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SOCCER AND VOLLEYBALL

VETERANS DAY ASSEMBLIES

TEAMS GEAR UP FOR DISTRICTS

Friday, Nov. 8 Oroville High School, 9 a.m. Tonasket High School, 9 a.m.

See Pages B2-3

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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School board works over levy options

TONASKET FFA STRIKES AGAIN

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Extending the school day is no longer optional, the elementary school is bursting at the seams with students, the alternative school is crumbling, the national award-winning FFA program has a lengthy waiting list and some of the athletic facilities are in dire need of a makeover. Those are just some of the needs the Tonasket School Board discussed at its Monday, Oct. 28, meeting as it prepared to finalize details on both a maintenance and operations (M&O) levy, and either a capital levy or bond, to provide the funds to address those needs. “Right now we have one more payment on the existing bond,” said Superintendent Paul Turner. “After this year that goes away... what we’d like to do is keep the total tax rate about the same.” The needs covered by the M&O levy include the expansion of programming and staff that would be required as the school returns to full-length school day. The district has been running about 45 minutes short of a full day since the 1990s. And while the district has attempted to get back to the full day in the past - and started that process with some additional staff hired last year - that process now must be completed by fall of 2014.

“We need to reach 1,080 (hours of contact time per year) per Senate Bill 5919 by next fall,” Turner said. “In other words we have to get back to the normal day that we wanted to get to anyway. Now the state is telling us we have to. “We need eight staff, which is $70,000 each including benefits... bottom line is $640,000. For and M&O levy we’d want to run $1.640 million, where $640,000 is getting the staff we need to get art, music and a counselor at the elementary, and to bring on staff at the middle and high school. We’ve talked about bringing on an ag science teacher to help out at the high school.” Further discussion involved the need for capital funding, and whether or not a capital levy or a new bond would be preferable. A capital levy would only require a 50 percent vote to pass, while a bond requires 60 percent; however, access to the funding would be more gradual with the levy, requiring phased construction rather than taking on all the projects simultaneously. “We can run a bond over 10 years to expand the value and keep the rate lower,” Turner said. “The capital levy can only go six years. It goes over time so we’d really have to prioritize which we would do first, second, etc. “We’ve had some deeper discussion about having the bond. That’s one thing

SEE LEVY | PG A3

Shifting landscape complicates NVH budget

For the second time in three years, a Tonasket FFA team took second place at the national convention last week. The Rituals (underclassmanlevel parliamentary procedure) team of (l-r) Jordan Hughes, Madison Bayless, Janelle Catone, Rade Pilkinton, Jenna Valentine, Sammie Earley and Rachel Silverthorn brought home Reserve National Champion honors, as well as making an appearnce (shown) in the RFDTV booth. Right, Pilkinton, with FFA Advisor Matt Deebach, won the individual national championship for his performance. For full details and more photos, see page B1.

Several scenarios to be considered BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - This past year has seen a mix of the good and the bad for North Valley Hospital’s financial condition. On the positive side, the hospitals’ registered warrants (money it owes Okanogan County) have been reduced from nearly $3 million in August, 2012 to about $300,000 at one point, and stood at $595,000 at the time of the Thursday, Oct. 31, meeting of the Board of Commissioner. And the second floor surgical center opened just last month. But much of that progress was painful, with the expense paid in layoffs in late 2012, closure of the Assisted Living facility and the closure of the Oroville and Tonasket clinics.

Lisa Hale & Ryan Pilkinton, submitted photos

The next year will bring forth its own set of challenges, including the unpredictable effects of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), reduced Medicare reimbursement rates, the possibility of losing its status as a Critical Access Hospital (see accompanying article) and projected financial losses in the Long Term Care division that could be made worse by those uncertainties. Chief Financial Officer Helen Verhasselt, in building a budget for 2014 explained the issues to the board and offered multiple budget scenarios for their consideration. “I ran multiple scenarios to try to figure out how we could break even,” Verhasselt said. “Once I ran out of those, the next thing I focused on was how we could minimize the losses.” Verhasselt said she based next year’s budgeting on this year’s patient volumes. She also asked the commissioners to

SEE BUDGET | PG A3

Man seeks ‘Five-Star Service Flag’ for family The Earl Thornton family of Oroville had five children serving the country during WWII BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – A worn clipping from the Oroville Weekly Gazette from the mid-forties has started Thomas Wilburn, son of Verna Thornton Wilburn, on a quest to get the Five-Star Service Flag promised to his family by the U.S Military during World War II. The flag was to be given to the late Mr. and Mrs. Earl Thornton for their five children, all serving the country during wartime. Their children, Cpl. Oscar Thornton and Cpl. Ernie Thornton, were both in France at

the time; Pvt. Preston Thornton was with the Merchant Marine in the Pacific, nurse Laura Thornton was in training at Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland and Verna Thornton was a Wave with the U.S. hospital staff in Jacksonville, Florida, according to the article which was sent to the Thornton’s hometown newspaper. “The copy of my article has suffered from being copied over the years and so I have no idea of the date or the original heading any longer,” Wilburn said. “It says pictured and yet I have no photographs and there is one mistake as well, Preston was in the U.S. Marines, not the Merchant Marines and was killed in action on Iwo Jima just weeks before the end of the war.” Wilburn said the article was sent to his mother in Jacksonville where she cared for burned Air Force pilots that were returned from Europe. “The technology of the time

was incapable of allowing these young men to survive their burns which normally amounted to large portions of their upper bodies burned to second and third degree,” said Wilburn. “They would however live for months so they would ship them from Europe to Virginia and Florida.” His mother told him the men would be severely burnt and in a lot of pain... resigned to their fates and waiting for infection to set in and take them. “She said they were just like her, her age, and they would talk about their dreams and their girls and their lives and wait for death. She said they were so overwhelmed and the men so lonely she and the others could never bring themselves to go home at night until they were dead from exhaustion because the patients never slept and were always lonely and always dying. “This haunted my mother until her dying day, the thousands of

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

CONTACT US

Volume 109 No. 45

aces she cared for and watched die so sorrowfully, it wounded her deeply.” Wilburn’s mother and father both served in the military and he grew up on military bases and several of his siblings went on to serve in the military. Now their children, his nephews and nieces, are following suit. “We are a military family. I spent the best part of my career building military facilities as a contractor,” he said. From what his mother told him, her parents never received the flag promised in the article sent to the Gazette by the military. He has been in touch with local legislators and hopes that the United States will make up for this oversight and deliver on a promise made to the Thornton family, several of whom still live in Oroville, more than 60 years ago. Editor’s Note: Wilburn said

Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

A Five-Star Service Flag similar to the one promised to the Thorntons in Oroville because they had five children all serving in the military during World War II.

Submitted photo

he believes the article is from 1945. The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune will be conducting a search of its archives to see if we can locate the article and we will reproduce the photo in a

future issue if we find it. The G-T welcomes anyone who might have further information or could help Wilburn it his attempt to get a five-star flag for his family. G.A.D.

INSIDE THIS EDITION Veterans Special A4-5 Letters/Opinion A6 Community A7-8

Sports B2-3 Home Special B4-5 Classifieds/Legals B6-7

Real Estate Obituaries Cops & Courts

B7 B8 B8


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 7, 2013

BOO!!

Gary DeVon/staff photos Oroville held their annual downtown Trick or Treat sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce. The streets were full of spooky, funny and amazing costumes worn by kids of all ages, including a family of nerds (above, right) .

Submitted photo

The Chamber also sponsored the annual business costume and decorations contest, judged by volunteers from the Oroville Senior Center. For best costumes Akin’s Harvest Foods (above) took first place, followed by Ship Happens (center) in second and Frontier Foods “Where’s Waldo” in third (left). For best decorations it was the Oroville School District office in first place (below far left), which attracted preschool kids to the Great Pumpkin Patch; followed by the clowns at City Hall (top, left) and Wells Fargo (center, left) as the Seahawks and Bears.

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Putting people first: an exemplary safety record “At Kinross, putting people first is a definition were applied at home, let’s core value. Health and safety are our say that you were hanging Christmas number one priority - among employ- lights on your roof while working off a ees, partners, contractors and suppli- ladder and you fell from the ladder and ers, and in the communiinjured your back. In ties in which we operate. that instance, if MSHA Throughout our organiclassification were apzation we are committed plied, if the doctor told to achieving excellence you to stay in bed for a in health and safety perweek while your back formance, and to everyrecuperated, this would one returning home safe be considered a Lost and healthy every day.” Time Incident. On October 16th, Kinross Kettle River – On the date of Oc2013, the Buckhorn Buckhorn Vice President tober 16th, 2013, the mine achieved a mile- and General Manager Buckhorn Mine met stone envied in the min- Mark Ioli. 731 days, or 2 years ing industry, as well as in all other in- without an LTI. This equates to just dustries. They celebrated two years over 634,229 man hours. In the minwithout a lost time incident. Accord- ing industry, this achievement caping to the Mine Safety and Health tures attention. If you look at the Administration (MSHA), a Lost Time mine accomplishment against mining Incident (LTI) is an injury classifica- industry averages in the year of 2011 tion that is applied when someone (the last complete year of data as resustains an injury that results in them ported by MSHA), we find that when being unable to report to work the we compare the Buckhorn Mine next day that would otherwise be a against underground mines with the workday for them, or an injury that re- same amount of employees, the nasults in them being restricted in what tional mining average is only 42 lost they can do for a time, so they can- time days. The Kettle River Mill site not perform all the regular aspects of also has an exemplary safety record, their job. To assist you in better un- in that it has exceeded 7 years withderstanding this concept, if the same out a Lost Time Incident!

The Kettle River – Buckhorn operation continues to make safety a priority in everything we do. In 2012, over 800 hours of employee safety training was conducted. This included annual safety training that is required

find a more dedicated group of team members to have working beside you. These folks not only take safety personally, they expect it of others as well. We routinely have people on the property such as contractors, vendors, and of course visitors. Everyone is instructed on safety before they are allowed on site. But once on site, we have the same expectations of them, to be safe and Exemplary safety record: the Kettle River Operations mill site has worked for seven years without a lost time incident. The Buckhorn watch out Mine has gone over two years without an incident, several times for the safethe average of 42 days for similar sites. ty of others. of every employee, as well as environ- I am proud to say that the Kettle River mental training, mine rescue training, – Buckhorn sites are the safest placnew hire training and “tailgate” meet- es a person can be at. Where else do ings, where crews and departments you have 230 or more people looking regularly share thoughts on safety out for your personal safety and wellbeing? How cool is that,”comments with their peers and supervisors. “The employees at Kettle-River Ernie Miranda, Health and Safety Buckhorn are world-class. You won’t Manager at Kettle River-Buckhorn.


NOVEMBER 7, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

A BIG HALLOWEEN SMILE You never know what you’ll find inside that pumpkin ... Kinley Mariah Turner, granddaughter of Paul and Brenda Turner of Tonasket, gets shows off her Halloween spirit.

Submitted photo

Rural hospital funds at risk By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The sea change to health care in general, and to the North Valley Hospital district’s operations, continues. And while some of that transformation has been obvious at the local level, more stormclouds on the horizon could signify the most significant (and most damaging) change of all. The Office of Inspector General, which serves as a fiscal watchdog for the Department of Health and Human Services (you’ve seen Kathleen Sebelius in the news lately? Her agency.) issued a recommendation that would, if enacted as proposed, eviscerate the funding for nearly two-thirds of the nation’s designated Critical Access Hospitals. Regional facilities that would be affected, should the rule be implemented, would include North Valley Hospital, Mid Valley Hospital of Omak, Three Rivers Hospital of Brewster, and Lake Chelan Community Hospital. “It would be a huge change,” said North Valley Hospital District Administrator Linda Michel. “Right now it is just a proposal. It will go to our legislators at some point. “We don’t know when, but sometime in the coming year. If it happens we have some huge obstacles in our way.” The critical access program was created in 1997 to help remote, rural hospitals like those in Okanogan County stay afloat. At the time, many rural facilities were closing because of a relatively low number of privatelyinsured patients relative to the number those that were publicly-insured (Medicaid/Medicare) - the same situation that NVH must deal with and which was a big reason why the Assisted Living is no longer. Until the CAH system was created, small hospitals received

reimbursements for their publicly-insured patients based on a prospective payment system (PPS). PPS pre-defines a set payment for specific medical condition “They pay very low rates in larger cities,” Michel said. “They have enough private and commercial insurance to cover the losses in Medicare and Medicaid. Rural communities don’t have that. They have very little private insurance. One reason is we don’t have a lot of employers.” PPS doesn’t consider the actual cost involved with care. When the Critical Access Hospital (CAH) system was put in place, it provided additional reimbursements for Medicaid/Medicare patients based on the actual cost of care. NVH was one of the first area hospitals to receive the CAH designation and the resulting additional reimbursement funds have made the difference between struggling to stay afloat, and simply sinking. “When we look at cost, we look at salaries, square footage, supplies,” Michel said. “Just as an example, Medicare might reimburse us $100 for an exam that cost us $400 (to provide). (With cost-based reimbursement they would additionally) reimburse us for part of that $300 if it’s on their list of things they reimburse us for.” The original federal requirements to be certified as a CAH were later modified to allow states to make their own decisions on which hospitals qualified for CAH funding. The Office of Inspector General made a number of recommendations to repeal those modifications, one of which is a distance requirement (basically, a definition of how “remote” a hospital is). By returning to original federal rule, the CAH status would be removed from any hospital that had another hospital (not just another CAH-certified hospital) within 35 miles (if on primary

roads, like US-97) or 15 miles on secondary roads. Not only would North Valley Hospital lose its CAH designation if that were enacted, so would every other hospital in Okanogan and Chelan counties. The only North Central Washington hospital that would retain its CAH designation would be in Grand Coulee. In Washington State, eight rural hospitals would retain their CAH status, 25 would lose it and five in the central and east portions of the state “may” meet the distance standard, according to a Washington State Hospital Association study. “We can still stay open, theoretically,” Michel said. “But we can’t survive on the Prospective Pay system. It’s why CAHs were created in the first place. “We need to lobby our legislators,” she added. “We need to lobby for the necessity of care in this area, the level of poverty, and the inability of a lot of people to travel to Wenatchee (which would under a worst-case scenario be the nearest hospital). And we don’t know what would happen with the VA clinic either.” This is one thing, at least, that isn’t a direct consequence of Obamacare. “Obamacare wanted the radius to be 10 miles, not 35,” Michel said. “That’s one good thing we can say at this point. “The OIG thinks this will save Medicare money. What they don’t understand is the Medicare people still need that care, pay their deductible and still have to go someplace for their care.” One thought, she said, might give legislators pause when considering this potential legislation. “I invite them to come up here and get sick,” she said. “Stay a week in our ER and see the patients we get. “If this happens and these hospitals close, pray you don’t get sick while you’re up here. It’s going to be challenging times.”

enhance our shop programs.” • Bathrooms and a concession stand at the football field, as well as significant work needed at the baseball, softball and soccer complex. “We’ve talked about bleachers on the east side of the field and more parking,” Turner said. “But those are kind of set on the table until we deal with the other issues.” Board member Ty Olson, a contractor, said that there likely won’t be a better time in terms of the market to take on a major project. “It’s a competitive market right now,” he said. “I don’t see it tightening up more than it is right now. Now is the time for us, if we’re going to do this before things free up and that competitive nature of the industry goes away (which would drive up costs).” There was also quite a bit of discussion over ensuring that the expanded facility would be able to accommodate the ever-shifting nature of curriculum and programming. Board chairman Jerry Asmussen noted that today’s kindergarteners, in many cases, will go into careers that don’t even exist yet. “We need to serve the needs of all kids,” said board member Catherine Stangland. “Multiple pathways to prosperity ... “I’ve been pushing, pushing for college, you (the rest of the board) have been pushing, pushing for vocational. Now I feel like it’s switched. I still really believe in college, but I recognize

that... I’ve got a college graduate, a valedictorian, who’s a barista right now. We’ve got to look at many, many options,” she added, listing a number that had been discussed. “Let’s build space that gives them those options.”

BUDGET | FROM A1 approve a five percent rate hike (in the hospital division only), as there had not been one since 2010. “On the Extended Care side this budget is looking at an average of about 48 Medicaid patients, three Medicares, and four private pays. We are not asking to do a price increase there.” In fact, Verhasselt proposed giving a 10 percent discount for those who paid their bills in short order, such as by the end of the month of the billing. “We’ve been facing some challenges trying to increase the private pays on the Extended Care side,” she said. “A lot of it is due to, people cannot afford about $7,000 a month private pay.” Admitting some patients into hospital swing beds, rather than to Extended Care, dramatically increases the hospital’s reimbursements as well. In those scenario, the best Verhasselt said she found was a $562,000 profit in the hospital division, with Long Term Care losing $520,000, for a net $42,000 profit. That number sent Verhasselt looking for other options, she said. “We can’t survive with that kind of profit,” said CEO Linda Michel. “We have to see the hundreds of thousands.” “For one thing, we need to do that if we’re going to get the rest of the way out of warrants,” Verhasselt said. The other scenario Verhasselt proposed involved two major changes that significantly cut into the LTC losses, she said. The first piece of that involves changing the way expenses are accounted for between the hospital and Long Term Care divisions. “What I have gotten approved by our cost report preparers is to change the allocation method. It still needs to be approved by Medicare but they think the scenario is acceptable. If the therapist is seeing patients on the extended care side, on their time sheet they would put how may hours they put on extended care. Those wages would be charged to extended care rather than the cost of the service. We would be keeping the rest of the expense on the hospital side, it would help the reimbursement rate in the therapy department and would reduce the expenses substantially on the extended care side.” The other piece of the proposal involved gradually reducing the

capacity of the Extended Care to 40 (from the current 58) beds in an effort trim the divisions losses. “The reason we looked at 40 beds is we looked at some other facilities that have made a 40 bed facility profitable,” Verhasselt said. “This would still be the same number of private pays in this budget as in the first scenario, and the same number of Medicares. It would reduce the number of Medicaid beds “It could potentially be better results if we draw more private pays, but I didn’t want to do an aggressive number there. The bottom line would reduce the net loss (of Long Term Care) to $178,000. We would have a net income (for the whole district) of $341,000.” Commissioner Clarice Nelson asked how reducing the number of beds could bring in more privately insured patients. “Right now we only have two private rooms,” Verhaselt said. “It would give us the opportunity to have more private rooms instead of double occupancy in the majority of our rooms. “We can do a revised budget at any point if the direction changes. The number of beds isn’t cast in stone either.” “This could all change,” said commissioner Dick Larson. “I remember when the nursing home rates and the hospital occupancy was low - this thing had 70 patients all the time and the rate was such that it made up for the shortfall in the hospital. That can change rather quickly.” “We have a proposal we could potentially move forward,” Duncan said. “In three months we could make a revision based on an evaluation of the performance at the end of the year. “I have concerns about lowering our capacity to serve the community, but we have to have capacity to serve the community.” The board asked Verhasselt to complete the details on a budget that involved working toward the 40-bed capacity in the Extended Care, while also submitting one that included only the changes in expense allocation between the two divisions. “Changing the rehab interdivision allocation would put us somewhere between the first and second scenarios,” Verhasselt said. “I was looking at ways to try to minimize the losses. This seemed like one of the better ones.” The board formally approved

the five percent rate hike for the hospital division later in the meeting. The budget will be submitted for final approval at the Thursday, Nov. 14 Board of Commissioners meeting.

New boiler up and running When one of the hospital’s boilers went down for the count last spring, the race was on to get it replaced before cold weather set in. Kelly Cariker, facilities director, declared that race won as the replacement was in its final stages of testing and had been up and running for about a day. The new boiler can run on either propane or diesel, and while propane would have been preferred, for the time being space considerations dictated the use of diesel fuel. “We currently have the (other) diesel boilers and a diesel generator,” Cariker said. “Due to building space we could not add more propane and keep the diesel there (at this time). As we move forward and use less diesel we could explore that.... Diesel wasn’t our first choice, but with Phase I we were kind of locked in for now.” The rest of the aging boilers will eventually need to be replaced as well, but Cariker said Phase I of the boiler replacement project was complete. “If we move forward with any of the other phases (such as the geothermal system discussed at previous meetings), anything else we do, we’ll need to be receiving grant funding or PUD subsidies before we go forward. The new boiler is not geothermal... this phase, we replaced like equipment with like equipment, though we do have more capacity with BTUs out of this one than we did with the one before it.” “If we can get some numbers and get started on the grant writing now, normally a project that size you need to do some advance grant writing,” Duncan said. “Even a Community Development Block Grant has a planning-only grant to help you pay for the planning part of it. That could allocate between $1540,000 to help us with that planning process. “I’ve been seeing more of the big foundations coming out with some bigger grants, as well,” she added. The Board of Commissioners next meets on Thursday, Nov. 14, for its public hearing to finalize the 2014 budget.

LEVY | FROM A1 the board really needs to make a decision on…. It also allows us, if the bond passes, to start working on getting construction going on all the projects.” The projected amount for the bond or capital levy ranged between $4-6 million, based upon an architect’s estimate of the projects. The facility needs include: • Classrooms at the elementary school. “We need to move the preschool,” Turner said. “Building a pod out the back for resource center rooms, will allow us to get our kindergarten and first grade all in the same pod. Right now we have a class in the 2-3 pod which causes a domino effect. And we’re looking strongly at the need to add a classroom by next fall because of our fourth and fifth grade numbers.” • Four or five classrooms added to the middle school, with an emphasis on space for STEM, although the need for flexibility for the future as curriculum needs change over time was emphasized; • A new Alternative School building, approximately 4,400 square feet. “Our alternative complex is falling down around our ears,” Turner said. • Expansion of the shop, which was built smaller than originally intended when the current facility was constructed. “We’ve looked at a three bay shop to reduce the overcrowding out there,” Turner said. “We need to take care of and

Budget update One of the board’s other priorities in the coming years is to incrementally increase the district’s fund balance to approximately $900,000. At the end of the 2012-13 school year it was at $550,000, and dipped to about $110,000 ($42,000 in the district coffers and about $70,000 in reserve at the ESD). “September was the month we were worked up about,” Turner said. “What I want you to look at is October and what we can expect. (Business Manger) Debbie Kitterman ran numbers on revenue versus expenditures for the month. Our revenues are coming in at $1.1 million and our expenditures are at $878,000. And that is coming to fruition with the numbers on the books right now.” “I’m still having a heart attack here,” said board member Lloyd Caton. “Where it’s at right now is still pretty anemic.” Enrollment was holding steady at 1,063 students in the district, well above the 1,030 anticipated for budgeting purposes. The Tonasket School Board next meets on Monday, Nov. 11, at 7:00 p.m.

Garden | FROM A8 on the September minutes of the meeting. As Vice President it is her job to plan ahead in the year book, meetings, garden tours and programs for the year. Garden Club members chose which month they can participate. A “Thinking of You and Get Well” card will be sent to Geneva Reeder, manager of the Hillside Apartments, who has been ill now for some time. She

has been very gracious in allowing our members to meet at the Community Room on occasion. A vote was taken and passed to order mulch or bark from Fancher’s Bonaparte Mulch for the flower gardens in town that we tend for winter and spring time. We will meet again on December 9 at the First Christian Church, Havillah Road, between

11 a.m. and 2 p.m. and at noon we will have our Christmas Dinner. Wendy Taylor gave a program in addition at the last meeting about the healing properties of the amazing frozen lemon. The next meeting will be at the Hillside Apartments on Nov. 11. We encourage guests and new members to attend the meeting. The number to call for time and place is (509) 223-3427.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 7, 2013

We Salute You!

J. Vincent Bretz

From: Tonasket Branch of Service: Army Stationed in Hawaii during WWII. Believed to be sargent. Father of Patti Hill

George Frank From: Tonasket Branch of Service: U.S. Air Force

DL Columbia

From: Oroville Branch of Service: Army Aircorp From: “In loving memory “ his wife and children.

Tonasket VA Clinic Accepting New Patients Open Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm By appointment.

Ph: 509-486-3107

In order to be a patient at the Tonasket VA Clinic you must:

• Enroll for medical benefits for Veterans.

JOIN US! VA Clinic Open House: Nov. 12 1pm to 4pm Located inside North Valley Hospital 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket

John Mike Pershing

Major Mark Warder

Leslie Warder Hill

Son-in-law of Patti and George Hill Currently in Las Vegas, NV

Currently in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

Currently in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

Tim Nelson

TSgt Tom Nelson

SSgt Josh Hollenbeck

www.nvhospital.org

For Veteran Benefits, contact Shane Barton at the Veterans Service Office Located at the Legacy Project Building in Tonasket.

Ph: 509-486-2121

From: Oroville Branch of Service: USAF With love: Mom, Dad & Family

From: Oroville Branch of Service: USAF With love: Mom, Dad & Family

Hometown: Chesaw Branch of Service: Active Duty Air Force Submitted by: Your entire family!

Veterans Share Oral History of War Veterans, We Honor You! By Daralyn Hollenbeck NCW Blue Star Mothers, President

Thank you for your service to our country. We join the rest of the nation on Veteran’s Day in remembering the sacrifices of our veterans and wish to express our appreciation for your service.

Physician-owned and patient-centered

17S. Western Ave., Tonasket 509-486-2174 1617 Main St., Oroville 509-476-3631

Our family does not have much of a military heritage. Not that our family did not serve—it’s just that after doing their stints, they packed up their medals, threw out their uniforms, folded their flags and banners, and tucked them into boxes and went on with life. It wasn’t until after my son began his military service that all the discolored and oxidized paraphernalia started coming out of the closets. Medals appeared along with stories of

valor, as well as souvenirs from foreign lands. Why weren’t these things displayed, preserved in shadow boxes, and stories archived with more care? When Grandpa put his medals in to the cigar box, the memories of friends lost and ugly sights seen went with them. Neither did uncles regale us with their war stories. Singling themselves out in tales seemed unimportant in light of the many who gave all, but they, to our greatfulness, were not called to do so. And Vietnam? Whether the vets had volunteered or drafted, so-

ciety at that time did not want to hear it and our vets learned to keep it to themselves. I knew nothing of the military. I became consumed about military life once my son signed his enlistment contract. Library books and the impersonal Internet took the place of family historians. I sat alone instead of upon the knees of grandfathers and uncles. Perhaps if a more personal impartation of the details of war had taken place in more homes around our country, today’s leaders would have different priorities when it comes to

sending our youth into battle. Veteran’s Day is a great reminder to have this dialogue as we honor our wartime eyewitnesses. Begin with informal conversations about “the old days” among family members. Our upcoming generations will benefit from being exposed to these oral histories. I encourage every blue star mother to see to it that this dialogue takes place.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Veterans Day events The Gazette-Tribune

Thomas Even, Sr.

From: Alton, Iowa Branch of Service: U.S.M.C From: Family

Thomas Even, Jr.

From: Tonasket, WA Branch of Service: U.S.M.C From: Family

Thomas Even, III

From: Cabool, Missouri Branch of Service: Army National Guard From: Family

TONASKET - American Legion Post 82 will be honoring Veterans Day on Monday, Nov. 11, with a parade and short ceremony in Tonasket. The parade will begin at 11:00 a.m. at the Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center and proceed south along US-97 to the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Park. There, at 11:30, a ceremony honoring veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces will take place. Dinner at the American Legion post will follow at 12:30, free to veterans and by donation for others. Both Oroville and Tonasket High Schools will be hosting Veterans Day assemblies on Friday, Nov. 8, that are open to the public. Veterans are specifically invited to attend.

The Tonasket assembly will be in the high school Commons from 9:00-10:00 a.m. Veterans are encouraged to bring items in to be displayed at the Veterans memorabilia table. Before the assembly from 8:45-9:00 a.m., the Tonasket High School ASB

and FCCLA will be providing a refreshment area for veterans and community members to sit, visit, and reflect. There will be decorated tables for veterans to sit at, enjoy refreshments and watch the assembly. Oroville’s assembly begins at 9:00 a.m. in Coulton Auditorium.

Honoring Those Who Served ¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97. Ph. 509-486-4496

at VIP Insurance Agency, we are

OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917 OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904

Ron McDougall

From: Oroville Branch of Service: U.S. Army Served in Vietnam Love from your family

Vernon J. Hills

Branch of Service: U.S. Army Served in Korea Love from your family

Don Thorndike

From: Oroville Branch of Service: U.S. Army Served in Korea Love from your family

Active Duty Veterans

By Daralyn Hollenbeck NCW Blue Star Mothers, President

Commonly, veterans are the survivors of the Second World

War and are in their 90’s or of the Korean War in their 80’s. Gulf

War veterans are in their 40’s, or more. But the truth is that the vast majority of today’s veterans are only 18 to 30-somethings. Using the dictionary definition, a man or woman is a military veteran after just one day of military service. Veterans’ Day is not just for the older generation to celebrate anymore! The younger generation now needs to pin on a poppy or American flag emblem to honor or in remembrance of their friends and peers who are presently serving or have recently served in our nation’s military. Veterans are now your brothers or sisters, schoolmates,

and hoodsmen. Veteran’s Day is now a celebration of today’s youth as well as the older “Great Generation!” 4.4% of Okanogan youth are currently serving in the military. And what these young people go through is atypical in life of the normal 20-30 year old on many levels. As 28 year old Army Veteran SGT Joshua Evans of Tonasket said after three tours in Iraq, “We still have a long road ahead of us in crushing this network of terrorists whose entire goal is destroying the American way of life. But it is a road that the men and women of the United States Armed Forces are prepared to walk. We have a completely volunteer force who know the tribulations in front of us, and are prepared to meet them head on.” An unknown author wrote, “A veteran is someone who, at one point in his/her life, wrote a blank check made payable to ‘The United States of America,’ for an amount of ‘up to and including my life.’” I, for one, see that blank check every time I

meet a vet. When a veteran takes off his/ her uniform after service he/she loses 3 things: purpose or mission, community, and identity. Having had service drilled into their being, 92% of recently separated vets state continued service in their community as important to them. What a gold mine for our communities! It is to our great benefit to focus in on how to lure these men and women back into their hometown communities. There is an enormous number of highly skilled, highly trained people who have great things to offer and can give the fighting spirit to our businesses and local economy. We shouldn’t miss this boat. As our hometown soldiers/ veterans endure the longest war in U.S. history (Afghanistan, 2001-present) we would also like to thank every military parent who raised the kind of young man or woman who stepped up to serve. We are proud to have you and them in our community. GOD BLESS OUR VETERANS.

WELCOME Veterans, Family & Friends

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Come visit your local U.S. Armed Forces Legacy site and see what we have to offer... l Full-Time Service Officer 1 Tonasket Shop Rd (off Hwy 97) l Military Library Tonasket, WA l Available for Weddings & Funerals For more information contact: l Restrooms & Showers Roger Castelda: 509-486-1175 l Meeting 3rd Wed. of each month at 6 pm Hugh Maycumber: 509-775-2297 l Membership Available George Frank: 509-486-2747

www.veteranlegacyproject.org

Put our Local Heroes on your Gift List this year! NCW Blue Star Mothers supporting moms of the military. Not every soldier has a spouse or children...but every soldier has a mother. Ncw.bluestars@yahoo.com. Phone 485-2906

G RANT’S

MARKE T

18 W. 4th, Tonasket 486-2127


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 7, 2013

THE TOWN CRIER Honor our veterans by continuing to honor voting rights Every Veterans Day we hear how those that have served our nation do so in order to protect the rights we hold so dear. Much of that has been true over the years as the men and women have fought in wars against nations where the rights we take for granted are all but unheard of. Places where they tell you how to think and how to vote -- that is if you’re even afforded the right to vote. Recent events have proven you can’t force democracy on people just because we find it the best system. You can only offer them the chance to taste democracy and hope it is to their liking. While at home we must vigorously defend the thing that makes our republic great, representative government – a government of democratically elected leaders who we vote into office with the idea they are going to represent Out of us to the best of their ability. As we all learned in school, our government My Mind is composed of three branches – the executive, Gary A. DeVon the legislative and the judicial. No one branch should be so much stronger than the other two that our system starts to fail. If the legislature enacts a law and the president signs it and the judiciary upholds that it’s constitutional ,it is the law of the land. Shutting down the government in order to try and revoke any law is certainly not patriotic and surely not what the framers of our government, who purposely avoided naming a king or emperor, had in mind. If you don’t like the decisions of your legislators or your president, then you must elect people who you feel represent you – that’s our American way of promoting change. Another way that the power of the people has been usurped is through gerrymandering U.S. legislative districts in such a way as one party or another gets the votes. It has been practiced by both parties and was a favorite of the Democrats. However, right now, the Republicans have done such a good job of moving boundaries around that they have assured their will be returned to office election after election. Be glad you live in Washington State, for no other reason than we don’t have the latest game being played in many states where the Republicans rule. That game is played to ensure that young people and minorities – those who more often than not vote for the Democrats, can’t vote. They’re purging the voter rolls, basically stealing the rights of tens of thousands of voters, in the name of fighting against voter fraud. It’s a solution looking for a problem as voter fraud in those states is all but nonexistent. Only a few Republicans have been brave enough to admit the reasons behind the purge and the new restrictions on voting rights, but it’s an open secret in their statehouses. Anything that restricts a legitimate voter’s right to practice their good American citizenship through throwing up roadblocks is taking this country in the wrong direction. This does nothing to honor those who have bled and died for our country and actually dishonors their service. This Veterans Day lets honor those who have fought to keep our country free by fighting to maintain the principals of the founding fathers and their vision of a truly representative government – not one where games are played to ensure an outcome that is neither representative, nor honest.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ‘This is no proper way to run a railroad’ Dear Editor, One of the foremost factors that prompted men like Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay to pen “The Federalist” (often incorrectly referred-to as “The Federalist Papers”) was their acute understanding of just how desperately vulnerable the infant United States was to what they called “the vice of factions.” The United States was (and is) a republic, and previous global experiments with that form of governance had oftentimes ended very badly because their citizenry proved far more interested in pursuing partisan feuds than in uniting for the common good.

James Madison’s famous “Federalist Number 10” held to the optimistic view that America’s huge size and diversity was not an invitation to divisive factionalism, but was instead a guarantee that “small groups of designing men” would be unable to impose their will. Madison would be very disappointed with what’s happening in contemporary America. To put things as bluntly as one possibly can, our political order is afflicted with the paralysis that inevitably accompanies the activities of highly-organized and true-believing factions. Uncivil and unending is the discourse between our two major philosophical alignments. Their arguments are as unproductive as the vigorous running of pet squirrels in their cages. Our politicians argue themselves

hoarse, insult each other with impunity, and leave the business of the people undone. This is no proper way to “run a railroad” -- OR to keep a republic like our own in good order. Our machinery of government needs a good set of repair persons. About all we’re seeing right now is a bunch of incompetent grease monkeys who are ruining the engine and making a terrible mess of the vehicle’s interior! Frank Goheen Camas, Washington We Want Your Letters: Send your letters to: Editor, Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844 or fax to (509) 476-3054 or email to gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Charter Schools and big money versus I-522 OPINION BY JERRY CORNFIELD

POLITICAL REPORTER

We’re learning this week where Washington’s first charter schools may open in 2014 and who may operate them. This much is certain: No one wants to do it in Snohomish County. Nonprofit organizations had until Tuesday to let the Washington Charter School Commission know if they intend to apply to run one of these publicly funded campuses. Full applications are due in a month. Of the nearly two dozen letters of intent received, none proposed pursuing this new venture in education in the state’s third largest county. Rather, there’s interest in converting a small private school in Spokane Valley and launching a military academy for middle- and highschool-aged students in Grays Harbor, Mason and Thurston counties. In Yakima, there’s one group designing a dual language — English and Spanish — elementary school and another proposing a campus with a curriculum focused on preparing at-risk high-schoolers for college. There also are people wanting charter schools in Enumclaw, Toppenish, Sunnyside.

Professional charter school management outfits want in as well with firms looking to bring their brand of educating to elementary and secondary students in Seattle and Tacoma starting in 2015. The applications due Nov. 22  must detail the proposed curriculum, budget, and staffing as well as provide background on those who will serve on the school’s board of directors. Commissioners won’t green light any charter schools until February but it’s clear today that Snohomish County won’t be home for any of them. What a difference $14.3 million can make. Foes of Initiative 522 have spent that much so far attacking the food labeling initiative and it is paying off. The latest Elway Poll found the measure has lost nearly one-third of its support in the past month. That is when the No on 522 committee began airing television commercials and mailing out literature on the purported warts of the measure requiring labels on foods containing genetically modified ingredients. I-522 is leading 46 percent to 42 percent with 12 percent undecided in the survey of 413 registered voters conducted Oct. 15-17 by Seattle pollster Stuart Elway. That’s a big tumble from mid-Septem-

ber when Elway found 66 percent of voters endorsed the initiative and only 21 percent opposed. Not surprisingly, advertising is changing people’s minds. Three out of four voters who had seen only ads for one side or the other planned to vote in the direction of the ads they have seen, he wrote in an analysis of the results. “Those who have seen no advertising planned to vote ‘yes’ by a 17-point margin — about the same margin the ‘yes’ side had before the advertising blitz began,” Elway wrote. For the Yes on 522 committee — which has spent $5.4 million — the silver lining is that the measure is still ahead. And Elway says history favors them winning, too. Since 1992, 17 of 22 initiatives which had support above 60 percent in Elway polls conducted in September wound up winning. “Momentum is on the side of I-522 opponents, but history is on the side of proponents,” he wrote.

Everett Herald Political reporter Jerry  Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at  www.heraldnet.com. Contact him at  360352-8623 or jcornfield@heraldnet.com.

Honoring our committment to our veterans Every year, November 11th is set aside as a day for Americans to remember and honor veterans of all wars who fought to protect the freedoms we all too often take for granted. This Veterans Day we must also take time to thank those servicemen and women currently protecting us and our way of life for their continued dedication to service and sacrifice. Veterans Day should not only be a time of solemn reflection, but also a time of celebration for the victories that our nation has U.S. Rep. achieved in our strugDoc Hastings gle to preserve peace, freedom, justice, and democracy. As we think about our nation’s veterans, we must also work to ensure that the commitments promised to them are kept.

As a country, we need to do a better job of supporting our returning service members by helping them secure employment after leaving active duty. I was happy to recently support legislation that provides services to veterans such as vocational rehabilitation and employment programs, educational assistance, and housing loan programs. Another challenge that must be addressed is making the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) more responsive to veterans’ needs. While Washington state has a growing veteran population, the VA is slow to react to the need for expanded health care access in our state. Earlier this year, I joined other Representatives in sending a letter to the President asking him to take direct action in decreasing the number of disability claims pending at the VA. I also recently supported legislation to establish a task force to evaluate the backlog of claims with the VA in addition to the appeals process of claims. Our veterans deserve access to the benefits they have earned in a timely manner.

Veterans in Central Washington also need better access to health care – they simply should not have to travel for several hours to access the care they need. The VA must provide more flexibility and be more responsive to the veterans it exists to serve. That is why I have consistently supported legislation to allow the VA to contract with local hospitals and clinics in order to allow veterans to take advantage of health care in their hometowns. On Veterans Day, I encourage you to take time to observe this day with reverence and gratitude for those who have served in all branches of the armed forces for their tireless dedication to maintaining our safety and our freedom. To the men and women that have answered our nation’s call to duty, I say thank you for your selflessness, for defending our shores, and for protecting our freedoms. May you always be remembered as guardians of the principles and ideals embodied in our Constitution.


NOVEMBER 7, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life Make your Christmas simple and fun Only 48 more days ’til Gary and Shirley Roberts Christmas! Are you ready for attended the Memorial service that? Make it simple held for Bob Riste, in and fun and enjoy the Yakima area, last family. Home made week. cookies and candies Most all know that and fudge, which American flags are we really don’t need, not to be thrown in but are great to have the garbage, but given around. And I have to a legion member one grand daughter to properly dispose that always requests of them. So, if you popcorn balls. I’m have a flag that has not an expert at makseen better days, take ing them, but they THIS & THAT it to the Legion on disappear, so I guess Nov. 11, where there they’re good enough Joyce Emry will be a Flag Retiring to get by with. Ceremony, at 2 p.m. Have you been Remember the date, to the American Legion, on Armistice Day, Nov. 11th. Wednesday evenings and had a There will be a program at the good hamburger? They’re good high school on that day inviting as ever. The two Marilyn’s are on veterans and anyone who wishes hand with the assistance of Cory to attend. Since I passed my Hilderbrand and they were kept paper on to my neighbor, I don’t real busy last week as there was have the time but if you are interquite a crowd. ested in attending, you can call

the school. At the Senior Center, on Halloween, some very strange looking characters were seen. The most ghoulish appearing and taking first prize was Margaret Hirst looking as if she could fly away on her broom. Pharmacist to customer: “This pill you take at bedtime. This other one you take after I tell how much the first pills cost.” It would be nice to know what to believe and what not to believe about this insurance mess the country is in, wouldn’t it? Remember! “After a certain age, if you don’t wake up aching in every joint, you’re probably dead.” I wrote this in my article last week, then, took it out, just in case it wasn’t true. But, again, from reliable sources, I’ve heard that the Weyerhauser chip plant, south of Oroville, is closed down. That will mean a loss of jobs

for several folks. Too bad, and hopefully it will be a temporary closure. Two elders meet on a street corner downtown. One says to the other. “Gosh I haven’t seen you in years. I can’t seem to remember, was it you or your brother who died?” So, the killing frost finally got to us. Winds have been prevalent and once again we have a generous amount of leaves on our front deck…and we don’t have one tree. My home state didn’t win the World Series, even with all my rooting for them. It seems to me the series is not as big a deal as back in radio days. My dad was an avid fan and he told me one day we’d go to St. Louis and he’d buy a five pound block of Hershey chocolate and we’d just eat all we wanted, while watching the game. Unfortunately he lived just long to enough to see a few games on the very first small TVs.

It’s very nice having all the brightly colored pictures of the sports “doings” in the paper and nice to see of some winnings, in the different events. How nice that the “fruit stand,” formerly Don’s, is gonna be a year ‘round enterprise. The best to those operating it. They sure did have good corn this past summer. Once again good times were had by those attending the pumpkin patch fun and games and especially the hay ride. I only had four small pieces of candy left after the trick or treaters. Darn! I had plans for the leftovers. We usually have only a few but more were on hand this year. Finally gas prices are lower, somewhat. And now I heard that milk is gonna reach sky high prices. $8 a gallon? Surely not! Lance and Vicki Haney have a 45th wedding anniversary coming in December. A fun time was had at the home of their daughter

and son-in-law, in Issaquah, with a nice luncheon and picture taking by Caleb Haney, their grandson. The early date was chosen as it gets more hectic around the real date, which is Dec. 21. We attended and it was a beautiful drive over the pass, with no snow, either going or coming. Some speedy winds did blow and put some without power for several hours. A phone call came from Marge and John Donoghue, Montana, while we were gone. They continue to take the Gazette-Tribune and keep up, somewhat, with the happenings in and around Oroville. Sorry to have missed your call. While we were in the Seattle area, we again had the pleasure of attending the Fifth Ave. Theatre, compliments of our grandson, seeing “Anything Goes” featuring the music of the late Cole Porter. The outstanding orchestra they have there presented the many musical numbers superbly.

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Page A8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Some snowfall in the highlands By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

The Chesaw Christmas Bazaar was held Nov. 2. We could have had a couple more venders and shoppers, but the weather kept many away. There was some snowfall in the surrounding areas but not here in Chesaw, until later in the evening. The Havillah Church Parrish will host their Harvest Dinner on Nov. 16. Fellowship will start at 5 p.m. Bring your favorite salad or dessert to share and dinner will be served at 5:30 p.m. For more info call Lenette at (509) 485-2211 Bring a Friend - Everyone is Welcome. Visit with old friends and or meet

HILLTOP COMMENTS your new neighbors. Attention Veterans: The body of believers attending the Chesaw Community Church express deep gratitude and appreciation for those men and women who have sacrificed themselves to provide a cover of liberty and protection for the United States of America. We remember you not only on Veterans Day, but every day of the year. Let us “Thank You” in person. Please come to the Chesaw Mercantile on Monday, Nov. 11 between 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. for dessert and coffee. I know you all have been waiting for the happenings in Molson at the Grange Hall on Monday nights. Pinochle scores for Oct.

7: Ina Visser won the Traveling Award. The High Scores went to Ray Visser and Vivian Emry, The Low Scores went to Ken Ripley and Judy Bunch. On Oct. 14 the winners were: Traveling, Cleta Adams. The Ladies High, Danny Weitrick, The Men’s High was Clayton Emry, the Low’s went to Ken Ripley and Bev Holden. The scores for Oct. 21: The Traveling was won by Douglas Knight and also the Men’s High. The Low went to Ken Ripley, The Ladies High was Danny Wietrick, the Ladies Low went to Sally Eder. Pinochle winners for Oct. 28: There were 34 players in attendance. The Low Winners were Harold Harper and Sally Eder. Marilyn Cross and Jim Fry were the High Winners. Nobody won the Traveling award last week. Until next week.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Food Worker Class

can Legion, Hodges Post #84, will be holding an official Flag Retirement Ceremony at the Legion Hall on Monday, Nov. 11 at 2 p.m. People with flags that are worn out and need to be replaced can bring their flags to the hall, 314 14th Ave., Oroville, and are welcome to attend the ceremony. Depending on the number of flags brought in they may not get to all the flags this ceremony, the rest will be retired at a future retirement ceremony.

OKANOGAN - Starting Nov 7 the Okanogan County Public Health Food Worker Class are offered every Thursday afternoon at 3:30 p.m. Okanogan County Public Health is located at 1234 South Second Ave., Okanogan, WA. Computer stations for the online Food Worker Class are available at Okanogan County Public Health Monday – Friday 7:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. For more information call (509) 422-7140.

WE Auction Notice

ELLISFORDE - The annual auction sale for the Whitestone/Ellisforde Church of the Brethren Women’s Fellowship will be held on Friday, Nov. 8, at the Whitestone Church, 575 Loomis/ Oroville Hwy., Tonasket. Doors will open at 6 p.m. and the auction will begin at 7 p.m. There will be handiwork (pillowcases, dishtowels, tablecloths, etc.), baked goods and candies up for auction. There will be refreshments by donation. Everyone is invited and urged to come. Proceeds will go to missions projects, including Mission Aviation Fellowship, Heifer Project and Disaster Ministries, and help maintain kitchen supplies for the two churches. For further information call (509) 223-3427.

Reed Engel at Esther Bricques

OROVILLE – Reed Engel will perform in the first of three concerts slated for November at Esther Bricques Winery this Thursday, Nov. 7. The following Thursday, Nov. 14 will see John Philips and Steve Pollard on stage, followed by Julie Ashmore and Rick Braman on Thursday, Nov.21. Doors open at 6 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Sibley at Genealogical Society Meeting

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Genealogical Society will hold its next meeting on Nov. 7, 2013 at 2 p.m. at the Wilson Research Center in Okanogan. The program will be presented by Kay Sibley of Oroville and her topic will be “The Mystery of “Okanogan Smith.” The story of Hiram “Okanogan” Smith is a swirl of fact and fiction. Spinning this fascinating tale will be Kay Sibley, retired Oroville educator and Executive Director of the Borderlands Historical Society. We’ll learn some interesting background: Why is Okanogan County called “The Late Frontier?” Where was Rag Town? Why is Oroville “The City of Trails?” Come join us for an interesting program. Everyone is welcome. For more information call Maggie at (509) 422-3944.

Scouting for Food

Oroville Cub Scouts and Girl Scouts are doing their “Scouting For Food Drive.” They will be dropping off grocery bags with donation information on Nov. 9. Filled bags may be left by doors and will be picked up on Nov. 16 by the scouts. All food collected will be donated to the Oroville Food Bank. Contact Karrie at (509) 560-9037 for more information.

Fire District 16 Budget Hearing

AENEAS VALLEY - The Okanogan Fire District No. 16 commissioners will hold their annual public budget hearing for year 2014 at their monthly work session at 6 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 11, at 6 Main Rd. in Aeneas Valley. The public is encouraged to attend. Call Mike Woelke at (509) 4861386 for more information.

Veterans Day Appreciation

CHESAW - The body of believers attending the Chesaw Community Church express deep gratitude and appreciation for those men and women who have sacrificed themselves to provide a cover of liberty and protection for the United States of America. We remember you not only on Veterans Day, but every day of the year. Let us “Thank You” in person. Please come to the Chesaw Mercantile on Monday, Nov. 11 between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. for dessert and coffee.

Flag Retirement Ceremony

OROVILLE – The Oroville Ameri-

Landlord and Tenant Law

OROVILLE – If you are a landlord or a tenant, you need to know your rights. You also must understand your responsibilities. When can a landlord enter a renter’s unit? Under what conditions might a tenant sue a landlord? What about a security deposit dispute? These questions, and others, will be answered at this class, Landlord and Tenant Law, on Monday, Nov. 11. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011 or email community.schools@ oroville.wednet.edu to register for this important class.

Tonasket VA Clinic Open House

TONASKET - The Tonasket Veterans’ Administration Clinic will be holding an open House on Tuesday, Nov. 12 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Meet and greet with VA Clinic physicians and staff; resources from the Spokane VAMC; flu shots, blood pressures and informational handouts; readjustment counseling services available; door prizes given every hour and Food and refreshments.

Okanogan Borderlands Historical Society Meeting

Habitat for Humanity meeting for November will be Tuesday, Nov. 12 at 6 p.m. at St. Anne’s Episcopal Church 639 Ridge Dr. in Omak. It will be a potluck appreciation dinner to celebrate the completion of the HFH home for the Lopez family and to thank all the volunteers and workers and anyone else who helped make it happen.

Oroville Chamber Meeting

OROVILLE - The Oroville Chamber of Commerce next meets on Thursday, Nov. 14 at 1 p.m. at the Plaza Restaurant. Jack Hughes, owner of Princes Department Store, will be the featured guest. He will be answering questions concerning a wide variety of topics that may be helpful to many other businesses, ranging from employee hiring and screening to marketing principles. The public is welcome to attend any of the monthly meetings.

Havillah Harvest Dinner

HAVILLAH - The Havillah Harvest Dinner is Saturday, Nov. 16, fellowship at 5 p.m.; serving 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Havillah Church Parish Hall. All are welcome. Bring your favorite salad or dessert to share. Games for kids to follow. For more information contact Lenette (509) 485-2211

Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Deb Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - On Tuesday, Nov. 12 at 6:30 p.m., there will be an Okanogan Borderlands Historical Society Membership meeting at the Depot to bring members up to date on some new exciting things. Please plan to come, and if you come at 6 p.m., you can enjoy a light dinner and dessert. It’s also time to renew your membership and we’ll have the information to renew there. Looking forward to seeing you all, OBHS Board

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

NVCS receives Sterling Bank donation

THE LEARNING TREE

By Jackie Valiquette

of the NVCS program to our community and for this generous donation. INSTRUCTORS! We need instructors for classes that are new to the program, or have not been offered for a long time. THINK…Build a Birdhouse; Candy Making; Learning Magic Tricks; Working With Clay; Hawaiian Hula; Cartooning for Kids (we’re all kids); Facebook

North Valley Community Schools

North Valley Community Schools is thrilled to announce that the program has received a $1000 award from Sterling Bank. Funding is a continuing challenge and this donation will help keep us ‘in business’ for the next few months. Many thanks to Sterling Bank for recognizing the value

Fun to judge costumes and decorations

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

By Dolly Engelbretson

our list and all were getting into the spirit of the occasion. In costume, greeting the little ones and having a great time. We had our own costume party here at the Center. I believe there were more participants in the party this year than before. The winner was Margaret Hirst in her witches costume, followed by Barbie Freimuth as a Catholic Sister in her Habit, Tiffany Catt as a Feline, Roberta and Howard Cole as... themselves, I guess and Doris Hughes and Evelyn Dull as Grand Mummies. A lot of fun was had by all.

Oroville Senior Center

Being a judge for Halloween Decorations and Costumes was a fun way to spend an afternoon walking around town, visiting with the merchants who had decorated their offices and wore costumes and were open for Trick or Treating. The various judges were all from the Senior Center and who accompanied me on this fun project were: Betty Steg, Marilyn Perry and Betty Bair. I would say that there were 17 merchants on

Successful benefit for Bev Montanye Submitted by Sue Wisener Tonasket Eagles #3002

You now it’s getting colder when the mice are looking for a warm place to set up house. Last Saturdays Benefit dinner/auction for Bev Montanye was a huge success with just over $10,000 raised. A great big thanks to everyone who helped out. There is a lot of planning, organizing and doing to put on this kind of event. Hats off to our wonderful bartenders as they were hopping and all the people

Attractive autumn arrangement By Audrey Holmes Club Correspondent

The Oct. 14 meeting and program was held at the country home of member Barbara Johnson. We enjoyed again, the

101; and Self-Defense for Women. These are but a few of the possibilities. What can you teach? Our instructors are compensated for their hours of instruction. You pick the day, time, and number of sessions. Enjoy a positive experience teaching members of our community who really want to learn what you have to offer. Ellen Barttels is the person with all the answers to your questions. Give her a call at 509-476-2011, email her at community.schools@ oroville.wednet.edu or drop by the NVCS office at the south end of Oroville High School. We want to hear from you! Lewis Wilson of the American Legion and I have been in contact with the Health Alliance Medicare through Confluence Health. The meeting will be here at the Senior Center on Nov. 19 at 3 p.m. Posters will be posted around town and of course Brochures and flyers will be available. Shannon Sims will be the featured speaker for the Wenatchee Valley Medical Center. Medicare will be the topic and Shannon should be able to explain any possible changes to individual Medicare policies. Our bazaar is scheduled for Dec. 7 so be thinking about items and/or baked goods for your table. Please contact Boots Emry for a table. More next time.

TONASKET EAGLES

4:30 p.m. Bowls of chili available after judging by donation. All proceeds to the youth programs. Don’t’ forget to come for Bingo on Friday at 7 p.m. and have a burger and fries as the kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m. Sundays is Breakfast from 9 a.m. - 11 a.m., while your hear don’t forget to shake and sign your name, you can’t win If you don’t play. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Neil Fifer, second place Dave Russell, low score went to Carol Ross and last Pinochle to Neil Fifer and Dave Russell. We wish all of those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

that donated. On Saturday Nov. 9 we are having a Medic First Aid Recertification class - offering basic First Aid, CPR and AED. Starting time is 9 a.m. and goes until 12 p.m. Cost is $25 per person, to pre-register please call (509) 486-4524. Later that day will be our Third Annual Chili cook-off from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Hot and mild classes, prizes given for hot, mild and peoples’ choice. No entry fee – five quarts Min/ Max, please have chili here by

daughter Cheryl Sylvester as her guest from Washington, DC. They brought along for their hostess, a gift of very large autumn arrangement of branches from a maple tree, flowering crab apple, golden berry bush, purple elm and dogwood. Some had golden or red berries, all very attractive. Wendy Taylor gave a report

TONASKET GARDEN CLUB way she grows her tomatoes, all in containers on her deck. Donna Sylvester, the club’s Horticulturalist, brought her

See Garden | PG A3

Habitat for Humanity

OMAK - The Okanogan County

OLIVER THEATRE

         Regular  Showtimes     Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.  –  Thurs…7:30  p.m.   Fri.  –  Sat………….……….7:00  &  9:00  p.m.                          (unless  otherwise  stated)  

Enjoy your  evening  out,  taking   in  a  movie  at  the  Oliver  Theatre!  

November, 2013  Programme                                  Visit  Our  Website  

At the

Phone 250-­‐498-­‐2277        Oliver,  BC  

Thurs. –  Fri.  –  Sat.        Nov.  21  –  22  -­  23  

www.olivertheatre.ca

MOVIES

Thurs. –  Fri.  –  Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.   Oct.  31,  Nov.  1  –  2  –  3  –  4  –  5     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:30  p.m.  

Oliver Theatre

Oliver, B.C.

Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

There will  also  be  a  matinee  of  this  show  on  the     Sat.  at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

Sun. –  Mon.  –  Tues.        Nov.  24  –  25  -­  26  

250-498-2277

Thurs. -­  NOV. Fri.          Nov.   8     FREE FAMILY MATINEE MON. 117  –  2PM Showtimes  on  Fri.  @  7:00  &  9:25  p.m.   Violence,  coarse  language.  

RUSH THURS.-FRI. NOV.7-8 SHOWTIMES ON FRI. 7PM & 9:25PM 14

BAD GRANDPA BY JACKASS

Sexually suggestive  scenes,  scenes  of  accident  trauma.  

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.     Nov.  9  –  10  –  11  –  12,  14    

Violence.

Thurs. -­  Fri.          Nov.  28  –  29     Showtimes  on  Fri.  @  7:00  &  9:25  p.m.  

SAT.-SUN-MON.-TUES., 14 THURS. NOV. 9-10-11-12,14

ENDER’S GAME FRI.-SAT.-SUN-MON.-

TUES.,NOV. 15-16-17-18-19. SHOWTIMES ON FRI & SAT 7PM & 9:15PMMonday, Nov.  11  @  2:00  p.m.   Crude  content,  coarse  and  sexual  language.  

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

Coarse and  sexual  language.  

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       Nov.  30,  Dec.  1  –  2  –  3,  5  -­  6     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:15  p.m.  

Free Family  Matinee  

Sponsored By  The  Royal  Canadian  Legion  –  Branch  97  

Fri. –  Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.  -­  Tues.     Nov.  15  –  16  –  17  –  18  -­  19     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:15  p.m.  

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

ENDER’S GAME

PG13

Action/Adventure/Sci Fi Starring Harrison Ford, Asa Butterfield, Hailee Steinfeld, Viola Davis. Fri. 7:00, 9:45 Sat.*4:15,7:00, 9:45 Sun. *4:15,7:00 Wkdys: 7:00

THE HUNGER  GAMES      CATCHING  FIRE  

BEGINS DEC.  7  

Shopping Days  7 Weekends  7 Saturdays

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater 91min

Starts Friday. Comedy Starring Owen Wilson, Woody Harrelson, Amy Poehler Fri.6:45 & 9:15. Sat.*4:00,6:45,9:15. Sun.*4:00,6:45. Wkdys 6:45. JACKASS PRESENTS R

BAD GRANDPA

Section Ballet Shoes Music Box

Mystery Foal

7.

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The Game of Life

THOR: The Dark World

27.95

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Friendship Stamps

6.

92min

Monster Treads Semi Hauler

19.95

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4 In A Row

8.

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Lee Frank Mercantile

PG13

Action/Adventure/Fantasy Starring Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Tom HIddleston, Anthony Hopkins

Fri.6:45, 9:45 Sat. *3:45,6:45,9:45. Sun. *3:45, 6:45.Wkdys 6:45. 120min Matinee $6.00

A Little Taste Of Our New

$ 95

Comedy Starring Johnny Knoxvil e, Jackson Nicoll, Spike Jonze, Georgina Cates Fri 7:15, 9:45. Sat *4:15, 7:15, 9:45 Sun *4:15, 6:45 Wkdays 7:15

Adult $8.50

This holiday season, when you are thinking of giving gifts to your friends and family, think also about giving back to your community. Before you click “buy” online or before you head out of town to shop, consider giving a unique gift from one of our many local businesses.

 47

Programme Subject  To  Unavoidable  change  without  notice  

MIRAGE THEATER

FREE BIRDS

Shopping days left until Christmas...

Violence, frightening  scenes.  

Violence.

The

114 min

BUY LOCAL

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

To start your Holiday Advertising call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 or 509-322-5712.

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PRICES IN EFFECT NOV. 6 - 17, 2013


NOVEMBER 7, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page B1

Okanogan Valley Life

Reserve National Champions

Tonasket FFA Rituals team earns program’s second national runner-up finish in three years

Quotable “It was almost surreal when they called out my name. I still haven’t fully accepted the fact that I won a national title.” Rade Pilkinton, individual national champion

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

LOUISVILLE, KY. - The Tonasket FFA program has filled its “headquarters” - advisor and ag teacher Matt Deebach’s classroom - with so many banners that the walls and ceiling are running out of space. None has been more prized than the national runner-up banner won by the 2011 Parliamentary Procedure team. For a small, out-of-the-way school like Tonasket, that might have seemed like a peak of success that could never be matched. Well, that banner is going to have some company. The Tonasket FFA’s Rituals team, which as freshmen claimed the state championship last spring, earned Reserve National Champion honors at the FFA National Convention in Louisville, Kentucky, last week, outperforming all but a team from San Luis Obispo, Calif. The seven sophomores - including one who moved away over the summer, and another who didn’t join the team until after the state convention - overcame some first round jitters to deliver the performance of a lifetime in the championship round of six national title contenders, missing out on the overall national title by the closest of margins. And when the tallying of individual scores was complete, Tonasket’s Rade Pilkinton was awarded the national title for individual performance. Pilkinton, Jordan Hughes, Jenna Valentine, Rachel Silverthorn, Sammie Earley, Madison Bayless and Janelle Catone weren’t sure if they qualified for the final round and had to wait for several hours before the final six out of 23 (and two out of their pool of seven) were announced. It was a long and uneasy wait, which is saying something considering there was at least one case of nervous preperformance vomiting to kick off the day. But given their chance in the finals, the group shone in what is also referred to as the novice version of the Parliamentary Procedure event for underclassmen. “They were nervous at the start, but they calmed down as they got going,” Deebach said. “They missed some of the oral questions in the opening round but had a great performance other than that. They did great on the debate (portion of the competition), and did excellent on the tests.” The team had to run through the competition twice: first in the flight round, and then in the final round of six national title contenders. Tonasket’s flight also included teams from Virginia, Louisiana, Indiana, Florida, Arizona and Oregon. But one of the strongest parts of their repertoire, the oral questioning, didn’t go as well as anticipated. With only two of the seven teams advancing there was no margin for error. “I was very nervous about not making the finals, because I know how close it is,” Deebach said. “The difference between first and third is so tiny, and I didn’t know any of their other scores. I just knew what I’d seen. I was definitely more nervous than with the Parli team (two years ago) - those kids had all the oral questions right.” As it turned out, Tonasket had excelled in the other parts of the competition, more than making up for the missed oral questions. “We beat the next closest team to us on the written tests by 20,” Deebach said. “But we didn’t know that until later. Sammie had the second-highest written test score. Opening those (scoresheets) up, I was like a kid opening a present.” Deebach wasn’t the only one unsure about making the finals. “I honestly could not believe we made it to finals because we did not do very good in the preliminary round,” Pilkinton said.

“When our chairman, Jordan, rapped the gavel to start the presentation my stomach filled with butterflies. I was worried I would fumble my words and mess up my part. The butterflies were just there to ensure me that it meant I wanted to do well. And that we did.” Janelle Catone

Above, the Tonasket FFA Rituals team and family members who made their trip show off their national runner-up ribbons. Pictured are (l-r) Lisa Hale, Shannon McLean, Sierra Hughes, Jordan Hughes, Teresa Hughes, Jenna Valentine, Madison Bayless, Christina Silverthorn, Rachel Silverthorn, Janelle Catone, Ryan Pilkinton, Rade Pilkinton, Bobbi Catone, Sammie Earley and Matt Deebach. Left, the team had a long and stressful wait to see if they made the championship round of six finalists. Below left, when not competing, there was time for the team to do some sightseeing in the Louisville area, including at the track where the Kentucky Derby is run. Hughes, Catone, Silverthorn and Bayless hammed it up as jockeys. Below right, the Rituals (novice Parli Pro) team in competition. Lisa Hale & Ryan Pilkinton/submitted photos

Madison Bayless

“Mr. Deebach had given us a little pep talk before each round just to focus, do our best, and have fun. But all throughout this week he had given us pep talks not only about competition, but life lessons I will remember forever.” Jenna Valentine

“The final round was crazy. There were so many people watching us, but I didn’t feel pressured.” Rachel Silverthorn

“It was hard at first because I felt out of place, but I was dedicated enough to the team to where I got comfortable and tried my hardest.” Sammie Earley, joined the team after the state finals

“I honestly was much less nervous than state. (Matt) Deebach told us that we can’t get any better now, so just do your best. There were no nerves left.” Jordan Hughes

“I would say finals was a lot less nerve-racking because we only had to wait 30 minutes rather than the couple hours in the preliminary round (to find out how they finished). We had less time to think about things.” “When it was time to hear the announcements of the preliminary round, (we) walked into the room and sat down,” Catone said. “We all held hands and bowed our heads. The announcer was getting ready to announce the final six teams and we were freaking out. ‘Washington’ was the first team announced and our team raised our hands and screamed.” “It was the best feeling in the world,” Silverthorn said. “We were more excited then than about getting second in the nation.” The primary goal, of course, was to win the national championship. Valentine, for one, did her best to convince the team to expect the best. “I did have a goal: it was to be the national champions,” she said. “I knew if we worked hard and kept our head in the game we could do it. Remember (from talking about the state finals last May), it’s never ‘If we make it into the final round,’ it’s ‘When.’ “I was always right until now, and I was just off by a hair. It helps to stay positive. But also

the experience was amazing; I had done something beyond my dreams.” Reaching the final round of six, took a lot of the pressure off. With that achieved, the Tonasket team’s performance in the finals was much more than what they had hoped for. “The final round felt like any other run we have done,” Hughes said. “The only difference was in the holding room and getting to talk to the other teams from other states, and making new friends.” “After the first run I was like, I just want to make it to finals,” said Bayless, whose older sister Hayley was on the 2011 Parli Pro team. “When we made it to finals I was all for getting first, but then we watched California’s run. (After that) all that was going through my head was second place. That is what I wanted to get and it happened! “ The younger Bayless had another goal as well. “I wanted to do just as good as my older sister,” she said, “and I did just that. I think we both get equal bragging rights, although I might get a little more because I made it to nationals my freshman year and she made it her senior year. I just wanted to share the same experience as my sister did and now we get to share it

together.” For Bayless, a mid-summer move to Connell complicated things. Since the FFA “season” runs through the calendar year she was still considered part of the Tonasket team, but had to do a lot of practicing on her own, as well as a number of trips back to Tonasket to work with the rest of the group. It was also an interesting ride for Earley, who was added to the team in the Rituals advisor’s role, which at the state level was filled by Deebach. “At our state level it’s a sixperson competition, but at the national level it’s seven,” Deebach said. “At state, the advisor doesn’t do anything but read off questions. But at the national level they do the whole event like everyone else. I’m sure they’ll be changing that in the future.” Earley, who was part of another Tonasket Rituals team at state, said it took some time to feel like she was part of the rest of the group. “It was hard at first because I felt out of place,” she said. “But I was dedicated enough to the team to where I got comfortable and tried my hardest.” Ryan Pilkinton, Rade’s father and a longtime math teacher and coach at Tonasket High

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“This is two totally different groups of kids in different events from the same little town. To pull this off at this level is just really cool.”

School, was one of several family members that made the trip to Louisville. He said he currently has five of the seven kids in class, and was wrapped up in the competition in all three of those roles. “The mental toughness those kids displayed was really remarkable,” he said. “To perform the way they did, at this level, with judges hanging on every word, it’s hard to describe. “I was wound up so tight. I coached in a state championship football game, and I was coaching baseball when we went to the regional finals. I was more wound up for this than for any sporting event. ...Part of it was that it was my kid, and part of it is you can’t do much other than sit and watch. I can’t imagine doing what they did when I was 15. The looks on their faces when they knew they were in the top two were priceless.” As for Rade’s national title? “I didn’t see it coming,” said his dad. I’m really happy and proud of him. He’s highly competitive and motivated. He has a knack for being able to perform on the spot, and frankly I don’t know where he gets that from.” “ I didn’t even know that there was an individual national championship,” Rade said. “When I heard about it I just figured that

some other kid from another state would get it, but when they said the person was from Washington State I kind of had hope it would be me. It was almost surreal when they called out my name.” “Matt deserves a ton of credit,” Ryan Pilkinton said of Deebach. “Without his guidance and the time he puts into this, none of this happens. We need to make sure his efforts are recognized. There’s something working here, for sure.” Hearing Deebach tell it, it was the time and work the seven super sophs put in that made the difference. “After the kids won state I had them write down their goals,” he said, noting that the bar set by the team two years ago didn’t hurt the motivation aspect. “They wanted to make the finals. They see it, they want to be it. It’s really been neat to see them work so hard, follow through to achieve their aspirations and then get the reward.”

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Matt Deebach, FFA Advisor, on leading two teams to 2nd place finishes at nationals

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 7, 2013

SPORTS Tigers prepare for district showdown Time to hit the road

Fall to Cashmere in home finale By Brent Baker

Volleyball team closes with win, heads to White Swan

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - If anything would prepare Tonasket’s girls soccer team for taken on the Northeast A League’s champion in this weekend’s district playoffs, it was playing the eight-time champion of their own league. Caribou Trail League power Cashmere blanked the Tigers 3-0 in their Saturday, Nov. 2, regular-season wrap-up, but the Tigers were confident about moving forward after the way they played. “It was a well-played game,” said Tonasket coach Darren Collins. “It could have easily been 1-0.” The Tigers had several scoring chances in the first half, though Cashmere’s defense was up to the task. Cashmere’s Tianna Helm - heavily recruited by NCAA Division 1 programs including Gonzaga, Yale and San Diego put the Bulldogs ahead with a brilliant, losing the defense with a lightning-quick crossover and ripping an effortless shot into the net. But overall the Tigers did a good job of defending her, and for the most part kept Cashmere’s outside game at bay. “We played tough defense,” Collins said. “Selena Cosino did a great job of keeping (Helm) under control, and I didn’t think Cashmere was able to handle the Willis twins (Ashlynn and Kayla) on the outside. “We’ve been working hard on not ‘biting’ on defense - just squaring up and letting them make a mistake rather than gambling and trying to steal the ball.” Cashmere (15-1, 14-0 CTL) added a second goal before the half on a shot that hit a Tiger’s leg and slipped in past the post, and in the second half added a long goal off the foot of Lauren Johnson. “I really felt like we played well,” said Kylie Dellinger, who along with fellow senior Kathryn Cleman has given the Tigers (9-7, 7-7) a 1-2 scoring punch all season. “Every time we play an upper-level team we do good . We talk on the field. With it being senior night you could really tell, we’re like one big family. It’s been great.” Senior Day is always an emotional event, but even more so for the Tigers this year, as Amanda Johnson saw her first action of the season for about a minute late in the first half. Johnson was nearly killed in a car accident last summer, and while her sports career is over, Collins said it was important to get her on the field. “She’s really not supposed to play,” he said. “But with her par-

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Above, Baylie Tyus is focuses as she makes a save during Saturday’s loss to Cashmere. Left, (l-r) Jonalynn Glover, Amanda Johnson, assistant coach Todd Mathews, head coach Darren Collins and Kathryn Cleman greet Johnson (13) after the senior saw her only action of the season. Johnson was severely injured in a car accident last summer, ending her sports career other than her minute-long appearance in the team’s final regular-season home game on Saturday.

Brent Baker/staff photos

ents there and it being Senior Day it needed to happen. She said her big motivation in rehab was to get well enough to get on the field. “I was afraid she might try to tackle someone. She’s lucky to be alive. But I was glad we were able to get her out there.” The Tigers’ 9-7 overall mark ensures they’ll have their first winning season since 2005, which was also the last time they finished in the upper half of their league standings. Dellinger said as the team looks to playing it’s district game - likely against Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls), which had a district seeding game

on Tuesday but has only lost to 2A West Valley (Spokane) this season - that solid defense will be the key to an upset. “We need to take a week of hard practice, focus, and do the little things - like breaking down instead of running at the ball,” she said. “If you break them down (on defense) you’ll most likely get the ball because they’re going to make the mistake. We just need to keep talking on the field and keep a positive attitude.” She said she and the Tigers are hoping for a big contingent of supporters to make the trip to the Spokane area for the game.

Tigers can’t finish Cashmere By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

“We can use all the support we can get,” she said. “I know it’s in Spokane, but people say they like watching us play. When we have a big crowd and good support, we play better. “I’m proud to be somebody who plays for the Tonasket girls soccer team.”

Tigers fall in PKs BREWSTER - Brewster edged the Tigers 2-1 in a penalty kick shootout on Tuesday, Oct. 29, to decide things after the two teams played to a 1-1 tie through regulation and overtime. By getting to the shooutout, though, the Tigers picked up one

Oroville stats: Rachelle Nutt 5/7 serving, 1 ace, 1 block, 11 attacks, 23 digs; Brittany Jewett 18/19 serving, 5 aces, 2 attacks, 18 digs; Bridget Clark 13/13 serving, 2 aces, 7 attacks, 13 digs; Nadia Maldonado 19/20 serving, 4 attacks, 16 digs; Monica Herrera 6/7 serving, 1 ace, 11 attacks, 9 digs; Mikayla Scott 9/13 serving, 1 ace, 11 attacks, 2 kills, 16 digs; Jessica Galvan 10/11 serving, 1 attack, 5 digs; Andrea Perez 10/13 serving, 1 ace, 3 attacks, 2 kills, 16 digs.

point in the standings that clinched the fourth playoff spot and an automatic trip to this Saturday’s district tournament game. “We got off the bus and were just slow,” Collins said. “We did what we need to do, but it was ugly.” Kathryn Cleman scored the Tigers’ goal in regulation, coming off an assist from goalkeeper Baylie Tyus. Jaden Vugteveen made Tonasket’s one goal in the shootout. “We didn’t even execute the shootout well,” Collins said. “We didn’t force their keeper to make any saves; we just missed. Usually we’re dead on with those.”

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Oroville set for playoffs Fall to Bridgeport on Senior Night The Gazette-Tribune

TONASKET - Tonasket’s volleyball team fought and clawed to get its first win of the season in its final match of the year, but couldn’t hold onto leads in its final two sets as Cashmere claimed a 25-16, 27-25, 25-18 sweep on Saturday, Nov. 2. “The girls fought hard,” said Tonasket coach Jackie Gliddon, “but came up short.” A number of the Tigers played well, she said. “Alissa Young played very well,” Gliddon said. “She hustled around and got to the ball. Cassie Spear played well again; Savannah Clinedinst played hard; Carrisa Frazier served well this year and today was no exception. “The girls competed in most matches,” she added. “We were just unable to finish with a win. “I want to wish the other teams the best of luck in post-season play.”

OROVILLE - Oroville’s girls soccer team fell to Bridgeport 6-0 in their final regular-season game on Thursday, oct. 31. The Hornets wrapped up with a 3-12 overall mark, 2-6 in Central Washington League play. That was good for a fourthplace finish and the Hornets’ first-ever district playoff berth. Oroville travels to Bridgeport for a rematch on Saturday, Nov.

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7, to open district tournament play. The winner of that game plays the Liberty Bell vs. Entiat winner for a trip to the state semifinals on Nov. 14. It will be the fifth meeting between the Hornets and league champion Fillies (14-1, 8-0) this season.

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Tonasket stats: Alissa Young 9/9 serving, 4 kills, 1 block; Cassie Spear 12/14 serving, 5 aces, 1 kill; Savannah Clinedinst 9/10 serving, 2 blocks, 1 kill; Carrisa Frazier 14/16 serving, 1 ace; Jenny Bello 2 aces; Rachael Sawyer 1 kill; Jenna Davisson 1 kill; Yazmin Cervantes 1 kill.

Brewster 3, Tonasket 0 BREWSTER - The Tigers lost at Brewster on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 25-11, 25-10, 25-11. “I thought the girls played decent on the court, moving and getting to most of the balls,” Gliddon said. “We just have trou-

MANSON - A road trip to Manson is bad enough. But the reward for the Oroville volleyball team’s first playoff appearance in forever will be a weeknight expedition to White Swan this Thursday. The Hornets, stung by their loss to Bridgeport on Senior Night, got back on the winning track on Tuesday, Oct. 29, taking down Manson 24-26, 25-16, 23-25, 15-3 to finish at 5-3 in Central Wa s h i n g t o n League North Division play. They already had the league’s third seed to the district t o u r n a ment Maldonado locked up, but gathered some momentum for Thursday’s loser-out contest at White Swan. “The team played well,” said Oroville coach Carrie Rise. “Brittany Jewett and Nadia Maldonado had a great night serving, and all of the players did well digging Manson’s great hits.” The Hornets will spend about six hours on the bus heading for their district playoff match, which is set for 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 7. Athletic director Tam Hutchinson said he had been trying to get the game moved to a central site but as of Tuesday morning had been unsuccessful. The Cougars (13-7-1, including best-of-3 tournament matches) went 2-2 in the CWL South Division, handing Kittitas its only loss of the season two weeks ago.

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Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket senior Tori King bumps up the ball during the Tigers’ final game of the season on Saturday, Nov. 2. ble finishing the point.”

Tonasket stats: Savannah Clinedinst 4/5 serving, 2 kills; Carrisa Frazier,

Jenny Bello, Alissa Young 1 ace each; Tori King, Jenna Davisson 1 kill each; Jenna Davisson 1 block.

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page B3

SPORTS

Speiker to run for 3rd state title By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Kjeld Williams breaks loose for a 16-yard run on a reverse in the second half of the Tigers’ loss to Chelan on Nov. 1.

Chelan beats Tigers on Senior Night By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Say this about Tonasket’s 48-7 loss to Chelan to close out the Caribou Trail League football season on Friday: it was a lot better than the Tigers’ games against the Goats the past two years. The Tigers were one defensive stand from still being in the game at halftime after Michael Orozco’s 42-yard run pulled his team to within 22-7 with 2:06 left in the second quarter. But Chelan immediately seized back any momentum the Tigers gained with a quick, four-play drive that resulted in a 28-7 lead at the half and doused any flickering upset hopes the Tigers may have had. Still, Tigers were outscored by the Goats 90-0 in the first quarter alone in the past two seasons (losses of 64-0 and 61-7), so even that deficit was a big improvement over the travails of years past.

“There were a lot of good things that happened tonight,” said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. “The kids from start to finish hung around mentally, kept fighting and battling.” Despite returning most of their lineup from a year ago, Chelan is a much different team than it’s been in recent years. New head coach Travis Domser installed a new and multi-dimensional offense, and with Michael Amsel, Jr. - the talented but mercurial quarterback - no longer the focal point of the offense, what is left is a talented but more balanced squad. “I knew enough of their kids that were coming back, I’d seen them play,” Hawkins said. “Amsel is the only guy they lost but there are a lot more people getting involved offensively. They have more than one guy.” Hawkins said the Tigers focused on trying to stop their sweeps to the outside, and they did so with some success. “Defensively we were more

aggressive and a lot faster than we’ve played,” he said. “We didn’t always make the play. But we did a good job of nullifying their sweep game. Even when we didn’t make the play on those, we were in the right place. But then they kind of hunkered down and pushed us around on the interior.” The quarterback/wide receiver platoon tandem of Tanner Hendricks and Luke Gleasman proved particularly troublesome as each hit the other on a number of big plays up the middle to key most of the Goats’ scoring drives. Hendricks completed 4-of-8 passes for 95 yards and a touchdowns and caught four Gleasman passes for 84 yards and two scores, as well as rushing for 38 yards on three carries. For his part, Gleasman threw for 86 yards and a touchdown on 4-of-5 passing and rushed for 76 yards and two touchdowns on eight carries. Orozco led the Tigers with 114 yards on 23 carries. Isaiah

Yaussey-Albright added 17 yards on four carries and Kjeld Williams had ran 16 yards with a reverse. Trevor Terris was 3-of-4 passing for 19 yards. Collin Aitcheson and Jacob Cory led the defensive effort. “It was a lot like watching WSU play Arizona State,” Hawkins said (the Cougars lost 55-24 to the Sun Devils). “When got is in ‘space,’ we had trouble with their receivers running some crisp routes. We ended up trying to chase them down and trying to make that quick decision where to go. “And did some silly things. Our kick return game ... starting two possessions at the one line makes it tough. But we still had a lot better showing tonight than we have the past couple years against them.” The Tigers (3-6, 1-6 Caribou Trail League) play a non-playoff crossover with Kettle Falls on Friday at 7 p.m. to close out the season.

Hornets win; now they wait Need White Swan to beat Liberty Bell to keep playoff hopes alive By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

BRIDGEPORT - Oroville wasn’t able to take control of its game at Bridgeport until the third quarter, despite the Mustangs coming into the Central Washington League football contest with just one win on the season. A burst of six touchdowns over a 14 minute span erased a 22-20 Bridgeport lead and the Hornets kept their playoff hopes alive by finishing off a 62-34 victory on Friday, Nov. 1. “We didn’t play well in the first half at all,” said Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson. “We went in at halftime and reminded the kids that this was still a game we

couldn’t afford to lose. We can still make the playoffs with some help, but we had to win this game. “We played a lot better in the second half.” The Hornets, still a little shorthanded due to a series of injuries that have particularly affected their play on both the offensive and defensive lines, allowed Bridgeport’s Jonathan Oregon to rush for 218 yards on 19 carries, also gave up a 90-yard kickoff return and a 40-yard fumble return for touchdowns. “Up front we’re still a bit shorthanded,” Hutchinson said. “But the guys that we had in there didn’t play the same way they did against White Swan. We had a terrible night with our tackling. “On most of (Oregon’s) runs we had him in the backfield and didn’t make the tackle.” But offensively their six-touchdown splurge required just 16 plays. A 56-yard run by Connolly Quick and 15-yard run by Luke Kindred in the final minutes

of the second quarter gave the Hornets a 34-22 halftime lead. The big plays continued in the third quarter as Oroville scored on a 37-yard Quick run, a 79-yard Kindred-to-Tanner Smith pass play, an 80-yard punt return by Smith and an 11-yard Kindred touchdown run. That gave Oroville a 62-22 lead heading to the fourth quarter on a running clock. Kindred opened the scoring with a one-yard plunge on the Hornets’ first possession of the game. After Bridgeport scored twice, Logan Mills broke loose for a 44-yard touchdown run that briefly gave the Hornets a 13-9 lead before Bridgeport returned the ensuing kickoff for a score. Kindred scored his second touchdown on a 27-yard run that gave Oroville a 20-16 lead midway through the second quarter. Quick finished with 152 yards on nine carries, with Kindred adding 67 yards on 12 carries. The quarterback also completed

2-of-3 passes for 100 yards. “Connelly ran the ball really well,” Hutchinson said. “They were shadowing Tanner with three guys all night, but it opened things up in other places and he did a great job of taking advantage of that.” EZ Delgado was in on 14 tackles, Sean DeWitte had 13 tackles, Kindred had 12 tackles and two interceptions Smkth had 11 tackles and Ricky Mathis picked off a pass. The Hornets (6-2) do have a Saturday, 3 p.m. non-league home contest against Chief Leschi, but the key game will be in White Swan, where the Cougars host Liberty Bell. A Liberty Bell win will eliminate the Hornets from the playoff chase. A White Swan win will put the Hornets in the playoffs if Kittitas also loses; if White Swan and Kittitas both win, a three-way mini-playoff between Oroville, Kittitas and Liberty Bell would be scheduled to determine the final playoff team.

WENATCHEE - Sierra Speiker has maintained a torrid pace on every cross country course she’s met this season. The Oroville senior is ready for one last race: the state finals meet in Pasco. Speiker once again dominated the field at Saturday’s Class 2B District 5/6 regional meet, winning by nearly four minutes while finishing the 3-mile course in 17:56.04. Also running for the Hornets was Phoebe Poynter, who finished eighth in 25:20.33. Speiker will be a prohibitive favorite in the state meet. Her quest for the state’s top time overall will be a difficult one as she won’t get to race against the other top runners in the state, who are all in the larger school divisions. Speiker also runs in the first race of the day, at 10 a.m., so the times of the other top finishers won’t be known for hours after she finishes. Only five girls advanced to the state meet from the Hornets’ regional, while 15 boys move on. Bridgeport’s girls, as the only team with a qualifying five-member squad, advance as a group with their top finisher, Letty Trejo, finishing fifth overall. Diego Santana led Oroville’s boys with a 23rd-place finish in 19:41.8. Other Hornets included Javier Castillo (32nd, 21:06.07); Nahum Garfias (33rd, 21:16.98); Emmanuel Castrejon (36th,

21:49.07) and Daniel Castrejon (37th, 22:36.74). Liberty Bell dominated the boys meet with the top three finishers - Ben Klemmeck, Willy Duguay and Liam Daily, all finishing less than a second apart at the front of the pack.

Girls (3-mile)

Team - Bridgeport 15. Oroville, Lake Roosevelt, Pateros, Yakama Nation, Liberty Bell, Riverside Christian NS Individual (Bridgeport and Top 5 to state) - 1. Sierra Speiker, ORO, 17:56.04; 2. Ashley Palmer, LR, 21:30.85; 3. Rhiannon Easter, PTR, 22:19.03; 4. Alexia Hanway, LR, 22:47.49; 5. Letty Trejo, BPT, 22:48.38; 6. Kaonna Olney, YAK, 22:59.49; 7. Lilly Schlotzhauer, LB, 24:11.72; 8. Phoebe Poynter, ORO, 25:20.33; 9. Anabel Valdovinos, BPT, 25:44.54; 10. Melissa Gray, PTR, 26:08.84; 11. Elsie Valdovinos, BPT, 26:18.74; 12. Clare Castrodale, LR, 26:25.23; 13. Anai Palacios, BPT, 27:46.92; 14. Annie Miller, RCH, 28:44.77; 15. Maddy Varrelman, BPT, 29:33.16; 16. Charisse Heath, YAK, 32:20.43.

Boys (3-mile)

Team - Liberty Bell 23, Lake Roosevelt 58, Bickleton 75, Yakama Tribal 86, Bridgeport 124, Oroville 133. Manson, White Swan, Riverside Christian NS Individual (Liberty Bell, LR, Bickleton and top 15 to state) - 1. Ben Klemmeck, LB, 16:56.04; 2. Willy Duguay LB, 16:56.6; 3. Liam Daily, LB, 16:56.95; 4. Timothy Celestine, YAK, 17:09.83; 5. Troy Roberts, BIK, 17:16.42; 6. Oren Cox, BPT, 17:22.25; 7. Ryan Widhalm, RCH, 17:26.22; 8. Andrew Gannon, BIK, 17:26.95; 9. Tarell Manjarrez, WS, 17:30.45; 10. Josiah Klemmeck, LB, 17:31.74; 11. Morgan Ott, LB, 17:45.55; 12. Sam Thomask, MSN, 18:20.26; 13. Miguel Leyva, MSN, 18:14.96; 14. Ray Yazzie, LR, 18:18.51; 15. Dominick Cotton, LR, 18:39.34.

Tigers wrap up season at regionals By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

SPOKANE VALLEY Tonasket’s cross country teams wrapped up the 2013 season Saturday, Nov. 2, at the Bi-district 6/7 regional meet, with none of the Tigers advancing to the state finals. Freshman Johnna Terris came the closest to nabbing one of the 20 spots on the girls side, finishing 30th in 22:47.61. Amber Monroe (32nd, 22:52.43) was close behind, followed by Lea Berger (50th, 24:59.21). Running for the boys were Adrian McCarthy (61st, 21:10.55); Tim Jackson (66th, 20:32.18); Bryden Hires (69th, 20:50.03); Smith Condon (70th, 20:50.86); Abe Podkranic (71st, 20:54.58); and Dallin Good 90th, 26:01.56.

Girls (5k)

Team - Lakeside 33, Riverside 47, Medical Lake 91, Freeman 92, Cascade 132, Chelan 137, Omak 168, Cashmere 233, Quincy 247, Chewelah 271. Tonasket, Newport NS. Individual (Lakeside, Riverside, Medical Lake, Freeman and top 20 to state) - 1. Rebecca Mildes, RVS, 19:02.98; 2. Erin Mullins, CAS, 19:35.59; 3. Mikayla Shuler, RVS, 19:54.86; 4. Jessica Ircink, LKS, 20:04.68; 5. Lindy Jacobson, LKS,

20:15.84; 6. Megan Ahrendt, LKS, 20:30.14; 7. Tati Foster, FRE, 20:34.72; 8. Chelsea Tremblay, LKS, 20:35.90; 9. Ashton Owens, RVS, 20:50.70; 10. Stefanie Mrikis, LKS, 21:08.26; 11. Alyssa Zimmerman, FRE, 21:11.54; 12. Addison Ivory, CHL, 21:17.87; 13. Sakaiya McCoy, MDL, 21:27.96; 14. Maleeka Wegner, MDL, 21:34.44; 15. Lydia Youkey, CAS, 21:34.62; 16. Alice Burchett, RVS, 21:35.95; 17. Makenna Pratt, LKS, 21:37.83; 18. Carissa Hambidge, RVS, 21:49.13; 19. Kaylin Sattler, MDL, 21:50.17; 20. Diana Montes, OMak, 21:53.70.

Boys (5k)

Team - Medical Lake 42, Riverside 67, Lakeside 73, Cashmere 105, Quincy 140, Cascade 163, Chelan 165, Omak 174, Freeman 253, Chewelah 312, Tonasket 332, Brewster 345, Newport 399. Individual (Medical Lake, Riverside, Lakeside, Cashmere and top 20 to state) - 1. Micah Dingfield, MDL, 16:38.89; 2. JT Lauderdale, LKS, 16:44.34; 3. Spencer Elmore, QCY, 17:01.71; 4. Ryan Coffman, LKS, 17:07.65; 5. Jacob Dingfield, MDL, 17:10.39; 6. Domenic Rehm, MDL, 17:23.030; 7. Logan Owens, RVS, 17:30.94; 8. Daniel Olmstead, CAS, 17:33.60; 9. Jonathan Mangas, CSH, 17:33.78; 10. Brandon Hartill, RVS, 17:39.77; 11. Tim Chernishoff, MDL, 17:39.93; 12. Samuel Goble, OMK, 17:40.25; 13. Victor Salgado, QCY, 17:42.05; 14. Donovan Dewey, QCY, 17:46.28; 15. Eric Taylor, RVS, 17:49.97; 16. Morgan O’Dell, OMK, 17:49.35; 17. Brandon Suhr, RVS, 17:57.48; 18. Angela Ferraro, RVS, 17:59.05; 19. Noah Kroeze, MDL, 17:55.99; 20. Ivan Reyes, CHL, 18:00.15.

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STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Football

Caribou Trail 1A League Overall W-L * Cashmere 7-0 * Okanogan 6-1 * Chelan 5-2 * Cascade 4-3 Quincy 3-4 Brewster 2-5 Tonasket 1-6 Omak 0-7 * Clinched playoff berth

W-L 8-1 8-1 6-3 5-4 3-6 3-6 3-6 0-9

Central WA 2B League Overall W-L * White Swan 5-0 Liberty Bell 4-1 Oroville 4-2 Kittitas 3-2 Bridgeport 1-4 Manson 1-4 Lk Roosevelt 0-5 * Clinched playoff berth

W-L 8-1 4-1 6-2 3-4 1-8 1-7 3-6

Volleyball Caribou Trail 1A League Overall

W-L W-L-S * Cascade 14-0 23-3-0 * Chelan 12-2 22-3-0 * Brewster 9-5 15-5-0 * Omak 9-5 9-5-0 * Quincy 6-8 8-11-0 Okanogan 4-10 4-10-0 Cashmere 2-12 2-13-0 Tonasket 0-14 0-16-0 * Clinched playoff berth

CWL 2B North League Overall

W-L W-L-S * Bridgeport 7-1 10-7-0 * Liberty Bell 6-2 10-5-0 * Oroville 5-3 8-7-0 Lk Roosevelt 1-7 2-15-0 Manson 1-7 3-11-0 * Clinched playoff berth

CWL 2B South League Overall

W-L W-L * Kittitas 3-1 13-1-0 * White Swan 2-2 13-7-1 Riv Christian 1-3 7-9 -1 * Clinched playoff berth

Girls Soccer

Caribou Trail 1A League Overall

Pts. W-L W-L-T * Cashmere 42 14-0 15-1-0 * Cascade 36 12-2 12-4-0 * Okanogan 30 10-4 11-5-0 * Tonasket 22 7-7 9-7-0 * Brewster 20 7-7 8-8-0 Omak 7 2-12 3-13 Chelan 6 2-12 3-13-0 Quincy 5 2-12 2-14-0 * Clinched playoff berth

Nov. 11-13 GSoc - Tonasket state tourn (if qualify), TBA

Thursday, Nov. 7 VB - Oroville at White Swan (district), 6 pm

Saturday, Nov. 16 GSoc - Oroville at Entiat-LB winner (if qualify), 1 pm

Friday, Nov. 8 FB (Var) - Kettle Falls at Tonasket, 7 pm Saturday, Nov. 9 XC - Oroville at State finals at Pasco, 10 am FB (Var) - Chief Leschi at Oroville, 3 pm GSoc - Oroville at Bridgeport (district), 1 pm GSoc - Tonasket at Lakeside/Newport winner (district), 2 pm VB - Oroville at Ephrata district (if

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PAGE B4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 7, 2013

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Winter is a few months away but, for some people, it has already arrived although unexpectedly. Once the days have started to get shorter, it is never too early or too late to prepare for the winter months. If not done already, now is the time to get your home ready for winter. Here is a "to do checklist" to accomplished your winter preparation:  Change or clean the filter on your furnace.  Have an inspection and maintenance check up done on your heating system.  Clean all of the home's heating registers and duct openings.  If using a fireplace or wood stove, have the chimney or flue cleaned and checked by a professional.   Prepare or purchase wood for the season.   Clean out rain gutters and down spouts.  Install gutter coverings to prevent clogging.  Inspect siding on the home and make repairs if necessary.  Store or cover all outdoor furniture.

 Check the home's roof for any

necessary repairs. Make sure that the roof ridge vent is clear of debris.  Check others vents on the roof and reseal with roof cement if necessary. This will prevent leaks.  Check all windows for cracks and replace if necessary.  Check windows and doors for drafts and caulk where necessary on the exterior of the home. Install weather tripping on the interior.  Cover any exposed pipes with insulation. Use heat tape if necessary to prevent pipes from freezing.  Put away all garden hoses.  Shut off all sprinkler systems.  Shut off outdoor water faucets and outlets.  Insulate the water heater.  Check all doors for drafts. Install weather stripping if needed.  Install storm windows.  Replace lightweight curtains with heavier drapes.  For very old windows, install heavy duty plastic to create a barrier.

 Bring out snow shovels, snow

blowers and ice picks.  Winterize the pool.  Trim down bushes, flowers and trees as needed. Cover any vulnerable plants with burlap. Winter cleanup and preparation can be quite tedious but will make spring opening much easi-

Reducing ambient noise in the home

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er. It will also help a home owner to save energy and avoid expensive mishaps that can happen in cold weather. It is always better to be prepared than sorry later. Get it done and then sit back with a blanket and nice cup of hot cocoa knowing that you've done your best to protect your home and your family.

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vehicle, a working area, place to store tires, snow blower, lawnmower, bikes and other sporting accessories, as well as an area to store tools, gardening equipment and jars of screws. Decide which type of storage system is best for each area. Wall-mounted storage systems to which specially adapted supports can be attached, including very practical friction grips, allow many different items to be hung in clear view with easy access. Some PVC interlocking wall systems with integrated storage can be easily installed on wall beams or on plasterboard. They are sturdy and non-

flammable as well as being resistant to shocks, water, humidity, mould and rot. You could also opt for compact modular cabinets that can be added to as your needs change. Available in different finishes, colors and dimensions, these modules allow you to store everything out of sight. They are stable and sturdy and come equipped with adjustable shelves and drawers that can support heavy loads. You can add metallic baskets, plastic trays, and compartments and have freestanding cabinets or ones fixed to the wall. Plan to add labels so you can find everything with ease.

Reducing the sound level in a home benefits every member of the family. Whether it’s a baby’s cries, a teen’s music, or a loud TV after the kids’ bedtime, unwanted noise in the home is like an invasion of privacy that can make a person crazy. By using panels, drapes, or blinds covered with soundproofing materials, it is possible to eradicate or lessen noise from both inside and outside the home without too much work. Acoustic panels are a good choice for soundproofing a room in a house or apartment. They are easy to install in all types of spaces, particularly on walls adjoining other rooms and on the ceiling. Available in square or rectangular tiles of different sizes, these panels are installed on rails that can be positioned in a variety of ways, depending on the surface to be covered. Acoustic blinds may also be a solution. These can be installed in patio doors and windows and are very useful in reducing the sound of traffic if you live in a city or if you are a shift worker and sleep during the day. These blinds reflect sound, muffle noise and filter light. Some acoustic fabrics are available that can be stretched or glued on walls. These textiles are made from sound-absorbing foam, which is very malleable and suitable for rooms with curves or complicated angles. Before gluing this flexible covering, ensure that the surface of the wall or partition is perfectly smooth and clean, and be sure to allow for wall fixtures, such as outlets and light switches.

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If summer is made for relaxing, and settling into a new school year takes up much of September, October and November is the ideal months to undertake some renovations. If you’re still unsure about fall renovations, here are a few arguments to convince you. If dark and cloudy fall days give you the blues, the best remedy is to get busy. Take advantage of the fall to repaint walls and ceilings in warm, energizing colors. Has your family been asking for a second bathroom for ages? Give them this luxury as a Christmas gift. By starting the work in early in the fall, it will be ready by the time you-knowwho climbs down your chimney. It is also an ideal time to do any necessary outdoor work, such as repairs to the roof or the siding. The weather is perfectly comfortable for working outside without being inconvenienced by the heat of summer or the cold of winter. If you realize that the work is urgent, do it now instead of putting if off until the

Early fall the ideal month to do work outside — the weather is neither too hot nor too cold. spring. The best thing is to take the bull by the horns and replace everything as soon as possible. You never know what Mother Nature has in store for you. Another advantage of early fall renovations is that construction workers in the various

trades are not nearly as busy at this time of year as they are in the spring and summer. They will likely be in a position to help you carry out the project you’re ready to undertake. Convinced? Just make a plan, get your tools and get to work.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 7, 2013

PAGE B5

Ready Keep the traditions, but ditch the worn-out decor your lawn for winter Though spring and summer are often seen as the primary seasons for lawn care, fall is a great time to ready a lawn for winter weather. The following tips can help a lawn withstand winter weather and might even make spring lawn care that much easier once the warm weather returns. * Fertilize. Fertilizing in the fall actually helps the lawn come the early spring. Nutrients remain in the soil throughout the winter months, and the lawn will utilize those nutrients once the snow melts and the sun and warmer weather return. * Aerate. Lawns typically become compacted by late summer, making it difficult for the grass to thrive. When fall arrives, aerating the lawn can relieve that compaction by removing plugs or cores of soil from the lawn. Once a law is aerated, the grass roots can spread out and thicken the lawn. It’s good to aerate in the fall when grass roots grow. * Edge the property. Homeowners who live in areas that experience heavy snowfall in the winter might want to edge their lawns in the fall. Edging can eliminate the risk of damaging grass that hangs over curbs and sidewalks when shoveling snow. What’s more, an edged lawn adds aesthetic appeal to the property. * Seed. Fall can be a great time to seed a lawn as well. Overseeding a warm season lawn in the fall can help a lawn resist diseases throughout the winter. * Rake the leaves promptly. Don’t allow leaves to accumulate on the grass before finally dusting off the rake. If you allow leaves to sit on the lawn too long, they can smother the grass. Don’t allow leaves to reach ankle length.

(MS) -- The holiday countdown is on and it’s time to get your house razzle-dazzle ready. But before you do, make sure to check that your lights and decorations are still in good working order after a year in storage. Not only can old decor look worn out, but it also can put you and your family at risk -- which is the last thing anyone wants at this joyous time of year. CSA Group, a leader in public safety testing and certification, offers these tips to help you stay safe this holiday: * Carefully inspect light strings each year. Discard any with frayed cords, cracked lamp holders or loose connections. Inspect for storage damage from moisture or rodents.

* Turn off the electricity to the supply outlet before working with outdoor wiring. Unplug light strings before replacing bulbs and check to ensure replacement bulbs match the voltage and wattage of the original. To avoid a shock from damaged wires, use insulated fasteners rather than metal nails or tacks to hold light strings in place. * Make decorating a family activity by planning this year’s theme with the kids, but don’t let children or pets play with light strings. * Keep electrical connectors for outdoor lights above ground, out of water and away from metal gutters. Connect outdoor lighting into receptacles protected by weatherproof ground fault circuit

interrupters (GFCI). These can provide protection from electric shock by sensing ground leakage and cutting electrical power. * Use heavy duty extension cords for high wattage decorations and large electronically-animated displays, and don’t overload extension cords. If you need to purchase new lights, look for a certification mark to ensure they are certified by an organization such as CSA Group. And remember: outdoor holiday lights are made for seasonal use only; extended exposure to the elements can lead to damage. So when the holidays are over, take down the festive decorations and place them back in their original packaging for next year.

ter days, install new ones -- and chairs, consider using a either store-bought or ones stain or topcoat to enhance the you build. For a wood table wood’s appearance or to match

the color of your cabinets. Shelving & Lighting -- Adding shelving anywhere you have unused space (bedroom/ bathroom closets) will help control clutter and provide display space for your favorite photos and collectibles in living room, family room, and kitchen. Enhance cabinets and furniture with new decorative

LED lighting. Living/Family Room -- Arranging furniture into “areas” will allow for varied activities simultaneously, such as conversation and watching events on television or playing games. Use plants, a bookcase or a divider to separate areas. Paint walls, hang pictures or stain wood furniture to add color.

Create a Fresh Look for Your Home (MS) -- Before the holidays bring family celebrations and visiting friends to your home, give your home a new look and improve its comfort level. Check out the suggestions below, make your project list, and then go to Woodcraft for the tools and accessories to get the job done. Put safety first, before you begin your first project, make sure you have eye, ear and breathing protection available and then follow the manufacturer’s directions for all the tools and products you use. Have a first-aid kit and a phone handy, and enlist help for the heavy-duty work.” Entrance, Windows & Floors -- Give your entrance an easy update with a new door or add color and new hardware to your existing one. Install new windows that are attractive, reduce heating and cooling costs, and are easy to maintain. And consider installing a hardwood floor in at least one of your rooms -- possibly the entryway and/or the living/ family room. Kitchen & Dining Areas -Apply stain or color to your kitchen cabinets and replace hinges and pulls or knobs to brighten your “home cafe.” If your cabinets have seen bet-

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Page B6 6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 7, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • November 7, 2013

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This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly

NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP NOTICE IS HEREBY that the City of Tonasket City Council will hold a public workshop at 6:00 pm on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at the Tonasket City Hall at 209 S. Whitcomb Avenue. The purpose of the workshop is to review proposed amendments to the City of Tonasket Comprehensive Plan Land Use Designation Map resulting from input from citizens and Council Members. The Land Use Designation Map provides the basis for application of specific zoning districts to various parts of the City that limits the types and density of allowed land uses. The Council is holding the workshop to allow an opportunity for discussion of the proposed revisions prior to taking final action on adopting updates to the Introduction and Land Use, Transportation, Parks and Recreation, Housing, Economic Development and Solid Waste Elements of the City of Tonasket Comprehensive Plan. The updated Comprehensive Plan (last updated in 1994) is the result of nearly two years of effort by the City Planning Commission and has been the subject of several public meetings, workshops and hearings. The Plan as being reviewed by the Council has been recommended by the Planning Commission for Council approval and adoption. All persons requiring assistance in accessing City Hall or need other assistance are requested to contact City Hall at 486-2132 24 hours prior to the workshop. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7, 2013. #524113 9

EOE

BUDGET ADOPTION HEARING The City of Oroville 2014 Budget Hearing will be held at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, December 3, 2013 in the City Council Chambers. The formal Adoption Hearing will be held at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, December 17, 2013. Copies of the proposed budget will

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REPUBLIC 3500 SF COMMERCIAL BUILDING for lease on 2.5 Acres. 14’ and 12’ Bay Doors, 1 bath, wood and propane Heat. $700 per month plus utilities, first and last month. 2 year minimum. Highway 21 North, Republic WA. 425-822-2901.

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Licensed Nurse Aide Certified needed to provide In-Home Care

Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN 2 positions. Full time

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1 BEDROOM House, 3 Miles South of Tonasket. Washer/ Dryer, Stove, Fridge. $450 Month, $350 Deposit. No Pets. 509-846-5801.

Commercial Rentals

DRIVERS -- Whether you have experience or need training, we offer unbeatable career opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877-369-7105 centraldrivingjobs.com

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For Rent

Health General

HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS

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www.gazette-tribune.com

WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com

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www.go2worksource.com

TONASKET HOME - In Town. Move in ready. 2000 Sq Ft, 4 bedroom, 2 bath plus office. Many upgrades including kitchen, bath, hardwood floors, appliances including washer & dryer, new metal roof, 2 car carport, enclosed shop. Quiet Neighborhood, close to schools Great Value! Price Reduced - $172,000. Call 509-322-2289

FINANCIAL

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Updated list of employment at

Okanogan: MA-R, MA-C, LPN or CNA Full time Registered Dietitian Full time. English/Spanish bilingual preferred. Promotor(a) 4 Per Diem positions; Okanogan & BrewsterEnglish/Spanish bilingual required

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126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details.

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Okanogan County

EVENTS-FESTIVALS

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WorkSource

ADOPTION -- Happily married couple wish to adopt a newborn. Promise love, laughter, security for your baby. Expenses paid. Call or Text Kate & Tim -- 302 750 9030.

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Help Wanted

ADOPTION

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TONASKET - 1 Bedroom $495. 2 Bedroom $595. Close to town. All appliances. Water/Sewer paid. 509-4861682 or 509-429-0873.

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

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Houses For Sale

Found

We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available:

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY JUDITH ANN DE VON, Plaintiff, v. Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. Defendants. CASE NO. 13-2-004901-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The State of Washington to the said Defendants, Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the17th day of October, 2013, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled courts, and answer the complaint of the Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, at his.office below stated; and in case ofyour failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of this action is to quiet title in Plaintiff to the following described real property situated in Okanogan County, State of Washington, to-wit: Lot 18, Block 4, Plat of ORO, Washington, as per plat thereof recorded in Book�A� of Plats, page 17, records of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington. DATED this 3rd day of October, 2013. /s/ PATRICK J. MORRISSEY PATRICK J. MORRISSEY, WSBA#3045 Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 707 Okanogan, WA 98840 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 17, 24, 31, November 4, 14, 21, 2013. #

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Similkameen Park Apartments Oroville, WA. Farm worker Preference 1, 2, 3, and 4 bedroom Starting @$365 per month + security deposit. Water, Sewer, Garbage, Washer and Dryer. Air conditioning, Play area, Storage Space. For more information contact Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. Tonasket #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 3200 Square foot, custom re- 509-476-9721/509-476-3059 modeled home. 4 Bedroom, 3 bath, finished basement. Singlewide Mobile Home, 2 Custom tile work throughout, bedroom, $350 a month. By Owner. $243,900 obo. Kitchen Appliances Included. 253-380-6030 Call 509-322-6349

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Join us and make a difference!

be available November 18, 2013 for any concerned citizens and may be obtained from the office of the City Clerk during normal business hours until the adoption hearing date. Citizens attending the hearings shall have the right to provide comments and ask questions concerning the entire budget. ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7 and November 14, 2013. #523256

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Oroville 3 BEDROOM HOUSE, 1 bath, garage, nice yard, 1 mile from border, 33548 Hwy 97. $700 month, $350 deposit. (509)486-2685

newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

Public Notices

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Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Statewides

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OROVILLE: 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH APARTMENT. Walk in closet, ground floor, nice yard with patio, W/D hookup. Good parking. No pets. No smoking. $525/ mo + $400 dep. 509-223-3064 509-5609043

Health General

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Announcements

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For Rent

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275


NOVEMBER 7, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune November 7, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Gerhard Operating Fund 8,100.00 Hotel/Motel Fund 16,000.00 City Hall/City Park Reserve Fund 8,143.00 Cumulative Police 29,600.00 Swim Pool Reserve Fund 15,000.00 Cumulative Building 6,746.00 C.I.P./Public Works Trust Fund 17,356.00 Water Reserve 67,587.00 Water Fund 377,000.00 Sewer Fund 485,250.00 Sewer Reserve 353,776.47 Bond Redemption Fund - Water 38,551.00 Water Bond Reserve 33,587.66 Bond Redemption Fund - Sewer 108,842.08 Sewer Bond Reserve 67,615.00 Total Preliminary Budget for 2013 $2,386,462.62 Alice Attwood, Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 31 and Novmber 7, 2013. #523102

Address for Mailing of Service: 139 South Worthen P.O. Box 19 Wenatchee, WA 98807-0019 (509) 663-0031 JANET L. CULP Personal Representative JOHNSON, GAUKROGER, SMITH & MARCHANT, P.S. Attorneys for Estate By:AARON J. HARRIS WSBA No. 36802 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7, 14, 21, 2013. #524840

as set forth in Paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 11/25/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrances paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE ROAD LOOMIS, WA 98827-9718 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE RD LOOMIS, WA 98827 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE ROAD TONASKET, WA 98855-9328 15 COLUMBIA DRIVE LOOMIS, WA 98827 PO BOX E LOOMIS, WA 98827 by both first class and certified mail on 3/8/2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determing your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by: The Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME (4663); We b s i t e : w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/foreclosure_help.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 888-995-HOPE (4673) Website: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/hcs.cfm?webListAction=search&seachstate=WA The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Website: www.ocla.wa.gov/ SALE INFORAMTION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 Dated: 7/15/2013 FIDELITY NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee 135 Main Street, Suite 1900 San Francisco, CA 94105 Phone No: 415-247-2450 Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature ADDRES FOR PROCESS SERVICE: Fidelity National Title Insurance Company clo Chicago Title Ins. Attn: Trustee Services Dept 701 Fifth Ave, Suite 2300 Seattle, WA 98104 Local Phone: 206-628-5666 Reference: FNTIC CA TS#: 12-03196-3 Further Contact

(GAL): Megan Curtis 415-247-2450 P1053361 11/7, 11/28/2013 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7, 28, 2013. #523834

Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE ROAD LOOMIS, WA 98827-9718 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE RD LOOMIS, WA 98827 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE ROAD TONASKET, WA 98855-9328 15 COLUMBIA DRIVE LOOMIS, WA 98827 PO BOX E LOOMIS, WA 98827 by both first class and certified mail on 3/8/2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determing your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by: The Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME (4663); We b s i t e : w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/foreclosure_help.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 888-995-HOPE (4673) Website: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/hcs.cfm?webListAction=search&seachstate=WA The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Website: www.ocla.wa.gov/ SALE INFORAMTION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 Dated: 7/15/2013 FIDELITY NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee 135 Main Street, Suite 1900 San Francisco, CA 94105 Phone No: 415-247-2450 Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature ADDRES FOR PROCESS SERVICE: Fidelity National Title Insurance Company clo Chicago Title Ins. Attn: Trustee Services Dept 701 Fifth Ave, Suite 2300 Seattle, WA 98104 Local Phone: 206-628-5666 Reference: FNTIC CA TS#: 12-03196-3 Further Contact (GAL): Megan Curtis 415-247-2450 P1053361 11/7, 11/28/2013 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7, 28, 2013. #524814

Candidacy or Petition of Nomination from the District office located at 516 Eleventh Street, Oroville WA. These forms must be completed and returned no later than 4:30P.M. Monday, November 18, 2013. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7, 2013. #524838 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 Date of Auction: November 12th, 2013 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1975 Trailer LIC# U265217 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7, 2013. #524119 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 Date of Auction: November 12th, 2013 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 990 Lincoln Town Car LIC# WA 446YYO 1992 Honda Accord LIC# WA ADF2818 1987 Honda Accord LIC# WA 025VOB Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7, 2013. #524116 Public Hearing Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the City of Tonasket at City Hall at 209 S Whitcomb Ave on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 during the 7:00 pm regular Council meeting. The purpose of the public hearing is to review final project performance on the Water System Plan and Bonaparte Creek Sewer Projects, which are both funded by the Community Development Block Grant Program with federal funding from HUD. City Hall is handicap accessible. Arrangements to reasonably accommodate special needs, including handicap accessibility or interpreter, will be made upon receiving 24-hour advance notice. Contact Alice Attwood at 509-486-2132. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 31 and November 7, 2013. #523098 PUBLIC NOTICE Preliminary Budget Hearing The City of Oroville will hold a public hearing to consider the Preliminary 2014 Budget during the November 19, 2013 regular council meeting. Citizens attending shall have the right to provide oral and written comments and suggestions. ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7 and November 14, 2013. #523261 PUBLIC NOTICE 2014 Preliminary Budget Notice is hereby given that the 2014 Preliminary Budget of the City of Tonasket, Washington has been filed with the City Council and the City Clerk of the City of Tonasket. A copy of the preliminary budget is available for inspection by any taxpayer at the office of the City Clerk during regular business hours. Notice is also hereby given that the City of Tonasket will hold a public hearing during the regular Council Meeting on November 12, 2013 at 7:00 pm in the City Hall, Tonasket, Washington for the purpose of a Final Budget Hearing. The following is a summary of the preliminary budget of the City of Tonasket for the year 2014. Current Expense Fund 581,308.41 City Street Fund 79,000.00 City Street Reserve 1,500.00 Cemetery Operating 24,000.00 Cemetery Improvement Fund 4,500.00 Cemetery Trust 63,000.00

Sinlahekin Wildlife Area P.O.Box C Loomis, Washington 98827 TO: Prospective bidders FROM: Justin Haug, Manager Sinlahekin Wildlife Area RE: Call for bids on the Eyhott Island Wildlife Area Agricultural Lease The Department of Fish and Wildlife will be accepting sealed bids on approximately 50 acres (+/-) of agricultural fields on the Eyhott Island Unit of the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area. Sealed bids will be opened at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Sinlahekin Wildlife Area Headquarters, 1680 Sinlahekin Road Loomis, Washington on November 22, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. Please call 509-223-3358 to receive your bid packet and/or if you have any questions regarding this lease. Bids will be accepted only if mailed and postmarked on or before November 22, 2013 or hand delivered before 1:30pm November 22, 2013 in ENVELOPES PROVIDED in Bid Packets will be accepted. Completed bid packets should be mailed to: WDFW Sinlahekin Wildlife Area P.O. Box C Loomis, Washington 98827 ALL INCOMPLETE BIDS OR BIDS RECEIVED AFTER 1:30 P.M. ON NOVEMBER 22, 2013 WILL BE REJECTED. Please review the information sheet prior to submitting in your bid. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7, 2013. #523879 Superior Court of Washington County of Chelan In the Matter of the Estate of: IONA M. PORTER, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00276-2 Probate Notice to Creditors RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: November 7, 2013 Personal Representative: Janet L. Culp Attorney for Personal Representative: Aaron J. Harris

TS No: 12-03196-3 Loan No: 7141034269 APN: 0810960001 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on 12/6/2013, at 10:00 AM, at the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA, Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, the undersigned Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or state chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to wit: LOTS 96 TO 106, BOTH INCLUSIVE, IN GOVERNMENT TOWNSITE OF LOOMIS, WASHINGTON, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME “C” OF PLATS, PAGE 17, RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON, LYING SOUTHERLY OF THE FOLLOWING: BEGINNING AT A POINT 530 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 96; THENCE WEST TO A PRIVATE ROAD IN THE NORTHERLY PART OF SAID LOT 98; THENCE WESTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID ROAD TO A POINT 465 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 105; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY IN A STRAIGHT LINE TO A POINT ON A LINE WHICH INTERSECTS THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 107 AND THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 108 OF SAID ADDITION AND EQUAL DISTANCE FROM SAID CORNER. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/9/2006, recorded on 3/17/2006, as Instrument No. 3100922 of Official Records in the Office of the County Recorder of Okanogan County, WA, from ELIZABETH A ROTHROCK, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as original Grantor(s) to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as the original Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as the original Beneficiary, The current Beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Soundview Home Loan Trust 2006-OPT3, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-OPT3, (the “Beneficiary”). More commonly known as: 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE ROAD LOOMIS, WA II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust./Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; The total amount of payments due is: $23,625.64; the total amount of late charges due is $1,257.69; the total amount of advances made is/are $7,413.03 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $157,102.20, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 3/1/2012, and such other costs and fees as provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on 12/6/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 11/25/2013, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 11/25/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default(s)

Plan for Long-term Care Costs FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

November is Long-term Care Awareness Month. And when it comes to long-term care — such as a stay in a nursing home or the services provided by a home health aide — you’ll want to plan for the potential costs involved. Of course, you might think that you’ll always be able to live independently, without requiring any assistance — and perhaps you will. However, the odds aren’t necessarily in your favor: About 70% of Americans who reach the age of 65 will need some form of long-term care in their lives for an average of three years, according to estimates from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. And every type of long-term care is expensive. Consider these numbers, taken from the 2013 Cost of Care Survey

produced by Genworth, a financial security First, you could “self-insure” by incorporating long-term costs into your future budget — but, company: as the above numbers indicate, that could be The national average rate for a private room pretty expensive. Your second choice is to in a nursing home is $83,950 — a jump of “transfer the risk” of incurring long-term care 24% over the past five years. And it’s not costs to an insurance company. A financial much cheaper for a semi-private room in a professional can assist you in choosing the nursing home — the average cost is $75,405 right solution for your individual needs. per year, up 23% from five years ago. However, as important as it is to address A full-time home health aide costs, on costs, and ways of meeting them, it’s also necessary to look at some of the other factors average, $44,479 per year. that may be connected with the need for If you had to spend more than $80,000 per long-term care services. To illustrate: If you year for a nursing home, and you needed to were to enter a nursing home, you might be stay in that nursing home for several years, suffering from a physical or mental disability what would it do to your savings? How would that could keep you from handling your own affairs. So you may want to consult with your it affect all your financial goals? legal advisor to discuss a durable power of Many people think Medicare will pay for long- attorney, which would allow you to delegate term care expenses, but that’s just not the your financial decisions to a relative, close case. In reality, Medicare only covers a small friend or anyone else you might choose. percentage of long-term care costs, which means it’s typically up to the individual to foot Preparing for the unexpected, including longterm care, takes time and careful planning. So the bills. why not observe Long-term Care Awareness You’ve worked hard to position yourself for Month by getting started on your plans? It can an enjoyable retirement, so it’s important be time well spent. to protect your income and assets from potentially huge long-term care costs. How This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial can you deal with these expenses? Essentially, you have a couple of options. Advisor.

REAL ESTATE

GUIDE

TS No: 12-03196-3 Loan No: 7141034269 APN: 0810960001 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on 12/6/2013, at 10:00 AM, at the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA, Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, the undersigned Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or state chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to wit: LOTS 96 TO 106, BOTH INCLUSIVE, IN GOVERNMENT TOWNSITE OF LOOMIS, WASHINGTON, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME “C” OF PLATS, PAGE 17, RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON, LYING SOUTHERLY OF THE FOLLOWING: BEGINNING AT A POINT 530 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 96; THENCE WEST TO A PRIVATE ROAD IN THE NORTHERLY PART OF SAID LOT 98; THENCE WESTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID ROAD TO A POINT 465 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 105; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY IN A STRAIGHT LINE TO A POINT ON A LINE WHICH INTERSECTS THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 107 AND THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 108 OF SAID ADDITION AND EQUAL DISTANCE FROM SAID CORNER. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/9/2006, recorded on 3/17/2006, as Instrument No. 3100922 of Official Records in the Office of the County Recorder of Okanogan County, WA, from ELIZABETH A ROTHROCK, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as original Grantor(s) to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as the original Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as the original Beneficiary, The current Beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Soundview Home Loan Trust 2006-OPT3, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-OPT3, (the “Beneficiary”). More commonly known as: 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE ROAD LOOMIS, WA II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust./Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; The total amount of payments due is: $23,625.64; the total amount of late charges due is $1,257.69; the total amount of advances made is/are $7,413.03 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $157,102.20, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 3/1/2012, and such other costs and fees as provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on 12/6/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 11/25/2013, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 11/25/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default(s) as set forth in Paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 11/25/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrances paying the entire principal and interest secured by the

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Page B8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Edith Elanor HoLmes

Edith Elanor Holmes (Scott) was born to parents Frank and Kathryn Scott at the family farm at Harrington, Washington on March 2, 1919. She passed away at home November 5, 2013. Edith grew up on the family farm and attended school in Harrington for 12 years—upon graduation she attended Seattle Pacific Edith Holmes C o l l a g e and graduated with a degree in Math and Science. She met Stuart Holmes while attending S.P.C. After her graduation she married Stuart in a beautiful yard wedding on the farm in Harrington on Aug. 17, 1940. Edith worked in Seattle at the Naval Accounting Agency. When Stuart was sent overseas (U.S. Navy) she returned home to help on the farm. Upon Stuart’s discharge from the Navy they moved to Spokane while Stuart took refresher classes at Deaconess Hospital. Upon completing this they moved to Oroville and started their medical practice. They lived in Oroville ever since. Dr. Stuart Holmes preceded her in passing on Sept. 12, 1993 Edith continued to live in the house that they built until her passing. Edith was a very busy person. She was very active in her church, where she taught Sunday school to the little ones to the eldest ones. She was an avid gardener just driving by her home was proof of this. She was a photographer and loved to travel the hills and take pictures. She enjoyed going huckleberrypicking right up to her last years of life. She was also a photographer and loved to travel and take pictures. She loved to go to the hills. Edith and Dr. made their own Christmas cards from pictures they took on some of their trips in our area. Edith is survived by her sisterin-law Marilyn Scott, Moscow, Idaho; brother-in-law Roy Kogle, Seattle, Wash; brother-in-law John Anderson, Issaquah, Wash.;

nieces and nephews: Greg Scott and wife Joan, Chewelah, Wash., Wilber Scott and wife Connie, Spokane, Wash., Margaret Kogle, Surprise, Ariz., Paul Scott and wife Lori, Kirkland, Wash.; John Kogle and wife Roxie, Seattle, Wash., Tom Anderson and wife Jolie, Newcastle, Wash. and Crystal Anderson, Seattle, Wash. She was proceeded in death by her husband, Stuart W. Holmes; father and mother, Frank C. Holmes and Kathryn Scott; brothers Arthur, Steve and Charles Scott and sisters Kathryn Kogle and Frances Anderson. Services will be held on Saturday, Nov. 9 at 2 p.m. at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, Pastors John Jenkins and Rod Brown officiating. Burial will follow at Oroville Riverview Cemetery. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

David Carl Englin

David Carl Englin, 37, of Bremerton, WA passed away October 26, 2013. He is survived by his Mother Kathy (Ken) Black, Father Craig (Susan) Englin, Sister Kimberly, Nephew Tyler, Niece Kara , Grandmother Marvel and numerous Uncles, Aunts and Cousins. David had a special love for the outdoors. He spent much of his time with his 3 beloved dogs fishing, hiking, David Englin and camping all over the Northwest. David’s other passion was Roller Hockey. He grew up playing and mastering the game at Skateland Roller Rink in Bremerton. He was very talented and in his prime was ranked among the best in the United States in the sport. He was named MVP of his Sophomore Division during his team’s 1st place finish at the Roller Hockey National Championships in 1992. David enjoyed giving back to the youth of the sport as well. He spent many hours coaching younger kids who were just getting started

Obituaries

in the sport. David was preceded in death by his Grandfather Carl Englin, whom he was very close. Grandfather Jens Bugge and Grandmother Ruth Teece. A Memorial gathering will be held, November 9, 2013, 12 p.m. at Riffe Lake followed by an informal gathering at McCloud’s Restaurant, Bremerton 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. A heartfelt Thank You to David’s Roller Hockey Family and his Friends for all their love and support.

Mary Lou Zimmerman

Mary Lou (Sylvester) Zimmerman was born on August 3, 1932 to Melvin and Nola (Day) Sylvester in Tonasket, Washington. She passed away on Sunday, November 3, 2013 at her home in Renton. Mary Lou attended TaHoMa High School in Maple Valley where she met the love of her life, LeRoy ‘Hap’ Zimmerman. Mary Lou They were Zimmerman married on Nov. 23, 1949. They had five children: Betty Lou, Jerri Lee, Terry Brian, Larry Eugene and Kevin Roy. She has a sister, Claudette Pulley and two brothers, Clyde Sylvester and Bill Burns. She loved and lived life to the fullest, her home and gardens, her kids and grandkids, and great grandkids. They all brought her much joy and love. She was extremely proud of each and every one of them. She had a long career at the Boeing Company, retiring in 1991. She was Hap’s partner in so many things. She worked along side him at the Honeydew Feed Store and Sharp Shop, they rode motorcycles together, they dipped smelt together, salmon fished, cut wood together, plucked chickens, camped with their kids, hunted rabbits, deer and elk, picked blue berries and watched the geese fly by. Took road trips in search of fruit and vegetables for her to can. She was her own woman. There

cops & courts Compiled by Zachary Van Brunt

Superior Court Criminal

The court found probable cause to charge Kevin Michael Clark, 32, Okanogan, with POCS (heroin). The crime allegedly occurred Oct. 24 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Gilberto Valenzuela Acasito, 46, Tonasket, with second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) and first-degree criminal trespass. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 26 near Tonasket.

Civil Matters

NCW Yellow Cab, Okanogan, was assessed $1,586.33 in workers’ compensation taxes and fines by the state Department of Labor and Industries.

District Court Jovanny Alvarez Urapo, 20, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Alvarez Urapo was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $818. He also had an additional thirddegree DWLS charge dismissed. Trevor Warren Armstrong, 28, Tonasket, had a first degree criminal trespass charge dismissed. Robert Charlie Atkins, 22, Oroville, guilty of second-degree vehicle prowl. Atkins was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 177 days suspended, and fined $808. Melvin Robin Augg-Dworsack, 21, Tonasket, guilty of violation of an anti-harassment order. Augg-Dworsack was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $933. He also had an additional charge dismissed: violation of a no-contact or protection order. Jacob Lee Balthazor, 23, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Michael Allen Berg, 68, Tonasket, has a charge dismissed: POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams). Berg was fined $200. Jason C. Buckmiller, 26, Oroville, guilty of DUI. Buckmiller was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Gustavo Camacho Jr., no middle name listed, 19, Oroville, guilty of third-degree theft and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of MIP/C. Camacho was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 178 days suspended, and fined $1,216. He also had a disorderly conduct charge dismissed. Joshua Curtis Carpenter, 22, Oroville, guilty of DUI. Carpenter

was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 357 days suspended, and fined $1,936. Jesus Alberto Castaneda, 19, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree theft. Castaneda was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $808. Ricardo Covarrubias Ibarra, 29, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Covarrubias Ibarra received a 90-day suspended sentence, and fined $818. Joseph Wayne Davis, 25, Oroville, guilty of second-degree criminal trespass. Davis was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $408. Anna Theresa Del Rosario, 41, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: violation of a harassment or nocontact order. Del Rosario was fined $400. Kevin Michale Dixon, 24, Oroville, had two charges dismissed: thirddegree DWLS and first-degree criminal trespass. Jesse D. Eisenbarth, 24, Tonasket, guilty of first-degree negligent driving. Eisenbarth was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $758.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 One-vehicle wreck on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013 DWLS on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Hit-and-run vehicle wreck on Hwy. 97 near Riverside. No injuries reported. Harassment on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. DUI on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Burglary on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Douglas Glen Johnson, 46, booked for possession of a legend drug and DUI. Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013 Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Assault on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Violation of no-contact order on Broadway St. in Loomis. Custodial interference on Golden St. in Oroville. Drugs on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Fraud on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Violation of no-contact order on Main St. in Oroville. Juan Gomez-Chareo, 34, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for no valid operator’s license without ID. John Andrew Hildebrand, 20, booked for no valid operator’s

license without ID and a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013 Weapons offense on Summit Lake Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Alcohol offense on Main St. in Oroville. David Allen Gorr, 55, booked on a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Fermin Sanchez-Orozco, no middle name listed, booked for nonemergency use of 911 and a USBP hold. Waylon Timentwa, no middle name listed, 25, court commitment for POCS and possession of drug paraphernalia. Ethan Correll Green III, 24, court commitment for DUI and thirddegree DWLS. Friday, Nov. 1, 2013 One-vehicle wreck on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Sylvester Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Palmer Mountain Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Harassment on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Burglary on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Jeffrey Howard Herschlip, 56, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTC warrant for reckless endangerment. Patrick Lee Day, 43, booked on a Superior Court warrant for POCS. Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013 Road rage on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Lost property on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Wedding ring reported missing. One-vehicle crash on Railroad Ave. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013 Domestic dispute on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Violation of no-contact order on Broadway St. in Loomis. Warrant arrest on Golden St. in Oroville. Vehicle prowl on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Threats on Ironwood St. in Oroville. One-vehicle wreck on Main St. in Oroville. Kathryn Ruth Wapato, 52, booked for first-degree DWLS. Omar Sylvester Jones, 31, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Melissa Marie Holcomb, 24, booked on a prosecutor’s FTA bench warrant for criminal trespass. For more Cops & Courts from around the county, visit our web site at www.gazette-tribune.com

wasn’t anything she couldn’t or wouldn’t do. Loving and strong willed. She lived a very full and rich life, squeezing the best out of every moment she had. She loved and cherished her friends dearly, Mark and Mary Hokenson, Mary Harwick, Louie Donckers and many others. These were lifelong friends, there for the shared good and bad times. Hap passed away in August of 1995. Their children Betty Lou and Terry Brian also predeceased them. Her brother Clyde passed in December of 2009. She is survived by her daughter Jerri Wood and her husband, Don and their three children: Brianne Joy, Christopher Jon and Justin Andrew. Her son, Larry Zimmerman and his son Tyler Arthur and her youngest son, Kevin Zimmerman and his son Steven Miller, his wife Kelli and their three children: Shayla, Cameron and Peyton, his son Kyle LeRoy and his daughter Sarah Lou. Her sister, Claudette Pulley in Tennessee and her brother Bill Burns in Idaho. Not to mention her brother-in-law, Vern Zimmerman of Chehalis, Wash. Mary Lou had a host of cousins, nieces and nephews; many of them ‘bonus’ kids. She loved them all. A memorial service will be held at Greenwood Memorial Funeral Home, on Friday, November 8 at 10 a.m. A private inurnment will

follow at a later date. In lieu of flowers, a donation to RiteCare of Washington would be greatly appreciated. They help kids learn to communicate and they helped Mary Lou’s grandchildren reach their goals. Their address is: 1207 North 152nd Street, Shoreline, Wash.; Attention Jackie Brown. Contributions to the American Cancer Society would help so many families like ours that have or will have cancer in their lives. Donating to your local Relay for Life organization is a great way to help those in your local community. A very special thanks to her physicians, Dr. Mayeno and Dr. Block who worked tirelessly to give us our Mom for just that much longer. Our thoughts and prayers are with all of our family and her friends. On behalf of her kids and grandkids, thank you for being you at this time.

Patrick David Myrick

Patrick David Myrick was one of five sons born to John and Juanita (Mountain Mama) Myrick on October 16, 1951. His journey ended on the 19th of October 2013, just three days after his 62nd birthday. Patrick was a welder by trade and worked at the Todd Shipyard

in Seattle until he became disabled. He loved music and was skilled at setting up and operating sound systems for many events here on our hilltop. He is survived by his parents and youngest brother, Kevin. Patrick was preceded in death by his brothers Paul, Michael and Richard. A Memorial Services will be held next spring at the Molson Grange. Patrick Myrick will be missed by family as well as his many friends. All valuables have been removed from property. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

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Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 5:30 p.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 07, 2013  

November 07, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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