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NOVEMBER 13-19, 2013 I VOLUME 38 I NUMBER 46

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM I FREE

BOEING’S 777XTORTION PAGE 7 | SOME CREEP WITH A CAMERA ON CAPITOL HILL PAGE 25

GOING TO POT

This week, businesses will vie for an opportunity to enter the legal marijuana market. These are their stories.

BY NINA SHAPIRO


Charles Lloyd photo by Dorothy Darr

Now through November 17

THIS WEEK’S CONCERTS: Thursday, November 14 emP museum: LeveL 3, 8Pm

The Gerald Clayton, Ben Williams, Kendrick Scott Trio

Pianist Gerald Clayton and bassist Ben Williams perform in a trio setting with the sensational drummer Kendrick Scott—all leaders in a new generation of jazz. A combo of Seattle High School Jazz All-Stars will workshop with the artists and open the concert. (Presented in collaboration with Icons Among Us: Jazz in the Present Tense with support from The Argus Fund.) FrIday, November 15 royaL room, PaNeL dIscussIoN aT 6:30, musIc aT 8Pm

Industrial Revelation / Overton Berry

Music and discussion relating to Seattle’s black music legacy, from the Local 493 veteran pianist Overton Berry (in performance with Evan Flory-Barnes) to the hard-hitting Industrial Revelation, with insights gathered by History Link on Seattle’s segregated Musician’s Unions 76 and 493. saTurday, November 16 royaL room, 7Pm

Peter Brötzmann & Paal Nilssen-Love

Generating as much power as a Northwest hydroelectric dam, the torrential German saxophonist and Norwegian drummer represent two generations of jazz-infused free improvisation. suNday, November 17 TuLa’s, 7:30Pm

McTuff

Closing night with a classic Hammond organ group as tough as its name implies. suNday, November 17 ToWN haLL seaTTLe, 8Pm

Charles Lloyd and Friends w/ Bill Frisell

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 13 — 19, 2013

The venerable saxophonist has performed breathtaking concerts here in Seattle and around the globe, and has built a legacy of some of the most compelling recordings in jazz. This promises to be a blissful finale to Earshot 25, as our favorite guitarist lends his boundless talents to a quartet that includes bassist Reuben Rogers and drummer Eric Harland.

2

Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra and Northwest Chamber Chorus w/ Special Guest Vocalists Everett Greene & Nichol Eskridge

DUKE ELLINGTON’S SACRED MUSIC Saturday, December 28, 7:30pm Town Hall Seattle 1119 Eighth Ave, Seattle, WA TICKETS AVAILABLE AT WWW.BROWNPAPERTICKETS.COM OR CALL 1-800-838-3006


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Tim Emmett in Iceland/ Photo: Keith Ladzinski

Mountain Hardwear presents an evening with

Tim Emmett/ Wednesday, November 20⁄ 7PM

Tim Emmett is an elite rock and ice climber, published author, popular international speaker and accomplished wingsuit pilot. In February 2012, he made a first ascent of ‘Spray On...Top!’ at British Columbia’s Helmcken Falls, dubbed as ‘the hardest ice climbing route in the world’. His recent trips have taken him to Iceland, Pakistan and Canada, in search of new routes, ice and base jumping exit points and a new taste of adrenaline.

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inside»   November 13–19, 2013 VOLUME 38 | NUMBER 46

» SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

»8

news&comment 6 8

MAP QUEST

Will Seattle’s newly drawn city council districts give voters a voice? Plus: Olympia bends over for Boeing. Again.

THE I-502 BOOM

BY NINA SHAPIRO | Meet a few of the pioneering entrepreneurs—from lab scientists to baking grandmas— on the front lines of turning legal pot into burgeoning businesses.

food&drink 21 ’SHROOM SERVICE

BY NICOLE SPRINKLE | A fungi hunt

on Whidbey Island. 21 | FOOD NEWS 21 | TEMPERATURE CHECK 23 | THE BAR CODE

arts&culture 25 SURVEILLED THREATS

BY DAVE LAKE | Who is this guy

sticking a video camera in your face?

25 ARTS

25 | THE PICK LIST 27 | OPENING NIGHTS | A junkie’s 28 | PERFORMANCE/EAR SUPPLY

31 FILM

OPENING THIS WEEK | Shia LaBeouf

in Romania, Daniel Radcliffe as Allen Ginsberg, and Naomi Watts on minimum wage.

33 MUSIC

RA Scion’s personal revolution could be the rap album of the year. Also: A Fruit Bats farewell, a showcase of guitar picking, and more. 33 | SEVEN NIGHTS 37 | CD REVIEWS

odds&ends 38 | CLASSIFIEDS

»cover credits

PHOTO OF ALEX COOLEY BY PETER KOVAL

Editor-in-Chief Mark Baumgarten EDITORIAL Managing Editor in Charge of News Daniel Person

50 Breweries pouring more than 150 beers of the season. Friday, December 6th Saturday, December 7th 5:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Senior Editor Nina Shapiro Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle Arts Editor Brian Miller Entertainment Editor Gwendolyn Elliott

Session #1 Noon-4:00pm Session #2 5:30pm-9:30pm

NEW VENUE!

Hangar 30 at Warren G. Magnuson Park 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle

Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert Staff Writers Ellis E. Conklin, Matt Driscoll, Kelton Sears Editorial Intern Alicia Price Contributing Writers Rick Anderson, Sean Axmaker, Sara Billups, Steve Elliott, Margaret Friedman, Zach Geballe, Andrew Gospe, Megan Hill, Robert Horton, Sara D. Jones, Isaac Kaplan-Woolner, Seth Kolloen, Sandra Kurtz, Dave Lake, Beth Maxey, Duff McKagan, Terra Clarke Olsen, Kevin Phinney, Keegan Prosser, Mark Rahner, Michael Stusser, Jacob Uitti

Ticket information at

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odyssey, and hive-mind dancing at PNB.

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news&comment What Did We Just Do?

hoods in this district are more than 60 percent minority, according to a census breakdown; some are as high as 87 and 91 percent. (For comparison, north Seattle’s District 5 neighborhoods average 20–40 percent persons of color.) According to Chris Stearns, the former head of Seattle’s Human Rights Commission, history hasn’t always been kind to minorities when it comes to the creation of electoral districts; elections can be influenced by the lines mapmakers draw, and minority voices can be silenced. “That’s really what the concern is rooted in,” says Stearns, who’s pushing for a study of just what Seattle has gotten itself into with its new districts. “It isn’t that [Charter Amendment 19 supporters] did something intentional,” he says, “it’s just, what if . . . there’s an unintentional outcome that could be bad for [people of color]?”

The little-watched Charter Amendment 19, easily approved by voters, tears up the way Seattle is governed, for better or worse. BY MATT DRISCOLL

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Will the new districts give voters a voice —or box them in?

TIM SILBAUGH

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 13 — 19, 2013

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n a clear day, heading south on Aurora from Acme Auto Electric, you can see the downtown skyline. With six lanes of traffic buzzing by and a slew of sleazy motels, prostitutes, and usedcar dealerships between here and there, it feels like a different city from the one that Amazon, the Space Needle, and City Hall call home. Curtis Gehrke’s family opened Acme Auto Electric in 1944, and on a sunny autumn afternoon his “retired” dad still helps behind the counter. Not counting a cat named Chica who gets feisty if you don’t pet her behind the ears and a miniature statue of James Brown by the cash register, Acme Auto Electric has five employees—three of them family members. Over the years, according to Gehrke, city government has kept its eye on downtown while ignoring the issues he confronts as a local business owner on a daily basis—big issues like crime, public safety, and where to build a new police station, and smaller issues like parking and storm-water drainage. Two years ago, he says, a purse-snatcher busted into his waiting room and made off with an elderly woman’s handbag. In the past he’s shot video of the nefarious drug and prostitution activity at the bus stop across the street and shown the footage to city officials, to little avail. “I think the city does what it wants to do,” Gehrke says of the perceived neglect. “I feel like they don’t care or listen to the small people.” It’s here, along the city’s most infamous thoroughfare—and largely from the pocketbook of one woman—that Charter Amendment 19 and Seattle’s new city council districts were born. The amendment, which in many ways flew under the radar this election season, will split the city into seven council districts, each of which will send a councilmember to City Hall, starting with the 2015 elections. Another two members will be elected at large, as all members now are. From the viewpoint of Faye Garneau, the longtime executive director of the Aurora Merchants Association who ponied up $265,000 of her own money for the district elections campaign, and business owners like Gehrke, the new districts are a chance to get the voice in council chambers that their piece of north Seattle has been lacking far too long. Currently, no city council member calls Seattle’s new District 5— shown in pink on the map—home. With broad bipartisan backing—from Garneau, who voted for Mitt Romney, to Mayor Mike McGinn, who did not, to the Trotskyquoting socialist city council candidate Kshama Sawant—Charter Amendment 19 was over-

whelmingly passed by Seattle voters last week. Proponents of the new plan say it’ll provide a fair and equal representation on the council that the at-large system couldn’t. It’ll bring smaller names back into the political process, they argue, and make doorbelling and handshaking as important as big-money backing and citywide name recognition. But in Seattle’s ethnically diverse southeast corner, far from Aurora’s cheap hotels and struggling family-owned businesses, some aren’t so sure

about the new districts. These are also the voices of “small people.” Just as the businesses and residents of north Seattle will have one council seat to call their own, so too will southeast Seattle— effectively lumping the bulk of the Emerald City’s Black, Latino, and Asian voters into a single district. According to 2010 census estimates, 33.7 percent of Seattle residents are people of color. By and large, they live south of Yesler Way—which happens to be the northernmost boundary of the newly created District 2 (shown in red on the map). The majority of neighbor-

The man responsible for Seattle’s new districts map is Richard Morrill, a retired geography professor from the University of Washington. The nearly 80-year-old Morrill is no stranger to his craft. He served as the Special Master to the federal court-ordered redistricting of Washington state in 1972, and advised the state of Mississippi on its own redistricting efforts for racial fairness from 1977 to 1983—just two highlights in a geography career that has spanned half a century. Pressed on the fairness of his map, Morrill is unflinching. “It’s very fair,” he says. Typically, if you wanted to disenfranchise a minority, you would draw the district lines to divide the group, to prevent it from voting as a single politically effective bloc. “I was very careful not to break up any ethnic populations,” Morrill says. “I think the right minority could win in any of the districts.” Along with making sure all districts were within 1 percent of each other in overall population and keeping traditional neighborhoods intact, Morrill says achieving racial fairness was his top priority. There’s no question that Seattle’s new districts do not break up the city’s ethnic strongholds. The only potential problem: Seattle only has one of them. As Stearns sees it, a city with a minority population of 33 percent should have more than one “guaranteed” spot on the council representing these voices. He wonders if a more creative map could have created two districts with ethnic majorities, noting that Morrill’s rigid map, which boxes in Seattle’s southeast district, “looks like something drawn on a tic-tac-toe board.” City Councilman Bruce Harrell, the current council’s only minority and a resident of District 2, says there was an upside for minorities in the old system. “I always saw [minorities] as a necessary voting bloc,” says Harrell. “All [candidates] had to be accountable to that bloc. . . . Now that dynamic goes away.” Asked point-blank whether the new district map is fair, Harrell takes a long pause. “I don’t know. I just don’t know,” he says finally. “It is what it is now.” E

mdriscoll@seattleweekly.com

THE WEEKLY BRIEFING: What’s going on at seattleweekly.com: As Mayor Mike McGinn conceded (“Government is like a shoe—you don’t notice it until it doesn’t fit”), a King County Metro announced that at the current funding rate, it will have to eliminate or reduce service on 80 dead man in Aberdeen was holding on to a slim lead in Council Ward 5 Coming off their defeat at the polls, GMO foes are taking aim at a Canadian apple that doesn’t bruise Obamacare got its first rock-star spokesman, percent of its bus routes by next June A new video game promises to let you burn down the Space Needle Sportsball argues why the Sounders should keep Schmid Chris Walla from Death Cab for Cutie

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Inslee, Boeing, and the 777Xtortion

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went for the newest demand knowing full well ncircled by smiling legislators and that Boeing deceived the government after the a gaggle of business leaders at his first giveaway. Legislators even added language June 2003 bill-signing ceremony in to nullify exemptions should Boeing pull another Olympia, Gov. Gary Locke moved his Carolina. What part of “You can’t legislate pen over paper, turning legislation into law and morality” don’t they understand? public money into corporate welfare. It was the Boeing’s South Carolina strategy provides right thing to do, the governor said. Either give another weapon to use on Washington: its the Boeing Company a $3 billion tax break or non-union operations in North Charleston. The watch the threat of outsourcing local jobs to that far-away aerospace plant and other non-union locales has emboldindustry BY RICK ANDERSON ened Boeing’s bargaining position here (even fly away. if Inslee’s office doesn’t see the harm: “They are He didn’t mention that the fix was in—that the “independent” consulting company he’d hired just diversifying,” says the governor’s aerospace for $715,000 to study the giveaway was also Boe- guy, Alex Pietsch). Workers this week are set to vote on a “piece of crap” offer, as the Machining’s paid corporate consultant, and would itself ists Union’s local leader calls Boeing’s proposal, benefit from the tax break. And he professed to which seeks to shift health-care costs to employtrust the word of a company with a scarred hisees and replace their longtime pension with a tory of criminal bribery and contractual fraud, savings plan. One tortured Boeing worker, faced confident Boeing would live up to its promise of making Puget Sound the center of its new 787 Dreamliner assembly operation. By 2005, it was Locke who’d flown away, leaving office after his second term as Boeing began outsourcing jobs, including building wings in Japan. By 2009, when Locke landed in D.C. to become Barack Obama’s Commerce Secretary, catering to Boeing’s needs around the world, the Lazy B was opening a second 787 production line—in South Carolina, where it garnered another $1 In 2003, lawmakers and Gov. Gary Locke gave Boeing a billion in tax incentives. Last week it was governor- $3 billion, 20-year tax break. Ten years later, Boeing insists in-training Jay Inslee offering that’s not enough. with this career Sophie’s Choice, told the Times’ three times as much to once again keep Boeing Dominic Gates: “It’s like I’m smiling while I’m from flying away. Despite its annual $85 bilbeing kicked in the balls. But it’s better than lion in revenue and $4 billion profit, the needy being decapitated.” aerospace giant insisted that Locke’s $3 billion, It’s a groinal sensation taxpayers might be 20-year tax break had to be replaced by Inslee’s experiencing as well. Just as nobody wanted to $9 billion, 27-year tax break, or it would be talk about the 2003 fix, no one seemingly wanted forced to make another Carolina-style move. to discuss the possibility that this tax break was Over the weekend, the legislature snapped a fraud. Boeing had demanded that both the to attention and doled out the huge exemption. legislature and the machinists concede to their Inslee and lawmakers then dissolved into an demands, and that’s how Inslee saw it. But did orgy of backslapping and self-congratulation. the company mislead the governor, or did the To the governor, it wasn’t largesse he was giving away to a Fortune 500 behemoth, it was process. cheerleading Inslee, trailed by his legislative pep squad, choose not to interpret the fine print, Lawmakers, “in very short order,” he said, “did since union ratification of the contract alone a great job producing a great product.” The seemed to assure the new plane would be built legislature had itself become a production line, here? As Boeing’s letter of understanding to the assembling CARE packages for America’s #1 union states, “the Company,” in return for ratifiplane maker. cation, “agrees to locate the 777X wing fabricaAnd Boeing was delighted to take delivery. tion and assembly, and the final assembly of the Taxes—not paying them—is part of the com777X in Puget Sound.” pany’s capital strategy. It regularly doesn’t pay Nine billion dollars and a kick in the balls any corporate income tax, and in addition to the later, “This is a great day for everyone in Wash$9 billion it now won’t be paying Washington ington,” Inslee said. “Winning the 777X will state, it gets an estimated $1 billion in other state secure tens of thousands of jobs and yield huge tax incentives, thanks to years of heavy lobbyeconomic benefits for generations to come.” It ing, campaign donations, and sustained threats was, almost word for word, pure Gary Locke— to pack up and move. Thus, you can’t blame the wherever he might be. E conspiring corporate minds at Boeing for taking another plane hostage—this time the 777X, as randerson@seattleweekly.com in Xtortion. Their demand that taxpayers pay a Journalist and author Rick Anderson writes about ransom or their plane disappears worked before. crime, money, and politics, which tend to be the same And look who they’re dealing with: The state thing.

SEATTLELAND

AP

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 13 — 19, 2013

City of Seattle

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GOING POT TO

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 13 — 19, 2013

Solstice’s Alex Cooley in his company’s SoDo warehouse.

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A grandmother, a Ph.D., and a multimillionaire are among the people scrambling to get business in order as the I-502 starting gate finally opens.

BY NINA SHAPIRO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER KOVAL

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or people who want to start a legal marijuana business, if it’s not now or never, it’s something close to it. On Monday, Nov. 18, the state Liquor Control Board will open a 30-day window for applicants seeking a license to produce, process, or sell marijuana. Some time later—the board hasn’t announced exactly when—it will begin to accredit marijuana testing laboratories. The beginning has finally come for the nuts-and-bolts implementation of Initiative 502, passed by voters last November and making Washington one of only two states, with Colorado, to legalize recreational marijuana. It’s a historic occasion that many have likened to the end of Prohibition. But the dawn of what Fortune has called “Marijuana Inc.” has some unique twists and turns. For one thing, Washington’s would-be entrepreneurs get this one shot at a license—perhaps their only shot ever. While there is a chance the LCB might open another window at some point, spokesperson Brian Smith allows, “There are no guarantees.” “This is not like any other business market,” he explains. He elaborates that LCB members deemed the 30-day period a way to limit the number of pot businesses in the state, which they thought necessary to protect public safety and avoid the wrath of the feds. “We’re walking a fine line here,” he says. Hence the current frenzy of entrepreneurial activity. Aspiring business owners have pored over the 40 pages of regulations approved by the LCB last month, looking for angles and sometimes cursing restrictions.The cap on retail licenses—334 across the state, 21 in Seattle—looms large. So does the three-license limit for any one individual or business, which the LCB has said is meant to prevent big-money companies from swooping in and dominating the market. » CONTINUED ON PAGE 10


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GOINGTOPOT » FROM PAGE 8

In the days leading to the application window, the prospective business owners are preoccupied with financing, branding, and, especially, real estate. Applicants must submit an address where their business will be located. Already a difficult task for any business, it is made harder by a myriad of marijuana-specific obstacles. To avoid a backlash from the federal government, which still considers marijuana an illicit substance, the state has adopted restrictions important to the feds. Applicants cannot declare an intention to set up shop within 1,000 feet of schools, parks, libraries, or other facilities frequented by children. And then there are local zoning codes and the wariness of landlords to consider. Still, some prospective sellers have grand plans. Others are aiming for a niche market. A good number have moved here from across the country—or in one case, the world—to get in on the industry’s ground floor. Many are homegrown. They are in their 20s, 30s, 40s, and 50s. One is a Ph.D., another a grandmother, yet another a self-proclaimed “multimillionaire.” Here are the stories of four businesses trying to overcome those obstacles, legitimize marijuana, and maybe at the same time make a fortune.

Shy Sadis and Derek Anderson take a break from their real-estate hunt.

Shy Sadis and Derek Anderson

THE JOINT

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 13 — 19, 2013

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t’s a little more than three weeks before the licensing window opens when Shy Sadis and Derek Anderson drive up to a dowdy two-story building on a dead-end commercial road in Kirkland. “I can tell you right now, it’s not my favorite spot,” says Anderson, a 33-year-old with a salesman’s fast-talking patter and casual business attire: gray slacks, a button-down shirt, and leather shoes. “It’s got no curb appeal,” adds the blunter Sadis, 40, dressed in jeans adorned with a belt buckle bearing the logo of the medical-marijuana dispensary that he and Anderson founded four years ago, and now hope to convert into a chain of 502 retail stores. “The Joint,” the buckle says, with a pot leaf filling in the “o.” On the other hand, the building is near I-405, and it’s one of the few spots in Kirkland that meets the 1,000-foot rule. Sadis stays behind to talk on his cell phone about other prospects while Anderson enters the building through the computer business that occupies the bottom floor. “I’m looking for the owner,” he tells the blonde, middle-aged woman behind the counter. “That’s me,” she says. He says he’s looking for a location to house his business. “What kind of business are you in?” she asks. “We’re gearing up to start a 502 business,” he says brightly. “OK,” she says noncommittally. But as Anderson keeps talking—working in that he was “born and raised” in Kirkland and that he and Sadis “run their business like a business”—the owner and her husband, who wanders over, seem supportive. “I just read this morning that 54 percent of Americans support legalizing marijuana,” she says. Her husband adds that he heard there’s a “former Microsoft executive trying to get into the business”—a reference to Jamen Shively, the

self-proclaimed “dot-bong” entrepreneur whose grandiose plans, albeit clouded by behind-thescenes shakeups, have garnered national press. (See “Jamen Shively’s Green Rush,” SW, Oct. 9.) Sadis, who has since entered, scoffs. The publicity reaped by Shively, whom he considers an opportunistic newbie, is a sore point with him. “We’re the pioneers,” he says. But he doesn’t argue with the couple’s general drift. Sadis and Anderson are primarily interested in leasing, though the owners reveal that they’ve been trying to sell the building for years. They are well aware of its sudden desirability to 502 entrepreneurs, a flurry of whom have already come by. “They were very interested,” the husband says of one group. “Here’s our main concern,” says the woman, whose next words explain why she and her husband ask not to be identified in this story. “If for some reason the feds come against this, the building could be confiscated.” Anderson jumps in to relate that the Department of Justice released a statement in August indicating that it would not move against Washington and Colorado as long as they abide by certain guidelines. The couple nods. They’ve heard about that. The husband enthusiastically takes the entrepreneurs on a tour of the place, pointing out attributes like cinder-block walls that he says even a sledgehammer couldn’t pierce. After the tour, the wife reiterates: “Look, we’re getting close to retirement age. We don’t want to have our assets seized.” But she and her husband agree to consider an offer. The entrepreneurs say they’ll be in touch. Whether or not this building works out, Anderson and Sadis are prepared to move ahead. They have already secured three locations where

they can operate 502 businesses, in Tacoma, Snohomish, and Bellingham. They also have two medical-marijuana dispensaries in Seattle, in the U District and Capitol Hill, but those won’t meet state regulations for 502 shops. In fact, those dispensaries will likely have to close. In late October, a state working group proposed regulations for the medical-marijuana industry that would funnel all legal pot sales through 502 stores. Yet Sadis and Anderson don’t want to give up the Seattle market. So they continue to look for sites in the city and nearby. The Bellingham location is the one that excites Sadis, and it has nothing to do with market potential. Last year, Bellingham authorities charged him with marijuana distribution after a raid on a Joint dispensary in that city. (Anderson was not charged because his name was not on the paperwork; Sadis says his own ownership stake in the business is much larger.) Court records say that the raid followed undercover buys at The Joint in which detectives were asked to show proof of authorization by a health-care provider, making the charges somewhat puzzling. However, the documents also note that Sadis acquiesced when one detective offered to sell him pot, which may or may not be illegal depending on your interpretation of the law. In any case, the cops later came looking for him, first at his home in Mill Creek, then at his son’s baseball game. Tipped off by his girlfriend, Sadis says, he left the game and drove to Bellingham to surrender in court. Sadis never did any jail time and worked out a “stipulated order of continuance” whereby the case will be dismissed in three years if he refrains from future felony marijuana crimes in Whatcom County. The deal does not bar him from opening

a 502 store, since that is legal. “It’s going to be super-sweet the day I open a 502 location [in Bellingham] and shove it in their ass,” Sadis says. Sadis’ ambitions stretch beyond Bellingham, and even beyond the state. “The Joint,” he says. “It’s super-catchy. I can take that brand anywhere.” He says he’s already registered businesses under that name in Nevada and Illinois, in preparation for what he hopes will be legalization efforts in those states, and has bought the rights to the urls “thejointllc.com” and “thejointcoop. com.” (Thejoint.com has already been snapped up, he explains, by a chiropractor.) He and Anderson are also discussing ways to get around this state’s three-license limit. They’re mulling a franchise-type operation, whereby friends, family members, and acquaintances would apply for licenses. LCB spokesperson Smith says “it would be very difficult” to establish such an operation because of rules that require license applicants to declare “true parties of interest,” who are then held to the three-license limit. One suspects, though, that if there’s a loophole, Sadis and Anderson will find it. The two—both of whom consume marijuana for medical purposes, Anderson for knee injuries related to sporting accidents, Sadis for migraines—met while working in the real-estate industry. Anderson flipped houses before getting “punched in the head by the economy,” he relates. Sadis, luckier, says he became a multimillionaire by buying foreclosed properties and apartment buildings. In their new line of work, they practice charity. They have made donations to the unions of King County police and Seattle firefighters. (Regarding people who want to give money, “We don’t discriminate,” says the police union’s Bob Casey.) They also participate in the annual Toys for Kids drive hosted by Mariners’ broadcaster Rick Rizzs. (Donate a toy, get a free gram of pot.) Yet they also have a keen sense of the bottom line. “I’m an entrepreneur,” Sadis stresses. “I’ll sell shit if it makes me money.”

Cooley examines his crop.

Alex Cooley

SOLSTICE

“T

his is the little thing that makes us so special,” says Alex Cooley. He’s referring to a document he’s just placed on a wooden conference table in his spare but chic office space on the first floor of a renovated 1927 SoDo warehouse. The prized possession is a certificate of occupancy from Seattle’s Department of Planning and Development, which gives Cooley the right to grow marijuana on the premises.


DPD issued the certificate in March—well in advance of the state’s issuance of 502 licenses and the city’s establishment of zoning regulations specific to the cannabis industry, which it did in October. Cooley—a self-assured 28-year-old with a clean-cut look alloyed by lobe-stretching disc earrings and finger tattoos that on one hand spell LOVE and on the other LIFE—wanted to set up shop sooner than that. And he wanted to do so with the city’s blessing. So, he says, “We went through the front door of the city of Seattle.” His pitch to DPD, he relates, was “Let us be the example.” “It was clear he wanted to do everything right,” recalls Brennon Staley, the DPD’s project manager for marijuana zoning regulations. Although the city didn’t have such regulations on the books yet, it did have them for something called “vertical farming.” No one was quite sure what that was since nobody had ever applied for such a permit, but it was intended to promote urban farming that maximized building space. Cooley, Staley says, “made a compelling argument” that his plan for a marijuana production facility fit the bill. And so Cooley’s company, Solstice, began growing pot in the SoDo space and selling his yield to medical-marijuana dispensaries. He is now avidly pursuing the recreational market. In fact, he intends to grow his business exponentially. Solstice is the company that Mark Kleiman, the UCLA professor who has served as the state’s

Warning of a production shortage in the first year of 502 implementation, Kleiman noted that there was only one already-permitted producer that Seattle could count on.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

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top pot consultant, referred to at an August Seattle City Council briefing. Warning of a production shortage in the first year of 502 implementation— given the time it takes to get a marijuana business approved through state and local authorities and then actually grow the plant—Kleiman noted that there was only one already-permitted producer that Seattle could count on. Solstice’s position has come at considerable cost. As Cooley observes, “It’s expensive being legitimate.” He says he and his two partners planned to spend $80,000 to bring his 9,000-square-foot space up to code: putting in insulation, upgrading the sprinkler system. Instead, the work ate up a third of a million dollars. “We almost went bankrupt,” Cooley says. They averted that fate, he says, by taking small salaries, reaching into their personal savings, and putting all the money they earned back into the company. Solstice is now a busy and sprawling operation, with 12 employees occupying three floors, including a mezzanine break room boasting a ping-pong table. The hub of the company, though, is its subterranean level, which devolves into a warren of rooms accessible only by key. As Cooley heads downstairs to give a tour, the sweetly cloying odor of pot becomes detectable, albeit not overpoweringly so due to the carbon filters the company has installed. Stop one is a garage-sized room where five workers—all men

in their 20s or early 30s, who found their way to Solstice through word-of-mouth or ads the company has placed on Craigslist and Monster. com–are breaking down plants into bud-heavy branches and hanging them on racks where they will dry for five to seven days. “See how few leaves there are, how swollen the bud is?” Cooley asks, holding up one such branch. Those qualities, aesthetically pleasing to buyers and thought to increase potency, are part of what allows the entrepreneur to sell his product as “premium” cannabis. Temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide exposure are all factors Solstice plays with to achieve them, and to prevent mold and other hazards. We next go to what Cooley calls a “clean room pass-through,” a changing area where we don white lab coats before heading into the “donor room.” There, cuttings from other plants grow on racks until they’re big enough to make it into the “vegetative room.” They’ll eventually get transferred to yet another room reserved for plants that are flowering. It takes between four and a half months and a year for a cutting to reach this stage. Cooley points out plants of the “tangelo” and “blueberry cheesecake” strains, which are supposed to smell like their namesakes. (The tangelo really does, the blueberry cheesecake not so much.) Then it’s back upstairs to the “safe room,” where processed buds and joints are kept under lock and key. “As you can see, there’s very little in here,” Cooley says, opening the safe to reveal only a few vials. That’s because Solstice sells out almost immediately to the 15 dispensaries he supplies, including the Northwest Patient Resource Center, which is aligned with exMicrosoftie Jamen Shively. Dozens more want to buy his marijuana, but, he says, “We can’t keep up.” Cooley, who went into the marijuana business after a hiring freeze prevented him from finding a teaching job in Seattle, and who cultivates a progressive corporate image as carefully as he does his crops, says he’s also choosy about whom he sells to. “Our ideologies have to align,” he maintains. Solstice’s ideology, according to Cooley, is environmentally conscious, pro–Fair Trade, and LGBT-friendly, although he admits a dispensary’s policy on, say, gay rights doesn’t always come up. Solstice is now planning a major expansion as the recreational market comes online. He is applying for three producer and three processor licenses. If the company gets all of those, it could have six separate facilities in addition to the SoDo operation. Despite its unique status as a city-approved, 502-ready facility, Cooley says he might reserve it for the medical market, a possibility he is entertaining due to the intricate details of state regulations. Most notably, the LCB is stipulating that producers and processors cannot work with marijuana plants they already have. Rather, to preserve the integrity of a “traceability” software system that will keep track of pot products from “start to sale,” entrepreneurs must bring new seeds and starter plants onsite within 15 days of starting operations under a state license. “We’d have to close down for a time,” Cooley says. “It would cost us a half-million to a million dollars to transition. We might as well take that money and build another facility.” On the downside, if the legislature decides to do away with dispensaries, the SoDo facility would be left without a clientele. The company is weighing its options and studying what Cooley says is a 1,000-page spreadsheet of data analyzing

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marijuana growing conditions around the state. Meanwhile, it is wrapping up a private offering to raise funds for a build-out. He won’t say how much money Solstice is seeking, but discloses that a planned second offering, after the company gets licensees and has more value, will go after a larger amount. Cooley keeps his cards close to his vest. For many months, he avoided interviews with the press, and when we first met, in late summer, he didn’t let on that he was likely to septuple the size of his operation. More, obviously, will become evident in time. “We’ve got a one-year, three-year, and fiveyear plan,” he says.

Molly Poiset

M

olly Poiset was learning how to make pastries at a Cordon Bleu school in Paris when I-502 passed. The school was a career turn for Poiset, who had spent many years as an interior designer for wealthy clients in the Colorado ski resort town of Telluride. Among the many reasons it was an interesting move was that Poiset has celiac disease, which prevents her from eating gluten. She says she wanted to learn to cook pastries the French way so she could adjust the recipes to exclude flour.

well-educated, professional, conservative people. People, that is, like her daughter. Three years ago, her daughter became severely ill with leukemia. Poiset learned, though a family support group she joined, that marijuana might help. But, she says, “the subject couldn’t be broached.” She felt sure that her daughter would never consider pot. Following a stem-cell transplant, her daughter is doing much better, but Poiset is continuing her mission to create cannabis fare so enticing that her daughter and others like her would try it. That, Poiset believes, makes her stand out in the industry. “Right now, anybody else who’s in the business of what we call ‘medibles’ are doing Rice Krispie treats, suckers, gummy bears,” she says. “They’ll take fortune cookies and dip it in chocolate that’s got some cannabis and call it dessert.” The question she faced while in Paris was where she should relocate to. Despite hailing from Colorado, she quickly realized that Washington was the place to be. Colorado is giving its first recreational marijuana licenses to existing medical operations, while Washington’s process is open to all comers. Poiset found a condo in an old Queen Anne high school-turned-condominium complex that reminds her of Paris, with its stately architecture, urban feel, and courtyard fountain decorated by sculpted lions. She turned the living-room space into an expanded kitchen, lining shelves against one wall with French-style pots and pans. “They’re very different. They have no bottoms!” she says, holding up one circular metal pan in which you can allegedly bake a cake.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 13 — 19, 2013

Molly Poiset in her home kitchen.

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When Washington and Colorado legalized recreational marijuana, she realized she could tinker with the recipes in yet another way. Her idea: to create high-end, French-inspired, beautifully decorated and packaged pastries infused with marijuana. “A lot of people who know me would say, ‘What the . . . ?’ They would not see it coming,” says Poiset, a petite 58-year-old grandmother who prefers wine to pot. But she had a clientele in mind that she cared very much about:

She filled another wall with two clocks, one set to Seattle time and one to Paris time, and giant blackboards, on which she writes recipes that she tries out on the wooden table in the center of the room. To use in her creations, she grows marijuana in a pot, as she does lavender and rosemary. “I’m on this huge learning curve,” she says one late August day at the table in her kitchen. She is dressed in an elegant long blouse cinched with a

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 15


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belt over white pants. Opera music is playing in the background. She says she’s still experimenting with recipes—although she tastes her creations only before she infuses them with marijuana, not after. “It’s not my thing,” she says of pot, and anyway she doesn’t want to get “baked” while she’s working. For that pleasure, she employs experienced pot users as taste-testers. Meanwhile, she is trying to get up to speed on LCB rules, the contacts she should know in the industry, and the Seattle neighborhoods where she might locate her business. The state does not give her the option of operating out of her home. By early November, she still hasn’t found a place. Agents and landlords, desperate to prove their liberal credentials, will say things like “We voted for Obama,” Poiset says. And then they’ll hang up on her. But she’s confident that some leads will come through. In the meantime, her plans are firming up. She knows she’s applying for a producer as well as a processor license. “I need to be in control of the supply chain,” she says, explaining that she wants to cultivate marijuana strains that are known for medical rather than psychoactive properties. She won’t be able to market her goods with medicinal claims; that’s forbidden by state rules. But she notes that the LCB will allow entrepreneurs to run a website about the medical side of pot as long as it is unconnected to their businesses. Producers and processors cannot get retail licenses, so Poiset will have to sell her pastries to the public through other outlets—all 21 of them, she notes with a wry laugh, referring to the maximum number of stores allowed in Seattle. She says she won’t be able to go much further afield to reach more stores because of yet more rules that prohibit using delivery people outside of one’s business. In September, Poiset earned an accolade that should help her market herself. Every year, the

magazine High Times hosts a “Cannabis Cup” awards ceremony in Seattle, with categories like “Best Sativa” (referring to one type of marijuana plant), “Best Concentrate,” and “Best Edible.” In this last category, Poiset entered a cannabisinfused white-chocolate truffle laced with frankincense and edible gold. She says she wasn’t expecting a win, in part because of her outsider status in the industry, which was reinforced at the event, held in a Fremont banquet hall. “Everyone looked very young and had many tattoos,” she recalls. She says her contrasting presence made her think of the Sesame Street song “One of These Things (Is Not Like the Others).” When the winners were announced, she recalls, “I was way, way in the back.” So when she heard she won second place for her truffle, she had to elbow her way to the front, repeating “Excuse me, excuse me.” She was thrilled.

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Sir/ Madam, I am a French student in biological engineering at the University of Technology of Compiègne. As part of my studies I am looking for a six-month internship as an engineering assistant. I have attached my CV.

S

o begins an e-mail from a French native to Analytical 360, which occupies a marijuana-industry niche that has emerged in the past couple of years. The company is a laboratory that tests marijuana, both for potency and for pathogens like mold. Showing me the French student’s e-mail on his computer in Analytical’s Wallingford office, COO Ed Stremlow chuckles. He’s grown used to such inquiries. He gets so many that he routinely turns people away. And of those he hires, he says, “I haven’t had an intern yet that didn’t want a job here.” Take Virginia Webber, a Bastyr University graduate who planned to go into quality-control

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 17

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also enthusiastic about the idea—as were three Seattle-based friends of theirs, including Stremlow, who were itching to try something new with their careers. “You hear horror stories of patients who have eaten something [infused with cannabis] and gotten sick or slept for the whole day,” says Stremlow, a former real-estate appraiser. So with the backing of their friends, Oliver and Taubner in 2011 started a marijuana testing lab in their Montana basement, devoting their spare time to the endeavor. They and their three cofounders eventually moved the business to Seattle to cater to the thriving medical-marijuana market here. Other than Northwest Botanical Analysis, founded around the same time, there were no other marijuana testing labs here at the time. The Stone Way space Analytical moved into is compact. A small lobby, decorated with Kandinsky prints, leads to a couple of back rooms. There, marijuana samples are photographed with a microscope that scans images into a computer, and then tested. Reece explains how a machine called a vortexer spins the samples really fast to facilitate the extracting of cannabinoids, marijuana’s active compounds. Then they can be analyzed with hulking equipment, which resemble several fax machines piled atop each other and utilize a method of quantifying compounds known as high-performance chromatography. The results do not always please customers. On this August day, a representative of a California-based company that makes a marijuana-infused soda comes in to discuss the disturbingly low potency Analytical’s tests have revealed. “He’s getting 18 milligrams of THC,” Stremlow explains, referring to pot’s psychoactive compound. “He was expecting 72.”

GOINGTOPOT » FROM PAGE 15

testing on herbs until she went into a dispensary and saw “budtenders” picking up marijuana with their hands—“without even using something like chopsticks,” she says. “I realized how much the movement needs education.” She started as an intern and is now Analytical’s quality-control manager. Or Caitlin Reece, who last year got a B.S. in environmental science from Evergreen State University. Believing that marijuana is a safer medical treatment than many pharmaceutical drugs, she applied for an internship; was told by Stremlow that there was a long waiting list; sent an application anyway; and scored a position. Her attention to detail in repetitive tests singled her out as a “rock star,” Stremlow says, and she is now the company’s lab manager. A marijuana testing lab might seem an unusual career path for young scientists, but they are likely reassured by the presence of veterans. Most notable is Lara Taubner, a biochemistry Ph.D. who this fall quit her job as a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Montana, where she studied mad cow disease in a federally funded lab, to devote herself full time to being Analytical’s chief scientist. She says she was persuaded to leap from academia into the decidedly more turbulent world of marijuana after looking at the research on the drug’s medicinal effects. Frequently discussed is the drug’s usefulness as a cancer treatment. What’s more, she says, “there are definitely ideas out there that cannabis can help prevent diseases

Analytical 360’s staff tests for potency and pathogens.

like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, even diabetes.” She would like Analytical to someday move into medical research. Yet she also saw a more immediate need in the marijuana industry: making the drug safe and reliable. “That’s basically

a scientific endeavor,” she says. Her husband, Randall Oliver, who with a B.S. is less academically credentialed than his wife but has worked for many years testing compounds and designing processes for pharmaceutical companies, was

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 19

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The representative, wearing argyle socks and sunglasses perched on his head, huddles by a computer with Analytical CEO Brenton Dawber to go over the test results. Dawber speculates that the THC is getting stuck around the bottle tops because of insufficient use of an emulsifier. The soda rep takes it in. Stremlow, who joins them, tells the rep that he knows that the California company’s salespeople have been bad-mouthing the lab. If it doesn’t stop, Stremlow warns, he’s going to bring in all the lab’s clients—some of them dispensaries that buy the soda—and set the record straight. “I don’t think you’ll have many accounts left,” he says.

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SE ATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 13 — 19, 2013

The rep, seemingly convinced by Dawber’s presentation, diffuses the tension. “I’ll let my sales guys know to correct their verbiage,” he says. Afterward, Stremlow says that he’ll have to take an even harder line when the recreational market comes online. “I’m not going to tell them how to fix their product. They’re going to have to pay for that.” Analytical plans to seek state accreditation so it can operate under 502, which obliges the lab to make certain investments. For instance, it has had to buy expensive new equipment that can perform additional tests required of marijuana entrepreneurs, such as those looking for pesticides. The question now is where to put the equipment. Needing more space, the lab found a building in Georgetown with receptive owners. The owners’ bank, however, threatened to call in its loan if they rented to Analytical. For months, the owners have been trying to find a bank that will refinance the loan. Meanwhile, the equipment is sitting in storage. While banks have been squeamish, others have expressed interest in investing in Analytical. Over lunch at the Tutta Bella down the street from their Wallingford offices, Stremlow and Dawber recall how a couple of retired guys with money to spare took them to dinner at nearby Blue Star Cafe & Pub. “They had been in gray markets before,” Dawber says. “Strip joints, porn shops,” is Stremlow’s recollection. At the end of the evening, Analytical’s founders concluded the retirees were more interested in reminiscing about old times than about putting down hard cash. No matter. Stremlow says he and his cofounders are wary of giving up an ownership stake to investors, even though the lab’s biggest challenges may lay ahead. As the 502 era gets underway, Analytical founders are expecting a surge of new labs. “Only the strongest will survive,” Stremlow says. “We hope we’ll be one of them.” E

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food&drink

Fungi Run

FoodNews

BY SARA BILLUPS

Hunting for matsutake mushrooms with chef Shane Ryan. BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

A

Left: matsutakes fresh from the forest. Top right: lobsters. Bottom right: my own matsutakes.

NICOLE SPRINKLE

the mushroom’s flesh is succulent, even silky in texture when properly sautéed, and faintly evocative of the sea.” Cook tells me he likes to eat them in a risotto mixed with real Maine lobster—a playful East Coast/West Coast preparation. We see plenty of un-colonized russulas too, white and pink ones—not poisonous, but without any taste, according to Shane. Each footstep seems to lead to yet another crop of funky fungi: yellow “coral” mushrooms that look like they’ve been pulled from a reef; tomato-red-topped species that resemble the homes of Smurfs; big, shiny, black, scallop-shaped ’shrooms glistening in the rain, clinging to logs in a way that reminds me of mussels attached to pilings. Then Shane moves off the path toward a tree trunk. “I found one!” he yells. It’s a matsutake, the mushroom he’s been after all season—rare and highly sought-after, particularly in Japan where the local species can command thousands of dollars per kilo. Those in the States, Shane tells me, can go for as much as $90 a pound. “Smell it,” he says. “They smell like cinnamon.” I take a big whiff, and am amazed at how much they actually do. Next to that one are two more. They look very similar to ordinary button mushrooms; the top looks like a penis, Shane says. Yeah, that’s pretty much the best way to describe it. Shane gets out his special mushroom-foraging paring knife, complete with a brush to whisk off dirt. “French,” he declares. He slices a tiny portion off the stem to check for worms and deems it clean. It’s a Two, he tells me. In the world of matsutakes, there is a clear hierarchy: A One is a mushroom whose gills have yet to open (meaning it’s the freshest, most sought-after). A Two’s gills are partially opened; a Three’s gills are entirely exposed. All are keepers.

Now that he’s found one, we’re done with the lobsters. I’ve even forgotten about chanterelles, which, though beguiling in taste, are in fact the easiest to find of the top edible wilds, particularly in the Douglas fir–rich Pacific Northwest. I make my own way off the trail, toward tall pines and firs. Hunkered down right next to the base of a trunk are two more matsutakes. They’re covered lightly with forest duff (one of their key traits), which I lightly pull off. These mushrooms are so deeply rooted that only the bulbous caps are visible. I take my knife and dig around them, carefully pulling them up with their stems intact. When they gently release, it’s a quiet thrill. I turn them over to examine the gills. None are exposed. “I have a One!” I shout crazily. Shane comes to look. Now he’s really on a mission. He finds several more, and offers me one. I find a few more too. The next patch he comes across, he doesn’t share. Even in the amateur world of mushroom hunting, the game is on. We’re on the same team, yet we’re not. “These matsutakes always seem to be near the base of a tree,” I pronounce. Shane tells me they’re nicknamed pine mushrooms because they often grow near pine trees. Touché. Other mushrooms favor firs or cedars. Understanding these survival strategies—of which there are many more—is key for a serious mushroom hunter. Not technically a fruit or a plant, but the reproductive body of a fungus, mushrooms thrive by feeding off other things (as the lobster mushroom does), by recycling organic material from the soil, or by pairing with certain plants to share nutrients. Part of a wild mushroom’s allure is its unclassifiable nature. Shane’s cell phone rings. His brother-in-law Sieb, who owns Prima Bistro on the island, is out in the woods near us. He’s also gathering hedgehogs. We’ve yet to come across these, identifiable

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

food@seattleweekly.com

Temperature Check From Bo maisano, executive cheF, KicKin’ Boot WhisKey Kitchen

Beignets and bloody marys. Both of these during a Sunday brunch is my definition of heaven.

All reality-based food shows. After Top Chef, they ran out of quality ideas. MasterChef Junior? Really? WTF?! I would love to see cooking shows go back to the old-school setup: show people how to cook the foods they love and emphasize the technique.

Yelp. Enough is enough.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 13 — 19, 2013

t 9 a.m. sharp, Shane Ryan pulls up to my place in his well-worn red Pathfinder. Wearing a baseball cap, a plaid flannel jacket, work pants, and boots, he tells me he’s nursing a hangover from late-night drinking with his brothers-in-law. It’s his day off from his job as chef at Matt’s in the Market, and he’s here to take me to Whidbey Island, where he will reveal to me—a local food writer, no less—his secret mushroom trail. It’s late in the season for chanterelles; one co-worker came back from a weekend hike reporting that he’d come across only rotted ones. I ask Shane if it’s likely we’ll find any still edible. “We’ll see,” he says. “I found bags full the other weekend. This season has been amazing.” Seeing as we had such a dry summer, I wonder why. Langdon Cook, mushroom-hunter extraordinaire and author of The Mushroom Hunters: On the Trail of an Underground America, will later explain to me that the key to a good harvest is getting rain at the right time. His theory (though he’s quick to point out that there are many theories, and mushrooms ultimately “are a mystery”): Though July and most of August were dry, there were some heavy, soaking rainstorms in late August. “This moisture kicked into high gear a fruiting of fall mountain porcini that was already underway, and also insured a long chanterelle season. On top of that, September was noticeably cool and wet—the sort of weather only a mushroom could love,” he says. When the ferry from Mukilteo arrives, we make our way toward Langley. After a few turns, we’re on a back road of dirt and stone. I say its name three times in my head, hoping I’ll remember it for future trips. Finally we park off-road on the edge of a forest. There’s a light drizzle. I take a pee behind a tree, Shane has a smoke, and then we head down a trail. There are markers in Latin (names I also try to commit to memory). The woods are a lovely, loamy mess of moss, pine needles, fallen logs, and dense branches and brambles. Suddenly we’re surrounded by massive mushrooms—big, brown portobello-looking things that Shane assures me are not edible. We see patches of long, skinny-stemmed mushrooms that are the whitest of whites: “Matsutake teases,” Shane calls them. We come to a clearing aglow with bright orangey-red clusters that look like they’ve come from the bottom of the ocean rather than the forest floor. These, I quickly find out, are lobster mushrooms. Shane picks one up and pronounces it “too wet.” Indeed, some are waterlogged, and crumble in your hands. But plenty don’t. I fill a bag with ones that are still firm and dry. He tells me that these mushrooms are in fact parasites that grow on the russula mushroom, covering it so completely as to render the host unidentifiable. As Cook writes: “Though such fiery color is often nature’s way of saying DO NOT TOUCH, the lobster mushroom, like its boiled crustacean namesake, is a sublime taste of the wild—and like marine lobsters,

Frito pie? Yes, please. Montana owners Kate Opatz and Rachel Marshall (who also runs Rachel’s Ginger Beer) announced plans to launch Nacho Borracho in the former Ooba Tooba space on Broadway. Look for a January opening. Kigo Kitchen opened in South Lake Union. The fast-casual Asian spot’s menu features build-your-own rice and noodle bowls topped with the likes of braised pork shoulder and pineapple tamarind sauce. Hours are 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Mon.–Thurs., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Fri. Pike Place Market is slated to open Atrium Kitchen later this month on the ground level of the Economy Building at First Avenue and Pike Street. The 600-square-foot industrial cooking demonstration space for area chefs and market vendors features a 10-burner range, work tables, and seating for 14. Events scheduled through the end of the year include demos by Andaluca’s Sarah Lorenzen and Madison Park Conservatory’s Cormac Mahoney. Restaurants around town are throwing parties in honor of Beaujolais Nouveau Day on November 21. Bastille in Ballard will pour the French red wine from 4:30 to 10 p.m., paired with charcuterie selected by chef Jason Stoneburner. Marche at Pike Place Market is bringing in a two-piece band, serving porchetta, and filling glasses at a tasting station. The party starts at 4:30 and ends when the barrel runs dry. Soda Jerk is taking it to the streets. To serve customers tamarind-ginger and blackberry-cardamom soda at locations in addition to farmers markets, the artisan-pop purveyor purchased a truck and has turned to Kickstarter to help get it up and running. Details are online. E

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food&drink» Fungi Run » FROM PAGE 21

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by the little spikes under the golden mushroom cap, where gills would normally be. While the season for chanterelles and matsutakes is winding down, hedgehogs, black trumpets, and yellow-footed chanterelles are in full swing and will go into winter. “It really never ends,” Shane says. Cook will later echo that sentiment, and add that the yellow-foots are great in a Christmas stuffing. But, maddeningly, mysteriously, a particularly plentiful spot of any kind might be devoid the following year. Another survival mechanism of mushrooms, perhaps. The forager’s fixation, for sure. Another call comes: Sieb confirms he’s still loading up on hedgehogs. “How can we not be finding them?” I ask Shane desperately. “Ahh, he may just be a little deeper in than us.” We find a few chanterelles that aren’t rotten—golden, with ridges (rather than gills) that run down the stem. At this point, I’ve filled an entire shopping bag with mushrooms, and it’s only been a little over an hour. We make a few clumsy circles until we find our way back to the car. Next to the red Pathfinder is another hulking red vehicle with stickers of guns and skulls on the back: Sieb.

H A P P Y H OU R

tro, Sieb’s unassuming French-inspired restaurant. Hidden atop a market and mercantile shop, it has imposing, wide-open views of the bay. We sit at the bar and order one of the best meals I’ve had in months: veal sweetbreads in an apricot gastrique and a dish of poached eggs with chunks of foraged lobster mushrooms, croutons, and pancetta that they smoke in their own tiny meat locker. The lobster mushrooms are meaty and have a very subtle seafood-like flavor—that fifth flavor that the Japanese call umami and which translates to “pleasant savory taste.” Shane has some wickedly good-looking bone marrow on toast. While we’re sitting there shooting the shit, Sieb walks in. He’s tall, with long, dark hair pulled back in a ponytail, gold hoops in each ear, and tats all over his arm. He’s holding several bags of mushrooms, which he’ll be serving in the restaurant, of course. He sits down and orders us all glasses of Fernet Branca on ice—a clear indication I’m in the company of chefs. Satiated by the meal and the mushroom extravaganza, Shane and I are quieter on our trip back. He tells me it’s his night off, and he’s going to prepare a matsutake salad for his wife when she gets home from work. Sliced super-thin, he adds. These mushrooms are too special to be cooked. I get mine home, wash them lightly with wet paper towels, and place them all over my kitchen counter. It’s pretty surreal-looking. My phone buzzes with a text message. It’s Shane. “Make sure to smell all your matsutakes to be positive that they are them.” One by one I pick up my pounds of matsutakes. Only one doesn’t exude cinnamon. Shit. It’s a precious One. But I can’t take a chance. I toss it. I head to my computer and pull up a map of Whidbey. The name of the road I repeated three times comes to me. I think I zero in on the turn. Though I’ll never print the location, I know I’m going back there myself this weekend. Maybe I’ll run into Shane, maybe Sieb. But more important, maybe I’ll meet up with more matsutakes, or finally find those hedgehogs. E

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hile I try to use The Bar Code to educate, to enrich, and to enhance your drinking experience, this week I ask your pardon as I vent. The truth is, some people have no idea how to act at a bar. I’m not talking about getting belligerent, angry, and projectile vomit-y, though of course BY ZACH GEBALLE that’s plenty annoying. I’m talking about the basics of bar etiquette. After consulting with colleagues, here is a far-from-definitive list of the reasons your bartender (and the customer sitting next to you) might hate you, even if we’d never say so to your face. You ask for a happy-hour menu at non-happyhour times. The list of restaurants that serve happy hour at 7:30 on a Saturday night is as follows: _______________. You ask “What’s on draft?” while standing in front of the taps. Weirdly, that information is provided for you in several spots: the tap handles you’re staring right past and the drink list you haven’t opened. You put your purse, bag, or coats on another bar seat. Bar stools are for people—people who will drink and eat and tip. Your coat, your shopping bags, and your purse will not. As for using those items to save a seat? For someone who will be arriving imminently, fine. For someone who won’t be showing up for an hour? Not cool. You ask for a more generous pour. Come on. You are entitled to the drink you ordered, which is a two-ounce shot in most bars. True, we can (and sometimes do) pour stiffer drinks for certain people—usually the ones who treat us well, come in regularly, and tip well. You refuse to slide down to open up seats. We’ve all seen it: groups of two or three at the bar with “buffer seats” between each group. Hey, I know it’s nice to have some privacy, but those sad little individual seats don’t look too inviting. Buffers are OK when a bar is slow, but if I see a group looking for seats, I will ask you (politely) to move one direction or the other. You snap your fingers or yell at the bartender. Hey, I get it. You want another drink. Guess what? So do the two people who ordered before you, and the three tables in the restaurant who just sat down and ordered cocktails. You mistreat the person you’re with. Nothing poisons a bar experience like a couple sitting next to you who won’t stop arguing. Alcohol amplifies moods and lowers inhibitions, and for some friends and lovers that means it’s time to air all that dirty laundry in public. Save that for the therapist. You try to steal cash out of other people’s check presenters and use it to pay your bar tab. The good news is, most of you are wonderful, lovely people, and many of the rest of you just don’t know any better. The guy who tried to steal cash, though? You deserved exactly what happened to you. So what bothers you about your fellow bar patrons? Or even (gasp!) bartenders? E

Join us in the Trophy Room for Happy Hour: Thursday Bartender Special 8-Close Fridays: 5-8pm

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 13 — 19, 2013


arts&culture

The Surveillance Troll

ThisWeek’s PickList

An anonymous stranger is trying to provoke you with his video camera, then putting the results on YouTube. Is he an artist, an asshole, or both?

BY DAVE LAKE

enlighten, and the clips make entertaining viewing—if not art that might be seen in a gallery. Sharon Arnold, owner of Georgetown’s LxWxH gallery, which sometimes features video installations, says she isn’t sure whether it’s art or not. “It’s definitely commentary,” she offers. “And it really hits home. We wouldn’t want a person recording us.” In his only known interview, SCM e-mailed the website Photography Is Not a Crime last November. Of his project’s origins, he wrote, “I was with a friend who wanted to film a social experiment. But we didn’t have audio equipment.

The in-your-face approach generally yields a hostile response—or perhaps those are the only ones SCM posts. (If people don’t get angry, he won’t get clicks.) People naturally resent being filmed without consent and having their personal space invaded. Here’s a typical exchange, between SCM and a business-dressed guy seated outside a Starbucks, talking on his phone: Man: “What are we doing here? I’d appreciate it if you’d go somewhere else with that.” SCM: “It’s OK, it’s just a video.” For a moment, the Starbucks patron seems amused, revealing a hint of a smile. He can’t believe the balls of this guy. Then he grows more agitated. Man: “It’s offensive to me. I’m trying to have a private conversation. Could you respect that? . . . Could you please move? Do you not understand what I’m saying?” SCM: “Calm down.” Man: “Leave! Fuck you, ya got it! And the horse you rode in on! You have no respect for anybody. What are you gonna do, follow me around now?” And as the target gets up to walk away . . . Man: “You even look like a dumb fuck.” Another common reaction to SCM is the claim that he needs permission to film them. The truth is he doesn’t, says Portland attorney Bert P. Krages, who specializes in photographers’ rights. “If he’s just recording what he’s seeing, there’s no

Killer Mike

real issue with regard to him getting releases.” That’s why paparazzi don’t need signed releases from celebs for permission to use their images for tabloids and gossip websites. Krages adds, “The general rule in the United States is that anyone may take photographs of whatever they want when they are in a public place.” And that includes the people in those places; there is no right to privacy on the sidewalk. In private spaces to which the public is invited, like Baskin Robbins or the Church of Scientology (both appear in SCM clips), the rules are different. There, as in most malls and stores, photography is generally allowed until someone with authority over the premises, like a business owner or restaurant manager, asks you to stop. Krages continues, “The dicey area in this legally comes with regard to the audio portion of taking video.” Washington state has what’s called a two-party notification law, which means both parties in a conversation have to consent to its being recorded. “Once people were clearly not consenting [SCM] to record their conversation,” says Krages, “he probably did cross a line.” What about harassment or public-nuisance laws? “The mere fact that someone’s annoyed by it generally won’t be enough.”

Last year, Killer Mike’s R.A.P. Music was a clarion call to anyone listening that the Atlanta rapper was on top of the world. As soon as the bass drops in lead single “Big Beast,” the MC erupts, growling “POW, motherfucker! POW!” like an action hero roundhouse-kicking a peon in the face. That’s what’s great about Killer Mike: He’s not afraid to pick a few bones. The album’s second single, “Reagan,” takes the late president to task for the war on drugs, trickle-down economics, and the inherent racism of his policies. “I leave you with four words: I’m glad Reagan dead,” the song chillingly ends. With his new Run the Jewels, Killer Mike continues on the same warpath. Tonight’s performance is the latest installment of the Red Bull Sound Select series, this time curated by Sub Pop. That means if you RSVP, you can see Killer Mike for a measly $3, a steal by any measure. Also on the bill, locals OCnotes and Porter Ray are opening, both gems in their own right. OCnotes’ self-described “Alien BootyBass” is exactly what it sounds like: spacey, warped jazz beats that float around behind the rapper’s philosophical musings. Porter Ray’s story goes back to the main inspiration for his funky, soul-infused tracks: the murder of his brother. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877784-4849, stgpresents.org. $3 with RSVP/$12 without. All ages. 8 p.m. KELTON SEARS

Jérôme Bel & Cédric Andrieux

Also, there’s no way to identify this nameless

filmmaker to file a complaint. He ignored my interview request, and his YouTube page announces that “SCM does not have a Facebook or website.” Judging from his filming locations—U Village, Big W Cleaners, Lost Sock Laundry, etc.—it’s clear he roams the U District and Capitol Hill. He’s in his late 20s, according to Photography Is Not a Crime, where he declared, “I don’t see any reason to wave my hands in the air and shout, ‘Look at me! I’m the Surveillance Camera Man!’ If something I do gets a lot of attention, great. But I don’t need to be a celebrity.” The hypocrisy of that statement, of course, is that SCM exploits the privacy of others while preserving his own. Street photographers like Lee Friedlander, Garry Winogrand, and Henri Cartier-Bresson captured subjects in public places, too, but they sought beauty in unprovoked moments. They portrayed their subjects from a respectful distance—not by creating a gotcha moment by thrusting a camera into someone’s face for lulz. SCM may create compelling content, but his supposed message—about privacy or photographers’ rights or whatever—is muddled by his bad manners. Because his videos are so meanspirited, they’ll never rise to be anything more than junk-food click-bait. E

visualarts@seattleweekly.com

In our first-person world, choreographer Bel has made a third-person autobiography. Cédric Andrieux is the title of the dance, the name of its performer, and the subject of the work. Bel combines spoken interview text with excerpts from the repertory Andrieux has danced in the companies of Merce Cunningham and Tricia Brown. The show is a panoramic view of 21st-

Andrieux in rehearsal.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 13 — 19, 2013

SCM’s goal seems to be to provoke rather than

I explained how we could only get good audio if we pushed the camera directly into people’s faces. After the first couple of approaches, he couldn’t keep a straight face. It was all me after that.”

HERMAN SORGELOOS

H

is favorite targets include the homeless, Asian shop owners, security guards, and cabbies. With an unwavering stare and nerves of steel, he aims his video camera at them, seemingly intent on eliciting anger, confusion, and anything else his unwilling subjects care to muster. Known only as Surveillance Camera Man, this provocateur’s YouTube videos have become viral, controversial hits, most yielding over 100,000 views. He’s uploaded five compilations since October 2012, each following a simple template: SCM, as we’ll call him, walks up to a stranger, usually in a public space, and silently trains his lens on them. When the subjects wonder why they’re being filmed, his response is almost always the same: “Just taking a video.” (SCM’s face is never seen.) Each compilation runs 4 to 6 minutes and contains several clips of SCM annoying people in various locations. The clips appear to be shot with a tiny camera or cell phone, adding to the target’s initial confusion about what’s happening. “It’s not easy to sum up the recipe of a viral video,” says Brad Kim, managing editor of Seattle’s Know Your Meme (part of the Cheezburger family of websites). He cites the “repetition of a single motif, brevity in length, elements of drama and surprise. And with the case of Surveillance Camera Man in particular, voyeurism and timeliness.” With Edward Snowden and the NSA surveillance scandal as a backdrop, SCM’s videos might arguably be making a political/artistic point. In one early reel, he alludes to the ubiquity of surveillance cameras in public. “Look at it this way,” he says to his target. “Do you ever go to the grocery store? You know how there’s, like, surveillance cameras everywhere? It’s not a big deal.” He’s been more silent in recent videos, leaving Internet commenters to debate whether the project is intended as art or simple trolling—like those sidewalk-slapping videos and other punkwith-a-camera stunts.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 26 25


(11/13) King County Mental Health & Substance Abuse Legislative Forum TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

arts&culture» Pick List

COMMUNITY

FRIDAY, NOV. 15

Double Feature! (11/13) Peter Baker The Real Bush/Cheney Dynamic

Matt Haimovitz

(11/13) David Folkenflik ‘Murdoch’s World’ Double Feature! (11/14) Peggy Kelsey Conversations with Afghan Women (11/14) Joe Sacco: ‘The Great War’

(11/15)SimpleMeasures:CelloDivasII (11/16) Saturday Family Concerts Christian Swenson (11/16) Early Music Guild presents Lucidarium: Una Festa Ebraica (11/17)EarlyMusicDiscoverypresents Discovering the Music of Medieval Italy with Ensemble Lucidarium (11/17) Thalia Symphony Orchestra ‘Struggle and Triumph’ (11/17) Earshot Jazz Festival presents CharlesLloyd&FriendswithBillFrisell

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 13 — 19, 2013

(11/18) Chris Matthews ‘Tip and the Gipper’

26

(11/19) Inside Art Local Artists on Imagery & Art (11/19)SeattleArts&Lecturespresents An Evening with Madhur Jaffrey (11/20) Ignite Seattle! (11/20) Rebecca Sive AWoman’sGuidetoWinningAnyOffice (11/21) Uri Gneezy The Hidden Power of the Economics of Everyday Life (11/21)AnnPatchettwithNancyPearl ‘This is the Story of a Happy Marriage’ (11/22) Global Rhythms: JP Jofre TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

WWW.TOWNHALLSEATTLE.ORG

» FROM PAGE 25

and only one historical figure (English Gen. Douglas Haig) as the day literally unfolds—you can read the spineless book in your lap by flipping panels, or lay the whole thing on the floor. Sacco’s separate annotations and a companion essay by Adam Hochschild helps make sense of the carnage, in which 21,000 Brits died on day one. What the black-and-white illustration captures is the sense of scale, as a veritable river of troops pours into the trenches and over the top, then becomes snared in the barbed wire, where German machine guns cut them to ribbons. We see horses near the start of Sacco’s graphic NORTON narrative, which then details the new industrial scale of war: the armaments and supplies that made possible this massive, inconclusive gathering of men. The battle lasted into October, with an aggregate death toll estimated at 300,000, which makes Sacco’s 24-foot tale seem small. Town Hall, 1119

century postmodern dance as well as a singular look at one of its famed practitioners. (Through Sun.) On the Boards, 100 W. Roy St., 217-9888,

ontheboards.org. $25. 8 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ THURSDAY, NOV. 14

Cinema Italian Style

SIFF begins this 18-film series with a thoroughly silly comedy about amateur soccer players on the island of Sardinia, though you don’t need to know anything about the sport to enjoy it. L’Arbitro intercuts scenes of village life with the declining fortunes of a smug, slick soccer ref (“l’arbitro”). For director Paolo Zucca, the comic spin matters more than the trajectory of the ball. For no good reason, the ref does a slo-mo ballet of sorts on the dusty soccer pitch. The local star, recently returned from Argentina, sports a mullet, a handlebar mustache, and a fashion sense belonging to the mid-’70s. His team’s coach is actually blind, and their dark-shirted rivals are lead by the nefarious local land baron. And while the ref preaches “respect for the rules,” what L’Arbitro celebrates is anarchic disrespect. Or rather, it’s as if civilization and rules are just a thin veneer over medieval codes for sport, courtship, and revenge—all of which we see enacted. Appropriately, the movie ends with a raucous festival, which can launch you to the after-party at the Hunt Club up at the Sorrento. The series ends Thursday with the highly acclaimed and anticipated The Great Beauty, about Italy’s glamorous national stasis, by director Paolo Sorrentino (This Must Be the Place, Il Divo). SIFF

Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 3249996, siff.net. $20–$25 with party, $6–$11 without. 7 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

Joe Sacco

Over in London, they could hear the artillery thunder and feel the ground shake on July 1, 1916, when the Battle of the Somme began in France. That horrific quagmire would haunt an entire generation of British soldiers and historians; over here, it barely registers. (The U.S. only entered World War I the following April.) Today based in Portland, the Australian-raised cartoonist/journalist Joe Sacco read about the battle as a boy, and now he’s drawn a continuous, 24-footlong account of July 1, called The Great War (Norton, $35). It’s a wordless, intricate panorama based on years of research. There are no heroes

measures.org. $15–$30. 7:30 p.m. (Also Mt. Baker Community Club, 2811 Mt. Rainier Dr. S., 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. ) GAVIN BORCHERT TUESDAY, NOV. 19

So You Think You Can Dance

There’s been a little flurry of dance programming on television lately, with the full-scripted drama of Bunheads and the selectively edited revelations of Breaking Pointe, but competition shows like So You Think You Can Dance deliver their drama in quick-time. We learn a little bit about the dancers and their journey to the television studio, but the emphasis is on the performance; and it’s make-or-break at competition time. The finalists from season 10 have hit the road and are dancing their eye-popping combination of jazz and acrobatics in this touring show. Don’t pretend you’ve forgotten Fik-Shun. Here’s your chance to see him again, along with Aaron Turner, Amy Yakima, Hayley Erbert, Jasmine Harper, Jenna Johnson, Makenzie Dustman, Nico Greetham, Paul Karmiryan, and Tucker Knox. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 877784-4849, stgpresents.org. $32–$62. 7:30 p.m.

SANDRA KURTZ E

Haimovitz prefers unusual venues.

STEPHANIE MACKINNON

(11/15) Joshua Greene Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them

Geppi Cucciari as the village beauty in L’Arbitro.

BD CINE/RAI

(11/14)SeattlePublicLibrarypresents ‘StillCrazy(Good)AfterAllTheseYears’

The move to get chamber music out of dedicated concert halls (and the occasional church), in an attempt to broaden its audience, is really a return to its roots: It was born and bred for domestic use (and the occasional pub). As good as a Haydn string quartet can sound in Meany Hall, it’s even more powerful in a living room. No classical soloist has been more devoted to just this mission than cellist Matt Haimovitz, who’s toured the country playing music from baroque to Led Zeppelin in all sorts of non-traditional venues—even including our Tractor Tavern. Locally, this banner is flown by Simple Measures, a chamber-music series that prefers cafes and community centers to the usual venues. It’s natural they should team up; and for Simple Measures’ first program of its season, guest Haimovitz will join Rajan Krishnaswami, Meeka Quan DiLorenzo, and John Michel for a four-cello blowout: half solo (Haimovitz plays Bach, John Corigliano, and the Beatles) and half the full quartet (Bartok, Gershwin, and more). Town Hall, simple


arts&culture» Stage

FINAL SIX PERFORMANCES!

Opening Nights Jesus’ Son

MCCAW HALL, 321 MERCER ST. (SEATTLE CENTER), 441-2424, PNB.ORG. $28–$174. 7:30 P.M. THURS. & SAT., 1 P.M. SUN. ENDS NOV. 17.

After opening its season with one iconoclast, Pacific Northwest Ballet is following up with

two others. Like Twyla Tharp, the Czechoslovakiaborn Jiří Kylián and Canada’s Crystal Pite are both taking ballet in unusual directions, combining it with several other movement styles. In this program of four dances, their work feeds PNB artistic director Peter Boal’s desire to broaden the horizons of his dancers and their audience. Kylián’s hybrid style retains the physical virtuosity of ballet, but tempers it with a kind of organic lyricism, drawing a more grounded quality from modern-dance techniques. After making over 75 works, most for Nederlands Dans Theater, he’s become one of the major influences on European contemporary dance—and an increasingly popular import to the U.S. PNB already dances a pair of his works to Mozart; and here we see how Petite Mort and Sechs Tänze both make sly fun of baroque mannerisms. New to PNB is Kylián’s 1981 Forgotten Land, inspired by an Edvard Munch painting of three women contemplating a drowned landscape. Given a propulsive quality by Benjamin Britten’s Sinfonia da Requiem, dancers surge like water across the stage, where couples struggle and fail to remain together. Those who’ve previously seen Pite and her Kidd Pivot company at On the Boards will be familiar with some of her extreme movement choices. But those kinetic experiments are really amplified by the sheer scale of Emergence. Created four years ago for the National Ballet of Canada, the work features almost 40 dancers in a stunning investigation of group behaviors and “hive mind,” drawing images from the insect world. Ballet often uses unison movement to create a sense of rising momentum, but here the collective action is more threatening than exhilarating. At several key moments, the dancers count in sotto voce as they snap from one position to another—a thoroughly eerie effect. Opening weekend was packed with truly impressive performances. Rachel Foster’s intensity was thrilling in the opening section of Emergence, where she was like a newborn colt struggling to master limbs and joints. Andrew Bartee and Kiyon Gaines, alternating in a thrashing solo from the same work, launched themselves across the stage. Lindsi Dec and Karel Cruz were a sleek pair in Petite Mort and an anguished one in Forgotten Land. But it was the company as a whole, throughout the program, that knocked the audience flat. SANDRA KURTZ E

stage@seattleweekly.com

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2013–2014 Leo K. season sponsor:

Hannah Mootz as Bo-Nita, 2013. Photo by Nate Watters

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Abernethy as our hapless hero in Jesus’ Son.

by ELIZABETH HEFFRON directed by PAUL BUDRAITIS

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Nov 29-Dec 29

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SE ATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 13 — 19, 2013

The primary challenge facing Book-It Repertory Theatre in its adaptation of Jesus’ Son is that Denis Johnson’s 1992 story collection lacks a clear narrative arc. Instead, the 11 stories are loosely linked by a few themes—rampant drug use and bad decisions chief among them—and the brutally honest perspective of a desperate narrator who speaks in Johnson’s lucid barroom poetry. Jeff Schwager’s adaptation boldly forces a narrative on the stories by having one actor play the role of the narrator throughout. The result is a memory play that jolts from one bad situation to another. The hero’s search for meaning is meandering and foggy, yet the collected tales do create a sense of story and culminate in a few startling moments of grace. Scott Ward Abernethy plays the protagonist Fuckhead with a true addict’s sense of resignation. Beset by bed-head and a hunger for heroin and pills, Fuckhead stumbles from one vignette to another. (Schwager has not included all of Johnson’s original tales here, but cherry-picked those with the greatest theatrical possibility.) Josh Aaseng directs the show, expanded from last fall’s staging, for Book-It’s traveling Circumbendibus program. Here, in West of Lenin’s black-box space, the set is anchored by a bar selling $4 PBRs, with live music from guitarist Owen Ross and multi-instrumentalist/vocalist Annie Jantzer. The duo plays a key role in the production, performing background music throughout and giving Jesus’ Son a sense of place, in time at least, by playing old rock songs like “Cowgirl in the Sand” and “Bird on a Wire.” In the first scene, based on Johnson’s story “Car Crash While Hitchhiking,” Fuckhead has a premonition of disaster for the young family that offers him a ride. He gets in anyway, telegraphing his death wish, and the audience is treated to a disquieting bit of stagecraft. As Fuckhead narrates, the wreck is enacted in slow motion, the family’s horror made apparent as the band plays “Heroin,” the tense and propulsive Velvet Underground song with the lyric that gave Johnson the title for his collection. Hearing the screams of the driver’s widow in the hospital later, Fuckhead proclaims, “I’ve gone looking for that feeling everywhere.” This is Jesus’ Son’s most powerful moment, and, like Fuckhead, I was spoiled by it—hoping for another dreadful fix. The play never again achieves such complete synergy of music, performers, and text. Yet the strong and fevered performances—in particular Zach Adair’s as hospital janitor Georgie—keep the tenuous narrative together enough to let Johnson’s intoxicating prose shine. MARK BAUMGARTEN

SHANNON ERICKSON

WEST OF LENIN, 203 N. 36TH ST., 216-0833, BOOK-IT.ORG. $22. 7:30 P.M. WED.–SUN. ENDS NOV. 24.

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arts»Performance B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

THE ATOMIC BOMBSHELLS: LOST IN SPACE! Seattle’s

premiere burlesque troupe’s latest extravaganza. (Early shows 17 and over, 10 p.m. shows 21 and over.). The Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, tripledoor.net. $22–$35. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 13, 7 & 10 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 14–Sat., Nov. 16.

BUBBLES IN THE WINE: LAWRENCE WELK IMPROVISED! A salute to Strasburg, N.D.’s greatest TV

NOV 19

MEANY HALL | 206-543-4880 | UWWORLDSERIES.ORG

musician. Market Theater, 1428 Post Alley, 587-2414, unexpectedproductions.org. $5–$15. Opens Nov. 15. 8:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. plus 2 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. Ends Nov. 23. MARGARET CHO Her new stand-up show is “Mother, Mother.” The Moore, 1932 Second Ave., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org. $32–$52. 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. THE CONSTRUCTION ZONE This reading series, co-run by ACT and WET, presents Boomcracklefly by Charise Castro Smith. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, acttheatre.org. $10–$20. 7 p.m. Tues., Nov. 19. FAMILY AFFAIR Jennifer Jasper’s “sick, hilarious, and ultimately relatable” monthly cabaret on the theme of family. JewelBox/Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., jenniferjasper performs.com. $10. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 13. THE FIFTH OF JULY Lanford Wilson’s dramedy explores the legacy of Vietnam. Meany Studio Theater, UW campus, 543-4880, depts.washington.edu/uwdrama. $10–$20. Opens Nov. 13. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 24. FULL SPECTRUM The new show from Cirrus Circus, SANCA’s youth troupe, includes the triple trapeze, aerial contortion, and more. School of Acrobatics and New Circus Arts (SANCA), 674 S. Orcas St., 800-838-3006, sancaseattle.org. $10–$20. Opens Nov. 15. 7 p.m. Fri., 3 & 7 p.m. Sat. Ends Nov. 23. THE HABIT 13 The new show from this sketch-comedy sextet. Seattle Public Theater at the Bathhouse, 7312 W. Green Lake Ave. N., 800-838-3006, thehabitcomedy.com. $19. Opens Nov. 15. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sun. Ends Dec. 1. THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES David Pichette and R. Hamilton Wright adapted this Sherlock Holmes tale. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 443-2222. $12–$80. Previews begin Nov. 15, opens Nov. 20. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sun., plus some 2 p.m. matinees Wed., Sat., Sun.; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends Dec. 15. THE NAKED SHOW “More than just a burlesque show,” it’s a variety show about nakedness. Theater Off Jackson, 409 Seventh Ave. S., 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets. com. $25–$35. 9 p.m. Fri., Nov. 15–Sat., Nov. 16. THE SATORI GROUP Readings of three works-in-progress: Mallery Avidon’s a to z; Martyna Majok’s The Ironbound; and Spike Friedman’s Returning to Albert Joseph. See satori-group.com for schedule. Inscape, 815 Seattle Blvd. S., 800-838-3006. $5. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 14–Fri., Nov. 15, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16–Sun., Nov. 17.

CURRENT RUNS

BLAK CLOUD The Crucible meets improv. Wing-It

Productions, 5510 University Way N.E., jetcityimprov.com. $12–$15. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Fri. Ends Nov. 22. BO-NITA In Elizabeth Heffron’s one-woman play, meet a smart, sensitive St. Louis girl of 13; her socially marginal single mom Mona; Mona’s various consorts; and Grandma Tiny, known for belly-dancing in stilettos. Hannah Mootz deftly and heartbreakingly embodies all of them and more in rapid-fire situational episodes, teetering between girl and hag, thug and wag. MARGARET FRIEDMAN Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 4432222. $12–$65. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sun., plus some matinees; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 17. BUCKSHOT Macha Monkey premieres Courtney Meaker’s play about family and the past. Cornish Playhouse at Seattle Center, 860-2970, machamonkey.org. $12–$20. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. plus Mon., Nov. 18. Ends Nov. 23. CAFE NORDO Equal parts meet-and-greet, nightclub, and gustatory exploration—a didactic-gastronomic tour through the life of a chicken named Henrietta, punctuated with high-flung prose to illuminate each course. The meal is the main event, and it does not disappoint. KEVIN PHINNEY Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave., cafenordo.com. $65–$90. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sun. Ends Nov. 24. CLARA The life of Clara Schumann: pianist, mother, wife of one great composer and crush of another. Eclectic Theater, 1214 10th Ave., 679-3271, brownpapertickets.com. $12–$25. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 24.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 13 — 19, 2013

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CALL FOR

ARTISTS

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DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 18

THE 2014 ANNUAL WASHINGTON STATE JURIED ART COMPETITION Open to all Washington State artists

enter: onlinejuriedshows.com info: collectivevisions.com 360.551.7526

Over $9000 in Awards! sponsored in part by:

Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

FLOYD COLLINS Adam Guettel’s musical about a media

sensation in radio’s early days. Richard Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave., 800-838-3006, seattlestageright.org, hugohouse. org. $15–$20. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. & Mon. Ends Nov. 23. HEART CONTENT CabinFever’s site-specific multimedia performance piece is inspired by First Hill’s Stimson Green Mansion, 1204 Minor Ave., 800-838-3006, cabinfeverliveart. com. $15. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 4:30 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 17. JESUS’ SON SEE REVIEW, PAGE 27. THE LUXURIA CYCLE Jimmie Galaites’ exploration of modern romance “satirizes . . . our society’s obsession with finding the perfect partner.” Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre.org. $5–$10. 8 p.m. Wed. Ends Nov. 13. LES MISÉRABLES Village Theatre dreams a dream of making a fortune over the holidays. Village Theatre, 303 Front St. N., Issaquah, 425-392-2202. $33–$68. Runs in Issaquah through Jan. 5, then at the Everett Performing Arts Center Jan. 10–Feb. 2; see villagetheatre.org for exact schedule. MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING It’s 1953, and Messina is a waterside pleasure dome. All the screwball elements are in place. Jennifer Lee Taylor and Matt Shimkus get the plummest bits as the fiercely unhitched sparrers Beatrice and Benedick. Her Bette Davis eyes belie a knack for clowning, and his seemingly impassive, Kennedy-jawed face becomes irresistible when stricken by her words. MARGARET FRIEDMAN Center House Theatre, Seattle Center, 733-8222. $25–$48. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat., plus some weekend matinees; see seattleshakespeare.org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 17. PRISCILLA, QUEEN OF THE DESERT The film about three flamboyant friends on a road trip through the Outback is now a musical. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 877-STG-4TIX, stgpresents.org. $25 and up. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 13–Thurs., Nov. 14; 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 15; 2 & 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16; 1 & 6:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. THE PURIFICATION PROCESS Breast cancer explored from the viewpoint of African-American women. Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center, 104 17th Ave. S., 800-8383006, brownpapertickets.com. $7–$15. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.– Fri., 2 & 7:30 p.m. Sat.–Sun. Ends Nov. 16. RED LIGHT WINTER Adam Rapp’s 2005 drama of the selfish choices people make when they think no one’s looking. At the bottom of the heap is Matt (Richard Nguyen Sloniker), a suicidal “emerging” playwright. During a trip to the sex salons of Amsterdam, his former college roomie Davis (Tim Gouran) returns to their hostel with hooker Christina (Mariel Neto). Act II begins in New York a year later; Christina shows up, nothing like what she originally represented herself to be. Desdemona Chiang directs this maelstrom-in-miniature with nearballetic grace. KEVIN PHINNEY ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, azotheatre.org. $25–$30. Runs Thurs.–Sun.; see acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 24. REPRESENT! A multicultural playwrights festival, part of the Hansberry Project. See acttheatre.org for lineup. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $5. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 13–Sat., Nov. 16, 2 & 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. ROPE English playwright Hamilton wrote Rope in 1929, based on the 1924 Leopold and Loeb murder, and it’s a dull product of its time. Two upper-crust collegians strangle an Oxford classmate for sport. Wyndham (Jaryl Draper) evinces a cool braggadocio that barely conceals his homicidal bloodlust, while Charles (Geoff Finney) veers madly between conniving stealth and the shivering, wild-eyed terror of a mistreated chihuahua. Justin Ison’s stultifying direction and Hamilton’s endlessly meandering text make this Rope very slack—death by filibuster. KEVIN PHINNEY The Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., ghostlighttheatricals.org. $12–$15. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., plus 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 10. Ends Nov. 23. SEX DRUGS DEATH DISCO Vincent Kovar’s play about ‘90s club promoter Michael Alig. Re-bar, 1114 Howell St., 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets.com. $15. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Nov. 23. 25 SAINTS “You’re disposable people,” a corrupt sheriff tells a pair of West Virginia meth dealers in the tensest of many tense scenes in this suspenseful stage thriller, skillfully directed by Desdemona Chiang. Charlie (a very fine Tim Gouran) lives for Sammy (Libby Barnard), his missing brother’s girlfriend; the two hold a deputy hostage in a rural cabin, aided by Charlie’s best friend/meth colleague Tuck (Richard Nguyen Sloniker). Even for viewers who loved Breaking Bad, the material can make you uncomfortable—like watching beetles trying to save themselves from drowning in vinegar. But you care about these characters, among whom motives are crossed as to who will flee and who will be ensnared by One Last Score. MARGARET FRIEDMAN ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 2927676, azotheatre.org. $25–$30. Runs Thurs.–Sun., see acttheatre.org for exact schedule for both. Ends Nov. 24. THE UNDERNEATH Kelleen Conway Blanchard’s horrormovie sendup is set in a seaside town. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., annextheatre.org. $5–$20. 8 p.m. Thurs.– Sat. Ends Nov. 16.

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THE WAY OF ALL FISH/I CAN’T REMEMBER ANYTHING Comic one-acts by Elaine May and Arthur

Miller. Trinity Episcopal Church, 609 Eighth Ave., 800-8383006, theatre912.com. Pay what you will. 8. 7:30 p.m. Fri.– Sat. and Mon., Nov. 18, 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 24.

Dance

SERENDIPITY DANCE BRIGADE Their show “Fire &

Ice” includes fabric sculpture and original music. Velocity Dance Center, 1621 12th Ave., 800-838-3006, brownpaper tickets.com. $25–$30. 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 15–Sun., Nov. 17. PACIFIC NORTHWEST BALLET: KYLIÁN + PITE: SEE REVIEW, PAGE 27. CÉDRIC ANDRIEUX SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 25. CAFÉ VARIATIONS Anne Bogart’s New York-based SITI Company “entwines longing, lust, lost love, found love, and budding romantic adventure” with Gershwin, set in a cafe. Jones Playhouse Theatre, 4045 University Way N.E., 543-4880, uwworldseries.org. $10–$35., 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 14–Fri., Nov. 15, 2 7 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE? SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 26.

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Classical, Etc.

• COMPOSER SPOTLIGHT Composer/cellist Derek M.

Johnson. Jack Straw Studios, 4261 Roosevelt Way N.E., jackstraw.org., Free. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 13. DXARTS Electroacoustic music old and new (one work dates back to 1930). Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, dxarts.washington.edu. $12–$20. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 14. DANIEL ZARETSKY Bach and more from this Russian organist. Kane Hall, UW campus, 685-8384, music. washington.edu. $15. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 14. NORTHWEST SINFONIETTA Britten’s bittersweet Serenade for tenor, horn, and orchestra marks the British composer’s 100th. Benaroya Recital Hall, northwest sinfonietta.org. $42. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 15. SIMPLE MEASURES SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 26. R. ANDREW LEE This pianist plays Dennis Johnson’s four-hour November (1959), which the Chapel’s Steve Peters describes as “a nearly lost masterpiece of early

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Blind to the Line

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moment to pat ourselves on the back, too, as the boldface names above join forces to celebrate the Kronos’ 40th anniversary. The quartet was founded here, as you surely know, and I love that they’re returning to their birth city to collaborate with their artistic descendants in a new chapter of the DAE’s ongoing work, Predator’s Songstress. This chapter, “Warrior,” combines Joshua Kohl’s score for the Kronos (plus six vocalists) with dance from Haruko Nishimura. Sitting somewhere (speaking of boundaries) near the intersection of Pärt, Reich, and Ligeti, Kohl’s evocative music is spacey, dreamy, but with that

November 22

JP JOFRE

Hard Tango Chamber Band Classical-Tango Bandoneón

ART CREDIT

EARSUPPLY

Global Rhythms 2013-14 w Brian Faker, Curator

ominous undercurrent without which it wouldn’t be a DAE piece. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org. $44. 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. (BTW, those non-boldface guys are in town this weekend, too. 2Cellos plays the Moore Sun., Nov. 17; and for more on Haimovitz’s appearances with Simple Measures, see the Pick List, page 26.)

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esieged by Strauss waltzes and Joplin rags and pretty much torn down for good by Rhapsody in Blue and Porgy and Bess: Any walls that may once have stood between “classical” and “popular” music haven’t, in any serious sense, for decades. Yet the BY GAVIN BORCHERT fact is that musicians thrive on preserving this distinction (even as we pretend to deplore it); we need these conceptual divides so that we can pat ourselves on the back for crossing them. Witness the Croatian duet 2Cellos, who’ve achieved mainstream exposure (Glee, Ellen) through their takes on pop/rock tunes (“Smells Like Teen Spirit,” “Candle in the Wind”). These two are clearly talented and their arrangements gratifyingly un-cheesy—but you can only roll your eyes at their tired claim to be “breaking the boundaries between different genres of music.” Sorry, bros: The Kronos Quartet recorded “Purple Haze” before either of you were born. So much for that “boundary.” Similarly, it’s always amusing, in every single article written about cellist Matt Haimovitz, to see the palpitations journalists go into when they find out he plays in bars! The cello! OMG!!!—as if Seattle’s Degenerate Art Ensemble hadn’t done that 20 years ago. OK, I admit we’re spoiled here in Seattle, and it’s unfair to snark at all those who are just catching up to our innovations. But let’s take a

minimalism.” Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., waywardmusic.blogspot.com. $5–$15. 6 p.m. (note early start time) Sat., Nov. 16. TOM BAKER A preview of Shendos No. 12, his new work for the Seattle Modern Orchestra, to be premiered Nov. 22. Soundbridge, Benaroya Hall, Second Ave. and Union St., seattlemodernorchestra.org. 5 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. THE DANESHVAR ENSEMBLE Traditional Persian music. Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E. Prospect St. (Volunteer Park), seattleartmuseum.org. $8–$12. 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. ENSEMBLE LUCIDARIUM From this renaissance instrumental group, music from Italy’s Jewish communities. (They’ll also play a family concert on Sunday, $5–$10.) Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 325-7066, earlymusicguild.org. $20–$42. 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16, 1 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. KRONOS QUARTET SEE EAR SUPPLY, BELOW. MCCABE-LARIONOFF DUO Pianist Robin and violinist Maria play Beethoven sonatas. Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, 685-8384, music. washington.edu. $15. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. THALIA SYMPHONY Michael Miropolsky conducts Berlioz, Saint-Saens, and Shostakovich. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., thaliasymphony.org. $20. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. UW CHOIRS The Chamber Singers and Chorale perform with Sapience Dance Collective and Karin Stevens Dance. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, music. washington.edu. $10–$15. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. NEW BAROQUE ORCHESTRA Corelli, Handel, and Rameau from this community ensemble. Trinity Episcopal Church, 609 Eighth Ave., earlymusicguild.org. Donation. 3 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. SEATTLE YOUTH SYMPHONY There’s Romeo and Juliet–inspired music on their three concerts this season; first up, Berlioz’s take. Plus Bloch (with cellist Joshua Roman) and Brahms. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 362-2300, syso.org. $15–$45. 3 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. 2CELLOS SEE EAR SUPPLY, BELOW. The Moore, 1932 Second Ave., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org. $42.50. 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. MODIGLIANI QUARTET A string quartet by Juan Arriaga, who died 10 days before he turned 20, plus Beethoven and Debussy.Meany Hall, UW campus, 5434880, uwworldseries.org. $34–$39. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Nov. 19.

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PBastards RUNS FRI., NOV. 15–THURS., NOV. 21 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 83 MINUTES.

Charlie Countryman OPENS FRI., NOV. 15 AT SOUTHCENTER. RATED R. 108 MINUTES.

Because of those Transformers movies, Shia LaBeouf gets the rap as a no-talent young journeyman who won the casting lottery. (Being fired by Daniel Sullivan, formerly of Seattle Rep, from this year’s Broadway revival of Orphans didn’t help his reputation.) But when not running from giant robots, LaBeouf hasn’t been terrible in The Company You Keep (as a reporter one step behind his story) or Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (as a financier one step behind Michael Douglas). He never seems to be in command of a movie, even when he lands the starring role. Yet there’s

PGod Loves Uganda

fair with his material. No editorial comment is needed when you have a shot of true believers wandering through a large room, apparently speaking in tongues; it might have come from a sci-fi picture. Showing what’s going on is enough. In a dismal village, a fresh-faced American woman discusses eternity with an older Ugandan lady. “If you die today and have not repented,” she reports, “you will not be with us in paradise. Does that scare you?” There are plenty of frights to go around in God Loves Uganda. ROBERT HORTON

In the Name Of

PI Am Divine RUNS FRI., NOV. 15–THURS., NOV. 21 AT GRAND ILLUSION. NOT RATED. 90 MINUTES.

Harris Glenn Milstead, aka the drag queen Divine, died 25 years ago at the peak of his career, untouched by AIDS, perhaps the most unlikely movie star in alternative-become-Hollywood screen history. Jeffrey Schwarz’s fond tribute documentary is rooted in Baltimore and the recollections of John Waters, Divine’s benevolent Svengali. (There were other formative mentors, we learn, but most are dead.) It may be hard to recall now, after Hairspray has been adapted into a popular stage show and movie musical (cue John Travolta) and with Drag Race a mainstream

RUNS FRI., NOV. 15–THURS., NOV. 21 AT SIFF FILM CENTER. NOT RATED. 83 MINUTES.

If he’d wanted to go the first-person Michael Moore route, Roger Ross Williams could have gotten some high drama into this documentary. Williams told The Hollywood Reporter that after shooting in Uganda for a few weeks, he was taken aside by a group of bishops who had discovered his sexual orientation. Homosexuality is illegal in that nation, and these clerics had been preaching their vehemently antigay beliefs to him, so the moment was tense. Williams was lucky; the priests began praying over him, the better to cure him. That moment is not included or described in God Loves Uganda, nor is Williams a presence in the movie (there is no narration). Instead, what he presents is a lucid and appalling portrait of the modern missionary movement and the effect it has had on a single African nation. Although Uganda’s widely criticized (and still pending) legislation threatening the death penalty for homosexual behavior is described in the movie, the broader subject here is the way American evangelicals are pouring money and legwork into the country. Williams tags along with missionaries from a Kansas City megachurch known as The International House of Prayer (yes, they call themselves IHOP) who pour their spiritual syrup over the burgeoning phenomenon of Christian fundamentalism in Uganda. That movement’s leaders, American and Ugandan alike, share a particular enthusiasm for denouncing homosexuality, which the movie connects to the rise in antigay sentiment in the country. The most humane exception is Bishop Christopher Senyonjo, whose sympathy with the LGBT community has made him controversial in Uganda. We also meet Kapya Kaoma, an Anglican priest who particularly notes how much harder it’s been to fight the AIDS epidemic since the instigation of “abstinence-only” policies encouraged by religious groups. Williams, who won an Oscar for the 2010 short film Music by Prudence, generally plays

so different from the shrieking live shows we see. And did you remember that Divine cut a series of late-disco albums during the ’80s? Those music videos are a treat to behold. Yet inescapably, Divine is now part of boomer nostalgia, like midnight movies, gay cabarets, and Studio 54 (where he met Andy Warhol, the Rolling Stones, and most of his idols). What was outrageous then almost seems quaint to us now. Time and distance have granted Divine a halo, and he wears it well. BRIAN MILLER

The diva in his prime.

TV staple, what a disruptive force Divine once was. He went beyond “passing” or prettiness or burlesque into a nether realm of exaggerated, messy revenge—“to use that anger from all his high-school traumas,” says Waters. In a way, Divine’s triumphant story is Revenge of the Nerds before nerds, sadistic glee before Glee. Before the 1988 Hairspray and his death that year, he told Charlie Rose “Cult status isn’t enough.” He wanted more praise from Pauline Kael. He wanted to be a real character actor, like Charles Laughton, who transcended drag. Sadly, he hardly got the chance. (One notable exception: Alan Rudolph’s 1987 Trouble in Mind, shot here in Seattle.) Divine died in his sleep soon after winning a recurring non-drag role on Married With Children (his episodes were never filmed). As a result, most of the clips come from Waters’ shock perennials, like Polyester, Pink Flamingos (with the notorious dog-poo-eating scene), and Female Trouble (also being screened at 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday). There are also generous selections from Waters’ home-movie collection and that of Divine’s family, from whom he was long estranged before a happy reunion. Praise rolls in from co-stars Mink Stole, Tab Hunter, and Ricki Lake and writers including The Village Voice’s Michael Musto. Milstead clearly had his demons—food chief among them—but also seemingly enjoyed near-total admiration from those in showbiz. He was a big stoner, says Waters, which might explain his mellow offstage demeanor,

RUNS FRI., NOV. 15–THURS., NOV. 21 AT SUNDANCE. NOT RATED. 102 MINUTES.

You may recall the controversy, some 20 years ago, surrounding the English film Priest, about a Catholic cleric hiding his homosexuality. A lot has changed since then. Still, after so many pedophilia lawsuits and exposés (including the 2006 documentary Deliver Us From Evil), this Polish drama might seem redundant—or worse, sensationalist. So we have a handsome parish priest, transferred from Warsaw to a rural village, where he oversees a reform-school farm full of shirtless, horny teens. Father Adam (Andrzej Chyra) came late to God, he explains in a sun-washed sermon, though he’s vague about his past. When not working (generally out of his cassock), he exhausts himself by running through the forest to deplete his desire. After rebuffing the wife of a colleague, he makes tearful, drunken Skype confessions to his unsympathetic sister in Toronto. He is, profoundly and sadly, alone. A rough-trade, bottle-blond teen arrives at the farm, and Adam watches aghast—or enviously—as he cornholes another lad on the rectory couch. (That defiled furniture is promptly removed.) But lurking around the periphery is gentle, long-haired farmhand Lukasz (Mateusz Kościukiewicz), nicknamed “Humpty,” who silently falls in love with the kind Adam. How can this situation be tolerated? Why doesn’t Adam simply leave the church and take Lukasz back to the more-tolerant city? The weight of tradition and the rhythms of rural life are keenly felt in Małgośka Szumowska’s very assured drama, handsomely shot in widescreen. (Her Elles, with Juliette Binoche as a journalist studying hookers, played the Varsity last year.) Lukasz is loyal to his family because they’re poor, and Adam is loyal to his flock because they plainly need him. In the Name Of isn’t so much about sexual frustration or religious hypocrisy as the conservative bonds of Catholic Poland. Lukasz and the reform-school boys were born after communism, but Adam and his church are still ruled by an inflexible hierarchy. (“We don’t sweep dirt under the carpet,” says a bishop, who does just that.) A different film might explode into conflict or reward us with a happy ending. Instead, in a very deliberate fashion, Szumowska suggests how a cycle of secrecy is perpetuated beneath the collar. BRIAN MILLER

Kill Your Darlings OPENS FRI., NOV. 15 AT MERIDIAN, SUNDANCE, AND LINCOLN SQUARE. RATED R. 100 MINUTES.

The Beat generation grew up on movies (and jazz and jukeboxes and Rimbaud), but it hasn’t been well served by the movies. Howl, On the Road, and Big Sur are among recent efforts to capture that boundary-breaking time; Kill Your

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 13 — 19, 2013

If Alfred Hitchcock were still alive and exploring 21st-century modes of moviemaking, would he come up with something like Bastards? The Master of Suspense changed with the times, and maybe it’s not too far-fetched to imagine him experimenting in the style operating here: a terse, elliptical, and ultimately horrifying method that withholds as much information as it doles out. This thought passed through my mind halfway through Bastards, but make no mistake: This movie is definitely the work of French filmmaker Claire Denis (White Material, 35 Shots of Rum, Beau Travail, etc.), whose cryptic approach only adds to the film’s creeping sense of unease. The picture begins by contemplating a wall of rain, as though preparing us for how hard it will be to see and understand what’s going on. A man commits suicide on this rainy night, and his brother-in-law Marco (Vincent Lindon) quits his job as a ship’s captain in order to come home and sort things out for his deeply damaged sister ( Julie Bataille) and niece (Lola Créton). Marco moves into a huge, empty apartment across the hall from a prominent businessman (Michel Subor), who lives with trophy mistress Raphaëlle (Chiara Mastroianni) and their young son. The hints that emerge about this world grow darker as the movie goes on—and are, in fact, about as dark as a family nightmare can get. With his blunt masculinity, Lindon raises our hopes that his rugged loner can rescue the disaster. That’s what rugged loners do in movies. But Denis is aware of how the power stacks up in this situation, so the resolution is probably going to be closer to Vertigo than Rear Window. And for a movie obsessed with how difficult it is to see the truth (and how reluctant people are to acknowledge it), it is fitting that surveillance cameras and other recording devices are an almost-unnoticed fact of life—culminating in the last, terrible sequence. A final piece of evidence, knowingly recorded for a camera, confirms our worst fears. Bastards is a skillfully assembled mosaic, the work of a filmmaker fully in control of her talents; and despite the grim material, we can at least find some satisfaction in how well the tale has been told. But Claire Denis sure doesn’t make it easy on us. ROBERT HORTON

something authentically fugitive and rabbity about the guy, as though he never stops long enough to think anything through. You can’t really imagine him playing a master spy or genius hacker; and it may take another decade to see if he pulls a McConaughey and develops any depth as an actor. For that reason, LaBeouf works just fine as a scared young Chicago tourist who stumbles into Bucharest’s underworld of gangsters and classical musicians. Innocent, bewildered Charlie knows nothing about handguns or Handel; he just runs through the city with goons and cops on his trail, receives multiple beatings, and falls in love with a lovely young cellist (Evan Rachel Wood). Oh, and one more thing: Charlie sees dead people. There’s even a Sixth Sense joke in Charlie Countryman, which is a little more meta than needed. Charlie communes with the spirits of his kindly mom (Melissa Leo) and the cellist’s wise father (Ion Caramitru). Yet these ghostly interludes are mostly lighthearted—nothing so leaden as M. Night Shyamalan. Effectively shot on location in Romania, Charlie Countryman is fundamentally a chase movie, with Mads Mikkelsen and Til Schweiger the baddies in pursuit of LaBeouf. His Charlie is certainly part of the action, only somehow always one step behind. BRIAN MILLER

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» FROM PAGE 31 Darlings is earlier and much more specific, tackling one crime and a few months on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, where a naive freshman arrives at Columbia University in 1944. His name? Allen Ginsberg, the shy son of a New Jersey poet and a mad housewife. That Daniel Radcliffe plays the young Ginsberg means people will take notice of this film. (Meanwhile, his Harry Potter colleague Rupert Grint provides minor comic relief in Charlie Countryman, also out this week.) Radcliffe has been on a tear since Deathly Hallows, working hard and often to prove he’s got a future outside Hogwarts. He does, and there’s much to commend about how he turns a watchful virgin into a shrewd campus survivor. I just wish the story—by Austin Bunn and first-time director John Krokidas—better served his talents. Ginsberg is initially awed by fellow student Lucien Carr (DiCaprio DNA culture Dane DeHaan), a privileged, blond, romantic WASP so unlike himself. Carr has other male admirers, including William S. Burroughs (Ben Foster, perfect), David Kammerer (Michael C. Hall), and—in a less sexual way—Jack Kerouac ( Jack Huston). Students of Beat literature know how and why all these famous names actually converged; for younger readers, let’s just say that a killing links them. Nothing dates faster than your father’s bohemia. The filmmakers do everything possible to make a 70-year-old murder mystery seem fresh. Kill Your Darlings is aggressively overscored with anachronistic tunes, overedited to match the amphetamines, and overserious about these poets’ grand sense of themselves. This self-declared “Libertine Circle” tears through the Village and Harlem, their strenuous jollity and campus hijinks supposedly corresponding to the coming literary revolution. (Howl and On the Road would be published in 1955 and ’57, respectively.) But sometimes dormroom bullshit sessions are nothing more than that, and the movie never lets Allen and company relax in this hothouse of homoerotic camaraderie; they’re too busy posing on pedestals. This stridently unsubtle film is afraid of showing the dull business of writing, yet I prefer its quieter moments—Allen’s proud father (David Cross) reading his college admissions letter; the tart disapproval of Kerouac’s neglected girlfriend (Elizabeth Olsen); or Allen finally summoning the nerve to cruise a sailor in a gay bar. Unlike Ginsberg’s poetry, Kill Your Darlings seems to have been written in all-caps. BRIAN MILLER

Spinning Plates

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RUNS FRI., NOV. 15–THURS., NOV. 21 AT VARSITY. NOT RATED. 93 MINUTES.

While the idea of a food documentary about three extremely varied places—a 150-year-old small-town country kitchen, a mom-and-pop Mexican joint, and a three-star Michelin restaurant—seems interesting, the delivery here is surprisingly sluggish. That’s not the chefs’ fault. What comes across in Joseph Levy’s film are the different yet equally compelling connections that these cooks have to their food. The family-run Breitbach’s in Iowa serves as the backbone of the community, a social hub where locals gather as much for the company as for the fried chicken and homemade pies. At Tucson’s La Cocina de Gabby, cooking is what binds a family together; at Alinea, it’s the

artistic outlet for Chicago chef Grant Achatz, who’s risen from the kitchens of Thomas Keller and Charlie Trotter to become a kind of Howard Roark-ian figure. But also like Roark in The Fountainhead, Achatz ultimately comes across as a caricature. Here’s the culinary renegade creating nitrous-frozen olive-oil lozenges; throwing spices and smearing fruits onto tablecloths with Jackson Pollock-like flourishes; building fork sculptures on which to serve his esoteric creations. When things turn against him, sadly, we almost don’t like him enough to empathize. Though Spinning Plates tries to establish a cohesive thread among these three restaurants and their proprietors, our attention is sliced too thin. Also, to manipulate our heartstrings, Levy too-carefully edits the catastrophes, emotionally ambushing us in the film’s final third. You haven’t gotten to know these people well enough to genuinely feel their losses or cheer their victories. To its credit, Spinning Plates isn’t as bombastic and unrealistic as the Food Network. Still, I left this quiet documentary feeling hungry for more. NICOLE SPRINKLE

Sunlight Jr. RUNS FRI., NOV. 15–THURS., NOV. 21 AT SUNDANCE. NOT RATED. 95 MINUTES.

A minimum-wage drama, Sunlight Jr. is an account of people who mean well, work hard, and still can’t make it. The title is a particularly bitter piece of irony, because the lives of this group of South Floridians couldn’t be less cheerful at the moment. Sunlight Jr. is the name of the convenience store where Melissa (Naomi Watts) holds down a cashier job. It’s dull work, but she hopes to snag a place in the company’s collegeplacement program—if only she can withstand the lazy harassment of her manager and the threat of a transfer to the dreaded graveyard shift. Melissa lives with Richie (Matt Dillon), a boozy paraplegic. These two make the film’s early reels promising, especially for the way writer/ director Laurie Collyer (Sherrybaby) treats this relationship: Melissa and Richie are affectionate, clumsy, sexual. They don’t live their lives in a smart way, but they care for each other despite the truly tough hand they’ve been dealt—not just his injury, but a general cloud of socioeconomic misfortune. A variety of challenges and opportunities come their way, including the predatory behavior of Melissa’s drug-dealing ex (Norman Reedus, from The Walking Dead) and the dismal example of her mother (a blowsy Tess Harper). The presence of movie stars Watts and Dillon means we won’t take any of this for documentary footage, but Collyer’s realistic method veers close to recreating the maddening behavior of selfdefeating folk in reality-TV shows. Collyer’s sympathy for her hard-luck characters is admirable, although it’s tough to cast glamorous actors in these roles and expect her dreary, kitchen-sink world to ring completely true. The going-nowhere lives are maybe a little too easy to caricature, and the sheer misery of this trap is grueling indeed. The only thing that truly clicks is that central relationship, its moments of unexpected tenderness and support; if only Melissa and Richie could tune out the rest of the world and need nothing of it. But the rest of the world keeps intruding, and it ain’t pretty. ROBERT HORTON E

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arts&culture» Music

Spirit Harvest

After listening to wheat fields, RA Scion releases The Sickle and the Sword and reaps a revolution. BY KELTON SEARS

E D I T E D B Y G W E N D O LY N E L L I O T T

Wednesday, Nov. 13 The title of JILLETTE JOHNSON’s debut EP, Whiskey & Frosting, describes her music perfectly. There’s the smooth sweetness one would expect from piano-driven pop, but it’s not without an edge thanks to Johnson’s sharp lyrics. Her debut album, Water in a Whale, full of the same mix of sweet and salty tunes, was released in June. With Camille Bloom and Jordan Lake. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, thebarboza.com. 7 p.m. $10 adv. 21 and over. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY As TONIGHT ALIVE’s Jenna McDougall told Seattle Weekly in March, Australian bands have to become successful overseas if they want to make it big Down Under. It’s not always the easiest or cheapest route for an up-and-coming group, but with a number of international tours and two albums—including September’s The Other Side—under its belt, this pop-punk quintet, it’s safe to say, is one Australia is proud to boast of. With The Downtown Fiction, For the Foxes, Echosmith, and the Matt Bacnis Band. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 262-0482, elcorazonseattle.com. 6:15 p.m. $13 adv./$15 DOS. All ages/bar with ID. ACP

F

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Thursday, Nov. 14

CATALDO Seattle pop songsmith Eric Anderson recently

Blue’s spectral coo buoys “Constant,” with a hook that haunts you like a ghost, and Cypher’s militia-ready verse in “Seven Generations” is a relevant rebel manifesto on sustainability: “Woke up with a new, clear mission to go for/Shut down; how long the system been broke for?” This latter track was inspired by a life-changing visit from the father of one of RA Scion’s friends, a First Nations man who blessed the rapper’s home and taught him the Native concept of Seven Generations—the idea that today’s actions will have consequences for those seven generations down the line. “He did a traditional Native blessing ceremony on my home, and it was such a powerful moment,” RA Scion says. “We could feel the energy in the house for years after that. Other people too would walk in the house and immediately identify with this pure, divine spirit.”

completed his fourth full-length album under the Cataldo moniker, a moody and moving addition to his soulful pop portfolio. But this isn’t a record release show; the album, currently bearing the title LP4, is due next year. Rather, this is a band relaunch, during which Anderson will test out some of that fresh material and trot out a new stage show—which, among other things, will debut the songwriter’s clean-shaven face. With Night Cadet, Silver Torches. Barboza. 8 p.m. $10 adv. MARK S. BAUMGARTEN NIGHTLANDS started when Philadelphia multiinstrumentalist (and War on Drugs bassist) Dave Hartley recorded the music in his dreams on a bedside recorder and then added lush, intricate instrumentation and vocal harmonies in the studio. His second fulllength, Oak Island, arrived early this year, filled with entrancing pop lullabies about space and spirituality. For this tour, Hartley is playing without a band, stripping the songs down to their most elemental state, perhaps arriving closer to the dreams whence they came. With USF. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 7844880, sunsettavern.com. 9 p.m. $8. MSB

That spirit is what makes the record such a

singers together. Lotte Kestner just finished recording an album with Seattle/Texas songwriting pair Ormonde; San Francisco’s Debbie Neigher is releasing an album November 15; and Lena Simon and Whitney Lyman of Pollens have been working on solo projects. Columbia City Theater, 4918 Rainier Ave. S., 723-0088, columbiacitytheater.com. 8 p.m. $10/$12 DOS. MICHAEL F. BERRY During its 2012 world tour, SWITCHFOOT captured footage of its two loves, music and surfing. Now the altrock quintet is premiering the result, a film called Fading West, before playing songs from the tobe-released album of that name. New fans will get an in-depth introduction to the band, while

cial guests Blake Lewis and Rodney Hazard, the Tempers, Romaro Franceswa, and Mike Giacolino. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442. $12. All ages. 7 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 14. E ksears@seattleweekly.com

LADIES CLUB 2 It’s no small task to get this many busy

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

standout. Rarely do artists put as much on the line as RA Scion does here—something he’s been no stranger to, in releases like Tobacco Road with hip-hop duo Common Market. This is not just fun and games, but heavy soul-searching. The production is appropriately heady as well, an inventive ambient take on typical hip-hop. “Hoof x Horn” throws a breathy, chopped-up monk-chant sample on top of a beat. “Myrrh” sounds like dew dripping off a fallen log, with trickling chimes dancing around on pitch-shifted vocals that evoke Flying Lotus at his most chilled-out. The album-release show will live up to the The Sickle and the Sword ’s focus on interconnectedness—it’s a benefit for the members of Seattle surf band La Luz, who were recently in a serious accident that totaled their van, destroyed their gear, and sent them to the hospital. All the proceeds will go to help the band back on their feet. “Just wanted to help out the homegirls,” RA Scion says. With live instrumentation and spe-

Friday, Nov. 15

Jessie Ware

longtime fans will appreciate deeper access to the group they know and love. The Moore, 1932 Second Ave., 467-5510, stgpresents.org/moore. 7 p.m. $25–$35 adv./$30–$40 DOS. All ages. ACP JESSIE WARE separates herself from the hordes of other neo-R&B/soul vocalists with her hip taste in collaborators; she’s sung on tracks from producers like SBTRKT, Disclosure, and Sampha. Debut album Devotion has a lot of those retro-futurist Drake-style beats that R&B singers scramble to sing on nowadays, and Ware’s pop songwriting is in peak form. With The Invisible. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 784-4849, stgpresents.org. 9 p.m. $25. All ages. ANDREW GOSPE GRAMATIK, the stage name of Brooklyn-by-way-ofSlovenia musician Denis Jasarevic, warns fans that as a part-time musician and full-time comedian, his music is one of “many elaborate jokes.” But if his grooveheavy jams, including those on 2013’s The Age of Reason, are made in jest, then Jasarevic is a damn fine comedian. With heRobust and Exmag. Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxonline.com. 8:30 p.m. $20. All ages/bar with ID. ACP

Saturday, Nov. 16

LYNX This Bay Area songwriter and producer amalgam-

ates an orchestra’s worth of strings with electronic textures and acoustic drums. Fitting for this electroacoustic polymath, she’s collaborated with EDM stars Bassnectar and Beats Antique as well as Blues Traveler harmonica virtuoso John Popper. With Natasha Kmeto, Spyn Reset, Ganjaology. Nectar Lounge, 412 N. 36th St., 632-2020, nectarlounge.com. 9 p.m. $8. AG KRONOS QUARTET No chamber ensemble in recent history has done more to advance the cause of contemporary art music than the Kronos Quartet. The group, founded in Seattle by violinist David Harrington, played its first concert here 40 years ago this month. Since then, the Kronos has collaborated not only with the most prominent contemporary composers—like Phillip Glass, Steve Reich, and John Adams—but also with a number of popular musicians, such as Amon Tobin, Sigur Rós, and most recently Bryce Dessner. The National’s guitarist supplied four compositions for the quartet’s most recent album, Aheym (“homeward” in Yiddish). Tonight’s concert will feature Dessner’s “Tenebre” as well as a performance of Predator Songstress: Warrior with the Degenerate Art Ensemble. Other works on the program highlight the group’s diverse and extensive repertoire, from Wagner to Penderecki. The Neptune. 8 p.m. $44. MFB ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO For more than 40 years, Escovedo has been following, seeking, and leading the rock-’n’-roll spirit, from his time as a young punk in Bay Area band the Nuns to his pivotal role in the Americana movement of the ’90s. Currently he’s touring with the Sensitive Boys, continuing to play new material in a rustic but raucous style he’s termed “American Baroque,” at age 62. He might just be more rock ’n’ roll than ever.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 13 — 19, 2013

or 19 years, Seattle rapper RA Scion was an adherent of the Baha’i faith. Drawn by its community focus and unique take on the “journey of the soul,” he found a home in Baha’i’s fold after abandoning his Southern Baptist upbringing. Then in 2010, after some serious reflection, he left Baha’i as well. “I wanted it to be the revolution I was looking for, and it wasn’t,” RA Scion says. “I understand why it can’t be. It’s a religion. It’s a respectful religion. You have to be humble above all things. Revolutionaries can’t be humble, you know?” RA Scion’s new album, The Sickle and the Sword, is indeed a personal revolution, one he hopes can give voice to the societal revolution for which he hungers. It also just might be Seattle’s rap album of the year. From start to finish, the record is an ethereal spiritual journey—a novel, earnest declaration of purpose and human connectedness that floats atop Rodney Hazard’s swirling, sorcerous production. It can be a confusing journey, with its incredibly dense rhymes and references to obscure pagan harvest festivals, cat-worshipping covens, and Native American eco-philosophy. For instance, on “In Veneration” RA Scion raps, “Blood moon about to burst/ Spill the secrets of the seekers it revealed along the search.” Conceptually, the record follows a loose timeline that starts with the creation of the universe. After dropping some esoteric knowledge about ancient traditions like Saturnalia and Lughnasadh, RA Scion takes you through the apocalypse and finally blasts off to outer space, where humanity starts a new colony in the cosmos. “The album has this focus on nature,” RA Scion tells Seattle Weekly. “When we lose this connection, when we destroy what provides for us and where we come from, there will be nothing left for us. Are we prepared for that?” This new spiritual headspace is on display in the verdant video for the record’s first single, “Constant.” Opening with printed words from English author George Eliot—“Thy bounty shines in autumn, unconfined; and spreads a common feast for all that live”—the video surveys lush, misted Orcas Island landscapes and urges listeners to “say grace” and “listen close to those wheat fields.” The Sickle and the Sword deals in the idea of connectedness not only thematically but practically, showcasing collaborations with Motopony’s Daniel Blue, Kung Foo Grip’s Greg Cypher, and former American Idol finalist Blake Lewis. None of these collaborations seem forced or just for show—instead, they add to the tangible mystic world RA Scion has crafted.

SevenNights

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mainstage

dinner & show

WED/NOVEMBER 13 & THU/NOVEMBER 14 • 7:30PM FRI/NOVEMBER 15 - SAT/NOVEMBER 16 • 7PM & 10PM

the atomic bombshells... lost in space!

SUN/NOVEMBER 17 • 7:30PM - SQUARE PEG PRESENTS

michael kaeshammer

TUE/NOVEMBER 19 • 7PM & 9:30PM - 91.3 KBCS WELCOMES

rokia traore

FRI/NOVEMBER 22 • 7PM & 9:30PM

the dusty 45s

w/ jack geary & the owl n’ thistle band SAT/NOVEMBER 23 • 8PM - STG PRESENTS

brett dennen w/ grizfolk SUN/NOVEMBER 24 • 7:30PM

chris hillman & herb pedersen w/ mary gauthier

WED/NOVEMBER 27 • 7PM & 10PM - CAN CAN PRESENTS SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 13 — 19, 2013

buckaroos

34

next • 11/29 & 30 the paperboys • 12/1 abbey arts presents winter round • 12/2 2nd annual dammit liz holiday special • 12/3 ed kowalczyk “i alone acoustic” • 12/4 omar torrez • 12/5 david bromberg quintet • 12/6 vaden todd lewis • 12/7 an evening with joe henry • 12/8 an evening with buika • 12/10 rhett miller • 12/12 - 12/28 land of the sweets: the burlesque nutcracker • 12/31 an evening with storm large • 1/4 seth freeman cd release party with the cody rentas band

happy hour every day • 11/13 daniel rapport trio • 11/14 smoke & honey • 11/15 gypsy swing happy hour: the djangomatics / joe doria trio • 11/16 country lips • 11/17 lisa and the po’k chops • 11/18 monday jazz sessions w/ pereira/goessl/bush trio • 11/19 singer-songwriter showcase featuring: amanda sue winterhalter, holly pulliam and ashley williams • 11/20 closed for a private event TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE · PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1 HOUR PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW · ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

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216 UNION STREET, SEATTLE · 206.838.4333


arts&culture» Music With Amy Cook. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. 9 p.m. $20 adv. MSB

Sunday, Nov. 17

THUNDERCAT Stephen Bruner is a frighteningly talented

bassist and a musical eccentric, two facts that led to him signing with Flying Lotus’ Brainfeeder Records, an electronica-heavy label where he’s something of an outlier. His music—joyous, falsetto-led electro-funk—is also far more danceable than anything his labelmates put out. With Kingdom Crumbs. Barboza. 8 p.m. $15 adv. AG Seattle’s DARKPINE is like a dreamier Yeasayer, chockfull of dark synths and bouncy bass lines that sound dance-ready in an off-kilter way. Tonight the band is celebrating the release of its self-titled EP, produced by Scott Colburn, who’s also worked with Arcade Fire and Animal Collective. With Hibou, Us On Roofs, Uh Oh Eskimo. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, chopsuey.com. $7, 8 p.m. All ages. KELTON SEARS MOONFACE Spencer Krug (Wolf Parade, Sunset Rubdown) writes masterfully composed indie epics full of cryptic lyricism that would stand up to academic literary analysis. Moonface, his newest project, has kept up that momentum. On his new record, Julia With Blue Jeans On, Krug strips his setup all the way down to solo piano, which will make tonight’s performance one of his most intimate yet. With Special Guest. Columbia City Theater. 8 p.m. $10 adv./$12 DOS. 21 and over. KS 2CELLOS Classically trained cellists Luka Šulic and Stjepan Hauser bring new life to both classic tunes and modern favorites in the most beautifully unexpected way. You may think you know Michael Jackson’s “Smooth Criminal” or Rihanna’s “We Found Love,” but these arrangements will open your ears to familiar songs in a whole new light. The Moore. 7 p.m. $32.50– $42.50. KEEGAN PROSSER

The Fruit Bats

Thursday, November 14

T

CULTS has moved in an ever-so-slightly darker direction

with sophomore album Static, a record informed by two solid years of touring and the dissolution of a fouryear relationship between the band’s primary members Madeline Follin and Brian Oblivion. The group’s classicist indie-pop is now denser and weightier, with less of a saccharine sheen. With SACCO, Mood Rings. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $18 adv. All ages. AG

Monday, Nov. 18

DALEY Seattle gets the whole blue-eyed-soul thing.

We’ve been listening to and loving on Allen Stone for years. Which is why up-and-coming British crooner Daley is exactly what we’ve been waiting for. With his perfectly coiffed ginger mohawk and sultry R&B chops, 24-year-old Gareth Daley broke onto the UK scene in 2010 when he was featured on the Gorillaz hit, “Doncamatic.” He’s since released his own EP, 2012’s Alone Together, a six-song collection that’s positioning him to be the next big thing in R&B. It’s the smoky, earnest quality in his vocals that make tracks like “Smoking Gun” and “Love Is a Losing Game” hit you in the gut, and that romantic coo makes for the best kind of pillow talk. Having already worked with the likes of Pharrell Williams, Jessie J, and Emeli Sande, this marks Daley’s first extended run of shows in the U.S., and it’s going to be one you don’t want to miss. Barboza. 7 p.m. $14 adv. 21 and over. KP MELLOWHIGH The trio of Hodgy Beats, Domo Genesis, and producer Left Brain is one of several Odd Future offshoot hip-hop acts. Its music is more varied and party-ready than the grinding slo-mo beats and permastoned flow of Earl Sweatshirt, OF’s rapper du jour, but also less distinctive. With Slow Dance, Gift Uh Gab. Neumos. 8 p.m. $15 adv. All ages. AG

www.elcorazonseattle.com

109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17

THE FLESHTONES with The Split Squad, The Boss Martians,

THE CASUALTIES with Negative Approach, MDC,

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17

Studio 66 and El Corazon Present:

and Atomic Bride Doors at 8 / Show at 8:30PM 21+. $12 ADV / $15 DOS Mike Thrasher Presents:

ANTHONY GREEN with Dave Davison (Maps & Atlases),

and Brick + Mortar Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $15 ADV / $18 DOS

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15

EZRA FURMAN with Tristen, Carson Allen, Ashtree,

and The Requisite Lounge Show. Doors at 7:30 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16 KISW (99.9 FM) Metal Shop & El Corazon Present:

ALESTORM with Trollfest,

Gypsyhawk, The Devils Of Loudun, and Jipsea Party Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $17 ADV / $20 DOS

The Insurgence, and Sledgeback Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $18 ADV / $20 DOS El Corazon Presents The Casualties Aftershow Party Featuring A Live Performance From:

NOEL AUSTIN’S PHREAKS

Music begins immediately after the Casualties show in the main showroom

Lounge Show. 21+. FREE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18

RONI LEE GROUP with Featuring

Performances By Seattle S!rens Of Rock: Aury Moore (AMB), Lizzy Daymont (Heart By Heart), Brenda Kashmire (Heartless), Stephanie Smith (Pretty Enemy), Alexis Ames (Echoes), and Kristina Pilskog (Vocalist)

Doors at 8 / Show at 8:30PM 21+. $5 ADV / $8 DOS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18

SAVE THE FOREST

with Mosquito Valentine Trio, and The One Inch Oneders Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

JUST ANNOUNCED 1/10 EARLY - SCHOOL OF ROCK PERFORM BIG 4 (METALLICA, ANTHRAX, SLAYER, MEGADETH)

1/10 LATE - SCHOOL OF ROCK PERFORM BLACK SABBATH 5/6 ICED EARTH UP & COMING 11/19 THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA 11/20 PROTEST THE HERO 11/21 FINNTROLL 11/22 AARON CARTER 11/23 AXE MURDER BOYZ 11/23 LOUNGE COWARDICE 11/25 DOGSTRUM 11/26 THY ART IS MURDER 11/27 EGO LIKENESS 11/29 ADESTRIA 11/30 THE DICKIES 12/1 BIG B 12/2 DINOSAUR BONES 12/3 LOUNGE DANIELIA COTTON 12/5 SUICIDAL TENDENCIES Tickets now available at cascadetickets.com - No per order fees for online purchases. Our on-site Box Office is open 1pm-5pm weekdays in our office and all nights we are open in the club - $2 service charge per ticket Charge by Phone at 1.800.514.3849. Online at www.cascadetickets.com - Tickets are subject to service charge

The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: see details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html and for an application email us at info@elcorazonseattle.com

COURTESY OF SUB POP

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 13 — 19, 2013

The Fruit Bats’ current tour was already intended to be a bit of a nostalgia trip, as the band was scheduled to play its brilliant (and recently reissued) 2003 full-length Mouthfuls. But now it will be a proper wake, a celebration of a life well-lived that provided the folk boom of the ‘00s with a little levity and a handful of truly transcendent songs. All that said, this really isn’t that big a deal. Johnson says he plans to continue recording and releasing music. He will even play Fruit Bats songs from time to time, but the band itself will soon be a memory. So here’s to good decisions. Here’s to the Fruit Bats. May they live on in our hearts, our minds, and our record collections. With the Donkeys. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 682-1414, stgpresents.org/neptune. 8 p.m. $16.50 adv./$18 DOS. MARK BAUMGARTEN

his may well be your last chance to see the Fruit Bats before the band ceases to be. This is an unexpected development. The Fruit Bats appeared to be an unbreakable band. There could be no artistic differences, since the project’s existence has relied solely on the participation of principal member Eric D. Johnson, the Chicago native who has lead the folk-rock group through its many incarnations for 13 years. And yet, earlier this week, Johnson announced that he will be putting his band to rest. “There is no major dramatic reason,” the characteristically chill musician told Paste Magazine. “It’s been a long run and it’s time for change.” It’s a death with dignity, then; the decision to move on is about Johnson’s career. A member of the musical middle class, the songwriter has been making a chunk of his living producing other artists—most recently Nina Persson of the Cardigans— and lending his breezy compositions to films, including the soundtrack for the Paul Rudd vehicle Our Idiot Brother. Without a band to keep up, the 37-year-old artist will be able to fully capitalize on those days spent in the studio and on the road, cultivating a distinctive sound and Eric D. Johnson a loyal fan base. He is moving on, but not before giving us all a brief moment to look back.

El Corazon

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arts&culture» Music

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

THOMAS DOLBY On his current tour, Thomas “She

P R O M O T IO NS

EVENT S

M US IC

Tuesday, Nov. 19

MUSIC NEWSLETTER

The inside scoop on upcoming shows and the latest reviews.

Buy, ARSeTllS A&ND BEaNTrtE ReTArINM ENT

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We pay more for your vinyl Lots of punk, wave and alt Closed Monday • Tue-Fri 1-8 • Sat 11-8 • Sun 11-7 9632 16th Ave SW, White Center, WA

In beautiful downtown White Center

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 13 — 19, 2013

Send events to music@seattleweekly.com. See seattleweekly.com for full listings.

you stomping your feet and joining the music-making. With Albatross, White Garden. Chop Suey. 7 p.m. $5 SU students/$8 GA. ALICIA PRICE BIG FREEDIA This queen diva has already stunned Seattle crowds with her bootylicious twerking twice in the past six months—first as the unconventional opening act for The Postal Service’s KeyArena show, then at this year’s Capitol Hill Block Party. To say her brand of bounce music is something all its own would be doing her a disservice. Neumos. 8 p.m. $15 adv. 21 and over. KP LUPE FIASCO The most recent effort from this Chicago rapper is the confusingly titled Food & Liquor II: The Great American Rap Album Pt. I. (Apparently the record that broke him, Food & Liquor, wasn’t a great American rap album.) This tour is in advance of his sixth album Tetsuo & Youth (also, it seems, not a great American rap album), set to drop early next year. With Stalley, Sadistik. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 6520444, showboxonline.com. 8 p.m. $32.50 adv./$36 DOS. All ages. AG

age Stereo

Records, Guitars & Vint

shop, Fa Good selection, Fun

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Surfer vibes join with the sounds of Seattle rock to create LURES, a trio of 20-somethings who will make you want to surf the rain-filled streets. The group just released Vacant, a two-track preview for its upcoming LP, to be released in January. Joining the show is Bigfoot Wallace & His Wicked Sons, a dirty gospel-rock group. Heavy guitar and organs will get

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The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band w/Chris Shiflett and the Dead Peasants Friday, November 15

T

his co-headlining tour was born when Shiflett, whose day job is guitarist for Foo Fighters, signed a deal for side project the Dead Peasants with indie label SideOneDummy, who then suggested a team-up with another act on its roster, Indiana’s Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band. Both bands play retro-influenced roots music, and both bandleaders are ripping guitar players. “This tour’s definitely going to be a showcase of guitar picking,” says Peyton, who plays in a fingerpicked style that allows him to manage rhythm and melody simultaneously. “I’ve tried to take the style of country-blues and finger-style guitar and take it somewhere else, places it’s not been.” Though the show’s format hasn’t yet solidified, both bands will play full sets and leave plenty of room for collaboration. “We’ll be doing some jamming,” Shiflett says. The Foo Fighters axeman put together the

SIDEONEDUMMY RECORDS

EE K LY

Blinded Me With Science” Dolby is presenting a show centered on his latest film, The Invisible Lighthouse. In the movie’s trailer, officials deny Dolby information about a soon-to-be closed lighthouse, which causes him to throw on a pair of night-vision goggles and figure things out on his own. A Q&A session and performance round out the evening. Showbox at the Market. 8 p.m. $20 adv./$25 DOS. 21 and over. ACP

Dead Peasants because he’d long been a fan of outlaw country and the Bakersfield sound. “Part of why I wanted to do this band,” he says, “was to go to honky-tonk school. I’d never really played country before, and I wanted to dig into it.” He was shocked when people at gigs started to dance. “That felt good,” he says. “I was really taken with that.” Peyton loved roots music growing up too, but admits that as a young musician he wasn’t as open-minded as Shiflett, who was raised on punk. “If it wasn’t country-blues, I hated it,” Peyton says. “I was really obtuse.” But Peyton—a real Reverend who has actually married fans at some of his shows—eventually came to appreciate a much wider swath of sounds. When he started to write songs, he wanted them to pay tribute to the music he loved, but also have them be something that wouldn’t sound out of place among contemporary bands on someone’s iPod. “I don’t want to be some museum-piece throwback,” he says. “I want to make music that’s timeless.” Though these two bands have different sounds, the through line between them is undeniable: Both manage to infuse modernism into styles rooted in the past—and both will make you want to dance. With Spoonshine. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. 9 p.m. $14 adv./$16 DOS. 21 and over. DAVE LAKE E

Chris Shiflett (front, in hat) and the Dead Peasants.


2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 jazzalley.com

LocaLReLeases Mount Eerie, Pre-Human Ideas (out now, P. W.

Elverum & Sun, pwelverumandsun.com) A year ago, Mount Eerie’s Phil Elverum released a 7-inch titled Clear Moon/Ocean Roar (condensed versions). Side A featured tracks from his Clear Moon album played atop each other at once, and Side B did the same with Ocean Roar. The result sounds like falling into a black hole. The idea behind the strange single likely wasn’t for serious listening, but rather a funny conceptual joke. And hey, it is pretty funny. Elverum is no stranger to yuk-yuks, as he pens his own comics Fancy People Adventures, full of surreal antihumor about granola bars and Kindle headphone jacks. Similarly, Pre-Human Ideas is also probably not intended for serious listening. Consisting of modified instructional demo versions of tracks from Clear Moon and Ocean Roar, this album finds Elverum throwing strange layers of MIDI instruments on top of songs and Auto-Tuning his voice, so as to “digitally [pose] as a hoarse woman or a rough older man.” Unsurprisingly, the album isn’t revelatory or even listenable, but that isn’t the point: It might be just to make die-hard Elverum fans chuckle. Bookending the album are two analog organ tracks, “ORGANS (Pale Lights)” and “ORGANS (The Place Live),” which kind of work as ambient tracks. But in the end, with all the MIDI and Auto-Tune, at least now we know what it would have sounded like if T-Pain had written the music for Twin Peaks. KELTON SEARS

The towering choruses on tracks like “Volcano Surfing,” “I See the Light,” and “Multiples” are some of the album’s clear highlights. So is guitarist/singer Irene Barber’s inspired wailing; her outsized vocals soar over the band’s thick guitar sound. The main problem with I’ll Keep You is its stifling consistency. Every song includes more or less the same structure and elements: mildly overdriven guitars, lead lines that mirror the vocal melodies, and a rhythm section that charges ahead at mid-tempo. On a formal level, these are fine rock songs, but tunes this straightforward need to try harder to be distinctive. For moderately experimental modern rock, you could do a lot worse than I’ll Keep You. Unfortunately, that’s probably the best thing you can say about it. (Thurs., Nov. 14, Chop Suey) ANDREW GOSPE

XVIII Eyes, I’ll Keep You (out now, self-released, xviiieyes.com) XVIII Eyes is the new, far more gothic-sounding moniker of the band formerly known as Eighteen Individual Eyes. The hardrock four-piece made the change because the old name was a mouthful and the new one is “straightforward, but still enigmatic.” The music on sophomore full-length I’ll Keep You has also been streamlined and polished compared to its predecessor, 2012’s Unnovae Nights. Though the band’s music was never as abrasive or subversive as its press would have you believe (psychedelic shoegaze this is not, unless the sole criterion for that is owning more than one distortion pedal), the songwriting and production are tighter here.

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STEVE TYRELL WITH SPECIAL GUEST DIANE SCHUUR THURS, NOV 14 - SUN, NOV 17

Jazz’s top two Grammy-winning vocal crooners

THE FOUR FRESHMEN TUES, NOV 19 - THURS, NOV 21

American male vocal band blending openharmonic jazz with big band vocal group sounds founded in the barbershop tradition

TAJ MAHAL TRIO FRI, NOV 22 - SUN, DEC 1 (CLOSED MON, NOV 25TH & THANKSGIVING)

Two-time Grammy winner and one of the most influential American blues and roots artists of the past half-century

ELDAR TUES, DEC 3 - WED, DEC 4

“He’s a (piano) genius beyond most young people I’ve heard.” - Dave Brubeck

ANGIE STONE THURS, DEC 5 - SUN, DEC 8

Neo-soul singer/songwriter with over 5 million albums sold worldwide and ten singles on the R & B charts

all ages | free parking full schedule at jazzalley.com

NTw.RlittleYreMdhUenS.coIC LIVE COUww m THURSDAY NOVEMBER 14TH

BUCKAROOSTERS 9PM - $3 COVER

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 15TH

BUCKING HORSE 9PM - $5 COVER

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16TH

BULLET CREEK 9PM - $5 COVER

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 17TH

JUKEHOUSE HOUNDS 9PM - $3 COVER 4PM OPEN MIC / ACOUSTIC JAM W/ BILLY BODACIOUS TUESDAY NOVEMBER 19TH

TEQUILA ROSE 9PM - NO COVER

MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY

KARAOKE WITH DJ FORREST GUMP 9:00PM • NO COVER

FREE COUNTRY DANCE LESSONS WITH OUR HOST MARY ANN AT 8PM; SUN, MON, TUES

HAPPY HOUR 9AM-NOON & 4-7 PM • MON-FRI

WELL DRINKS & DOMESTIC BOTTLED BEER $2 16 OZ. MICROS $3.50 DINNER: 5-10PM EVERYDAY BREAKFAST & LUNCH: SAT 8AM-2PM / SUN 9AM-2PM 7115 WOODLAWN AVENUE NE 522-1168

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 13 — 19, 2013

IRENE BARBER/SAMANTHA WOOD

Ravenna Woods, The Jackals (out now, selfreleased, ravennawoods.net) There’s a very intentional haunted vibe to the second album from Seattle rumblecore trio Ravenna Woods. It starts with the album’s name and its accompanying artwork—featuring a man attempting to escape out the window of a spooky house—and extends to the lyrics. “Just live alone and lock your doors,” frontman Chris Cunningham implores on the second track, “Live Alone,” over the band’s trademark pattering drums and cascading acoustic guitar. “There’s somethin’ terrible happenin’.” The music, though, doesn’t really carry the haunted vibe, which is a relief. Such all-consuming spookiness would be a rickety old bridge too far. Instead the album is lively and dense, filled with layers of insistent, tickling instrumentation and swelling orchestration. On its debut, 2010’s Demon and Lakes, Ravenna Woods established a sound rooted in drum and guitar interplay, but it felt limited to that dynamic. Here the band shows growth, adding other instruments—in particular the restrained piano work of new member Sam Miller—and proving itself adept at shifting direction and dynamic with purpose. That is the case on “Border Animals,” the band’s most fully realized song yet. It opens with that base drum-and-guitar formula before shifting and swelling to a fever pitch, Cunningham spitting out vocal darts that land like punches. The vocals, in fact, are the most haunted aspect of the album, channeling three spirits of popular song: On “Border Animals” it’s the bratty Elvis Costello; elsewhere, the regal Matt Berninger or the ethereal Thom Yorke— who’s falsetto croon Cunningham replicates on the album’s title track, a song that makes up for its clear stylistic cop with an aching emotional performance. Still, the resemblance is eerie. (Sat., Nov. 16, Neumos) MARK BAUMGARTEN

JAZZ ALLEY IS A SUPPER CLUB

37


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W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT NEWSLETTER

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A R T S A N D E N T E R TA I N M E N T

filtering the best of

THE NORTHWEST!

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 13 — 19, 2013

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

38

W E E K LY

instagram.com/

MUSIC

EVENTS

PROMOTIONS PROMOTIONS NEWSLETTER

The inside scoop on VIP events, free tickets, and event photos.


Bazaars/Craft Fairs COVINGTON

BOTHELL

Support Local Vendors & Crafts People!

MY FRIENDS & MORE Holiday Bazaar! Join us to Celebrate our 14th Anniversary of Community Fun with Fabulous Local Artisans! Saturday, November 16th, 10am to 5pm, one block North of Home Depot (18701 120th Ave NE). Santa arrives at 1pm! Parents bring your Camera for Free Photos with Santa! Pets Welcome! Free Admission, Free Parking, Free Refreshments and Free Children’s Craft and Play Area Provided! Tour Buses Welcome. Full Wheelchair and Stroller Access. www.craftybug.com

Bazaars/Craft Fairs

Renton

Employment General MARKETING COORDINATOR The Daily Herald, Snohomish County’s source for outstanding local news and community information for more than 100 years and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking a Marketing Coordinator to assist with multi-platform advertising and marketing solutions of print, web, mobile, e-newsletters, daily deals, event sponsorships and special publications as well as the daily operations of the Marketing department. Responsibilities include but are not limited to the coordination, updating and creation of marketing materials across a range of delivery channels, social media, contesting, events, house marketing, newsletters and working closely with the Sr. Marketing Manager to develop strategies and implement the marketing plan. The right individual will be a highly organized, responsible, self-motivated, customer-comes-first proven problem-solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to hreast@soundpublishing.com No phone calls please. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

ADVERTISING & MARKETING COORDINATOR Seattle Weekly, one of Seattle’s most respected publications and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking an Advertising and Marketing Coordinator to assist with multi-platform advertising and marketing solutions of print, web, mobile, e-newsletters, event sponsorships and glossy publications. Responsibilities include but are not limited to management of digital inventory in DFP, social media, contesting, events, house marketing, newsletters and coordinating with staff as it relates to these duties. The right individual will be a highly organized, responsible, self-motivated, customer-comes-first proven problem solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match). If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to hreast@soundpublishing.com

No phone calls please.

Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com HELP WANTED!! Make up to $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.needmailers.com

Employment Computer/Technology Partner, IP Transactions & IT & Telecommunications Infrastructure (Multiple Openings) K&L Gates LLP (Seattle, WA) resp for negotiatng & drftng cmplx technlgy agrmnts, incl but not lmtd to, sftwr dvlpmt, licnsng, contnt, wireless, telecomm, SaaS, roaming, IT & telecomm infrstrctr, hrdwr supply, manufrng & distrbtn agrmnts. Counsels clients on copyrght, patent, tradmrk, trade secret law, & open source, e-commerce & online contrctng, & privacy & data protctn, & M&A IP due dilignc. Advises on IP issues, drafts mergr & purchase docmnts, & post-mergr intgrtn matrls. Advises clients on website accessblty issues & complnc w/ the Americans w/ Disabilities Act. Must hold a JD dgr. Must have 7 yrs of past exper as an Attorney w/ AM100 law firm in IP & telecomm w/ an emphasis on mobile devcs, mobile ntwrks, operatnl sftwr & srvcs, gaming & financl srvcs. Must be licnsd to practice law in WA State. Send resume via U.S. mail to Ms. Kristine M Immordino, Office of HR, K&L Gates LLP, 925 Fourth Ave., Ste 2900, Seattle, WA 98104-1158. Serve as Software Engineer with Getty Images (Seattle) Inc., in Seattle, WA. Write code, tests and maintain existing code for websites using MVC3/Razor, and new WCF operations using C#, .NET framework 4.0, IIS 7, Entity Framework 5.0, LINQ, JavaScript (using jQuery library) on Windows Server 2008 R2. If you are interested in this role, please visit: www.gettyimagesjobs.com and apply to Tracking Code 305729-531.

Employment Social Services VISITING ANGELS Certified Caregivers needed. Minimum 3 years experience. Must live in Seattle area. Weekend & live-in positions available. Call 206-439-2458 • 877-271-2601

Employment Career Services THE OCEAN Corp. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a new career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid avail for those who qualify 1.800.321.0298

Announcements

BASEBALL LESSONS

Employment Professional DIRECTV is currently recruiting for the following position in Lynnwood: Sr. Human Resources Business Partner If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv.com/careers. EOE.

Major League Baseball Pitcher. Lessons in Pitching, Hitting, Game Fundamentals & Essential Player Development. Please Call Sean With All Inquiries. 206-2250706 (Mercer Island)

HOLIDAYS ARE NEAR, GET HIRED NOW! OUR GOAL IS TO KEEP TREES SAFE & BEAUTIFUL AND WE NEED YOUR HELP!

As an Order Generator for TLC4Homes Northwest you speak to Home Owners and set them to meet with our Trained/Certified Arborists. Our Arborists Provide Home Owners Free Estimates and Free Safety & Health Inspections for Tree & Shrub Trimming, Pruning & Removal Services. Work year round helping home owners keep their Trees Safe & Beautiful!

WORK OUTDOORS AND SET YOUR OWN SCHEDULE. TRAVEL, CELL PHONE, MEDICAL ALLOWANCE AVAILABLE

Requirements: Vehicle & Driver’s License ¡ Cell Phone ¡ Internet Access Fill out our online application: http://www.evergreentlc.com/inside-app-order.php

Call Recruiting Dept. for Snohomish, King, Pierce, Kitsap & Thurston County:

509-227-7410 ext. 3304 or 3308

Classified @ 206-623-6231, to place an ad

Call Apartments for Rent King County

Lost

Auto Events/ Auctions

Dogs

Studio in Ravenna for rent $750 206-441-4922

AM-PM TOWING INC

Abandoned Vehicle AUCTION!!!

University District 3 bedroom apts available for rent. 206-441-4922 9am–2pm

WA Misc. Rentals Rooms for Rent Greenlake/WestSeattle $400 & up Utilities included! busline, some with private bathrooms • Please call Anna between 10am & 8pm • 206-790-5342

U-DISTRICT $450-$550 All Utilities Included! Call Peir for more info (206) 551-7472

WA Misc. Rentals Want to Share TUKWILA $550 MONTH. Your own private living room, bedroom, bath. Private Entrance. Sink, fridge and counter area plus free TV. View, off street parking. Own parking place. Laundry on-site. Large quality home. Employed with steady income. References and deposit required. No Smoking, No Pets. 1 Adult Only. 206-246-4171 Evenings

MISSING DOG - LOGAN. Missing since August 10th from Auburn area. Sightings in Kent and Bellevue. Mini Blue Merle Australian Shepherd. Very scared and skittish. Please call Diane at 253-486-4351 if you see him. REWARD OFFERED. Auctions/ Estate Sales

11/15/13 @ 11AM BICHON FRISE Puppies. 2 Females Left! $900. Parents AKC registered, Companions only. Vet check, first shots, wormed. 360-271-8912, 360-865-3346. Pictures/ info: www.bichonfrisepuppies4sale.com

Announcements

NORTHEND MASSAGE FOR YOUR HEALTH LAURIE LMP #MA00014267 (206) 919-2180

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Alan R. Harrison / ALAN R. HARRISON LAW, PLLC 470 B Street, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 Telephone: (208) 552-1165 Fax: (208) 552-1176 (ISB#: 6589) Attorney for Plaintiff IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF BUTTE SIMONE HARDIN, Plaintiff, Case No. CV-13- ___________ vs. VINTON COLLINS, MARGARET A. COLLINS and/or THE ESTATE OF MARGARET A. COLLINS, SUMMONS EVE MARY COLLINS-BENAVIDEZ and BRUCE ALEXANDER, HEIRS OF VINTON F. COLLINS and MARGARET A. COLLINS, John and Jane Does 1-10, and any other unknown heirs, devisees, or owners. Defendants. TO: BRUCE ALEXANDER; HEIR OF VINTON F. COLLINS and MARGARET A. COLLINS, any unknown heirs and/or Devisees; JOHN and JANE DOES, 1-10, and any other unknown, heirs, devisees, or owners. NOTICE: PLAINTIFF, SIMONE HARDIN, HAS FILED A COMPLAINT TO QUIET TITLE TO PROPERTY. THE COURT MAY ENTER JUDGMENT AGAINST YOU WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN TWENTY (20) DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. You are hereby notified that in order to defend this lawsuit, an appropriate written response must be filed with the above-designated Court within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons on you. If you fail to so respond, the Court may enter judgment against you as demanded by the Plaintiff in her Complaint. A copy of the Complaint is served with this Summons. If you wish to seek the advice of or representation by an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be filed in time and other legal rights protected. An appropriate written response requires compliance with Rule 10(a)(1) and other Idaho Rules of Civil Procedure and shall also include: 1. The title and number of this case. 2. If your response is an Answer to the Complaint, it must contain admissions or denials of the separate allegations of the Complaint and other defenses you may claim. 3. Your signature, mailing address and telephone number; or the signature, mailing address and telephone number of your attorney. 4. Proof of mailing or delivery of a copy of your response to PlaintiffĂ­s attorney, as designated above. To determine whether you must pay a filing fee with your response, contact the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this ____ day of October, 2013. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: ________________________________ Deputy Clerk

Preview 10-11AM 14315 Aurora Ave N. Professional Services Music Lessons

Marine Power

SEATTLE Public Auction/ Landlord Lien Foreclosure Sale 11/22/13 at 9 AM. 1959 VAGAB 55/10 Mobile Home University Trailer Park Sp. 18-A, 2200 NE 88 St, Ph: 206-525-7828

Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

1 Vehicle

1987 Mercedes BTM 6VCW262 - Runs

GUITAR LESSONS Exp’d, Patient Teacher. BFA/MM Brian Oates (206) 434-1942

Home Services Drywall/Plaster

DRYWALL 10’ STORM Inflatable Boat with motor (30 lbs thrust), battery, anchor & oars. Also includes two way pump, valves and more! Great fishing boat for a lake or slow river. Good cond! $600 or make offer. Kent. 253854-2785. harmunson@q.com

SAME DAY QUOTES

Hanging Taping Patching Repair Painting Call Eric Tyler Drywall

425-443-5216

Liscensed*Bonded*Insured

INTERMODAL DRIVERS: HOME DAILY

Schneider National is Hiring Truck Drivers s ,OCAL)NTERMODALWORKOPPORTUNITIES s $!),9(/-%4)-% s ./ 4/5#(&2%)'(4 s %ARNUPTO YEARBASEDON EXPERIENCE s $RIVERSWITHATLEASTMONTHS EXPERIENCESHOULDAPPLY

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 13 — 19, 2013

SATURDAY, November 23rd, St. Andy’s Gals Holiday Bazaar, 9am to 3pm at St. Andrew Presbyterian Church, 3604 NE 10th Court, Renton Highlands. Lots of Crafts, Gifts, Holiday Decorations, Baked Goods and Raffle Items. A portion of the proceeds will benefit Youth and Women Programs. For more information and directions, see our website at: www.standrewpc.org or call: 425255-2580

Join in the Fun & Excitement! Win Prizes at the Clubhouse in Timberlane during our Annual Holiday Gift and Craft Bazaar. Saturday, November 23rd, 9am to 4pm, 19300 SE 267th Street, Covington. See you there! Vendors, contact Tonja at To n j a _ H u m m e l @ T i m berlaneHOA.org or call 425-373-6306

Employment General

EOE M/F/D/V

Bazaars/Craft Fairs

Apply online: schneiderjobs.com/newjobs More Info: 800-44-PRIDE 39


Nov 20 th & more!

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Call

@ 206-623-6231, to place an ad Are you suicidal, but resisting harming yourself? We want to hear from you! The Behavioral Research and Therapy Clinics at the UW is looking for participants for a study on suicidal thoughts, feelings and behaviors. For more information, call 206-543-2505.

Earn $100 per donation!

If you have severe or life-threatening Allergies or an Autoimmune Disease your Plasma is vital. Learn more at www.plasmalab.com 425-258-3653

HAPPYHAULER.com Debris Removal • 206-784-0313 • Credit Cards Accepted! HOUSE SITTER AVAILABLE Insured, bonded, great w/pets, plants, house cleaning. Seattle/King Co Area. Avail:Dec-Mar. housitter@gmail.com

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Toke Signals with Steve Elliott Your source for uncut, uncensored, no-holds-barred, non-corporate-controlled cannabis news.

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(#0,-#.35) 5-"#(!.)(5-,"5./35R5*,.'(.5) 5 ##( Testosterone & Prostate Study Men are needed to participate in a study looking at the effects of testosterone on the prostate gland. This study will be conducted at the University of Washington, Seattle. It involves the use of two investigational drugs and a prostate biopsy. The study involves 9 visits over a period of 5 months. To be eligible you must be: tZFBSTPGBHFt.BMFt*OHPPEIFBMUI t/PUUBLJOHNFEJDBUJPOTPOBEBJMZCBTJT 7PMVOUFFSTXJMMCFSFJNCVSTFEGPSUIFJSUJNFBOEJODPOWFOJFODFGPSFBDITUVEZWJTJU DPNQMFUFEBOENBZCFDPNQFOTBUFEVQUP If interested, call 206.616.1818 (volunteer line) and ask for more information about the PROS-2 study. 4UFQIBOJF1BHF .% 1I%8JMMJBN#SFNOFS .% 1I%+PIO"NPSZ .% .1)%BOJFM-JO .%

Shelton

Your Hours: Mon-Thurs & Sat 10a-7p Fri 10a-8p Sun 11a-5p 3811 St Rt 3 (Bayshore) 360-426-0420

VA seeks adults with schizophrenia and adults without schizophrenia for a research study investigating how genetics may affect the development of schizophrenia.

My one reason for donating plasma?

To show I care about my community

• Participants should be age 18-65 with no current drug or alcohol problems. • Participants will be paid $15/hour for their time and provided lunch.

Please call: 206-277-1163

Learn more about donating plasma at

Grifolsplasma.com

7726 15th N.W., Seattle, WA In addition to meeting the donation center criteria, you must provide a valid photo I.D., proof of your current address and your Social Security or immigration card to donate. Must be 18 years of age or older to donate.

10338 Aurora Ave Aurora N, Seattle www.foursquare.com 10338 Ave¡ N, Seattle

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www.seadancingbare.com OPEN MON-SAT: 11AM - 2:30AM & SUN 2PM - 2:30AM


Seattle Weekly, November 13, 2013