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NOVEMBER 6 -12, 2013 I VOLUME 38 I NUMBER 45

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM I FREE

OUR NEIGHBORS, THE NUKES. PAGE 5 | WHERE THE MARINERS WENT WRONG, AGAIN. PAGE 7

s r g e o d d n U An Oral History of Barsuk Records

Featuring Death Cab for Cutie, Rilo Kiley, Nada Surf, The Long Winters, John Vanderslice and many more. BY MARK BAUMGARTEN


Now through November 17

THIS WEEK’S CONCERTS: Wednesday, november 6 KirKland Performance center, 7:30Pm

Omar Sosa Afri-Lectric Sextet

The Cuban composer and pianist fuses global elements with jazz and Afro-Cuban spiritualism to create a captivating, urban sound. (Welcomed by 91.3 KBCS.) (Presented by Kirkland Performance Center.) Wednesday, november 6 triPle door, 7:30Pm

Garfield High School Jazz Band

The region’s perennial powerhouse of high-school jazz, under the baton of its long-serving, multi award-winning director, Clarence Acox, shows why it seems to carry the very spirit of Seattle’s remarkable jazz continuum. thursday, november 7 Poncho concert hall, cornish colleGe, 8Pm

Kneebody

A “resolutely un-pindownable band” (Nate Chinen, NYT) melds urban genres, from electro-pop to punk and hip-hop, into its own signature sound: keyboardist Adam Benjamin, trumpeter Shane Endsley, tenor saxophonist Ben Wendel, bassist Kaveh Rastegar, and drummer Nate Wood. Free masterclass, PONCHO Concert Hall, 12:30pm. (Welcomed by 91.3 KBCS) saturday, november 9 Jones Playhouse theater uW, 7:30Pm

Dave Douglas w/ The Cuong Vu Trio & University of Washington Jazz Students

A rare opportunity to hear two renowned jazz trumpeters perform together – here with UW faculty members and top students. (Presented by The University of Washington School of Music.) sunday, november 10 meany hall uW, 7:30Pm

Bill Frisell’s Big Sur Quintet / Jim Woodring, Eyvind Kang, featuring Bill Frisell After Eyvind Kang and cartoonist Jim Woodring join him in an opening performance, Bill Frisell presents the Seattle premiere of his Big Sur Quintet, as riveting a band as any working today – joining the guitarist are Jenny Scheinman on violin, Eyvind Kang on viola, Hank Roberts on cello, and Rudy Royston on drums. (Presented by The University of Washington School of Music.) Wednesday, november 13 royal room, 8Pm

Piano Starts Here: The Music of Bud Powell

Four of Seattle’s brightest pianists—Marc Seales, Sumi Tonooka, Gus Carns, Tim Kennedy—celebrate one of the true giants of jazz piano, Bud Powell.12/10/6 thursday, november 14 seattle art museum lobby, 5:30Pm

Bill Anschell Quartet

Sublime piano jazz ensemble with Peruvian overtones. Free thursday, november 14 emP museum: level 3, 8Pm

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 6 — 12, 2013

The Gerald Clayton, Ben Williams, Kendrick Scott Trio

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Pianist Gerald Clayton and bassist Ben Williams perform in a trio setting with the sensational drummer Kendrick Scott—all leaders in a new generation of jazz. A combo of Seattle High School Jazz All-Stars will workshop with the artists and open the concert. (Presented in collaboration with Icons Among Us: Jazz in the Present Tense with support from The Argus Fund.) friday, november 15 royal room, Panel discussion at 6:30, music at 8Pm

Industrial Revelation / Overton Berry

Music and discussion relating to Seattle’s black music legacy, from the Local 493 veteran pianist Overton Berry (in performance with Evan Flory-Barnes) to the hard-hitting Industrial Revelation, with insights gathered by History Link on Seattle’s segregated Musician’s Unions 76 and 493. $

COMING UP... Peter Brötzmann & Paal Nilssen-Love, McTuff, Charles Lloyd and Friends w/ Bill Frisell

More than 50 events in venues all around Seattle Buy tickets at www.earshot.org & 206-547-6763 Charles Lloyd photo by Dorothy Darr


inside»   November 6–12, 2013 VOLUME 38 | NUMBER 45

NOW THROUGH JAN 5 TH 2014

» SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

CHALLENGE YOUR PERSPECTIVE.

O N E X H I B I T I O N AT PA C I F I C S C I E N C E C E N T E R

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news&comment 5

NAVAL-GAZING

Hundreds of nuclear warheads stored at Kitsap raise serious security questions. Plus: Rick Anderson on Tukwila pimps. 7 | SPORTSBALL

9

BARSUK AT 15

BY MARK BAUMGARTEN | An oral history of the indie label’s rise from hobby horse to mainstream force.

food&drink 21 ¿QUÉ PASA, PASEO? BY PATRICK HUTCHISON | The story

behind the popular sandwich shop’s mysterious winter hiatus. 21 | FOOD NEWS 21 | TEMPERATURE CHECK 22 | THE BAR CODE

arts&culture 27 INCA! INCA! INCA! BY BRIAN MILLER | SAM’s big

Peru show goes back 3,000 years.

27 ARTS

27 | THE PICK LIST 30 | OPENING NIGHTS | Murder and

meth-heads.

33 FILM

OPENING THIS WEEK | The new Thor

movie, a not-so-great Great Expectations, and Matthew McConaughey as a cowboy with AIDS.

37 MUSIC

The hard-earned existence of a nomadic folk-music lifer; networking at an indie anniversary show; and more. 37 | SEVEN NIGHTS 40 | CD REVIEWS

odds&ends

22 | WINTER BEER PAGES 41 | TOKE SIGNALS 42 | CLASSIFIEDS

»cover credits

Editor-in-Chief Mark Baumgarten EDITORIAL Managing Editor in Charge of News Daniel Person Senior Editor Nina Shapiro Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle Arts Editor Brian Miller

We all know that people look different. While these differences are socially and culturally real, contemporary scientific understanding of race and human variation is complex and may challenge how we think about it. RAC E: Are We S o Diffe re nt? builds unde rs ta nding of w hat race is and is not, providing tools to re cognize racial ideas and pra ctice s in conte mpora ry life in the U. S . I n conjunction wi th th i s ex h i b i t, th e Seattl e R ac e an d So c i al Ju s ti c e I nitia ti ve is offe ring free w o rks h o p s fo r g ro u p s to ex p an d th ei r u n d ersta nding of ra ci a l eq u i ty i n th e c o mmu n i ty. L ear n mo re at s eattl e.g o v /rs j i

Entertainment Editor Gwendolyn Elliott

RACE is a Project of American Anthropological Association. Funded by Ford Foundation & National Science Foundation.

Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert Staff Writers Ellis E. Conklin, Matt Driscoll, Kelton Sears Editorial Intern Alicia Price Contributing Writers Rick Anderson, Sean Axmaker, Sara Billups, Steve Elliott, Margaret Friedman, Zach Geballe, Andrew Gospe, Megan Hill, Robert Horton, Sara D. Jones, Isaac Kaplan-Woolner, Seth Kolloen, Sandra Kurtz, Dave Lake, Beth Maxey, Duff McKagan, Terra Clarke Olsen, Kevin Phinney, Keegan Prosser, Mark Rahner, Michael Stusser, Jacob Uitti

Local Exhibition Sponsors:

Pacific Science Center is committed to providing accessibility for all guests. For detailed information about our facility and services, please visit pacificsciencecenter.org.

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news&comment rity around the weapons making the news. Some of these stories are current, such as reports that nuclear-weapon blast doors have been regularly left open, including twice this year. But similar stories from the past have recently hit The New York Times bestseller’s list, courtesy of investigative journalist Eric Schlosser, who’s trying revive a conversation in America about The Bomb. Schlosser argues that concern around nuclear weapons shouldn’t be relegated to countries firing them at each other. People should also consider their day-to-day control. How are they handled? How possible is an accident? “The more complex a system, the more vulnerable it is to accidents and problems,” Schlosser said recently in Seattle, here to support his new nuke-gazing book Command and Control. “If there’s one thing I learned researching this book, it’s how often improbable things happen.”

The 100-Kiloton Bomb in the Room With a massive nuclear arsenal harbored in the Sound, are we whistling past the shipyard?

Naval Base Kitsap contains hundreds of

BY DREW ATKINS

second layer of fence. When the first Marine arrived on the scene, however, participant Lynne Greenwald said he quickly lowered his weapon. In front of him stood five elderly men and women, some in their early 80s, putting up an anti-nuke banner. As more Marines approached with guns drawn, the activists made peace signs with their fingers to avoid getting shot. The November 2, 2009 break-in was an attempt to call attention to our area’s nuclear weapons. Its tactics were unusual, but in the modern anti-nuke movement, its participants’ ages were not. When nuclear submarines first arrived at Naval Base Kitsap in the early ’80s, there were protests and frequent media coverage. But Glen Milner, head of local anti-nuke organization Ground Zero, says interest in the issue has tapered a bit, and at this point the movement skews older. But that could change. It’s been a bad PR year for America’s nuclear arsenal, with stories of closely averted nuclear apocalypses and lax secu-

“When we brought that military investment here, we didn’t know we were inviting nuclear weapons.” Such accidents aren’t totally hypothetical. The main incident in Command and Control occurred in 1980, when a repairman dropped a wrench into a missile silo, puncturing the missile and eventually causing it to explode. Its undetonated warhead was flung into a ditch a hundred yards away. In 2003, a ladder was left in a missile tube at Naval Base Kitsap, which later punctured the nose of a Trident II missile and came within

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

THE WEEKLY BRIEFING | What’s going on at seattleweekly.com: The State Attorney General is funding pot A Bremerton man on house arrest made his escape, training for health-care providers, using money won in a lawsuit with Pfizer. only to be trapped on a sand bar by the rising tide. Environmentalists were dumping “drift cards” into the Salish Sea to study where oil A forum asked the question: Is Downtown safe? A man was shot in the chapel at Union Gospel Mission. would go in the case of a spill.

a

BY RICK ANDERSON

I

t was a big motel, two stories. But the simple way to find out who was selling cocaine or sex was to walk into the office and ask the man at the front desk, “Who’s working tonight?” “How much you want?” 42-year-old desk clerk Chris Saroya told one man who asked the question one night last summer. “Hundred dollars’ worth,” the man said, the words buzzing over his wire to the agents outside. Saroya, who ran the Travelers Choice motel with his brother, called a room and a dealer appeared in the lobby. The dealer had 11 felony convictions on his record and was working on his 12th. At this motel and two others, the Great Bear Motor Inn and the Boulevard Motel, just short walks apart along the Highway 99 strip south of Seattle in Tukwila, were at least four experienced dealers to choose from—with 44 felony convictions en masse. Experienced women were available as well. One turned up to 40 tricks Kulwinder “Chris” Saroya

a day, making $3,000. With four hours’ sleep, that’s two tricks an hour. The wired man and the dealer walked to room 118, and the buyer got his rock and left. Outside, officers were waiting with a cocaine test kit. Two days later, the man came back. “What’s up?” Saroya asked. “Same thing,” the man said. He went to a room, got the rock, and left. Five days later, he returned. “Who’s working tonight?” This time, Saroya was sorry. His man had moved to the Great Bear, which he and his brother also owned. Go there, he said. But there was already a wired undercover buy going on at the Bear that day, August 1. There were also uniformed police over at the Boulevard, investigating the discovery of a body, an apparent drug overdose—one of several at the Boulevard in recent years, with three others at the Travelers. After repeated undercover buys over the next few weeks, law-enforcement officers arrived in force at the three motels on the morning of August 31. One news report pegged the invasion at 400 federal and local officers. It was live on television: A SWAT tank stood by as agents swarmed the motel ramparts, herding people downstairs. The 34 adults and 11 children who

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

U

nder a full moon and floodlights, the perimeter fence of Naval Base Kitsap was cut open and five intruders stepped inside. Their goal: access to one of the world’s largest stockpiles of nuclear weapons, located roughly 20 miles from Seattle. Relying on satellite data from Google Maps, the group made their way to the weapons storage bunker, known as Strategic Weapons Facility Pacific (SWFPAC). It was about 2 a.m. The base was well-lit, but they made no attempt to hide as they walked. They roamed the base undisturbed for around four hours, passing military personnel who paid them no mind. Within the base’s perimeter, two more layers of fence and a guard tower surrounded SWFPAC. Undeterred by signs claiming intruders would be subject to “use of deadly force,” they took their bolt cutters to the fences and shortly were inside. Security was summoned via a tripwire in the

WIKIPEDIA

A Trident II missile, the type hosted on submarines moored in Puget Sound, can carry as many as eight nuclear warheads.

nuclear warheads—it hosts eight nuclear submarines, which each hold 24 Trident II missiles, which in turn contain as many as eight warheads apiece. In 2006, The Seattle Times estimated it was “the largest nuclear-weapons storehouse in the United States, and possibly the world.” And since 1990, there’s been reasonable debate over whether one of those missiles might accidentally explode, because of the way the Tridents are designed. The nuclear warheads in each missile are arranged around its propellant fuel, making them more vulnerable. On top of that, the fuel used is more likely to explode in an accident—being dropped, for example—than an alternative solid fuel. The current design was chosen despite these concerns, writes Schlosser, because it increased the missile’s range and explosive yield. However, an accident on one missile could release “a massive cloud” of plutonium over the region, or trigger the warheads nearby. “You have to be very, very careful loading and unloading them,” Schlosser says.

Sex, Drugs, and the Travelers Choice

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 6 5


news&comment» Bomb in the Room » FROM PAGE 5

Travelers Choice » FROM PAGE 5

inches of the its warheads. The military initially refused to acknowledge the incident, prompting Reps. Norm Dicks and Jay Inslee to demand a briefing. Afterward, Inslee said he was “stunned at some repeated failures to follow procedures.” The entire command structure of the weapons facility was relieved of duty six weeks later, citing a “lack of confidence” in their abilities. Six years later, in 2009—months before peace activists broke in—the commanding officer of the facility was relieved again, citing a similar “loss of confidence.” Yet the missiles themselves remain, and the military has designs to extend their lifespan. In 2012, the Navy proposed a second munitions wharf at Navy Base Kitsap to work on the Trident missiles, at a cost of $715 million. However, the Department of Defense Explosives Safety Board refused to grant the wharf approval, in part because the Navy hadn’t studied the likelihood of an accident at the wharf, or proven that an explosion at one wharf wouldn’t cause an explosion at the other. Construction of the wharf is nonetheless underway. Though the Navy would not confirm it, the base likely took an alternate certification that allowed them to proceed in exchange for assuming all risks and liabilities for accidents or explosions at the wharf.

lived in the motels were moved elsewhere. Officers boarded up the buildings, surrounding them with barbed-wire fences, as the feds seized the three properties as criminal enterprises. Neighbors, tired of picking up condoms and needles, applauded. The motels had been deemed public nuisances, responsible for almost one out of every six Tukwila police calls, including deaths, rapes, assaults, and robberies. In a oneyear period, police responded to 223 calls at the 27-room Boulevard alone. But the confiscations and the arrests of the three operators and three dealers, among others, seemed destined for a long slog through criminal and civil courts, with complicated story lines about ownership and money laundered through bank accounts over the years. A year-long probe into the explicit crimes—drugs and prostitution—revolved around the testimony of informants, whose reliability would be questioned. But two months after the takedown, it’s suddenly over, bringing the government a windfall— more than $4.5 million in forfeited currency and property. In the past two weeks, all three motel

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 6 — 12, 2013

The five elderly break-in artists were sen-

6

tenced to a few months in prison each. Upon their release, some have resumed participation in the small protests frequently held outside the base’s entrance, and have been arrested again. But their actions never created the ripple of resistance they sought. Naval Base Kitsap remains as popular and economically important to its county as ever. According to UW history professor John Findlay, the state’s clout in D.C. over the decades has secured more and more military funding for Kitsap County. Coupled with what Joint Chiefs of Staff member Adm. Jonathan Greenert calls the Navy’s shift to the Pacific, the base’s importance will likely only grow. “When we brought that military investment here, we didn’t know we were inviting nuclear weapons,” says Findlay. “But once you give them the land, it’s theirs to do with what they will.” Congressman Derek Kilmer, who represents the base’s 6th Congressional District, described the area as extremely supportive of the Navy’s presence. It employs about 34,000 people, he says, and unemployment in the region has stayed low even during some of the recession’s roughest patches. “By all accounts, our community is a lot stronger because of the presence of the Navy,” Kilmer says, noting that a recent study has found that over half of Kitsap’s economic activity was tied to the Navy. “That’s a strong indication of what a big deal this base is.” A spokeswoman for the Navy notes that the base is “committed to the safety of our military and civilians” and the “local community and its populace.” Schlosser and other critics don’t question that spirit of service; the point they raise is whether safety can ever be the paramount consideration when active nuclear weapons are involved. E

news@seattleweekly.com

One woman turned up to 40 tricks a day, making $3,000. With four hours’ sleep, that’s two tricks an hour. operators cut plea deals with U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan: Kulwinder “Chris” Saroya; his brother, Jaspal Singh, 37; and Lakhvir “Larry” Pawar, 41, the operator of the Boulevard Motel, owned by his father. All have pleaded guilty to drugconspiracy charges. And Tukwila’s International Boulevard neighborhood has taken on new life. As Police Chief Mike Villa told his city council, officers were actually “having a hard time” finding criminal activity in the area. Saroya, Singh, and Pawar’s father have agreed to give up a fortune in land, buildings, cash, and cars. The forfeited properties include the three motels, together assessed at roughly $3.6 million, according to county records. Sayora and Singh will also forfeit their $680,000 six-bedroom custom home in SeaTac, a 2007 Mercedes, and $236,275 in cash. Pawar forfeits $91,000 along with a 2008 Acura. In return, federal prosecutors will recommend prison time of one year and a day. The three Indian Americans, who face up to 20-year terms, will be sentenced in February. Of the three main dealers busted, two—Jacob Day and Maurice Gardner—have pleaded guilty and await sentencing. The third, Thai Van Thanh, who has 16 felony convictions, is awaiting trial. Prosecutors say the three motel operators did almost 60 percent of their business in cash, much of which was washed through personal accounts. Sayora explained most of his customers weren’t credit-card types. He told investigators he was stuck with currency-carrying drug dealers and prostitutes. “Normal people,” he said, didn’t choose the Travelers Choice. E

randerson@seattleweekly.com


page»header The Mariners’ Innovation Deficit

I

SPORTSBALL

ing pitcher to protect a lead in the final inning—a “closer”—been adopted by all teams. And, in keeping with baseball’s conformist style, I do mean all teams. In 1994, Lee Smith became the first pitcher to have more than 75 percent of his saves in one-inning appearances. In 2013, 93 percent of saves were of the one-inning variety. You’d think baseball managers—who are, as far as I can tell, genetically distinct—would deploy their relief pitchers in a variety of ways. Some would use their closer for a few innings, as was common in the 1970s and ’80s; some would choose a closer game-to-game depending on the situation; some would use their best reliever against the opposing team’s most dangerous hitter. Instead, every manager in baseball designates a single man as his closer, and calls on him only when his Highest-Level Playing Experience team leads in the ninth of Head Coaches inning or later. All other approaches—even those NFL D-II or Below that were successful NFL within living memory— are outré. Football’s forward pass has a similarly long history and is more D-I common now than it was 60 years ago. But NBA D-II or there is still a wide variBelow NBA ance in how teams use it. The 2013 Seahawks throw about 26 passes per game, 16 fewer than D-I league-leaders Detroit— and 10 fewer than the 1950 Los Angeles Rams. MLB Minor MLB

League

Change is so rare in baseball that when it

happens, they make a movie about it. Moneyball dramatized how statistical analysis has transformed the way teams measure player performance. But if you want to catch up on the latest on-field strategy, you may as well watch The Babe Ruth Story. The wildest strategic innovation of the past 30 years lasted just seven games. In 1994 Tony LaRussa, then in his 16th season as a major league manager and recognized as among the best in the game, abandoned the traditional five-man pitching rotation in favor of a three-squad rotation. Responsibility for pitching rotated among the three squads, each consisting of three pitchers. In the first seven games of the new system, the A’s lost six times. LaRussa called it off. Still, despite all this tradition-worshipping resistance, now that the Moneyball-minded are increasingly being hired to head major league front offices, it follows that radical changes in baseball tactics are inevitable. And if there’s a team with a reason to try them first, it’s the Mariners. With plummeting attendance, pathetic performance, and repeated managerial mishires, the Mariners should have cast a wide net. Instead, they re-ran the same type of search they’ve done the past five times with zero success? To steal another famous quotation: “He who rejects change is the architect of decay.” E

sportsball@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

f “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results” makes one insane, then the Seattle Mariners are undies-on-their-head lunatics. Since 2003, the team has hired five managers. Each was a former professional player with major league coaching experience. None lasted more than three seasons. Each BY SETH KOLLOEN finished in last place at least once. None finished in first. Now the Mariners have hired a manager again. And the man they picked is—I think you can guess— a former professional player with major league coaching experience. The reported finalists for the job included Ex-Mariner Joey Cora, “a great baseball man,” according to former boss Ozzie Guillen. Also Rick Renteria, an ex-MLB infielder and “tremendous baseball man,” according to former Astros manager Brad Mills. The man who won the job is Lloyd McClendon, a former MLB outfielder and manager. McClendon says of himself: “I’m a baseball man.” What, you may wonder, is a “baseball man”? It means someone who has a long affiliation with the game and respect for its culture and is a staunch defender of Playing the Game the Right Way™. In other words, an absolute conformist. The Mariners’ prerequisites weren’t unique. Most baseball managers are “baseball men.” Nearly all have played in the major leagues—86 percent of them since 1900, including 25 of the 2013 season’s 30 MLB managers. It makes sense: A player who reached baseball’s highest level should have an advanced understanding of the sport. Who wouldn’t want to hire a former player? An NFL team, that’s who. Twenty-four of the NFL’s 32 current head coaches never played in the league, including the Seahawks’ Pete Carroll. Why would elite playing ability be more important for a baseball manager than for a football coach? There is no reason, just circumstance. The difference between the two sports is in the path to getting the job. Football coaches can prove their ability at the high school and college levels. Win at these competitive jobs and you can emerge from utter obscurity into a shower of cash—like Chip Kelly, an assistant at the University of New Hampshire who developed an innovative hurry-up offense, won 46 games with it at the University of Oregon, and is now paid $5 million a year to coach the Philadelphia Eagles. Major league managers, by contrast, train for the job in the minor leagues, where the primary goal is not winning games but preparing young players for the majors. That means playing exactly the way the big club does. A minor league manager is no more likely to try something as unorthodox as Kelly’s offense than a commercial airline pilot is to fly a loop-de-loop. Football’s path rewards innovation. Baseball’s rewards conformity. As in any competitive industry, in football the best idea wins. Young baseball managers may have ideas, but they aren’t allowed to try them. Thus innovation in baseball moves at a glacial pace. Take relief pitchers (in the Mariners’ case, please!). Only now, after nearly 100 years of experimentation, has the simple idea of using one hard-throw-

7


SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 6 — 12, 2013

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Success was not guaranteed for Barsuk, cast as it was in the shadow of the prior decade’s dominant independent outfits, including Merge, Matador, and its neighbors in Sub Pop. But something made Barsuk stand out—ingratiating it with artists and fans alike, helping launch the label into mainstream culture, and providing it with the flexibility to survive during one of the

As a sophomore at Sehome High School in Bellingham, Josh Rosenfeld met senior Emily Alford. They dated for some time, a courtship that involved his making numerous mixtapes. She remembers hearing Talking Heads and They Might Be Giants for the first time on those tapes. The couple split and Rosenfeld went to Colorado College. But he soon reunited with his friend and future wife after transferring to the University of Washington, where he studied comparative literature and math. He shared an apartment with Alford, and worked at Cellophane Square Records in the U District.

actually friends and not just a strategic alliance amongst struggling bands. Josh ushered me into a whole community of friends who had grown up in Bellingham and then moved here. JOHN RODERICK (lead singer, The Long Winters) My band at the time, the Bun Family Players, opened for This Busy Monster at Moe. We were pretty impressed with them—they were more established than us and had really complicated song structures—but when I tried to chat them up after the show, Christopher was impenetrable and Josh was condescending. At that time there weren’t many bands playing that kind of proto-indie music and I thought we’d be buddy bands, but they blew us off. We didn’t actually become friends for another five years.

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music industry’s most tumultuous decades. What follows is the story of the label’s early years, the ones that set the stage for this weekend’s celebration. As became clear in my conversations with the label’s co-founders, as well as the associates and artists who contributed to this brief oral history, the success of Death Cab and the label’s other artists has a little to do with luck and a lot to do with Barsuk’s commitment to its artists, attention to detail, and willingness to be involved in every little part of the process. Though Rosenfeld admits he will not personally be tuning any floor toms, I got the sense that the 40-year-old label boss would if he needed to. “I really can’t express how important Barsuk Records has been in my life,” Ben Gibbard told me. “Josh is pretty much the only reason I am sitting here talking to you. If it wouldn’t have been for Josh, Death Cab wouldn’t be where it is today. I love telling this story.” All quotes have been edited for length and clarity.

EMILY ALFORD The Cellophane Square crew was a huge part of our lives. We went to shows a lot and hung out with record-store people a lot, and I really loved that crowd. Everybody who worked there was really smart and really excited about music to the point where they could talk to you about it for hours and would. I think everybody there made $5 an hour. It was not a high-paying job. CHRISTOPHER POSSANZA I went to Cellophane Square pretty often. It was a place with a lot of good used CDs, and they had a lot of things you wouldn’t find at some of the more mainstream places. It was a place where I would find more indie and punk stuff. I was really into Guided by Voices, and I was still amassing my collection of XTC records as well. Josh and Barrett [Wilke] were both working at Cellophane Square at the time. I was beginning to write songs and wanted to start a band. I had a guitar player and needed a bass player. I asked Josh to play bass and Barrett played drum. We named ourselves This Busy Monster. This was in 1991 or ’92. SEAN NELSON (lead singer, Harvey Danger) I had seen Josh around because he worked at Cellophane Square, so he was easy to spot and we had a class together. We became friends because we both had bands, and neither of our bands really fit into the Seattle music scene. There just wasn’t any sense in which they were cool or fashionable and their music was certainly not easy to grasp, but if it appealed to you, it was of course incredibly rewarding. They were one of the first groups that we made friends with where we were

POSSANZA We had been playing in the band for a while, and we wanted to get some music out into the world. Mainly we wanted something that we could share with record labels so we could find a label to put out our album. So we made a couple of seven inches and used those to shop around. ALFORD I was an elevator operator at the Space Needle, and it did pay pretty well. I had a little bit of money, and I could give them, like, $500 to make a pressing of their first 7-inch. And they very nicely thanked me by engraving my name on the little runout grooves on the record. They sold them and consigned them at record stores, and it all worked out the way it is supposed to; I got my money back and they got their record and everybody was happy. CHRIS WALLA (producer; guitarist, Death Cab for Cutie) My first Barsuk purchase was the first This Busy Monster 7-inch. I had seen them play at the Moore Theatre opening for The Posies. I was really excited when I ran into the 7-inch at Cellophane Square. I was going on and on about how cool the printing was to the woman behind the counter, and she was like, “I think you need to meet Josh.” BEN GIBBARD (lead singer, Death Cab for Cutie) This Busy Monster came and played a show in Bellingham. At this point This Busy Monster, I think, had pressed a couple of their own 7-inches. They were all very friendly and Josh was really nice and I was really impressed that they had records, which was something that, at least in our little college town, nobody had at that point. People had cassettes. I was given


planes, and I really liked the band, but I particularly loved the package. I liked that the Barsuk logo was all in lower case, and there was something subtle about it that I felt drawn to. DAVID BAZAN (singer/songwriter) My first interaction with Barsuk was probably Something About Airplanes. They had a reputation early on in being interested in involved packaging design. That was really cool to me; that kind of spoke to me as somebody who wasn’t as interested in the bottom line—that they just really wanted to make something beautiful. GIBBARD We were just kind of dreaming up what we thought were outlandishly expensive and crazy ideas for packaging, and it was a real testament to Josh at that point, and to Jay and Joe at Elsinore, that they thought, Cool, this is a great idea, we can do this. POSSANZA Josh did a lot of the design work, and I learned the programs and how to put it together. Some of our friends who went by the name Thingmaker at the time, they were printers, they helped us a lot with learning how to use the programs to make the art and learning how to prepare it for printing and everything. JOSEPH CHILCOTE (co-owner, Elsinore Records) It was a ball. I remember all of us getting together at the OK Hotel on the Seattle waterfront to draw the rowboat for the cover of Something About Airplanes. We all drew a rowboat on a cocktail napkin. Chris Walla was the winner. JAY CHILCOTE That was the perfect marriage of the two labels. Hand printing with a die-cut oval, but then drawing the physical artwork image on a napkin in a bar. POSSANZA [This Busy Monster] had sort of stopped playing as much around the time the first Death Cab album came out. At the time I was working for a software company, and I was concerned with making enough money to live. I think my priorities shifted over time, all of our priorities. ROSENFELD We did a tour with Death Cab down to South by Southwest around that time with another of the early Barsuk bands, Little Champions. Sean and John joined This Busy Monster for that tour. RODERICK I remember that tour well. It was an eye-opener for us all. Death Cab took their performances seriously, and the other bands on the label at the time were more hobbyists, more weekend warriors. The San Francisco show was where we all got the message. Barsuk needed to start acting like a real record label, and I needed to make a good album and buy a van. ROSENFELD It might have actually been during the course of that tour that it started to occur to me that This Busy Monster wasn’t my main calling. Death Cab for Cutie was a real band that had real fans and was working really hard to be a band, and we were doing this other thing that was keeping the band from being our main thing. I think I maybe had my first cell phone, and I remember trying to do label business from the road and driving through West Texas with no cell phone service, and just thought, Wait a minute, this is not going to work.

LEARNING While Rosenfeld and Possanza were winding down This Busy Monster and beginning to contemplate the future of the nascent label, Sean Nelson was taking his band to the next level. In 1997, Harvey Danger had released “Flagpole Sitta,” a song that became Seattle’s first huge post-grunge hit and that

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this false sense—and I say this with tongue in cheek—that Barsuk was a real label, not knowing that all you needed to do was call a pressing company and order records and then put a name on the back of the record. NELSON There was a dog, Barsuk, who belonged to Christopher. I spent many excellent days and nights hanging out with those folks and playing with Barsuk; he was a very sweet dog, which is why they named the label after him, I guess. But it wasn’t until Death Cab came along that they decided they were going to get somewhat serious about the label, and put out the first Death Cab record in conjunction with Elsinore. GIBBARD Death Cab started with this local label, Elsinore, putting out the first cassette. Then when the band was put together with Nick [Harmer] and, at the time, Nathan [Good], and Chris [Walla], we had this idea: Why don’t we make a record, like a CD? Elsinore I don’t believe had the money to press a CD. JAY CHILCOTE (co-owner, Elsinore Records) In Bellingham for us it was about creating a sense of community and having a label that would give it some legitimacy. Josh, on the other hand, was much more savvy business-wise, PR-wise, and just experienced, so he was on the other end of the spectrum. WALLA When [Elsinore] expressed that they didn’t feel they had the resources and that they wanted somebody to help with it, Barsuk was the first name that came up. I had a good solid collection of experiences with Josh, so I felt good about that. So I was like, “Yeah, that’s cool, we can do that.” GIBBARD Josh had heard some of the material and got excited, and he came up and we all sat around and talked. I remember sitting on Jay and Joe from Elsinore’s porch with Josh. We were sitting around and talking about how we were going to press 1,000 CDs. And I think myself and Chris were like, “That’s crazy. There’s no way we’re going to sell 1,000 CDs; that’s just way too many.” And Josh was like, “Well, you know 1,000 CDs is where you get a price break, so we should probably press 1,000.” JOSH ROSENFELD In ’98 we figured out how to make our first CDs, and those were the first This Busy Monster album, Like Icicles, and because we knew how to press CDs we offered to do a pressing for Death Cab for Cutie for their first album, Something About Airplanes. Those two albums came out in August of ’98, and that’s where we mark the beginning of the label, because that’s where it became something that required care and feeding. BARBARA MITCHELL (publicist) KEXP played this song and I was not getting out of my car until I found out who it was. It was the first Death Cab single. I was doing independent PR at the time and basically tracked Josh down. We met up at the Eastlake Zoo. I didn’t give him any way to say no. I said, “You’re going to let me do press for this, I’m not going to charge you anything and it’s gonna be great.” So I worked the first two Death Cab records. JENNY LEWIS (singer/songwriter; former member, Rilo Kiley) I was a huge fan of Something About Airplanes, which I bought at Aron’s on Highland [in Los Angeles]. It just really resonated with me. I grew up on hip-hop, and lyrics are what I focus on while listening to music. With that record it was the stories in the songs; they were relatable. So having listened to that somewhat religiously, I looked at the back of the record, and there was this little dog and the Barsuk stamp. MATTHEW CAWS (lead singer, Nada Surf ) I got a copy of that record, Something About Air-

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» FROM PAGE 11 earned Nelson and his bandmates a contract with a major label. Things soon went south for the band due to massive corporate reorganization. As Barsuk was releasing its first CDs, Harvey Danger was playing a waiting game, fearing that its next record would never be released. ROSENFELD We were friends with the guys in Harvey Danger and saw the troubles that they were having with their label. That gave us the goal, which also came out of punk rock, to be the most artist-friendly label we could be. We wanted to have really fair deals with bands, and to just be the best environment for musicians because we were musicians. The greatest expression of that we could do was to say, “Let’s just give almost all the money to the bands.” The very first deals that we did with Death Cab was an 80/20 split in the band’s favor. A great testament

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Pop) I remember talking to him about royalties. We told him how royalties were paid out. I remember him sitting there and going, “Oh my God.” ROSENFELD After college I got a job doing statistical analysis in the research department of the Hope Heart Institute. I think in the spring of 2000, right around the time the second Death Cab record [We Have the Facts and We’re Voting Yes] came out, I quit that job. I was just young and stupid. I had saved up a little money from that job and I didn’t really have high expenses. ALFORD I had been working at Amazon since ’96, but around 2001 it became clear that Josh needed help. I really wanted to be that person— partially because that person was going to be working at our house, but also it seemed like a good opportunity. So I decided to leave my job and work with the label. Committing to the label full-time allowed Rosenfeld to expand its reach. Now with some cash flow, he started investing in talent and resources.The label, built until now to promote the music of friends, was beginning to court relative strangers—some of whom were outside of Seattle, even.

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per per ticket ticket President & CEO, National Urban League Please RSVP by November 22, 2013 | Purchase tickets at urbanleague.org The Westin Westin Seattle The Seattle President & CEO, National Urban League to Death Cab is that it didn’t take them very long For more information, please contact events@urbanleague.org or 206.461.3792 1900 5th 5th Avenue, Avenue, Seattle, Seattle, WA WA 98101 98101 1900 at all before they were like, “You know what? Friday, December 6, 2013 You’re doing a huge amount of work. This isn’t 7:30 - 9:00am {Doors open at 7:00am} Friday, per December 6, 2013 fair to you; let’s go the regular 50/50 deal.” The Please7:30 RSVP by November 22, 2013 | Purchase tickets atto urbanleague.org Please RSVP by November 22, 2013 | Purchase tickets at urbanleague.org ticket - 9:00am {Doors open at 7:00am} most I wouldorlet206.461.3792 them per do is 60/40 in their favor. The Westin Seattle For more information, please contact events@urbanleague.org For more information, please contact events@urbanleague.org or 206.461.3792 ticket GIBBARD I know that Josh has learned 1900 5th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98101 The Westin Seattle through the years that for a business to function, 1900 5th Avenue, WA 98101 especially a record label in the ‘00s, in an era Pleasetickets RSVP by Nov.Seattle, 22, 2013 Please RSVP by November 22, 2013 | Purchase at urbanleague.org where people aren’t necessarily buying music, you For more information, please contact events@urbanleague.org or 206.461.3792 need to have more of a fair split. Please RSVP by November 22, 2013 | Purchase tickets at urbanleague.org Purchase tickets at urbanleague.org ROSENFELD There was a great indie label For more information, please contact events@urbanleague.org community in Seattle or in 206.461.3792 the late ‘90s and early For more information, please ‘00s. If I had question about how things worked, contact events@urbanleague.org or I would call up Megan [ Jasper] at Sub Pop or 206.461.3792 Chris [Takino] at Up Records. MEGAN JASPER (executive vice president, Sub

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JOHN VANDERSLICE (singer/songwriter) It was really the Death Cab guys who helped me get on the label. I remember meeting Josh at one of the last shows for my band [MK Ultra], and Chris Walla told me that “Naw, I don’t really think this is his thing,” which was really devastating to me at the time. It was like the only label that I knew. But I had enough of an open door with Josh that five or six months later I sent him my first solo record that I had completed with John Croslin, who did all the early Spoon records. I think that Josh bonded to that record, and that was the beginning of it. LEWIS Rilo Kiley was making a record at home. When we finished the record, I suggested

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» FROM PAGE 12 we send it up to Barsuk. Josh called us and he said he was going to come down to L.A. He said this was the first time he had ever traveled outside of Seattle to check out a band live. So Josh flew down to see us in L.A. and basically offered to put our record out. VANDERSLICE After that first album, Mass Suicide Occult Figuirines, I couldn’t afford to go on tour. Josh encouraged me to spend all of my energy making a very committed second album and trying to find an identity that was outside my old band. So I stayed in and recorded another record, Time Travel Is Lonely, which was by far the biggest leap I had made creatively at that point for sure. That record coming out was really the beginning of my career; that’s when people started responding to me. NELSON Around the time when Death Cab was getting ready to make its third album, The Photo Album, I became a partner in Barsuk by investing with them in a studio that became Chris Walla’s Hall of Justice. Back then it had been John and Stu’s place where John Goodmanson recorded our first Harvey Danger record. A lot of great records had been made there. WALLA We were getting ready to move down from Bellingham and I was trying to figure out what my next move was as a recording engineer. And Barsuk saw it as a good investment.

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BOOMING Undeterred by the bankruptcy of its distributor, Barsuk joined the more stable (and Sub Pop affiliated) Alternative Distribution Alliance. The label continued to sign artists, and took on greater risk by moving the operation out of the house and into a warehouse in Seattle’s Georgetown neighborhood. They also gambled the label’s reputation on Nada Surf, the former major-label band responsible for the ’90s hit “Popular.” CAWS We were pretty deeply uncool in a way. That’s a challenge we had from the beginning. When we started recording, I wanted to be on Matador, I wanted to be on Merge, I wanted to be on Touch and Go, and I sent cassettes to all of those labels and didn’t hear back from any of them. But we were offered a deal from Elektra, which we hemmed and hawed about for a month because we didn’t want to be on a major. But there was nothing else, no other doors were opening, so we did it, and kind of knew from the outset that we would have a bad experience. We understood that there was some baggage and that we didn’t really fit a profile of somewhere like Barsuk, which seemed to be more underground in all the cool ways. ROSENFELD Their second record had been turned in to the label, and it was the totally standard major-label story: The label didn’t hear the hit, so they got dropped. They were totally destined for one-hit-wonder-ness in many people’s minds. And then they made this record, Let Go, which was so good and nobody wanted to touch it. Even when we started telling people “I think that we are going to put out a Nada Surf record; it’s really good,” there were a lot of people who were like, “Nooooo. It will destroy everything you built; you can’t start working with an ex-majorlabel band.” MITCHELL There were a bunch of us over at Josh’s place after a Death Cab show, and I’m pretty sure it was Nick [Harmer] who started to give Josh grief about putting out a “one-hit-wonder band.” Josh just turns to him and says, “Have you heard the record?” And Nick was like, “No.” And Josh was just like, “Then I think you should

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

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Walla used the studio to record The Photo Album, and then began to hone his production skills by working with other artists, some of whom, such as The Long Winters, were destined for Barsuk. BAZAN One of the things I am most grateful to Barsuk for is putting out those Long Winters records. I don’t think that there were a lot of people around who were going to give Roderick that opportunity at the time, and, man, I think the music world is such a better place for those records being out there. RODERICK I made that [first Long Winters] album with Chris Walla and Sean Nelson, and we all wanted it to be on Barsuk. A family was coalescing around the label and around a particular style of Seattle indie, and it felt very natural for me to want to be a part of it. Fortunately, the record we made turned out to be one of the albums that defined the sound of the label going forward. That record didn’t find the same national audience the subsequent Long Winters albums did, but we were very proud of it at the time. It was the culmination of everything we’d learned. NELSON Josh didn’t like John’s previous band, the Western State Hurricanes; he thought it was just too much of a rock band and not really interesting to him. Though he admired the songcraft, he didn’t like the aesthetic of the band. And The Long Winters was a thing that was a lot more in keeping with the Barsuk overall aesthetic. And so Barsuk was like, “Yes, we want to put it out.” ROSENFELD At that point the first Death Cab record had sold 6,000 copies, and the next one sold 12 or 15,000 copies, and the next one looked like it might sell 30 or 40,000 copies. There was a feeling that we were growing and if we put our time into it, then maybe it would be something we can do for a few years. We didn’t really have any overhead. I didn’t pay myself at all the first year that I worked full-time on the label. POSSANZA Around 2002 is when I quit my

job at the software company and started doing the label full-time. ROSENFELD Right after we had shipped The Photo Album, our distributor, DNA, went out of business. We shipped a whole bunch of records out into the world, lost all that inventory in the bankruptcy, and never got paid for any of those records. At that time, had we been a real record label with a staff and an office, we probably would have gone out of business and had to sell our rights to the records. I mean, it was probably 60 or 70 percent of our annual revenue that we lost in that one moment. But at the time we were still operating out of our house and we didn’t have any overhead, so we were able to absorb. Still, during that period I am sure we thought many times, Well, this isn’t going to work, we should probably pack it in. JASPER The distribution was such a huge deal at that time. Distributors, if they weren’t totally solid, were a fuckin’ mess. And if you didn’t work exclusively with one distributor, you were working with many distributors, and then you were just chasing people down to pay you and it was very difficult. Getting paid was not always a given, and it was hard. ROSENFELD In the Behind the Music episode, there would be some very dramatic music happening right now. Ghang-ghang-ghang!

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» FROM PAGE 15

OPENING SOON

shut up” . . . but in a much nicer way. NELSON Far from being cowed by that advice, it galvanized Josh’s desire to do it even more, because Josh has a very strong streak of rugged individualism. The desire to flout the conventional wisdom of the music biz is a big part of why he started the label to begin with. Doing the thing that is not the obvious thing, but that you have a conviction for—that is right in the DNA of the whole label. CAWS He went through the whole process of signing us and releasing the album without ever hearing “Popular,” which was great. Is it perverse to not go check it out? Maybe. But maybe he didn’t want to know why everyone was giving him heat. MITCHELL For him to get behind a record like that, it was like, “Oh, you’re really behind it.” When I was managing the Posies, he turned down two Ken Stringfellow records, and he said, “I know we can probably sell some records, but

Winters’ tremendous second album, that was just getting super-good press everywhere, and they were going on tour and people were going to the shows all across the country, and Death Cab took The Long Winters out, and Nada Surf and Death Cab toured together, and Nada Surf and The Long Winters toured together. And also that spring The Postal Service album came out on Sub Pop. In addition to his duties in Death Cab, Ben Gibbard also worked on minor side projects. One of those was with electronic producer Jimmy Tamborello, who under the name Dntel had released an album called Life is Full of Possibilities, which featured Gibbard’s lyrics and vocals on the song “(This Is) The Dream of Evan and Chan.” Later the two collaborated on a full-length album, Give Up, under the moniker The Postal Service. GIBBARD There is this disinformation in the world that Barsuk passed on the Postal Service record, and that is absolutely not true— the record was always going to be a Sub Pop record, and it was Tony Kiewel at Sub Pop who expressed interest in putting out a full-length record based on the earlier recordings I did with Dntel. It wasn’t offered to Barsuk; it was always meant to be something away from Death Cab. At the time, with the band relationship, I

CHERYL DUNN

Matthew Caws, left, and his Nada Surf bandmates during the Elektra era.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 6 — 12, 2013

“HE WENT THROUGH THE WHOLE

16

PROCESS OF SIGNING US AND RELEASING THE ALBUM WITHOUT EVER HEARING ‘POPUL AR,’ WHICH WAS GREAT.” —MATTHEW CAWS

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there is something about this that is not sitting with me.” ROSENFELD Let Go came out in February, and it started really selling well. So suddenly we had Death Cab doing really well on the label, and Nada Surf doing really well on the label, and John Vanderslice doing really well. 2003 was this really crazy year for us because we only put out four albums and every single one of them was really acclaimed, critically, and it suddenly had this feeling that, hey, we’ve been building this for a few years and now it’s starting to fire on all cylinders. Jesse Sykes’ Reckless Burning was coming out, and When I Pretend to Fall, Long

wouldn’t call it volatile, but Death Cab would not have felt good about me doing another record on Barsuk with another band. That would have hit too close to home, even if it was an option, and it never really was. JASPER Death Cab has been an unwavering focus for Ben. He made that really clear to us when we started working on the Postal Service record. ROSENFELD Our thought was that we’ll have Sub Pop put that record out, and that will help to have Sub Pop talking about how this is Death Cab for Cutie’s side project, and that will help us

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 18


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for when we put the Death Cab album out in the fall. It’ll be great. And then, ha ha. JASPER The Postal Service record obviously went on to sell a lot of records; it’s almost at 1,200,000. And that Death Cab record went on to do really well also. It was surprising that the Postal Service record outsold Death Cab for Cutie at the time because Death Cab was so big and no one knew who the Postal Service was, but I’ve got to say that I admire Ben for sticking to his guns and saying “Death Cab is my focus.” He could have switched gears and gone to where the sales were at the time. Ben Gibbard and his bandmates were in fact planning on switching gears, though in a different sense. After ignoring calls from major record labels for years, the band decided it was time to make the leap. Death Cab would eventually sign to Atlantic Records in November 2004. But first they had some unfinished business to take care of. ROSENFELD Up until 2003, all the deals we had with bands were just kind of one-record-ata-time-handshake. GIBBARD There was no need for a contract, because there was nothing on the line. There was no sense that any of the first couple records were going to sell a bunch of copies, or that we were going to get upstreamed to a major label. But by the time we were preparing to put Transatlanticism out, we were starting to think . . . ROSENFELD They came to us and said, “We want to do a three-record deal with Barsuk and we want to be contractually obligated to you, so that if somebody comes to us and offers us a bunch of money, you have to get paid contractually.” I can’t imagine that really has ever happened in the history of the music business. That’s nuts. GIBBARD We all realized that we can’t just walk away leaving Barsuk flapping in the wind. We need to make it right. Legally we could have just walked away, but at the time we were like, we need to make this an everybody-wins situation. We were in a very advantageous position to cre-

ate a scenario in which Barsuk could find themselves a windfall that would help them move forward without the next record that we would not be making for them. ROSENFELD They said, “We want to do an agreement with you so that all our past records stay with Barsuk, and we want to do a threerecord deal with this one [Transatlanticism] that we are about to turn in as the first.” And that was their idea. And so we took that idea and we used it as a template for pretty much any band we wanted to sign. That same deal has been the backbone of every deal we’ve done since. Since our overhead has grown, we’ve actually moved to a 50/50 split rather than 60/40, but otherwise largely it’s the same deal. GIBBARD It was a crazy year. Everything was shifting culturally in a way that hadn’t happened to date for independent indie-rock culture. It was a big watershed year for that stuff to be moving into the mainstream as much as it could. It was the Shins in Garden State; it was watching this weird TV show [The OC] and hearing the characters talking about my band. ROSENFELD Transatlanticism came out on Barsuk in October of 2003, and it just felt like we could do no wrong. The band was getting bigger and bigger and starting to talk to major labels, and we were being engaged in all those deals, and it really felt like, We’re winning! The underdogs are winning!

POSTSCRIPT ROSENFELD It turns out in the long run we didn’t win, but we certainly had a good run there for a little while. The record business has gotten harder and harder over the last eight years. I’m really proud of the music we’ve continued to put out—Ra Ra Riot, Mates of State, Rocky Votolato, Phantogram. Some of those records have sold really well. And occasionally an album will sell really well. But you know what’s really amazing? This probably sounds like b.s., but it’s really true: If I’m having a hard month and feeling like this is gonna be the end for us and that all the struggle is going to finally come to a conclusion, I just need to go and see David Bazan play a show. It takes, like, a song and a half and then I remember, “Oh, it’s all worthwhile.” E

mbaumgarten@seattleweekly.com


BlackRapid presents a special event in support of

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food&drink

The Secret Life of Sandwiches

FoodNews

BY PATRICK HUTCHISON

Juicebox is getting ready to open in permanent digs on 12th Avenue on Capitol Hill. The cold-pressed juicery and breakfast-and-lunch spot is scheduled to launch next week.

BY SARA BILLUPS

The quest to find out where Paseo’s owners go for the winter.

D

Paseo’s staff isn’t camera-shy.

there is another Paseo! It’s an interview with the Key West manager, Shaun Nielsen, who ran the Seattle locations with Lorenzo for over a decade, and who shares Lorenzo’s incredible story. He came to America at age 14 as part of Operation Peter Pan, which assisted parents in getting their children out of Cuba and away from Castro’s unstable government. Lorenzo ended up in the opposite corner of America, though. When Seattle’s Paseos were well-established, he moved to Key West and opened another, leaving our beloved shops in the care of his sons. That is where the fact train stopped. I tried to contact Nielsen, but heard nothing back. I couldn’t even get his phone number or e-mail address. It all adds to the legend of how good Paseo is—a sort of Wizard-of-Oz factor. Does it matter why they won’t talk to anyone or be photographed? Not really. It seems strange to us, considering most restaurants leap at the opportunity for publicity. But clearly Paseo doesn’t need the press. As long as they focus on making some of the best food in the city, no newspaper, no magazine, nothing can help or hurt them. They’re maxed out. Hell, they could murder a puppy every time someone ordered a sandwich, and they’d still turn a profit. But the secrecy made me madly more interested. So I set out to interview the sons instead. But call after call went unreturned, forcing me to coldcall them when they least expected it, just before opening on a Saturday morning. That’s when I met Mario Triolo, Paseo’s manager and a five-year veteran of the establishment. Triolo’s unshaven face can be business-serious when he needs it to be, but the Spiderman beanie he wears nearly every day betrays his friendly, laidback personality. I asked him about the story and he seemed excited, optimistic that the brothers would talk to me. We set up a tentative interview. Midweek I called to confirm, and Triolo added, “They’ll talk, but you can’t ask about the recipes.” “No problem,” I said. “I have no interest in that aspect of the business.” Everything was set. Or so I thought.

It was morning when I walked into the Fremont Paseo. I found Triolo and Jordan Platz, a four-year Paseo veteran, stacking napkins and organizing the thousands of bags that will eventually bulge with heavenly sandwiches. They’re the daily face of Paseo, and admit to the weird fame it brings. I ask Platz, “What’s it like working here?” “I’ll meet people at parties that recognize me as the sandwich guy,” he says. “It happens more often than you would think.” We talk about the hectic pace of working in such a popular restaurant; about their undying love for the sandwiches; even how they miss the place when it closes for the winter. Both are quick to enlighten me about their usual break schedules. Triolo’s answer is simple: “I usually take a few weeks to visit family on the East Coast, nothing special.” He informs me that the break, though it seems longer, is usually only about a month. This year it’ll start in mid-December and last until about mid-January. For Platz, each break is an opportunity to travel. “My plans change from year to year. This year I’m headed to Mexico, sometimes I’ll stay and work on my music.” His band, Automotive Steamhorse, is about to release an album. But I’m really here to find out more about the sons. “Can I talk to the brothers?” I ask. “Ah, I guess they’re not interested,” says Triolo. “Do you know what they do with their break?” “Yeah, we can’t really talk about the family,” he replies. No dice. Nothing. It’s clear that there’s no negotiating this. Triolo and Platz seem disappointed too—maybe I’ve infected them—but, alas, respectful of the choice.

Until now, we could only score chef Manny Alfau’s marinated pork sandwiches and plantain fritters at La Bodega pop-ups around town. Just when the wait was getting excruciating, Alfau announced that his much-anticipated Dominican eatery is set to open in Pioneer Square on Friday, Nov. 15. Check Facebook for updates. Renowned Indian cookbook author and actor Madhur Jaffrey comes to Town Hall later this month. Tickets for the November 19 Seattle Arts & Lectures talk are on sale now. California-based chain Fatburger opened a cobranded location with chicken-wing spot Buffalo’s Express at Alki Beach. The first Fatburger location within the Seattle city limits includes a full bar and outdoor seating. E food@seattleweekly.com

Temperature Check From mitch Palmer, Bartender at art oF the taBle

Dishes and plating becoming more complex. More components, more garnishes (vinaigrettes, oils, microgreens), more flavors, more flair, more thought put into how these things play off each other and really elevate the dining experience. No more “Less is more.” More is more!

Chefs becoming restaurateurs. Stop building empires! It seems as though when the doors open in one place, an announcement goes out that another spot is opening. What happened to just making a great restaurant? I want quality over quantity.

Meanwhile, our love affair with Paseo will surely

continue, with them secretly blowing our minds with bread and pork and us lining up diligently outside. Though Triolo requests, “Please don’t stand in the street. We like you and we’d hate for you to get hit by a bus.” “Oh,” he adds with a smile, “and bring cash.” E

food@seattleweekly.com

Bartenders becoming celebrities. Remember that we’re just putting booze in a glass! If someone wants a vodka soda, give it to them! We are still in the service industry.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

The only info I found was on keynews.com, a news source for Key West, Fla., where—gasp!—

Josh Henderson is set to open the doors of Hollywood Tavern this Tuesday, Nov. 12. Styled after a classic roadside tavern (but souped up with fire pits and cornhole), the whiskey-and-burger spot’s menu also includes fresh pasta and soft-serve for the kids. Woodinville Whiskey is scheduled to launch its new distillery on the premises later this year.

KAREN STEICHEN

ucks flying south, holiday decorations, Christmas music, depressingly short days—they all remind me of the same thing: Soon the sandwiches will go on vacation. Every year, Paseo Caribbean Restaurant, whose pork sirens lure crowds to round-the-block lines in Fremont and Ballard for a chance at eating their famed Cuban Roast sandwich, closes for a long winter break. The dates are never the same, but the pain when they leave is all too consistent. A story about the sandwiches themselves would be nothing new. They’ve been featured in every Seattle publication possible and then some, finding spots in Food & Wine and Esquire, which named Paseo’s the Best Cuban Meat Sandwich in America. That’s why I wanted to know more about the break, the last uncovered nugget of a story about the restaurant. What is the time off for, and what does the Paseo staff do during it? I imagined visits to relatives, some quaint Cuban town, beautiful beaches, roasting whole pigs . . . My mind ran wild picturing what these sandwich lords would do with a few weeks off. After hours of research and several interviews, I’m proud to say I have no freaking clue where they go or what they do during their break. From a business perspective, it’s a hard move to comprehend. I’m no financial wizard, but if I ran a business that was exceptionally popular, I’d want to keep it going, because, well, money = good. So I figured it must be for personal reasons. I’d heard the legend of Paseo’s secret recipe: The owner purportedly came in when the restaurant is closed, and, under cover of night and behind locked doors, created the magic sauces and spice blends that bring Seattle to its knees, quivering from porkgasms. This owner, I knew from snippets of existing online articles, was a man named Lorenzo Lorenzo (really?), a Cuban American. My research also told me that his sons now run the restaurant. So I set out to enlighten Seattle about a family I was sure that, like me, they’d be curious about—a family that has given us sandwiches so good, I’m surprised they don’t come with a pack of cigarettes. I would introduce the Lorenzo family with a story about their fascinating break: colorful tales of reunions, mountains of amazing food, some real inspirational good-eatin’ lore. It was after the fourth phone call that I feared the story would be a bust. Not a single article published about Seattle’s famed sandwich parlor mentions the owners’ names, much less what they do during their break. None talk about the family history or its inspiration. On Seattle’s highest-rated restaurant, according to Yelp, there’s a surprising lack of information. Even paseoseattle.com is elusive: When you click on the “About” tab, you get “About Page Coming Soon! Stay Tuned!” Classic.

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Le Nouveau est arrivé! food&drink» Thursday, Nov 21st

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HELP US RAISE $20,000 FOR THREE IMPORTANT CAUSES! WHEN YOU DINE AROUND SEATTLE at any of the 50 local participating restaurants this November 3-27, you get a great meal while helping make our local economy strong. MAKE AN EVEN BIGGER DIFFERENCE by donating to the Dine Around for a Difference Fund, which will support three fantastic local non-profits.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 6 — 12, 2013

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Hot Toddy Redux: Five Drinks to Warm Up To

A

cider with two ounces of Tuaca (an Italian herbal liqueur), and garnish with whipped cream and some ground cinnamon. Beaujolais Tasting Station Tom and Jerry If you’re throwing a winter (with the expertise of our party and want to impress your guests with a Director du Vin, Cyril Frechier) fun and yummy winter cocktail, this variation on egg nog is the way to go. These amounts are for one drink; scale up as needed for a larger batch. Separate the white and yolk of one egg. Beat each separately, then fold them together and place them in whatever mug you’ll be using. Gently and slowly stir in a half-ounce of simple (highlighted by a special 2 course Pri-Fixe) syrup, an ounce of dark rum, and an ounce of brandy. Top it with either hot water or hot milk, which should be added slowly as well—you don’t want to cook the egg. I prefer to use milk, which makes a thicker and more luxurious cocktail. Stir the drink as you add the hot liquid, and garnish  with grated nutmeg.  Hot Mess I’ll readily admit  that this drink is not for everyChocolate-Covered Cherry  one. The combination of flavors I prefer coffee-based hot drinks.  is a bit unusual, and those who This, in particular, is one of my  don’t like herbaceous drinks will favorites. Though it requires a   definitely want to steer clear. couple of somewhat obscure ingreHowever, if you’re looking for dients, it’s also amazingly delicious Seattle, WaShington more depth and less sweetness and very simple. Combine one in a warm drink, this might be ounce of dark creme de cacao, 86 Pine St • 206.728.2800 the one for you. It certainly is one ounce of Cherry Heering (a www.marcheseattle.com for me. Danish cherry liqueur), and a halfIn a prewarmed mug or glass ounce of Kahlúa some other  or  (see note below), combine one coffee liqueur. Then top with as    ounce Fernet Branca, one ounce much coffee as you like (I generabout    bourbon, and a half-ounce of ally  prefer eight ounces with alcohol), and  Cointreau or Triple Sec. Top much this whipped  with six to eight ounces of hot cream ifyou’re feeling particularly   water. If the Fernet’s intense decadent. minty flavor is too much for Green Toddy The hot toddy is,      you, substitute a sweeter and of course, one of the best-known     easy richer amaro like Averna. The hot drinks. It’s also extremely drink can also be paired with to make. A common preparation coffee, though if you do, add a is just hot water, lemon, and honey, bit of simple syrup; the drink but I like to make mine with jasAbove, a Green Toddy. can get really bitter with a mine green tea instead. It lends a Below, a Tom and Jerry. darker roast. savory note to an otherwise sweet So there you go: Drinking and boozy affair. Mix two ounces of in the winter doesn’t have to just be about Irish brandy (you can use whiskey instead, but it tends coffees and hot buttered rum! You can experito clash more with the tea’s flavor), a tablespoon ment with warm cocktails almost as much as of honey, a half-ounce of lemon juice, and eight with cold. Let me know what you think of ounces of brewed green tea. For a bit more exotithese drinks, or e-mail me your favorite winter cism and to add a complex spiced note, float a drink recipe. star-anise pod in it. VOLTERRA BALLARD One note: These cocktails will taste best and Hot Apple Pie Another favorite. It can be 5411 BALLARD AVE NW stay warm better if you preheat the glass or mug. made with a rich non-alcoholic cider, but I like SEATTLE, WA 98107 Pouring in a bit of hot water and letting it sit for to make it with a drier hard cider, which gives 206 7895100 a minute or so is the best way to do this. E the drink more complexity and better keeps the sweetness in check. Just mix six ounces of hot thebarcode@seattleweekly.com (a unique wine from the south of Burgundy)

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BeaujolaiS PairingS StartS, 4.30 PM ENDS, when barrel runs dry

s fall settles in and winter looms, it’s time to consider one of the oft-neglected corners of the drink world: the warm cocktail. While they’re pretty much irrelevant in hotter months, there’s something inarguably comforting about wrapping your hands around a nice steaming mug of hot, delicious, and intoxicating liquid when you’ve just come in from the BY ZACH GEBALLE cold. Generally speaking, hot cocktails lean toward the sweeter side. While I’m not a huge fan of sweetness, some seems right in a warm drink. Maybe it’s because they feel like a treat we reward ourselves with for bearing yet another winter. Whatever the reason, here are five of my favorite steaming glasses of alcoholic goodness.

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WINTER Beer PAGES

By Geoff Kaiser

Happy Holidays, Enjoy Chuckanut Beers All Year Round Happy Holidays from Chuckanut Brewery!

Give the Gift of Chuckanut’s Seasonal Beers! chuckanutbreweryandkitchen.com

‘Tis the Season for Winter Ales

With the arrival of winter comes a whole new slate of seasonal beers fit for the colder, darker days we know to expect here in the Northwest. While seasonal beers can span a wide variety of shapes and styles, most tend to be dark in color and fairly high in alcohol content. A perfect example is the popular Jolly Roger Christmas Ale from Maritime Pacific Brewing Company. The flavor is full of caramel, dark fruit, brown sugar, and roasted malt flavors. This malt-dominated winter warmer weighs in at around 9% ABV and comes in six-packs. You’ll be popular if you bring a sixer to a holiday party in the coming weeks, but you might want to take the bus home.

It’s no secret that the Pioneer Square neighborhood is undergoing a bit of a revival, and with that comes more options for finding good beer. Collins Pub, located just off the corner of Second & Yesler, has been around for quite a few years, and is one of my favorite places in the city for a pint. There are also plenty of places near Century Link and Safeco Field, such as Elysian Fields and Pyramid.

The newest beer-focused venue in the neighborhood is Altstadt, which was slated to open around November 6 at 209 First Ave. S. Altstadt is a German-style beer hall with a focus on housemade sausages and sauerkraut to go with a selection of traditional German and Eastern European beers, as well as plenty of offerings from local breweries. I expect you’ll often see the award-winning German-style lagers from Bellingham’s Chuckanut Brewery flowing here. They will have a total of 12 beers on draught, as well as a large selection of bottled beers. Chef Brendan McGill (of Hitchcock on Bainbridge Island) and partners Lex Petras and Ward Van Allen are behind Altstadt, and chef de cuisine James Pech (formerly of La Spiga & Spring Hill) will bring a particular fondness & expertise for the cuisine of Germany and Eastern Europe. Altstadt means “Old Town” in German, and their intent is for this to be a laid-back place where anyone is welcome. The main dining area will be family-friendly, at least during the day, but there is a 21-and-over bar area as well. In other neighborhood news, Ballard continues to become what has to be one of the most brewery-dense zip codes in the country. Stoup Brewing became the ninth brewery to open their doors in the neighborhood when they started pouring in their taproom on October 23.

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Give a Gift from Chuckanut Brewery! Tours Nov 17 & Jan 12 at Noon Great Food & Beer in the Kitchen

50 Breweries pouring more than 150 beers of the season. Friday, December 6th Saturday, December 7th 5:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Session #1 Noon-4:00pm Session #2 5:30pm-9:30pm

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Hangar 30 at Warren G. Magnuson Park 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle

Ticket information at

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

Fremont Brewing has been churning out some of Seattle’s best beer since opening in 2008, and their annual winter release of Bourbon Barrel Abominable is certainly something worth looking forward to. They’ve had very limited amounts of this beer in the past, but it sounds like they’ll have more than 1,000 cases (that’s a lot) to sell at the brewery and local retailers this year. Make sure you get some. Fremont will also be releasing a new seasonal winter ale this year called Bonfire Ale. True to its name, the recipe uses some smoked malt, along with darker chocolate malt, rye, and two types of wheat. If you aren’t familiar with smoked beers, this promises to be a good intro to the style. A great way to try seasonal beers is to look for tastings at local bottle shops. Places like Beer Junction in West Seattle, Full Throttle Bottles in Georgetown, and Malt & Vine in Redmond hold regular tastings that focus on different styles or breweries, and this time of year you are bound to find them tasting some winter beers. The tastings typically cost just a few bucks, and if you like what you can taste, you can opt to buy some to bring home.

601 W Holly St, Bellingham, WA 360-75-BEERS (360-752-3377)

Brewery Tour Pioneer Square and Ballard January 12th at Noon Continue to Grow

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 6 — 12, 2013


SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

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An international high energy performance of cultural & contemporary dance & music featuring styles including Hip Hop, Ballroom, Contemporary, Eastern European, Marimba Music, and Breakdancing.

“Beguiling… shattering” —Seattle Weekly

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Hannah Mootz is Bo-Nita, 2013. Photo by Nate Watters

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COMMUNITY DAY

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Saturday, Nov 16, 10 am–3 pm In honor of the exhibitions Peru: Kingdoms of the Sun and the Moon and Robert Davidson: Abstract Impulse, join us for a marvelous celebration of Peruvian and Native American art and culture. With live music, tours, art making and workshops inspired by the exhibitions, including a performance by DE CAJóN Project, there’s something for everyone! The day concludes with a special performance by artist Robert Davidson and the Rainbow Creek Dancers from 3 to 4 pm.

FREE and open to the public

Seattle Art Museum Downtown 1st Avenue & Union Street

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arts&culture

Before and After Columbus SAM celebrates Peru, while simiplifying its complicated past.

BY BRIAN MILLER

ThisWeek’s PickList WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6

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The gold Mochica octopus head-piece.

DAN IE

absorbed into their cosmology. (The Catholics, looking for local converts, would later do a little of the same borrowing on the sly— “syncretism,” the curators call it.) Still, per the sun and moon in the show’s title, natural cycles of fertility and death are expressed throughout. Gods, animals, and men—or amalgams of all three—exist in the same world and show up on the same pottery, all vying for place and station. Some clay vessels are for water; others are for sacrificial blood (both human and animal). Here it’s worth stating that tombs are for the

bmiller@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE ART MUSEUM 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Thurs.; 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Wed., Fri., Sat., & Sun. $12–$20. Ends Jan. 5.

It’s the keen edge of Keillor’s satire that best belies his stereotype (among those who don’t know better) as merely a lutefisk-eating Paul Harvey. You wince as you laugh as he skewers objects of Bobo veneration like public radio (in my favorite of his novels, Wobegon Boy) or the writing of poetry, in his 1996 short story “The Poetry Judge.” After being confronted with steaming piles of narcissism—from lacerating post-Plathian resentment of distant dads to gory ’Nam flashbacks (“It was hard to read those poems and imagine how possibly to judge them as writing . . . ‘Thank you all for sharing your horrors with us, and I choose horror No. 5’ ”)— the judge/narrator eventually gets around to his aesthetic credo: “Some were good enough that I might have read them out loud to someone sitting nearby—the simple test of a good poem.” Insofar as this is Keillor’s own credo— no reason to think otherwise—you can see it in action in his new collection of light verse, O, What a Luxury (Grove Press, $20). His breadth of subject shows in a sample of titles in the table of contents: “Kansas.” “Urology.” “Show Business.” “Doxology.” “Cicadas.” “Class Warfare.” There’s lots here on Minnesota, of course, and New York City, his other home base; and an ode to Seattle’s hills: “People do not coast in this town/They don’t believe in the fall of man/They’re never depressed, or feel let down/If you’re tired you can move to Spokane.” The best—which richly satisfies his read-out-loud test—is the “Love Poem” reprinted here that forms the climax of Wobegon Boy: “I believe in impulse, in all that is green/Believe in the faithful vision that comes true/Believe that all that is essential is unseen/And for this lifetime I believe in you.” Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th

Ave., 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com. Free. 7 p.m. GAVIN BORCHERT

THURSDAY, NOV. 7

The Stone Roses: Made of Stone

When Coachella announced that the Stone Roses would headline this year’s festival in April, young American music fans responded with one emphatic question: “Who the fuck are the Stone Roses?” Music bloggers scoffed. But let’s be fair. Outside rock-mag offices and musicrehearsal spaces, the Mancunian rock band is pretty obscure. They released just two albums

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

one percent, the Mitt Romney ruler-priests of antiquity. Only the elite could amass and preserve any treasure; how the forgotten peasants lived or what they created is for scholars to speculate. What we’re now seeing under glass are mostly tokens of power and self-validation, the symbols of a hierarchy—which is no less true in the museums of Europe. When one looks at the spectacular gold Mochica octopus ornament (looted in 1988, recovered by Scotland Yard in 2004), its purpose is obscure to us now. Circa A.D. 100–800, it would’ve been worn on the forehead during ritual ceremonies. With a snarling cat face at its center, it would’ve conferred status on its wearer—and possibly fear among those who beheld him. Then it was entombed with its owner to perpetuate that status in the afterlife. The fantastical, chimerical object, here seen for the first time outside Peru since its recovery, even gets its own ocean-blue gallery with a companion video. Entombed, it slept through modern Peruvian history: Pizarro’s murder of the last Inca chief Atahualpa in 1532, 300 years of colonial rule, the decline of Spain, the 1821 declaration of Peruvian independence, several regional wars, recent political tumult, and the early-20thcentury Indigenismo folk-art movement. Kingdoms is arranged as a four-gallery circuit. The first two are pre-Hispanic, where you’ll want to linger longest over the tiny, intricate objects— made from seashells, ceramics, colorful feathers, copper, gold, silver, turquoise, and emeralds. For me, the following colonial gallery is just a bunch of dull Christian saints and martyrs, crucifixion scenes, and obscenely ornate gold and silver

work from materials either melted from Inca tombs or mined by their enslaved children. You could see this stuff in any European museum. (Though, obviously, the blood- and sacrifice-infused Catholic imagery has something in common with pre-Columbian art: It likewise supports an unfair ruling hierarchy.) Things get more interesting again in the final 20th-century and Indigenismo gallery. In Peru and other Latin American countries came a new artistic and scholarly focus on native life before colonization. Early photography helped, as did the 1911 rediscovery of Machu Picchu. Inca and Quechua-speaking culture came into vogue again, like the Maya in Mexico. We see examples of local painters who, like Diego Rivera, began to incorporate native faces and ancient motifs into their work. It’s a return of the repressed, if you like—the waking from a long colonial night. Here also are a few unexpected surprises, like a series of black-and-white fashion and ethnography shots taken by Irving Penn during a 1948 visit. And the Seattle-based Peruvian photographer Eduardo Calderón is represented by some recent pictorial scenes. There are also superb early photos by the indigenous photographer Martín Chambi. All these images do romanticize the past—like Edward S. Curtis documenting the American Indian. But what matters, however belatedly, is that they were recorded; and the weight of history is felt in these respectful, cracked-glass contact prints. “What does it mean to be Peruvian?” asks the novelist and Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa, who ran for the presidency in 1990 (Fujimori won). “To be white, Indian, Chinese, black, mestizo, Japanese? It’s all of those things, and many others.” Interviewed for the show’s catalog, he insists there’s no collective Peruvian identity, that the nation’s narrative doesn’t simply concern colonizer and oppressed. Kingdoms takes a contrary view, ending on the positive note of Peru’s indigenous revival. (Its first native president, Alejandro Toledo, was elected in 2001.) Vargas Llosa calls the Inca “an expansionist empire that incorporated cultures, tribes, and nations, and followed an extraordinarily civilized policy of respecting the beliefs, languages, and customs of the societies it absorbed.” You certainly see some of that diversity in Kingdoms, though more from its pre-Inca past than its multicultural present. E

Garrison Keillor

GROVE PRESS

D

oes culture only grow from place, or can culture be imposed on it? When dealing with the morethan-3,000-year historical survey that is Peru: Kingdoms of the Sun and the Moon, that country’s long, complicated history forces such questions. Is there only one Peru, or many? Would the Spanish conquistadors of the mid-16th century have deemed their newfound land a nation? Or put on a show of its holdings? Of course not. Pizarro and company were only there to plunder and conquer. They named and invented Peru. A few objects were deemed valuable enough to preserve (as tributes and spoils, not out of respect), and we see some of those dazzling examples at SAM. But most gold and silver finds were simply melted down and shipped back to Spain, minted into new coins. History became currency, fuel for an expanding empire. When the foreign concept of “art” came to Peru, it was an entirely Christian and European notion. Whatever the locals had been creating before then—for ceremonial, funerary, and ritual purposes—wouldn’t be considered museum-worthy for another three centuries. In a way, Kingdoms both rectifies and reinforces that divide. Originated at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, this state-sponsored traveling show of more than 300 items is essentially chronological, proceeding from rich pre-Columbian artifacts to the colonial era, then briefly visiting the 20th century. A timeline, mounted on the wall next to the entryway video of Machu Picchu, is essential, but there’s scant mention of Peru’s recent past. What of the Shining Path, Lori Berenson, or Alberto Fujimori? Those fraught subjects are surely addressed in Peru’s more recent protest and political art, yet they’re entirely absent here. Disappointingly, apart from William Cordova’s big speaker installation located just outside the exhibit, there is no contemporary art. The country’s been on a somewhat rocky but democratic path since 2001 (post-Fujimori, who’s now in jail), and Kingdoms is in part a celebratory PR campaign, intended to put the best face on an emerging nation. The economy is growing, the guerrillas have mostly been pacified—so come drill for oil or walk the Inca Trail! Though we tend to think of pre-colonial Peru as Inca, that larger empire only came late, lasting a century before Pizarro and smallpox. The tombs that archaeologists subsequently explored—right up to the present day, with some amazing recent finds on view at SAM— represent at least a dozen distinct cultures extending back over millennia. Thus we have masks, knives, vessels, totems, and jewelry from the Mochica, Chimú, Nazca, Lambayeque, etc. All had distinct design motifs and animist religious beliefs that the Inca

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 28 27


arts&culture» Pick List Brown leads the Stone Roses revival.

MADEOFSTONEFILM.COM

» FROM PAGE 27 over the course of six years about two decades ago—not enough of a sustained effort for their soul-indebted beat-heavy, jangly rock songs to jump the pond and make an impact. But that doesn’t mean that this audacious group doesn’t deserve new listeners. This is where The Stone Roses: Made of Stone picks up. Filmed by celebrated British director (and huge Stone Roses fan) Shane Meadows, the doc doesn’t dwell on the band’s past—the rise from the Manchester scene of the mid-’80s to million-selling Britpop success; the fight with its label; its eventual dissolution in 1996—but focuses on the band’s unlikely 2012 reunion. The film opens with a movingly cinematic scene of gray-haired singer Ian Brown greeting a long line of screaming fans at the barricade of a massive outdoor concert during that reunion tour. What follows is an amalgam: a moving portrait of the band’s fans, a Europe-spanning road movie, and a concert film that captures the timelessness of these songs and the prodigious talents of these musicians. This is a great, belated introduction to a band that clearly needed it. iPic Theaters Redmond,

16541 N.E. 74th St., 425-636-5601, ipictheaters. com. $18.50–$27. 7 p.m. (Repeats Sun.) MARK

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First Thursday

Gallery4Culture, 101 Prefontaine Place S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 296-7580, 4culture.org. Free. Opening reception 6–8 p.m. BRIAN MILLER FRIDAY, NOV. 8

Elizabeth Gilbert

The only similarity between Alma Whittaker, the wealthy 19th-century heroine of Elizabeth Gilbert’s new novel The Signature of All Things (Viking, $28.95), and the author in her memoir Eat, Pray, Love is this: Both women travel far to heal a broken heart. Otherwise, the two couldn’t be more different. Alma would never be caught dead at a spiritual retreat, nor would she seek solace in frivolous indulgences like fine food. Born into a family of botanists and explorers (her father traveled with Captain Cook), she has a fierce intellect and curiosity for the natural world. This impels her to join the scientific conversations of her time—including evolution. Not bestowed with beauty, Alma keeps a lonely, bookish existence: managing the affairs of her father’s estate and publishing her research on moss in academic journals. Then she falls in love with a brilliant but troubled artist who stirs in her uncomfortable notions of the spiritual world (and some latent sexual desires). But Ambrose Pike is not what he seems, and Alma will travel years and great distances—all the way to Tahiti—to uncover his improbable secret. Meanwhile, Alma’s decades of study turn out to be of remarkable consequence, yielding another big plot turn that makes for thoroughly enjoyable historical fiction. Gilbert has chosen an explosive point in history, the Darwin-era collision between science and faith, and imbued it with a fresh, compelling voice. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth

There are several worthwhile stops on the gallery circuit tonight, including Molly Iverson at Davidson Galleries, Marco Mazzoni and Lindsey Carr at Roq La Rue, and Fay Jones at Grover/ Thurston. Also, there are some non-First Thursday events to note this weekend: Portland photograAve., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. pher Holly Andres is giving a PCNW lecture at 6 7:30 p.m. NICOLE SPRINKLE p.m. Friday on her eerie staged scenes in The Homecoming; down at M.I.A. Gallery, also 6 p.m. Friday, Belgian photographer Sofie Knijff will attend the opening of her child-portrait series Translations, taken in countries including South Africa, India, Mali, Brazil, Iceland, and Greenland; and don’t forget the Georgetown Art Attack, beginning at 6 p.m. Saturday. However, because we always like to see what nonprofessional artists are up to, be Gilbert returns to fiction sure to look in the windows at Galafter a 13-year break. lery4Culture tonight before DEBORAH LOPEZ

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 6 — 12, 2013

BAUMGARTEN

venturing inside, where John Feodorov is showing new paintings. Facing the sidewalk is a small selection of photographs taken by a dozen Metro bus drivers, called Artopolis. (No, they weren’t driving and photographing at the same time, because that would be unsafe.) Here are random image grabs from routes all over Seattle, taken during moments of repose, shift changes, and coffee breaks. Passengers stare out the windows, the clouds roll by, and the texture of the city shifts with every click of the odometer. Most of us are stuck in an office, but these photographers are constantly on the move, gaining new perspectives with each mile and fare. (Through Nov. 27.)


(11/6) Town Music: Enso String Quartet Opera Composers’ String Quartets (11/6) Scholar in Residence Dr. David Montgomery Stories From My Pet Rocks TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

(11/7) Simon Singh ‘The Simpsons & Their Mathematical Secrets’

SATURDAY, NOV. 9

Kylián + Pite

Pacific Northwest Ballet’s Peter Boal is adding to the contemporary side of the repertory this autumn. On the heels of last month’s world premiere by Twyla Tharp, he’s got a program featuring Jiří Kylián, whose work for the Nederlands Dans Theater combines multiple influences into a series of vivid kinetic experiences. The company already does two of Kylián’s more lighthearted dances, and we’ll see his Petite Mort and Sechs Tänze. Making its local premiere is his 1981 Forgotten Land, a much darker and more emotionally driven work set to Benjamin Britten’s Sinfonia da Requiem. The program’s other new-to-us work is Crystal Pite’s Emergence, which knocked audiences flat at the National Ballet of Canada when she premiered it there in 2009. Pite started in British Columbia, and her career has taken her to

(11/7) ‘The Book of Jezebel’ Anna Holmes & Lindy West (11/8) Elliott Bay Book Co. Elizabeth Gilbert

Lester Brown

‘BreakingNewGround’onFoodSecurity Double Feature! (11/11) Reclaiming Prosperity Greg LeRoy: Good Jobs First ANGELA STERLING

956-8372, theveraproject.org. Free. 1–4 p.m. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT E

(11/11) Robert McChesney & John Nichols ‘Dollarocracy’ (11/12) Mark Halperin & John Heilemann Game Change 2012 (11/12) Chris Hadfield ‘An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth’ (11/13) King County Mental Health & Substance Abuse Legislative Forum Double Feature! (11/13) Peter Baker The Real Bush/Cheney Dynamic (11/13) David Folkenflik ‘Murdoch’s World’ Double Feature! (11/14) Peggy Kelsey Conversations with Afghan Women (11/14) Joe Sacco: ‘The Great War’ TOWN HALL

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(877) 784-4849

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40TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION GROUPS OF 10 OR MORE CALL (206) 315-8054 Krzysztof Penderecki Quartetto per archi John Oswald Spectre FOR SINGLE TICKETS CALL (877) 784-4849 Bryce Dessner Tenebre EST. 1907 2ND AVE & VIRGINIA ST Ken Benshoof Traveling Music Richard Wagner (arr. Aleksandra Vrebalov) Prelude from Tristan und Isolde A Semiperfect Number with special guest Jherek Bischoff GROUPSWarrior OF 10 OR MORE CALL (206) 315-8054 Predator’s Songstress: Photography: Kronos Quartet by Jay Blakesberg with special guest Degenerate Art Ensemble Degenerate Art Ensemble by Bruce Tom Photography FOR SINGLE TICKETS CALL (877) 784-4849 EST. 1928 Program subject to change 9TH AVE & PINE ST

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NOVEMBER 16 I 8 PM I THE NEPTUNE THEATRE GROUPS OF 10 OR MORE CALL (206) 315-8054 FOR SINGLE TICKETS CALL (877) 784-4849

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EST. 1921 NE 45TH & BROOKLYN AVE

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

When Tavi Gevinson was 14 years old, she founded Rookie, an online fashion magazine for teenage girls inspired by her blog Style Rookie. (The project was a hobby her father wasn’t aware of until she asked permission to do an interview with The New York Times.) The site has now expanded its coverage to include visual arts, music, pop culture, and social issues. Gevinson, editor-in-chief at just 17, oversees an editorial staff of over 70 writers around the world, most of them also teenage girls. Rookie Yearbook Two (Drawn and Quarterly, $30) is her imprint’s second collection of work culled from the site. It includes contributions from Mindy Kaling, Molly Ringwald, Carrie Brownstein, and a host of other high-profile women in media and the arts. Tonight’s event will feature a zine workshop, readings, a book signing, and maybe a fashion tip or two. The Vera Project (Seattle Center),

OFF USED BOOKS

BOTH THIRD PLACE LOCATIONS

(11/9) Morton Subotnick & Lillevan ‘From Silver Apples of the Moon to a Sky of Cloudless Sulphur’

11/11

Tavi Gevinson

40%

(11/8)EthanCasey&BillSteigerwald 2 Authors, 2 Road Trips, 2 Americas

(11/10) Fifth Annual Seattle Slack Key Festival

321 Mercer St. (Seattle Center), 441-2424, pnb. org. $28–$174. 7:30 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ

Used Book Sale! November 9 & 10

(11/7) Donald Fagen of Steely Dan with Ross Reynolds ‘Eminent Hipsters’

Lindsi Dec and Karel Cruz in Petite Mort.

Europe and back multiple times with her own contemporary ensemble and commissions for ballet companies. She’s working at the edge, everywhere. (Through Nov. 17.) McCaw Hall,

Semi-Annual

29


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arts&culture» Stage

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 6 — 12, 2013

SEATTLE WEEKLY WED: 11/06/13 B&W 4.83” x 2.69” HR ALL.BTH-P.1106.SW

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Opening Nights Rope THE BALLARD UNDERGROUND, 2220 N.W. MARKET ST., 395-5458, GHOSTLIGHTTHEATRICALS.ORG. $12–$15. 7:30 P.M. THURS.–SAT., PLUS 2 P.M. SUN., NOV. 10. ENDS NOV. 23.

Nothing’s more savage than murder, and nothing’s more bloodless than a British drawing-room chat-fest. Pair the two, and you’d bet money that a grisly killing would keep tensions high in Ghost Light Theatricals’ Rope, inspired by the 1924 Leopold and Loeb murder. (Alfred Hitchcock’s 1948 movie was adapted from this play.) Yet though the show clocks in at only two hours (with 15-minute intermission), Justin Ison’s stultifying direction and Patrick Hamilton’s endlessly meandering text make this Rope very slack. Forget the murder: This play is death by filibuster. Why? English playwright Hamilton wrote Rope in 1929, and it’s a product of its time. During several long speeches—punctuated by one character’s repeated demands for yet another drink—I was reminded of the English insistence that meat should be boiled until all traces of flavor had safely vanished. And that is what happens here, after two upper-crust collegians strangle an Oxford classmate for sport. Wyndham ( Jaryl Draper) evinces a cool braggadocio that barely conceals his homicidal bloodlust, while Charles (Geoff Finney) veers madly between conniving stealth and the shivering, wild-eyed terror of a mistreated chihuahua. To their house come various gasbags who cannot wait their turn to deliver speeches that could be timed with a calendar. Principal among them is Rupert (Chris Martinez), the worthy if wordy adversary who eventually uncovers both the crime and the body—perhaps to his own ruin. On the plus side, Kristina Stimson drapes her cast in some splendid Gatsbyesque finery, and Ison’s set design (in collaboration with Terra Morgan) shrouds the proceedings in an eerie elegance. But the British accents, while clipped and delivered with aristocratic pomp, correspond little to a map of the UK. That the actors are working so hard on their Oxbridge-ese only slows further what little action there is. As true-crime tales go, Rope is dated enough in its dramatic construction. What really signals its age, however, is the (then-) shocking suggestion that the perpetrators are—gasp!—homosexual lovers. Today, if you

They’re no saints: Barnard and Sloniker.

wanted to update the text, you’d have Wyndham and Charles exchange their vows on death row, and have their execution chamber decked out as a wedding suite. KEVIN PHINNEY

P25 Saints ACT THEATRE, 700 UNION ST., 292-7676, AZOTHEATRE.ORG. $25–$30. RUNS THURS.–SUN. ENDS NOV. 24.

“You’re disposable people,” a corrupt sheriff tells a pair of West Virginia meth dealers in the tensest of many tense scenes in this suspenseful stage thriller. But these disposable people will steal your heart even while scrambling from one tragicomic mess to the next, under the skillful direction of Desdemona Chiang. Azeotrope is known for its intense performances of hard-edged texts where the subject and writing don’t aspire to the avant garde. (Red Light Winter, which shares the same cast, is running on alternate nights.) They’re hot-wired traditionalists, an approach well suited to Josh Rollins’ credulity-testing tale, which premiered in Chicago last year. Charlie (a very fine Tim Gouran) lives for Sammy (Libby Barnard), his missing brother’s girlfriend, whose (offstage) bloody tangle with the sheriff launches the story’s sprint like a starter pistol. Shell-shocked in the cabin doorway, smeared with blood, Sammy strips as Charlie and his best friend/meth colleague Tuck (Richard Nguyen Sloniker) wrestle a wounded deputy into a big wooden trunk. Don’t get distracted by Evan Mosher’s “screaming” crickets or Andrew D. Smith’s ethereal, leaf-filtering lighting ; 25 Saints requires close listening, as crucial plot elements are embedded in rapid torrents of dialogue, making it easy to miss some of Rollins’ story twists. Even for viewers who loved Breaking Bad, the material can make you uncomfortable; it’s like watching beetles trying to save themselves from drowning in vinegar. Can any of these characters leverage their meth money to escape the Appalachian dirt? (Catherine Cornell’s cramped, shabby set contributes to a sense of claustrophobia and chemical menace.) Each bears the scars of multigenerational poverty and abusive authority. Meanwhile, motives are crossed as to who will flee and who will be ensnared by One Last Score. Rollins does unfortunately write his villains as cartoons, which undermines the intended realism here. Many of this production’s gems occur in the subtler moments, as when Sammy dons a respirator mask to avoid a conversation, but then removes it to accept a Pringle. For such a purchase price, how can these kids ever hope to escape? MARGARET FRIEDMAN E

stage@seattleweekly.com


arts&culture» Performance B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

BUCKSHOT Macha Monkey premieres Courtney Meaker’s

play about family and the past. Cornish Playhouse at Seattle Center, 860-2970, machamonkey.org. $12–$20. Opens Nov. 8. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. plus Mon., Nov. 18. Ends Nov. 23. CLARA The life of Clara Schumann: pianist, mother, wife of one composer and crush of another. Eclectic Theater, 1214 10th Ave., 679-3271, brownpapertickets.com. $12–$25. Opens Nov. 7. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 24. THE ERIC ANDRE SHOW Adult Swim’s comedy/variety/ music show, live. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., thecrocodile.com. $10. 8 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 7. FLOYD COLLINS Adam Guettel’s musical about a media sensation in the early days of radio. Richard Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave., 800-838-3006, seattlestageright.org, hugo house.org. $15–$20. Opens Nov. 8. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. & Mon. Ends Nov. 23. HEART CONTENT A site-specific multimedia performance piece inspired by First Hill’s Stimson Green Mansion, 1204 Minor Ave., 800-838-3006, cabinfeverliveart.com. $15. Opens Nov. 8. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 4:30 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 17. JESUS’ SON Book-It adapts Denis Johnson’s semi-autobiographical short stories. West of Lenin, 203 N. 36th St., book-it.org. $22. Preview Nov. 5, opens Nov. 6. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sun. Ends Nov. 24. LES MISÉRABLES Village Theatre dreams a dream of making a fortune over the holidays. Village Theatre, 303 Front St. N., Issaquah, 425-392-2202. $33–$68. Runs in Issaquah Nov. 7–Jan. 5, then at the Everett Performing Arts Center Jan. 10–Feb. 2; see villagetheatre.org for exact schedule. MORNING’S AT SEVEN The Endangered Species Project reads Paul Osborn’s 1939 dramedy. Stage One Theater, 9600 College Way N., endangeredspeciesproject.org. 7 p.m. Mon., Nov. 11. NEVERWHERE An adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s sub-London fantasy. Cornish Playhouse at Seattle Center, cornish.edu. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Wed., Nov. 6–Sat., Nov. 9, 2 p.m. Sat., Nov. 9–Sun., Nov. 10. PRISCILLA, QUEEN OF THE DESERT The film about three flamboyant friends on a road trip through the Outback is now a musical. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

EarSupply

»  By Gavin Borchert

Arrières-pensées

SW FILE PHOTO

THE WAY OF ALL FISH/I CAN’T REMEMBER ANYTHING Comic one-acts by Elaine May and Arthur

Miller. Trinity Episcopal Church, 609 Eighth Ave., 800-8383006, theatre912.com. Pay what you will. Opens Nov. 8. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. and Mon., Nov. 18, 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 24.

CURRENT RUNS

• BO-NITA In Elizabeth Heffron’s beguiling new one-

woman play, meet a smart, sensitive St. Louis girl of 13; her socially marginal single mom Mona; Mona’s various consorts; and Grandma Tiny, known for “professional” belly-dancing in stilettos. Hannah Mootz deftly and heartbreakingly embodies all these characters and more in rapid-fire situational episodes. Directed by fringe fave Paul Budraitis, Mootz teeters between girl and hag, thug and wag; her lexicon glides seamlessly between raunch and poetry. Heffron gives ambiguities their ample due, but the system has failed everyone, compounded over generations. MARGARET FRIEDMAN Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 443-2222. $12–$65. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sun., plus some matinees; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 17. CAFE NORDO Restaging its 2009 debut production, Cafe Nordo’s show is equal parts meet-and-greet, nightclub, and gustatory exploration—a didactic-gastronomic tour through the life of a chicken named Henrietta, punctuated with high-flung prose to illuminate each course. The meal is the main event, and it does not disappoint. KEVIN PHINNEY Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave., cafenordo.com. $65–$90. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sun. Ends Nov. 24. MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING It’s 1953, and Messina, as conceived by Craig Wollam, is a waterside pleasure dome. All the screwball elements are in place (under the direction of George Mount). Jennifer Lee Taylor and Matt Shimkus get the plummest bits as the fiercely unhitched sparrers Beatrice and Benedick. Her Bette Davis eyes belie a knack for clowning, and his seemingly impassive, Kennedy-jawed face becomes irresistible when stricken by her words. The careenings of this love-wreck, and that of Beatrice’s virtuous cousin Hero (Brenda Joyner) and her gullible admirer Claudio (Jay Myers), propel us from swizzle parties to casual picnics, outfitted (emphasis on

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in 1980. (He’s since done a few more, and supposedly intends to get around to all 12.) What were violent virtuoso gestures in the original are transformed and expanded into skittering flashes of light and lush eruptions of color. In its lurid rhythmic thrust, the Notation no. 2 is the one that most reminds me of the music of Boulez’s teacher Messiaen, and anyone who loved the SSO’s performance of Messiaen’s Turangalîla last winter will relish what sounds rather like a highly concentrated condensation of it. Conductor Ludovic Morlot will couple the Notations with Mahler’s Sixth Symphony; I’m not sure how the four tiny movements, just three, two, five, and two minutes long, will fill the concert’s first half by themselves. Maybe he’ll play them twice? A second run-through wouldn’t hurt, to pick up more of what you’ll miss the first time Boulez’s sensory-overload extravagance hurtles past. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., 2154747, seattlesymphony.org. $19–$112. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 7, 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 9.

“fitted”) by Doris Black. As if the rich visuals, enhanced by Roberta Russell’s ethereal lighting, were not world enough, Rob Witmer’s soundscape offers yet more gratifications. MARGARET FRIEDMAN Center House Theatre, Seattle Center, 733-8222. $25–$48. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat., plus some weekend matinees; see seattleshakespeare. org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 17. RED LIGHT WINTER Azeotrope’s staging of Adam Rapp’s 2005 drama is a tale of alienation, over-education, and the selfish choices people make when they think no one is looking. At the bottom of the heap is Matt (Richard Nguyen Sloniker), a suicidal “emerging” playwright who might actually emerge if he weren’t so terrified of the world. During a trip to the sex salons of Amsterdam, his former college roomie Davis (Tim Gouran) returns to their hostel with hooker Christina (Mariel Neto), supposedly to help Matt get over his cheating ex-girlfriend. Act II begins in New York a year later; Christina shows up unexpectedly, nothing like what she originally represented herself to be. Desdemona Chiang again directs this maelstromin-miniature with near-balletic grace, letting Rapp’s characters stalk one another in concentric circles until there’s no place left for refuge. KEVIN PHINNEY ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, azotheatre.org. $25–$30. Runs Thurs.– Sun.; see acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 24. ROPE SEE REVIEW, PAGE 30. 25 SAINTS SEE REVIEW, PAGE 30. See seattleweekly.com for many more Current Runs.

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Dance

• PACIFIC NORTHWEST BALLET: KYLIÁN + PITE SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 29.

CORNISH DANCE THEATER Site-specific choreography

by Salthorse. See cornish.edu for venues.1 & 3 p.m. Sat., Nov. 9.

Classical, Etc.

ENSO STRING QUARTET Verdi tossed off his tasty but

neglected string quartet as a lark during rehearsals for Aida. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhall seattle.org. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 6. PAUL KIKUCHI This composer’s song cycle Bat of No Bird Island is inspired by (and includes sounds of) his great-grandfather’s collection of 78’s. Wing Luke Museum, 719 S. King St., paulkikuchi.com. 6 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 7. SEATTLE SYMPHONY SEE EAR SUPPLY, LEFT. MATEO MESSINA This Seattle-born film composer annually packs the house for his fundraiser concert for Children’s Hospital. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., thesymphonyguild.org. $42–$200. 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 8. THE MET: LIVE IN HD Patricia Racette and Roberto Alagna play the doomed lovers in Puccini’s Tosca. See metopera.org for participating theaters. 10 a.m. Sat., Nov. 9, 6:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 13. ROBBIN GORDON-CARTIER From this harpist, music from opera to gospel. Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center, 104 17th Ave. S., 684-4757, langstoninstitute.org. $5–$10. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 9. PETER AND ZOLTAN KATONA The Seattle Classic Guitar Society presents this duo, who’ll play Spanish music and Bach. And Queen. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 297-8788. $28–$38. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 9.

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ORCHESTRA SEATTLE/SEATTLE CHAMBER SINGERS

Stephen Rogers Radcliffe conducts Mendelssohn and Brahms. First Free Methodist Church, 3200 Third Ave. W., 800-838-3006, osscs.org. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 9. MORTON SUBOTNICK This electronic-music pioneer performs with video artist Lillevan. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $15–$20. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 9. SEATTLE SYMPHONY A “Beyond the Score” multimedia look at Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $19–$84. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 10. SINE NOMINE RENAISSANCE CHOIR Anne Lyman conducts Gesualdo’s weirdly, even luridly, chromatic madrigals. Trinity Episcopal Church, 609 Eighth Ave., earlymusicguild.org. Donation. 3 p.m. Sun., Nov. 10. OCTAVA CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Equally devoted to music of the 18th and 21st centuries, they’ll play Bach and a new clarinet concerto by SW’s Gavin Borchert. Maple Park Church, 17620 60th Ave. W., Lynnwood, octava chamberorchestra.com. $5–$15. 6 p.m. Sun., Nov. 10. MUSIC OF REMEMBRANCE Betty Olivero’s suite for the 1920 film The Golem is choreographed by Pat Hon. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 365-7770, musicof remembrance.org. $40. 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 10. MATTHEW BENGTSON Bach and Scriabin from this pianist. Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, 685-8384, music.washington.edu. $15. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Nov. 12. HASKELL SMALL This pianist plays Federico Mompou’s 28-movement suite Musica callada. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 15 Roy St. Free. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Nov. 12.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

Even young Turks can get nostalgic: That’s perhaps one lesson to be learned from Pierre Boulez’s Notations. These brief orchestral movements were derived from a set of 12 piano pieces he wrote in 1945, when he was 20 and making a name as one of the most belligerent of storm-the-ramparts modernists. (Listen to the stale crème fraîche that constituted the mainstream of French music at the time, and you’ll sympathize.) Then again, Boulez has refashioned his existing pieces into new ones his entire career, ever eager to Boulez. take his musical materials and concepts down unexplored paths, ever reluctant to let good ideas sit locked away in completed works. The first four of the reworked Notations, which the Seattle Symphony is playing this weekend, were finished

877-STG-4TIX, stgpresents.org. $25 and up. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Nov. 12–Thurs., Nov. 14; 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 15; 2 & 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16; 1 & 6:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. REPRESENT! A six-day multicultural playwrights festival, part of the Hansberry Project. See acttheatre.org for lineup. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $5. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Nov. 12–Sat., Nov. 16, 2 & 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. SHORT NIGHTS OF THE SHADOW CATCHER Book-It’s staged reading of an adaptation of Tim Egan’s prize-winning account of the life of pioneering Seattle photographer Edward S. Curtis. Seattle Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., book-it.org. Free. 7 p.m. Wed., Nov. 6.

31


arts&culture» Visual Arts B Y K E LT O N S E A R S

Openings & Events NANZ AALUND The local jewelry artist presents a new

By William Shakespeare Directed by George Mount

collection of intricate pill boxes. First Thursday opening reception, 6-9 p.m. Core Gallery, 117 Prefontaine Place S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 467-4444, coregallery.org, Weds.-Sat., 12-6 p.m. Through Nov. 25. AFFORDABLE ART FAIR This collector’s wet dream gathers thousands of pieces in the same place, all priced from $100-$10,000. See affordableartfair.com/ seattle for full schedule and details. Seattle Center Exhibition Hall, 684-7200, seattlecenter.com, Free, Nov. 7-10, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. HOLLY ANDRES The Homecoming presents her eerie staged scenes. Also note lecture by the visiting Portland photographer (6 p.m. Friday, $8-$10). Photo Center NW, 900 12th Ave., 720-7222, pcnw.org, Mon.-Thurs., 11 a.m.10 p.m.; Fri.-Sun., 12-8 p.m. Through Dec. 15. BELLTOWN ART WALK Neighborhood galleries (including Northwest Woodworkers Gallery, Form/ Space Atelier, A/NT Terminal Gallery, and others) and non-galleries (Cyclops, Black Bottle, Bedlam Coffee, etc.) extend their hours so you can check out work by local artists. See belltownartwalk.com for details. Second Friday of every month, 6 p.m. BEST OF THE NORTHWEST This is the 25th annual arts and crafts fair run by Northwest Art Alliance. Over 100 local art-makers will be featured with their jewelry, clothing, paintings, and more. Music and food are part of the fun. Magnuson Park, 7400 Sand Point Way N.E., nwartalliance.com. $5-$8, Nov. 8-10. CENTRAL DISTRICT ART WALK Local artists with studios along E. Cherry St. (between 23rd and 24th Aves.) invite you to come in and see what’s brewing. Venues include Autumn Thing, Doubt Us Artwork, Miss Cline Press, Outside In Studio, and Coyote Central. Info: centraldistrictartwalk.com. Second Saturday of every month, 1-5 p.m. ROBERT DAVIDSON Thinking Abstract takes the Haida artist’s traditional Native artwork and pushes it in new experimental directions. (Note that he also has a career retrospective opening at SAM on November 16.) First Thursday opening, 6-8 p.m. Stonington Gallery, 125 S. Jackson St., 405-4040, stoningtongallery.com, Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Nov. 26. ISABELLE DUTOIT The globe-trotting painter’s new series Fragile depicts solitary animals with stark, empty backgrounds, at times both comical and a poignant commentary on habitat loss. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Patricia Rovzar Gallery, 1225 Second Ave., 223-0273, rovzargallery.com, Open daily 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Nov. 30. CHARLES EMERSON In his Poetic Entanglements, the painter creates unique color fields that appear like surreal technicolor clouds and light rays. First Thursday opening reception, 5-8 p.m. Sisko Gallery, 3126 Elliott Ave., 283-2998, siskogallery.com, Fri.-Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Dec. 31. GEORGETOWN ART ATTACK This month’s shindig features Aaron Murphy’s surreal futuristic robot landscapes, a small-press art show curated by Larry Reid at Fantagraphics, a collection of role-playing game art, and more. As always, artist studios are open at Equinox and Nautilus, and the evening continues at 8 Pound Hammer and other local bars. Info: georgetownartattack.com. Second Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. GROUP SHOW Recent work from Jacqueline Barnett, Marita Dingus, Elizabeth Sandvig, and Laura Thorne, including gestural paintings and beaded sculpture. Opening reception 2 p.m. Sunday. Francine Seders Gallery, 6701 Greenwood Ave. N., 782-0355, sedersgallery.com, Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Nov. 30. HEROES RETURN & RESONANCE In Heroes Return, Sean Fansler paints the salmon of the Northwest returning home to die at the end of their life cycle. Nancy Coleman and Monka Dalkin’s Resonance explores the many dimensions of wax as a medium. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Gallery 110, 110 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 624-9336, gallery110.com, Weds.-Sat., 12-5 p.m. Through Nov. 30. DAVID HYTONE & MICHAEL WEINSTEIN Hytone’s pieces are thick and cakey exercises in textural painting. Weinstein’s scultpure combines wood with bright metal to create abstract forms. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Gallery I|M|A, 123 S. Jackson St., 625-0055, galleryima.com, Tues.-Sun., 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Through Nov. 30.

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Final Two Weeks Now 17 Must thru close Nov. Nov.17!

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Oct. 23–Nov. 17, 2013

www.seattleshakespeare.org

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Directed by Anne Bogart Created & Performed by SITI Company Music by George & Ira Gershwin Adapted from The Cafe Plays by Charles L. Mee, Jr.

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• MARY IVERSON At first, Mary Iverson just thought

the color of the cranes at the Port of Seattle looked nice against the sky. Then she got a permit form Stevedore Services of America to do plein air painting out on the terminals, hanging out for a year and getting to know shipyard workers as she rendered the boats and cargo coming in. Eventually, she started reading up on the industry. She found out how quickly things were growing—more and more cargo was being shipped in, bigger boats and cranes had to be built, terminals had to be widened. “It just kept going and going,” says Iverson. “It seemed like this growth would never stop.” As an environmentalist and someone who volunteers for the Sierra Club, her admiration for progress clashed inside with her concern for the health of the planet. In Sunk, her paintings are a manifestation of this inner turmoil—natural landscapes with shipping containers, boats, and stark geometric lines superimposed on them. These surreal visions are both apocalyptic and beautiful, poignant reminders of an imperiled planet. “It’s this luminous West,” says Iverson, clashing with our need for growth. These paintings are my only way of dealing with this.” (First Thursday opening reception, 4:30-7 p.m.) KELTON SEARS Davidson Galleries, 313 Occidental Ave. S., 6241324, davidsongalleries.com, Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Through Nov. 30. FAY JONES Stills collects Jones’ whimsical still-life paintings full of strange characters and muted primary colors inspired by the sets of Jean Renoir’s films. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Grover/Thurston Gallery, 319 Third Ave. S., 223-0816, groverthurston. com, Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Dec. 21. SOFIE KNIJFF The Belgian photographer visits with Translations, a series of child portraits taken around the world. Opening reception: 6 p.m. Friday. M.I.A. Gallery, 1203 Second Ave., 467-4927, m-i-a-gallery. com, Sat., 12-6 p.m.; Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Dec. 14. MARCO MAZZONI Naturama features his new paintings. Also on view, works by Lindsey Carr, called Le Petite Singerie. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Roq La Rue, 532 1st Avenue S., 374-8977, roqlarue. com, Weds.-Sat., 12-5 p.m. Through Nov. 30. RICHARD MORHOUS His thick lines and bold-color style in Making Marks render childlike scenes of cities, parks, and landscapes. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Lisa Harris Gallery, 1922 Pike Place, 4433315, lisaharrisgallery.com, Mon.-Sun., 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Through Dec. 2. ANDRE PETTERSON & GUY LARAMEE Impressions of Africa takes Petterson’s photos from a trip to Africa and layers painting on top to enliven the image. Islands finds Laramee scultpting literal island landscapes out of the pages and bindings of old hardback books. First Thursday opening reception, 6 p.m. Foster/White Gallery, 220 Third Ave. S., 622-2833, fosterwhite.com, Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Nov. 30. PUNCH INVITATIONAL The 15 current gallery members each choose one work from one artist for this invitational exhibit showcasing artists from the Northwest and as far away as Florida. First Thursday opening reception, 5-8 p.m. Punch Gallery, 119 Prefontaine Place S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 621-1945, punchgallery.org, Thurs.-Sat., 12-5 p.m. Through Nov. 16. A SENSE OF PLACE II This group show, curated by Juan Alonso, collects work by 10 Seattle that explores how our environment shapes us. First Thursday opening reception in the City Hall lobby and Anne Focke Gallery below, 4-6 p.m. City Hall, 600 Fourth Ave., 684-8888, seattle.gov, Mon.-Fri., 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Jan. 3. KATE STEIGER Art of Living gathers her textile works for a special holiday exhibition. First Thursday opening reception, 5-8 p.m. Hanson Scott Gallery, 121 Prefontaine Place S., 361-5385, hansonscottgallery. com. Weds.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Dec. 21. SUITCASE In Suitcase, Swiss artists Peter Aerschmann, Leyla Goormaghtigh, and Sophie Schmidt create sitespecific multimedia work. Good Manners and Great Understandings presents local artist Julia Freeman’s similarly mutlimedia work. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Soil Gallery, 112 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 264-8061, soilart.org, Weds.Sat., 12-5 p.m. Through Nov. 30. JOAN TENENBAUM The Idea of Color presents jewelry based on the artist’s years in Alaska. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Stonington Gallery, 125 S. Jackson St., 405-4040, stoningtongallery.com, Mon.Sun., 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Dec. 2. WALLINGFORD ART WALK Participating venues and galleries include Stu Stu Studios, Fuel Coffee, Julia’s Restaurant, and Oasis Art Gallery. See wallingfordartwalk.org for full roster of attractions. First Wednesday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

• 


arts&culture» Film Texas collaboration gave Stanton an unprecedented lead role). The interviews and music are mixed with film clips and smudgy shots of driving around. We also tag along as Stanton gets half-looped on cranberry juice and tequila at his favorite L.A. watering hole. This barely adds up to a movie, but it is a mood: a sad song playing on the jukebox, the bartender making his last call. For such an accomplished and much-admired actor, Stanton is insecure, and this—rather than privacy—seems to be the reason for his reluctance to talk about himself. One wishes for something as memorable as his Repo Man credo, but no such luck. The most he’s got is a Buddhist-ish idea about “nothing” as the center of himself. His elusive manner, his apparent wish to vanish before our eyes, suggests he might be right. ROBERT HORTON

Opening ThisWeek PDallas Buyers Club

Leto (left) and McConaughey as fellow hustlers.

How I Live Now OPENS FRI., NOV. 8 AT SUNDANCE. RATED R. 101 MINUTES.

Great Expectations OPENS FRI., NOV. 8 AT SUNDANCE, MERIDIAN, AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG-13. 128 MINUTES.

MAIN STREET FILMS

Charles Dickens’ 1860 novel of class-jumping seems to defy updating from its Victorian era. Alfonso Cuarón tried to kick Pip and Magwitch into modern New York with his 1998 adaptation; he was roundly booed for the bother. Now Mike Newell—like Cuarón a veteran of the Harry Potter series—has a go with the franchise, and he opts for a conservative approach, not deviating far from David Lean’s 1946 benchmark. It’s the same three-part arc: Pip’s poor, humble origins on the moors; his sudden transformation into a London gent (funded by a mysterious benefactor); and the shattering realization that wealth and beauty are not what they seem. Parts I and III are the most compelling here. Orphaned young Pip (Toby Irvine) roams the bogs like a frightened marsh bird; the sand and sun are an idyll compared to later scenes in sooty London. There is love from Pip’s blacksmith brother-in-law Joe ( Jason Flemyng), then terror at meeting long-locked convict Magwitch (Ralph Fiennes), a fugitive made of mud and anger. In her cobwebbed mansion, Miss Havisham (Helena Bonham Carter) is a more vague, ethereal creature; and her stratagems are less keenly felt than Magwitch’s. He deals with knives and mutton and revenge; she’s the aloof

Coltrane’s lawyer Jaggers lights a path for Pip.

agent of romantic snares, with Estella (Holliday Grainger) her chief instrument of mischief. Why isn’t this Great Expectations more vital? There are colorful supporting roles for England’s finest (Sally Hawkins, Robbie Coltrane, Ewen Bremner, etc.), but the grown Pip (War Horse’s Jeremy Irvine, brother of Toby) is a handsome bore. He and Estella have no heat, and Pip’s London dissolution with the Finch Club is a snooze. J.K. Rowling has never said as much, but Pip’s magical leap of station makes him a direct forebear of Harry Potter. Harry leaves his lowly suburb for a life of enchantment and danger, while Pip here finally grows disenchanted with gilded city life. That turn ought to be more crushing, like Magwitch’s final flight; yet when Pip goes back to visit the moors, we feel the sting of salt air and regret. BRIAN MILLER

Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction RUNS FRI., NOV. 8–THURS., NOV. 14 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 77 MINUTES.

Harry Dean Stanton does not want to talk about himself. This might stop many potential documentary filmmakers from attempting a profile of the weathered actor, now 87. But director Sophie Huber tried anyway; and if the movie fails to give us much factual information about its subject, it certainly captures the aura that surrounds him. We do learn that Stanton was born in Kentucky, did military service, roomed with Jack Nicholson for a while, and has never been married. He lets a few things slip, including the tidbit “She left me for Tom Cruise”—somehow one of those sentences you never expected to hear from the mouth of a character actor this unglamorous. (The ex-girlfriend in question was Rebecca De Mornay, who lived with Stanton before she met Cruise on the set of Risky Business.) One thing Stanton does like to do is sing, and the movie is strung together with craftily crooned numbers from the country-folk songbook. Stanton’s baritone has frayed a little with age (you might remember him serenading the jailhouse in Cool Hand Luke), but he really understands singing. His old buddy Kris Kristofferson might be on to something when he suggests that music is Stanton’s true passion. Kristofferson rolls by for an interview and a song, and we also hear from Deborah Harry, David Lynch, and Wim Wenders and Sam Shepard (whose Paris,

Do teenagers even read the newspapers these days? (No, I know.) Or follow world events on Twitter or TV? Adapted from a 2004 youngadult novel by Meg Rosoff, this movie’s 17-yearold heroine has no interest in world affairs. Why, when she’s shipped from New York to stay with English cousins for the summer, are there armed soldiers at the airport? Petulant, eye-rolling Daisy (Saoirse Ronan) never considers such matters. She’s mad at her father back home, now remarried with a new baby on the way. She initially hates her cousins’ shabby-genteel country home, but never wonders why Aunt Penn, some sort of policy expert, is planning for a third European war.

MAGNOLIA PICTURES

are better, more accurate films about the latter subject, but those are called documentaries. And a quarter-century past the dawn of the AIDS crisis, with modern drugs now keeping the HIVpositive healthy, Ron is the worst kind of role model and the best kind of rascal that the medical journals need. BRIAN MILLER

Love after the apocalypse: Ronan and MacKay.

When it comes, the force of a distant nuclear blast is portended by an eerie wind and frightened dogs. Then a light cloud of ash falls on stranded Daisy, 14-year-old Issac, little Piper, and handsome 18-year-old Eddie (George MacKay), a falconer upon whom Daisy had already developed a silent crush. With Aunt Penn away in Geneva, suddenly they’re a survivalist band in a nation without electricity, ruled by martial law, with roving guerrilla bands in the woods. Needless to say, Daisy will have to get over her teen angst and make like Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games. This Ronan does with authority. Once a bratty child in Atonement, she’s growing nicely into her nascent stardom. Kevin Macdonald might not seem the likeliest director for this post-apocalyptic teen romance, and the familiar first kisses and “I will find you!” declarations are pretty routine. Yet How I Live Now is weirder and stronger in depicting England’s descent into violence and near-fascism—like a prelude to Children of Men. A primal switch has been flipped, as if morality disappeared with the power grid. Then you remember how Macdonald’s The Last King of

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

Making a straight white Texas homophobe the hero of a film about the ’80s AIDS crisis doesn’t seem right. It’s inappropriate, exceptional, possibly even crass. All those qualities are reflected in Matthew McConaughey’s ornery, emaciated portrayal of Ron Woodroof, a rodeo rider and rough liver who contracted HIV in 1985. This urban cowboy became an outlaw pharmacist and activist, written up extensively in the Dallas media, far from the New York and San Fran frontlines. Fond of strippers, regularly swigging from his pocket flask, doing lines of coke when he can afford them, betting on the bulls he rides, Ron has tons of Texas-sized character. He’s a wiry little hustler with jeans sliding off his bony hips when we meet him; and that alarming cough means something malign lurks within his body. But is there any conscience in there, too? Directed by Jean-Marc Vallée from a script by Craig Borten and Melisa Wallack, the unruly Dallas Buyers Club goes easy on the sinner-tosaint conversion story. McConaughey and the filmmakers know that once Ron gets religion, so to speak, their tale risks tedium. For that reason, the film enjoyably careens along with Ron’s unlikely education. Waking up in the hospital after a collapse, he’s incredulous that he’s got a “faggot” disease. Thirty days to live? He doesn’t believe it. And that “cock-sucker” Rock Hudson (then dying of AIDS)? A waste of Hollywood pussy, Ron scoffs to his friends. But they’re not his friends for long. Ron’s secret gets out, and he’s shunned at work and in the titty bars. Finally this reckless, uneducated galoot goes to the library and reads up on the AIDS crisis. McConaughey looks up from the microfilm kiosk and—Goddammit, how did he become such a good actor?—his eyes fill with silent dread. It’s true. He knows. And he realizes he’s alone, a pariah to his redneck buddies. As Ron desperately bribes and steals a path to off-label meds, then drives to Mexico to smuggle them from a sympathetic hippie doctor (good to see you, Griffin Dunne), his allies and adversaries do read like fictional composites. There’s nice Dr. Saks ( Jennifer Garner) and her profit-minded, drug-trial-chasing boss (Denis O’Hare), plus a friendly cop (Steve Zahn) and the transvestite who becomes Ron’s right-hand woman in the Dallas Buyers Club (essentially the Costco of AZT alternatives). Jared Leto’s Rayon is even skinnier and certainly slinkier than McConaughey, eyebrows plucked, makeup so Dallasin-the-’80s, wearing her heels and hemlines with authority. Rayon is also an addict, sicker than Ron, but they’re fellow gamblers who delight in beating the house. Cheats and liars have all the fun, which is why Dallas Buyers Club gets so much play out of Ron dressing up in various costumes, flying to Japan in a cowboy hat, waving his huge Rolex and huger ’80s cellphone, relishing his chance to be more than trailer trash. He’s really living, even as he’s dying. Dallas Buyers Club is ultimately more a caper movie than an AIDS story. There

ANNE MARIE FOX/FOCUS FEATURES

OPENS FRI., NOV. 8 AT HARVARD EXIT AND LINCOLN SQUARE. RATED R. 117 MINUTES.

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Scotland and Oscar-winning 1999 doc One Day in September (about the 1972 Munich Olympics terrorist attack) also charted the abrupt, bloody breakdown of society. Daisy, on her long trek to find Eddie, never asks who the enemy is or why the UK has become a police state. Since Macdonald isn’t directing this film for Times-reading grownups, maybe there’s no point to politics. Still, I think the movie’s intended audience may not remember a shirtless Eddie as much as it will the yipping foxes feasting on stacked corpses at an internment camp. It certainly changes Daisy—and for the better. BRIAN MILLER

La Maison de la Radio RUNS FRI., NOV. 8–THURS., NOV. 14 AT VARSITY. NOT RATED. 99 MINUTES.

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If I told you they were making a documentary about NPR, would you line up to see backstage scenes of Scott Simon, Ira Glass, and Terry Gross? (Personally, I’d flee in the other direction.) And what if the radio hosts were all French? The miracle of Radio France, which is something like the BBC, is that it gets to broadcast several specialized channels—news, arts and culture, classical music, etc.—with scant regard for profit or plebeian taste. (The state-supported broadcaster was gradually privatized under Mitterand.) Located in a large circular fortress in Paris, the enterprise is unapologetically highbrow, and director Nicolas Philibert (To Be and To Have) is not one to question that mission. Like Frederick Wiseman, he simply looks at and listens to the hosts, technicians, musicians, and producers. A workplace documentary is only going to be as interesting as the work, and these people are not lion tamers. Meetings and recording sessions are hardly scintillating to watch, though I have seldom seen so many faces concentrating on the precise sound of words. These people are exacting about every syllable and tweak at the mixing board. And we do occasionally venture outside to record wild sounds or report on a soccer game or the Tour de France. One or two moments are even fictional, as when a host asks us to imagine the sonic landscape of 17thcentury Paris. The streets are wooden planks and mud, he explains; there’s livestock in the streets; church bells ring the hours; and no one ventures out at night, when wild animals creep back into the city. And there you might imagine a Victor Hugo story—but written for the ear, not the page. BRIAN MILLER

It’s a long way down to the pit where the Flannigan brothers find themselves in The Motel Life. This film, based on a 2007 novel, takes place in the cheap roadside motels of Reno and Elko, Nevada, where brothers Frank (Emile Hirsch) and Jerry Lee (Stephen Dorff ) have resided since they were teenagers. The motel life is not the good life. It’s filled with poverty, depression, and delusion, suitably rendered by directors Alan and Gabe Polsky. This is a stark and direct film with a fairly straightforward story, once it gets to it. Jerry Lee Primary made a tragic mistake and didn’t own up to it; instead he botched a suicide attempt, putting a bullet in his previously amputated right leg. Now the brothers are on the lam, broke and bleeding, with nowhere to go. How the Flannigans descended to this day-to-day desperation is a more complex story, one that Motel Life tries to cram into the opening 15 minutes. It’s a disorienting bit of exposition, jumping among three different time frames, plus a couple of animated fighter-pilot fantasy scenes. In his novel, Portland author and musician Secondary Willy Vlautin took more time to weave the Flannigan brothers’ hard-luck story into their current predicament. Running a pinched 85 minutes, this adaptation has no such luxury, which is a shame. When Motel Life does slow down and focus, it gets better. Hirsch, Dorff, and Dakota Fanning (as Frank’s love interest) are all convincing as beautiful losers. (Kris Kristofferson also shows up for a flaccid turn as the straight-shootin’ carsalesman father figure to the brothers.) Scenes between the brothers are the most powerful, charming and heartwarming despite the film’s pervasive anxiety and dread. To soothe his brother’s pain, Frank tells fantastical stories filled with buxom sexpots, bloody fights, and vanquished villains (vividly animated by Mike Smith), while Jerry Lee shares advice from Willie Nelson’s autobiography to help Frank cope with his own internal wounds. These tender performances do All tints of secondary col more to convey a history of hard living, and the collage and size s bonds that history has created, than Rotate, any number of flashbacks ever could. MARK BAUMGARTEN

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Sundance Shorts 2013 RUNS FRI., NOV. 8–THURS., NOV. 14 AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS. NOT RATED. 90 MINUTES.

In The Date, awkwardness that could’ve been played for laughs—the owners of show cats making small talk as the yowls and growls of

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mating felines alarm an inexperienced chaperone—instead becomes a very human moment of anxiety (then comforted over a smoking break). Whiplash, built around the debut of a member in a school jazz orchestra, elevates the intensity as a teacher terrorizes his players like a drill sergeant in Full Metal Jacket. These two films, beginning a collection of eight shorts from the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, sneak up on you—not for any surprise ending or high-concept twist, but for the transformation of simple ideas and choice moments into fully realized little stories. If features are like novels, shorts can be anything from short stories to vignettes to poems to nonfiction essays. At their best they capture a beautifully observed moment, a lovely metaphor, or an illuminating point of view; and they give emerging filmmakers a chance to learn their craft. This program offers a little of everything: a foreign-language film (The Date, from Finland), animation, a couple of docs, and a variety of styles and sensibilities. The best titles are modest in scope, more concerned with the texture of the moment than the size of the drama. Skinningrove, a portrait of an isolated British fishing community (also a tour through a photographer’s connection with his subject), and Irish Folk Furniture, a playful celebration of practical artisanship as folk art, make a strong connection with places we might not otherwise explore. The final half-hour isn’t so strong. Jonah loses its characters and themes in a showcase of imagination and digital effects. K.I.T., an awkward comedy about awkward moments, forgets that brevity is the soul of wit. Thanks to aggressive local programming at SIFF and Bumbershoot’s One Reel Film Festival, Seattle has nurtured an audience for shorts. Roughly midway between those two fests, this compilation offers a varied buffet of flavors— some undercooked, some not for all tastes, but a modest fall sampler. SEAN AXMAKER

Thor: The Dark World OPENS FRI., NOV. 8 AT ARK LODGE AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG-13. 112 MINUTES.

Even with its flaws, Thor: The Dark World may be what the wretched Man of Steel should have been. Colorful, godlike hero. Big fights and destruction. Unashamed that it’s from a comic book. Pretty

It’s all smiles in Asgard: Portman and Hemsworth.

fun. It’s better than Ol’ Goldilocks’ debut in 2011’s Thor—larger in scale, faster-paced, more sure of itself. The fish-with-six-pack-out-of-water shtick is gone, and it’s Hammer Time. The Marvel mumbo-jumbo: A roiling, magical “Aether” is what Dark Elf Malekith (Christopher Eccleston) needs to destroy the universe in the window that appears every 5,000 years when all nine realms align. Note 1: Not dreamy Lord of the Rings elves, but an unpleasant race that Odin’s father defeated before the universe was formed. (The all-father’s father? Keep moving.) Note 2: Earth and Asgard are two of the realms. Not much about the other seven, but maybe they make all the fabulous Asgardian costumes, like a cosmic Gap. Earth apparently being the trailer-trash realm, Odin (Anthony Hopkins) wants Thor (Chris Hemsworth) to stop pining about somedaytoothless mortal Jane (Natalie Portman), marry warrior-goddess Sif ( Jaimie Alexander), and succeed him on Asgard’s throne. But Jane becomes the feisty Aether host body and gets herself invited to Asgard anyway. Awkward? It gets so much worse that Thor unlocks and teams up with treacherous brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) to save Jane, stop Malekith, and make the universe safe for the Avengers sequel. Kenneth Branagh’s Thor was respectable, a little dull, not the cream of Marvel’s crop. Its main accomplishment: avoiding laughable ridiculousness with the caped hammer-twirler. Casting still goes a long way. Hemsworth holds his own as jock-god against show-stealer Hiddleston’s drama-god, such that it’s hard to imagine another actor making it work. Branagh successor Alan Taylor comes from good TV (Game of Thrones, Mad Men, The Sopranos), and he knows how to keep it moving, give moments to lots of characters, and balance swaggering fights, destruction, and lightheartedness. (See: Thor on the London tube.) The wild climactic battle adds a new wrinkle—and several dimensions—to a tired boss-fight genre. I say thee nay: scientist Stellan Skarsgård reduced to pantsless comic relief; sidekick Kat Dennings (with a new intern dude) still annoys; Malekith is as two-dimensional as they come; and his attack on Asgard is more Star Wars than Norse. And why just two fighter jets against the giant, world-destroying thing? Oh, right, because it’s a comic book. And take note: Don’t leave before you’ve seen both brief scenes during and after the end credits. MARK RAHNER E

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SevenNights E D I T E D B Y G W E N D O LY N E L L I O T T

Wednesday, Nov. 6 ANDRE ALLEN ANJOS This RAC producer is a prodi-

gious remixer—there are more than 150 remixes on his Soundcloud page, and his name is an acronym for “Remix Artist Collective.” He’s since moved on to original productions—mostly easily digestible electropop fare centered on guest vocalists and simple dance beats. With MNDR. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, thebarboza.com. 8 p.m. $15 adv. ANDREW GOSPE OF MONTREAL On its latest record, Lousy With Sylvianbriar, of Montreal, led by its creative center Kevin Barnes, has shifted away from the psych-pop sound that has defined it for years and stripped things down. While its newer material may be sparser, don’t expect the same from the live show. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442. 8 p.m. $18. CORBIN REIFF

Thursday, Nov. 7

The synth-popped soul being crafted by RADIATION CITY is one of the most exciting things happening in Portland right now. It sways, it hits, and it leaves you woozy. This show celebrates the release of the live full-length album Live at the Banana Stand, which was not actually recorded at a banana stand, but in the basement of upstart Portland studio/label Banana Stand Media. With Tomten, Smokey Brights. Neumos. 8 p.m. $12 adv. MARK S. BAUMGARTEN NADA SURF Not too many one-hit wonders (“Popular,” anyone?) can morph into career artists, but Nada Surf has done just that. Tonight it will play, in its entirety, its perfect power-pop platter Let Go—which plays like a winning hybrid of Teenage Fanclub’s Bandwagonesque and Weezer’s 1994 debut. With Mates of States, The Prom. Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151,showboxonline.com. 8 p.m. $15 adv./ $20 DOS. DAVE LAKE DEERHOOF To make music that successfully sounds like it’s falling apart, you actually have to be pretty well put together. For almost 20 years, San Francisco’s Deerhoof has walked that fine line, writing art rock that tumultuously trips over itself before erupting into tightly wound balls of kinetic energy. Drummer Greg Saunier’s lines stumble like Jackie Chan in Drunken Master— powerful, seemingly nonsensical rhythms that spaz around behind lead singer/bassist Satomi Matsuzaki’s childlike mumblings about pandas and flowers. As Dada as Deerhoof gets, at the end of the day it’s still pop—wonderful, head-scratching avant-pop that your little sister might even sing along to between all the spastic free-jazz, no-wave breakdowns. Also on the bill is Seattle’s Jarv Dee, an incredible rapper who couldn’t sound any less like Deerhoof. In

a way, the combination makes sense: If the band is already surreal, might as well make the night even weirder. With LXMP. Vera Project, 305 Warren Ave. N., 956-8372, theveraproject.org. 7:30 p.m. $16 adv./$17 DOS. All ages. KELTON SEARS

Friday, Nov. 8

dinner & show

DADA In a year marked by strong debuts from Rage

Against the Machine, Stone Temple Pilots, and Dr. Dre, 1992 saw the release of an equally strong but lessremembered first LP: Puzzle by the Los Angeles trio Dada. With Nevermind pushing alt-rock radio toward heavier, angst-ridden acts, it was hard for a slick and commercial band like this to get attention. But it wasn’t Dada’s fault; it just formed a decade too late. 1982 would have loved Dada, with its big harmonies, shredding guitar leads, and efficient arrangements. In 1992, however, sandwiched between Sublime and Screaming Trees, Puzzle made only a minor splash. Even among the more melodic bands of the era like the Lemonheads or R.E.M., Dada didn’t fit in since its roots were in neither punk nor college radio. But Puzzle is still a great record—best remembered for its first single, “Dizz Knee Land”—and the current tour celebrates its 20th anniversary. With High Freq. Studio Seven., 110 S. Horton St., 286-1312. 7:30 p.m. $15 adv./$18 DOS. DL COWBOY MOUTH The quintessential New Orleans rock-’n’-roll band makes a rare trip to the Northwest for back-to-back shows Friday and Saturday nights. Last year’s This Train is a return to the “Hurricane Party”-style rock that put the band on the map before Katrina. With Goodbyemotel (Friday) and The Cringe (Saturday). Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. 9 p.m. $16 adv./$18 DOS. MICHAEL F. BERRY

mainstage WED/NOVEMBER 6 • 7:30PM EARSHOT JAZZ FESTIVAL PRESENTS

garfield high school jazz band THU/NOVEMBER 7 • 7:30PM

wesley stace w/ casey neill FRI/NOVEMBER 8 & SAT/NOVEMBER 9 • 8PM 91.3 KBCS WELCOMES

leroy bell & his only friends WED/NOVEMBER 13 & THU/NOVEMBER 14 • 7:30PM FRI/NOVEMBER 15 - SAT/NOVEMBER 16 • 7PM & 10PM

Saturday, Nov. 9

the atomic bombshells... lost in space!

THE FRATELLIS For a brief moment in the 2000s, it

seemed like Arctic Monkeys, the Libertines, and the Fratellis would become the-next-big-things, but each saw larger success elude them. After five years away, the Fratellis have resurfaced with a new album and tour, which they hope will put them back on the map. With the Ceremonies, Conway. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, thecrocodile.com. 8 p.m. SOLD OUT. DL SEATTLE ROCK ORCHESTRA Need proof that Seattle loves Pink Floyd? Look no further than Seattle Center’s The Wall laser show, which hasn’t stopped running since 1982. The latest SRO performance affirms the love, tackling some of the band’s best-loved songs, including “Money,” “Comfortably Numb,” and the entire Dark Side of the Moon. Lasers not included. The Moore, 1932 Second Ave., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.com. 8 p.m. $22.50. DL KING OF THE DOT HIP-HOP BATTLE LEAGUE It’s been a while since Seattle has seen a high-profile MC competition. King of the Dot brings some of North America’s top freestylers to town; the main event pits

SUN/NOVEMBER 17 • 7:30PM - SQUARE PEG PRESENTS

michael kaeshammer

TUE/NOVEMBER 19 • 7PM & 9:30PM - 91.3 KBCS WELCOMES

rokia traore

FRI/NOVEMBER 22 • 7PM & 9:30PM

the dusty 45s

next • 11/23 brett dennen w/ grizfolk • 11/24 chris hillman & herb pedersen • 11/27 the buckaroos • 11/29 & 30 the paperboys • 12/1 abbey arts presents winter round • 12/2 2nd annual dammit liz holiday special • 12/3 ed kowalczyk “i alone acoustic” • 12/4 omar torrez • 12/5 david bromberg quintet • 12/6 vaden todd lewis • 12/7 an evening with joe henry • 12/8 an evening with buika • 12/10 rhett miller

happy hour every day • 11/6 katie davi • 11/7 first thursday art opening w/ heather fitzpatrick & james redfern / how now brown cow • 11/8 the djangomatics / st kilda, fan fiction and spank williams • 11/9 the cody rentas band • 11/10 casey macgill quartet • 11/11 monday jazz sessions w/ pereira/goessl/bush trio • 11/12 singer-songwriter showcase featuring: katrina charles, aaron zig and irene pena • 11/13 daniel rapport trio TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE · PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY RICHARD SAUNIER

Deerhoof weird it up on the beach.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

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37


El Corazon

arts&culture» Music

www.elcorazonseattle.com

109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9

MAYDAY PARADE with Man

RARE MONK with Happy Leviathan, plus guests

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10

Mike Thrasher Presents:

Overboard, Cartel, and Stages & Stereos Doors at 6 / Show at 6:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $22 ADV / $25 DOS

RAIN LIGHT FADE

with Maklak (Tour Kickoff Show), JAR, The Accountants, plus guests Doors at 7:30 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8

MEGA RAN WITH K-MURDOCK with D&D Sluggers, Amanda Lepre, Professor Shyguy, The Icarus Kids, A_Rival, and Death*Star Lounge Show. Doors at 7:30 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9

Lounge Show. Doors at 7:30 / Show at 7PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

BOBAFLEX with The Hardcount,

Letzter Geist, plus guests Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 KISW (99.9 FM) Metal Shop & El Corazon Present:

OVERKILL

with Kreator, and Warbringer Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $24 ADV / $27 DOS / $75 VIP

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13

King Ryan Events presents Live Music Showcase:

Mike Thrasher Presents:

Under The Bodhi Tree, NGU, Megan Erickson, Christina Pallis, and Steven Curtis Doors at 4 / Show at 4:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $20

Echosmith, and Matt Bacnis Band Doors at 6 / Show at 7PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

REBELS REVOLT with Nycole,

TONIGHT ALIVE with The Downtown Fiction, For The Foxes,

JUST ANNOUNCED 12/6 NOI!SE (CD RELEASE) 12/7 LOUNGE WITCHBURN / THE HEROINE 12/13 LOUNGE TOMMY & THE HIGH PILOTS 12/22 BEST

Tickets now available at cascadetickets.com - No per order fees for online purchases. Our on-site Box Office is open 1pm-5pm weekdays in our office and all nights we are open in the club - $2 service charge per ticket Charge by Phone at 1.800.514.3849. Online at www.cascadetickets.com - Tickets are subject to service charge

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 6 — 12, 2013

The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: see details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html and for an application email us at info@elcorazonseattle.com

38

Friday, November 8

W

ords like “credibility” and “persona” tend to turn up more often in discussions about hip-hop or pop than about folk music, but for a songwriter like Cass McCombs, they’re just as relevant. McCombs released his debut album 10 years ago, scrounging together tours and releasing an album every two years since. His is the hardearned existence of a music lifer, which, combined with his complete lack of interest in talking about himself in interviews, lends weight to his multifarious music. He’s developed a reputation as an intensely serious man whose nearascetic focus on his art is rare (and also pretty refreshing) in a time when many bands are seemingly as content to make memes as they are music. But for all his prickliness, McCombs is gracious toward his fans, at least in terms of how they interact with his songs. “What a song can do is manipulate someone’s imagination so every listener has their own individual interpretation,” he told Stereogum in a recent interview. “To guide [listeners] is wrong; whatever they feel is right.” This sort of egalitarian spirit informs Big Wheel and Others, McCombs’ sprawling, uneven, and occasionally brilliant new album. Its 22 songs were recorded in just a week; as a result, the album feels loose and extemporane-

Fredo against Sun Tzu, and local MCs Mic Phenom, Brainstorm, and IllxChris are also on the bill. Nectar Lounge, 412 N. 36th St., 632-2020, nectarlounge.com. 1 p.m. $15. MFB PHANTOGRAM leads a late-era showcase of Barsuk Records bands tonight. The Sarasota Springs, N.Y., band made a strong showing with the emotive, twitchy, beat-heavy electronic-pop songs on debut full-length Eyelid Movies in 2009. Now we’re just waiting on the follow-up, which the band claims will be out soon. With Menomena, Maps & Atlases, Yellow Ostrich, Cymbals Eat Guitar, Say Hi. Neumos. 7 p.m. $15 adv. MSB KAREEM KANDI’s music draws on influences as diverse as hip-hop and traditional Middle Eastern music. A sax player, arranger, and composer, he fuses these influences with solid technique and a firm grasp of traditional jazz, funk, soul, and blues. Delvon Lamarr (organ) and Julian MacDonough (drums) will be joining him. Vito’s, 927 Ninth Ave., 397-4053, vitosseattle.com. 9:30 p.m. MFB

Sunday, Nov. 10

A$AP FERG He’s not as Internet-famous as A$AP Rocky,

but in many ways this Harlem rapper is stylistically similar: His debut album, Trap Lord, pairs supremely tasteful beats with adequate rapping about sex and money that’s never deeper than it sounds. Buy a $75 VIP ticket and receive a custom Trap Lord bandana. With Joey Fatts, Ashton Matthews, 100s. Neumos. 8 p.m. $20 adv. All ages. AG JESSE SYKES AND THE SWEET HEREAFTER As part of Barsuk Records’ anniversary celebration, Sykes will not only be accompanied by the original Sweet Hereafter lineup, featuring Anne Marie Ruljanchic, Kevin Warner, and Bill Herzog, but she’ll be playing the entirety of her Barsuk debut Reckless Burning from

ous, even though some songs are several years old. It’s a good encapsulation of the many styles he’s dabbled in over the years—plainspoken character studies, dusky Americana, loosely psychedelic mantras. Excellently crisp production from longtime collaborators Ariel Rechtshaid and Chet “JR” White makes it one of the better-sounding rock albums you’ll hear in 2013. The album includes two versions of the centerpiece track, “Brighter!,” a classicsounding folk song whose title and lilting guitar belie lyrics about living a driftless existence. The song might be personal (McCombs is notoriously nomadic), but then again it might

PONY CASSELLS

OF FRIENDS 1/4 & 1/5 COLOSSAL FEST 1/11 VOLTAIRE 1/25 THE EXPENDABLES 2/11 FALLING IN REVERSE 2/26 CHILDREN OF BODOM 3/30 THE LACS / MOONSHINE BANDITS UP & COMING 11/14 THE FLESHTONES 11/15 ANTHONY GREEN 11/15 LOUNGE EZRA FURMAN 11/16 ALESTORM 11/17 THE CASUALTIES 11/18 RONI LEE GROUP 11/18 LOUNGE SAVE THE FOREST 11/19 THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA 11/20 PROTEST THE HERO 11/21 FINNTROLL 11/22 AARON CARTER 11/23 AXE MURDER BOYZ 11/23 LOUNGE COWARDICE 11/25 LOUNGE VERDANT MILE 11/26 THY ART IS MURDER

Cass McCombs

not. Regardless, it hints at another possible reason McCombs takes great pains to keep his personal life separate from his music—for a songwriter so singularly focused, there’s not much distinction between the two. With Michael Hurley. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-7416, thecrocodile.com. 8 p.m. $13. ANDREW GOSPE

start to finish. In the decade since the release of that album, Sykes’ sound has flourished, leading her into more expansive, psychedelic territory. Here, though, she’ll return to her quieter, acoustic roots. With Rocky Votolato, Laura Gibson. Tractor Tavern. 7:30 p.m. SOLD OUT. MSB VANESSA CARLTON Although it’s been nearly three years since this singer/songwriter’s last album, 2011’s Rabbits on the Run, the indie-pop powerhouse is returning for two intimate shows. Though Carlton’s newer material doesn’t seem to have the same spice as her Grammy-nominated debut, its soft, piano-driven arrangements are sure to be best realized at The Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333. 7 (all ages) & 9:30 p.m. (21 and over). $25 adv./$30 DOS. KEEGAN PROSSER

Monday, Nov. 11

CRYSTAL ANTLERS The only time I’ve seen Crystal

Antlers, the keyboardist drunkenly pounded out an amazing solo on the synth using a beer bottle. While that might not be a regular part of its show, the band’s fun psych-influenced rock is guaranteed to be a good time after the two local psych openers, The Blinding Light and Kingdom of the Holy Sun, light all sorts of incense. The Lo-Fi, 429 Eastlake Ave., 254-2824, thelofi. net. 9 p.m. $8. 21 and over. KS ATLAS GENIUS The PNW must have made an impact on this alt-rock trio, because Aussie brothers Keith and Michael Jeffery and Brit Darren Sell are back following a show at this year’s Sasquatch! If you didn’t catch them then, make sure you do now; Atlas Genius’ catalogue boasts undeniably catchy tunes, including “Trojans” and “If So.” With Family of the Year and Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 682-1414, stgpresents.org/neptune. 8 p.m. $25. All ages. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY


Tuesday, Nov. 12 CROCODILES A lot of bands sound at least a little

bit like Crocodiles, because a lot of bands borrow transparently from the bountiful post-punk and newwave sounds of the ’80s. The San Diego band’s got a sense of humor, at least, rendering its jangly pop songs—as self-aware as they are inoffensive. With Wymond Miles. Barboza. 8 p.m. $10 adv. AG OVERKILL AND KREATOR These legends of thrash metal show no signs of slowing—literally or figuratively. Both released studio albums last year (Overkill’s 16th, Kreator’s 13th); the riffs are as fast and heavy as those of any of their early material, and Kreator’s Mille Petrozza’s signature “Cookie Monster” growl has only improved with age. With Warbringer. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 2620482, elcorazonseattle.com. 7:30 p.m. $24–$27 DOS/$75 VIP. MFB SELENA GOMEZ Seattle fans of the former Disney star missed out on seeing Gomez live when her appearance at KISS 106.1’s Jingle Ball 2012 was canceled at the last minute. Luckily, the young starlet is making it up to tweens across the Pacific Northwest bigtime—first with this stop on her Stars Dance Tour, and again in December when she’ll perform at Jingle Ball 2013. And while the fresh-faced singer’s heavily Auto-Tuned dance pop may not be your cup of tea, it’s no secret that, for better or worse, her lead

The Long Winters/ David Bazan/ Chris Walla Friday, November 8

H

single “Come & Get It” is the epitome of can’t-getit-out-of-your-head catchiness. (That it may or may not be aimed at the Biebs is just a plus.) It’s also worth noting that Gomez is rumored to put on quite the production for her headlining gigs—and that this stop will also feature up-and-coming reggae/poprock trio Emblem3, who stole the hearts of teen girls across the country last year as contestants on The X-Factor. With Christina Grimmie. KeyArena, Seattle Center, 684-7200, keyarena.com. 7 p.m. $26–$66. KP TORO Y MOI With Anything in Return, Chaz Bundick has come a long way from his home-laptop-recorded origins. It’s a slick, bona fide pop record, borrowing from disco, funk, and ’90s house music. Outside of Washed Out’s Ernest Greene, there might not be a musician who’s grown out of chillwave more successfully. With Classixx. Showbox at the Market. 8:30 p.m. $25 adv. All ages. AG SLAID CLEEVES For 20 years, this Austin-by-way-ofMaine singer/songwriter has carved a quiet and distinguished career by crisscrossing the country singing his twangy blue-collar tales for anybody who will listen—including Stephen King, who was so inspired by Cleeves that he wrote the liner notes for one of his records. Tractor Tavern. 8 p.m. $18 adv./$20 DOS. 21 and over. DL Send events to music@seattleweekly.com. See seattleweekly.com for full listings.

Pedro the Lion, then Headphones, and now as a solo artist. The New York Times called his most recent work, 2011’s Strange Negotiations, “one of the year’s most affecting rock albums.” Play your download cards right, and the Times could be writing about your affecting album next year. Completing the trifecta is Death Cab guitarist Walla, also an early member of The Long Winters. But it isn’t just his band allegiances that make him an influential local force; it’s also his prowess as producer, having worked on records by Ra Ra Riot, Tegan and Sara, and the Decemberists. His latest endeavor, Trans-Records, is home to The Lonely Forest and Cumulus—both from Anacortes (why not Walla Walla?)—who at one time didn’t know Mr. Walla. So what are you waiting for? Even if you don’t manage to

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

AUTUMN DE WILDE

ere’s a helpful hint to all the aspiring indie rockers out there: Go to this show! The top-billed performers—Bazan, Walla, and the Winters’ John Roderick—are a triumvirate of local musicians who could help your career immensely. Between them, they have talent for miles, but they also know the bulk of the town’s most influential music-makers, many of whom will be in attendance, so bring a stack of download cards and distribute them liberally. An evening with Bazan, Walla, and the Long Winters In terms of hon(pictured): a perfect networking opportunity. ing your songwriting, you could do a lot worse than Roderick and The Long Winters, who will play their 2003 indie classic When I Pretend to Fall in its entirety. Not only is the album one of the great indie releases of the aughts, but if you befriend Roderick and write a song with him, you could win an award like the one he got for his work with Canadian singer/ get your band signed, at least you’ll spend an songwriter Kathleen Edwards: the 2012 SOCAN evening hearing some of the best indie rock Songwriting Prize, given annually to the most this town has to offer while celebrating the 15th creative and artistic work in Canadian indepenb-day of Barsuk Records. With Minor Alps, Sunset Valley. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th dent music. St., 682-1414, stgpresents.org. 7:30 p.m. $15 Bazan is another guy who’s been making adv./$20 DOS. DAVE LAKE gorgeous music in this town for years—first in

39


arts&culture» Music

NTw.RlittleYreMdhUenS.coIC LIVE COUww m

LocaLReLeases

Borkowski’s voice, which is sometimes hardly louder than a whisper and has the faintest hint of a rasp, all adding to the soothing effect. Evans’ bass provides a nice groove no matter what Borkowski is singing about, and his string arrangements provide that extra dose of emotion. The album’s 12 songs, many of which near or pass the five-minute mark, are simple, with minimal supporting instrumentation, but because of Borkowski’s enchanting voice and thoughtful lyrics, Polymorph is a standout—one listeners will return to time after time.

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 7TH

JUKEHOUSE HOUNDS 9PM - $3 COVER

SAMMY STEELE 9PM - $5 COVER

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 10TH

DAVANOS

9PM - $3 COVER 4PM OPEN MIC / ACOUSTIC JAM W/ BILLY BODACIOUS TUESDAY NOVEMBER 12TH

T & D REVUE 9PM - NO COVER

MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY

KARAOKE WITH DJ FORREST GUMP 9:00PM • NO COVER

FREE COUNTRY DANCE LESSONS WITH OUR HOST MARY ANN AT 8PM; SUN, MON, TUES

HAPPY HOUR 9AM-NOON & 4-7 PM • MON-FRI

WELL DRINKS & DOMESTIC BOTTLED BEER $2 16 OZ. MICROS $3.50 DINNER: 5-10PM EVERYDAY BREAKFAST & LUNCH: SAT 8AM-2PM / SUN 9AM-2PM 7115 WOODLAWN AVENUE NE 522-1168 2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 jazzalley.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 6 — 12, 2013

JAZZ ALLEY IS A SUPPER CLUB

40

RACHELLE FERRELL THURS, NOV 7 - SUN, NOV 10

Singer, pianist and crossover artist who is equally at home with gospel, pop, classical music and jazz

JEFF KASHIWA AND COASTAL ACCESS TUES, NOV 12 - WED, NOV 13 Seattle’s own smooth jazz saxophonist

STEVE TYRELL WITH SPECIAL GUEST DIANE SCHUUR THURS, NOV 14 - SUN, NOV 17

Jazz’s top two Grammy-winning vocal crooners

CHRIS SCHMIDT/RICKIO WIIDS

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 8TH & SATURDAY NOVEMBER 9TH

AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

Sweet Madness, Made in Spokane 1978–1981 (out now, Light in the Attic, sweetmadnessband. com) If you’ve seen the recent documentary A Band Called Death, you know it’s possible for an obscure but ahead-of-its-time band to surface virtually out of nowhere. Death’s early-’70s speedy hard rock predated punk and was a revelation to the tiny group of followers who discovered the band via its rare 7-inch and, later, the Internet—that is, at least until the movie came out and Chicago-based indie label Drag City issued a proper album. In the same way, Light in the Attic found success after reissuing the first two albums of singer/songwriter Rodriguez, the subject of the recent cult documentary Searching for Sugar Man. Spokane’s Sweet Madness follows a similar template, with its appearance in 2011’s punk documentary SpokAnarchy!, which earned it newfound attention, and, at last, this reissue—which, in this digital age, should dramatically widen the band’s reach. Made in Spokane culls 16 of its songs, which veer from punk to New Wave to garage and power pop, bringing to mind a slew of the era’s bands: Devo, the Only Ones, Talking Heads, the Replacements. Sweet Madness brought punk to Spokane and ignited a micro-scene; if the attention for the reissue continues, it just might do it again. DAVE LAKE Kate Borkowski, Polymorph (out now, selfreleased, kateborkowski.com) A word of advice: Do not listen to Polymorph at work. Or while operating heavy machinery. Borkowski’s voice is so warm and inviting, a lullaby beckoning you to sleep. There are a couple more-upbeat songs (“Fiddlehead,” “Kamikaze Geese”), but overall the album is more appropriate for the calm at the end of a long day. Produced by Grammynominated producer/Tori Amos bassist Jon Evans, Polymorph is Borkowski’s debut album, and it shows a singer bound for a long career. There’s an ethereal, haunting, yet jazzy air to

THE FOUR FRESHMEN TUES, NOV 19 - THURS, NOV 21

American male vocal band blending openharmonic jazz with big band vocal group sounds founded in the barbershop tradition

TAJ MAHAL TRIO FRI, NOV 22 - SUN, DEC 1 (CLOSED MON, NOV 25TH & THANKSGIVING)

Two-time Grammy winner and one of the most influential America blues and roots artists of the past half-century

all ages | free parking full schedule at jazzalley.com

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Spekulation, Doc Watson: The Instrumental Album (out now, self-released, spekulationmusic.com) The Seattle rapper’s latest marries the sounds of the ’70s with today’s beat-heavy production aesthetic. Orchestral strings, horns, and wahwah guitar saturate these 13 tracks, and opener “We’ve Got All Night” rocks an up-tempo blues/ hip-hop blend over a funky bass riff. Elsewhere you’ll find electric currents of mid-’70s discoflecked soul, particularly on “Summer Dresses” and “Good Enough.” Frequent collaborator Nate Omdal is featured on closing track “So I’ll Go,” which deconstructs Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You” over a sparse acoustic bass line. The album’s first single, “SinnerMan,” is a dubstep remix of that spiritual, and the must-see video features dancer Marquese Scott’s interpretation. Spekulation and Omdal, in fact, coscored the original music to The Enemy Within, a genre-bending dance film that features Scott and three other contemporary dancers, and its movie trailers highlight tracks from this album, too. MICHAEL F. BERRY

Susy Sun, Wanderlust EP (out now, self-released, susysun.com) The second release from this Seattle-based singer/songwriter (real name, Susy Sundborg) is a six-track dalliance into her dreamy, whimsical world. Similar to indie-pop staples Ingrid Michaelson and Sia, Sundborg creates a brand of pop by turns chilling, honest, and sugary-sweet—in a way that has you rooting for her on the crazy battlefield of love, if only because her songs make you feel warm and lovely (even if they’re sad). In addition to Sundborg’s vividly honest lyrics, Wanderlust features soaring arrangements by violinist Andrew Joslyn, which provide Sundborg’s songs with a rich chamberpop sound. Sundborg’s delivery of sparkling melodies and powerful storytelling make this EP worth a listen. It may not be the edgiest EP you’ll hear all year, but if your heart is aching—or just in need of an impassioned jump-start—this release will feel just right. KEEGAN PROSSER E

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Let Marijuana Patients Grow Their Own

T

he current power grab in Washington state politics—in which the Liquor Control Board, having effectively been fired by voters from selling alcohol, was then put in charge of recreational marijuana under legalization measure I-502—is a fascinating study in the difference between political promises and political reality. A complete ban on home BY STEVE ELLIOTT growing by medical-marijuana patients is one of the proposed new rules unveiled by the Board on October 21. Along with a proposed ban on collective gardens— which would effectively take out medical-marijuana dispensaries—the growing ban would give patients no other option than the recreational pot stores established under I-502. The promise, of course, was that I-502 “wouldn’t negatively impact” patients by compromising their safe access to cannabis. The reality, as is becoming more and more apparent, is that patients and the collectives that supply them are seen as impediments to recreational-marijuana profits, and the fat tax proceeds expected to follow. Simply put, the LCB is attempting to “fold in” the medical-marijuana market, primarily over concern that untaxed dispensaries would prove too much competition for state-licensed recreational-pot stores. While state officials began a few months ago on a more honest note—admitting that the specter of competition is the reason they found it necessary to gut the state’s 15-year-old medicalmarijuana law—their talking points quickly shifted to being “in compliance” with “federal guidelines,” with the threat of Drug Enforcement Administration raids always a reality. While such factors could conceivably be a source of legitimate concern for dispensaries, indiSTEVE ELLIOTT

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vidual patients growing medicine at home are under no such threat. The federal government has shown no interest in raiding individual patients growing their own—in fact, it has specifically expressed a disinclination to do so, from President Obama down through the chain of command. So why did it suddenly become so crucial to force patients—many of them on fixed incomes, and economically marginal—to stop growing their own medicine, when that’s the only way so many of them can afford any cannabis at all? You guessed it—because the Liquor Control Board wants even patients to have to go to their licensed recreational-marijuana stores (and pay those high taxes, you betcha!), because growing their own would be “bad for profits.” With absolutely no credible threat of federal raids on individual patient grows, even to suggest that “federal guidelines” are any excuse for taking away the established right of medical-marijuana patients to grow their own is beyond absurd, it is cruel and capricious—especially since many patients cultivate very specialized strains crafted to address their specific symptoms. Many of these strains are, for example, high in CBD, which doesn’t get you high at all, but is effective against pain and inflammation. Do you really expect to find those strains in a recreational-marijuana store? Lending an air of Kafkaesque unreality to the idea of patients having to access their medicine through recreational-marijuana stores is the fact that these staffers, unlike dispensary employees, will likely know nothing about cannabis’ medicinal uses—and even if they do, under LCB rules they are forbidden to discuss it. Simply put: If home-growing is taken away from patients, some of the sickest and most vulnerable will no longer have medicine. Do we really want to do that in the name of profits? E Steve Elliott edits Toke Signals, tokesignals.com, an irreverent, independent blog of cannabis news, views, and information.

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NVIDIA Corporation, market leader in graphics and digital media processors, has an engineering opportunity in Redmond, WA: Sr. Compiler Engr (COM01), contribute to NVIDIA’s Compiler Engineering Technology advancement; and Sr. Systems Software Engr (SSWE235), facilitate the development of code generation, debug and optimization tools for NVIDIA’s propriety soft-modem processor. If interested, ref job code and send to: NVIDIA Corporation. Attn: MS04 (L.Lashgari). 2701 San Tomas Expressway, Santa Clara, CA 95050. Please no phone calls, emails or faxes.

Employment General

ADVERTISING & MARKETING COORDINATOR Seattle Weekly, one of Seattle’s most respected publications and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking an Advertising and Marketing Coordinator to assist with multi-platform advertising and marketing solutions of print, web, mobile, e-newsletters, event sponsorships and glossy publications. Responsibilities include but are not limited to management of digital inventory in DFP, social media, contesting, events, house marketing, newsletters and coordinating with staff as it relates to these duties. The right individual will be a highly organized, responsible, self-motivated, customer-comes-first proven problem solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match). If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to hreast@soundpublishing.com

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MY FRIENDS & MORE Holiday Bazaar! Join us to Celebrate our 14th Anniversary of Community Fun with Fabulous Local Artisans! Saturday, November 16th, 10am to 5pm, one block North of Home Depot (18701 120th Ave NE). Santa arrives at 1pm! Parents bring your Camera for Free Photos with Santa! Pets Welcome! Free Admission, Free Parking, Free Refreshments and Free Children’s Craft and Play Area Provided! Tour Buses Welcome. Full Wheelchair and Stroller Access. www.craftybug.com

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Auto Events/ Auctions Stan’s Mountain View Towing Inc Abandoned Vehicle Auction 9000 Delridge Way SW, Seattle WA Wednesday 11/13/13 Gates Open 9AM, Auction 12 PM 206-767-4848

Schneider National is Hiring Truck Drivers s ,OCAL)NTERMODALWORKOPPORTUNITIES s $!),9(/-%4)-% s ./ 4/5#(&2%)'(4 s %ARNUPTO YEARBASEDON EXPERIENCE s $RIVERSWITHATLEASTMONTHS EXPERIENCESHOULDAPPLY

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 6 — 12, 2013

Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

Employment General

EOE M/F/D/V

Employment Computer/Technology

43


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Seattle Weekly, November 06, 2013