Sunglasses ~ Western Gifts Creations 509-846-5752 Some clothing

Holiday Party Today! Thurs., Nov. 21  3 to 6 p.m.

Featuring Lay Z Designs Jewelry & Accessories by Sabrina Lay

1204 Main St., Oroville

509.476.3566

Stop in and Welcome Rocio & Cynthia

Cop car awaits Police Sgt. Darren Curtis said that the recently-purchased used police car had arrived but would not be able to be put into service until after the first of the year. “We had to get it in the city’s name,” he said. “But we don’t have the money to have somebody put all the stuff into it. “It’s a police package car - that means the motor and suspension have been upgraded and that kind of thing. It doesn’t have a light bar, or other things we need for us to utilize it.” After the first of the year, the department will be able to afford installation costs, as well as a new light bar that will cost around $1,000, he said. The council also approved Curtis’s request to apply for a grant for up to $10,000 from the Washington State Police Chiefs traffic safety grant program for a variety of equipment for the department. Attwood added that she would research grants through Rural Development for the purchase of an additional police car without dipping into the city’s general fund. The city council next meets on Tuesday, Nov. 26.

Out On The Town your guide to

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Advertise your specials and events here!

Dining

& Entertainment

EVERY WEEK Call Charlene at 509-476-3602

To start your Holiday Advertising call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 or 509-322-5712.


Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 21, 2013

CELEBRATING SUCCESS

Tonasket’s national runner-up FFA Rituals team demonstrated its craft for the entire Tonasket High School student body during an assembly last Friday. After ag instructor Matt Deebach reviewed highlights of the team’s trip to the national convention in Louisville, the team put on a display of the event that won the national honor. Above, Rade Pilkinton, Janelle Catone (hidden), Jenna Valentine (hidden), Jordan Hughes, Rachel Silverthorn, Sammie Earley and Kathryn Cleman (substituting for Madison Bayless, who moved away) begin the event. Left, Pilkinton (who won the individual national championship), Catone and Valentine react to their cheering classmates.

Brent Baker/staff photos

HOSPITAL | FROM A1 and written reports at our board meetings. Yet those board meetings are not consistently attended by our community, so how can they know if we’re being transparent or not?” • that as a public rural hospital, making a profit should not be a goal. “None of us are trying to turn this into a private hospital,” she said. “However, we can’t just break even at the end of the year or you have no money to put back in your facility and do the things you need to improve patient care. Yes, you have to make a profit. You don’t have to sock it away forever; you have to make a profit to reinvest back into the community and into the hospital.” • that the hospital district was spending too much money on outside consultants “From 2001-09 (before Michel’s arrival), $621,000 had been spent on consultants. Since 2010,we’ve had two: one for the dietary department, and one to increase our rates with Medicare.” • that the hospital put its warrants “on hold” while completing the second floor surgical center. “The county won’t allow us to do that,” Michel said. “We still have to pay that money. It took us three years to finish the second floor because it we took it slowly and tried to be responsible with what were doing.” • that calling health care a dif-

District seeks additional funding for space, staffing By Brent Baker

bare minimum of $35 to $40 million just to breach.” He said the cost of permitting and cleanup could drive the price considerably higher, especially when all the contamination from mining operations in the last century is taken into consideration. “The most recent dam breaches were very expensive: $105 million for the least expensive and

the most expensive was $365 million,” he said. While in the past, the Gillespies have stated to this newspaper they weren’t necessarily trying to force the dam’s removal, only to stop the pursuit of power generation because it would dewater the falls. All that seems to have changed. “Both Jeré and Joseph Enzensperger have testified

on the water quality permit on record saying they want the dam breached,” said Grubich. The PUD GM wonders if the online poll is generating the community input from all areas of the county. He also wonders if there is enough awareness of the cost of breaching the dam and losing the energy resource versus the cost of pursuing renewable energy at Enloe.

Sterling Financial to merge with Umpqua Will create West Coast’s largest community bank with 394 locations in five states The Gazette-Tribune

PORTLAND, Ore. & SPOKANE, Wash.- Umpqua Holdings Corporation and Sterling Financial Corporation have entered into a definitive agreement in which Sterling will merge with and into Umpqua. The transaction will have a total value of approximately $2.0 billion. The merger will result in the West Coast’s largest community bank with expanded geographic reach. The combined organization will have approximately $22 billion in assets, $15 billion in loans and $16 billion in deposits, with 5,000 associates and 394 stores across five states – Oregon, Washington, Idaho, California and Nevada. Umpqua and Sterling have also agreed to establish and fund a $10 million community foundation, underscoring their mutual commitment to serving their communities. Upon completion of the merger, the company will operate under the Umpqua Bank name and brand. The combined company will continue to deliver the high-touch level of service that Umpqua and Sterling customers expect, with an expanded branch and ATM network and a broad range of products and expertise in retail, small business, private and corporate banking; asset and wealth management; and securities brokerage. Umpqua Holdings Corporation will continue to be led by Ray Davis as president and CEO. Sterling president and CEO Greg Seibly will join Umpqua Bank as

co-president, with Umpqua Bank co-president Cort O’Haver serving in the same capacity. “Together, Umpqua and Sterling will create something unique in the financial services industry, an organization that offers the products and expertise of a large bank but delivers them with the personal service and commitment of a community bank,” said Davis. “With our size, shared cultures and financial strength, our combined organization will be uniquely positioned to deliver value for our associates, customers, communities and shareholders. We look forward to starting the process of bringing our companies together.” Seilby adds, “Sterling has emerged from its 2010 recapitalization a stronger, more profitable bank. Over the past ten quarters we have consistently demonstrated a trend of improved profitability because of our employees’ unwavering commitment to their customers and their communities. We admire Umpqua’s shared commitment to community banking and look forward to working with them to create one of the strongest, most innovative community banks in the country.” The boards of directors of both companies have unanimously approved the transaction. Upon completion, the combined company’s board will have 13 directors, comprised of nine representatives from Umpqua and four representatives from Sterling. Peggy Fowler will continue as board chair. Completion is expected during the first half of 2014, and is subject to approval by each company’s shareholders, regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions.

About Umpqua Holdings Corporation Ump qu a

Hol di ng s

Corporation (Nasdaq: UMPQ) is the parent company of Umpqua Bank, an Oregon-based community bank recognized for its entrepreneurial approach, innovative use of technology, and distinctive banking solutions. Umpqua Bank has locations between San Francisco, California, and Seattle, Washington, along the Oregon and Northern California Coast, Central Oregon and Northern Nevada. Umpqua Holdings also owns a retail brokerage subsidiary, Umpqua Investments, Inc., which has locations in Umpqua Bank stores and in dedicated offices in Oregon. Umpqua Private Bank serves high net worth individuals and non-profits, providing trust and investment services. Umpqua Holdings Corporation is headquartered in Portland, Oregon. For more information, visit www.umpquaholdingscorp.com.

About Sterling Financial Corporation Sterling Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: STSA) of Spokane, Washington, is the bank holding company for Sterling Savings Bank, a Washington state chartered and federally insured commercial bank. Sterling Savings Bank does business as Sterling Bank in Washington, Oregon and Idaho and as Sonoma Bank and Borrego Springs Bank in California. The bank offers banking products and services, mortgage lending, and trust and investment products to individuals, small businesses, corporations and other commercial organizations. As of June 30, 2013, Sterling Financial Corporation had assets of $9.94 billion and operated depository branches in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and California. Visit Sterling Financial Corporation’s website at www.sterlingfinancialcorporation.com.

VA Clinic North Valley Hospital’s VA Clinic held an open house on Tuesday, Nov. 12, which according to Director of Ancillary Services Noreen Olma and Business Development Coordinator Terri Orford went very well. “It was better than I ever expected,” Olma said. “We had a great turnout and great support

from the Spokane VA.” Olma said Spokane sent eight specialists and that seven new veterans were enrolled into the system. “It was really special to have the interaction with the veterans,” Orford said. “They were very appreciative... They’ve said it’s the most thorough exam in their entire lives in the VA system. When I asked why, they said, ‘Because they actually put their hands on us and talk with us.’ “They are so inundated in Spokane and Seattle with the volume, they can’t dedicate the time that we can to our veterans.”

And finally ... Phase I of the boiler replacement project came in significantly under budget, Kelly Cariker said. “Between the project savings and the contingency fund we came in $27,946 under budget,” he said, noting that a contingency fund for overruns also went unused. “And the boiler’s in and running.” The hospital’s warrants owed to the county stood at $799,489 as of Nov. 14. “They are up,” Verhasselt said. “October was a three paycheck month, and we paid our quarterly taxes in October, too.” The Board of Commissioners will not meet in late November; its next meeting is Thursday, Nov. 12.

Tonasket Schools near levy, bond decision bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

DAM | FROM A1

ficult thing to understand was insulting. “That wasn’t my intent,” she said. “I know there are trained financial people in this community. But as we look at the intricacies of this budget, Helen knows things none of us understand. She can explain them and then we understand ... but that is her expertise. “I’m a little weary from being accused of not being honest - and the team - and I think it’s time I set the record straight. You can believe what I said, or you don’t have to.” Michel also responded to a letter from last week’s GazetteTribune that said she needed to “update her information” regarding Critical Access Hospital funding. Most of her response involved reading portions of the article (written by this reporter), which contradicted what the letter’s author claimed Michel said. “I am offended by this,” Michel said, “and for the hospital by this.”

TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board worked toward a final decision on what it will present to the community in terms of its funding needs for the immediate future at its Monday, Nov. 11, meeting. The bi-annual maintenance and operations levy is up for renewal, while the board has also been considering whether to run a capital levy or a bond for needed facilities work. The bond used for construction of the current buildings will be retired in December. “There’s no decision quite yet, but we’re pretty much headed toward running a bond for $6 million and a $1.64 million M&O levy for staffing,” said Superintendent Paul Turner in an interview several days after the meeting. “We’re still talking with the staff to make sure their needs and concerns have been accounted for. But that is where we’re leaning.” There are several factors playing into the district’s needs. First, the district has been operating with a shortened school day since the 1990s. The current school day gives students 1,000 hours of contact time with

teachers, which does meet the state minimum - though not for long. The district has been trying, particularly for the last two years, to return to a full school day that will result in 1,080 hours. The state legislature, in 2011, ruled that the 1,080 hour year would be a requirement as of 2014-15, though many districts, Turner said, hadn’t taken note of that until last spring. “The increase to 1,080 hours was going to force our hand a bit,” he said. “Fortunately it’s something we’ve been working toward anyway.” Secondly, expanding enrollment at the elementary school (which will eventually hit the middle and high schools). The board has also been looking at creating more flexibility to serve both college-bound students and those seeking to enter a career field immediately after high school. The proposed M&O levy includes $640,000 dedicated to hiring new staff that will be required in order to manage the scheduling requirements of the lengthened school day. The bond (or capital levy) would provide funding for additional space in all three schools, replace the alternative school building, and upgrade portions of the athletic facilities (football concessions, baseball/softball/ soccer complex). “What it boils down to is that we need staffing and facilities to extend the day, and we need to

have space in order for the kids to learn what they need to,” Turner said. “The elementary is bursting at the seams, and expansion in the middle school will affect the high school, which will need more space as well. “We want to be able to prepare kids for college but for career opportunities if that’s the direction they choose to go. In the big picture, we’re trying to be flexible.” One example of a program with room to expand is the agriculture science/FFA program. Discussions of adding a second ag instructor (and more shop space) have occurred at several points throughout the year; the highly decorated program, which recently brought home a national runner-up finish, has far more students wanting to participate than one ag teacher can accommodate. The M&O levy, which will replace the existing, expiring levy, requires a 50 percent vote to pass. A bond would require a 60 percent vote, if the board approves it; a capital levy would only require 50 percent but would be far more complicated to implement. “I think it’s a good time to do this for a number of reasons,” Turner said. “For one, the bond that financed the building is expiring. Our goal with the bond and the levy is to keep the level of taxation close the same as what it has been.” The school board next meets on Monday, Nov. 25, at 7:00 p.m.

Kids Kindergarten through 6th grade

WRITE TO SANTA!

Let him know what you want for Christmas and you could...

WIN

An Old Fashioned Sled donated by

&

Lee Frank Mercantile & Scholz Sporting Goods

Mail Letters to: Santa Claus North Pole c/o Gazette-Tribune 1422 Main / PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844

Letters must be received no later than Dec. 6, 2013 to be eligible for the drawing. All letters will be forwarded to Santa and all names will be placed in drawing and included in our Special Dec. 19th Christmas issue!


NOVEMBER 21, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Increasing my fiber intake

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

I hate to admit this in public, but my system got a bit constipated, and it was costing a lot just to keep things moving with a respectable modicum of efficiency. A heavy dose of fiber seems to have solved that problem. Before writing this off as a too-much-information half-baked rant, remember that we are smack-dab in the digital age. The ever-expanding flow of information has rapidly devoured the resources of infrastructure, and many rural denizens have developed as much of an addiction to the internet as our more urban and suburban counterparts. Perhaps even more so, as some of our other infrastructure will never be what it is in Bellevue. Which is just as it should be; traffic lights give me hives. So, caught in mid-move (we recently moved about three blocks uphill from our previous Tonasket residence), we were dependent on my 4G connection for about a month. Using my phone as a wireless hotspot got us by, but cost me the equivalent of 25 quad lattes. And I’d rather have the coffee. My withdrawal from unfettered, unlimited access to the wonders of the internet was painful, to say the least. Why did I do this myself? We’d cut the cable/satellite cord a year ago in a cost-cutting measure and discovered that 95 percent of what we watched we could find a way to view online for a lot less money. For awhile, the cost was often the quality of the picture. But we had a wedding reception to HALF-BAKED pay for and a transmission to get repaired and a house to move into. Brent Baker I was holding out for brighter days ahead. The frustration of the little Netflix spinning twirlygig had gotten to be too much, especially since that generally coincided with those rare hours that Kim and I were home at the same time. Watching ESPN online and having it look like the TV screen was the glass wall of an aquarium was no picnic either. Though the sight did have me pondering that the NFL could alleviate its concussion problem by playing its games underwater. I am grateful for the wireless internet service we used for three years. But as my (and everyone else’s) appetite for all things digital became increasingly voracious, so did the desire to alleviate the bottleneck. An upgrade, were it available, was the first order of business. Our recent move, and the more-than-rumor that both Charter and Frontier were working to provide fiber service throughout the north county, had me holding out for something new. For the past month I watched longingly as bucket trucks strung fiber on utility poles. Checked the websites for both providers. Dutifully entered my address. Was saddened each time it returned the message that the address wasn’t in the system, or that service was unavailable. I pestered Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb almost daily (I usually gave him Sundays off), since he had mentioned with a twinkle in his eye and dimples in his cheeks that fiber optic internet access was coming to Tonasket. And even Loomis. Really. So I checked, wheedled, cajoled, and prayed. And paid my phone provider, dearly. Finally, the glorious day arrived. Frontier was ready to go online slightly before Charter. In the interest of fairness, I won’t advocate for one over the other - this choice was, for me, a matter of expediency. But competition is a beautiful thing for the consumer. We’re screaming along at 12 mb/second downloads - I’ve been testing, and it really, really does go that fast, even during primetime. For those who want to run a home-based business, or even communicate with distant relatives, while maintaining our coveted rural lifestyle, this is a big deal. As for me, I’m just happy that the Seahawks no longer require scuba gear and that the Netflix twirlygig no longer threatens my sanity.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Useful information

Dear Editor In response to the letter titled Hospital head needs to update her info in the Nov. 14th Gazette-Tribune. I would like to respond to the writer who has provided the North Okanogan County Community with exceptional disinformation rather than with useful information about North Valley Hospital, Linda Michel and Critical Access Hospitals. This is a huge disservice to the community. Correct, there is no proposal by Congress to change Critical Access Hospital/CAH requirement status and NVH would most likely not close due to its Critical Access Hospital status. There is, however, a recommendation by the U. S. Office of the Inspector General/OIG to revise the CAH program. Here is the rub: If CAH payments were decreased from the 101% that NVH now receives, it would no longer be paid on a cost basis and it would not have the funds it would need to offset the advantage that urban hospitals have with significant volumes of patients

and easier marketing abilities. Healthcare costs have gone sky high, (ie electronic health records, physician recruitment and more) and there is not much room for error for a rural hospital if something goes wrong. Budget cuts would again have to be made, and even though NVH would most likely not lose its CAH status, it or part of it could close. Hospital reimbursement has and is continuing to change and is very confusing to most people. NVH has learned from recent events and is doing a good job of communicating with the community it serves. People now receive a quarterly newsletter and it uses the GazetteTribune to provide the community with needed information. The Gazette-Tribune itself has done a great job of covering NVH Board meetings and events so the community can be well informed. Still, if folks do not investigate more than what they read in letters in the paper, they will not be well informed. I suggest that if you want to learn more that you go to NVH and ask for material on CAHís and reimbursement to read. I went to the Board

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Cat Man’s Axiom OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

In 1969, after the Army, I wanted to blow sirens, shoot guns, drive like a wild man and catch bad guys, so I became a cop. In their brochure the Washington DC Police Department advertised that they actually had “air-conditioned” patrol cars. What’s not to like, I thought. Sign me up. But, like regrettably so much in life, the air-conditioned cruisers turned out to be true but not true. The DCPD was buying AC equipped cars alright but they went first to high ranking supervisors and Bill Slusher thence were passed down through the ranks over years. By the time they actually got down to patrol level, street officers were lucky if the rattling wrecks were watertight, ran uphill under their own power, and had functioning heaters. The AC units were always kaput by then and were regarded as new-age luxuries not worth spending scarce budget money on for mere front line troops. As a rookie, it was my great fortune to be assigned to a field training officer who was one of the wisest men I’ve ever known. He was a 42 year-old black man about five-footfour, bald and thin as a rail. Regardless, he could pull a 220 pound ghetto thug from the center back seat of a Cadillac Brougham, through the side window, and dump him on the pavement, thence to ask him if he wanted that bird finger he’d just aimed at us relocated from his hand to where retrieval could be a delicate endeavor. I’m paraphrasing here. My mentor was respectfully known on the force and on the mean streets of DC as Cat Man, partly for his uncanny ability to scale

the side of a building by pulling himself up vent pipes, fire-escapes and window ledges like Spiderman. Thus did he provide many a profoundly unwelcome shock to many an ongoing drug deal or other crime. Local criminals called the precinct every week to get Cat Man’s work schedule so they knew when not to surface for their nefarious trades. Not surprisingly, Cat Man told me the truest thing I’ve ever heard about truth. I call it Cat Man’s Axiom. “Listen ta me, white boy,” said he, “they’s always at least two sides to ever’ story, and da truth ain’t never none of ‘em. Da truth always be somethin’ in between you gots to figger out fo’ yosef.” Grammar wasn’t what Cat Man did best but you get his drift. Almost half a century since, I have never encountered any reason whatsoever to question Cat Man’s Axiom. So when I read that current efforts to require voter ID in America constitute some kind of SPECTRE plot by Republicans to suppress young and minority voters supposedly bought and paid for by Democrats, I wonder, dang, reckon there might be another side to that story? I wonder if Democrats aren’t witlessly making an ageist, racist statement that American young people and minorities are somehow too mentally feeble to obtain and display the same ID they already must produce to buy booze, drive, enter clubs, cash checks, board airplanes or meet scores of other intelligent identity requirements. I wonder if it might not be just as true that Democrats oppose common sense voter ID only because they desperately depend on illegal alien voters, multiple-vote voters and dead voters to remain in power? Recent news stories lend considerable credence here. When I hear Democrats allege there is no

meeting on Nov. 14th and received seriously good info/handouts on rural health care and the reimbursement issue. These Board meetings are open to the public and NVH welcomes us to come to attend. If you are concerned about the future of rural hospitals I challenge you, the now informed community members, to write letters to our state and federal legislative officials with your concerns. These letters are not difficult to write and can be used by us ordinary community members to communicate what we think needs to happen, or not happen. In that way we can participate in our system of democracy. Respectfully, Karen Schimpf Tonasket

Safety in our parks Dear Editor,

While traveling through Canada I broke down at Watson Lake. While staying there I met young man who told me about a funeral he was attending in town. A boy was killed on the local soccer field. The goal cage had tipped over crushing the child’s neck killing the boy instantly. Today, Nov. 12, I noticed in Oroville City Park a cage rolled out into the center of the field. Did kids roll it out into the field? While at Winthrop in 2012 attending the Farmers’ Market I noticed two little girls playing under an old school bell. This bell was mounted for years in a little steeple. One girl could stand up inside the bell. I could see her from the waist down. The girl standing outside the bell was spinning it. I saw a large nut and washer fall out of the bell. I ran over and stopped the kids and moved them away. A second nut was holding the bell up by half the threads. The weight of the bell would have crushed the girl inside and the second girl outside could have been crushed also. The bell has been fixed. Dan Lorz Oroville

voter fraud problem in America I wonder this: As we have absolutely no viable system whatever in place to determine who’s filling in a ballot, whether they’re who they say they are, whether they’re of voting age or are a citizen of this country, then how, exactly could anyone possibly ... know ... that we have no egregious voter fraud? Might it thus not be as true that we may have a massive voter fraud problem? Do da name ACORN, ring a bell? Likewise, when I read that Republicans are purging poor helpless young and minority folk from voter rolls with voter ID laws I’m moved to wonder, exactly how can any voter with common proof of their citizenship and age be purged from voter rolls? Isn’t this very purge risk a call ... for ... voter ID? I’m equally given to consider this question: With elections being literally and by far the highest stakes gambling in America, and with money being what it is in politics, are we to seriously believe that no one is heavily exploiting the abysmal dearth of ID integrity in our voting system? Do we dare not know for sure? What? Legal campaign money to influence voters is critically important, but somehow legal voting is ... not? What’s the truth about voter ID? I invoke Cat Man’s Axiom. Is the truth not “somethin’ in between you gots to figger out fo’ yosef”? William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. Enjoy-his down anddirty, Southern murder mystery Shepherd of the Wolves - Redux - Not Your Mommy’s Book Club Selection (Amazon or your local bookstore). He may be contacted at williamslusher@live.com.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 21, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

No snow to shovel, yet We’ve continued to have mist and rain most every day, but so far no snow to shovel. If I liked cocoa it would be a good day for a steaming hot cup with a few little marshmallows floating on top. Try it. You’ll probably like it. I like most “chocolaty” things but never did learn to like cocoa. But, some orange spice tea would be good. With the death of Evelyn Frazier, the five Naggy sisters have a void in their family. Evelyn had been fighting a valiant battle with cancer for several months, and is so often the case, she lost, last Tuesday. At my last inquiry, no final date for a memorial service had been chosen, but it was believed to be late in November. Condolences go out to the family members in their loss. When our families scatter it isn’t easy

to get them all together for holiday dinners, but it seems ours will be with the younger generation, “on the other side of the mountain” this year. Today I learned of a grade school child being sent home, because he was wearing a T-shirt with the word “Redneck” on it. The principal overruled the situation and told the boy he could return to school and continue to wear the shirt. (I’ll bet Jeff Foxworthy clapped for that one). What in the world is happening to the country that folks are getting so “thin skinned” over words that have been around forever? First it was school and college mascot names, like “Indians” “Warriors”, “Redskins” etc. I’m wondering just who it is that is offended. The few, like it is with the Christmas songs not being sung in school and worst of all the lack of the Pledge of Allegiance

being said in school and the audacity on Saturday, Dec. 7. of the teacher saying “there just wasn’t So often I wonder why bad things time in the schedule for saying it” and happen to good people. That is the it takes only seconds, from case of Ellen Roberts who is start to finish. No wonder the now in Omak hospital as the country is “messed” up in so result of a broken leg. She many ways today. had surgery last Saturday. How many believe we How “things” go remain to need a retail store in Oroville be seen. At 103 years of age, for selling marijuana? this was not a good thing to When my daughter asked happen to her. At this time if I would like to have a table you can be sure she wishes at the community bazaar she had not reached for a with her, it seemed like fun, book that she wanted and and that it was a long time with a stool and the THIS & THAT tangled away, it seemed. And now it result was a fall. She is a is so near and I have so many Joyce Emry delightful lady and will take things to finish and so little this in stride, as she has other time. Of course, it would mishaps that she has encounhelp if I didn’t play pinochle so often and tered. If the world was filled with people would do the work. like her what a wonderful place it would Keep in mind the date of the two be! Since starting this article I have upcoming bazaars. The Community one received word from family, that Aunt held at the grade school gym Friday Ellen, miraculously made it through the an Saturday, Dec. 6 and 7 and the surgery and everything went as well as Oroville Senior Citizens at their building could be expected, considering her age.

Circus cabaret to visit PAC

Great spread at Havillah Harvest Dinner By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

Last Saturday the Havillah Church Parrish hosted their fall Harvest Dinner. The Church supplied the meat for the meal and the guests supplied the salad and desserts. Wow! What a spread. You could not go home hungry. A big “Thank You” goes out to all of the community that weathered the snow and cold to have an evening of fellowship and good

Submitted by Vera Zachow Omak Performing arts center

OMAK - Let the excitement of the circus envelope you at the Omak PAC, Friday, Dec. 6 at 7 p.m.

This evening of aerialists, juggler, circus arts, belly dancing and much more will be long remembered for the beauty and grace of these breathtaking aerialist acts. You will enjoy the performance of Fantastic Fonzie, the wonder dog as he joins in the fun. This dynamic group of acrobats will take you to another dimension and you will leave in awe with new enthusiasm for circus acts. Come at 6:30 to see the Children’s Dance Theater perform selections for from their upcoming “Nutcracker.” Children’s Dance Theater members will be selling concessions before the performance and during intermission. Support the girls that are earning money to dance at Disneyland in 2014. Tickets for Animated Object Circus Cabaret are $15.00 for adults and $10.00 for students and children. They can be purchased at Rawson’s in Okanogan, The Corner Shelf in Omak, Tonasket Interiors and Oroville Pharmacy as well as online at brownpapertickets.com or at the door.

Submitted photos

A dynamic group of acrobats will be performing at the Omak Performing Arts Center on Friday, Dec. 6 at 7 p.m. Those that come early can see the Childredn’s Dance Theater perform selections from the upcoming “Nutcraccker” at 6:30 p.m.

Things to know about NVCS By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

Ten things to know: 1) Our purpose is to provide educational, recreational and cultural classes and events for our community; 2) We are the only community schools program in Okanogan County; 3) We offer 30-50 class-

What a lady! (Monday) A stop at Omak hospital found her asleep but we woke her and she was alert and ready to visit. Did you forget to put your “Scout sack” out for pickup by the Scouts for the food bank, last Saturday? I did. I suspect they will accept it, anytime. I made a phone call and information was, “leave your sacks at Rocky DeVon’s office as he is advisor of Cub Scouts. Some changes at the former Princes grocery as the sign now reads Harvest Foods. And Princes Department store has some signing reading Hughes. It looks a mighty lot like Christmas inside and they were just getting started. How can it be that time of the year, already? The temperatures are getting pretty low and still some of the flowers refuse to die. 28 degrees is quite cold. A trip to Spokane last weekend allowed us to see a Gonzaga game, which they handily won and will soon be on their way to another season of league games. They’re “lookin’ good!” next BINGO night will be on Dec. 20 at 6 p.m. Bring a friend and have a good time. The Molson Grange Hall will have their annual Christmas Party on Saturday, Dec. 21 at 6:30 p.m. and it will be a potluck. Bring the kids and their friends. The Pinochle winners for Nov. 11 with 36 players, again were Highs- Ken Chapman and Danny Wietrick, Lows were - Harold Harper and Sally Eder, with the Traveling going to Mary Louise Loe. Bring your Friends and join in the fun. If you want to have breakfast at the Chesaw Tavern after church on Sunday just let Susie know ahead of time and she will stay open. Call (509) 485-2174.

HILLTOP COMMENTS food. The Havillah Church holds services every Sunday at 9 a.m. On Thanksgiving Day they will start at 9 a.m. and Christmas Eve at 7 p.m.and Christmas Day at10 a.m. The Services are open to everyone. Come and bring a friend. For more information give Lenette at (509) 485-2211 a call. A good time was had by the Hilltoppers who went to play BINGO at the Molson Grange Hall last Friday. The paybacks were $9 or $9.50 per game. The

THE LEARNING TREE

classes take place at Oroville High School, and several are taught in Tonasket; 8) We hold fundraising events two or three times each year; 9) We are governed by an executive director and seven member board; and 10) We have offered classes since 2005! Just two classes remain in fall quarter – Make a Piñata on Dec. 2 and Dec. 9 and Learn to Draw a Face on Thursday, Dec. 5. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 4762011 or email her at community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu to register.

es during each of three quarters of the year; 4) We have one paid employee who has all the answers; 5) Our office is located in the south end of Oroville High School; 6) We are funded by class fees, business and private donations, and grants; 7) Most

POOL LEAGUE NEWS Looks like more ladies playing this year By Gai Wisdom NV Pool League

The results of two weeks are out now. The figures look a lit-

tle funny right now because of the byes. Pay no attention. It all evens out in the end. Score sheets are, for the most part, coming in on time for Jan to do her thing. Remember to put your team number on your score sheet and fill out the back. This information is important for year-end stats. I don’t have the information from Jan but it seems to me we have more ladies play-

ing this year. I’ll have to look into that. If there are any problems with the weather slowing you down or preventing you from getting where you need to be, be sure to call early and keep everyone posted. Team captains will make every effort to reschedule according to the rules. Keep your stick warm, treat your servers’ right, and Play Pool!

FREE THANKSGIVING DINNER

Still recovering from burglary By Jan Hansen Oroville Eagles

We are recovering from a devastating burglary at our beloved Eagles. The physical damage, emotional damage and financial damage to our club is beyond description. Please support your Eagles in this time of recovery. On Saturday, Nov. 23 there will be a benefit steak and prawns dinner and auction for William “Jazz” Janczyk’s son Josh who was injured playing football for Oroville and is going to require several surgeries to repair the

EAGLEDOM AT WORK damage. We will not have the regular Steak Night on Friday., Nov. 22, but will have Meat Draw. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesdays of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day and Seahawks games are always Happy Hour. We have free pool every Sunday. Monday is Taco Night, during Pool League we have burgers on Wednesdays, Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Steak Night, Karaoke

and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what’s happening at your club and join in. As always, We Are People Helping People.

Thanksgiving Dinner being served at Eva’s Diner By Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

Halloween is past and Thanksgiving is just one week away, but the stores seem to have completely skipped over that holiday and gone directly to Christmas. Which reminds me that the Senior Center Bazaar is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 7.

There are still two or three tables left for rent if you are interested. Just a reminder that Thanksgiving dinner will be served at Eva’s Diner. She asks for help with salad, deserts or condiments. Pinochle scores for Nov. 9: The door prize was won by Boots Emry; Most Pinochles by Naoma Vandiver; High Scoring Man was Gordon Roberts. Scores for Nov. 16: The door prize was won by Ken Ripley; Most Pinochles by Betty Steg; High Scoring Man was Jim Fry; High Scoring Woman was Barbara Cline.

At the

MOVIES

OLIVER THEATRE

FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

Throughout your career, you have been working hard to save in one or more retirement accounts. Then, once you retire, you’ll have some new decisions to make. But one choice has already been made for you: the age at which you must start taking withdrawals, or “distributions.” It’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with these distribution rules because they can have a big impact on your retirement income. And you may even want to take action before the end of the year. Here, in a nutshell, is the story: Once you reach age 70½, you must begin taking taxable withdrawals — known as “required minimum distributions,” or RMDS — from your traditional IRA and most other retirement plans, such as a 401(k) plan, a 403(b) plan or a 457(b) plan. A Roth IRA,

however, is not subject to RMDs.

If you turned 70½ in 2013, you may want to take your first RMD no later than Dec. 31. You could wait until April 1, 2014, to take your initial distribution, but you’d then have to take your next one by Dec. 31, 2014 — and two distributions in one year could have a sizable impact on your taxes. After you’ve taken your first RMD, you’ll have to take one by Dec.31 of each calendar year for the rest of your life — or until your account balance is zero. These minimum distributions are calculated annually based on your age, account balance at the end of the previous year, marital status and spouse’s age. If you do not meet the annual minimum distribution, you may be subject to a 50% penalty on your underpayment, plus ordinary income tax as the funds are withdrawn. Of course, while you have to take at least the minimum distribution from your retirement plans, you can always take more — but should you? There’s no one “right answer” for everyone. Obviously, if you need the money, you may have to go beyond the minimum when taking distributions. But if you have enough income from other sources — such as investments in other accounts,

You work hard to build your retirement plans. So, when it’s time to start tapping into them, you’ll want to make the right moves. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.  –  Thurs…7:30  p.m.   Fri.  –  Sat………….……….7:00  &  9:00  p.m.                          (unless  otherwise  stated)  

OLIVER THEATRE Oliver Theatre

November, 2013  Programme  

       Phone    Regular   Showtimes   250-­‐498-­‐2277        Oliver,  BC    

Sun. – –    M on.  ––    S Tat.   ues.   hurs…7:30   p.m.   Thurs.   Fri.        –N  Tov.   21  –  22   -­  23  

                             Visit   Oyur   ebsite   Enjoy   our  W evening   out,  taking  

in a  movie  at  the  Oliver  Theatre!   Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. www.olivertheatre.ca   November,  2013  Programme  

Oliver, B.C.

Fri. –  Sat………….……….7:00  &  9:00  p.m.                          (unless  otherwise  stated)  

250-498-2277

Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

Thurs. –  Fri.  –  Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.                  3      1,          N  Vov.   isit   Oct.   1  O –  ur   2  –  W 3  –ebsite    4  –  5     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:30  p.m.  

Phone 250-­‐498-­‐2277        Oliver,  BC  

Thurs. –  Fri.  –  Sat.        Nov.  21  –  22  -­  23  

FREE BIRDS www.olivertheatre.ca

Thurs. –  Fri.  –  Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.   Oct.  31,  Nov.  1  –  2  –  3  –  4  –  5     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:30  p.m.  

THURS.-FRI.-SAT. NOV. 21-22-23 SHOWTIMES: THURS. 7:30PM FRI. 7PM & 9PM. SAT. 2PM, 7 & 9PM

There will  also  be  a  matinee  of  this  show  on  the     Sat.  at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

Sun. –  Mon.  –  Tues.        Nov.  24  –  25  -­  26  

There will  also  be  a  matinee  of  this  show  on  the     Sat.  at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

CARRIE

Sun. –  Mon.  –  Tues.        Nov.  24  –  25  -­  26  

Violence, coarse  language.  

Thurs. -­  F ri.          Nov.  7  –  8     Violence,   coarse   language.   Showtimes  on  Thurs.   Fri.  @-­    F7ri.   :00   &ov.    9:25          N 7  –  8p    .m.  

SUN. - MON. - TUES. NOV 24-25-26 SHOWTIMES 7:30PM Showtimes on  Fri.  @  7:00  &  9:25  p.m.  

Social Security and even earnings from a part-time job — you may want to stick with the minimum distributions and leave your retirement accounts as intact as possible for as long as possible, thereby allowing them to potentially continue growing on a taxdeferred basis.

Whatever your decision, you’ll want to allow sufficient time to determine the size and timing of your RMDs, because if you have several retirement accounts, you may need to make some choices. For example, if you have more than one IRA, you can add the RMDS and take the combined distribution amount from any one — or more — of your IRAs. And if you have more than one 401(k), you must calculate your RMDs separately for each plan. To help ensure you’re doing things “by the book,” consult with your tax and financial advisors before you start taking your RMDs.

         Regular  Showtimes  

Enjoy your  evening  out,  taking   in  a  movie  at  the  Oliver  Theatre!  

Have You Started Taking Your RMD’s?

Reported by Edward Jones

OROVILLE SENIORS

CARRYING ON THE TRADITION of Linda’s Bakery, Eva’s Diner in the same location at 712 14th Ave. in Oroville, is offering a free Thanksgiving Dinner on Thursday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The dinner, prepared by Eva’s will include all the traditional Thanksgiving items like turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and pie for desert. John Desgardin of Hometown Pizza and Pasta is helping out with the pies and rolls again this year. This is a free dinner, but donations are gratefully accepted.

Sexually suggestive  scenes,  scenes  of  accident  trauma.  

Sexually suggestive  scenes,  scenes  of  accident  trauma.  

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.    

ABOUT TIME

Violence. Violence.  

Thurs. -­  Fri.          Nov.  28  –  29     Thurs.  -­  Fri.          Nov.  28  –  29     Showtimes  on  Fri.  @  7:00  &  9:25  p.m.  

Showtimes on  Fri.  @  7:00  &  9:25  p.m.  

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Nov.   Mon.   9  ––    1T0  ues.,   –  11  –T  1hurs.   2,  14       Nov.  9  –  10  –  11  –  12,  14    

THURS. - FRI. NOV. 28-29 SHOWTIMES ON FRI: 7PM & 9:25PM

Coarse and  sexual  language.  

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       Nov.  30,  Dec.  1  –  2  –  3,  5  -­  6     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:15  p.m.  

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL Crude content,  coarse  and  sexual  language.  

Monday, Nov.  11  @  2:00  p.m.  

Free Family  Matinee  

Crude content,  Sponsored   coarse  and  Bsy  exual   anguage.   The  Rloyal   Canadian  Legion  –  Branch  97  

Coarse and  sexual  language.  

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       Nov.  30,  Dec.  1  –  2  –  3,  5  -­  6     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:15  p.m.  

Fri. –  Sat.   –  @ Sun.   –  Mon.   -­  Tues.     Monday,   Nov.   11    2:00   p.m.  

Nov. 15  –  16  –  17  –  18  -­  19     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:15  p.m.   Sponsored  By  The  Royal  Canadian  Legion  –  Branch  97  

Free Family  Matinee  

Fri. –  Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.  -­  Tues.     Nov.  15  –  16  –  17  –  18  -­  19     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:15  p.m.  

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

THE HUNGER GAMES

The

BEGINS DEC.  7  

Violence, frightening  scenes.  

Action/Adventure/Sci-Fi Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Phillip Seymour Hoffman,Woody Harrelson Fri. Midnight Show:12:01,6:30,10:00 Sat.*2:30,6:30, 10:00 Sun. *2:00,7:00 Wkdys: 7:00

Violence.

146 min

THE HUNGER  GAMES      CATCHING  FIRE  

Programme Subject  To  Unavoidable  change  without  notice  

PG13

Subject to  Classification  

Catching Fire Violence.

THE HUNGER  GAMES      CATCHING  FIRE  

Programme Subject  To  Unavoidable  change  without  notice  

BEGINS DEC.  7  

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

LAST VEGAS

PG13

DELIVERY MAN

PG13

Starts Friday. Comedy Starring Robert 105min DeNiro, Morgan Freeman, Michael Douglas, Kevin Kline. Fri.7:00 & 9:30. Sat.*4:30,7:00 ,9:30. Sun.*4:30,7:00. Wkdys 7:00. Starts Friday. Comedy Starring 103min Vince Vaughn, Chris Pratt, Cobie Smulders Fri . 6:45, 9:30. Sat *4:15, 6:45, 9:30 Sun *4:15, 6:45 Wkdays 6:45

THOR: The Dark World

Action/Adventure/Fantasy Starring Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Tom Hiddleston, Anthony Hopkins

PG13

Fri.6:45, 9:45 Sat. *3:45,6:45,9:45. Sun. *3:45, 6:45.Wkdys 6:45. Adult $8.50

120min

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


NOVEMBER 21, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck President, NCW Blue Star Mothers

Let me introduce the warriors recognized in this year’s Hometown Soldier Calendar: For the month of January 2014 we will be honoring SrA Brandon Swenson and his family from Oroville. Brandon’s father, Brian (Retired Air Force), and his two brothers, Nate and Cody, are currently serving in the Air Force. Brandon is based in Qatar. In February we honor IT1 (IDW/SW/AW) Chris Rojeski of Tonasket. He is Lead Petty Officer of the Hopper Information Services Center, Operations NW, Whidbey Island, WA. His son, Alexander, was born in March, 2013. March honors SPC Eddie (Tom) Peery of Loomis who is recently home from a deployment to Afghanistan. In the calendar you will see Eddie holding his newborn daughter, Pyper, who was born in January, just before he left on this last deployment. SSgt Scott Fry, from Omak, has been serving in the Air Force since 2005. One of the photos for the month of April is of him standing in front of just one of a city of shelters he erected in Kyrgyzstan. Our May warrior hails from Chesaw. SSgt Josh Hollenbeck is part of a special team that quickly opens mission-ready for-

NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS ward airbases. His birthday just happens to be in May on 5th. A1C Cody Swenson from Oroville is honored during the month of June. We’ve included a photo of him with his brother Brandon and his Blue Star Mother Shannon! Cody is currently serving in Guam. Honored in July is SPC Beau Swenson of Chesaw. Beau is a mechanic and truck driver and you’ll see a photo of him with some of his buddies in Bagrahm Afghanistan and a photo of him and his brother Bud (no relation to the Oroville Swensons) both serving in the army. Specialist Bud Swenson, Beau’s brother, is our August honoree. We were sent a couple of charming photos of him and his new wife, Marina. It was hard to choose! September is AST2 Darren Hicks’s month. Recently married, Darren is currently stationed in Kodiak, AK and is enjoying wilderness! The pictures used for his month were taken during a shooting of the “Coast Guard Alaska” T.V. series. SGT Jarred Palmier has seen much of the world: Hawaii to Afghanistan to Germany! In the month of October are photos of Jarred include a formal photo the day he graduated as a Blackhawk Helicopter Mechanic

and another of when he was promoted to Sergeant while serving in Afghanistan. LtCmda Allen Willey of Tonasket was honored as the key note speaker at the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy dedication in Tonasket last May, as well as for the calendar month of November. You will note on the calendar that he is designated a “Navy Mustang.” This means that he started at the very bottom as an enlisted man and has worked his way up to a commissioned officer. This is an honored accomplishment in any military branch. Senior Airman Nathaniel Swenson of Oroville and his bride Jerian are honored for December. Nate is with the Security Forces as designated by his unique Air Force head covering. He is currently deployed to Afghanistan. Inside the back covers are two honored soldiers. We ask that between the time you get your calendar and January that you display these last two pages! Army Infantryman SPC Eric Orr of Oroville is currently deployed to Zabul Province Afghanistan as part of the Vigilant Strategic Services Afghanistan group. During the printing of the calendar, Eric was promoted from Private First Class (PFC) to Specialist (SPC). Congratulations! 1SG Michael Dezellem of Okanogan is based in Hawaii and is the brother of Karen Taylor of Okanogan. This calendar raises awareness of the many heroes our area sends to serve, and the families supporting them.

OROVILLE - The next meeting of the Stroke Support Group will be Thursday, Nov. 21 at 10:30 a.m. at The Youth Activity Center (YAC), 607 Central Ave., adjacent to the Oroville Free Methodist Church. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome and this meeting there will be a guest speaker. The meeting has been moved up a week due to the Thanksgiving holiday. There will be a guest speaker and refreshments.

Genealogy of the Constitution OMAK - KrisAnne Hall will present “The Genealogy of the Constitution” Thursday, Nov. 21. The presentation begins at 6:30 p.m. and will be held in room 304 at Wenatchee Valley College, Omak Campus; located at 116 W. Apple, Omak. Admission is free and the event is open to the public.Donations will be welcomed to help defray KrisAnne’s travel expenses. Please RSVP to karbuckle@gmail.com if you would like to attend. Hall will also be speaking to the Omak High School’s Current World Problems class earlier that afternoon.

Winter Market OROVILLE - Winter Market will continue at the Oroville Community room at the library, 1276 Main St. each Saturday. This week it will be on Saturday, Nov. 23 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Come visit with your local farmers, bakers, artists and crafts people. Shop local and give back to the community where you live and visit. For more information call (509) 476-2662 (library) or (509) 476-2884.

Turkey Pool Shoot OROVILLE - The Shop Tavern will be holding a Free Turkey Pool Shoot on Saturday, Nov. 23 at 6 p.m. Entry is free and th game is 8 Ball. The first through fourth place finishers win turkeys. The Shop is also open Thanksgiving Day from 6 p.m. to close. Serving a Turkey buffet until gone.

100th Masons Installation The Aurora Lodge #201 of the Free and Accepted Masons will be celebrating their 100th annual installation of officers on Saturday, Nov. 23, at 2:00 p.m. The installation will take place at the Oroville Grange Hall, 622 Fir Street, Oroville. The public

is welcome to attend. Please call (509) 476-2566 for more info.

TES Scholastic Book Fair

Tonasket Elementary School is hosting a Scholastic Book Fair, Dec. 2-7. Times will be MondayFriday, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., as well as Friday evening from 5-8 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. for family shopping. This is a great time to get some book for Christmas reading. We are also collecting donations to buy books for ECAP/Head Start. Look for our boxes around town or drop by the fair to donate. For more information contact the school at (509) 486-4933 or check out the link on the school web page.

Draw a Face at NVCS OROVILLE – Have you tried to draw a face only to be unhappy and frustrated with how it turns out? In this class, Learn to Draw a Face, on Thursday, Dec. 5, you will learn no-fail steps to create a face with symmetry and expression. Yes, you can learn to do it with our artist instructor leading the way. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email her at community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu, or register online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

Oroville PTO Christmas Bazaar OROVILLE Oroville Elementary School PTO will host the annual Christmas Bazaar in the gym, Friday, Dec. 6 between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 7 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration forms are available at Oroville Elementary, Oroville High School, Oroville Pharmacy, Oroville Public Library and Oroville City Hall. Vendor space is available and your booth fee will benefit local

312 S. Whitcomb

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Your Complete Eyecare Centre

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

students! Call Susan at (509) 476-2427 for more information.

Hand Bell Choir at Tree Lighting & Loomis Church Tractor Parade LOOMIS - The public is invited to come and enjoy the Touch of Grace Hand Bell Choir in concert at the Loomis Community Church on Sunday, Dec. 1 at 11 a.m.

Ken Neal/submitted photo

The Aurora Masonic Lodge of Oroville held a benefit auction on Saturday, Nov. 16 at the Oroville American Legion Hall. “Even though the crowd was small... everyone dug deep to help out our Masonic programs,” said auctioneer Ken Neal, a member of the Aurora Masons. These programs include Bikes for Books, the Christmas Baskets for needy families, the May Day Kids games, two scholarships each for both Tonasket and Oroville, and of course the Shrine Hospitals and Scottish Rite Learning Disability Programs, according to Neal. The auctioneer said there were many generous donations from the business community and private individuals at the auction. “In fact, we got some last minute donations of some nice items that we will be saving for another auction in the spring.... So $5500 in a little over three hours is great,” Neal adds.

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Stroke Support Group

RAISING MONEY FOR KIDS, NEEDY

OROVILLE - This year the annual Tree Lighting Ceremony for Oroville will be on Saturday, Dec. 7 at Centennial Park. The ceremony will be preceded by a Christmas Tractor Parade down Main Street. More details will be sent out next week. But we wanted potential participants to start getting their tractors decorated (especially with lights.) The Parade will start at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 7 and will conclude at the park (next to Sun Lakes Realty) on Main Street. If you would like your tractor in the parade, please contact Sandy Andrews at the Camaray Motel (509) 476-3684. The Tree Lighting Ceremony will include nearly 30 singers from the Okanagan International Chorus. And, of course, the event concludes with a visit from Santa as well as free Hot Dogs and Hot Cocoa.

Tonasket Food Bank The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., excluding holidays, at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192. Next week, due to the Thanksgiving Holiday, the food bank will be open on Tuesday, Nov. 26 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. to distribute food. It will resume it’s Thursday schedule the following week.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 4763978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386. Next week, due to the Thanksgiving Holiday, the food bank will be open on Tuesday, Nov. 26 from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. to distribute food. It will resume it’s Thursday schedule the following week.

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

WATERFRONT

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

TONASKET

OKANOGAN

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

(509) 826-6191

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

(509) 826-6191

Toll Free

www.wvmedical.com

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health (509) 826-5600

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Calendar Backgrounds

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

 Anti

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

 Behavioral

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion  Walk

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 YOUR AD HERE

Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602 OPTICAL

Advertise In The

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

OH MY ACHING NECK! Massagers - Shiatsu Neck Massager, Finger & Palm Massagers.

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Call Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 Ext 3050

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 21, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • November 21, 2013

$MBTTJĂ FE %FBEMJOF  /PPO 5VFTEBZ r $BMM  UP QMBDF ZPVS BE

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275 The Classified Department WILL BE CLOSED Thursday and Friday 11/28 and 11/29 for the Thanksgiving Holiday. Deadline will change as follows: DEADLINE FOR THE 11/28 edition will be

Monday, 11/25 AT NOON.

Please call 800-388-2527 or email classified@soundpublishing.com

Houses For Sale

For Rent

Announcements

Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 6+ acres, $910. 2 Bedroom House, In Town, $650. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Lakefront Apartment, $725. Darling 1 Bedroom, $495. Deluxe Lakefront Home, Furnished, 3 Baths, $1595. OTHERS. Call Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121 OROVILLE: 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH APARTMENT. Walk in closet, ground floor, nice yard with patio, W/D hookup. Good parking. No pets. No smoking. $525/ mo + $400 dep. 509-223-3064 509-5609043 Oroville 3 BEDROOM HOUSE, 1 bath, garage, nice yard, 1 mile from border, 33548 Hwy 97. $700 month, $350 deposit. (509)486-2685

COUPLE SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeking to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of opportunity, humor, adventure and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at direct at 206-920-1376, toll-free at 877-290-0543 or email AndrewCorley@outlook.com You can also contact our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376.

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

OROVILLE GARDEN APARTMENTS. Senior or Disable Housing 1 bedroom upstairs Subsidized Unit if eligible. Located downtown. Applications available at 617 Fir St., Oroville. Call: 509-476-3059 TONASKET - 1 Bedroom $495. 2 Bedroom $595. Close to town. All appliances. Water/Sewer paid. 509-4861682 or 509-429-0873.

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Tonasket

3200 Square foot, custom remodeled home. 4 Bedroom, 3 bath, finished basement. Custom tile work throughout, By Owner. $243,900 obo. 253-380-6030

www.gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET HOME - In Town. Move in ready. 2000 Sq Ft, 4 bedroom, 2 bath plus office. Many upgrades including kitchen, bath, hardwood floors, appliances including washer & dryer, new metal roof, 2 car carport, enclosed shop. Quiet Neighborhood, close to schools Great Value! Price Reduced - $172,000. Call 509-322-2289

Commercial Rentals REPUBLIC 3500 SF COMMERCIAL BUILDING for lease on 2.5 Acres. 14’ and 12’ Bay Doors, 1 bath, wood and propane Heat. $700 per month plus utilities, first and last month. 2 year minimum. Highway 21 North, Republic WA. 425-822-2901.

Crosswords

Help Wanted

WorkSource

Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

22. 1990 World Series champs

4. Mary in the White House

23. What “it� plays

5. Appropriate

24. Country whose capital is Kuala Lumpur

6. Lower in rank

26. “You ___ kidding!� (contraction)

8. Eudora ___, Am. short-story writer

28. Rain clouds

9. Buttocks

32. Tree trunk

10. Assessments of worth

34. Deterioration

11. Lady Macbeth, e.g.

38. Long, long time

12. Put one’s foot down?

39. Club publication

13. Adjusts, as a clock

40. “No ifs, ___ ...�

21. Openness

41. Convert to occidental customs

25. Setting for TV’s “Newhart�

43. A deadly sin

27. Held back

44. Apprehensive

29. Lower case letters

45. Accumulate

30. Torsos (slang)

47. Air letter

31. Acad.

51. Blackguard

32. Reprimand, with “out�

54. Delhi dress

33. Arch type

57. Unsure how to respond

35. Computer-generated imagery (acronym)

59. “___ Brockovich� 60. Buttonhole, e.g.

ANSWERS

Across 1. Ziti, e.g. 6. Cut, as a log 10. Song and dance, e.g.

61. Angers

36. Storage space between ship decks

62. Anger, with “up�

37. Bowel cleansings

63. Emcee

42. Needle opening

64. Argus-eyed

46. Ethically indifferent

65. Shiny on top?

48. Devinely inspired poet in India

66. “What’s gotten ___ you?�

49. Acrylic fiber

67. Destruction of cells by antibodies

50. Kind of mill

14. Nabisco cookies 15. Carbamide

7. Caribbean cruise stop

52. Wombs 53. Breaks

Down

16. Dermatologist’s concern

54. Balkan native 55. “Mi chiamano Mimi,� e.g.

17. Mails

1. Place

56. Brook

18. Ram

2. “Gladiator� setting

58. Easter flower

19. Connive

3. Native of W. African country whose capital is Dakar

20. Incapable of being taught

Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Join us and make a difference! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: Okanogan: MA-R, MA-C, LPN or CNA Full time Registered Dietitian Full time. English/Spanish bilingual preferred. Promotor(a) 4 Per Diem positions; Okanogan & BrewsterEnglish/Spanish bilingual required Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN 2 positions. Full time Brewster (Jay Ave.): Pharmacist Full time MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time

Vehicles Wanted The Classified Department WILL BE CLOSED Thursday and Friday 11/28 and 11/29 for the Thanksgiving Holiday. Deadline will change as follows: DEADLINE FOR THE 11/28 edition will be

Monday, 11/25 AT NOON.

Please call 800-388-2527 or email classified@soundpublishing.com

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF NOV. 18, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION

Tonasket: Nurse Case Manager (must be an RN)0.80 FTE/32 hours per week MA-R, MA-C, or LPN 2 per diem positions See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Garage & Yard Sale INDOOR YARD SALE. Lots of nice things, household, furniture. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Nov 22-24. 9am - ? 124 Chesaw Rd.

ADOPTION -- Happily married couple looking to adopt YOUR baby. Promise love, laughter, security for your baby. Expenses paid. Call or Text Kate & Tim – 302 750 9030. EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HEALTH/BEAUTY IF YOU USED the blood thinner Pradaxa and suffering internal bleeding, hemorrhaging, required hospitalization or a love one died while taking Pradaxa between October 2010 and the present, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles H. Johnson 1-800-535-5727 HELP WANTED HEALTHCARE JOBS! Now Filling the following Nursing Positions: CNA’s LPN’s, RN’s and Med Aids, $2,000 Bonus + FREE Gas. Call AACO for Details: 1-800-656-4414

Start your newspaper subscription today and see the light. Get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

Statewides HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS DRIVERS --Small Enough to Care. Really! At Haney Truck Line, we care about you and know you need family time! CDL-A required. 1-888-414-4467. www.GOHANEY.com OWNER OPERATOR Dedicated Home Weekly! Solos up to $175,000/year. $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Teams up to $350,000/year. $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Forward Air 888-652-5611 DRIVERS -- Whether you have experience or need training, we offer unbeatable career opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877-369-7105 centraldrivingjobs.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com REAL ESTATE $500 TAKES POSSESSION of 20 surveyed acres close to Nat’l Forest w/ year-round access. Beautiful view, trees and site work is done! Call TLC 1-888-440-9824 REF: BC

Public Notices 2014 BUDGET NOTICE Notice is hereby given that a 2014 budget for Okanogan Fire District #16 was presented and adopted by the Commissioners at a public hearing on November 11th, 2013 at 6 Main Road in Aeneas Valley. Revenue 2014 Beginning Fund Balance - $45,000 General Property Taxes - $47,000 Grants - $95,000 State Entitlements-$1,000 Intergovernmental Service Revenues $23,000 Interest and Other Earnings -$1,000 Contributions & Donations Private $12,000 Interfund Loan Receipts - $500 Other Non-Revenues - $1,000 Total Revenue - $225,500 Expenditures 2014 Ending balance - $26,000 Administration and other services $24,000 Salaries and other wages - $0 Personnel benefits - $3,500 Supplies - $40,000 Other services and charges -$18,000 Capital outlays -$114,000 Total Expenditures - $225,500 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on Nov. 21 and 28, 2013. #528005 NOTICE OF EQUALIZATION OF ASSESSMENT ROLL OF THE OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Assessment Roll for the year 2014 has been prepared by the Secretary and that the Directors of the OrovilleTonasket Irrigation District will meet as a Board Equalization at the district office located at 516 Eleventh Street, Oroville, Washington, on December 12, 2013, at 1:30 P.M. for the purpose of equalizing said District’s 2014 Assessment Roll. Said Assessment Roll is available for review at the District Office until equalized by the Board of Directors on December 12, 2013 Jay W. O’Brien, Secretary/Manager Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 21, 2013. #528059 Summary of Ordinance #736 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, amending Section 2.24.080 of the Tonasket Municipal Code and thereby amending provisions of the “Cemetery Perpetual Care Trust Fund�. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-486-2132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 21, 2013. #528021

Phone: 509-476-3602 Toll Free: 866-773-7818

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY JUDITH ANN DE VON, Plaintiff, v. Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. Defendants. CASE NO. 13-2-004901-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

www.gazette-tribune.com

continued on next page

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 1420 Main St. ď Ź P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA. 98844


2 5

7

6

2

8

8

3

5

3

1

4

3

7

8 6

2

5

4

5

1

7

1

3

1

5 2

4

Easy, difficulty rating 0.41 6 1

8

3

1

3 9 2

7

9

2

3

9

7

6

4 5

6

8 7

7

1 8

1 9 3 4

8

3

3

8

1

5

5

2

6

2

9

4

4

5

2

6

7

9

2

5

4

8

4

509-476-3602

6

8

Sponsored by

7

9

1

ANSWERS

3

4

9

7

5

2

2

6

6

1

1 2

5

6

7

8

4

8

3

9

5

1

7

Puzzle 46 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

9

5

4 3

1 5 3 6

4 8 2 7 9

9 7 4 3 2 1

8 6 5

4 1 5 8 3 2

7 9 6

3 2 6 7 1 9 4 5 8

8

9 7 4 5 6 3 2 1

6 3

1 2 9 7 5 8 4

5

7

8

4

2

9

1

5

6

8

4

3

9

6

3

1

7

2

Puzzle 47 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

7 5 9 3

8 1 4 6 2

8 1 4 6 2 7

9 5 3

6 2 3 4 9 5 7

1 8

9 8 1 7 3 6 5 2

4

2 3

6 5 4 8 1

9 7

5 4 7 2

1 9 3 8 6

1 6

8 9 7

4 2 3 5

4 9 2

8 5 3 6

7 1

3 7 5 1 6

2 8 4

9

Puzzle 48 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

Superior Court of Washington County of Chelan In the Matter of the Estate of: IONA M. PORTER, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00276-2 Probate Notice to Creditors RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW

1

7

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of PATRICK DAVID MYRICK, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00106-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Kevin J. Myrick as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets.

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 47 (Easy, rating 0.41) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

6

11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: November 7, 2013 Personal Representative: Janet L. Culp Attorney for Personal Representative: Aaron J. Harris Address for Mailing of Service: 139 South Worthen P.O. Box 19 Wenatchee, WA 98807-0019 (509) 663-0031 JANET L. CULP Personal Representative JOHNSON, GAUKROGER, SMITH & MARCHANT, P.S. Attorneys for Estate By:AARON J. HARRIS WSBA No. 36802 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7, 14, 21, 2013. #524840

2

Date of First Publication of this Notice: November 14, 2013 /s/ Dale L. Crandall WSBA #32168 Attorney for Kevin J. Myrick P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 14, 21, 28, 2013. #526727

3

PATRICK J. MORRISSEY, WSBA#3045 Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 707 Okanogan, WA 98840 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 17, 24, 31, November 4, 14, 21, 2013. #

Sudoku

1

Public Notices

9

The State of Washington to the said Defendants, Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the17th day of October, 2013, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled courts, and answer the complaint of the Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, at his.office below stated; and in case ofyour failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of this action is to quiet title in Plaintiff to the following described real property situated in Okanogan County, State of Washington, to-wit: Lot 18, Block 4, Plat of ORO, Washington, as per plat thereof recorded in Book”A” of Plats, page 17, records of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington. DATED this 3rd day of October, 2013. /s/ PATRICK J. MORRISSEY

Public Notices

8

Public Notices

Public Notices

4

continued from previous page

Page A9 9

5

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune November 21, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 2

6 3

8 4

5

5

1

2 7 9

7 3 6

9

5 1 6 9 8

2 4

5 2 8 3

6 7

6

2

3

7

8 9 3 6 4 5 1

5

5

2 1

4

6

7

8

1

4

9

7

8

9

2

3

7

9

4

8

6

3

7

5

6

2

8

5

4

9 5

4

6 2

3 1 6

7

7

5

9 1 3

8 4 2

3

2

9

7

1 5 4 3 8

6 9

7 8 5 6 1

2 4

5

6

2

1

8 4 9 2 3 5 7

1

4

5 6

3

9

1

3

7

4

9

2

8

7

6

8

4 3

8

6

4

1

5

3

6 8

4

1 8

2 7 5

2

4

7

3

1

5

3

2

7

5 9 6 4 2

3 1 9 6 8

8

7

9

1

4 5 3 8 6

1

6

9 3

2

6

4

8

7

2

1

5

4 6

5

1

6 7

6

3

7 1

2 4 9

5

9 8

6

3

6 9

1

3

4

8 5

3

9

5

4

5

7

7

9

1 2 9 5 4 8

6 3

4 7 5 2 3 9 1

8 6

2 3 8 6 1 7 9 4 5

1 6

9 5 4 8 3 7 2

9

6

1

7

5

3

4

2

1

9 2 3 8

4

7 1 5 9 3 2

8 6

6

3 4 8 2 1 5

9 7

1

9 8 3 5 7 6 2 4

7

5

2 9 4 6 8 1 3

9

5

9

8 1

7 4

9 2

5

4

3

7

1

4 8 6 5

6

7

5

9

4

1

2

4 6

2

9

5

7

3 4 6 8

8 6

3

5 7

8 1 7 5

7 1 8

2

9

4

3

6

2 9 1 5 7 4 6

5 3 7 8 4 9 2

2

Puzzle 37 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

1 7

5 2

8 3

6 1

8 4 5 9

2 1 6 7 3

3 2 6 7 4 8

5 9 1

1 9 7 5 6 3 8

2 4

5 3 4 8 7 9 1 6

2

6 1

8 2 3 5 9

4 7

9 7 2 4

1 6 3 8 5

4 8

1 3 9

2 7 5 6

2 6 9

1 5 7 4

3 8

7 5 3 6 8

4 2 1

9

Puzzle 45 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.45)

1 4

9 3 2

1 6 8 2

9 3 4

5 7 3 6 8 4

9

4 2 9 7 5 1 8

2 8 1 5 6 7 3

7 5

6 3 4 9 1

9 3 4 1

2 8 6

6 9

7 8 1

2 5

8 1 2

4 3 5 7

3 4 5 9 7

6

7 5

2 1

3 6

9

4

8 2

5 7

4 3

6

2

9

1

8

Puzzle 42 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

9 4 8 2 6 1 3

1 6

2 7 3 5 8

6

7

9

5

2

7 5

9 4

1 4

3

2

8

9 1 4 6

5

7 3 8

3 8 4 6 1 7

5 2 9

Puzzle 38 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

REALTY

3

2

7

1

#1 Top Producer Office in North County! SUN 1411 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 LAKES Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool 6

3

8

Puzzle 41 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

2 4

1

8

8

9

8

3

2 9

5

Puzzle 40 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.37)

9

3

8

1

5

4 7

7

2

2

2

2

6

7

7

Puzzle 44 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

7 9

4

8 6

1

Puzzle 43 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

8

1

9

3

6

3

9

2

1

8

5

2 9 6 3

8 7 5 4 1

3 4 5 1 9 6

8 2

1 8 7 4 5 2 6

4 5 8 7 1 3 2

6 7

1 8 2 9 3

9 3 2 6

4 5 1

5 2

4 9 6

8 7

8 1 3

2 7 4 9

7 6 9 5 3

1

3

9

5

7

1

6

4

7

9

6

4

8

3

5

8

2

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon LAKE AND COUNTRY Beautiful lakeviews from this 1.76 acre parcel with access to both Hwy 97 and Westlake Rd. Build your dream home here amongst year-to-year leased golden delicious apple orchard! City water available. MLS#552716 $90,000

1

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

4

Puzzle 39 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee 1999 Highway 7, Oroville — 3 bed, 2 bath: Remodeled manufactured home on 6.28 acres. You will enjoy the new flooring and new counter tops in the kitchen and bath rooms. There is plenty of room to enjoy the outdoors with two decks. There is room for animals in the two irrigated pastures. NWML# 516347 $179,500

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

7

509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

3

www.windermere.com

9

Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

1

If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you.

4

HOME

8

Find The Right

– On Golden Pond –

Charming country home. Spacious with 2 bathrooms. Big fenced five acres. Open floor plan, bright cheerful kitchen with all appliances. The living room has sunny southern exposure. Front deck and back porches workshop and irrigated acres. $134,900.

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in our Real Estate Guide

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

- 24 Hour Service Licensed & Bonded

509-486-2692 P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

Attorney

Auto / Upholstery

Quality Supplies Since 1957

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Midway Building Supply

RYAN W. GUNN Attorney at Law

n Family

Law n Criminal n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620 Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

All of your Automotive & Upholstery needs

Busted Knuckle

Auto & Upholstery HOURS: Mon. - Sat., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Storage

Subscribe

Got Water?

OROVILLE

OKANOGAN VALLEY

Over 25 Years experience! Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

MINI STORAGE

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

www.gazette-tribune.com

Concrete

Insulation

OSOYOOS READI-MIX

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Installed Insulation

Oroville Building Supply 33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

Seats  Headliners  Door Panels Convertible tops / Vinyl roof covers — Auto & Small Engine Service — We Do Tire Repair & Balance! 124 Chesaw Rd, Oroville 509-476-2611

Pumps

— Fred Cook —

Building Supplies

&

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 We Work Saturdays! 11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Septic Service

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

www.orovilleministorage.com

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

 Installed

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

Well Drilling

“The Water Professionals” Excavation and Septic Service

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power / Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

Garage Doors

Thank you for your continued support!  Septic Pumping

 Septic Installation  Portable Toilets

509-422-3621 Cell: (509) 322-4777 MORGASE983JS

Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store  Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Zimmatic Pivots  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com


Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 21, 2013

COPS & COURTS Compiled by Zachary Van Brunt

Superior Court Criminal Thomas L. Waters V, 23, Omak, was found guilty Nov. 6 of POCS (heroin). Waters was sentenced to 12 months in prison for the Aug. 5 crime. In a separate case, Waters pleaded guilty Nov. 12 to TMVWP. For that crime, Waters was sentenced to eight months in jail to run concurrently with the above sentence. He was fined $600. William Lee Pearcy, 29, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Nov. 8 to seconddegree malicious mischief. Pearcy was sentenced to 45 days in jail, and fined $1,110.50 for the Oct. 11 crime. Gustavo Duarte Mares, 25, Omak, pleaded guilty Nov. 13 to third-degree rape. Mares was sentenced to nine months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the March 18 crime. Tara Marie Jaime, 21, Omak, pleaded guilty Nov. 15 to first-degree trafficking in stolen property and third-degree theft. Jaime was sentenced to 45 days in jail on the first count and 364 days in jail with 319 days suspended for two years on the second. She was fined $1,110.50 for the July 24 crimes. Miguel Angel Nino Chavez, 27, Omak, pleaded guilty Nov. 15 to delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine), three counts of alien in possession of a firearm, and possession of a stolen firearm. Nino Chavez was sentenced to 13 months in prison and fined $2,310.50. The crimes occurred on May 6 and Aug. 13. Angelina Marie Jones, 27, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Nov. 18 to possession of a stolen firearm. Jones was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the June 16 crime. She had two additional charges dismissed: theft of a firearm and carrying a concealed weapon. The court issued an arrest warrant for Kevin James Smith, 27, Omak. Smith is wanted for felony violation of a no-contact order and fourth-degree assault (DV). The court found probable cause to charge Johnny Barton Woodward, 56, Omak, with attempting to elude a police vehicle, POCS (methamphetamine) and third-degree DWLS. The court found probable cause to charge Tawnya Hope Chapman, 42, Omak, with delivery of a firearm to an ineligible person. The court probable cause to charge Ezra Thomas Chapman, 32, Omak, with three counts of second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm.

Civil Matters Ricardo A. Guia, Tonasket, was assessed $1,024.24 in overpayment of unemployment insurance benefits by the state Employment Security Department. Hans P. Rabenold, Oroville, was assessed $1,755.12 in overpayment of unemployment insurance benefits by the state

Employment Security Department. Cates & Erb, Inc., Omak, was assessed $3,939.43 in workers’ compensation taxes and fees by the state Department of Labor and Industries.

District Court Lamont Lawrence Lussier, 62, Omak, guilty of reckless driving. Lussier received a 364-day suspended sentence, and fined $1,118. Dorothy Mae Marchand, 87, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Marchand was fined $200. Earl K. Marchand Jr., 44, Okanogan, guilty of DUI. Marchand was sentenced to 364 days with 360 days suspended, and fined $1,936. Jeremiah J. Marchand, 38, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Marchand received a 90-day suspended sentence, and fined $468. Garrett Jarome Marlatt, 22, Omak, guilty of reckless driving and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of third-degree DWLS. Marlatt received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $1,936. A third-degree DWLS charge was dismissed. Rosa M. Martinez, 32, Riverside, had a bail jumping charge dismissed. Daryl Anthony McCraigie, 24, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. McCraigie was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 324 days suspended, and fined $828. Dale Edward McGowan, 62, Tonasket, guilty of first-degree negligent driving. McGowan was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $1,158. Jacki Renae McNeil, 37, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Van Thomas Medcalf, 57, guilty of DUI. Medcalf was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 360 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Jared Joseph Milam, 28, Omak, guilty of second-degree criminal trespass. Milam was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 59 days suspended, and fined $358. A disorderly conduct charge was dismissed. Cory Alvin Mount, 43, Omak, guilty of second-degree recreational fishing with no license or catch card. Mount received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $568. Jarred Clayton Naclerio, 22, Oroville, guilty of first-degree negligent driving. Naclerio was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 81 days suspended, and fined $1,158. Raymond L. Nicholson, 34, guilty of non-emergency use of 911. Nicholson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 356 days suspended, and fined $808. Jennifer Deann Nieshe, 32, Riverside, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Nieshe was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. Charles Theodore Oakman, 24, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Julie Angeline Oliver, 46, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Oliver received a 90-day suspended sentence, and fined $618. Misty Francine Ornelas, 32, Tonasket,

had a charge dismissed: animals at large. Miguel Juarez Ortiz, 31, Omak, had a bail jumping charge dismissed. Kenneth Taylor Pillow, 20, Tonasket, has a charge dismissed: use or delivery of drug paraphernalia. Pedro Ponce Sanchez, 28, Okanogan, guilty of DUI. Ponce Sanchez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 348 days suspended, and fined $1,281. Alan Forbes Price, 40, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Price was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $658. Gerardo Hernandez Ramirez, 43, Omak, guilty of second-degree DWLS. Ramirez received a 180day suspended sentence and fined $1,018. Wade Allen Reddington, 40, Omak, guilty of use or deliver of drug paraphernalia and third-degree DWLS. Reddington was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $1,396.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 Automobile theft on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Theft on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Saddle and electronics reported missing. Theft on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Mail reported missing. Theft on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Vending machine damaged. Stolen vehicle recovered on N. Second St. in Okanogan. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Dayton St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Dayton St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on S. Birch St. in Omak. Burglary on Cherry St. in Oroville. Theft on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Fuel reported missing. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Lita Diane Avelino, 53, court commitments for POCS and possession of drug paraphernalia. Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013 Trespassing on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Theft on Omak Ave. in Omak. Forgery on N. Ash St. in Omak. Three reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Fraud on Ironwood St. in Omak. Fraud on Oak St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Appleway Ave. in Oroville. Trespassing on 10th Ave. in Oroville. Theft on N. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Harassment on Seventh St. in Tonasket. Jeremy Wayne Hill, 29, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Deanna Lynn Mattix, 46, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. William Dwaine McMillan, 56, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for hitand-run (unattended property).

Ezra Thomas Chapman, 32, booked on three counts of possession of a firearm. Donevan Phillip Smith, 27, booked for POCS (heroin), possession of drug paraphernalia and a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013 Malicious mischief on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fuel reported missing. Theft on Rehmke Rd. near Tonasket. Mail reported missing. Fraud on Tonasket Airport Rd. near Tonasket. Fraud on Dixon Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on Quince St. in Omak. Fraud on E. Apple Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Juvenile problem on Main St. in Oroville. Michael William Craig, 22, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. George Joshua Gilmer, 34, booked for assault of a child. Jillian Marie Lewis, 25, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013 Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Rose St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Ed Louis Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on Golden St. in Oroville. Fraud on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Fraud on Conconully St. near Okanogan. Theft on Watoka Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on Aeneas Valley Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Fraud on Miller Rd. near Omak. Drugs on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on S. Main St. in Omak. Fraud on S. Birch St. in Omak. Sean Thomas, no middle name listed, 47, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Martin Ray Hoffman, 48, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourthdegree assault (DV). Ashley Huner, no middle name listed, 25, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants, both for thirddegree DWLS; and an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Rodrigo Villafana-Sanchez, 28, booked for interfering with reporting (DV) and fourth-degree assault (DV). Jeffry Ray Boston, 42, booked on two OCSO FTC warrants: making false statements and possession of drug paraphernalia. Friday, Nov. 15, 2013 Trespassing on Gavin Rd. near Oroville. Fraud on Bunch Rd. near Havillah. Warrant arrest on Elmway in Okanogan.

Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013 Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Mailboxes reported damaged. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Eastside Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Sawtell Rd. near Oroville. Fuel reported missing. One-vehicle crash on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Assault on Appleway Ave. near Okanogan.

Two-vehicle crash on S. Granite St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on Apple Lane in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Automobile theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Fraud on Deerpath Dr. in Oroville. Theft on Mill Dr. in Tonasket. Rototiller reported missing. Malicious mischief on Seventh St. in Tonasket. Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013 Trespassing on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Assault on Oroville Eastside Rd. near Oroville. One-vehicle rollover crash on Allemandi Rd. near Loomis. Injuries reported. Fraud on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. Illegal burning on Jasmine St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Kermal Rd. near Omak. Utility problem on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Found property on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Purse recovered. Fraud on Garfield St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Central Ave. in Oroville. Violation of no-contact order on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Cameron Blake Emery, 21, booked for DUI.

Key:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP – Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

ProMote Your event! One Call • One Bill • Statewide YOU NEED HELP – They need work.

“ wnPa imPaCt adS

Reach over 2 million readers with many skills throughout Washington by advertising your job in 106 Community Newspapers! aCCess a

YOU NEED HELP – They need work. PoWerfuL over•2 million readers•with manyBILL netWork of LOWReach COST ONE CALL ONE

have BeCOme a key element

CoMMunitY skills throughout Washington by102 advertising Buy a Region or the Entire State! neWsPaPers aCross your job in 106 Community Newspapers! Request a free information kit today:

LOW

Of Our event marketing

Washington for PriCe. COST • ONE CALL •one ONEfLatBILL 509-476-3602

Strategy.

Buy a Region or the Entire State! ContaCt Your LoCaL WnPa Request a free information kit today: MeMber neWsPaPer 509-476-3602 to Learn More.

~ virginia BlOOm taSte fOr wine & art BlOOmS winery, langley

Give The Gift That Keeps On Giving... Every Week!

Early DEaDlinEs Due to the Thanksgiving Holiday we will have the following deadlines: Our paper will come out on Wed., Nov. 27 before Thanksgiving Display Classified Ads Friday, Nov. 22 at 5 pm Legals Fri., Nov.22 at 5 pm *Classified Ads Mon., Nov. 25 at noon *Display Advertising Friday, Nov. 22 at 5 p.m. *Editorial & Community Bulletin Friday, Nov. 22 at 5:30 p.m.

Harassment on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Assault on Aeneas Valley Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Frontier Dr. in Tonasket. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Round Up Rd. near Oroville. Mailboxes reported damaged. Violation of no-contact order on Second St. in Riverside. Fraud on Thiess Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Mill St. in Okanogan. Theft on Omak Ave. in Omak. Chainsaw reported missing. Assault on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on N. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Bradley Allen Sweat, 24, booked on a Department of Corrections warrant. Audrey Lou Handyside, 56, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA for second-degree criminal trespass. Jeremy K. Wickwire, 36, booked for residential burglary and a USBP hold. Joseph Albert Rowe, 61, booked on a bench warrant for POCS with intent to deliver. Tanya Paige Hayner, 25, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Jesse Autry Hope, 18, booked on two counts of fourth-degree assault (DV) and POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams). David Ernest Matt, 36, booked on two Omak Police Department FTC warrants: second-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. George Scott Smith, 40, booked for DUI, third-degree DWLS and reckless endangerment. Steven Charles Williams, 38, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer.

DONKEY BASKETBALL

LOCAL WILDLIFE

OWL Informational presentation Friday, March 23 PAGE A3

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

Watch Donkey Basketball at the OHS Commons March 28 See page B3

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM 22, 2012 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND The Okanogan Valley’s best| THURSDAY, source MARCH for local news, sports andPRICE business!

GLOWING PERFORMANCE Concern TonasketSubscribe/Renew council Today! expressed updates on projects

over coaches resignation

City’s engineers seek to clarify priorities regarding upcoming street improvement projects The council authorized Councilwoman Jill Vugteveen and Danison to make a final decision to move forward, with a priority on creating a “straight shot” from one end of town to the other along at least one side of the road with ADAapproved curb access ramps. The airport runway seal project’s target schedule is for completion before the Father’s Day Fly-in. Meanwhile, the council granted public works director Bill Pilkinton a leave of absence of indefinite length and appointed Hugh Jensen as acting public services director.

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket City Council provided updates on a number of civic projects that are progressing through their planning stages at the Tuesday, March 13, council meeting. Tonasket city planner Kurt Danison said he met with three property owners affected by the need for an easement to complete the Mill Drive/Bonaparte Creek sewer project and said that they seemed to be willing to provide the easement access. “They’re willing to provide easement through their property so we can connect up the sewer through there,” Danison said. “They were under the impression that water was included in this... I don’t Police Chief Robert Burks said that know how it came about... I don’t think we said we were going to put in a water he is working on a policy governing the department’s handling of data collected system there. “I think they walked away with a better during video surveillance. Burks also announced that officer understanding.” The council planned an open house Audra Fuller passed her civil service for March 20 for residents to interact exam and has been hired as a full-time with the engineers and councilmembers officer. Burks said he is finalizing a “wish on the sewer project committee. The council also responded to a memo list” to be submitted for Stonegarden Varela and Associates seeking to clar- describing how potential grant money ify priorities on the upcoming street would be used. Stonegarden grants proimprovement projects that had been dis- vide money for local law enforcement cussed at a previous council meeting. entities to use while assisting in U.S. The project was facing a delay without Border Patrol operations, although any such a prioritization as funding for the equipment purchased is not limited to those operations. project may not be enough to complete In County, home delivery “Oroville was able to get an SUV the entire “wish list.” “We want the (hospital parking cross- through Stonegarden grant money,” ing) beacon as the base project,” said Burks said. “This is the initial part of the Mayor Patrick Plumb. “The rest we will process that we do every year. We don’t have done as we have the funding to SEE COUNCIL | PG A3 complete.”

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Teresa Hawkins expressed her concern over the resignation of varsity basketball coach Glenn Braman during the public comment portion of the Tonasket School Board meeting on Monday, March 12. Hawkins, wife of longtime varsity football coach Jay Hawkins, said she was concerned that the direction of the school district concerning its coaches was taking an ugly turn. “I’m concerned with the resignation of coach Braman,” she said. “I’m concerned because my husband is also a coach. I’m not comfortable with how that came about.” Hawkins said she had heard secondhand remarks attributed to a school board member that fed into her concern. “I’m hoping the school board acts as a board, and not on individual agendas,” she said. “I hope we’ve learned from the process that went down. “I think it’s sad if we let a group of parents who are upset or who have a vengeance with a coach from a long time ago to come in and rally people up to make a decision to not reinstate a coach. I think it would be really sad if we have to go around the community to bring in support to show that a coach has just as many people, and more, (supporting him) as those who complained 50 about him.” Citing her experience as a coach’s wife and as a mother of an athlete coached by others, Hawkins said that athletics teaches kids to deal with adversity, but that parents encourage that growth. “We want the situation to be perfect for our kids,” she said. “But what do we teach them when we run to every need they have? “(Coaches) love the game, they’re competitors, and they want to teach kids to work together, to go out in life and be successful. Kids can’t be successful if their parents don’t let them grow as individuals. That’s a part of athletics. Nothing is going to be perfect.” Hawkins said she was concerned that situations that contributed to Braman’s resignation, as well as rumors about her husband’s position, could damage the reputation of the district. “People want to come to this district,” she said. “It’s because of you guys (the school board) up here. You have done a great job of keeping this school district as one of the elite. “Don’t ruin that. Don’t let that happen, you guys.” In other business, superintendent Paul Turner read a proclamation from

BUY 1 YEAR & GET 1 MONTH FREE! BUY 2 YEARS & GET 2 MONTHS FREE! Fuller passes exam, video policy progress

NAME:__________________________________________________________ ADDRESS:_______________________________________________________ EMAIL:__________________________ PHONE:_______________________ CHECK ONE: BEST VALUE!

GREAT DEAL! Photo by Gary DeVon

26 months (112 issues) only $54 13 months (56 issues) only $30 for Scholars and the Oroville High School Music Department on Wednesday, March 14 Kaylee Clough performs “The Glow”90 at the Variety Show and Auction presented by Dollars

in the high school commons. The eight-year-old has been taking ballet for five years and recently performed at the Seattle Dance Workshop Competition and took a silver medal. The annual talent show is used to raise funds for the Oroville Dollars for Scholars Continuing Education awards. For more from the event see page B2.

CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED OR CREDIT CARD PAYMENT

Oroville killed Check or Money Order CreditPrincipal Card Please call 800-388-2527 or email classified@sound- Former publishing.com Editorial and Display advertising Signature________________________________________________________________ call 509-476-3602 or email gdevon@gazette-tribune, GAZETTE-TRIBUNE chelm@gazette-tribune or bbaker@gazette-tribune Card #for TeenCredit may be charged second degree murder

Expiration Date:

DONKEY BASKETBALL

LOCAL WILDLIFE

BY GARY A. DEVON

OWL Informational presentation Friday, March 23 PAGE A3

MANAGING EDITOR

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

Watch Donkey Basketball at the OHS Commons March 28 See page B3

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

SPOKANE – Former Oroville High School Principal Frank Motta died from injuries sustained while trying to help a neighbor whose Spokane area home had been overrunWWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM by a teenage | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE party. GLOWING PERFORMANCE Apparently Motta was asked to keep Concern an eye on the house by his neighbor expressed and on Saturday, March 10 when he

Tonasket council updates on projects

Crimes Detectives. He was booked into the Spokane County Jail on the charge of felony assault. Motta, who was in critical condition at Sacred Heart Hospital, died of his injuries on March 15. Information Officer Chamberlain speculated that the charges against Lewis would be upgraded to Mail to: second degree murder by the Spokane County Prosecutor’s office, but as of Monday they were still listed as first degree assault. When Motta came to Oroville in 1981 to take his first principal’s job he was just 34-years-old and stayed here for four years, according to his good friend Don DeVon, who served under Motta as a high school councilor in Oroville, as well as in Palm Desert, Calif. DeVon described Motta as a “highly innovative”

PO Box 657 Kirkland, WA 98083


NOVEMBER 21, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A11

SPORTS

Hornets boast two Players of Week

JENEY HAD HORNETS’ NUMBER ... AND IT WASN’T 867-5309

The Gazette-Tribune

Brent Baker/staff photo

Reardan’s Clinton Jeney (35) reaches back to tip a would-be touchdown pass away from Oroville’s Nathan Hugus (88) during Friday’s state 2B playoff game in Spokane. The ball was tipped up at least twice before Dan Peone (22, far right) raced in to finish off the interception. Jeney scored five touchdowns - three rushing, one on an interception and one on a kickoff return - to lead the Indians past the Hornets 41-20.

Hornets drenched out of state playoffs By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

SPOKANE - Maybe it was the cold. Or the rain. Or yet another long road trip, or coming off having played two overmatched opponents heading into the playoffs. Whatever the reason the Oroville football team had far from its best outing on Friday, Nov. 15, in their state playoff opener. Reardan rolled to a 41-20 victory to end the Hornets’ season in disappointing fashion in a game that Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson believed his team had a chance to win. “I sure wish we had played better,” Hutchinson said. “We weren’t aggressive as a team. Luke Kindred had an outstanding game and other kids played well at times, but overall Reardan came at us and we just kind of backed off. “It was pretty disappointing.” Kindred toughed it out on offense, but defensively was all over the field, finishing with 24 total tackles, including 14 unassisted. The fact he had the opportunity to make that many plays, though, spoke to the Hornets’ inability to get Reardan’s offense off the field, except when the Indians coughed up the ball. “We watched film of them against Lind-Ritzville/Sprague and Asotin, and we weren’t really that impressed,” Hutchinson said. “But they played hard, a lot harder than we did. If we played against them the way we did against White Swan at least it would have been competitive. But to me, the game was worse than the score.” The score was indeed deceiving. The Hornets twice scored on defense as the rainy, 35-degree weather seemed to bother the Indians’ ability to hold onto the ball. Connelly Quick gave Oroville the lead in the first quarter with a 58-yard fumble return, while Kindred added a 75-yard fumble

OROVILLE - Oroville High School athletes picked up two more individual awards in recent weeks as cross country runner Sierra Speiker and volleyballer Brittany Jewett were named Washington Interscholastic Activities Association Class 2B Athletes of the Week in consecutive weeks. Sp e i k e r, who went on to win her third cross country state title in four seasons, was named Sierra Speiker Athlete of the Week for the week ending Nov. 9 after her performance at the District 5/6 regional meet. Speiker finished the 3-mile course in 17:56.04, winning the race by about four minutes to claim the regional title and a spot at the state finals. Jewett, the Hornet volleyball team’s setter, was a major factor in the team earning its first district playoff berth since the mid1990s. Her performance against White Swan during the week ending Nov. 16 15/15 serving, 45 sets, eight Brittany Jewett digs, three kills and three attacks - earned her the award. Both are seniors. Speiker won the award during cross country season last year as well. Oroville’s Tanner Smith also won the award after the Hornets’ first football game of the season.

DeVon signs with Nevada The Gazette-Tribune

Left, Blaine Weaver tries to hang on to Reardan’s Dan Peone. The Hornets were unable to slow down the Indian’s running game. Above, senior quarterback Luke Kindred and dad Tony commiserate. Brent Baker/staff photos

return for a score in the fourth quarter. But Reardan had its way with the Hornets, outgaining them on the ground 394-136 and holding Oroville to just five first downs while racking up 17 of their own. The passing game didn’t fare much better. Kindred completed 7-of-12 passes but managed a paltry 16 yards as the Hornets’ usually-successful screen passes usually resulted in two or three defenders waiting for the receiver behind the line of scrimmage. “We warned the kids about how we needed to stay low and stay on our blocks,” Hutchinson said. “You could say Reardan had us scouted well. But I thought we had guys where they belonged, we just kept backing up.” Though the Hornets led 7-6 after the first quarter, signs of trouble were evident. Other than a 21-yard run by Kindred on Oroville’s first play from scrimmage, the Hornets managed exactly zero yards of offense on six plays in the quarter. Meanwhile, the Indians - who

didn’t complete a pass all night - had already run off seven plays of 10 yards or longer. When not fumbling the ball away, Reardan running backs Caleb Kopp, Clinton Jeney and Dan Peone seemed to gain four or five yards just by leaning forward. Jeney’s 10 yard run late in the first quarter got his team within a point of the Hornets. The roof caved in, though, in the second quarter. Dustin Rettkowski broke loose for a 44-yard run that gave the Indians the lead for good, and moments later, Jeney struck again, this time picking Kindred and racing 53 yards for the score. “That interception really got them fired up,” Hutchinson said. “On the other hand, whenever we did something good, we let up.” The Hornets had a chance to get back within a touchdown before the half, driving into the Reardan red zone. Kindred tried to hit Nathan Hugus with a pass in the end zone, but again Jeney was there, reaching behind him to tip the ball in the air. As he

and Hugus fought for possession, Peone raced over to pick the ball out of the air for an interception that ended the Hornets’ threat. Jeney, who finished with 171 yards on just 11 carries, strafed the Hornets with touchdown runs of 37 and 65 yards in the third quarter. The second score came one play after Kindred finished off a 45-yard “Beast Mode” run of his own, breaking five tackles, that briefly gave the Hornets hope of getting back in the game. Kindred’s 75-yard fumble return early in the fourth quarter pulled the Hornets to within 35-20. But it was Jeney - again - who extinguished their last faint hope by returning the ensuing kickoff 90 yards for the final points of the night. Jeney finished with 337 total yards, including rushing, kick returns and the interception return. Kindred led the Hornets with 69 yards on 11 carries, with 65 yards coming on two plays. Tanner Smith added 47 yards on 10 carries and caught

five passes for five yards. Sean DeWitte added 23 yards rushing on 10 carries and caught two passes for 11 yards. Defensively, Kindred had his 14 solo tackles, 10 assists and three fumble recoveries. Jake Scott added three solo tackles and four assists, DeWitte added four solo tackles and Smith had four solos and one assist. The Hornets finished out the season with a 7-3 mark, including 4-2, good for second place in the Central Washington 2B League. It wasn’t the end to the season Hutchinson envisioned. The Hornets had hoped for a rematch with the Waitsburg-Prescott team that ousted them from the playoffs last year. The Cardinals, though, also lost last weekend, to Adna. “I can’t remember a time when we had two defensive scores where we ended up losing by 21 points,” Hutchinson said. “I really don’t know what to say. They were a good team; we gave them opportunities that they took advantage of them.”

RENO, NEV. - Peighton DeVon has signed with the University of Nevada Volleyball team, one of three players added on the first day of the early signing period. DeVon signed a National Letters of Intent to play for the Wolf Pack. “I’m excited about the class of 2014,” said U of N coach Ruth Lawanson. “It is one of our smallest classes we have brought in the last few years. However this group will give us needed depth in a few key positions and allows us to add more flexibility to our team. A 6-0 middle blocker, DeVon attends Shadle Park High School in Spokane. She was named SPH’s top offensive threat and biggest blocker her senior year. Playing for the Club Catalyst Volleyball team, she averaged 6.78 blocks and twelve kills per match. In addition to lettering in volleyball twice, she was a two-year letter winner in track and field and basketball. DeVon is the daughter of former Oroville High School student Nichole DeVon from Spokane and the granddaughter of Don DeVon of Oroville.

Subscribe to the... OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

WINTER SPORTS Preview 2013

Our WINTER Sports Section will be coming out Soon!

Don’t miss out...reserve your space now! OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Contact Charlene at 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712


Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 21, 2012

Obituaries

Thelma Watson

Thelma Lucille Watson Thelma L. (Gardner) Watson of Tonasket passed away peacefully the morning of November 13, 2013. She had been a resident of the Tonasket and Oroville areas for a bit over 20 years. Born in Harden County, Tenn. on March 27, 1941 to James Gardener and Lonie Parker. Thelma enjoyed Western movies and books, gardening, putting together puzzles and her little dog Suzie. In Thelma’s first marriage she had four children; Wayne Sills, William Sills, Patsy Wooton and Darlene Reece. Then, in 1982 she married the love of her life, W.C. (Pete) Watson. Together they traveled and worked at many various jobs previous to settling in Tonasket. They loved to drive into the mountains gathering wood and searching for huckleberries. She now has joined her late husband Pete, and leaves behind her very close friends Fred and Jessie Cook. A private burial will take place at the Mountain View Cemetery near Loomis, Wash. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to her favorite charity: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

ethics, and passion for Miami Dolphin football. Our beloved Adis left this world just as kind and gentle as he entered. Always more concerned with his family’s needs above his own. He was a great man of dignity and respect and will never be forgotten. Adis was preceded in death by his father, Robert R. Steele, and brother Calvin Steele. He is survived by his mother, Alice Green, sisters Lynnette Howell (Scott), Deanna Barnes (Bill), Melanie Caldwell (Marc), Wanda Litrell, and Tracy Welch-Henner, and brother Wayne Green. He loved his nieces Tangi, Brianne, and Lauren, and his nephews Derek, Christopher, Chris, Willy, David, Levi, Landon, and Aiden. Adis is also survived by many great nieces, nephews, step brothers, sisters, and cousins. May we continue to honor Adis by holding the unselfish love he gave so freely with one another. A memorial service was held on Saturday, November 16, 2013 at Danekas Funeral Chapel in Chewelah. Adis’ family would like to thank Danekas Funeral Chapel, Dr. Boone, Blue Creek Floral, The Chewelah Casino, Hospice Center of Spokane, St. Joseph’s Hospital of Chewelah, and Sacred Heart Hospital of Spokane for their care and support. Please visit the online memorial and sign the guest book at www.danekasfuneralchapel. com. Danekas Funeral Chapel, 155 West First Avenue, Colville, Wash. was entrusted with the arrangements.

Evelyn Frazier

Evelyn R. Frazier

Adis Steele

Adis Ronald Steele Adis Ronald Steele, age 53, passed away peacefully at his home on November 9, 2013, with his sisters Lynnette and Deanna at his side following a courageous battle with cancer. His kind and gentle spirit entered this world on June 20, 1960 in Tonasket, Washington. He was born the second son to Robert R. and Alice F. Steele. He was a fun loving little boy who loved the outdoors. He liked fish, ride bicycles and spent many of his childhood years with his sister Lynnette as his protector, and his tag-along sister, Deanna as his companion. Following graduation from high school in 1979, Adis joined the Navy, and proudly served his country for four years. Following his honorable discharge, he resided in California for a few years then returned to Washington State to be close to his family. Adis started working for the Double Eagle Casino in 1994, until they closed their doors in 2005. He then went to work for the Chewelah Casino until Oct. 6, 2013 when his failing health no longer allowed him to work. This was not an easy step to Adis’ remarkable work ethic. Adis was a beloved son, brother, uncle, and friend to many. To know him was to love him, and anyone who had the pleasure to do so, was touched by his compassion. He would turn his back on no one in need. He was known for his avid movie critiques, exceptional work

We would like to share our family story with you. Evelyn R. (Naggy) Frazier passed away peacefully on November 12, 2013 at North Valley Hospital after a heroic battle with cancer. Our mom, sister, grandmother, wife, aunt and friend was born July 22, 1938 at Oroville General Hospital to William and Grace Naggy, and was the youngest of their five daughters. Evelyn was raised on Ellemeham Mountain where the family owned a cattle and horse ranch and where she built a strong work ethic, a dedication to family, appreciation of animals and unconditional love. She enjoyed horseback riding and owned many horses over the years-each one like family to her. Evelyn graduated from Oroville high school in 1957 and went to work for the Oroville cannery until she married Roy Frazier on Nov. 14, 1959. They worked alongside each other in the family apple orchards along with raising cattle, horses and multiple hay fields. Evelyn enjoyed many aspects of the farm life including a large garden that produced bounties of cucumbers for pickles, cabbage for sauerkraut, tomatoes for canning salsa and passed this onto her children, grandchildren and family. Evelyn was an active member of the Ellivoro Rebecekah Lodge #234, and held several positions including conductor and dedicated member of the drill team. Evelyn always had a warm and welcoming smile and enjoyed being in the outdoors as she represented one of the strongest and greatest generations ever. Evelyn was preceded in death by her father, William Naggy; mother Grace Naggy and her husband, Roy Frazier. Evelyn is survived by her sons Jeff (Gail) of Oroville and Stan of Boise Idaho; grandchildren Ryan, Scott, Madisyn, Dylanie and Joey; great granddaughter Autumn and her loving dog Tucker. She is also survived by her sisters Betty (Dave) Dieterich and Shirley Moser of Oroville, Barbara Jean Conner of Omak and Lorriane Schmeer of Spokane.

Okanogan Valley

A celebration of life will be held Saturday, November 30 at 11 a.m., at the Oroville United Methodist Church. Donations may be made in her memory to Nourishing Hands Rescue of Oroville. Precht-Harrisn-Nearents Chapel is entrusted with the arrangements.

Robert (Bob) Arthur Grover Robert Arthur Grover, better known to his friends and family as “Bob,” was born to Charles and Bessie Grover on October 4, 1929 in Albany, New York. Bob went to heaven on November 6, 2013. Bob started his career off as a chauffeur in New York. He later became a short-haul truck driver which became his passion. During this time he married the love of his life, Adeline Vera Roy, in 1954 on Valentine’s Day. Shortly thereafter, they decided to take a venture to California to be closer to Adeline’s family. They settled in a cozy home in Santa Ana, Calif. Bob continueddriving truck, delivering asphalt until he retired. Bob and Adeline enjoyed the simple life and fishing and gardening. They did not have children during their married life, however, they loved all the children in the neighborhood. Several of them, Aurora (Aurie) Magallanes and Bethany Hernandez were still in touch with Bob until his passing. They wrote him many letters and sent lots of pictures. Bob talked very highly of this family and loved Aurie and Bethany so much. Bob’s sweet Adeline who he adored passed away in 1988. Bob continued to enjoy family in California. At Thanksgiving he would always bring flowers to the cook, his niece Lea, in appreciation of the great dinner. Bob loved his cars, trucks and was especially interested in small engines. He graduated from Foley-Belsaw Institute in 1999 with a diploma in small engine service and repair. This became his hobby and he gladly fixed all the neighbors’ lawn mowers. Bob soon had a new chapter in his life in 2002- Oroville, Washington. His many friends in Oroville became a family to him. Bob continued tinkering with small engines and during the winter he would attach a snow blade to his riding lawn mower. He went all over the neighborhood plowing driveways showing his kindness to many. What a nice surprise after a long day’s work to come home to a cleared off driveway. Hmmmm... Bob must have been here. Bob was always helping neighbors and friends. He was the kind of man that would /(give you the shirt off his back.” Bob became close friends with his neighbor Mae Hill and her nephew Earl Hill. What a great friendship they shared! Many years later, Bob took care of Mae so she could be at home during her illness. After a year or so of care giving, Mae passed away. Bob remained close friends with Earl and continued on with life, always making jokes and putting a smile on our faces. He will be missed by many! Bob was preceded in death by his parents Charles and Bessie Grover, his brother Charles Grover and wife Adeline Grover. He is survived by his nieces Lea Walker and Maureen Halverson; nephews Doug Walker and Jack Walker all of California; his brother Leslie Grover and niece Crystal Roberts of Washington.

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

CHURCH GUIDE Your Mark ar d Calen

2013 Christmas Concert Luke 2:10-11

“Joy to the World” Friday, Dec. 6th at 7 p.m.

Tonasket Bible Church (6th & Whitcomb)

For more information call 509-486-8888

OROVILLE

CHESAW

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 5:30 p.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Monuments & Bronze

CEMETERY MARKERS

See Us First for Greater Savings BUILD A LASTING TRIBUTE TO YOUR LOVED ONE

~ 62 years of serving you ~ Where pride in craftsmanship still exist today!

Sales Representative Joy Lawson

1-509-476-2279 OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 888-838-3000

k Thin ! n Gree

Did you know? We use... Soy Ink  Recycled Paper Excess paper recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844  509-476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 21, 2013  

November 21, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 21, 2013  

November 21, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune