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HAUNTED HAYRIDE AND OROVILLE HOMECOMING Photos, pages A2-3

MOSQUITO OPEN HOUSE

Information about Mosquito District Nov. 6 at 5 p.m. at Oroville City Hall BEFORE BED SATURDAY, NOV. 2

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

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Pellet gun causes lockdown at Tonasket Schools TONASKET – Devin Martinez, an 18-year-old Tonasket High School student, is in custody after being spotted on the Tonasket High School campus with what turned out to be a pellet gun, causing a district-wide lockdown for nearly an hour on Thursday, Oct. 24. “Basically he was being stupid,” said Tonasket Police Chief Rob Burks. “He said he’d bought it from a friend the night before and left it hidden overnight near the school. During lunch he was trying to sneak it to a friend’s car. “Someone saw him walking across the parking lot trying to hide it, and it has a wood stock so it looks like a real rifle. “He also had a knife on him, so between

that and the pellet gun we booked him cuted our district safety drill swiftly to for possession of a dangerous weapon on ensure the safety of our children. The school grounds.” person of interest “There was a was apprehended perceived threat in by our local law “The elementary looked like e n f o r c e m e n t . the community of a male walking toward a vacuum cleaner hit it. They Upon notification our campus with a from authorities, were out on recess and they school resumed as rifle at approximately 12 p.m …” said sucked into that building so normal.” Superintendent Paul Burks said the fast.” Turner in a stateoriginal call to ment. “The district dispatch indiPaul Turner, immediately put cated the suspect Superintendent, Tonasket School District schools into lockwas armed with a down. Students, handgun. He said staff and local law enforcement exe- he called Okanogan County Sheriff for

Quick reports on test results

all available units, put local EMS on stand-by and alerted the Tonasket Fire Department for traffic control. Burks said when he arrived at the school, “The kid had run off. We had one deputy on the scene already so I headed down the hill (toward town) to see if I could find anyone running, but didn’t. When I got back the principal and vice principal were walking with the kid, but he didn’t have a gun. So I asked him where the gun was; he took me to it and it turned out to be a pellet rifle.” Burks said Martinez claimed to not understand what the fuss was over a pellet rifle. “We have kids in class thinking there

might be a shooting, parents hearing about it and wondering what’s going on,” Burks said. “He wasted the time of fire, police and EMT. If I’d have pulled up on him while he was putting the gun in the car I very well could have pulled my gun on him. “With all the incidents we hear about these days, you don’t mess with something like that where someone could get shot.”

DEBRIEFING Turner said at the Monday, Oct. 28, Tonasket School Board meeting that he was very pleased with the overall

SEE LOCKDOWN | PG A8

Ground broken for Water Ranch

CELEBRATING THE WATER RANCH

Set for completion next Spring

BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – At last Monday’s Oroville School Board meeting Superintendent Steve Quick reported on several test results that track student progress over the years. Quick said that although students showed increased progress in some areas, there were others were more work was needed. He also said the district’s results compared favorably to other nearby districts.

“I think we’re very compatible with Tonasket... when it comes right down to it our kids perform just as well on tests”

Above, Jesse Olson cuts the ribbon at the Tonasket Water Ranch site at Chief Tonasket Park with some help from Mayor Patrick Plumb and encouragement from friends; left, project organizer Linda black and Plumb officially break ground on the Water Ranch, which is planned for opening next summer.

Supt. Steve Quick, Oroville School District

In going over the MSP/HSPE results for various grade levels. He projected charts that showed students’ progress over several years. “I think we’re very comparable to Tonasket... when it comes right down to it our kids perform just as well on all the tests. We scored a little higher in some areas than Tonasket and in some areas Tonasket scored a little higher,” said Quick. Principal Sarmiento said the charts reflect that student progress tends to dip as they transition from elementary school to junior high or middle school, much as it does across the state. “It is that period at the start of when you get the kids and when they leave (the elementary),” said board chairman Rocky DeVon in response. “We’ve got to get both schools on board to get a handle on that.” Under “Good News and Announcements” he announced that Lily Hilderbrand, a junior at OHS, will serve as the student representative to the board for the rest of the school year. During reports from the principals and Quick, Hilderbrand got the chance to talk about what was happening at the school. She said that last week was

SEE SCHOOLS | PG A4

Brent Baker/staff photo

TONASKET - There’s no turning back now. The Tonasket Water Ranch took another step toward becoming a reality on Friday, Oct. 26, as Linda Black and her team of organizers hosted a groundbreaking ceremony at Chief Tonasket Park to celebrate the beginning of the final stages of Black’s water park dream. After a year of fundraising - and a lot more time than that working with engineers, agencies and local businesses to make the park a reality - Black and Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb plunged their gold shovels into the dirt at the water park site. But not until after Tonasket Elementary School fourth graders, invited to the groundbreaking party, hosed down the mayor, TES principal Jeremy Clark and “Splash-man,” following Plumb and Jesse Olson performing the official ribbon-cutting. “I wanted the community to understand, with this ceremonial ground-breaking, that this really is happening,” Black said. “Right now I’m relieved; I’ll really be happy once it’s built. But I’m relieved because there is no turning back.” Black said there is still about $10,000 to be raised for things like picnic tables and some other thigns that aren’t part of the basic

SEE RANCH | PG A8

Trick or Treaters welcomed downtown Halloween party planned at Tonasket CCC BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

NORTH COUNTY – Oroville merchants are again offering children a safe place to come Trick or Treating at their places of business this Halloween from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. The popular annual event

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 43

is sponsored by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce and participating businesses can be spotted by the green “Trick or Treat Here” signs on their windows or doors. The chamber is also encouraging staff at local businesses to dress up and decorate their places of business for the annual contest. As in past years the Chamber of Commerce will be sending around a group of judges to decide which businesses have the best costumes and the best decorations. Past winners have included the Oroville City Hall, the Oroville School District Office, Sterling Bank, Oroville Reman

and Reload and RE/MAX Town and Country Realty. In Tonasket, North Valley Hospital is inviting kids to come by and Trick or Treat from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Halloween Party In addition, The Tonasket Community Cultural Center will be having a Halloween Party for all kids. They will have finger foods, candy, games and a haunted house in the back room. The fun starts at 5 p.m. The Gazette-Tribune hopes that everyone will have a safe and fun Halloween.

Look for the Green Trick or Treat Here signs at local Oroville businesses.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Hayride Homecoming Letters/Opinion

A2 A3 A5

Community A6-7 Cops & Courts A9 Classifieds/Legals A10

Real Estate Sports Obituaries

A11 A12-13 A14


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 31, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

‘Spooktacularʻ Haunted Hayride Photos by Gary DeVon

It takes a lot of volunteers to make each year’s Haunted Hayride a success. This year 81 ‘spooktacular’ people volunteered their time to throw a scare into 535 hayriders last Saturday night. The free event is sponsored by Oroville’s RE/MAX Lake & Country Realty and Taber’s Taste of Summer.

Above, a real scare salon “just a little off the top please,” below, right, some of the more than 500 riders on return from their adventure in the haunted orchard above Taber’s Taste of Summer Fruit Barn north of Oroville.

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OCTOBER 31, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE 2013 OROVILLE HIGH SCHOOL HOMECOMING

Above, Sierra Speiker is crowned homecoming queen; right, Speiker and senior princesses Brittany Jewett and Nadia Maldonado; below, Meagan Moralez and Kaitlyn Grunst dress up as well, just not quite so formally.

Top, the senior PowderPuff football team shows off its muscle; middle, the Hornet football team wore pink socks to raise awareness for and raise funds to fight breast cancer (as part of Ashley Marcolin’s senior project); bottom, boys and girls traded off clothing for the day.

Photos by Brent Baker & Oroville HS Yearbook Staff

Clockwise from above, the homecoming court and family members line up during halftime ceremonies of last Friday’s football game; fans gathered as the traditional bonfire took down a pile of old apple crates (and a wandering Cougar); senior football players, cheerleaders and head football coach Tam Hutchinson gather in the bed of a pickup truck during the bonfire.

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Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 31, 2013

Tonasket FFA takes 2nd at national convention The Gazette-Tribune

LOUISVILLE, KY - For the second time in three years, a Tonasket FFA team is bringing a national runner-up trophy home from the national FFA convention. Sophomores Rade Pilkinton, Jenna Valentine, Janelle Catone,

Jordan Hughes, Sammie Earley, Madison Bayless and Rachel Silverthorn, who won the state Rituals championship last spring, matched the stellar finish of the 2011 Parliamentary Procedure team for the best team finish in the storied history of the Tonasket FFA program.

Pilkinton also won a national championship for his individual performance. They completed their competition Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 29. We will have more details on the team’s trip to the 86th national FFA convention in next week’s Gazette-Tribune.

Brent Baker/staff photo

North Valley Hospital surgery supervisor Trevor Rise shows off one of the four exam rooms in the newly-opened second floor surgery center during last Friday’s open house.

NVH celebrates opening of new surgical center By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com Gary DeVon/staff photos

Oroville Shipping company is located just south of the U.S./Canadian Border at 33436B Hwy. 97 in Oroville.

Oroville Shipping Company, for all your shipping needs By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE Oroville Shipping Company is the newest business set up to meet the public’s shipping needs. The business is located at 33436B Hwy. 97 north of Oroville next door to the Blossom and Briar Floral and Gift Shop. Owner Tim Whiteaker said Oroville Shipping’s location between Oroville and the border makes it more convenient for Canadian customers who want to ship or pick-up packages from services like FedEx or UPS For Canadians this “gives you a U.S. address to ship to. Have your parcels sent to our secure facility... Once your parcel arrives, we will email you notification then you can come to Oroville and pick it up. We are fast, friendly and will help you with your shipment,” said Whiteaker, who adds that his company’s location is easy to find and there is lots of parking.

Tim Whiteaker, owner/operator of Oroville Shipping Company says packages can be pre-packaged or you can pack them up with materials he can supply. The business will also allow Canadian customers to give a U.S. address where packages can be shipped and later picked up. Look for the big FedEx Authorized Ship Center flag on the east side of the highway. Whiteaker and his wife Cenah also keep a stock of shipping materials on hand like boxes and

bubble wrap for customers that want to prepare their packages on site. Oroville Shipping Company can be reached by calling (509) 476-2089 or by email at orovilleshipping@outlook.com.

TONASKET - North Valley Hospitals showed off its new second-floor surgical center on Friday, treating visitors to tours and giving an overview of the services to be offered there, as well as some reflection on the road to getting the refurbishment completed. “We have everything upstairs,” said surgery supervisor Trevor Rise. “It’s the first time we’ve had everything in one place. It really helps with efficiency and continuity.” The open house opened with a number of speakers, including Business Development Coordinator Terri Orford, CEO Linda Michel, Dr. Paula Silha and Dr. Donald Sebesta. Orford read a congratulatory letter from U.S. Representative Doc Hastings. “This hospital and the services its dedicated team provides is an impressive example of patientfocused commitment,” he wrote. “Everybody associated with this hospital should be proud of the work that they do each day and the quality of care that the provide.” Michel talked about the challenges of getting the project completed, as well as some of the future challenges NVH faces as health care is in a state of rapid change. “We’ve experienced a very, very long journey getting here,” Michel said. “Every frustration or

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one are affecting rural health care so drastically that rural care may become extinct in the future. We are determined to continue our journey forward to provide high quality care in local communities and continue to focusing on what we all contribute to that cause every day on this campus.”

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OCTOBER 31, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Foley: Remembering an Eastern Washington giant BY REP. CATHY MCMORRIS ROGERS U.S. FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT - WASHINGTON STATE

Together we remember the life of an Eastern Washington giant, Tom Foley, who represented our Fifth Congressional District with distinction for 30 years. Even today, wheat farmers and all the citizens of our district benefit from the tremendous work he did to ensure that farmers had a voice in the nation’s capital, to protect Fairchild, and improve infrastructure. He rose as high as a person can rise in politics, chosen by his colleagues to be Speaker of the House, a position he held from 1989 to 1995. On the floor of the House last week I introduced a resolution in his memory, and the House adjourned out of respect for his passing. After he left the House, he served with distinction as America’s ambassador to Japan. In a country where experience and age are respected, his lifetime of service was a badge of honor that helped him keep trade relations between the world’s two biggest economies on a smooth course. After I was elected in 2004, I met with him when he visited Tom Foley during the State of the Union and on other occasions. He was always a perfect gentleman, kind and insightful. Now, as I am a member of House Leadership, I can see more clearly the challenges Speaker Foley faced and the great grace and wisdom he showed in carrying out those duties. On one hand, a member of Leadership has an ability to influence legislation in a manner that is important to our district. On the other hand, as a leader chosen by the other Members of Congress, it is important to set an example for your colleagues from all over the country. Tom Foley managed to thread that needle well. We remember Tom Foley’s leadership as a time that was less gridlocked than the one we live in today. Certainly there was no 24 hour news cycle, no MSNBC and Fox News, and little of the heated rhetoric we hear so often today from both sides. Before the “Republican Revolution” of 1994 that cost Tom Foley his congressional seat and Speakership, one party controlled the House for forty years. I grew up with that image of Congress, where extraordinary leaders like Tip O’Neil and Tom Foley battled with Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. Tom is survived by his wife Heather who worked for many years at his side in the Capitol. Our condolences go out to her and to everyone who was close to Ambassador, Speaker Foley. I have written this entire column without mentioning the political party to which Tom Foley belonged – because his passing is a loss for all of the 5th Congressional District regardless of party. But out of respect for the man and his memory, I will conclude by saying he was proudly and always a Democrat, who believed deeply in the principles of his party and in the greatness of our country. He loved and served his country, his party, and his district where he grew up. We should all follow his example.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Oroville Superintendent should apologize Dear Editor, I feel like us as citizens of Oroville need to be aware of an incident that happened at our last home football game vs. Liberty Bell. I would not like to travel two or more hours and be treated as the Oroville Superintendent did the Liberty Bell Mountain Lions supporters sitting in the bleachers. I was proud of both teams. It was an exciting well played game and the sportsmanship was great. But in the second half the Mountain Lions started closing the score and their supporters started cheering and encouraging their team. That is when our superintendent decided that “he” had enough of their supporting their team and was rude and down right embarrassing. He told them there was designated areas (which was not there at that time) and they needed to move. They asked if he was serious. He stated “yes” he was serious and if they didn’t move he wanted them to leave the game. Now to you citizens and you school board members what would happen if you were to drive some distance to support your children and you sat in an area that has a decent view of both ends of the field and was told you needed to move to the other end of the bleachers which is around the 20- 30 yard line of the south end of the field? Yes again this was in the second half. This was unacceptable hospitality and bad sportsmanship. Maybe our school board and community should have a second look at who is leading and supposed to be a role model for our children. I apologize to the Liberty Bell Mountain Lions Visitors but think it should be our superintendent apologizing. Good Luck to all the high school football teams and keep the good sportsmanship going. You are all enjoyable to keep up with. Jessie Rise Oroville

Reasons for decision Dear Editor, After reading the remarks in last week’s paper regarding our decision to hold an Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) class, decided to clarify the reasons. As the Coordinator for Oroville Ambulance, and after 26 years of experience in EMS, I have seen the transformation of pre-hospital care and specifically the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) certification intensify to improve the treatment of our patients. Prehospital is no longer just a ride to the hospital in an ambulance, we actually provide treatment to our patients and held responsible for Washingtn State DOH Standards of Care! The EMT class has gone from a 45 hour class to a class of 180 hours and along with that goes more skills, ongoing training, and responsibility. It has moved from a volunteer certification to a career certification in urban and some rural areas. The course curriculum is extremely challenging, as is the hours, and demands placed on the student. It is also very expensive. The Emergency Medical Responder class is

a 60 hour class, less extensive, less expensive, yet allows the student to obtain all but a few of the same skills as an EMT. When compared to the EMT class the EMR class is one third less hours and also one third of the cost. With careful thought and observation of other agencies, Oroville Ambulance has decided to use the EMR class as an entry level position for our agency. This would allow for responders to join our service without the high demands of the EMT class both academically and financially. It would allow responders to test the waters, so to speak, and see if they are cut out for EMS (some are not). After a year these responders would have the opportunity to move up to the EMT level should they choose. Later the EMT will have the opportunity to upgrade their certification to the AEMT (Advanced Emergency Medical Technician), should they desire. The entry level position and graduated opportunities to upgrade certifications has worked very well in other agencies, and since the demands of the EMT certification has increased. It does allow for those wanting to experience EMS to start out with less demand initially and take on more at their own choosing, or to opt out all together if they find EMS is really not a good fit for them, all without a huge initial investment. The EMR will also be much more prepared to achieve success in the EMT upgrade after responding for a year under the guidance of an EMT. The economy, busy lives, and small community make it difficult to find people willing to make the sacrifices of joining our service. We are trying to make it easy as possible to increase our responder numbers. The more responders we have, the less demands are placed on the entire agency. With our call volumes increasing dramatically, we also need to increase our responder numbers. The rewards of working in EMS are huge; there is nothing better than having the opportunity to help others. If you would like to join our agency, pick up an application at City Hall or call (509) 476-4320. We are holding an EMR class starting the end of November. Thank you and stay safe out there, Debra Donahue Oroville

This is who we are Dear Editor, We have become aware of the fact that Okanogan County Transportation and Nutrition (OCTN) is being confused with the recently placed on the ballot, Okanogan

County Transportation Authority(OCTA) bus line. We, OCTN is in no way connected with OCTA. When we were ask if we would support OCTA we informed them that the only way we would was if they would, with an open end contract with us to use our buses in conjunction with their program keeping our service as a personal service enabling our riders to retain their independence. They agreed. We are in no way connected with OCTA and their services. Our buses do a lot for the community by allowing anyone, not just Senior Citizens, to ride our buses for a small fee. We have the ability to transport bicycles, wheelchairs, walkers and etc, to enable our citizens to remain independent and free to go to job sites, personal and professional appointments and shopping. We are funded by Federal and State programs for seniors citizens, donations from seniors for the meals and rides, donations from the communities we serve and other grants that are available. While we have your attention, I would like to touch on some of the meal services that we produce. All six Senior Citizen Centers in Okanogan County serve meals at least twice a week. OCTN provides the employees that work these centers and provide very tasty dinners. OCTN also manages meals for the two other counties and the support given from their counties. OCTN does an exemplary job of management for all these services that are being provided. I do want to add, our meals aren’t just served to Senior Citizens, the public is also welcome, although they will have to pay a little bit more for their meal. We welcome you at any of our centers. We also want the people of Okanogan County to be aware of the fact that as our economy diminishes; we also are having some real funding problems as our State and Federal organizations face problems and would welcome donations from anyone. Our Senior Citizens have paid their dues and have a lot to offer to those following behind them. What we can learn from our Seniors is endless. We at the Okanogan County Senior Citizens Association (OCSCA) as a board and delegates are proud to oversee their operations, as well as In Home Healthcare of WA and our 6 Sr Centers in Okanogan County. Sally R Alexander Board President OCSCA

Power (back) to the people OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

So let’s talk about Initiative 517 on this season’s Washington state ballot. Oh gee, I hear you saying, I’d rather listen to six hours of old Al Sharpton speeches, but nay citizen, I-517 is the most important initiative on the ballot. Here’s why: I-517 is sometimes confused with I-522. The latter is a gimmick of some organic food industry marketeers to unnecessarily and expensively ‘label’ GMO foods (which the American Medical association, Bill Slusher the Centers for Disease Control and countless other credentialed scientific authorities have determined to be as harmless as any other food) which are ... already ... labeled. Vote no on the anti-corporate cultist, voodoo boogeyman scare called I-522. I-517, on the other hand, is a critical measure richly worthy of your yes vote. For anyone not familiar with it, Washington’s initiative process allows any Washingtonian or group thereof to offer up a new state law for a vote. With very few limitations, citizens may directly place a new law on the state books, bypassing the legislature entirely. The initiators must gather legally sufficient numbers of citizen signatures to place the initiative on the ballot, but if they do, and if it receives more citizen votes for than against, it becomes law. It is the purest form of free government. As the Washington State Constitution itself says beyond legal dispute: “The first power reserved by the people is the initiative.” The US Constitution also guarantees Americans “the right to petition the government.” I-517 provides Washingtonians the means to enjoy both these unequivocal, inalienable rights. Anyone confused about what “the first

power reserved by the people is the initiative” means? Anything not to be understood about “first power” or “the people?” Indeed, it would seem that the writers of both constitutions went to considerable semantic effort so their meaning would be plain enough that power puffed politicians and activist judges are not required to decipher it for us. I-517 makes our state’s great, unique and vital initiative process safer, more credible and more efficient for the citizens of Washington. I-517 places Washington on a par closer to other initiative states in three important ways: • it provides additional time for gathering the citizen signatures necessary to place an initiative on the ballot; • it ensures that signature gatherers may not be intimidated from their task by goon squads or political harassers of either party who oppose any given initiative; • and I-517 calls for legal challenges to an initiative (if any) to come after it is voted on rather than being used by opponents in either party as a shyster contrivance to block the public from an up or down vote on any qualifying initiative. Notice carefully that nowhere... nowhere... does I-517 pretend to favor one political party or another. In fact it serves the citizens of both parties equally. I-517 is not a partisan issue from the standpoint of the public interest. It protects and enhances the ability of citizens of both parties equally to place the appropriate constitutional leash on runaway power-player politicians of either party. So, you might reasonably ask, who would thus vote against I-517? Opponents of Washington’s initiative process, and by extension the Initiative 517 that would protect it, are those who would keep the people the dominated serfs of the legislature, unable to directly influence the laws that govern them. In other words, after

all the contrary excuses are in, for opponents of I-517 it’s ultimately about keeping constitutionally guaranteed power from the people and concentrating it all in the hands of the political elite. Not all but far too many lawmakers don’t want to be held accountable and correctable by the public for reasons that are abundantly apparent daily. They vastly prefer that the public exclusively pay taxes (more and more taxes, Democrats would have it), stay obediently in their designated governmental holding pens, and leave the heavy thinking to the cocktail wizards in Olympia. Consider this constitutionally obscene travesty, citizens of Washington: Again and again, Washingtonians have overwhelmingly passed initiatives to limit predominantly Democrat legislators from extorting taxpayers into poverty with their congenital fetish for endlessly increased, perpetual taxes. As soon as the required two years after these initiatives passed, said Democrat legislators rushed every time to strip the people of their constitutional, majority mandate that legislators of both parties answer to the citizen by initiative. What more extraordinary a threat to freedom and democracy could possibly exist than such a betrayal by elected legislators? What more urgent a call for protecting our initiative process? Please, vote a resounding YES for I-517. Remind those legislators who seem so woefully confused about it that they work for us, not the other way around. William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. His column appears here twice monthly. Enjoy-his down and-dirty, Southern murder mystery Shepherd of the Wolves - Redux - Not Your Mommy’s Book Club Selection (Amazon or your local bookstore). He may be contacted at williamslusher@live.com.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 31, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Don’t forget to buy some Halloween candy Happy Halloween! Did you buy the the (God) out of “So Help Me God” is treats for the kids too early and eat them not popular with a lot of folks. and have to buy more? Sometimes that Last Friday open house was held happens at our house because I always at Tonasket Hospital Surgical Center. buy what I like and it is so tempting. Thanks to being early, (for once) we You’d think after all these years I’d were privileged to have a private tour. smarten up. But, on the other Thanks, Trevor Rise. What hand, why should I? It is said a lot of nice improvements now, that chocolate is good have been made. A bucket for us. of paint here, a moved partiWell, the first game at tion there, and you have an Gonzaga has been played. It inviting atmosphere. was pretty “lop-sided” and we Having used the hospiknow that it won’t always be tal on different occasions, that way, but isn’t it always since 1947, back in the old fun to win? Thanks to Edna St. Martins days, with nuns Leslie’s call I knew of it. quietly moving about, doing Only in a small town do such THIS & THAT the cooking, sewing, canthings happen. ning, utilizing “road kill” Joyce Emry Isn’t it amazing that the deer and many other money good ol’ USA has gotten saving ways, that wouldn’t this far without the interference of the pass many of the rules and regulations ACLU? Now they have filed suit to these days. I’ve always been treated end prayer from the military, completely. with respect and dignity and so glad How absurd. And they’ll probably win. Arthur Lund had the foresight to build The timing for changing the style of the hospital, with the help of the comMarine Corps hats is probably not a munity (sometimes when they weren’t good thing, at this time. (if at all). Some in favor of helping) but to get their loan, folks just don’t understand the mean- they donated. ing of “cutting back on unnecessary As with everything, there are those spending” when the country has severe who speak harshly of the hospital, but financial problems. And then there are many lives have been saved, over the those that don’t understand that taking years, by having the facility, close by.

And with the new equipment they have many more procedures can be done, efficiently and safely, and it makes it more inviting for visiting doctors to participate. Not everything is done perfectly, but neither does that happen in the larger facilities. (from personal experience I could tell you about that, but that is another story.) It was indeed a pleasure meeting the doctors and nurses and other staff members that make the hospital “work,” as well as Extended Care facility. A rural and depressed community, as we are here in the Okanogan, we are blessed to have the facility. And yes, it is a shame we lost the Assisted Living portion, and a lot of finger pointing has been done about that, but there are a lot of answers about that, that didn’t surface, until it was too late (and no they didn’t pay me to write this). And once again let me thank all you good folks out there, that know me only by the photo at the heading of “This and That” for taking the time to say they enjoy that little section of the paper, a lot. Kay Tracy’s daughter, Sharon, tells me that her mom is okay with and appreciates, short visits. So, stop in at Extended Care. If she doesn’t remember you, try another day. She’s one special lady! I suppose, since we are into November, we’d better dig out the winter coats,

scarves, gloves and other “warm” accessories. I don’t like getting all “bundled” up and resist as long as I can. I’m kinda the barometer at the Senior Center. When they see me wearing a coat, they figure it must be colder. Now, that Erv Friemuth is no longer with us, his red and yellow coats telling us the temperatures, are truly missed. I’m on the BBC diet... Buy Bigger Clothes! Vicki and Walt Hart had another successful Halloween party last Friday night. Folks of all ages! Families, singles, couples, little kids, brought goodies to share. Wilders (and friends) provided nice music. The Harts surely have proven that you can stay sober and still have a good time. Some good costumes were seen, but Walt wasn’t as outstanding, as he was last year…or so it seemed to me. I’m hearing of break-ins and walk-ins into some folks homes, so you’d better lock up. It is unfortunate that some would rather steal other folks property than do an honest days work. And usually, drugs are at the bottom of the problem. As the holiday season approaches, soon we’ll start hearing the hullabaloo about Christmas songs not being allowed to be sung in school programs or decorations displayed on government properties etc. The few that that oppose are like super glue… they hang on tight. And, of course, they win, sometimes. It sure is lot more convenient to have mail-in ballots, isn’t it? Now that the barrier’s have been removed from the World War II Memorial, (that never should have been there in the first place), and if you are a veteran and physically able, sign up for

NVCS Welcomes New Board Member

TERRIFIC KIDS

Submitted by Jackie Valiquette

With our Terrific Kids for the month of October we have our Co-chairs of the Kiwanis Terrific Kids program Wayne Verbeck and Bill Dean. This program has been a very successful project for the Kiwanis Club and is appreciated by the Terrific Kids and the community.

THE LEARNING TREE

The NVCS Board of Directors is pleased to announce the selection of Cynthia (Cindy) Ground to complete our seven member Board. Cindy has enjoyed a long relationship with the program, taking community schools classes in every area – recreational, cultural and educational.

She is the owner of Oroville Chiropractic Clinic, has taught classes for the NVCS program, and is the perfect choice for a quality addition to the Board. Welcome, Cindy! ALIEN AGENDA – what on earth? Well, maybe NOT on earth. Whatever your beliefs, open your mind to the possibilities. Could there be an extrater-

First round of pool matches begin Nov. 7

POOL LEAGUE

North Valley Community Schools

Submitted photo

taking the Honor Flight to Washington DC. It is truly one of the highlights in my husband’s memory bank. There is no cost, the flight has been made even easier and even if you are wheelchair bound, you can do it. But you gotta get on the list. It’s important to leave a twinkle in your wrinkles! And be thankful that wrinkles don’t hurt. And be thankful that gray hair (or no hair) doesn’t cause you to gain weight. And be thankful you don’t always catch everything everyone says…or feel that you need to. It’s bazaar time at the United Methodist Church, Nov. 2 and spaghetti dinner with the good sauce by the recipe Ralph Patterson left behind. Can’t do stairs? There will be seating for you upstairs. Dinner will include dessert, as always. Time is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. And that’s next Saturday. Lunch is from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. About 50 friends and relatives of Judy Coonfield gathered at the above church, last Friday, for food and remembering. Have you heard the new song… My Name is America? It sure beats the heck out of some of the rap songs that are full of the “F” word and other derogatory words. Let’s hope that both the writer and performer get accolades for “telling it like it is,” a patriotic song, sung with feeling and you can even understand the words. Writer is Kurt Orning and performed by Todd Allen Herendeen. I’ve never heard of him but let’s hope that will change. As of Sunday, still no killing frost but the wind in howling and there’s a chill in the air, after a bit or rain fell early Sunday morning.

It’s that time of year again. We are ready to play pool Yep, by the time the newspaper comes out, we will be less than a week away from our first matches. Some teams jumped up and rearranged themselves and some

Halloween Party planned at Senior Center

teams will play with the same members they’ve had forever. There is an odd number of teams this year so there will be “byes” to contend with. We will still be fielding a good number of

OROVILLE SENIORS

have a luncheon dish. Last week I neglected to thank Oroville Senior Center all those who donate books, puzzles, cassettes, DVD s. and talking The buzz is all about the books. Halloween Party scheduled We currently have quite a supfor the 31st. Doris Hughes and ply of books and are looking for Evelyn Dull have been planning more as they seem to be on a for some time (they have won rotating basis and come and go. the last two years) so put on your With winter coming on I am thinking caps. Maybe you too sure we will be using and reading Can be a winner. We will have more books. prizes for those who are not the One of our members has donatbig winner. ed several muumuu’s or caftans in Bazaars are popping up all a larger size so if you require a around the Valley. Chesaw Bazaar large size or know someone who is scheduled for next Saturday,Nov. does, come take a look in the 2 at the Community Budding. pool room. A donation would be The Senior Center Bazaar and appreciated. PTO’s are in December and I am Pinochle Scores for Oct. 26: not sure when Tonasket will be The door prize was won by Ed holding theirs. The Senior Bazaar Craig who was high scoring man is Dec. 7, so contact Boots Emry for the evening; Also, Ed and to reserve a table. She already has Wilma Coburn also shared 1,500 five reserved tables, a trump, but due to the Why not startsoagive newher holiday tradition? Make thisfact the that call at time (509) of 476-3353. We are still Wilma a different partner year that you help save forand a child’s college working on the menu, but we will had 1,500 the week before, the education.

restrial presence among us? Are we the only planet that supports life? You may be surprised at the degree of influence aliens have had in our history. This will be a compelling discussion. Three sessions begin November 5. Classes coming up: Voice Training (six sessions begin Nov. 5); Nuts and Bolts (for non-profits, Nov. 6); Beginning Acrylic Painting (two sessions begin Nov. 7); and Landlord & Tenant Law (Nov. 11. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011 or email her at community.schools@oroville.wednet. edu to register for these classes. Online it’s www.northvalleycommunityschools.com. teams to play “in the middle of the week, in the middle of the winter.” The Pastime Bar and Grill is a new sponsor this year and we welcome them aboard. We met Leslie from The Chesaw Tavern at the last meeting and she seems very supportive. So, we will be off to our usual running start on Wednesday, Nov. 6 at 7 p.m. See you there. pot only contained $2.50. Wilma Coburn was the high scoring woman. Sally Eder had the only 300 pinochle of the evening and it was dealt to her. More next time.

By Dolly Engelbretson

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket is hoping for a similar turnout for Saturday’s auction as it had for last year’s event.

Annual Auction Nov. 2 Submitted by Janet Culp CCC of Tonasket

The Community Cultural Center’s annual auction will be held on Saturday Nov. 2. Doors open at 5:00 p.m., silent auction will be open from 5:007:00. Dinner will be served at 6:00. Live auction will begin at 7:00. This event will support the centers winter operating expenses including heat, electricity, and insurance. Dinner will be both meat and vegetarian lasagna, green salad

COMMUNITY CULTURAL CENTER w/ Italian dressing, homemade French bread, squash soup and ginger carrots. Various items have been donated by our community for this auction including: handmade quilt, Seattle Mariners baseball package, tickets to ACT theater and dinner at Salty’s (Seattle), beautiful art prints, kitchen items, airplane flight, sheep cheese

round, wheel barrow with gardening tools, truck load of wood, GPS unit, wooden wall art, a variety of desserts and gift certificates, and much, much more. Announcer Tryg Culp will bring forth the evening, auctioneer Rich Fewkes will conduct the live auction, and background music will be provided by Kyle McConnell. This annual auction in the big back room of the CCC is always entertaining and fun. Please come support our community center. Donations are being accepted. Please call 486-1328 for more information.

Omak breast cancer fundraiser Submitted by Lynn Hoover

OMAK - The 2nd annual Bowling for Boobies will be held this Saturday, Nov. 2, at Valley Lanes in Omak. Doors will open at 6 p.m. for dinner and drink specials with bowling and fun activities to begin at 7 p.m. Cost

is $15 per person. Advance tickets are available from any Bouncin’ for Boobies Board Member or at Valley Lanes. Tickets can also be purchased at the door. Must be 21 or older to attend. An all pink basket will also be raffled off with many items donated by local businesses and individuals. Raffle

basket compiled and donated by Panda Dunckel. This is another great Bouncin’ for Boobies event to help raise money for local fighters battling cancer. For more information about Bouncin’ for Boobies, please visit the Bouncin’ for Boobies page on Facebook.

Give a Holiday Gift That Doesn’t End When the aBatteries Give Holiday Run Gift Out. That Doesn’t End When the Batteries Run Out.

Give a Holiday Gift You can’t control Keep a level head in That Doesn’t End When the market, butmarket. you an up-and-down the Out. can Batteries control yourRun decisions.

Edward Jones can work with you to www.edwardjones.com develop a strategy www.edwardjones.com save foracollege. One option is a Make 529 college Whytonot start new holiday tradition? this thesavings where giftsave can for have tax benefits for you, timeplan, of year thattoday’s you help a child’s college family members and the child.* education. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in certainJones states forcan thosework residents. Edward with you to develop a strategy

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Financial Advisor

certain states. for those residents.

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

32 N Main St Suite A WA 98841 Sandra Rasmussen To makeOmak, your college savings gift in time 509-826-1638 Financial Advisor Sandra Rasmussen . for the holidays, call or visit today.

Advisor 32 N Main St Suite AFinancial . www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Omak, WA 98841 32 N Main St Suite A

OLIVER THEATR

At the

Enjoy your  evening  out,  taking   in  a  movie  at  the  Oliver  Theatre!  

MOVIES

November, 2013  Programme                                  Visit  Our  Website  

www.olivertheatre.ca

Oliver Theatre

Thurs. –  Fri.  –  Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.   Oct.  31,  Nov.  1  –  2  –  3  –  4  –  5     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:30  p.m.  

Oliver, B.C.

Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

250-498-2277 PG

THURS.- FRI.–SAT.–SUN.–MON.– TUES. OCT.31, NOV.1–2–3–4–5 Thurs. -­  Fri.          Nov.  7  –  8     SHOWTIMES ON FRI.&SAT. 7&9:30PM. Showtimes  on  Fri.  @  7:00  &  9:25  p.m.   Violence,  coarse  language.  

RUSH THURS.-FRI. NOV.7-8 SHOWTIMES ON FRI. 7PM&9:25PM 14

Sexually suggestive  scenes,  scenes  of  accident  trauma.  

JACKASS PRESENTS BAD GRANDPA SAT.-SUN-MON.-TUES., THURS. NOV. 9-10-11-12,14

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.     Nov.  9  –  10  –  11  –  12,  14     14

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com Crude content,  coarse  and  sexual  language.  

Monday, Nov.  11  @  2:00  p.m.  

100 min ENDERS GAMEFree Family  MR atinee  

Sponsored By  The  Royal  Canadian  Legion  –  Branch  97  

– Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.  -­  Tues.     Action/Adventure/Sci Fi Fri.  Nov.   15  –  16  –  17  –  18  -­  19     Starring Harrison Ford, Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:15  p.m.   Asa Butterfield, Hailee Steinfeld, Viola Davis. Fri. 7:00, 9:45 Sat.*4:15,7:00, 9:45 Sun. *4:15,7:00 Wkdys: 7:00

The

MIRAGE THEATER Violence.

Programme Subject  To  Unavoidab

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

FREE BIRDS 91min

PG

Starts Friday. Comedy Starring Owen Wilson, Woody Harrelson, Amy Poehler Fri.7:00 & 9:30. Sat.*4:00,7:00,9:30. Sun.*4:00,6:45. Wkdys 6:45. JACKASS PRESENTS R

BAD GRANDPA

92min

Comedy Starring Johnny Knoxvil e, Jackson Nicoll, Spike Jonze, Georgina Cates Fri 7:15, 9:45. Sat *4:15, 7:15, 9:45 Sun *4:15, 6:45 Wkdays 7:15

THE COUNSELOR

R

117min Crime/Drama/Thriller Starring Brad Pitt, Javier Bardem, Cameron Diaz, Penelope Cruz

Fri.6:45, 9:45 Sat. *3:45,6:45,9:45. Sun. *3:45, 6:45. Wkdys 6:45. Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


OCTOBER 31, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life TONASKET ASB COMMUNITY SERVICE

Tonasket Farmers’ Market TONASKET - The final Tonasket Farmers’ Market of the year is Thursday, Oct. 31. Come join us for some of the best in local produce, crafts, personal care products, homegrown music and farmstead cheeses. Whether you make a quick spin to pick up supper ingredients or hang out for hours, you’re sure to get what you want. For more info call (509) 486-1199. Downtown Trick or Treat OROVILLE Oroville Businesses with a Trick or Treat here sign are participating in this year’s Trick or Treat for the kids on Thursday, Oct. 31 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Staff at local businesses are being encouraged by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, the sponsor of the event, to dress up as well and decorate. For more infomration contact Clyde at the Camaray, (509) 476-3684 or Leah at the Day Spa at (509) 476-9000. Stroke Support Group OROVILLE - Their will be a Stroke Support Group meeting on Thursday, Oct. 31 at 10:30 a.m. at the Youth Center at 607 Central Ave. in Oroville (Adjacent to the Free Methodist Church). This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be a guest speaker and refreshments. Hydes Perform for Halloween Party OROVILLE – Come celebrate Halloween at Esther Bricques Winery. The Hydes are performing, costumes are encouraged and potluck is planned for Thursday, Oct. 31. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861. Health Care Coverage Workshop TONASKET - Statewide Health Insurance Benefit Advisors (SHIBA) will be putting on a free workshop for the public at the North Valley Hospital Board Room on Monday, Oct. 28 and Friday, Nov. 1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. They will be providing three volunteers and assistance is available on a “first come first serve basis”. Please bring a list of your medications with you to the workshop. Washington state’s SHIBA can help you: Understand your health care coverage options and rights; find affordable health care coverage and evaluate and compare health insurance plans. They provide free, unbiased and confidential assistance with Medicare and health care choices. Their volunteer advisors are trained to give you the latest Medicare and health care coverage information. Highland Wonders Highland Wonders returns to Tonasket with “David Douglas in the Okanogan Country,” a presentation by naturalist teacher and author, Jack Nisbet, Friday, Nov. 1, at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. The presentation begins at 6:30 p.m. with desserts, tea and coffee; the dinner benefiting the CCC begins at 5:00 p.m. The meal is $7 for CCC members or $8 for non-members. Between 1826 and 1833, Scottish naturalist David Douglas visited the Okanogan six different times, including an epic 1833 trip that took him north to the Thompson and Fraser Rivers.

Halloween party a great success Submitted by Sue Wisener Tonasket Eagles #3002

Well after all the wind, its time to rake leaves again. Last Sunday was District 10 meeting in Oroville #3865. They did a great job. The next meeting will not be until bFeb. 16 in Methow Valley #2584. The meeting will include Nomination of District Officer. Hope to see a good turn out. On Saturday was the kids Halloween party, put on by the Auxiliary. It was a great success. Approximately 40 children attended. Lots of cookie being decorated and face painting. Later that night was the adult Halloween party many of great costumes. First place went to Keith Montanye, as walking dead, second place David and Tammy Hollett as, 1840’s leather outfits that were homemade; third place Bud and Karen they

In this slide presentation we will compare the landscape and people that Douglas described with what lives in the Okanogan today. For more information, email julie@okanoganhighlands. org, call (509) 433-7893 or or visit okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw .

dropping off grocery bags with donation information on Nov. 9. Filled bags may be left by doors and will be picked up on Nov. 16 by the scouts. All food collected will be donated to the Oroville Food Bank. Contact Karrie at (509) 560-9037 for more information.

Chesaw Christmas Bazaar CHESAW - The Chesaw Christmas Bazaar will be Saturday, Nov. 2, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Country Kitchen will be serving “Walking Tacos” for lunch along with baked goods, drinks and lots more. Venders are welcome, $10 will rent a table. There will be homemade items, books dried flowers, jewelry and more. Call Marianne (509) 4852103 for more info or a table.

Fire District 16 Budget Hearing AENEAS VALLEY - The Okanogan Fire District No. 16 commissioners will hold their annual public budget hearing for year 2014 at their monthly work session at 6 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 11, at 6 Main Rd. in Aeneas Valley. The public is encouraged to attend. Call Mike Woelke at (509) 486-1386 for more information.

Community Coat Closet The 5th annual community coat closet will be held at the Depot Museum in Oroville on Saturday, November 2 from 9:30 to 3:30. There will be free coats for children through adults. Please note there is a one coat limit for each person attending. This event is sponsored by Royal Neighbors of America in partnership with Oroville Sterling Bank. Oroville Booster Club Auction The Oroville Booster Club’s annual auction at the American Legion Hall will be held Saturday, Nov. 2. The silent auction starts at 5 p.,m., live auction at 6:30 p.m. Lots of fun and great auction items. Snacks are provided and all are welcome. The Legion Hall is located at 314 14th Ave. Children’s Author to Speak at Oroville School OROVILLE - Author Jack Gantos will be speaking at the Oroville Elementary School on Tuesday, Nov. 5. Gantos has written books for people of all ages, from picture books and middle grade fiction to novels for young adults and adults. His work include Hole in My Life, Joe Pigza Loses Control and Dead End in Norvelt. Training Your Voice OROVILLE – It can be fun, invigorating, and difficult! But, singing is a happy and joyful thing to do, especially if you have the skills to help you constantly improve. Our instructor, Jeff Gee, knows what he’s doing. Whether you’re a beginner and just hum in the shower, or if you sing with a choir or entertain others, you will learn more about proper singing techniques. Let your voice out! Enjoy it more! This six session class begins Tuesday, Nov. 5. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 4762011, email her at community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu. Online it’s www.northvalleycommunityschools.com to register. Food Worker Class OKANOGAN - Starting Nov 7 the Okanogan County Public Health Food Worker Class are offered every Thursday afternoon at 3:30 p.m. Okanogan County Public Health is located at 1234 South Second Ave., Okanogan, WA. Computer stations for the online Food Worker Class are available at Okanogan County Public Health Monday – Friday 7:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. For more information call (509) 422-7140. Scouting for Food Oroville Cub Scouts and Girl Scouts are doing their “Scouting For Food Drive.” They will be

TONASKET EAGLES came as Rabbit and Bunny. On Saturday, Nov. 2 we are having a benefit dinner and auction for Bev Montanye to cover medical expenses. Chicken dinner with all the fixings starts at 5 p.m. and goes to 6:30 p.m. Auction to follow and after that karaoke with Linda Wood. On Saturday, Nov. 9 will be our third annual Chili cook

312 S. Whitcomb

Tonasket VA Clinic Open House TONASKET - The Tonasket Veterans’ Administration Clinic will be holding an open House on Tuesday, Nov. 12 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Meet and greet with VA Clinic physicians and staff; resources from the Spokane VAMC; flu shots, blood pressures and informational handouts; readjustment counseling services available; door prizes given every hour and Food and refreshments. Oroville Chamber Meeting OROVILLE - The Oroville Chamber of Commerce next meets on Thursday, Nov. 14 at 1 p.m. at the Plaza Restaurant. Jack Hughes, owner of Princes Department Store, will be the featured guest. He will be answering questions concerning a wide variety of topics that may be helpful to many other businesses, ranging from employee hiring and screening to marketing principles. The public is welcome to attend any of the monthly meetings. Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Deb Roberts at (509) 486-2192. Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 4763978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386. Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune. com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844. off. Come in and sign up. Show everyone what chili is all about. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are a follows: first place Lyle Anderson and Julie Hovland, second place Gladys Fifer and Joanne Michels, Low Score, Wanda Sutherland and Bill Maple, Last Pinochle went to Lyle Anderson and Julie Hovland. We wish all of those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

Submitted photo

Tonasket High School ASB Officers and Leadership Class delivered over 1200+ food items (cans, boxes, bags,etc) and a check for $107.53 dollars to the Tonasket Food Bank on Tuesday, Oct. 22. THS thanks all those involved in making a difference in your community. Special thank you to the Tonasket Middle School, Tonasket Elementary School, and the PTO for all your help.

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PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 31, 2013

County voters asked to fund transportation City of Tonasket seeks criminal justice funding THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN – Okanogan County voters are being asked to fund a transportation district through a special sales and use tax levy; while Tonasket seeks an approval of a levy to help pay for criminal justice costs. The transportation ballot measure, Special Elections – Proposition 1, proposes giving the Okanogan County Transit Authority (OCTA) the ability to impose a four-tenths of one percent tax on all taxable purchases made within the county. The tax is the equivalent of four cents on every $10 of taxable purchases made. The money will fund “the operation, maintenance equipment and facilities for a public transportation district within the boundaries of the Transit

Authority.” The OCTA includes Okanogan County except the southeastern precincts and the town of Nespelem. While the City of Oroville recently agreed to increase funding to the separate County Nutrition and Transportation System, Tonasket decided to remain at the same funding levels. The Tonasket Council has also been vocal about their reservations about the amount of the tax being asked to fund the OCTA, especially at a time when they are seeking a 0.1 sales tax increase to help them with their own needs within the city limits. Voters in the City of Tonasket will be asked to decide whether or not to impose the 0.1 percent added to the sales and use tax. One-third of the collected increase in funds would be used for public safety, as required by law. Two-thirds of the collected increase in funds would be used in the General Fund, such as police and fire protection, parks,

the Tonasket Airport, the youth center. Like the state sales tax, edible items are not taxed and utility tax rates would be unaffected. The Tonasket City Council voted several months ago to put this proposition on the ballot to help deal with chronic budget shortfalls caused by a combination of rising costs and stagnant to falling sales tax income. In discussions about the tax and included in information on a recent information sheet sent out in the city’s utility bills - the intent is to use the funds to help pay for law enforcement costs, such as jail and booking fees and dispatch fees. If passed, 85 percent of the increased funds will go to the City of Tonasket, while 15 percent will go to Okanogan County. By contrast, a county-wide increase would see the city collect 40 percent of the increase, with 60 percent going to the county If passed, the new rate would take effect Apr. 1, 2014.

SCHOOLS | FROM A1

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket Elementary School principal Jeremy Clark takes one for the “team” during the water fight / groundbreaking celebration for the Tonasket Water Ranch at Chief Tonasket Park on Friday.

RANCH | FROM A1 infrastructure. “The equipment is here and paid for, the engineering is paid for,” she said. “It will happen in the spring but people will still be hearing from me “I feel good knowing this will be available to the community, and that they’ll enjoy it. I feel that makes this year worth it.” Doug Leese - in character as a cowboy (befitting the “ranch” theme) introduced Black’s team of supporters, including Elise Peacemaker, Jara Donner, Cathy Olson, Stacey Kester, Chamber of Commerce president Julie Alley, city planner Kurt Danison, Tonasket Schools superintendent Paul Turner, landscape architect Ken VanVoorhis, the Tonasket City Council, and a number of local artists who volunteered their talents to enhance the project. The first of those pieces, a

Brent Baker/staff photo

Linda Black honored her team of “Wonder Women” with capes during Friday’s groundbreaking, including (l-r) Elise Peacemaker, Jara Donner, Cathy Olson and Stacey Kester. fish sculpture designed by Jane Thompson, was placed at the site. “We have $10,000 more to go, so I’ll still be selling fish,” Black

said. “There’s still work going on; we’re not quite there yet. But what we’ve done has been hardearned.”

LOCKDOWN | FROM A1

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Oroville School Board Members Travis Loudon, Rocky DeVon, Todd Hill and High School Principal Kristin Sarmiento look over one of the computer labs at Oroville High School. They were on a facilities tour of the high school, part of the board’s ongoing program of touring district facilities at regular intervals throughout the year. Homecoming and that two students, Kaitlyn Grunst and Ashley Marcolin, did cancer awareness projects for their Senior Projects during a soccer game and a football game. She also talked about Megan Morales’ Senior Project, a new scoreboard for the soccer field. “There will also be a Challenge Day for the junior high on Halloween,” said Hilderbrand. In Elementary Principal Joan Hoehn’s report, she said this month was Read At Home Month and that students who read 15 minutes every night would be able to take part in an ice cream party. “Atkins (Harvest Foods) is supplying the ice cream for the party,” said Hoehn. The principal said children’s author Jack Gantos would be speaking at the school on Tuesday, Nov. 5 and that there is a book sale planned for Nov. 6 from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. and on Nov. 7 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. In her report, High School Principal Kristin Sarmiento discussed some of the recent training she and Principal Hoehn have attended, as well as training she has received regarding high school accreditation. “This will fit in with a lot of things we are already doing at

the high school,” she said. “I also went to the Oroville Council meeting and got their support for our application for the Race to the Top grant.” Sarmiento said that two students will also be going to record education Public Service Announcement at the radio station in Omak. “We are having a Veterans Assembly that is open to the public on Friday, Nov. 8 starting at 9 a.m.,” said Sarmiento, adding that local veterans are encouraged to attend. Supt. Quick reminded everyone that the Booster Club Auction is this Saturday at the American Legion Hall. He then went over the Board’s Goals for the year and which goals had seen progress and which needed more effort. Among these are reviewing district policy as changes are suggested by the Washington School Directors Association; communication and commitment to student learning; creating conditions for student and staff success; one to one computing (a computer or iPad for each student); engaging the community in education and holding the district responsible for student learning. One goal Quick said needed more work was the creation of a

home school outreach program. Quick also went over changes to the employee contracts that were hammered out in collective bargaining. The board approved the contract at their meeting and Quick said that the contract still needed to be ratified by the OEA. Reports were also given by Walt Arnold who teaches Driver’s Ed and Ag classes, as well as Kelly King and Mary Willey from the elementary school. The board approved a consent agenda that included hiring Brian Martin as Assistant High School Boys Basketball Coach; Dane Forester and Brett Fancher as Junior High Basketball Coaches and Ed Booker as Assistant Wrestling Coach. They also approved several donations – $720 for the yearbook camp and $3029 for partial payment for the new timers on the football field from the Booster Club and a donation of books for the HOSTS program from George Penner. DeVon and the board said the district really appreciated the donations from both the Booster Club and Penner. After a short financial report, the board agreed to “pay bills” and then went on a tour of the high school to discuss facility improvements and needs.

response of school staff and law enforcement in handling the lockdown, but that the situation revealed areas in need of work to be better prepared for future incidents. “Our main concern deals with students not in the building when we went into lockdown,” he said, noting that with the situation arising during lunch, a lot of high school students were off campus. “It’s not so much the initial thing; it was the trickle effect and how you deal with that. We’ll have continued conversations on how

to deal with and control that. “It was right when we were in transition at the elementary. If this had been a real shooting ... we need to have the conversation of how we manage the people outside. “The last concern is still communication. We had some more glitches on some different things we need to improve on.” Overall, he said the response was swift and effective. “I want to give (high school principal) Jeff Hardesty, (vice principal) Kevin Terris and

(VISTA coordinator) Bob Ashmore kudos. When this came out we went into the lockdown district wide. “It was amazing - the elementary looked like a vacuum cleaner hit it. They were out on recess and they sucked into that building so fast ... foom. “Also Rob Burks and (Okanogan County Sheriff Deputy Terry) Shrable, who was in close proximity and responded very quickly. It was taken very seriously and dealt with in an expedient manner.”

Mosquito Open House, Nov. 6 SUBMITTED BY CHRIS BRANCH - DIRECTOR OROVILLE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

OROVILLE - The Oroville Planning Commission wants to know what you think about mosquito control. Next Wednesday, Nov. 6, at 5 p.m. the Planning Commission invites you to an informational open house to develop a recommendation to the Okanogan County Commissioners Advisory Group on creating a Mosquito Control District for a proposed ballot measure in 2014. They not only invite you, but encourage you to come to the Oroville City Hall and learn more on this subject, and to share in a mapping exercise where you can identify where the boundary of a Mosquito Control District should be in relation to where you live. They already know that nobody likes to be bitten. Not only do the

bites itch but mosquitoes have a habit of spreading diseases that none of us care to contract. In recent years, the cities of Oroville, Omak, and Okanogan have experienced the increasing difficulty of permitting for a costly program to aerial spray malathion. The duration of effectiveness of the spray program is sometimes unpredictable, and the expenditure takes away from other vital services including parks, police and street maintenance. In Washington State the formation of Mosquito Control Districts was authorized in 1957 by the State Legislature. Currently, there are 14 such districts, most of which are in eastern Washington. With the threat of West Nile virus and the increasing concern over the use of pesticides over surface water, effective mosquito control financing through special district formation is often considered an attractive option. Mosquito

Control Districts are typically more effective because their programs are comprehensive and they control the mosquitoes before they ever get to the biting stage using a natural occurring bacterium that lives in the soil. Spraying at the adult stage is considered a last resort typically not needed. An Advisory Group to the Okanogan County Commissioners has been formed to gather information to develop recommendations regarding the formation of a Mosquito Control District especially in regard to its boundaries in areas around the county. The Oroville City Council through its research and recommending body, the Planning Commission, wants local public opinion on this topic. The City Council must decide whether to adopt a resolution to allow the City to be included in a mosquito control district.

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OCTOBER 31, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

COPS & COURTS SUBMITTED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT SUPERIOR COURT

CRIMINAL

Karilyn Ann Cline, 23, Oroville, pleaded guilty Oct. 22 to second-degree theft (access device) and third-degree theft. Cline was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended for two years, and fined $1,110.50 for the Sept. 10 crimes. James Everett Davis, 56, Oroville, pleaded guilty Oct. 22 to POCS (methamphetamine). Everett was sentenced to 30 days in jail, and fined $1,610.50 for the Sept. 21 crimes. Charles Daniel Wynecoop, 25, Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 23 to first-degree trafficking in stolen property and second-degree possession of stolen property. Wynecoop was sentenced to 50 months in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the Jan. 12 crimes. He was also ordered to pay $1,384.74 in restitution to Donovan D. Schreckengost of Federal Way. In a separate case, Wynecoop pleaded guilty to making a false statement to a public servant and second-degree TMVWP. Wynecoop was sentenced to 18 months in prison to run concurrently with the above sentence, and fined $1,110.50 for the Feb. 22 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Patrick Charles Denison, 30, Tonasket, with seconddegree malicious mischief. The crime allegedly occurred Oct. 11 in Tonasket. On Oct. 15, Denison waived his right to arraignment within 14 days as he works out of state. Arraignment was scheduled Nov. 18. The court found probable cause the charge William Lee Pearcy, 29, Tonasket, with second-degree malicious mischief. The crime allegedly occurred Oct. 11 in Tonasket. The court found probable cause to charge Chad D. McFarland, 39, Omak, with second-degree theft and second-degree vehicle prowl. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 20 in Riverside. The court found probable cause to charge Ernesto Ramirez Palomares, 44, Omak, with seconddegree burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 13 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Wayne Joseph Harry, 26, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine) (with intent to deliver) and second-degree felon in possession of a loaded firearm. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 12 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Jeremiah Van Tachell, 22, Omak, with second-degree TMVWP. The crime allegedly occurred Oct. 11 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Shannon Dawn Edwards (a.k.a. Shannon Dawn Squetimkin), 40, Omak, with second-degree theft and second-degree vehicle prowl. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 20 in Riverside. The court found probable cause to charge Linda Beth Clark, 54, Okanogan, with two counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and one count of unlawful use of a building for drug purposes. The crimes allegedly occurred in August, September and October. The court found probable cause to charge Kenneth Alan Russell, 30, Tonasket, with second-degree malicious mischief. The crime allegedly occurred Oct. 11 in Tonasket. The court found probable cause to charge Wesley Faron Anderson, 52, Okanogan, with four counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). The crimes allegedly occurred in August and September. The court found probable cause to charge Albert John Glassmeyer, 46, Spokane, with harassment (threats to kill) and disorderly conduct. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 19 at the Barter Faire site near Tonasket. The court found probable cause to charge Michael Scott Maloney, 26, Chattaroy, with seconddegree assault (with a deadly weapon) and fourth-degree assault. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 19 at the Okanogan Family Faire site near Tonasket. The court found probable cause to charge Nicolas Gutierrez Lopez, 56, Okanogan, with second-degree attempted rape and fourth-degree assault. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 20 in Okanogan.

CIVIL MATTERS

Lawrence Construction Services of Wash., Oroville, was assessed $1,759.16 in unpaid workers’ compensation taxes and fines by the state Department of Labor and Industries. Mike Cheney, Oroville, was assessed $2,566.85 for overpayment of unemployment benefits and interest by the state Employment Security Department. Cathi L. Everts, Riverside, was assessed $3,903.90 for overpayment of unemployment benefits and interest by the state Employment Security Department. Erick Arballo, Omak, was assessed $3,757.87 for overpayment of unemployment benefits and interest by the state Employment Security Department. Bert’s Satellite TV, Oroville, was assessed $1,789.01 in unpaid taxes and fines by the state Department of Revenue. Stidman Contracting & Repair, Omak, was assessed $3,109.96 in unpaid taxes and fines by the

state Department of Revenue. Home Services Northwest, LLC, Tonasket, was assessed $5,737.68 in unpaid workers’ compensation taxes and fines by the state Department of Labor and Industries.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 Malicious mischief on Nick Cain Rd. near Okanogan. Custodial interference on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on E. Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Brooks Tract Rd. near Omak. Theft on W. Lakeshore Dr. near Oroville. Found property on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Backpack recovered. Burglary on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Drugs on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Found property on N. Cedar St. in Omak. Two bicycles recovered. Public intoxication on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Benton St. in Omak. Fraud on Engh Rd. in Omak. Janice Louise Waters, 39, booked for third-degree DWLS and on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Caleb Seth Arnett, 34, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer and for DUI. Raymond Edward Ballard, 50, booked on an Oroville Police Department warrant for failure to pay fine for third-degree theft. Melissa Rosa McCraigie, 30, booked for first-degree trafficking in stolen property and thirddegree theft. Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013 Trespassing on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. Trespassing on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Assault on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Illegal burning on S. Cordell Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Harassment on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public urination on S. Main St. in Omak. Automobile theft on Dogwood St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Earl Kenneth Marchand, 44, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for DUI. Audrey Roseanne Leach, 28, booked on an FTA warrant for third-degree assault. Jeremy Leroy Paul Stearns, 26, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Gustavo Camacho, no middle name listed, 19, booked for disorderly conduct, an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree theft and a USBP hold. Joshua William Combs, 18, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant MIP. Jesus Alberto Castaneda, 19, booked on three Superior Court FTA warrants: third-degree assault, harassment and resisting arrest; a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft, and a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Jeffrey Howard Herschlip, 53, booked on an FTC warrant for reckless endangerment. David Thomas Kay, 32, booked for third-degree DWLS, an FTA bench warrant for POCS and a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013 Theft on Epley Rd. near Omak. Theft on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. ATM card reported missing. Threats on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on W. Old Anglin Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Spring Coulee Rd. near Okanogan. Violation of no-contact order on Palmer Mountain Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on N. Main St. in Omak. Harassment on Seventh Ave. in Omak. Theft on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Drugs on Engh Rd. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Two reports of public urination on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on Orchard St. in Oroville. Theft on Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Purse reported missing. Disorderly conduct on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Noel Lockett, no middle name listed, 46, booked for violation of an anti-harassment order. Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013 Harassment on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Stereo equipment reported missing. Warrant arrest on W. Delicious St. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Vehicle prowl on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Spring Coulee Rd.

near Okanogan. Theft on Conconully St. near Okanogan. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Theft on Sagebrush Trail near Omak. DWLS on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Engh Rd. in Omak. Weapons offense on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Weapons offense on Keystone Rd. near Riverside. Drugs on N. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Found property on E. Cherry Ave. in Omak. Two bicycles recovered. Custodial interference on Omache Dr. in Omak. Automobile theft on Oak St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Theft on S.E. State St. in Tonasket. Kevin Michael Clark, 32, booked for POCS (heroin) and a Department of Corrections detainer. George Everett Gilmer, 56, court commitment for two counts of third-degree DWLS. Devin Martinez, no middle name listed, 18, booked for possession of a dangerous weapon on school grounds. Tyson Everybodytalksabout, no middle name listed, 23, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Alan Forbes Price, 40, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Stuart Adam Grim, 27, booked for third-degree DWLS. Luis Albert Martinez-Gonzalez, 22, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS and a USBP hold. Tyce Jeffrey Farrar, 24, booked for DUI. Jeanie Kay Todd, 32, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and interfering with reporting (DV). Lois Juliann McCraigie, 66, booked for DUI and third-degree DWLS. Friday, Oct. 25, 2013 Fraud on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Fraud on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Howell Canyon Rd. near Tonasket. Threats on Barnholt Loop Rd. near Okanogan. DWLS on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Alcohol offense on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Trespassing on Sawtell Rd. in Oroville. Harassment on Main St. in Oroville. Burglary on W. Fourth St. Theft on W. Fourth St. Desiree Joyce Abrahamson, 22, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams). Emily Marie Stokes, 26, court commitment for second-degree introduction of contraband. Sandina Marie Nelson, 19, booked for obstruction and resisting arrest. Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013 DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Explosives on S. Orchard Loop near Tonasket. Trespassing on Summit Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. One-vehicle wreck on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Assault on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Burglary on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. DUI on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Burglary on N. Main St. in Omak. Lost property on Engh Rd. in Omak. Custodial interference on S. Ash St. in Omak. Violation of no-contact order on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle wreck on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ironwood in Oroville. Robert Joe Storm, 32, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Carrie Marie Leslie, 38, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Stephen Dale Moses Jr., 53, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Timothy J. Valle, 28, booked for DUI and third-degree DWLS. Robert Ellis Allen, 30, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Jerry Ray Mears Jr., 25, booked for violation of a no-contact order. Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013 Assault on Appleway Ave. near Okanogan. Burglary on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Burglary on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Two reports of theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Assault on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Main St. in Oroville. Vehicle fire on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Golden St. in Oroville. Trespassing on S. Whitcomb St. in Tonasket. Ruben Cruz-Sanchez, no middle name listed, 23, booked on a USBP hold. Gilberto Valenzuela-Acasito, 46, booked for first-degree assault and first-degree criminal trespass. Trevor Warren Armstrong, 28, booked for two counts of firstdegree criminal trespass, two counts of residential burglary, first-degree theft and thirddegree theft.

Georgi’s Market providing year-around fresh food THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE – At Georgi’s Market, owned by John and Rosa Snider, their goal is to provide year-around fresh local and regional foot to the community. They want to do that by giving small farmers a venue to market and sell their products seven days a week, as opposed to the four day markets that are currently available, they say. “We will be carrying a variety of different fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs during the appropriate seasons as well as dairy products, meats, preserves, ciders and other value added products year-round. We will also be offering classes on various topics such as canning, freezing and cellaring options,” said the Sniders. Their brochure says they chose the name Georgi’s because “George” is derived from the Greek word for “Farmer” or “Earth Worker” and in their experience farmers are the embodiment of patience, perseverance, hard work and dedication. Which they say is exactly how they describe Rosa’s mom, Georgia, whom the family calls Georgi. The market is looking for local suppliers and will be stocking

Gary DeVon/Staff Photo

Rosa Snider, who owns Georgi’s Market with her husband John. In addition to fresh, local and regional produce, the market has espresso, as well as bird and bat houses and local art for sale. their shelves based on the availability. The encourage local producers to get in touch with them, “Although supplying fresh, healthy, local and regional food is our main focus, we will also offer assistance in working with the right entity (USDA, Health Department, WSDA)( to get the appropriate licenses, i.e. proces-

sors, cottage kitchen licenses, figure out the labeling requirements, etc. so you can get your product to market,” they say. Georgi’s Market is located south of Oroville at the former Don’s Fruit Stand, located at 32706 U.S. Hwy. 97. Contact them by dropping by or calling (509) 322-8696.


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Okanogan 31, 2013 OKANOGANValley VALLEYGazette-Tribune GAZETTE-TRIBUNE| •OCTOBER October 31, 2013

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale Tonasket

3200 Square foot, custom remodeled home. 4 Bedroom, 3 bath, finished basement. Custom tile work throughout, By Owner. $243,900 obo. 253-380-6030

TONASKET HOME - In Town. Move in ready. 2000 Sq Ft, 4 bedroom, 2 bath plus office. Many upgrades including kitchen, bath, hardwood floors, appliances including washer & dryer, new metal roof, 2 car carport, enclosed shop. Quiet Neighborhood, close to schools Great Value! Price Reduced - $172,000. Call 509-322-2289

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

REPUBLIC 3500 SF COMMERCIAL BUILDING for lease on 2.5 Acres. 14’ and 12’ Bay Doors, 1 bath, wood and propane Heat. $700 per month plus utilities, first and last month. 2 year minimum. Highway 21 North, Republic WA. 425-822-2901.

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Nice 3 bedroom 2 bath mobile 1st plus deposit. $695/ month. Pets negotiable with deposit. No smoking. Tennent pays utilities. Call or email for more information. 509-476-2087. riveroaksrv@hotmail.com

Announcements

OROVILLE FOR SALE OR RENT: 3 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom Mobile Home. This Unit Needs Some TLC. $500 Per Month. Ideal For A Handy Man. Reduced Rent For Someone Willing To Do Some Painting, Etc. Call: 1-250-498-3200 or Email Us At: olivertw@eastlink.ca

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602 THANK YOU to all the citizens of Oroville who ordered Apple Pies from Immaculate Conception Church. Thanks also to all our Parish Members and Friends from other Parishes who come every year to be part of the experience. We appreciate you and hopefully we will do this all over again next year!

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Crosswords

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Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Health General

NAC

Licensed Nurse Aide Certified needed to provide In-Home Care Riverside/Tonasket area Experience preferred but not required. Duties include heavy patient care. Shift Times Flexible Must have NAC license from WA State 1-800-637-9998

inquire@availhome.com

EOE

Miscellaneous 2 - 8’5�x7’ Insulated Garage Doors, $125 each or both for $200. 2 - 46� Oak Vanities, $50. 4’X30� Oak Tri-view Mirror, $25. Coleman “Road Trip� Grill/Griddle. Cost $230. Sale $140. Call: 476-3944, 560-0499

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lies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

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The family of RICHARD ROBBINS wish to express their sincerest gratitude to everyone for their love and prayers shown to us during our time of the passing of my husband and our father. He may have gone to a better place but his love and memory will live on inside us forever.

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ANSWERS

Statewides

WorkSource

COUPLE SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeking to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of opportunity, humor, adventure and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at direct at 206-920-1376, toll-free at 877-290-0543 or email AndrewCorley@outlook.com You can also contact our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376.

Similkameen Park Apartments Oroville, WA. Farm worker Preference 1, 2, 3, and 4 bedroom Starting @$365 per month + security deposit. Water, Sewer, Garbage, Washer and Dryer. Air conditioning, Play area, Storage Space. For more information contact Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

1 BEDROOM House, 3 Miles South of Tonasket. Washer/ Dryer, Stove, Fridge. $450 Month, $350 Deposit. No Pets. 509-846-5801.

Announcements

Help Wanted

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For Rent

2 Bedroom House, In Town, $650. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Lakefront Apartment, $725. Darling 1 Bedroom Apt, $495. Deluxe Lakefront Home, Furnished, 3 Baths, $1595. OTHERS. Call Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

Commercial Rentals

For Rent

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This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating week-

EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS NEED CLASS A CDL Training? Start a Career in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Classâ€? training.• New Academy Classes Weekly • No Money Down or Credit Check • Certified Mentors Ready and Available • Paid (While Training With Mentor) • Regional and Dedicated Opportunities • Great Career Path • Excellent Benefits Package Please Call: (602) 730-7709 DRIVERS -- Get on the road fast! Immediate Openings! Top Pay, Full Benefits, CDL-A, Hazmat, Doubles Required! Haney Truck Line, Call Now. 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com GORDON TRUCKING, Inc. A better Carrier. A better Career. CDL-A Drivers Needed! Up to $1500 sign on bonus! Dedicated Fleet Options. Home weekly available in some area.. EOE. Call 7 days/week! 866-725-9669 LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com REAL ESTATE PALMER MOUNTAIN -- 20 surveyed acres with trees, views & seasonal creek! Off grid for camping, hunting or just fun in the mountains! $295 monthly on guaranteed contract. Call TLC 1-888-440-9824, Ref: PM120

Public Notices Notice of the Intent to Adopt an Election Resolution The Okanogan Conservation District Board of Supervisors will hold a meeting at 4:00 PM on November 7, 2013 at the USDA Service Center, 1251 S. 2nd Ave, Okanogan, WA to adopt a resolution setting the date, time, location and manner of an election to fill a Conservation District Supervisor’s expiring term. Post in the Public Notices in the Gazette-Tribune on October 24, 2013 and October 31, 2013. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 24 and 31, 2013. #522267

Think Green!

Public Notices IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY JUDITH ANN DE VON, Plaintiff, v. Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. Defendants. CASE NO. 13-2-004901-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The State of Washington to the said Defendants, Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the17th day of October, 2013, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled courts, and answer the complaint of the Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, at his.office below stated; and in case ofyour failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of this action is to quiet title in Plaintiff to the following described real property situated in Okanogan County, State of Washington, to-wit: Lot 18, Block 4, Plat of ORO, Washington, as per plat thereof recorded in Book�A� of Plats, page 17, records of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington. DATED this 3rd day of October, 2013. /s/ PATRICK J. MORRISSEY PATRICK J. MORRISSEY, WSBA#3045 Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 707 Okanogan, WA 98840 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 17, 24, 31, November 4, 14, 21, 2013. # Public Hearing Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the City of Tonasket at City Hall at 209 S Whitcomb Ave on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 during the 7:00 pm regular Council meeting. The purpose of the public hearing is to review final project performance on the Water System Plan and Bonaparte Creek Sewer Projects, which are both funded by the Community Development Block Grant Program with federal funding from HUD. City Hall is handicap accessible. Arrangements to reasonably accommodate special needs, including handicap accessibility or interpreter, will be made upon receiving 24-hour advance notice. Contact Alice Attwood at 509-486-2132. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 31 and November 7, 2013. #523098 LEGAL NOTICE NEGOTIATION OF STATE LEASES WITH EXISTING LESSEES BETWEEN DECEMBER 2013 AND FEBRUARY 2014 EXPIRES: APRIL 2014. 10-A69485-GRAZING-All of Section 36, Township 40 North, Range 30 East, W.M.

continued on next page

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1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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OCTOBER 31, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune October 31, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Notice is also hereby given that the City of Tonasket will hold a public hearing during the regular Council Meeting on November 12, 2013 at 7:00 pm in the City Hall, Tonasket, Washington for the purpose of a Final Budget Hearing. The following is a summary of the preliminary budget of the City of Tonasket for the year 2014. Current Expense Fund 581,308.41 City Street Fund 79,000.00 City Street Reserve 1,500.00 Cemetery Operating 24,000.00 Cemetery Improvement Fund 4,500.00 Cemetery Trust 63,000.00 Gerhard Operating Fund 8,100.00 Hotel/Motel Fund 16,000.00 City Hall/City Park Reserve Fund 8,143.00 Cumulative Police 29,600.00 Swim Pool Reserve Fund 15,000.00 Cumulative Building 6,746.00 C.I.P./Public Works Trust Fund 17,356.00 Water Reserve 67,587.00 Water Fund 377,000.00 Sewer Fund 485,250.00 Sewer Reserve 353,776.47 Bond Redemption Fund - Water 38,551.00

Water Bond Reserve 33,587.66 Bond Redemption Fund - Sewer 108,842.08 Sewer Bond Reserve 67,615.00 Total Preliminary Budget for 2013 $2,386,462.62 Alice Attwood, Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 31 and Novmber 7, 2013. #523102

Citizens attending shall have the right to provide comments and ask questions concerning the entire budget. ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 31, 2013. #523263

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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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PUBLIC NOTICE The Oroville City Council will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, November 5, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. to consider possible increases in City revenues, including property tax revenues, for the year 2014. The Ad Valorem taxes will be adopted during the same meeting.

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 44 (Easy, rating 0.40) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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PUBLIC NOTICE DIRECTOR POSITION The Whitestone Reclamation District will have two Director positions to be filled at the annual election to be held on December 9, 2013. Candidates interested in being a Director on the District Board must file a Petition of Nomination declaring their candidacy with the Secretary of the District no later than November 4, 2013. Forms for the Declaration of Candidacy and Petition of Nomination for Director of the Whitestone Reclamation District are available from the District Secretary. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 24, 31, 2013. #519816

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PUBLIC NOTICE 2014 Preliminary Budget Notice is hereby given that the 2014 Preliminary Budget of the City of Tonasket, Washington has been filed with the City Council and the City Clerk of the City of Tonasket. A copy of the preliminary budget is available for inspection by any taxpayer at the office of the City Clerk during regular business hours.

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Written request to lease must be received by November 30, 2013, at Department of Natural Resources, 225 S Silke Rd, Colville, Washington 99114-9369. Each request to lease must include the lease number, the name, address and phone number of applicant, and must contain a certified check or money order payable to the Department of Natural Resources for the amount of any bonus bid plus a $100.00 deposit. The envelope must be marked “Sealed Bid” and give lease number, expiration date of lease applied for and give applicant’s name. The applicant must be prepared to purchase improvements that belong to the current lessee. Persons wishing to bid to lease any of these properties can obtain more details, bid packet, and qualification requirements by contacting the Colville office or calling (509) 684-7474. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 31, 2013. #523109

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE 2

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Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 31, 2013

SPORTS Playoff chances endangered White Swan goes old-school to beat Hornets, 22-20 By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Oroville’s hopes for a state playoff berth took a major hit Friday as the Hornets dropped a hard-hitting 22-20 homecoming night contest to White Swan. A win would have lifted the Hornets into a first-place tie; now, they will need just the right combination of wins and losses by other Central Washington League contenders to make the playoffs at all. A series of key injuries - Jake Scott and Charles Arrigoni didn’t play at all, while center/nose tackle Boone McKinney and running back/kicker/defensive back Dustin Nigg were injured during the game - proved to be the difference as White Swan shelved its spread offense and passing attack at halftime to take advantage of a big size advantage on the line and negate the Hornets’ speed. The result was a 1940s-style double-wing wedge offense - basically a rugby scrum - that fed a steady diet of 400-lb fullback Tony Picard and 230-pound running back Brian Walker at the Hornets’ depleted defense. “They’d been scoring 35-40 points in the first half all year with their double-spread and we handled it pretty well,” said Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson, whose team led 7-6 at the half. “The kids were ready for it. “The injuries really hurt us and they saw that. They had big kids even without the 400-pounder. Their 225-pounder (Brian Walker) was even harder to bring down because he was a true runner, and they had some big boys up front.” The injuries also forced the Hornets into some tough decisions, most glaringly the choice not to punt on 4th-and-1 from their own 16-yard line with the score tied at 14-14 early in the fourth quarter. McKinney also served as the team’s long-snapper, and with him out of the game the Hornets had already had a punt blocked. Nigg recovered that blocked punt and had run for a first down, but one play later he was out of the game with a concussion. “We didn’t want to just give them six points back there,” said Hutchinson of the potential of another blocked punt. “We’d gotten lucky that first time when Dustin made something out of it. “And then we had a little miscommunication with our hand signals (on the fourth down play). Originally thought we’d go with a play action pass, but I kind of hedged a bit and went to an option off tackle. When they loaded up front I thought we were OK going off tackle, but we ran right up the middle, which didn’t work so well.” Kindred was stuffed at the line for no gain, giving White Swan the ball at the Hornet 16-yard line. Two plays and a 2-point conversion later, the Cougars had a 22-14 lead. The Hornets had plenty of time to get back into it. Quarterback Luke Kindred broke off a 45-yard run to the White Swan 3-yard line, but the Hornets fumbled the ball away on their next play to end the threat.

Terry Mills/submitted photo Brent Baker/staff photo

Tony Picard (41), White Swan’s 400-pound fullback, gave the Hornets plenty of trouble during the Cougars’ 22-20 win over Oroville on Friday. On this play, though, Connolly Quick (20) stripped Picard of the ball as Luke Kindred (11) and (12) joined in on the tackle. Oroville got one last chance and Kindred, who finished with 148 yards on 12 carries, took advantage of it, scoring on a 36-yard run (complete with a hurdle over a Cougar defender at the goal line) to cut the White Swan advantage to 22-20. But a fumbled hand-off on the 2-point conversion attempt - the Hornets’ fourth fumble of the game - left them two points shy. White Swan recovered the ensuing onside kick and the game was all but over. “The kids are pretty down,” Hutchinson said. “They’re thinking their playoff chances are just about done. But they played a good game against a good team. “The game that really hurts is the loss down at Kittitas a few weeks ago.” That said, a number of things could fall that Hornets’ way that aren’t all that improbable (as long as the Hornets beat winless Bridgeport this week): • If Liberty Bell ( now 3-1 in league play) beats Kittitas (3-1) and loses to White Swan (4-0), the Hornets, Mountain Lions and Kittitas would all finish at 4-2, tied for second place in the league. Since all would have beaten one and lost to the other, a three-way playoff to determine which one of the three advances to the state tournament would be held early the week of the first state game. • Less probable, but helpful, would be a Manson (1-4) upset of Kittitas. If Liberty Bell also beat Kittitas but lost to White Swan, Oroville and Liberty Bell would finish tied for second place, and since the Hornets beat the Mountain Lions head to head, the Hornets would advance. It would all have been easier, of course, had the Hornets held onto win last Friday, and for awhile it looked like they might. Tanner Smith’s 37-yard touchdown catch from Kindred on the Hornets’ final drive of the first half gave Oroville a 7-0 lead. But White Swan responded with a two-minute drive to pull within one as Joseph Kosik found Tristan

Spencer in the corner of the end zone for a 19-yard grab on the final play of the first half that Joe Sarmiento came inches from knocking down. The Hornets took a 14-6 lead on Smith’s 26-yard run early in the third quarter. This time White Swan responded with a 13-play, 68-yard drive, ramming their big line and the immense Picard right up the middle of the Hornet defense. Kosik, who was 7-of-14 for 94 yards through the air in the first half, didn’t throw a pass in the second half as the Cougars relied on their retro, but effective, scrum. Brian Walker scored both second half touchdowns for White Swan, the second a 7-yard run after the Cougars took possession at the Oroville 16-yard line following the failed fourth-down play. Walker finished with 83 yards rushing and Picard had 74 for White Swan (7-1, 4-0 CWL). Smith rushed for 66 yards on 10 carries and had the one catch for 37 yards for the Hornets. Sean DeWitte had a huge 23-yard catch on 3rd-and-17 that set up Kindred’s late touchdown. Brian Wise and Nathan Hugus also had one catch apiece. Kindred was 4-of-7 passing for 96 yards, one touchdown and an interception. Kindred (in on 15 tackles), DeWitte (eight tackles), Logan Mills (11 tackles and a fumble recovery) and Connelly Quick (an interception, and a strip of Picard for a fumble) led the Oroville (5-2, 3-2) defense. “DeWitte played a really good game and Quick had a good game, too,” Hutchinson said. “Quick could have had another interception and maybe a touchdown - he had their little screen pass read perfectly but he got shoved pretty hard in the back and ended up without having a chance at the ball. “Now we just need to get these last two. Not making the playoffs would be disappointing, but 7-2 would still be a pretty good season.”

Bridgeport tops Hornets to clinch league By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - An emotional night for the Oroville volleyball team didn’t turn out to be the best night as far as actually playing volleyball went for the Hornets. With a shot at the Central Washington League North Division league title on the line, as well as pre-game Senior Night festivities during the midst of homecoming week, the Hornets’ emotional tanks were on empty by midway through the match. Bridgeport wrapped up the title and an automatic state 2B tournament berth with a 25-19, 23-25, 25-15, 25-15 victory over the Hornets. “This was a disappointing loss for us,” said Oroville coach Carrie Rise. “Frankly the team fell apart during the third and fourth games, with emotions running high in several of the players.” The Hornets played from behind throughout the first game, conceding the final two points on self-inflicted errors. But they

Brent Baker/staff photo

Mikayla Scott hits the ball past a pair of Bridgeport defenders during last Thursday’s match. seemed to find their groove early in the second set, bouncing back from an 8-4 deficit as Andrea Perez served three straight aces to reclaim momentum. She later added a solid cross-court kill to

give the Hornets a 21-16 lead, but Oroville had to hang on for dear life to win the set after the Fillies tied it on 23-23 behind Anita Velasquez’s hitting. The tide turned for good midway through the fourth set as Velasquez served four straight aces to give the Fillies a 16-11 lead, and added two more aces to finish out an eight point run to make it 20-11. From that point forward the deflated Hornets never mustered much offense and mostly bumped or tipped the ball over the net rather than getting set up for strong attacks or well-placed taps. With the loss the Hornets will likely finish with the league’s third seed to districts, meaning a trip to the South Division’s No. 2 finisher (still to be determined, likely White Swan or Riverside Christian) on Thursday, Nov. 7. The Hornets (7-7, 4-3 CWL North) had one last regular-season match at Manson on Oct. 29. “We will spend the next two weeks re-grouping before dis-

tricts,” Rise said, “so we can play to our potential.” Oroville stats: Rachelle Nutt 5/8 serves, 12 attacks, 1 kills, 3 digs; Brittany Jewett 7/8 serves, 1 ace, 1 attack, 4 digs; Bridget Clark 8/8 serves, 1 ace, 3 attacks, 2 blocks, 4 digs; Nadia Maldonado 12/13 serves, 3 attacks, 6 digs; Monica Herrera 2/2 serves, 5 attacks; Mikayla Scott 6/7 serves, 1 ace, 12 attacks, 1 kills, 2 digs; Jessica Galvan 2/2 serves; Andrea Perez 9/13 serves, 3 aces, 15 attacks, 1 kill.

Oroville 3, Waterville 1 WATERVILLE - The Hornets bounced back from a Game 1 loss to beat Waterville on Oct. 22, 24-26, 25-14, 25-12 and 25-(unknown for Waterville). Oroville stats: Rachelle Nutt 9/12 serving, 3 aces, 1 block, 8 attacks, 2 kills, 23 digs; Brittany Jewett 15/15 serving, 5 aces, 3 blocks, 9 digs; Bridget Clark 6/6 serving, 7 attacks, 6 digs; Nadia Maldonado 12/13 serving, 1 ace, 3 attacks, 1 kills, 10 digs; Monica Herrera 9/11 serving, 2 aces, 6 attacks, 1 kill, 4 digs; Mikayla Scott 12/14 serving, 1 ace, 15 attacks, 4 kills, 7 digs; Jessica Galvan 8/11 serving, 1 ace, 3 attacks, 1 kill, 9 digs; Andrea Perez 12/15 serving, 1 ace, 6 attacks, 9 digs.

Speiker, Liberty Bell dominate CWL meet

By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TWISP - There weren’t any big surprises at Saturday’s Central Washington League cross country finals. Oroville’s Sierra Speiker cruised to her fourth straight league title by nearly four minutes, while Liberty Bell claimed five of the top six spots to dominate the boys side. Make that five of the top seven spots; with the boys and girls running together (there were only 13 girls and no full teams entered), Speiker officially matched the sixth-place time in the boys race and was within shouting distance of third. Her time of 18:26 was about 15 seconds off her best 5k

time of the year but about 1:30 faster than her time on the same course in 2012. The hilly course was not conducive to fast times; boys’ winner Ben Klemmeck (17:52) was more than a minute slower than his best 5k, and runner-up Liam Daily (17:55) was about 23 seconds slower than his best, running on their home course. Also running for the Oroville girls was Phoebe Poynter (12th, 30:32). Diego Santana (16th, 21:25) topped the Oroville boys. He was followed by Javier Castillo (20th, 22:01), Nahum Garfias (22nd, 22:40), Emmanuel Castrejon (26th, 23:29), Daniel Castrejon (29th, 24:19) and Dakota Haney (32nd, 27:05).

The Hornets travel to Wenatchee’s Walla Walla Point State Park on Saturday, Nov. 2, for the District 5/6 regional statequalifying meet. The top three boys teams and top one girls team (if any full teams race) will qualify for state. Individually, the top 15 boys and top five girls go on to the Nov. 9 state finals meet in Pasco.

Boys (5k)

Team - 1. Liberty Bell 18, 2. Lake Roosevelt 62, 3. Bridgeport 73, 4. Oroville 85. Individual (Top 15) - 1. Ben Klemmeck, Liberty Bell, 17:52; 2. Liam Daily, Liberty Bell, 17:55; 3. Oren Cox, Bridgeport, 18:18; 4. Morgan Ott, Liberty Bell, 18:20; 5. Josiah Klemmeck, Liberty Bell, 18:24; 6. Willy Duguay, Liberty Bell, 18:26; 7. Ryan Widhalm, Riverside Christian, 18:54; 8. Miguel Leyva, Manson, 19:12; 9.

Ray Yazzie, Lake Roosevelt, 19:28; 10. Sam Thomas, Manson, 20:21; 11. Logan Szafas, Liberty Bell, 20:24; 12. Marc Martinez, Bridgeport, 20:49; 13. Carter Dornfeld, Liberty Bell, 20:50; 14. Robert George, Lake Roosevelt, 20:58; 15. Brandon Desautel, Lake Roosevelt, 21:06.

Girls (5k)

No team scoring Individual - 1. Sierra Speiker, Oroville, 18:26; 2. Ashley Palmer, Lake Roosevelt, 22:09; 3. Alexia Hanway, Lake Roosevelt, 24:39; 4. Rhiannon Easter, Pateros, 24:48; 5. Letty Trejo, Bridgeport, 25:25; 6. Lilly Schlotzhauer, Liberty Bell, 25:34; 7. Melissa Gray, Pateros, 27:07; 8. Elsie Valdovinos, Bridgeport, 27:56; 9. Clare Castrodale, Lake Roosevelt, 28:27; 10. Anai Palacios, Bridgeport, 29:03; 11. Annie Miller, Riverside Christian, 29:04; 12. Phoebe Poynter, Oroville, 30:32; 13. Maddy Varrelman, Bridgeport, 31:24.

Tonasket quarterback Trevor Terris breaks free for a 59-yard touchdown run in the third quarter of Friday’s victory at Omak.

Patience keys end to losing streak By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OMAK - For the first time in six weeks, the Tonasket Tigers had smiles on their faces in the post-game huddle. After a brutal month-long road trip and a tough homecoming loss to Quincy, the Tigers inflicted a little misery of their own by defeating Omak 35-21 on Friday, Oct. 25, to end a five-game losing streak. “I was really happy for the kids,” said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. “After all the hours they’ve spent on the practice field it was great to see things come together for them. Seeing those happy faces on the field after the game made a lot of things worth it.” The Tigers spotted the winless Pioneers the first score of the game. But they bounced back with a 29-yard Michael Orozco run in the first quarter and a 2-yard run by Collin Aitcheson to take a 14-7 halftime lead. Omak nearly tied it before the half, but in contrast to a week ago, a last second pass for a wouldbe touchdown was knocked away in the endzone to preserve Tonasket’s lead. “The kids had a lot of energy,” Hawkins said. “We tried to change things up last week in practice, freshen things up a bit and clear our heads. We wanted to have some space to play with energy and just have fun playing. “We went in at halftime and said, ‘It’s been awhile since we’d been ahead at halftime and they just let out this roar. It’s a funny thing with the energy - maybe it comes from almost always being the underdog. There’s been times when we’ve had that energy and we’ve looked like a pretty decent team. But it’s hard to sustain that game after game when there’s never any margin for error.” Unlike games with state-ranked opponents like Cashmere and Okanogan, on this night there wasn’t the pressure to be perfect

on every play. The Tigers kept the pressure on, keeping Omak (0-8, 0-6 Caribou Trail League) pinned at their own end of the field and getting touchdowns on a pair of long runs. Orozco broke one for 35 yards and, on the Tigers’ next play from scrimmage, Terris made it a 21-point lead with a 59-yard touchdown run. It got a little sticky down the stretch. “The last 12 minutes was excruciating,” Hawkins said. “They blocked a punt to make it 28-13, then we kind of went back and forth.” Orozco scored from one yard out midway through the fourth quarter to run it up to 35-14 kept it from getting too close for comfort. “I thought we were pretty efficient offensively, probably for the first time all season,” Hawkins said. “It was nice to see all of the components working. “We stayed patient on offense. We got a couple of first downs after 3rd-and-6, 3rd-and-8. We stayed patient, then eventually would break a big one and get a long-gainer. The nice thing is it wasn’t always 3rd-and-8.” The Tigers also won the turnover battle, forcing three and not losing the ball once other than on the blocked punt. Orozco finished with 185 yards rushing on 24 carries, with Terris picking up 90 yards on 11 carries. The victory also clinched a non-playoff crossover game for the Tigers (3-5, 1-5 CTL), which this year will be at home. At this point it looks likely that it will be a rematch against Kettle Falls, a team that the Tigers beat 13-7 in the second game of the season, though that won’t be certain until after Kettle’s game this week. “It helped to have that as something to play for,” Hawkins said. “We talked about winning as many plays as we could and seizing opportunities when they arose. “We finally did that.”

Tiger soccer tries to improve seeding By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s girls soccer team gave Cascade a run for its money Saturday, but the Tigers weren’t able to pull off a repeat of last year’s upset of the Kodiaks in a 4-0 loss on Saturday, Oct. 26. “We played a good game,” said Tonasket coach Darren Collins. “Especially in the first half, when we put eight shots on them. “Our passes were great. We played calm and with a lot of control. It was a good back and forth game that the score doesn’t really reflect.” The Tigers’ Ashlynn Willis almost scored in the first minute on a shot that nearly drew paint off the post. Later, Jaden Vugteveen did hit the post with a penalty kick. Several other scoring chances went just wide or high. “In the second half we wore down a bit,” Collins said. “Selena Cosino and Elizabeth Jackson both had to come out (with injuries), so losing two of our best defenders hurt. Our defense held

up really well but we had a much harder time mounting any kind of offense.” The Tigers (9-5, 7-5 Caribou Trail League) were at Brewster for a key match that will determine the league’s fourth and fifth spots. A Tiger win would clinch a spot directly to a winner-to-state district game at Lakeside (9 Mile Falls) on Nov. 9. A loss by two or more to the Bears would send the Tigers to a home play-in game against the CTL’s No. 6 team (still to be determined) on Nov. 5, with the winner of that contest playing at Cashmere on Nov. 9. “I feel pretty good about how we’re playing,” Collins said. “We’ve been consistent, winning a lot of 50/50 balls.”

Tonasket 9, Omak 0 OMAK - Tonasket blanked Omak on Tuesday, Oct. 22, behind a four-goal, three-assist effort from Kathryn Cleman. Ashlynn Willis, Kayla Willis, Kylie Dellinger, Jaden Vugteveen and Esmerelda Flores each added goals for the Tigers, with both Willis sisters and Dellinger each adding an assist.


OCTOBER 31, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A13

SPORTS

Monroe cracks top 7 at CTL finals Tigers move on to District 6/7 state qualifying meet in Spokane this weekend By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

Kaitlyn Grunst and the Oroville girls soccer team wore purple as part of Grunst’s senior project to raise awareness for all forms of cancer. The Hornets fell to Entiat 1-0 on Saturday but earned a district playoff spot with a 3-2 victory at Manson on Saturday.

Hornets earn first district playoff bid Hornets fall to Entiat, edge Manson By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Whether or not Oroville’s youthful soccer team has turned the proverbial corner or not may be debatable, but the improvement made by the Hornets this season is undeniable. Bolstered by a the navigation of a steep learning curve by its freshman and eighth-graders, the Hornets have given up 30 fewer goals than a year ago, tripled their win total and qualified for the district playoffs for the first time since the program started in 2004. Even the games they’ve lost are now coming by scores like Thursday’s 1-0 defeat at the hands of Entiat, in a game that Oroville actually outplayed the Tigers for long stretches. “One mistake - a team mistake - and they capitalized on it,” said Oroville coach Laura Kinman. “But our passing game today was wonderful to watch. We made some great passes and great feeds to the outside.” Kaitlyn Grunst, who used the

game as her senior project to promote cancer awareness (the Hornets wore purple socks, while visiting Entiat donned pink socks for breast cancer awareness), said that other than not quite getting the win, the game lived up to her hopes. “It was a strong game,” she said. “We played our hardest. I think it was entertaining to watch. I couldn’t have asked for a better game except for winning. Our offense took a lot of good shots; our defense did great and I’m really proud of them.” The Oroville defense concentrated most of its efforts on keeping Entiat’s Alexis Swearingen marked at all times. But with about five minutes to play, Swearingen got loose behind the Hornets’ defense. Rangel came forward and deflected Swearingen’s shot, but it looped into the net for what turned out to be the game-winner. Grunst said her fundraiser was to raise awareness for all cancers (including breast cancer) and that she had been inspired by her grandmother, who suffered from lung cancer. “It was so that we could get money towards Our House (in Wenatchee) where my grandmother stayed while she was having treatment,” she said. “It was just to thank them for being so

kind to my grandmother. “I thought it would be more personal if I did something for all cancers. So we wore purple and sold the (multi-colored) bracelets. But I wanted to do it along with breast cancer too, which is why I asked the other team to dress in pink. That was really nice, and I thanked them for that.”

Oroville 3, Manson 2 MANSON - After a week of near-misses, Oroville scored a 3-2 victory at Manson on Saturday, Oct. 26, to wrap up the No. 4 seed to the district playoffs. Kambe Ripley scored two goals and Meagan Moralez added one for the Hornets. The Hornets finish the regular season at home on Thursday, Oct. 31, against Bridgeport. They then travel to Bridgeport to face the Fillies for the fifth time this season, this time in a loser-out district semifinal match, on Nov. 9. Liberty Bell 3, Oroville 2 OROVILLE - The Hornets came within minutes of upsetting last year’s state semifinalists, giving up a goal in the final five minutes that snapped a 2-2 tie on Tuesday, Oct. 22. The Mountain Lions trounced the Hornets 9-0 in their first meeting of the season.

“That game really showed how huge our growth has been this year,” Kinman said. “I’m so proud of what they’ve done. Our team leaders, our seniors, have done an outstanding job of getting the younger girls working together.” Moralez and Ripley scored the Hornets’ goals, both on penalty kicks. “It’s great we’ll have so many girls coming back next year,” Kinman said. “But I’m really going to miss Meagan and Kaitlyn.” After an evenly-played first half in which both teams had just a couple of good scoring chances, the Hornets put most of the pressure on in the second. Tori Kindred had three solid shots on goal that were either deflected by defenders or sailed just wide and Yessi Nemicio clanged one off the right post. At the defensive end Xochil Rangel made life easier for herself by coming out on the ball several times to prevent tougher shots on goal, while Grunst had a pair of non-keeper saves at the goal mouth to keep it at 0-0 deep in the second half.

CHELAN - Tonasket senior Amber Monroe, in her first season of running cross country, cracked the first team of Caribou Trail League finishers with a seventh-place finish at the Thursday, Oct. 24 league finals meet in Chelan. Monroe finished the 2.8-mile course in 19:48.0 to claim the last first-team spot over eighth place Jesica Bauer of Cashmere. Cascade’s freshman sensation, Erin Mullins, easily won the race in 17:14.9 over teammate Jennifer Novikoff (2nd, 19:14.7). The rest of the field was more tightly spaced as eight runners came in between 19:14 and 20:00. Also running for the Tigers were Johnna Terris (15th, 20:38.2), Lea Berger (25th, 22:43.7), Jenna Valentine (30th, 23:12.3) and Kallie Mirick (40th, 28:08.7). The girls team finished fifth out of six scoring teams with 117 points, beating Quincy. Cascade (52) edged Chelan (56) for team title honors. “We ran a little tired and not as focused as we need to,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “We will be ready this week.” For the boys, Quincy’s Spencer Elmore (15:23.2) won the league title by 13 seconds over Cascade’s Daniel Olmstead, while Cashmere (42) took the team title over Quincy (63). Tonasket’s boys finished sixth out of seven scoring teams with 185 points, beating Brewster. Individual finishers for the boys were Adrian McCarthy (31st, 17:46.0), Tim Jackson (35th, 18:18.1), Bryden Hires (36th, 18:23.1), Smith Condon

(41st, 19:08.7), Abe Podkranic (42nd, 19.11.7), Hunter Swanson (44th, 19:59.3) and Keeton Hoines (46th, 21:25.8). The Tigers compete at the Class 1A District 6/7 regional meet at Spokane Valley’s Plantes Ferry Park on Saturday, Nov. 2. The girls run at 12:20 p.m. and the boys at 1:00. The top 20 in each race will advance to the WIAA state championship meet in Pasco on Nov. 9. Both top Tiger contenders for a state berth are on the girls’ side; Monroe currently ranks 21st in the region in at the 5k distance and 17th in the 3-mile; Terris is ranked 28th in both.

Girls (2.8 mile) Team - 1. Cascade 52; 2. Chelan 56; 3. Omak 77; 4. Cashmere 80; 5. Tonasket 117; 6. Quincy 121; Brewster 201. Individual (Top 15) - 1. Erin Mullins, Cascade, 17:14.9; 2. Jennifer Novikoff, Cascade, 19:14.7; 3. Addison Ivory, Chelan, 19:16.1; 4. Sarah O’Dell, Omak, 19:38.7; 5. Lydia Youkey, Cascade, 19:39.1; 6. Breanna Knishka, Cashmere, 19:43.2; 7. Amber Monroe, Tonasket, 19:48.0; 8. Jesica Bauer, Cashmere, 19:49.9; 9. Jessica Oules, Chelan, 19:53.4; 10. Jasmine Gonzalez, Cashmere, 20:07.0; 11. Alexandra O’Dell, Omak, 20:08.7; 12. Abigail Early, Omak, 20:22.2; 13. Daisy Campos, Chelan, 20:23.5; 14. Jessica Galvan, Chelan, 20:24.2; 15. Johnna Terris, Tonasket, 20:38.2.

Boys (2.8 mile)

Team - 1. Cashmere 42; 2. Quincy 63; 3. Cascade 79; 4. Chelan 83; 5. Omak 87; 6. Tonasket 185; 7. Brewster 201. Individual (Top 15 and Tonasket) - 1. Spencer Elmore, Quincy, 15:23.2; 2. Daniel Olmstead, Cascade, 15:35.7; 3. Jonathan Mangas, Cashmere, 15:43.5; 4. Ivan Reyes, Chelan, 15:47.3; 5. Victor Salgado, Quincy, 15:50.6; 6. Morgan O’Dell, Omak, 15:51.3; 7. Samuel Goble, Omak, 16:03.9; 8. Drew Van Polen, Cashmere, 16:07.1; 9. Eli Phillips, Cashmere, 16:10.8; 10. Ricardo Naranjo, Cashmere, 16:11.3; 11. Jimmy Garcia, Quincy, 16:11.9; 12. Oliver Fernandez, Cashmere, 16:23.6; 13. Cole Paton, Cashmere, 16:24.4; 14. Ian Allen, Chelan, 16:26.0; 15. Nathan Wells, Cascade, 16:29.8.

Tiger volleyball falls twice TONASKET - The Tonasket volleyball team’s loss to Omak on Tuesday, Oct.22, was a competitive one, said Tigers coach Jackie Gliddon. “Even with the loss, Tonasket played well and I felt we competed with Omak,” Gliddon said. The Tigers fell 25-16, 25-16, 25-20 to the playoff-bound Pioneers. “The girls put down a total of 14 kills,” Gliddon said. “Cassie Spear was very dependable in the back row and serving line for us and Savannah Clinedinst, once

again, played very well.” Tonasket stats: Cassie Spear 9/9 serving; Savannah Clinedinst 12/12 serving, 5 kills, 1 block; Jenny Bello 8/8 serving, 4 kills; Alissa Young 6/6 serving, 3 kills; Rachael Sawyer 4/4 serving, 2 kills, 1 block; Jenna Davisson 1 block; Alexia Sutton 5/5 serving.

Cascade 3, Tonasket 0 TONASKET - The highlyranked Kodiaks overwhelmed the Tigers on Saturday, Oct. 26, 25-7, 25-11, 25-1. “Cascade came with a mis-

sion in mind and played very well,” Gliddon said. “My girls had trouble handling their serves and their tremendous hits. “We had a few blocks; but not for kills. We’ll get back to the gym and prepare this week.” The Tigers (0-14, 0-12 Caribou Trail League) played at Brewster on Tuesday and finish the season at home against Cashmere on Saturday, Nov. 2. Tonasket stats: Savannah Clinedinst 3 kills; Cassie Spear 4/4 serving, 1 ace.

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Football

Caribou Trail 1A League Overall W-L Cashmere 6-0 Okanogan 5-1 Chelan 4-2 Cascade 3-3 Quincy 3-3 Brewster 2-4 Tonasket 1-5 Omak 0-6

W-L 7-1 7-1 5-3 4-4 3-5 3-5 3-5 0-8

W-L White Swan 4-0 Liberty Bell 3-1 Kittitas 3-1 Oroville 3-2 Bridgeport 1-3 Manson 1-4 Lk Roosevelt 0-4

W-L 7-1 3-1 3-3 5-2 1-7 1-6 3-5

Central WA 2B League Overall

Volleyball

Caribou Trail 1A League Overall

W-L W-L-S Cascade 12-0 21-3-0 Chelan 10-1 15-1-0 Brewster 8-4 8-4-0 Omak 8-5 8-5-0 Quincy 5-7 5-8-0 Okanogan 4-8 4-8-0 Cashmere 1-11 1-11-0 Tonasket 0-12 0-14-0

CWL 2B North League Overall W-L W-L-S Bridgeport 7-1 9-3-0 Liberty Bell 5-2 10-4-0 Oroville 4-3 7-7-0 Lk Roosevelt 1-5 2-9-0 Manson 0-6 2-9-0

Girls Soccer

Caribou Trail 1A League Overall Cashmere Cascade Okanogan Tonasket Brewster Chelan Quincy Omak

Pts. W-L W-L-T 36 12-0 13-1-0 30 10-2 10-4-0 24 8-4 9-5-0 21 7-5 9-5-0 15 5-7 6-8-0 6 2-9 3-10-0 6 2-10 2-12-0 6 2-11 3-12-0

Central WA 1B/2B League Overall Pts. W-L W-L-T Bridgeport 18 6-0 12-1-0 Liberty Bell 12 4-2 7-7-0 Entiat 12 4-2 6-8-0 Oroville 6 2-5 3-11-0 Manson 0 0-7 0-11-0

Schedules Oct. 31 - Nov. 9 Thursday, Oct. 31 GSoc - Bridgeport at Oroville, 4 pm Friday, Nov. 1 FB (Var) - Chelan at Tonasket, 7 pm FB (Var) - Oroville at Bridgeport, 7 pm Saturday, Nov. 2 XC - Oroville at 1B/2B Regional (Wenatchee, Walla Walla Pt.), 1/1:30 pm XC - Tonasket at 1A Regional (Spokane, Plantes Ferry), 12:20/1 pm GSoc - Cashmere at Tonasket, 1:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Cashmere at Tonasket, 1/2:30 pm

Tuesday, Nov. 5 GSoc - CTL #6 at Tonasket (if necessary), TBA Thursday, Nov. 7 VB (Var) - Oroville at South Div. #2 (District playoff), TBA Friday, Nov. 8 or Saturday, Nov. 9 FB - NEA Team at Tonasket (nonplayoff crossover), TBA Saturday, Nov. 9 XC - Oroville qualifiers at State Finals at Pasco - Oroville (1B/2B) - Girls 10 am, boys 11:30 am. XC - Tonasket qualifiers at State Finals at Pasco - Tonasket (1A) Girls 10:30 am, Boys 12 pm GSoc - Tonasket at Lakeside (9-Mile) or Cashmere (District playoff), 2 pm GSoc - Oroville at Bridgeport (District playoff), 1 pm FB (Var) - Chief Leschi at Oroville, 3 pm

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Life is better when your doctors and your Medicare health plan work together. Good news for area residents on Medicare! Now you can enjoy the highest quality in health care and your Medicare health plan through the new partnership of Confluence Health, Wenatchee Valley Medical Center and Health Alliance Medicare. All three organizations are driven by the philosophy that patient and member needs come first. Through this partnership, you’ll enjoy: High-quality care from local doctors and hospitals you know and trust Benefits you really want and need in a high-quality Medicare health plan • $0 a month Medicare health plan option* • $0 Preferred Generics at Walmart & Sam’s Club** • •

Find out more. Come to a FREE Informational Meeting† in your area. Call NOW to reserve your seats: 1-877-561-1684 (TTY/TDD: 711 or 1-800-833-6388 Washington Relay), 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., 7 days a week. Don’t wait! Enrollment starts October 15 and ends on December 7. Soap Lake Senior Center 121 2nd Ave. SE Soap Lake, WA Oct. 28 – 12:30 p.m.

Omak Clinic 916 Koala Dr. Omak, WA Nov. 5 – 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 6 – 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 7 – 10 a.m. & 1 p.m.

Health Alliance is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Health Alliance Medicare depends on contract renewal. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or copayments/coinsurance may change January 1 of each year. The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information, contact the plan. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply. Other providers are available in our network. * You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. ** Low copayments available at other pharmacies. † A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at a sales meeting call 1-877-561-1684 or TTY/TDD: 711 or 1-800-833-6388 (Washington Relay). H3471_14_10940 Accepted 09/23/13


Page A14

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 31, 2013

TVBRC VOLUNTEER APPRECIATION

Obituaries

Gordon Mooney

Gordon LeRoy Mooney

Gordon LeRoy Mooney, age 93, beloved husband, father and grandfather passed away peacefully on October 15, 2013 at North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket. Gordon was born December 11, 1919 in Molson at his grandmother’s home to Roy and Celeste Mooney. He joined his sister, Celeste and later sister Lola followed. Gordon grew up in Molson, helping his father at the creamery and delivering milk to folks in his wagon. He graduated from Molson High School in 1937. Although Gordon pursued several jobs and businesses, farming was in his blood. He began farming on a small place on nine mile road near Molson in 1942, which became the beginning and heart of “the Ranch.” He added a farm in Oroville just south of town in 1948, where he and his dad built a large barn that still stands today. In 1954, he met and married Lorraine Potter, who had a daughter, LaVerne. Daughter Corinne arrived in spring of 1956 and the family moved to the Ranch later that summer. Diane Gail followed in 1958 and Wayne in 1960. Gordon worked hard to build up his ranch, adding more acreage as one by one neighboring farms came up for sale. These eventually accumulated to some 2000 acres, which he ran and worked virtually by himself. In 1958, he was chosen as Conservation Farmer of the Year for his ‘well rounded, dry land farming practices”. Gordon and Lorraine divorced in 1973. Then, in 1977, Gordon was baptized as one of Jehovah’s Witnesses and married the love of his life, Jeanette Shepard. They purchased an orchard in Oroville and moved off the hill to operate their new enterprise. Gordon loved flying, owning and flying several planes over the years. He enjoyed telling stories of his adventures and his family loved to hear his exciting tales. He and Jeanette avidly took up snow skiing and water skiing, which he patiently taught all the grandkids. After he retired, he and Jeanette were able to take numerous trips and cruises to many places. Gordon loved snorkeling and scuba diving and even went parasailing at the age of 70. This intelligent, kind and gentle man will be greatly missed by his large family and many spiritual brothers and sisters. He was a devoted son, brother, husband, father, grandfather, great grandfather and friend who always put others needs before his own. Gordon is survived by his wife of 36 years, Jeanette and her children, Sheri Shepard of Pennsylvania and her daughter Heather and John (Anne) Shepard of Seattle; three daughters: LaVerne (Ron) Durheim of Palmer, Alaska and their children, Marlena and Jeremy; Corinne (Michael) Clark of Spokane and

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Advertise your goods and services in the Classifieds and reach hundreds of potential buyers daily. Call today to place your AD and make a sale quickly. Watch for classified specials! OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 509-476-3602

Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center Volunteer Coordinator Linda Black hosted the center’s annual volunteer appreciation lunch on Thursday, Oct. 17, featuring lunch provided by The Kuhler Bar & Grill and a mix of reminiscing about the year past and looking forward. Community Cultural Center building manager Aurora Jones gave a brief presentation on the CCC, and the volunteers also took a tour of motel facilities at the Red Apple Inn and The Junction after their meal. All of the 2012 volunteers returned for the 2013 season. Visitors to the center included international travelers from Denmark, Germany, France, Switzerland, China, New Zealand, the Netherlands and, of course, numerous guests from Canada. The TVBRC also hosted 54 nights of bicycle camping in its “back yard.”

children, Dusti, Clifford, Justin and Matthew Gilbert; Gail (Ray) Harden of Oroville and children Ty and Brandi; son: Wayne (Donna) Mooney of Spokane and children, Katey, Jesse and Hannah; sister: Lola (Bob) Power of Omak; sister-in-law: Linda Cook of Tonasket and 15 grandchildren. Gordon was preceded in death by his parents, an older infant brother, Roy Jr.; sister, Celeste Quilliam; brother-in-law, Lawson Cook and father-in-Law, Albert Libby. A Memorial is planned for November 9 at 1:30 p.m. at the Oroville Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses. This will be followed by refreshments at the Tonasket High School Commons. The family would like to thank Dr. Helleson and his staff, and all the staff at North Valley Extended Care for all their kindness and care to Gordon as well as to his family.

Margaret Brengle

Brent Baker/staff photo

Margaret Brengle passed away peacefully in Puyallup Wash. on August 23, 2013 at age 92. She was born in Wisconsin and raised in North Dakota. She taught school in Seattle, Canada and Tonasket where she retired in 1986. She is survived by two sons, John in Puyallup and Paul in Stockton, Calif. A “Memories of Margaret” event will be held on Nov. 2 at 1 p.m. at the Ellisforde Church of The Brethren on Hwy. 97. Her friends are invited to attend.

NCW beef producers winter school ‘Planning & Managing for Herd Health’ Submitted by Sherry Bodkins WSU Okanogan County Extension

BRIDGEPORT - Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) is the

largest cause of disease loss in beef cattle This program will provide a comprehensive overview of herd health management to prevent disease in your cattle herd — especially Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex — and it will also focus on managing micronutrient nutrition for your cattle in a region that has specific challenges related to copper and sele-

nium deficiencies. Learn how to overcome this region’s chronic problems with selenium and copper deficiencies, and how to bring nutrients into balance for your cattle and how to prevent BRD and other diseases, to significantly improve the health and productivity of your beef cattle herd. Classes will be held in the commons room at the Chief

Joseph Dam in Bridgeport on Saturday, Nov. 2 from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. This is a free program and includes a free beef fajita lunch sponsored by New Generation Feeds and CHS Nutrition! RSVP Requested For more information or to RSVP call (509)422-7245 or email okanogan.county@wsu. edu.

Initiative 522 – badly written, costly and misleading Consumers would pay higher grocery prices “Economic studies show I-522 would increase grocery prices for Washington families by hundreds of dollars per year.” Dan Newhouse, Former Director Washington State Department of Agriculture

“I-522… it's a step in the wrong direction, adding costs without bringing benefits.” Tri-City Herald Editorial, 10/13/13

“[I-522] holds the potential to create more problems than it solves – for farmers, manufacturers, retailers and consumers.” Yakima Herald-Republic Editorial, 9/30/13

Many food labels would be false and inaccurate “Many of the food labels required by this poorly written measure and its special mandates would be false and inaccurate, which would mislead consumers.” Dr. R. James Cook, Plant Scientist Professor Emeritus, WSU* *Title and affiliation for identification purposes only

Every farmer in the state would be affected by I-522 “I-522 hurts all WA farmers – whether they grow genetically engineered crops or not – by requiring them to install and maintain separate and costly new systems at every stage of the production process.”

“Exemptions for everything from dairy and beef products to restaurant foods render much of I-522 meaningless to consumers.” The Spokesman-Review Editorial, 10/22/13

“I-522 doesn’t live up to its own truth-inpackaging claims.” Tacoma News Tribune Editorial, 10/6/13

“If the initiative intends to inform consumers, it fails.” Wenatchee World Editorial, 10/12/13

NO 522

April Clayton, Ph.D., Orondo, Washington Organic Farmer and Chemist

Every major newspaper in Washington says NO on I-522: Seattle Times • The Olympian • Everett Herald The Spokesman-Review • Walla Walla Union-Bulletin • The Columbian • Tri-City Herald • Wenatchee World Longview Daily News • Tacoma News Tribune • Yakima Herald-Republic • Moscow-Pullman Daily News This voter information paid for by NO on 522, P.O. Box 7325, Olympia, WA 98507. Top five contributors: Grocery Manufacturers Association Against I-522, Monsanto Company, DuPont Pioneer, Dow AgroSciences LLC, Bayer CropScience.

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 31, 2013  

October 31, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 31, 2013  

October 31, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune