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VETERANS DAY PHOTOS AND

HAVILLAH HARVEST DINNER

A PROFILE OF A LOCAL VET

Saturday, Nov. 16, 5:00 p.m. Havillah Church Parish Hall

See Pages A4-5

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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PARADE FOR A CHAMPION

Incumbents ruling the day for local office, except one Transportation - ‘yes,’ Criminal Justice - ‘no’ NORTH COUNTY – Even after the Hughes received 1643 votes over incumsecond vote count all incumbents for bent Lael Duncan who garnered 695. office, except Lael Duncan for North “I’m looking forward to the challenge. Valley Hospital I appreciate all the C o m m i s s i o n e r, support... I was “I’m looking forward to have been returned overwhelmed by to their previous the challenge. I appreciate the support actuposts. ” said Hughes. the support... I was over- ally,According In fact, as of to whelmed by the support election officials, last Friday’s count, Teresa Hughes 6,068 ballots were actually.” has gained in her counted at 8:43 p.m. Teresa Hughes, run for the NVH on Tuesday and NVH Commissioner Elect Commissioner an estimated 2,285 Position 5 seat. Dick ballots remained Larson, in Position 4 for the Hospital uncounted, not including any ballots that Board maintained his may be received in the next few days that lead against challeng- were postmarked on or before election er Rosa Snyder. day. After the second count, the election Hughes from officials estimate about 300 remaining Tonasket, appears to ballots that could be counted. have won the conIt’s unlikely the remaining ballots tested commissioner could change the results and not all the seat. This, according uncounted ballots include the hospital to the unofficial tally district. Teresa Hughes of votes cast countIn the other seat up for election at ed by the Okanogan NVH, Position 4, favors incumbent Dick County Auditor’s office last Tuesday evening and the second county last Friday. SEE ELECTION | PG A2

Few areas in city legal for pot shop

Oroville High School senior Sierra Speiker was escorted back into town Sunday upon her return from Pasco, where the standout student-athlete won her third state cross country title in four years and second in a row. Above, Speiker shows off her state championship medal from the front seat of an Oroville fire truck; right, the champion was escorted by the Oroville Fire and Rescue Department, Oroville Police Department, after the impromptu parade was arranged by Oroville Ambulance Coordinator Debra Donahue.

BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Being rich in parks, schools, playgrounds and day care centers means locating a marijuana store may be problematic for any would-be retailers in Oroville. “The Department of Justice, even though they said they won’t be getting involved, has some caveats,” said Oroville Police Chief Clay Warnstaff at the city council’s Tuesday, Nov. 5 meeting. According to the state Liquor Control Board’s rules, licensed marijuana retail stores “must be at least 1,000 feet from an elementary or secondary school, playground, recreation center or facil-

Gary DeVon/staff photos

ity, child care center, public park, public transit center, library or arcade where admission is not restricted to those age 21 and older.” Last year Oroville passed an ordinance where someone convicted of illegal drug dealing within 1,000 feet of many of these same areas would be liable for double criminal penalties and fines. These areas were mapped out and Warnstaff had a pretty good idea which areas were not covered. Chief Warnstaff said, “That leaves maybe a small area near John Moran’s building… about two places between there and Jon Neal’s where someone

SEE POT SHOP | PG A2

WSP: Both drivers DUI in SR97 collision Crash sends seven, including pedestrian, to hospital BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – A two-vehicle collision five miles south of Oroville on SR97 Friday afternoon sent seven people, including a pedestrian, to the hospital and led to both drivers being investigated for Driving Under the Influence. Mary E. Capote-Smith, 44, Oroville was heading southbound in a 2000 Chevrolet Tahoe when she attempted a left turn onto Ward’s Road in front of a northbound vehicle driven by Brian I. Mathis, 27, Oroville. Mathis’ 1992 Chevrolet pickup was struck nearly head-on. Smith-Capote was transported to North Valley Hospital by the Oroville Ambulance and Mathis was taken to Mid Valley Hospital by a Washington State Patrol Trooper, according to WSP Trooper B. Lovell, who filed the incident report. Mathis’ passengers, Bianca V. Carrera, 19, and an eight-year-old and

four-year-old girl, were all transported to North Valley Hospital by ambulance. The four-year-old was later airlifted to Sacred Heart Hospital in Spokane. Mathis and his passengers were wearing their seatbelts/restraints, but CapoteSmith was not, according to Trooper Lovell. Two pedestrians were standing near the stop sign on Ward’s Road when the accident occurred, Colten J. Naclerio, 21, pushed his fellow pedestrian out of the way and was struck by CapoteSmith’s Tahoe. Naclerio also went to North Valley via ambulance. The collision occurred shortly after 3 p.m. last Friday, Nov. 8, near Ward Road and Gene’s Native Smokes and resulted in traffic being backed up going both directions as the damaged vehicles, one on its side, blocked the highway. Emergency personnel from the Oroville

SEE COLLISION | PG A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 46

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Oroville firefighters cut the roof off the Chevrolet Tahoe involved in a two-vehicle collission on Highway 97 south of Oroville. The collission, being investigated as a double DUI, sent six people, including a pedestrian walking on Ward’s Road ,to the hospital.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Veterans Special A4-5 Letters/Opinion A6 Community A7-8

Sports B1-3 Community B4-5 Classifieds/Legals B6-7

Real Estate Obituaries Cops & Courts

B7 B8 B8


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 14, 2013

CEREMONIAL FLAG RETIREMENT

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The other vehicle involved in the collision on SR97 was this 1992 Chevrolet pickup that had four people, including two children in it. All went to North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, but the four-year-old was later airlifted to Sacred Heart Medical Center in Spokane.

Collision | FROM A1 Fire Department worked to extricate the passengers from the crashed vehicles, including peeling back the roof of the Tahoe. The fire department also helped to control traffic on the highway as traffic was reduced to one narrow lane of travel. Officers

from the WSP, Oroville Police Department and Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Department responded to the accident, as well as emergency personnel with the Oroville Ambulance. While Trooper Lovell cites the cause of the accident as both driv-

ers “DUI” (Driving Under the Influence), he lists charges as “pending.” in his report. Each vehicle was towed by Thompson Bee’s Towing to the State Patrol bullpen in Okanogan while the accident investigation continues.

Walt and Vicki Hart place American flags in the fire, one at a time, during the flag retirement ceremony at Oroville American Legion Hodges Post 84, last Monday afternoon. The ceremony offered people with worn flags an opportunity to have them properly retired with reverence.

Election | FROM A1 Larson from Oroville in what is currently a much closer race with challenger Rosa Snider. Larson had 1,289 votes cast for his return to office, while Snider had 1,084. The Oroville Mayor’s race and seats on the Oroville City Council were the only other challenged races in the North County, with the electorate seemingly happy with the current slate of officials. Chuck Spieth is leading in the mayor’s race by a comfortable margin at this time. He earned 245 votes for a return to office over challenger Chris Allen who received 121 votes for a change in the top spot. Jon Neal and Tony Koepke also have big leads over their challengers for seats on the council. Neal had 267 votes in his favor, while Russell W. Rounds had 101 for Position 1 and Koepke had 217 votes to Paul E. Bouchard’s 139 for Position 2. While county-wide voters gave a narrow majority to the Okanogan County Transportation District 1 request for a four-tenths increase to the sales tax, Tonasket’s request for help for Criminal Justice Funding looks to be unpopular amongst the city’s voters. As of election day, the Transportation Proposition had 5,134 votes, or 56.2 percent for approval, while 4,002, or 43.8 percent, went against. Tonasket’s Proposition had 119 votes, or 55.1 percent, rejecting the measure, to 95 or 44.39 percent, approving. The measure did pick up some

approval, but it is unlikely there are enough outstanding votes to stem the tide of those against the tax. Okanogan County voters were asked to fund a transportation district through a special sales and use tax levy. The transportation ballot measure, Special Elections – Proposition 1, proposes giving the Okanogan County Transit Authority (OCTA) the ability to impose a four-tenths of one percent tax on all taxable purchases made within the county. The tax is the equivalent of four cents on every $10 of taxable purchases made. The money will fund “the operation, maintenance equipment and facilities for a public transportation district within the boundaries of the Transit Authority.” The OCTA includes Okanogan County except the southeastern precincts and the town of Nespelem. The Tonasket measured asked the voters to approve a sales and use tax of 0.1 percent. One-third of the tax was to be used for criminal justice purposes or fire protection, or both, effective April 1, 2014. County-wide voters are also supporting a return to office of John Smith for the Seventh District Senate position. He is leading fellow Republican Brian Dansel by 128 votes in Okanogan County. However, Smith is trailing by 2,198 votes when all Seventh District votes were tallied last Friday. Unlike the state

POT SHOP | FROM A1 could set up a shop in the city.” Medical marijuana is currently under separate rules as far as quantity someone could possess, but Warnstaff said there are some that want the two groups to abide by the same rules. “We have people in town that

voters, county voters like I-517. However, county and state voters both agreed to reject I-522. County voters voted for repeal on all three advisory measures on the ballot. The state said repeal one, keep the other and are deadlocked on the third. The next ballot count for Okanogan County is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 14 at 5 p.m. in the county auditor’s office. The election will not be certified until Tuesday, Nov. 26, according to election officials.

BUY LOCAL

can grow it legally (for medical use),” said Warnstaff. About the new legalized marijuana laws he added, “Right now you can have it in the home and you can smoke it legally, you just can’t grow it or buy it… so I don’t know where people are getting it.”

This holiday season, when you are thinking of giving gifts to your friends and family, think also about giving back to your community. Before you click “buy” online or before you head out of town to shop, consider giving a unique gift from one of our many local businesses.

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COMMERCE

SAVE THE DATE!!! Tonasket Chamber of Commerce Invites you to participate in Winter Fest Friday Dec. 6 from 5:30pm to 8:00pm. Look for other Winter Fest weekend events! www.tonasketchamber.com

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 14, 2013

VETERANS DAY

Viet Nam vet carves out a new life Ken Fulford faces PTSD, life issues with humor, ingenuity By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The outcast military veteran living alone in the mountains is almost as much a part of Pacific Northwest folklore as the Sasquatch. But in Okanogan County, the off-thegrid veteran is quite real. Some live that life by choice. Others find withdrawal from society the only way to carve out a life in a world that seems only now learning how to accept and cope with the damage Viet Nam wrought on those who physically survived the conflict. The living hell that was Nam came home with many who served there, and Ken Fulford was no exception. “Yeah, I’m a Viet Nam veteran,” Fulford said. “I have issues and I’ve had issues. “I filed (with the VA) in ‘84 and wasn’t allowed my retirement until 2003. It’s just the way the VA works. I was honorably discharged Feb. 2, 1980. I spent six years as a US Navy Reserve. “I filed knowing I was having some problems. For one thing I liked to stay drunk all the time. And I had nightmares a lot. My lady friend and I were fighting all the time. Money became an issue. All of the normal things of life became hurdles.” Fulford now lives in a self-built solarpowered log cabin on Mt. Hull, in the center of what can be a “wild west” environment. He not only knows the Okanogan Sheriff’s deputies by name, he likewise can identify the voices of each of the county dispatchers. He even willed his property to the Sheriff’s department a few years ago. His only connection to the “grid,” as it were, is a phone line. Hard-wired, not cell. “I always told everyone that asked, we didn’t win the war but we haven’t stopped fighting it,” Fulford said. “We brought it home with us. That anxiety attack that started when I was 20? It hasn’t stopped yet. “There was a time when I would get so angry I’d start shaking. A lot of guys figured I had Parkinson’s. No, I have PTSD (post traumatic stress syndrome). I was just pissed off enough to want to choke you to death.”

Nam Fulford served in the U.S. Navy as an F-4 mechanic in VF-213 Black Lion Squadron on the U.S.S. Kitty Hawk (CV-63). In 1974-75, that meant taking part in the evacuation of U.S. forces that led to the fall of Saigon. “It was Nixon that said we were going to stop shooting,” Fulford said. “Thing was we didn’t get Charlie (the Viet Cong) to promise to stop shooting. Obstinate little bastards.” U.S. forces evacuated not only their own, but tens of thousands of South Vietnamese refugees as Saigon was overrun. “They was coming down through the whole length of the coast, overrunning little bergs here and there like Dien Bien Phu,” he said. “We were pulling first Marine Recon, Big Red One, and Ranger units and Special Forces and SEALs as fast as we could to get them out of the way. So when we did have to open up and create an ‘incident’ they wouldn’t be there to be in the way.” Once enemy forces reached Saigon, chaos ensued. “Charlie decided it was easier to go through the international airport that we couldn’t shoot at that to get to our embassy three blocks away,” Fulford said. “So instead of going through the gates of Saigon, he come through the gates of the airport where we couldn’t shoot at him. “If you ever watched the TV pictures of it, it was a bloody mess. We pushed helicopters overboard, tried to make room in every hole for people. We put them everywhere we could, got them blankets, shoes and clothes.” Even while still in the Navy, Fulford’s temper could get the best of him, one time earning him a demotion. “I smacked my chief petty officer after I caught him in bed with my first wife,” he said. “He’s lucky I didn’t kill him. I got 30 days in the brig, he got two weeks R&R in Hawaii. “I split his lip; I’m surprised they didn’t give him a Purple Heart.” The aftermath Nam doesn’t leave a man; Fulford struggled after his discharge. “I went and filed with the VA, tried to get Social Security to kick in and they denied me three times,” he said. “It got worse. I had some issues by ‘87 that got me four months in jail. Lost my so-called family and all of that. My sister, brother in law, nephews, dad and mom. “They started having this idea that I was someone they didn’t want to have around.” Fulford eventually settled in with a job at Osterman Fisheries in Anacortes. “I had done four years apprenticeship

Brent Baker/staff photos

Left, Ken Fulford and his cat with an attitude, Tai Chi, manage to co-exist as roommates in Fulford’s home on Mt. Hull. Above, Fulford built his log home despite a number of misadventures, including a two-year delay in getting the logs delivered and a fall from the second floor roof that left him feeling fortunate to be alive.

since I’d got into trouble, and 12 years “I know one who would really like to get to where I had my own crew and to be here. Our poor officers, they can’t worked for three different companies,” even get their own damn bullets.” he said. But in 1997, he said, he was diagnosed Building a home with cancer. He worked until 1999 Fulford won his retirement compensa“Until I couldn’t stand up,” he said - tion in 2003, but it came with strings when was asked to take a month off. attached: because of his background, “I was sicker than a dog,” he said. he wasn’t allowed to manage his own “My dad said, ‘Well, if you’re going money. He reached out to Bertha and to die, come home.’ Herb Wandler of He said he couldn’t Tonasket, whom he’d afford to come and get known for some time. “We brought (the Viet After passing a backme.” A Tonasket native, check, Bertha Nam War) home with ground he’d bought the prophandled his finances, us. That anxiety attack and Fulford set about erty he now lives on seven years earlier, his home. that started when I was building but it hadn’t yet been “It took two years to cleared. He took up 20? It hasn’t stopped get the logs,” Fulford residence down by said. “It was amazing yet.” the river in a 20-foot the amount of agony Ken Fulford trailer he owned. we went through to get “I thought I could that to happen by ‘05. move up here, God We had the roof on it willing, cut firewood, create a life and by that fall, primarily Larry Brown and do the right thing for myself,” Fulford I working at it, driving the nails and said. “I moved everything - cars, trucks, screws.” projects - over from the coast. I don’t That was after pouring the foundation know what I thought I was doing. I was more than a year earlier. Struggles with just constantly busy. I think I was just the log home builder he’d hired proso afraid of the cancer that I just worked tracted the process. as hard as I could to keep from thinking “I was amazed a log home builder about it. Just an insecure kid, really, like couldn’t build a log home, and it went I was when I was overseas.” downhill from there,” Fulford said. “I The self-medicating with alcohol and insulted him, because he was being marijuana wasn’t helping, but poverty insulting to us. helped start the drying-out process. “It’s like a boat - like a hole in the “I didn’t really stop the drinking but water you keep throwing money into. I by the time I got here I didn’t have realize, it’s livable and I’ve been living the money to continue,” Fulford said. here since the fall of ‘05, but I lived “Every once in a while a neighbor would down in my shop for a year. It took thouget me a beer or a pint. Or bring me a sands of dollars, and every time I would bag. Then I found out it wasn’t just mari- have to go to Bertha and ask for money juana you were getting. It was laced with to get things done. Insulation, roofing, all sorts of stuff.” you name it.” One thing he decided not to pay for An unusual will was electricity after being told it would Fulford said his relationship with the cost $2,500 to get it to his house from Sheriff’s department began shortly after the road. he moved onto the property in about “I was probably looking at $5,000 2001, when he says someone poisoned with permits and all,” Fulford said. “And his dog. I know me pretty well. I would have to “With those kinds of issues, I needed go buy a TV, a better stereo, get me a help,” he said. “I had a lot going on. mixer and can opener and all the goodI met (Sheriff) Frank Rogers through ies. Then I’m getting a bill every month, Bertha Wandler. for the pleasure of spending my money “We had a nice long talk. I promised on all these other attachments. Frank I would get clean as far as my “The way its laid out is excellent for medications at the time - I was self- solar power. I can go a week before I medicating. I had nobody else. I tried to have to fire up a generator, thought in the get family to come and help, tried to get winter it’s harder.” somebody else here with me. Eventually Fulford was allowed access “I have no family. I couldn’t get any- to his own money. one in my family to pay attention or “Within two years I was on my own care.” feet and proved to the state that I was His familiarity with the Sheriff and capable,” he said. “Bertha gave me a deputies has ruffled some feathers, to springboard and gave me a chance to say the least. step out there. Then getting to know the “I’ve got neighbors that would real- guys on the Sheriff’s department, that ly like to poke a bullet through me,” probably kept me out of prison. I was Fulford said. “I’ve had four busted out getting pretty hot about the antics up of here. I’ve pushed some issues with here.” others. When you’re talking meth labs, grow ops, hot rod motorcycles, bandito- Near-death experiences types, you’re putting your life on the A couple of incidents changed line. Fulford’s outlook on life and, ultimately, “I had to talk it over with Frank... I had his direction. At about the time his log to figure out a way to make this balance cabin was finally going up, Fulford went out in the long run.” down. He hopes the department will allow “I was pretty badly poisoned,” he said. one of its deputies to live in Fulford’s “I can’t say their names but I can point to residence once he’s gone. the evidence of them poisoning my cat, “A young officer coming to work me, putting stuff in my water. I had to needs a place that doesn’t cost much,” pour everything out that I had because I he said. “This county doesn’t pay noth- was afraid of it.” ing. To give the county a place to put Fulford went to the sheriff, both askhim and his family is probably more ing for and offering help. important than anything they can do on “He convinced me that in order for their own. me to have anything worth saying that

he can bank on that I can help him with, Maybe they just didn’t get the kid.” I had to be clean,” Fulford said. One of his neighbors started feeding It also led to a trip to the hospital, the cub pablum. At the time, Fulford was where tests revealed both that his cancer living on $30 a week, but that didn’t stop was in remission, and proved he was him from feeding the bear. drug-free. “I made peanut butter sandwiches, “My white blood cells were coming stew, anything to get him to shut up at back,” he said. “I had complete blood night,” he said. “I’d go out and put it on work done at the VA, and I had that sent the stump, and I’d turn around and he’d to Frank because it showed I was clean, be there. He was spoiled. and I was in remission. “We got him through the first winter. “The doctor thought it was the fresh Buckshot (Fulford’s dog) was really glad air, clean living, eating better foods, when I got him to go to bed (hibernate), putting my home together. It gave me one sandwich at a time down to his more than I was getting in society. mama’s den. Then he was home and he I’ve been clean ever since, but I grew calmed down. When he came out in the a ponytail.” spring he was huge, as big as me.” Fulford doesn’t have a ponytail at the BB disappeared for several years, but moment. made an unexpected return. “I had to cut it off,” he said. “It was “In ‘09 BB came into the yard and ruining my life. It was being a problem.” he was huge. He came right up on Three years later, Fulford was trying the porch,” Fulford said. “Bear just to install a cap on his chimney. thought he’d come out and check out “I fell off the roof,” he said. “From the Missy, (a dog) that I hadn’t had when top. The ladder decided we needed to go BB had been around. I stepped out back down to the ground level... the door, had the pistol in my belt. “I don’t know how long I laid there but He stood up and he was so big you I realized I’d better get up. Something couldn’t see out the door. I thought, was saying, you’d better get your butt I’m way too close. And he looked at up. Or you’re not ever getting up.” me the same way. Unfortunately, he’d left his phone “He rared back and I didn’t know upstairs on a windowsill. So, he said, what to do. I didn’t want to talk ‘cause despite four fractures in his back, he he could knock my head to Republic. had to climb back up the ladder to get So I yelled, ‘What the hell do you think the phone so he could call for help. And you’re doing? You don’t come up on the then it took three hours for an ambu- porch!’ He literally motioned - stands lance to find him in the up, motions toward the labyrinth of dirt roads, dog, like he’s asking unmarked driveways who the new guy is. and threatening signs I go, ‘Get the hell off “Tai Chi has been a characteristic of Mt. the porch!’ blessing. Without him Hull. “He turns around “It was six weeks and walks off, grumI’d have gone way off before I could start bling, like a kid in the deep end a long trouble.” working on the house again,” Fulford said. Fulford said that time ago. Now I’m just That was, in part, BB eventually got into off the end of the pier a the grease running a what got him thinking about passing his neighbor’s biofuel little bit.” property on to the plant and was removed Ken Fulford Sheriff’s office. from the area. “To fall off a roof “I think they took and there’s nobody him over to Starvation around except Tai Chi, Ridge and let Seattle you don’t realize the power that has,” kill him,” Fulford said. “So, BB is dead.” he said. “Now I can call Dispatch and Despite the difficulty of losing some everybody knows me.” of his companions, he said having them around has definite benefits. “None of the animals seem to notice Talking to the animals Living alone on the mountain, with that I don’t have power,” Fulford said. some neighbors friendly, others not “Even Tai Chi doesn’t complain.” so nice, and all craving their privacy, Fulford has poured his love into ani- Legacy Fulford often thinks of what Tonasket mals. His constant companion, Tai Chi, a Siamese cat, knows he’s Fulford’s room- and Okanogan County were like when he was young, and said he is trying mate, nothing less. “He’s got a personality that won’t quit to leave a positive legacy despite the and he’ll let you know,” he says. “He struggles both external and within. “When I was a kid we went to church wakes me up every morning. Hardly ever uses his box, but when he does he’s - the Lutheran Church, the Brethren desperate. Lets me know when he needs Church, the Free Methodist Church,” he said. “My dad always said if you needed to go out; he’s worse than a dog. “But he’s been a blessing. Without help you go to the Rampleys, or Herb him I’d have gone way off the deep end Yarnell. Ray Attwood. Ed Buchert. I had a long time ago. Now I’m just off the end family. I was so proud. “I have flashbacks from the days when of the pier a little bit.” He also usually has at least one dog I was a happy camper. I thought it was on hand. And there are a plethora of deer best that I tried to remedy the problems and other wildlife that make the area that the county has incurred. I wanted to home, so Fulford has made it is mission make sure I left a legacy in the place I was born. to look out for them. “I have put a lot of time and effort into About 12 years ago, he was awakened one night by the sound of something he this, trying to make it nice. All them guys (county officers) are welcome here and I thought was yelling “Mama!” “I put up with it a couple nights,” make it known. Some of them are pretty Fulford said. “I called (WDFW officer) good friends. Some of them are a little Troy McCormick. I told him I thought standoffish, a little worried about me.” He paused, then laughed. I had a bear cub out there missing his “I would be, too, if I didn’t know me mommy. He told me they’d killed a 500 pounder across the line from me up here. as well as I do.”


NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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VETERANS DAY Honoring our Military Veterans Photos by Gary DeVon and Brent Baker

Above, a parade through and ceremony at the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Park marked Tonasket’s annual observance of Veterans Day on Monday, Nov. 11. The Oroville High School Band (right) plays “Eagle Point Overture” at last Friday’s Veterans Assembly. The event featured music, poetry, posters and videos produced by the students . Far right, Oroville Elementary Students look over some of the dozens of Veterans Day cards they along with their fellow grade school students made to honor veterans at last Friday’s assembly.

Above left, Marcelino Ruiz Martell’s drum solo was one of many ways in which Tonasket High School students honored veterans last Friday. Also included were poetry readings by a number of students and performances as well as instrumental and choral numbers directed by Mariliz Romano. Above right, Jeff Gee’s second grade class sings “America the Beautiful” for the Veterans, family and friends.

Left, Floyd Kennedy, one of the areas last surviving World War II veterans, speaks at the Tonasket High School assembly last Friday. Above, veterans and scouts march ed down Whitcomb Avenue to the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Park.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 14, 2013

THE TOWN CRIER LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Service flag article brings quick results

Happy to help local family get their Five Star Service Flag It all started with an old, dog-eared Oroville Weekly Gazette clipping found with his late mother’s things. An e-mail from California to the Gazette-Tribune and a Veteran’s Day article and soon Thomas Wilburn was going to have his wish fulfilled -- a promise the U.S. military made to his grandparents nearly 70 years ago -- a Five Star Service Flag representing the five children all involved in the war effort during World War II. The American Legion, Hodges Post 84, of Oroville, will purchase the flag and present it to the family, according to Post Commander R. L. “Louie” Wilson. He’s the man that gave Wilburn a call after reading the article in the G-T last week. “We are going to get that banner for him, the Legion is going to supply it for the family, it is long overdue,” said Commander Wilson. “Once again we are making good on someOut of one else’s promise,” Wilson said. No truer words were probably ever spoken My Mind about who have faithfully served our Gary A. DeVon country.those How many times have we asked our sons and daughters to fulfill a promise... fight our battles, protect our country and defend our rights? Not only that, they are called upon to give aid like in the Philipines where they’ve been called to help out victims of Typhoon Haiyan. Our service men and women have made the sacrifices and continue to do so today on several fronts. So it is a pleasure to learn that the G-T and the article we wrote played at least a small part in helping to get the remaining members of the Thornton family their Five Star Service Flag. Even with all the fighting going on today it’s hard to imagine one family in rural America that gave so much for their country when they were called -- five of their sons and daughters. We hope our veterans realize how much they are appreciated and know that they deserve all the assemblies, parades, cards letters and thanks we can give them -- not just on Veterans Day but every day.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Dear Editor, Well sir, you have certainly earned my highest regards! I was in the grocery store last night when I got a phone call that absolutely lifted my heart; I cannot tell you how wonderful I feel! Sadly, my memory is poor so I cannot recall the gentleman’s name but he assured me he was going to be calling back in a few weeks. After he introduced himself he told me to rest assured that my family was going to get that flag in the article. Then I was very confused and thought maybe you had shown him the information I e-mailed to you, but then he said he was going to dinner last night and before he left his wife said he should read this article in the Gazette-Tribune. It was the article you did about my families flag...he said he had been moved to tears and I was still confused at this point as I did not realize there was a new article that you had penned. When we realized there was a discombobulation in our conversation we got that straightened out and t his incredibly kind man that balked when I called him a gentlemen took my address and promised to send me the paper he was reading so that I would have a copy of the article you wrote. Sir, Is there any way I can express how grateful I am? To continue, he is the leader of one of your local veterans groups... again I apologize for my memory, I mean no disrespect to this gentlemen that I do not recall the details more accurately I can assure you, he has forever earned a spot in my heart, right alongside your own. In the end, he made it clear this was going to be resolved....what a special man. Thomas L. Wilburn and the entire Thornton family

Good bunch on Oroville Ambulance crew Dear Editor, Concerning the bad mouthing and inference about our ambulance service being under-manned and slow to respond: We had two ambulances out in good time together for the bad car wreck south of town.... That doesn’t look like we are as bad as we have been painted. Considering all the regulations we need to meet that almost ties our peoples’ hands in running an almost all volunteer service, I think we have a good bunch in the service to our community! In God we trust, Betty Roberts Oroville

Hastings piece insulting to veterans Dear Editor, As a veteran (USAF 1966-70) I find Congressman “Doc” Hastings’ Veterans Day propaganda piece insulting. Hastings record does not bear out his claim of support for American veterans. Less than two months ago he voted against excluding veterans from benefit cuts in case of a government shut down or default. In July rather than pushing for veterans benefits he claims he is for he voted to spend nearly $4 billion tax dollars on programs the Pentagon said they didn’t

COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

MOLSON LEADER 90 YEARS AGO:

Nov. 7-14, 1923: A new Oakland car loaded with 24 cases of liquor was seized and the driver, who gave his name as Fred Walker of Walla Walla, was arrested at three o’clock Monday morning near Havillah by Customs Officer Floyd Loomis and Deputy Sheriff M. McCoy and G. Warren, who was deputized by F. Loomis. The case was turned over to the county and state authorities and Walker was taken to Okanogan for a hearing. Wm. Powers, of the Hazelwood Creamery Company, has a force of men at work tearing down the old creamery building and erecting a new building directly west of the old building. The cement floor was poured the last of the week, but the cold nights make it slow to setting. As soon as the walls are erected, a stove will be put in the building and a fire kept up all night to help harden the floor. An ice house will be built back of the new building and every thing possible done to make the creamery an up-to-date and sanitary shipping station. Clyde Davis, of Molson, was arrested Friday on a charge of having raised a check from $8 to $80. He was taken before Justice G. W. McKee where he pleaded guilty to the charge and was bound over to the superior court. His bond was fixed at $1,500. The check was given to him by J. Dammel and E. Wildermuth on whose threshing machine he had been employed for two days and was cashed at a Tonasket bank. Dunlap’s Department Store advertises ‘Our price for “Wenatchee Best” flour is $2.10 per sack; $8.15 per bbl. We also have “Rosebud” hard wheat flour at $2.20 per sack and Oyster shell at 100 lb. for $2.75. Bids will be received up to December 1, 1923 for 50 cords of dry firewood. Must be 50 percent fir, cut from green standing timber and well seasoned. To be delivered at

need or want! He also strongly supports privatizing Social Security and turning it over to the Wall Street Banksters with no protection for the large number of veterans who depend on the program. Maybe the greatest insult was Hastings’ vote to send our troops into the Iraq War based on a lie and voting against any provision to pay for it or pay for benefits once our veterans returned. “Doc” Hastings’ record is one of giving corporations anything they want - it is certainly not one of supporting veterans. His article reads like a campaign brochure but not anything based on his real voting record. William F. Johnston Chesaw

What needs to be done? Dear Editor, I would like to say thank you to the people that voted for me. I would also like to say congratulations to those that were re-elected. One of the reasons I ran for office was because people stated that we needed a change on how the city was being run. With this in mind, I was surprised to see that less than half of the registered voters even voted. I know that not all the people of Oroville feel we need a change. But for those that do, you need to vote. Again, thank you for those that did vote for me. Also, I would like to know what the people of Oroville think about the Meth labs that are going on in our city. What do you think needs to be done? Paul Bouchard Oroville

Hospital head needs to update her info Dear Editor, This letter responds to Ms. Michel’s article about Critical Access Hospitals. Before pushing the panic button, Ms. Michel should update her information. There is no proposal by Congress to change CAH requirements or status. A report was issued in August, NOT by Congress, noting that many CAHs do not meet current criteria for CAH status, and that money could be saved if those hospitals changed to prospective payment. Those statements are true. It is not true that CAHs would necessarily close if they changed to the prospective payment system (PPS); indeed, they were paid under PPS before CAH status was invented. The fact is that many CAH are very close to another hospital, and it is these CAHs that

ITEMS FROM THE PAST Molson School house by January 15, 1924. Rights reserved to reject any or all bids. Molson Union High School District #2. W. E. Morris, Clerk. Clark Westover and W. H. McCord, of Wauconda, are conducting an infant industry that give promise of considerable development in Okanogan County. The men are buying pine and fir cones, extracting the seeds and selling them to supply the market and to rehabilitate the forest destroyed in the war in France and Belgium and for reforestation work elsewhere. .

OROVILLE GAZETTE 50 YEARS AGO:

Nov. 7-14, 1963: “PROCLAMATION: WHEREAS, The men and women who served in our Nation’s armed forces have contributed immeasurably to the preservation of America’s freedom and to the advancement of the goal of world peace; and WHEREAS, the Nation is eternally grateful to our veterans, for these contributions; and WHEREAS, it is fitting that we set aside a special day each year to honor our veterans and give a nation wide expression of our esteem for them; and WHEREAS, THE Congress of the United States has declared the eleventh day of November of each year to be a legal holiday and designated it as VETERAN’S DAY in honor of our veterans and as a day dedicated to the cause of world peace: NOW THEREFORE, I WALTER A L. HART JR., Mayor of the City of Oroville, do hereby call upon all or our citizens to observe Monday, November 11, 1963, as VETERAN’S DAY,

could be reclassified IF a proposal is enacted. It is not true that PPS does not consider rural location, salaries, and other costs of providing services. All those things are part of rate setting, and that is why it is important to submit an accurate cost report to CMS. Every hospital submits an annual cost report. PPS requires effective, efficient management of every hospital. CAH permits many small hospitals that are poorly managed -NVH among them, according to many -- to continue to operate. It is appropriate to look at the best, most cost-efficient ways to ensure health care in our communities, and I encourage the NVH Board and administrator to do that, instead of panicking at the mention of a single, reasonable report. S.T. Johnson Tonasket

Need to support our hospital Dear Editor Over the past, several weeks there have been several articles in our local newspaper regarding North Valley Hospital. One was celebrating the completion of the newly renovated second floor surgical unit while the others have dealt with the ongoing challenges facing the hospital due to budget constraints and many new medical regulations during this time of medical upheaval. With this in mind and the season of Thanksgiving approaching I have decided to use this forum to publicly thank the medical staff, all employees and let the community know how fortunate we are to have this facility available to us. Since the beginning of the year, my husband has been a weekly patient at our local hospital. One could definitely say he has qualified for “frequent patient status”. The medical challenges have been many, however with excellent care his health steadily improves. The care is personal and that is important when illness strikes The hospital provides many services, tests and procedures. I encourage the community to check and use the hospital facilities whenever possible. A special thanks to Dr. Donald Sebesta, and the second floor surgical team for their excellent care and support. You are the best and I give thanks everyday that you are there for us! Again, we are fortunate to have the quality of care that all those at NVH provide and we must try to support them during these challenging times. Joanne Morris Oroville and ask that the day be observed with appropriate ceremonies and the display of the Flag of the United States at each and every residence and business firm, not only in tribute to our veteran’s but also in re-dedication to the cause of peace with honor throughout the world.” Six young men will close out their high school football playing career Monday against the Tonasket Tigers. Rick Anderson, Delbert Jennings, Ron Peterson, Robert Walker, Jim Thornton and John Zosel have been outstanding performers for the Hornets for the last two years. The Oroville Hornets, riding high after their 19-13 win over Chelan Goats take on the Tonasket Tigers in a game that will decide the Cariboo League Trail 1963 championship. A Hornet win would give the Hornet’s their first football championship in many years. A mighty bunch of Hornets, staring defeat in the eye, clawed back with an eye-watering, spine tingling passing attack to subdue a gallant Tonasket team during the annual Veteran’s Day battle between the two schools on the Ben Prince Athletic Field. With 4:15 remaining and the score at 13 – 13. In the last four minutes, Tigers and Hornets each scored another TD for another tie at 19-19. On a Tonasket fumble, Oroville was able to score again with a final of 26-19 and the championship.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 25 Years Ago:

Nov. 10-17, 1988: After nearly three years of offers and counter-offers, the merger between the North End Water Users Association (NEWU) system and the city water system took one more step closer towards finalization when the council here tentatively approved a final draft of a merger contract. Regal Fruit Co. of Tonasket, celebrated 40 years of continuous operations in the processing of apples. Two growers

SEE PAST | PG A7


NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life Saddened by the death of Edith Holmes The middle of November and that much closer to ending the year 2013. A lot of disturbing happenings have been the order of the day, the passed few months. Maybe things will be smoother when we have a new year, but don’t bet on it. On Nov. 5 the community was saddened by the death of long time resident Edith Holmes, wife of the late Dr. Stuart Holmes. The couple came to Oroville in the mid-forties. I remember how pleased our community was to have a doctor and Edith was always by his side, whether it be giving assistance in the office, hiking in the mountains, which

they loved, admiring the many wild flowers or doing their evening walks. Edith loved nature and flower gardening was one of her passions and her beautifully landscaped yard made you want to slow down and see what was blooming. And we that were fortunate enough to receive, each Christmas, one of her hand made Christmas cards, with their (or her) photo on it, will have those memories and cards to keep forever. Edith enjoyed a good long life and the fall she had, leaving her lying unattended for several hours took its toll on her. Had it not been for the unwavering love

and caring concern given her by Ginger (Cody) Miller during the past several months, she would have needed nursing home care, but she was able to remain in her home, which she had had a large part in designing, until a peaceful death ended her life. A true lady to say the least! It is good to have pastor Rod Brown and Kathy safely home from their excursion to Israel and parts thereof. And also taking part in the service for Edith was John Jenkins, who had known her, many years, both as a friend and her former clergy at the Free Methodist Church. Word has been received of the

Lighted tractor parade, Christmas tree lighting, Dec. 7

OROVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

and will conclude at Centennial Park (next to Sun Lakes Realty) on Main Street. If you would like your tractor in the parade, please contact Sandy Andrews at the Camaray Motel (509) 476-3684. The Tree Lighting Ceremony will include nearly 30 singers from the Okanagan International Chorus. And, of course, the event concludes with a visit from Santa as well as free hot dogs and hot cocoa. Come help kick off the holiday season by enjoying the parade and tree lighting.

by Clyde Andrews Oroville Chamber of Commerce

OROVILLE - This year our annual Tree Lighting Ceremony on Saturday, Dec. 7 will be preceded by a Christmas Tractor Parade down Main Street.

More details will be sent out next week, but we wanted potential participants to start getting their tractors decorated (especially with lights.) The parade will start at 5 p.m. on Saturday

HILLTOP Several inches of new snow in the COMMENTS Highlands Contest winners at the Chesaw By Marianne Knight

Highlands Correspondent

Well... we think that winter is here, although the first day of winter is on Dec. 21. We have had several inches of snow since Nov. 5 and it is just not going away. It is quite beautiful. Not quite Christmas card special yet, but I am sure that is to come. We have passed autumn, with all of the beautiful leaves that have now fallen and covered the ground. Halloween is behind us now and all of the ghosts, witches and other scary monsters have gone into hiding ‘til next year. We do have the names of the Pumpkin Decorating

Mercantile. The pumpkins were furnished by the Mercantile for the children to decorate or carve a face. Some were quite scary others very original. Prizes for the “best” were gift certificates to be used at the Mercantile. First place was Raylin Monlux, age 10, winner of a $25 gift certificate. Second place of $5 each were Justin Vaughan and his sister, third place was Kylie Acord, age 9-years-old for $5. The other contest at the Mercantile was to guess how many pieces of candy corn were in the jar. Troy Anholt was the winner. His guess was 527. The actual count was 525. Thanks for

participating. The last Friday Night of the month is Movie Night at the Mercantile. Bring a potluck dish to share with others and enjoy a movie and making friends. The Havillah Church Parrish is having a Harvest Dinner on Nov. 16. Fellowship will start a 5 p.m. with dinner being served from 5:30 p.m. ‘til 7 p.m. Please bring your favorite salad or dessert. Everyone is welcome and bring a friend. Visit with old friends or meet your new neighbors. For more info call Lenette at (509) 485 2211. The winners of the Pinochle games on Nov. 4 with 36 players in attendance. High’s went to Harold Harper and Marilyn Cross. The lows were Everett Turner Mary Louise Loe. The traveling went to Willie Pennar. The Series #1 winner was Evelyn Dull. Until next week.

death of Jimmy Moss. The Moss she’ll be back soon. family were residents of Oroville, It might be a question of age many years, with Mr. Moss being if… someone walks up to you manager of the PUD. I don’t have and says, “I’ll bet you don’t any other particulars concerning remember me” …and they’re his death, at this time. absolutely right. Remember Dick Goodman? Mark Twain said, ”Life would He was here to attend the be infinitely happier if only we Memorial service of could be born at the age Edith Holmes. of eighty and gradually Special thoughts approach eighteen.” and prayers are in Christmas shows on order for Evelyn TV already? Frazier, who is Shortly the loads of having some diffiChristmas trees will cult days with after start arriving in the effects of chemo department stores. Live treatments. Also ones are nice for their Marilyn (Sawtell) fragrance, but having Toth. And Jim to constantly pick up Finley is having THIS & THAT needles from underhealth issues as Joyce Emry neath them is a pain. well as Marilyn I’m gonna stick with Wilder. Keep these my artificial one and good folks in your thoughts and we can spray pine scent in the prayers. room if we long for the fragrance. Sandra’s on Main is still closed Once again a cougar has been and is missed by her clients for sighted… on the porch of the nail and foot care. Hopefully Verbeck residence, which is just

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Benefit for Barb Millner Saturday, by Sue Wisener Tonasket Eagles #3002

Winter is just around the comer so it’s time to think about letting your smaller pets indoors at night. There has been requests for karaoke to come back on Tuesday nights. Starting Nov. 12 – it’s back starting at 8 p.m. Come and sing your favorite song with Linda Wood, also Saturday night at 9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22 it’s Turkey

and learn about your rights and responsibilities. Dowsing & Divining is a one session class on Thursday, Dec. 21. It’s for those who are already dowsers or have at least taken the basic course. Make a Piñata on Dec, 2 and 9 with Vera; an authentic papier maché work of art. And, finally,

TONASKET EAGLES Bingo starting at 7 p.m. come play and win a turkey. On Saturday, Nov. 23 we are having a dinner and silent auction for Barb Millner who recently lost her husband and is in need of a roof for her home and to celebrate the life of our friends. Homemade lasagne buffet starting at 4:30 p.m. for $10. There will also be Blues & Rockin’ Extravaganza featuring The Fat Tones and Jammers. For more

information call Judy at (509) 486-4793 or Sandy Gleason at (509) 486-4692. Nov. 28 come join your friends for Thanksgiving dinner put on by the Aerie and Auxiliary from 1:30pm to 4:00pm it is free or by donation. Thanksgiving day we will be closing at 6 p.m. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Jo Porter, second place Dave Russell, low score went to Sue Wisener again and last pinochle to Carol Ross and Gladys Fifer. We wish all of those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

PAST | FROM A6 were honored and received special recognition as 40 year members of Regal. Mary Gratrix and Don and Middie Verbeck for their long commitment to Regal. Also recognized were John Gillespie, former manager and recently retired, and Corinne Coe, who had worked as Secretary for the entire 40 years. Members of the American Legion and the public were at hand to watch the raising of new American and Washington State Flags at the Oroville Welcome Gates last Friday. The new flags were raised in celebration of Washington

State’s 99th birthday as a state and Veteran’s Day. The new flags were acquired by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce for the celebration. Weather Report: Nov. 8, 43 degrees maximum, 26 degrees, minimum; Nov. 9, 41 and 36; Nov. 10, 42 and 36; Nov. 11, 44 and 35; Nov. 12, 49 and 32; Nov. 13, 44 and 22 and Nov. 14, 44 and 25. Total precipitation for the week, .75 inches. If you have been wondering about the Roadrunner Drive-in in Tonasket, seeing it close and soon after re-open, wonder no more. To begin with, the name

is now Gringo’s Roadrunner” and as of Nov. 1, the new owners are Darrel and Judy Shaw and Mike and Miki Tibbs. This foursome should be familiar to most of you and amongst the four of them is a lot of experience serving food. The beautiful signs, done by Palmer Sign Company, now compliment the fence at the Tonasket Visitor Information Center and the Center will be ready come spring. Last Saturday, Rob Nau and a crew of volunteers placed these 12 attractive signs on the fence at the rear of the area.

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Learn to Draw a Face; the soul of our being, on Thursday, Dec. 5. Yes, you can learn to do it. Winter quarter begins in midJanuary with a whole new slate of classes, some never before offered and some that are always popular. Think Blue when you look for the new catalog after first of the year! To register for any of the remaining fall classes call Ellen Barttels at (509) 4762011, email her at community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu or go online to www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

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a short distance from the first sighting, at the Y of the N county road. Makes one wonder if it is the same animal or do we have others on the loose. It takes a very caring grandmother to drive, alone, to Brewster sports activities, returning in the dark in the fall and winter games. And that is what Hazel (Lenton) Dezellem does. Watch for the deer, Hazel! The last frost we had, Friday night, just about wiped out the rest of the flowers. Petunias are extremely hardy and some at our house still haven’t given in to the cold, but look pretty sad. And then, there are the leaves and folks trying to get them all raked up before the snow might cover them. Beauty always comes from within –– within jars, compacts, tubes and bottles. “Beautiful children are accidents of nature, but beautiful old people are works of art.” So said, Eleanor Roosevelt.

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Page A8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life BIG RETURNS AT CCC AUCTION

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Oroville Chamber Meeting OROVILLE - The Oroville Chamber of Commerce meets the second Thursday of each month at The Plaza Restaurant at 1 p.m. Featured speaker Jack Hughes has had a scheduling conflict and will not be able to meet, so it will be a Destination Oroville meeting. Everyone who wishes is invited to attend. For more information contact 1-888-699-5659.

Afternoon Senior Dance OKANOGAN - There will be an afternoon dance on Friday, Nov. 15, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Okanogan Area Senior Center (1300 2nd AVE S, Okanogan), with live music by Brock Hires. This event is free to attend and all ages are welcome. Sponsord by Health Alliance.

Molson Family Bingo MOLSON - Come to Molson Grange on Friday Nov. 15, 2013 at 6. p.m. for a fun night of family Bingo and bring a snack for break time. We hope to see you.

Oroville Grange Flea Market OROVILLE - The Oroville Grange Flea Market will be Saturday, Nov. 16 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 622 Fir St. Watch for posters and signs on Hwy. 97, south of town. A lot of new vendors and bargains. We rent tables to sell yours. Coffee any time. For more information call (509) 475-3878.

Benefit Auction Aurora #201 Masonic Lodge of Oroville will be hosting a benefit auction on Saturday, Nov. 16, 7-10 p.m. at the Oroville American Legion Hall to benefit numerous programs, including Shrine hospitals, learning disability programs, Bikes for Books, May Day games, Christmas baskets, and two scholarships each for Tonasket and Oroville. For more information contact Brick Wall (509) 560-0572 or Ken Neal (509) 476-2033.

Oroville Winter Market OROVILLE Oroville Community Library Presents: Winter Market, an indoor market in the Library Community Room at 1276 Main St. for Farmers, Bakers, Artists and Craft Makers! First market will be Saturday Nov. 16 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. Winter Market will run through January, longer if attendance is high. Shop local for the holidays and give back to the Community where you live and visit. Great place to meet up with friends and family on Saturday. Help warm our town!

All are welcome. Bring your favorite salad or dessert to share. Games for kids to follow. For more information contact Lenette (509) 485-2211.

Business Entities Class at NVCS OROVILLE – Do you own a business? Is there a partnership or joint venture? Maybe you’re looking at forming a limited liability company. Whatever your entity, our instructor, Tony Castelda, will discuss current tax issues, your rights and responsibilities, and how to avoid violations. Your questions will determine how the conversation goes. This class, Business Entities, will be held in Tonasket on Monday, Nov. 18. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011 or email her at community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu to register.

Stroke Support Group OROVILLE - The next meeting of the Stroke Support Group will be Thursday, Nov. 21 at 10:30 a.m. at the The Youth Activity Center, 607 Central Ave., adjacent to the Oroville Free Methodist Church. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome and this meeting there will be a guest speaker. The meeting has been moved up a week due to the Thanksgiving holiday. There will be a guest speaker and refreshments.

Genealogy of the Constitution OMAK - KrisAnne Hall will present “The Genealogy of the Constitution” Thursday, Nov. 21. The presentation begins at 6:30 p.m. and will be held in room 304 at Wenatchee Valley College, Omak Campus; located at 116 W. Apple, Omak. Admission is free and the event is open to the public.Donations will be welcomed to help defray KrisAnne’s travel expenses. Please RSVP to karbuckle@gmail.com if you would like to attend. Hall will also be speaking to the Omak High School’s Current World Problems class earlier that afternoon.

100th Masons Installation The Aurora Lodge #201 of the Free and Accepted Masons will be celebrating their 100th annual installation of officers on Saturday, Nov. 23, at 2:00 p.m. The installation will take place at the Oroville Grange Hall, 622 Fir Street, Oroville. The public is welcome to attend. Please call (509) 476-2566 for more information.

Oroville Monthly Meeting Elementary Christmas Bazaar for Democrats

OROVILLE Oroville Elementary School PTO will host the annual Christmas Bazaar in the gym, Friday, Dec. 6 between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 7 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration forms are available at Oroville Elementary, Oroville High School, Oroville Pharmacy, Oroville Public HAVILLAH - The Havillah Library and Oroville City Hall. Harvest Dinner is Saturday, Nov. Vendor space is available and 16, fellowship at 5 p.m.; serv- your booth fee will benefit local Whyp.m. not to start a new tradition? Make this at the(509) Call Susan ing 5:30 7 p.m. at holiday the students! time of year thatHall you help save for afor child’s 476-2427 more college information. Havillah Church Parish

Tree Lighting & Lighted Tractor Parade in Oroville OROVILLE - This year the annual Tree Lighting Ceremony for Oroville will be on Saturday, Dec. 7 at Centennial Park. The ceremony will be preceded by a Christmas Tractor Parade down Main Street. More details will be sent out next week. But we wanted potential participants to start getting their tractors decorated (especially with lights.) The Parade will start at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 7 and will conclude at the park (next to Sun Lakes Realty) on Main Street. If you would like your tractor in the parade, please contact Sandy Andrews at the Camaray Motel (509) 476-3684. The Tree Lighting Ceremony will include nearly 30 singers from the Okanagan International Chorus. And, of course, the event concludes with a visit from Santa as well as free Hot Dogs and Hot Cocoa.

The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket held its annual auction on Nov. 2, raising funds for its operating expenses and making a push to enhance its general membership. Janet Culp said that the auction brought in $9,750, which is a record for the eight years the CCC has held the fundraiser.

Tonasket Food Bank

“We had some great bidders generously, repeatedly, raise their hands. Lots of competition, and fun doing it.”

TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Deb Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

She added there was also a good response for the general membership drive and the appeal for funding for children’s programs. “Everything about the evening was a winner,” Culp said. “Great food, fun silent auction items, the live auction with MC Tryg Culp and auctioneer Rich Fewkes.”

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 4763978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Above, a big crowd listens as Fewkes makes the call for another highquality item. Left, bidding move quickly on most items. Brent Baker/staff photos

Listing Your Item in our Calendar in the newspaper and online Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

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Noted children’s author Jack Gantos was at the Oroville Elementary School on Tuesday, Nov. 5 to talk with students about writing. Here he explains journal mapping to sixth grade students. He also discussed the elements of writing. Gantos is a Newberry Award winning author and his visit was sponsored by the North Central Washington Regional Library.

WINTHROP County Democrats will be at River Run Inn, outside of Winthrop on Nov. 16 Potluck start at 12 p.m., monthly meeting to follow.

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page B1

Sports

Thrice is nice for cross country champ Speiker claims third state championship By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

PASCO - Happy, but not quite satisfied, Sierra Speiker still has goals and aspirations to reach for, even after winning her third Class 1B/2B state title in three years. Speiker was heavily favored in the Saturday, Nov. 9, race at Pasco’s Sun Willows Golf Course and didn’t disappoint. She ditched the rest of the field as she crested the hill at the 100-meter mark and cruised to a 30-second lead within the first mile, extending that to 41-second victory. Her time of 18:20.41 was her personal best for the course. And like every course she’s run on this season, the drop was precipitous: 24 seconds. Speiker was treated to a police / fire / ambulance escort through Oroville on Sunday when she returned home. One thing that made this season play out the way it did is that Speiker always wants more, and Saturday was no exception, state championship or not. “I felt pretty good,” she said, adding that she’d wanted to get under the 18 minute mark. “I wish I was a little faster, but that’s OK.” One of her top competitors this season, freshman Erin Mullins of Cascade, won the Class 1A state title. Mullins and Speiker engaged in a battle at the Omak Invitational in October that resulted in the season-best times for both. “I wish I could have run with her,” Speiker said. “That would have been nice.” “When you’re out there running alone, 45 seconds ahead of the competition, it is kind of hard to push and get your best time,” said Oroville coach Doug Kee, who said he thought Mullins and Speiker might have pushed each other under that coveted 18-minute mark. “It really helps to have somebody pushing you and she didn’t really have that today. But she ran an excellent race.” Speiker’s time actually held up well against the larger divisions despite her “running against the clock” predicament. Her 18:20 would have won the 1A race, placed third in 2A, taken fourth in 3A and seventh in 4A. That’s all speculation; there is no telling how any of those races would have played out with Speiker in the mix. (No matter the speculation, one amazing reality: Alexa Afraimson of Camas, who set a course record with a blazing 17:01.1 in the 4A race, was 49 seconds faster than anyone else in any class). That desire to run with others with the same passion and skill as Speiker motivated her to step her training up last summer as she ran as many as 70 miles a week to prepare for the season. That translated to personal bests on every course she ran by anywhere from 30 seconds to over a minute. Drops in time that are unheard of amongst runners already at the top of their class. “I wanted to get colleges looking at me so I could go and run in college next year,” Speiker said.

Brent Baker/staff photos

Clockwise from top, Sierra Speiker gets off to a fast start at Saturday’s state cross country championship run; Speiker crests the hill near the start of the course and loses the rest of the field for good; Speiker stands tall on the medal podium (photo by Doug Kee); Sierra Speiker glances at the clock as she makes her final push to the finish line. “And I really wanted to break 18 (minutes) but ... next year. “(I’m) very excited. It will be nice to run with somebody and train with them. Push me, and not always be out there by myself.” Speiker doesn’t know where that will be yet; however, in the more immediate future there is still next spring’s track season. As the defending 3200-meter (about two mile) champion, she wants to

defend that title and add the 1600 to her resume. “I really want to push for those,” she said. “I can get 11 minutes (after two miles) in cross country so I should be able to get that in track (for the 3200). I can do 11 minutes and still have to keep going, so I better be able to get that in track.” “She really needs to work on the 800 even though that’s not her goal,” Kee said. “(If) she can

get that down, she’ll get the others (times) down.” Kee said his coaching relationship with Speiker has evolved as she’s gained both experience and confidence. “It’s been entertaining,” he said. “The first two years she was so shy you never got a word out of her. But now she’s pretty much in charge. I tell her what to do and she says, ‘Why don’t we do this instead?’ So I only think I’m in

Sierra sends thanks “I‘d like to say a special thank you for my welcoming back parade from the state cross country meet Sunday, Nov. 10. I’d like to thank the Oroville fire and rescue department, the Oroville police department, all those people who braved the weather to cheer me on, but especially to Debra Donahue for the parade and Trish Tibbs for putting up signs at my house!” Thanks, Sierra Speiker charge. “But it’s been great, it really

has. It’s been a lot of fun to work with her.”

Hornets, Reardan in rematch of ‘93 state showdown By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Getting to the playoffs in a year when there were just two available state berths and three very worthy teams was no small task for Oroville’s football team. The Hornets needed some help to get there, and on Friday, Nov. 8, everything fell their way as White Swan defeated Liberty Bell and Manson upset Kittitas. Those results knocked the Mountain Lions and Coyotes out of contention and lifted the Hornets into the league’s second and final playoff spot. The Hornets (7-2) travel to Spokane on Friday, Nov. 15, to face Reardan (7-2) in the first round of the state 2B tournament. Reardan has a rich state playoff tradition, featuring six appearances in state title games and four championships. Oroville, while making its third straight state playoff appearance, has only seven in its history and one victory - a 55-13 win over Manson in 1995. This year’s game is a rematch of a 1993 state playoff between the Hornets and Indians that went down to the wire. Everything was set up for a deep tournament run for the Hornets. Oroville was unbeaten in the regular season and

ranked No. 1 in statewide polls. Led by standout running back Brandon Lewis, Coach Rich Guenther’s squad won its first league title in 50 years as they swept their Central B-11 foes, culminating with a victory over Wahluke in the season’s final game between the top two teams in the league. That earned the Hornets a first round game, which was played at Reardan despite the Hornets’ league title and lofty ranking. Lewis ran for 4,800 yards and 64 touchdowns in his career to, at the time, rank second on the state’s all-time rushing list and fourth in scoring. But Reardan was able to hold Lewis, who was playing with an injured shoulder, to just 55 yards. The game went down to final seconds as the Hornets stopped Reardan on a 4thand-2 play at midfield with 48 seconds left. Three plays later, Reardan picked off quarterback Kevin Marchand’s pass to end the Hornets’ comeback. Reardan went to on to play in the state title game, losing 20-6 to Raymond. But that was history. This year’s Reardan squad will be a handful, no matter what happened in 1993. The Indians’ two losses came to defending state champion, unbeaten Lind-Ritzville/Sprague, 27-13 (no one

has played LRS closer than that), and 20-0 to Bonners Ferry, a middle-of-the road Class 3A team from Idaho. Like the Hornets, the Indians are heavily dependent on their ground game, led by Clinton Jeney. Quarterback Wyatt Nieman is a threat through the air. Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson hadn’t seen the video of Reardan’s games that he’d accessed but said he’s been told their offense “isn’t real fancy. “As always, a lot depends on how we play defensively, especially if we tackle well. “I’m not concerned about our offense. I think it will OK regardless. The only problem we’ve had there his year is holding onto the ball (especially in the Hornets’ two losses). But we’ve moved the ball on everyone we’ve played.” More good news for the Hornets is that a number of their key injuries are healing up. Lineman Boone McKinney, who hasn’t played in three weeks, was cleared to play on Monday and will see some playing time this week. “We’ll see what he can do; we’ll get him started with the long snapping again and go from there,” Hutchinson said. “He’s been out running since last week.” The Hornets and Reardan played two common opponents this season. Reardan beat Mary Walker 35-14, while

State 2B Playoff Preview

Oroville vs. Reardan (at Gonzaga Prep) Friday, Nov. 15, 7:00 p.m.

Reardan Indians

Oroville Hornets

Record: 7-2 (5-1 Northeast 2B) Coach: Erick Nikkola State Tournament history: 21 appearances, including 4 state titles and 2 runner-up finishes 2012 State Tournament: beat Kittitas 2014; lost to Waitsburg-Prescott 39-12 2013 Season in Review: Reardan 31 Kittitas 6 W Reardan 48 *Liberty (Spangle) 18 W Reardan 13 *Lind-Ritzville/Spr. 27 L Reardan 0 Bonners Ferry 20 L Reardan 53 *NW Christian 20 W Reardan 35 *Mary Walker 14 W Reardan 14 *Davenport 0 W Reardan 37 *Colfax 20 W Reardan 27 Asotin 6 W *League game

Record: 7-2 (4-2 Central WA 2B) Coach: Tam Hutchinson State Tournament history: 7 appearances 2012 State Tournament: lost to Waitsburg-Prescott 54-26

Oroville also beat the winless Chargers 49-28. Reardan also beat Kittitas 31-6, while the Hornets lost to the Coyotes 20-13 in a game Oroville dominated, but lost thanks to five turnovers. The game will be played at Gonzaga Prep High School, which like last year’s playoff game in Pasco, features an artifi-

cial turf surface. “It’s tough that we can be a #2 seed and end up on the road,” Hutchinson said. “But it’s a nice stadium and we’re excited to play there. “We’ve said all along that the big thing was just to get into the playoffs. Now we can see what happens.”

Season in Review: Oroville 19 Brewster Oroville 49 Mary Walker Oroville 13 *Kittitas Oroville 59 *Manson Oroville 30 *Liberty Bell Oroville 42 *Lk Roosevelt Oroville 20 *White Swan Oroville 62 *Bridgeport Oroville 61 Chief Leschi *League game

7 W 28 W 20 L 6 W 27 W 14 W 22 L 34 W 8 W


Page B2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 14, 2013

SPORTS

‘Road warriors’ fall to Cougars By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

WHITE SWAN - It didn’t take long to figure out that White Swan is a very good volleyball team. Oroville’s first district tournament appearance since 1996 was a brief one as the Hornets were swept by the Cougars despite putting together a solid effort. After a six-hour bus trip to get to the hosts’ gym on Thursday, Nov. 7, the Hornets fell 25-19, 25-21, 25-20 and saw their season come to an end. “They had some great hitters,” said Oroville coach Carrie Rise. “And we had, like one blocker. Offensively they had a lot of options. But I thought the girls played well.” White Swan’s front line trio of Cayla Jones, Cory Wabaunsee and Rennae Bill kept the Hornets scrambling as there were always at least two of them near the net ready to home in for the kill. The Hornets got their share of blocks, but had to guess which side of the net the action would be coming from. That relegated them to trying to cover the floor, which they did well. White Swan actually had more self-inflicted wounds than did the Hornets, but was able to take advantage of being able to play more aggressively. The Hornets gave up an 8-2 run in the opening set to fall behind 17-11, but got back into it as Rachelle Nutt placed a ball on the line and added a kill, while Bridget Clark scored off a block to pull to within 17-14. Oroville wasn’t able to get any closer than that. White Swan looked like it would run away with the second set, breaking out to a 20-12 lead. The Hornets got back to within 22-20, with Mikayla Scott making a umber of key plays. The Hornets never led in the third set but never trailed by any more than the 25-20 final margin. Brittany Jewett spent more time picking up floorburn than she spent upright as Oroville kept White Swan’s hits in play for a number of long volleys, staying within 2-3 points until the Cougars finally put the match away. White Swan went on to beat Liberty Bell in four sets on Saturday to take the league’s third state tournament spot behind division champions Kittitas and Bridgeport. Oroville last won a league title in 1992 and last made the district tournament sometime between that season and 1999. The Hornets finished 5-3 in Central Washington League North Division play, good for a third place finish and the final seed into the tour-

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Oroville senior Meagan Moralez brings the ball upfield during Saturday’s district tournament loss at Bridgeport. It was the first district tournament game in the history of the Hornets’ girls soccer program.

Above, Brittany Jewett sets up a teammate at White Swan on Thursday. Left, Jessica Galvan digs out a Cougar attack. Brent Baker/staff photos

nament. Oroville had a chance to force a three-way tie for the league title with Liberty Bell and Bridgeport late in the season, but nervousness in the most important game they had ever played in helped cost them that match against the Fillies. Those nerves weren’t on display at White Swan, which was a bigger and more athletic team than either Oroville

or Bridgeport. The Hornets kept to their game plan, covered the floor well to save a number of White Swan hits, and communicated far better than the tightlywound bunch that showed up for the Bridgeport outing. “I was worried that the crowd might be huge,” Rise said. “But it was a good, excellent crowd. They were very accommodating, letting us in early.”

She said the only reason she’s not ready to get to work on next season is that she wasn’t ready for this year to be done yet. “We have just three seniors,” Rise said. “This game, we even played Kendal Miller, who is a freshman. Overall it was a great season, but this was a building year. To go from winning one match in three years to going 8-8 is pretty amazing. “I have been so proud of the Lady Hornets this season. They stayed positive, worked hard, and set their sights on getting to district.” Oroville stats: Bridget Clark 8/9 serving, 1 kill, 2 attacks, 2 blocks, 7 digs; Jessica Galvan 3/3 serving, 1 attack, 1 dig; Monica Herrera 2/2 serving, 3 digs; Brittany Jewett 15/15 serving, 3 kills, 6 attacks, 8 digs; Nadia Maldonado 1/2 serving, 1 attack, 7 digs; Kendal Miller 1 ace, 2/3 serving, 1 attack, 10 digs; Rachelle Nutt 4 aces, 6/7 serving, 3 kills, 2 attacks, 1 block, 12 digs; Andrea Perez 3/5 serving, 14 digs; Mikayla Scott 7/8 serving, 5 kills, 5 attacks, 11 digs.

Hornets fall in district contest THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

BRIDGEPORT - Oroville’s girls soccer team fell in the first district tournament game in program history at Bridgeport on Saturday, Nov. 8, 6-0. The Hornets, the Central Washington League’s fourth seed, struggled all season against the top-seeded Fillies, who improved to a Class 1B/2B best record of 15-1 with the win and will face Liberty Bell for a trip to the state semifinals. The Hornets did generate a few opportunities on offense, but were unable to capitalize. With the ball at the Hornet’s end of the field for much of the game, the Oroville defense was solid for most of the contest. The Hornets (3-13) return most of the squad next year as they only graduate seniors Meagan Moralez and Kaitlyn Grunst.

Bruce Thornton/submitted photo

To say that Tanner Smith had some gaping holes to run through on Saturday would be an understatement.

Hornets cruise in tune-up By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - A day after learning that they do, indeed, have a berth in the state 2B playoffs, Oroville’s football team cruised to a 61-8 non-league victory over overmatched Chief Leschi in a Saturday afternoon matinee. On Friday it looked like the Hornets (4-2 in league play) could easily finish their season at 7-2 and left out of the field of 16 state playoff teams. But that evening, White Swan defeated Liberty Bell 37-27 to knock the Mountain Lions (4-2) into a second place tie in the Central Washington 2B League with the Hornets. More improbable was Manson (2-7 overall) knocking off Kittitas 51-40 to drop the Coyotes (3-3) out of a second place tie and out

of the playoffs. That left the Hornets and Mountain Lions tied for the league’s second playoff spot, and since Oroville beat Liberty Bell 30-27 a few weeks ago, the Hornets advance to the post-season while the Mountain Lions stay home. White Swan (9-1, 6-0 CWL) won the league title.

Final home game The Hornets needed just 23 plays (as well as returns of an interception and a punt) to score their nine touchdowns, all of them in the first half as Oroville took a 61-0 lead. With the entire second half played under a running clock, Chief Leschi scored in the final minutes after holding the ball for almost the entire fourth quarter

against the Hornets’ JV players. Tanner Smith rushed for 103 yards and three touchdowns on six carries and also started the Hornet avalanche with a 66-yard punt return two minutes into the contest. Robbie Dudley added 62 yards on seven carries while EZ Delgado, Dustin Nigg and Sean DeWitte also added rushing touchdowns. Nathan Hugus added a 33-yard interception return for a score. Quarterback Luke Kindred carried the ball just twice - once for a 2-yard touchdown, and once for a successful 2-point conversion run. The Hornets led 34-0 after one quarter. Lane Tietje, Casey Martin, Robbie Dudley and Jake Scott led the defensive effort.

Arrigoni adjusts to Div. 1 By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

CHENEY - Catie Arrigoni, a 2011 Oroville graduate, made the bump up to NCAA Division 1 cross country this fall after a stellar two-year career at Everett Community College. Now competing for Easter Washington University, she and her Eagle teammates recently finished seventh at the Big Sky Conference championships and are preparing for the NCAA West Regionals in Sacramento on Nov. 15.

Arrigoni finished 51st on the 5k course in Bozeman, Mont., in 18:21.8, fifth on the squad. “Being in D1 is so much different then Everett,” Arrigoni said. “It’s not a few girls that are good; it is everyone and they are all really good. It is more intimidating when you step up to the line.” She said she’s enjoyed her group of teammates that have pushed each other to get better throughout the season. “When we are all nervous we know we have each other and will push each other through out

the race,” she said. “We didn’t do as we had hoped (at the Big Sky meet)... Now we have regionals in California. That is something I’m looking forward to going to and hope to improve and do better then the last race.” The Eagles’ season highlight was getting all of their top five under the 18 minute mark, including Arrigoni at 17:50. “That was really exciting,” she said. “We all work out and run hard together. I think in the next two years we are just going to keep feeding off each other and get better and better.”

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SPORTS Lakeside powers past Tigers District loss ends Tonasket’s best season since 2005 BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

NINE MILE FALLS - Tonasket’s girls soccer team thought that playing the likes of Cashmere and Cascade during the regular season would prepare them for another top flight opponent like the Lakeside squad they faced in Saturday’s district playoff contest. That turned out not to be the case, as the physical and - more importantly - supremely skilled Eagles ousted the Tigers to the tune of a 7-0 defeat. The Tigers struggled to contain Lakeside scoring stars Alexis Cook-Cox and Callie Best - not because they hadn’t seen players of their talent before, but because the Eagles’ entire team played a crisp, precise brand of possession soccer that kept the Tigers working just to gain any sort of possession. Coupled with a level of physicality that got out of hand in the second half and eventually left the Tigers short-handed, a game that was still competitive at the half quickly spun out of control. “The girls played hard,” said Tonasket coach Darren Collins. “They played well, especially that last part of the first half. That was awesome. “But this team was way better than Cashmere, I thought. They had the two girls, but as a whole they passed the ball like nothing we’d seen. It seemed like every one of their passes was within inches of where it needed to be.” Cook-Cox and Best quickly put Lakeside on top in the opening 13 minutes, but the Tigers settled down, kept the two scorers marked and received three sterling saves from Baylie Tyus when they did break through. Offensively, the Tigers had a number of chances late in the first half, though none as threatening as Kathryn Clemans’ shot that went just wide in the opening moments of the contest. “For some reason we came out slow, other than Kathryn almost scoring,” Collins said. “We just didn’t mark well and they made us pay for it.” Playoff soccer gets more physical the deeper in the tournament it gets, and this contest was no exception. With nary a yellow (or red) card issued in the contest, the game got rougher as it progressed. Defenders Elizabeth Jackson and Dani Capote both left the game with injuries (Jackson’s leg injury resulted in a trip to a local ER). Even Collins’ vociferous protests after Jackson’s injury failed to draw a card.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Austin Knowlton flies in to make a tackle during Friday’s season-ending loss to Kettle Falls.

Kettle edges Tonasket in OT BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Top, the Tigers’ Kylie Dellinger gets a pass off despite some tight Lakeside defense during Saturday’s district playoff game. Above left, defender Elizabeth Jackson shadows Lakeside star Callie Best before Jackson had to leave the game with an injury. Above right, Myra Gaytan and the Tigers responded in kind when the game got physical in the second half. Left, Selena Cosino heads the ball out of trouble from the defensive end of the field. She and eight other seniors played their final game for the Tigers. Brent Baker/staff photos

“Yeah, well,” Collins said of the officiating, leaving it at that. During a disastrous 10 minute stretch early in the second half, the Tigers gave up an own goal off an inadvertent header of a Lakeside corner kick, lost

Jackson to her injury and Cleman to a ball in the face, and gave up a penalty kick to Cook Cox, a goal to Best, and another score from Hannah Mitchell. Jocelyn Cook-Cox added a goal off direct kick just outside

the box after a hand ball to put icing on Lakeside’s cake. The Tigers finished their best season since 2005 with a 9-8 mark, but lose nine seniors to graduation.

TONASKET - In the dark, crisp early-November evening, Trevor Terris hit Roberto Juarez cutting across the goal line with no time left on the clock. The offense lined up again, and Derek Sund booted the extra point. Unfortunately, that same pass play had gone awry when it would have counted on the scoreboard, in overtime, with Tonasket trailing Kettle Falls 33-27. That attempt had fallen incomplete, ending the Tigers’ final game of the season. “That’s a really cool thing,” said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins as the voice of one of his seniors emanated from the huddle with one last pep talk. “That’s just a testament to these guys. Very cool. “That’s what it’s about ultimately. We spent a lot of time together on this field. It’s me going years from now going to their weddings and stuff, and we can talk about all sorts of things (besides football).” It was a difficult end to a tough season, but for more than two hours the Tigers and Cougars played the kind of back-and-forth, game that was a lot more fun than many of Tonasket’s Friday nights on the field against the Caribou Trail League’s top teams. The Tigers (3-7) had beaten Kettle Falls 13-7 in the second game of the season. “It was back and forth all night,” Hawkins said. “I kept thinking, when we were up a touchdown a couple of times there in the second half, we couldn’t get the ball back to get up by more. Terris had a career night rushing the ball, starting off with a 63-yard run for a touchdown on the Tigers’ first play from scrimmage. He finished with a careerhigh 161 yards on 14 carries and three scores, including runs of 19 and 10 yards in the third quarter.

Volleyball team deserved better WHITE SWAN - You might set up so that the north and south have missed it, but Oroville’s vol- division champions automatically leyball team played its first dis- head to the state 2B tournament, trict playoff game since sometime but play each other for the disin the 1990s on Thursday. trict championship and seeding Actually, you almost certainly on Saturday in Ephrata. didn’t see the game yourself; there The north runner-up plays the were fewer Oroville supporters winner of the south #2 vs. north than team members at the game. #3 game, which was White Swan This isn’t a criticism of Hornet vs. Oroville. fans, but of whatever process Thursday’s match originally was used (if there was showed up on such a thing) to set CWBathletics.com up Thursday’s game, (the league’s official which involved a ludiwebsite) as being crous six-hour bus ride played in Ephrata. (each way) on a school I saw that myself night for one match and had it on my that took a little over calendar, but somean hour. time in October it Long travel times are changed. Oroville a fact of life for rural athletic director high school teams. It’s HALF-BAKED Tam Hutchinson one reason why regusaid it was unclear Brent Baker lar-season schedules when or by whom. around here tend to go Other league athletic heavy on Friday and Saturday directors didn’t seem to want to games. get involved, White Swan was conThe Caribou Trail League, tent to play its game at home, and which stretches from Quincy to assigned tournament director Mike Tonasket, has a few three hour Wilson of Liberty Bell has been on trips in there. administrative leave and was unable The Central Washington to be contacted. League’s 2B schools separate Hutchinson said at least one into north and south divisions other league A.D. told him that for many sports, including vol- the set-up was what had been leyball and basketball. It makes agreed on at a district meeting in for an odd set-up - in volleyball, September; Hutchinson rememthere are five northern teams bers differently. and three southern teams that However it happened, there is for the most part don’t even no excuse. It’s not rocket science. play one another during the No matter which teams would regular season. When north and have been involved - say, Liberty south teams meet during the Bell vs. Riverside Christian of basketball season, those games Yakima (a matchup that could are scheduled for Saturday after- easily have happened), it was noons to account for those five going to be a totally inappropriand six-hour bus rides. ate and unnecessary trip for a The District 5/6 bracket was weeknight.

It’s not like there weren’t other options. Ephrata or another neutral site is one. Another would have been to adjust the Saturday schedule of the tournament in Ephrata to get that additional match in. It might have meant a late night in Ephrata. But it still wouldn’t have meant (a) leaving at 9 a.m. on a school day to get there, or (b) pulling in at 3 a.m. on another school day. As it happens, Ephrata is also hosting the 1B district Saturday. A similar play-in game is being played first thing in the morning. Somehow the 1B schools figured it out. This is no indictment of White Swan, either. The school was accommodating, allowing the Hornets some extra gym time to work out the kinks of a long bus trip. Their fans were loud but friendly. But the trip cost the girls two school days (they may have been there Friday, but in what condition?), their parents and classmates didn’t get to see them, and they didn’t get the experience the other teams did of being there with the other playoff qualifiers, watching and scouting who they might play against next. For their part, the Hornets played a solid game against a team that had more size at the net, more strong hitters, and last year played in the state tournament. The Hornets finished at .500, winning as many matches this season as they did in the last decade combined. Now it’s done. It’s just too bad there weren’t the cheers of their family and friends to soak in as part of the district tournament experience.

Michael Orozco added 157 yards on 31 carries as the senior duo accounted for all but 38 yards of the Tonasket offense. But though they had their chances to build onto their lead, the Tigers couldn’t put the Cougars away. Terris’s final touchdown, a 10-yard run, gave the Tigers a 27-20 lead with 1:02 left in the third. It took Kettle Falls just four plays to score, with Michael McIntosh taking Cole Wren’s pass 54 yards for the score that ultimately forced overtime. Kettle had a chance to win in regulation, advancing to Tonasket’s 12-yard line with about a minute to play. But the Tigers held on 4th-and-1 to set up overtime tied at 27-27. Kettle Falls took the extra session’s first possession and took just four plays to score on Wren’s 1-yard run. The Tigers looked ready to answer as Orozco carried five straight times to get the ball to the 7 despite a penalty that added the the difficulty of their task. But on 4th down, the Tigers committed their second penalty of the overtime possession to move back to the 12-yard line, and Terris’ pass for Juarez fell incomplete to end the game. “Their safety crept down in the box; we just didn’t get the ball to him,” Hawkins said. But getting in those down and distance situations has been a n issue for us. We really put ourselves in a bad situation in overtime those penalties. Those were killers for us all year.” The Tigers outgained Kettle 356171 on the ground, but Wren completed 9-of-14 passes for 162 yards. Two big pass plays were assisted by Tiger defenders slipping on the grass as frost began to form at halftime. “It’s unfortunate; we just gave up too many big plays,” Hawkins said.

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Page B4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Advanced care training course for EMTs offered in Tonasket

A VISIT FROM TONASKET EMS

The Gazette-Tribune

NORTH COUNTY - Area residents will receive advanced emergency medical care after current EMTs graduate from a specialized from a course that is being taught for the first time in the state of Washington. Tonasket EMS Director Michael Greene, a paramedic, petitioned the state to teach the course that will certify current Tonasket EMTs to start IVs, administer numerous medications and advanced procedures. In addition to new EMT students from Tonasket, current and new EMTs from Ferry County and Oroville will be joining the class. Greene received approval for the course from the Department of Health and County Medical Program Director after convincing them that providing advanced emergency care at the scene and during lengthy transports, rather than at the hospital, will help save lives. Greene said he is honored to be teaching the new course to current Tonasket EMTs “They are the most motivated and dedicated group of volunteers I have ever had the honor to work with,” he said. Almost all of the current Tonasket EMTs are taking the advanced training course. The class will be held mostly on weekends and include 10-hour days and travel to western Washington to work in busy emergency rooms and taking a national certification exam. Students are paying for the class themselves but books are being paid for with a $3,000

Mrs. Baker’s kindergarten class at Tonasket Elementary School had a visit from the Tonasket EMS last week, though not for an emergency. Students were able to climb in and learn some basics about what happens in the back of an ambulance should one end up there for real. Above, Crystal Brown shows off one of the gloves used by EMTs. Right, Leilani Kilpatrick poses with a group of kids pleased with their souvenirs from the visit. Submitted photos

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donation from the Okanogan Family Faire and a private donation from local community supporter Peter James. Greene says part of the reason the county medical program director and Washington State Department of Health approved the new course was the lengthy ambulance transport times for the 1,600 square mile ambulance district. “I explained to the county medical program director that the Tonasket EMS District is larger than the entire state of Rhode Island (1,254 square miles),” he said. “What makes the class unique is the combining of basic and advanced students in the same training course. By allowing new EMTs to take the class alongside the current Tonasket EMTs both groups will benefit. The new EMT students will learn from the experience and knowledge of the current EMTs. The current EMTs learn by teaching others. It is also more cost effective for the students to combine two classes into one.” The class size is limited to 20 students, with about five spots remaining. The registration deadline is Nov. 24. The advanced course is open to currently certified EMTs with at least one year of experience. The basic class is open to anyone over age 18 that are either high school graduates or have obtained their GED. The course will begin Jan. 4 and run Saturdays and Sundays for 10 hours, plus numerous Tuesday and Wednesday classes, for a total of 210 hours. For additional information, contact Greene at (509) 5600080.

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Okanogan Valley Life OROVILLE BOOSTERS RAKE IT IN FOR KIDS

Brent Baker/staff photo

Karla Stucker shows off some of the “bling” in her shop located inside II Sisters Video in Tonasket.

Country Crazy Cowgirl Bling moves into Tonasket’s II Sisters TONASKET - A successful run at area bazaars and rodeos over the spring and summer inspired Karla Stucker to set up shop with her new business, Country Crazy Cowgirl Bling, which she started up last February. The business now occupies a portion of II Sisters Video Store in Tonasket at 415 S. Whitcomb Ave. Stucker will not be on hand all the time but items can be purchased from Country Crazy Cowgirl Bling during II Sisters’ business hours, Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.7:30 p.m; Friday, 9 a.m.-8 p.m.; and Saturday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Country Crazy Cowgirl Bling

offers handbags (including concealed weapons handbags), men’s and women’s wallets, sunglasses, belts, caps and hats, home decor, some clothing and various gift items. Stucker took her products on the road to get things started, attending the Okanogan Soroptimist Bazaar and the Oroville Spring Bazaar, then the Methow Valley Rodeo both Memorial and Labor Day weekends, Junior Rodeos, the Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo, the Omak Stampede, and the Waterville and Okanogan County Fairs. “Things went well,” she said.

“People loved my products and prices. “We hope to continue to build our product lines and are open to new ideas or suggestions.” Country Crazy Cowgirl Bling will be hosting an open house during Tonasket Winterfest, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. At that point customers can make orders for Christmas and free coffee and cookies will be available. Karla Stucker and her husband Rod live on ranch between Oroville and Tonasket. They have two pboys at home (Chance and Riley) and three adult children (Alison, Pam and Trampas).

The Oroville Booster Club raised more than $11,000 at their live and silent auction held Saturday, Nov. 2, at the American Legion Hall. Altogether the club raised over $20,000 between this event and the dinner auction at Veranda Beach Resort in October. Proceeds to both academic and athletic programs to support the youth at the Oroville School District. Above, the crowd at the lively auction bid on many items donated by local individuals and businesses. Left, auctioneer Ken Neal has been coaxing crowds out their hardearned cash for worthy for more than 20 years.

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket students line the street as the Capitol Christmas Tree caravan speeds by on Wednesday, Nov. 6.

Capitol Christmas Tree rolls through Tonasket TONASKET - The U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree passed through Tonasket on Wednesday, Nov. 6, to the delight of much of the Tonasket School District students, who lined the hill along SR-20 to catch a glimpse of the caravan on its way to Washington, D.C. This year’s tree grew on the Newport District of the U.S. National Forest in Pend Oreille County. According to the tree’s official website, it was wrapped over a period of three days and will be visiting communities across the country before arriving in Washington in time for Thanksgiving. The tree stopped in Republic for a ceremony and was later on display in Wenatchee that

Brent Baker/staff photo

Students wave as the tree heads off to D.C. via Tonasket and Wenatchee. evening. Last year, a group of Tonasket fourth graders made Christmas ornaments made from Mt. St. Helens ash that were

traveling with the tree, as well as companion trees that will be designated for offices around the capitol.

Scholarship application forms available Submitted by Glenna Hauenstein Oroville Scholarship Foundation

OROVILLE - Attention, O.H.S. Graduates attending college or vocational technical school. During the month of November, scholarship application forms will be available for students who have completed at least one year of college or vocational tech school. To receive the guidelines and application form go to our website www.orovillescholarshipfoundation.com. When completed, please mail to: Oroville

Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 123, Oroville, WA 98844. They must be postmarked by Dec. 6, 2013. Recipients will be notified during the last week in December. At the first meeting of the school year, we were pleased to have a new high school counselor, Steve Gunderson, attending. Also, a check for $300 was presented to the music director, Eric Stiles, and the music department for his help and student participation at the March 2013 variety show. After the summer class reunions, donations were

k n i Th ! n e e Gr

received from the classes of ‘63 and ‘73. Many thanks to these O.H.S alumni. The first fundraising event for this year will be a basket drawing the week of Christmas. The basket will be displayed at the Community Bazaar, Senior Center Bazaar and Princes Center. We are hoping to add some new members to the committee this year as several long time volunteers are planning to retire. If you are interested, please contact Glenna Hauenstein at (509) 476-2416 or Teresa Kitterman at (509) 476-2127.

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Similkameen Park Apartments Oroville, WA. Farm worker Preference 1, 2, 3, and 4 bedroom Starting @$365 per month + security deposit. Water, Sewer, Garbage, Washer and Dryer. Air conditioning, Play area, Storage Space. For more information contact Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

TONASKET HOME - In Town. Move in ready. 2000 Sq Ft, 4 bedroom, 2 bath plus office. Many upgrades including kitchen, bath, hardwood floors, appliances including washer & dryer, new metal roof, 2 car carport, enclosed shop. Quiet Neighborhood, close to schools Great Value! Price Reduced - $172,000. TONASKET - 1 Bedroom Call 509-322-2289 $495. 2 Bedroom $595. Close to town. All appliances. Water/Sewer paid. 509-4861682 or 509-429-0873. Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 6+ acres, $910. 2 Bedroom House, In Town, $650. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Lakefront Apartment, $725. Darling 1 Bedroom, $495. Deluxe Lakefront Home, Furnished, 3 Baths, $1595. OTHERS. Call Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

For Rent

OROVILLE GARDEN APARTMENTS. Senior or Disable Housing 1 bedroom upstairs Subsidized Unit if eligible. Located downtown. Applications available at 617 Fir St., Oroville. Call: 509-476-3059

REPUBLIC 3500 SF COMMERCIAL BUILDING for lease on 2.5 Acres. 14’ and 12’ Bay Doors, 1 bath, wood and propane Heat. $700 per month plus utilities, first and last month. 2 year minimum. Highway 21 North, Republic WA. 425-822-2901.

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Found

Statewides

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF NOV. 11, 2013

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Lost REWARD: LOST CAT. Lost from Tonasket Veterinary clinic on 10/25/13. Male neutered no tail Manx cat. 5 years old / 10 lbs. Call Jill 509-560-9335

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1. Driving around for fun 9. Bug 15. Hired vehicle (3 wds) 16. Spot 17. Poisonous substance obtained from belladonna 18. Cost setter 19. 20-20, e.g. 20. Kind of seat 22. “Laughable Lyrics� writer 23. “-zoic� things 25. Stage item

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Okanogan Co Dispatcher & RIVERCOM 911 Immediate Openings!

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

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WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

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This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPTION -- Happily married couple wish to adopt a newborn. Promise love, laughter, security for your baby. Expenses paid. Call or Text Kate & Tim -- 302 750 9030. EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 6343838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED HEALTHCARE JOBS! Now Filling the following Nursing Positions: CNA’s LPN’s, RN’s and Med Aids, $2,000 Bonus + FREE Gas. Call AACO for Details: 1-800-656-4414 HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS OWNER OPERATOR Dedicated Home Weekly! Solos up to $175,000/year. $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Teams up to $350,000/year. $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Forward Air 888-652-5611 DRIVERS -- Whether you have experience or need training, we offer unbeatable career opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877-3697105 centraldrivingjobs.com DRIVERS -- Tired of Being Gone? We get you Home! Call Haney Truck Line one of best NW heavy haul carriers. Great pay & benefits package. Call 1-888-414-4467 or www.gohaney.com

Public Notices

Public Notices

BUDGET ADOPTION HEARING The City of Oroville 2014 Budget Hearing will be held at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, December 3, 2013 in the City Council Chambers. The formal Adoption Hearing will be held at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, December 17, 2013. Copies of the proposed budget will be available November 18, 2013 for any concerned citizens and may be obtained from the office of the City Clerk during normal business hours until the adoption hearing date. Citizens attending the hearings shall have the right to provide comments and ask questions concerning the entire budget. ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7 and November 14, 2013. #523256

the 1st day of November, 2013, was continued to DECEMBER 13, 2013. All other terms of the above referenced Notice of Sale continue in full force and effect. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on the 13th day of December, 2013 at the hour of nine thirty (9:30) A.M. at the front foyer on the first floor of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 3rd Avenue North, Okanogan, Washington 98840, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in Okanogan County, Washington. The property, which is not used principally for agricultural or farming purposes, is commonly known as NHN 40 Acres, Harmony Heights, Okanogan, Washington, and bears property tax identification numbers 8896300100, 8896300200, 8896300300, and 8896300400, is described as: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the Zimmerman Reach Short Plat as recorded in Book A, Section 4, Page 212 of short plats, under Auditor’s File No. 3147876, records of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington and previously described as: The Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 33, Township 31 North, Range 24 East, W.M., Okanogan County, WA bearing property tax identification number 3124332009. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust granted by Gary and Cynthia Zimmerman on July 17, 2008, and recorded with the Okanogan County Auditor on July 21, 2008 at Auditor No. 3134901 to secure an obligation in favor of Columbia State Bank, as Beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust or the Beneficiary’s successor is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The indebtedness secured by the Deed of Trust arises from a Promissory Note dated July 17, 2008, which has matured. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made are for failure to pay when due the following amounts that are now in arrears: Principal: $126,923.88 Unpaid interest: $4,379.74 ( t h r o u g h July 16, 2013) Attorneys’ Fees and Costs: $2000.00 (estimated) Total Due: $133,303.62 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $126,923.88 together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured from July 17, 2008, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. Interest is continuing to accrue at the default rate of 20% or $69.5473 per day on the Note. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 1st day of November, 2013. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 21st day of October, 2013 (11 days before the sale date) along with payment of other ordinarily scheduled monthly payments to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 21st day of October, 2013, the default as set forth in paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 21st day of October, 2013, and before the sale by the Grantor or the Grantor’s successor in interest or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Grantor or the Grantor’s successor in interest at the following addresses: VIA POSTING AT: 40 Acres, Harmony Heights, Okanogan, WA (Property located NW corner of Kamsak and Valley Ridge Road with access from Kamsak and driveways on Valley Ridge Road) BY FIRST CLASS AND CERTIFIED MAIL Fidalgo 2010 LLC P.O. Box 755 Conway, WA 98238 Michael Beverick 10595 Merry Canyon Road Leavenworth, WA 98826-9556 on May 22, 2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY JUDITH ANN DE VON, Plaintiff, v. Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. Defendants. CASE NO. 13-2-004901-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The State of Washington to the said Defendants, Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the17th day of October, 2013, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled courts, and answer the complaint of the Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, at his.office below stated; and in case ofyour failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of this action is to quiet title in Plaintiff to the following described real property situated in Okanogan County, State of Washington, to-wit: Lot 18, Block 4, Plat of ORO, Washington, as per plat thereof recorded in Book�A� of Plats, page 17, records of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington. DATED this 3rd day of October, 2013. /s/ PATRICK J. MORRISSEY PATRICK J. MORRISSEY, WSBA#3045 Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 707 Okanogan, WA 98840 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 17, 24, 31, November 4, 14, 21, 2013. # PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 Date of Auction: November 20th, 2013 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1995 Saturn SC2 Lic#: 012XKU Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 14, 2013. #526626 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 Date of Auction: November 20th, 2013 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1976 Chevrolet 2500 LIC# A33498Y Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 14th, 2013. #526628

REAL ESTATE

PUBLIC NOTICE Preliminary Budget Hearing The City of Oroville will hold a public hearing to consider the Preliminary 2014 Budget during the November 19, 2013 regular council meeting. Citizens attending shall have the right to provide oral and written comments and suggestions. ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7 and November 14, 2013. #523261

$500 TAKES POSSESSION of 20 surveyed acres close to Nat’l Forest w/ year-round access. Beautiful view, trees and site work is done!Call TLC 1-888-440-9824 REF: BC

Please take notice that the Trustee’s Sale that is more fully described in Okanogan County Auditor No. 3184014, recorded on July 18, 2013, that had been scheduled to occur on

LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

509/476-3378

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The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville 3

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REDUCED! Priced to sell! 609 Golden St. 3bed/1.5bath-Comfortable, well maintained, upgraded 3 bedroom home with a large fenced backyard, attached 2 car garage. Not far from schools. NWML#534303 $119,000 7 9

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LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

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Charming home right in town! Completely rebuilt from the studs with new wiring, plumbing, insulation, windows, new bath and kitchen with stainless steel appliances. Modern, open concept with high ceilings, wood floors, nice porch and beautiful yard. Corner lot and turn-key ready; this is a must-see! MLS® 528521 $135,000 5 1 3

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#1 Top Producer Office in North County! 1

1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

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Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

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*BaSed on Statewide SurveyS ShowinG 2.3 people read each copy of a community newSpaper.

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contact YouR local WnPa Request a free information kit today: MeMbeR neWsPaPeR 509-476-3602 to leaRn MoRe.

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DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP – Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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Sunday, Nov. 10, 2013 DUI on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Caudill Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on Kermel Rd. near Omak. Theft on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Generator reported missing.

Meggin Elizabeth Lindsey, 35, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV).

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Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013 One-vehicle crash on Duck Lake Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Two-vehicle crash on Omak Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Assault on W. Second St. in Tonasket. Assault on Appleway Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Ross Canyon Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on Edmonds St. in Omak. Burglary on Ferry St. in Omak. Assault on Mill Dr. in Tonasket. Malicious mischief on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Brian Lee Mathis Jr., 27, booked for DUI. Tonya Renee Fisher, 46, booked for DUI. Michael Wayne Tooker, 30, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV).

DWLS on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Badger Rd. near Tonasket. DUI on Omak Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Loomis Ave. in Loomis. Domestic dispute on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Fraud on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Burglary on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Weapons offense on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Rick William Kennell, 57, booked for DUI. John Arthur Manuel, 49, booked for third-degree DWLS. Daniel Dominguez Martinez, 26, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). James Dean Wilson, 58, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Michael Edward Stanger, 24, booked for DUI.

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Domestic dispute on Engh Rd. in Omak. Harassment on S. Granite St. in Omak. Harassment on Ivy St. in Omak. Burglary on Golden St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on N. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Christopher J. Simpson, 42, booked for DUI and second-degree DWLS.

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Superior Court of Washington County of Chelan In the Matter of the Estate of: IONA M. PORTER, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00276-2 Probate Notice to Creditors RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 46 (Easy, rating 0.36) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: November 7, 2013 Personal Representative: Janet L. Culp Attorney for Personal Representative: Aaron J. Harris Address for Mailing of Service: 139 South Worthen P.O. Box 19 Wenatchee, WA 98807-0019 (509) 663-0031 JANET L. CULP Personal Representative JOHNSON, GAUKROGER, SMITH & MARCHANT, P.S. Attorneys for Estate By:AARON J. HARRIS WSBA No. 36802 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7, 14, 21, 2013. #524840

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son having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: November 14, 2013 /s/ Dale L. Crandall WSBA #32168 Attorney for Kevin J. Myrick P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 14, 21, 28, 2013. #526727

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PUBLIC HOSPITAL DISTRICT NO. 4, OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON (North Valley Hospital) NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held pursuant to RCW 70.44.060(6) on the 14th day of November, 2013, for the purpose of receiving public comment on the 2014 Budget. Any interested person may present their comments by making oral comments at the time of the public hearing or by submitting their comments in writing prior to or at the time of the public hearing. The hearing shall be held at the Commissioner’s Board Room at North Valley Hospital located at 126 Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket, Washington, commencing at 7:00 p.m. on the date set forth above. PUBLIC HOSPITAL DISTRICT NO. 4 OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON (North Valley Hospital) /s/ Helen Casey President of the Commission Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 14, 2013. #526638 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of PATRICK DAVID MYRICK, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00106-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Kevin J. Myrick as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any per-

Sudoku

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Public Notices

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hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. SEL, Inc. Olivia E. Gonzalez Stokes Lawrence, P.S. 1420 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3000 Seattle, WA 98101-2393 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 14, December 5, 2013. #524134

Public Notices

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune November 14, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

On Golden Pond this charming home in the county has 2 bedrooms 2 bathrooms and is set on 5 acres. This home has an open floor plan with a bright cheerful kitchen with all appliances. The living room has sunny southern exposure. There is a front deck and back porch, workshop and irrigated acres. $134,900.”

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Page B8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 14, 2013

cops & courts Compiled by Zachary Van Brunt

Superior Court Criminal

Logan James Board, 25, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Nov. 4 to residential burglary, second-degree theft, POCS (hydrocodone) and third-degree malicious mischief. Board was sentenced to 90 days in jail for the first three counts, and 364 days in jail with 274 days suspended for two years on the fourth. Board was fined $1,110.50 and ordered to pay $3,071.28 in restitution for the October 2012 crimes. The court dismissed Nov. 4 a charge against Vincent Matthew Antonelli, 37, Omak: first-degree unlawful possession of a firearm. Steven Lee Pendley, 23, Omak, was ordered Nov. 5 to pay $5,704 in restitution to Eric P. Skansgaard of Omak. The payment stems from crimes committed in October 2012. Cheyenne Rochelle Lezard, 18, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Nov. 7 to theft of a firearm, seconddegree theft (access device) and second-degree vehicle prowl. Lezard was sentenced to 90 days in jail for the first two counts, and 364 days in jail with 274 days suspended for the third. Lezard was fined $1,110.50 for the Sept. 17 crimes. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Dec. 17. The court found probable cause to charge Trevor Warren Armstrong, 28, Tonasket, with two counts of residential burglary and firstdegree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred in October. The court found probable cause to charge Douglas Glen Johnson, 46, Tonasket, with POCS (hydrocodone) and DUI. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 29.

Civil Matters

Anthony L. Matt, Omak, was assessed $2,313.36 for overpayment of unemployment benefits and interest by the state Employment Security Department. Sean S. Love, Tonasket, was assessed $7,439.29 for overpayment of unemployment benefits and interest by the state Employment Security Department. Maria G. Orozco, Omak, was assessed $2,121.80 for overpayment of unemployment benefits and interest by the state Employment Security Department.

District Court Christopher Buck Ellis, 37, Riverside, had two charges dismissed:

fourth-degree assault and thirddegree malicious mischief. Sheileyna R. Friedlander, 22, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Friedlander received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $768. Mary Christina George, 23, Omak, guilty of first-degree criminal trespass and third-degree theft. George was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $808. George Everett Gilmer, 56, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. Gilmer was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $1,716. Donald Lee Grant, 38, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Grant was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. Kelly Sue Gregg, 51, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree theft. Gregg was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $768. Kristina M. Grooms Sloan, 39, Omak, guilty of second-degree criminal assistance. Grooms Sloan was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $808. She also had a resisting arrest charge dismissed. Seth Jared Harris, 27, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Harris was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $858. He also had an additional third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Thomas Howard Hartman, 64, Omak, had a charge dismissed: operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Hartman was fined $200. Bruce Wilson Hawkins, 52, Tonasket, had a harassment charge dismissed. Hawkins was fined $500. John Michael Hendrickson, 30, Omak, guilty of DUI. Hendrickson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined $1,936. Jennifer Margaret Herriman, 21, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Herriman was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. Mitchell Ray Hofferber, 53, Tonasket, guilty of first-degree negligent driving. Hofferber was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 82 days suspended, and fined $858. Walter Ray Hoffman, 42, Riverside, had two charges dismissed: bail jumping and reckless driving. Tara Marie Jaime, 21, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Jaime was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 175 days suspended, and fined $808. Monica Gaye Joseph, 53, Omak, guilty of second-degree DWLS.

Joseph received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $1,018. Jessica June Kitterman, 23, Tonasket, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Kitterman was fined $500. Carrie Marie Leslie, 38, Okanogan, guilty of first-degree criminal trespass. Leslie was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 172 days suspended, and fined $808. Jillian Marie Lewis, 25, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Lewis was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 178 days suspended, and fined $808. Noel Lockett, no middle name listed, 46, Oroville, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Lockett was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,183. Leaysha Lamariah Lee Louis, 19, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Louis was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $808. Adam Charles Luntsford, 39, Omak, guilty of attempted violation of a no-contact or protection order. Luntsford was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 60 days suspended, and fined $433.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, Nov. 4, 2013 Theft on Rone Rd. near Tonasket. Toolbox reported missing. Harassment on Stage Coach Loop Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. Burglary on Oak St. in Omak. Burglary on Ferry St. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Assault on N. Main St. in Omak. Child abuse on Golden St. in Oroville. Theft on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Jewelry reported missing. Trespassing on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Brandon Shea Marchand, 39, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Robert Trevor Richardson, 33, booked on a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Sarah Marie Ohmer, 41, booked for first-degree criminal trespass. Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013 DWLS on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle rollover crash on Aeneas Valley Rd. near Tonasket.

Obituary

Donald John Reynolds

Donald John Reynolds, age 69 of Tonasket died on October 25, 2013 at his home in Tonasket. He was born on January 6, 1944 in Oakland, California. Johnny joined the Marine Corps on Jan. 6, 1961 and served until April 25, 1965. Most of his time was spent in Vietnam. After his service, he was signed by the Chicago Cubs to pitch baseball for about five years. Next he pursued music and was the drummer for the group Journey. When his music career ended his next venture was with the Southern Pacific Railroad a job that lasted about nine years.

Burglary on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle prowl on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Kermel Rd. in Omak. DUI on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Harassment on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Harassment on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Assault on S. Granite St. in Omak. Burglary on Sixth Ave. in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Malicious mischief on S. Antwine Ave. in Tonasket. Stephanie Renee Judd, 22, booked for DUI. Lester Vincent Priest, no age listed, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Shanie Rae Marchand, 34, booked on Superior Court FTA warrants for vehicular assault and vehicular homicide. James Carl Walker Jr., 45, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for DUI and an order for protection. Joshua Ryan Taylor, 33, booked on multiple warrants for firstdegree trafficking in stolen property, first-degree possession of stolen property, four counts of possession of a stolen vehicle, attempted residential burglary, second-degree theft and second-degree possession of stolen property. Davis Henderson Tatshama, 29, booked on Superior Court warrants for third-degree assault, DUI and first-degree DWLS. Moran Marcos Buenaventura,

20, booked for making false statements to an officer and on three Omak Police Department warrants: third-degree DWLS, minor intoxicated in public, and second-degree DWLS. Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 Theft on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Summit Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Oak St. in Omak. Theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Threats on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on N. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Main St. in Orovile. Patrick Lee Luntsford, 57, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Leroy Joseph Zacherle, 44, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for DUI. Luis Antonio Orosco, 29, booked on a drug court violation warrant. Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013 Warrant arrest on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Elm St. in Omak. DWLS on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Omak. Burglary on E. Division Ave. in

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In 1993, he retired to Tonasket. He made several friends, played cards and enjoyed watching baseball and football.

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Washington’s Statewide Focus On Education Month

November 2013. North Central Washington’s Public Schools thank you for your support for our schools and students.

Public schools all over North Central Washington invite you to connect with community events and activities.

See COPS | PG B7

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 5:30 p.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship Donald Reynolds

Friday, Nov. 8, 2013 Trespassing on Engh Rd. near Omak. Burglary on Eastside Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Electronics reported missing. Burglary on Timbuktu Lane near Oroville. Public intoxication on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Injuries reported. Theft on Koala Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Elmway in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Warnock Rd. near Oroville. Illegal burning on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Threats on River Loop Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on Pine St. in Okanogan. Structure fire on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Fraud on Kenwood St. in Omak. Fraud on N. Juniper St. in Omak.

Okanogan Valley

Immaculate Conception Parish

He is survived by his son, John Darron Reynolds and his brothers Paul Siri and George Siri. Johnny was preceded in death by his mother, Patricia F. Lacy Military Graveside Services will be held on Saturday, November 16, 2013 at 1 p.m. at the Tonasket Cemetery with the Tonasket American Legion, officiating.

Tonasket. Threats on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Stephen Charles Williams, 38, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Jason Charles Buckmiller, 26, court commitment for DUI. Tawnya Hope Chapman, 42, booked for delivery of a firearm to an ineligible person and obstruction. Daniel Adam Dabbs, 34, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Elliott Gibson, no middle name listed, 32, book on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Your support for public schools is changing lives. North Central ESD

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 14, 2013  

November 14, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 14, 2013  

November 14, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune