Page 1

OKANOGAN FAMILY FAIRE AND TONASKET HOMECOMING Photos, pages A2-3

STUDENTS RAISE CANCER AWARENESS

Fundraisers at Oroville home soccer on Thursday, Oct. 24 and football on Friday, Oct. 25.

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Election coming up Nov. 5

MUST HAVE BEEN SOMETHING HE ATE ...

Candidates challenge incumbents for hospital commissioner, Oroville mayor and council BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Justin Leslie got creative with this big pumpkin that he carved into a hungry Jack o’ Lantern. Makes you think maybe one of the smaller pumpkins ventured a little too close. Leslie, who has this scary scene on display outside his Juniper Street home, bought the monstrously proportioned pumpkin from Don Beanblossom’s pumpkin patch in Oroville. The pumpkin weighed in at between 450 and 500 pounds and took four people to lift, according to Beanblossom. It took Leslie two and a half hours to carve. Obviously, the Jack o’ Lantern hasn’t been sticking to his diet for Halloween. For a schedule of Halloween Happenings in Oroville and Tonasket see page A4.

NORTH COUNTY – Four incumbents and four challengers might be the ones to watch in local north county races as the ballots where slipped into peoples mailboxes last week. This Nov. 2 voters in Oroville are asked to choose between longtime mayor and former city councilman C.H. “Chuck” Spieth or newcomer Chris Allen. There are also two city council seats up for election and each has someone jockeying for that position. Russell W. Rounds filed for Council Position 1, against incumbent Jon R. Neal and Paul E. Brochard filed for Council Position 2 against incumbent Anthony “Tony” Koepke. The mayor and council positions all have four-year terms. Incumbents on the North Valley Hospital Board also find themselves facing challengers. Rosa Snider, a vocal critic of the closing of the Assisted Living facility is going up against longtime hospital commissioner Dick Larson for Position 1. Teresa Hughes is also seeking the Position 5 seat of Lael Duncan and

SEE ELECTION | PG A8

Oroville Brisa Leep claims Miss Tonasket crown approves online billpay BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Like last year, there was no suspense involved with the crowning of the 2014 Miss Tonasket Rodeo. And like outgoing Tonasket Rodeo Queen Karlie Henneman, next year’s queen, Brisa Leep, is more than ready to take on the role. Leep spent much of last summer at Henneman’s side at numerous rodeos throughout the region, often serving as her friend’s hairdresser. That experience, Leep said, only made her want to represent Tonasket as its rodeo queen all that much more. “If anything, that just made me sure,”

City will upgrade computer systems BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

“I wanted my shot at it. It just looks like so much fun.” Brisa Leep, 2014 Miss Tonasket Rodeo

she said. “By the end of the summer, I was 110 percent positive I wanted the role. “I feel like I’m about 80 percent ready. There’s still some things I’m not sure about, but overall I’m so ready. I’m just looking forward to going and seeing so many different rodeos, getting to meet so many queens, and getting to represent my town.” For the second year in a row, there was only one applicant for the Tonasket Rodeo Queen competition. But after working closely with Henneman for most of the summer, Leep could hardly wait to get started on her own journey as queen. And she can only hope to have as good a year as Henneman did, who so enjoyed the experience that she didn’t really want to give the crown up, even to one of her best friends. “This last year was amazing,” Henneman said. “All I wanted to be was Miss Tonasket

Brent Baker/staff photo

Brisa Leep (left) is crowned 2014 Miss Tonasket Rodeo boy close friend and outgoing queen Karlie Henneman at Saturday evening’s ceremony. Rodeo, and that’s what I got to be; I never wanted to be anything else. “Brisa will do a great job. She’s been there (for me) every step of the way.” Visiting royalty included 2013 Omak Stampede Queen Breanna Howell; 2014 Omak Stampede Queen Tiffany Mannikko; 2013 Okanogan County Junior Rodeo Association Queen Trinity DeJong; 2014 Okanogan County Fair Queen Miranda Cleveland; and 2006 Tonasket Rodeo Queen Amber Utt. Henneman thanked the businesses

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 43

and individuals that supported her during her reign before transferring her crown to Leep. Leep presented awards on behalf of the Tonasket Comancheros to the Tonasket Lions Club (Organization of the Year); Steve Lorz (Volunteer of the Year); McMillan Construction (Business of the Year); and J. W. Fox (Comancheros Member of the Year). For Leep, the beginning of her year as Tonasket Rodeo Queen marks the end of a long wait.

“I’ve been preparing for this for awhile,” she said. “I was so excited to get a chance at this. I was nervous a bit about giving a speech and being up in front of all these people. But it was so worth it and such a thrill.” Leep said she’d been waiting for this day since her friend Kelsey Gallas was named 2009 Miss Tonasket Rodeo. “I’ve been watching as the other queens went through and had other friends get other titles,” she said. “I wanted my shot at it. It just looks like so much fun.”

SEE UTILITIES | PG A8

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE – Oroville water, sewer and garbage customers may soon be able to pay their bill online as the city council approved the concept at their Tuesday, Oct. 15 council meeting. “We’ve been outsourcing our utility bills for the last two months now and that has worked well, the next step is online payment and e-billing,” said Kathy Jones, Oroville City Clerk. “It will save quite a bit on Canadian postage and most of our Canadian customers want to pay online anyway,” Jones added. “Our monthly fee (to the city to add e-billing and online bill pay) will probably be $75.” Jones explained the outsourcing of the billing has already saved the city money and if customers chose to get their bills through email, rather than have the traditional postcard sent to through the mail, it will save the city even more. She said the service would probably start in about four months if approved. Councilman Tony Koepke made a motion to approve the city pursuing the new electronic billing and bill paying. The motion was seconded by Councilman Ed Naillon and passed unanimously. “We’re really excited about this... we think will be able to expand the

Family Faire Homecoming Letters/Opinion

A2 A3 A5

Community A6-7 Cops & Courts A9 Classifieds/Legals A10

Real Estate Sports Obituaries

A11 A12-13 A14


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 24, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Okanogan Family Faire Photos by Gary DeVon

Above, the Okanogan Family Faire holds wonders for all ages. Last weekend’s faire took place under mostly sunny skies and was a celebration of the event’s 40th Anniversary. Right, Planetary Refugees was one of the more popular groups at this year’s faire.

Just taking some time to jam near under the flag pavilion near the entrance to the fair.

Defying gravity at Youthtopia, a playground offering kids a safe place to play.

Youthtopia also offers a big tipi where children can go and play with the musical instruments and listen to storytellers who volunteer their time.

For the last few years kids have been able to help to fashion a dug out canoe. The work under the watchful eye of craftsmen who help instruct them in the use of tools and how to shape the boat.

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OCTOBER 24, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE 2013 TONASKET HIGH SCHOOL HOMECOMING

Right, “Mr. T” Trevor Terris and homecoming queen Amber Monroe (wearing well-used firefighting boots from her summer adventures) make their grand entrance at Friday’s homecoming assembly; above, Christian Diaz performs during air band competition; below, Alissa Young gets some serious air to knock down Vanessa Pershing’s pass during Wednesday night PowderPuff football.

Top, Thursday night’s bonfire and car bash warmed the chilly autumn air; above, the high school class competition involved collecting food for the Tonasket Food Bank (which brought in more than 1,200 cans of food and $100); below, the seniors “Thrilled” the homecoming assembly crowd with a reenactment of a Michael Jackson (Marcelino Ruiz Martell, center); and the varsity cheerleaders led cheers during the assembly.

Above, the Tonasket High School football team filled a flat bed truck during Friday afternoon’s parade through downtown. Above left, the senior PowderPuff football team rolled to decisive victories over the sophomores and freshmen to win Wednesday night’s tournament.

Photos by Brent Baker

 ELECT Teresa

A number of class competitions took place throughout the week, including the caterpillar race in the Tonasket High School parking lot. Above, the freshman class tries to avoid a group face-plant as its team navigates around a cone marking the out-and-back course.

HUGHES North Valley Hospital District #4 - Board of Commissioners Seat 5

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I-522 is about labeling Genetically Modified Food Confused? Not sure what to believe? The contributions speak for themselves YES =11,000 plus individuals from across Washington State - avg. $25 each NO = A few large corporate donors from outside Washington that would profit handsomely from keeping GMOs hidden in our food

It’s Our RIGHT TO KNOW PLEASE VOTE YES ON I-522

Paid for by GMO Awareness Group, Box 2931, Sequim, WA 98382


Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 24, 2013

City of Tonasket wins award

BAD MOON RISING

By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The City of Tonasket and Mayor Patrick Plumb were informed that they would be receiving an award from the Infrastructure Assistance Coordinating Council for work done on the Bonaparte Creek Sewer Extension project. “This award will reflect a large (number) of unsung leaders in the City of Tonasket,” Plumb said. “I am proud to represent them in our completion of the Bonaparte Creek/Mill Drive/Bretz Road Sewer and Water projects. There is a page full of people that deserve recognition that I outlined on my Facebook page, and each of them need to be awarded also.” “This recently completed project decommissioned 50 substandard and failing septic systems that were responsible for contaminating the local swimming hole, Bonaparte Creek,” wrote Jamie Varela of Varela & Associates, who nominated the City of

Brent Baker/staff photo

A small group of Tonasket High School fans gathered above the “T” atop the hill behind the football field to watch Friday’s homecoming game. The nearly full moon rose behind them just as the teams were ready to kick off. Unfortunately the Tigers lost in the moonlight to the Quincy Jackrabbits, 44-7.

Oroville Ambulance Coordinator

OROVILLE - Oroville has an Emergency Medical Responder class coming up next month. We are working hard to recruit more members for our service. Providing care to those who are in need is a very rewarding, exciting, and fulfilling experience. Responders are also financially compensated for their time and service. The EMR certification trains a person to use critical thinking skills to assist EMTs with patient care, drive the ambulance, and assess emergency situations. I would also like to thank our Oroville Ambulance crew. This year we have seen the call volumes go up considerably, yet our crew has successfully met that challenge. We now have 24/7 sign ups to make sure there is always a

crew available when the call goes out. This has meant huge sacrifices in the lives of our small crew, yet each and every one of them has selflessly stepped up to the plate to make sure the needs in our community are met and that our ambulance is never sitting idle without a crew. Adding more members would greatly diminish the demands on our small group of responders. We man our ambulances with three crew members rather than two, which is the requirement. Not only are these responders available, they work very hard to improve their skills by training, attending conferences, studying on their own, and getting involved at the County and Regional Levels. I would like to assure you that even though our numbers are small, we get the job done and meeting the response time percentages required by Washington

EAT DRINK BE SCARY

time with his family, immediately drove to Olympia with his entire family, which included a newborn child at the time, and met face to face with ECY agency representatives and was able to fill this final key funding gap and complete this long sought after project.” The awards were presented at the IAC’s annual awards ceremony on Wednesday in Wenatchee. “It is an exciting time to be a part of the City of Tonasket and growing our community through annexation and expansion of City services, which are recognized at the State level for the quality of the infrastructure and for the services that the City provides to the citizens,” Plumb said. “We should all be proud to have such great people working on our behalf. I would especially like to credit the current seated City Council members and the previous members of the Council for their understanding and establishing a vision for our City. We are also served by a great bunch of hardworking staff that I am proud of.”

... others have crept up faster and ours have stayed back where they shouldn’t be.”

at. But there’s not been funds taken away or diverted from anything.”

If it’s on Facebook ... And ... fresh from the world of getting one’s information from social media sites, board member Lloyd Caton said rumors circulating about misappropriation of funds not only were untrue, but not possible for money that had not even been allocated yet. “There’s been some misinformation out there ... about there being a bunch of money dedicated to vocational ed coming up missing,” he said. “None of that is true. I don’t know where these people come up with this. We haven’t allocated or dedicated money for any kind of shop yet... It’s been a discussion point for a couple of years (and) it’s a discussion point in this levy/bond package we’re looking

Other business The board went into a work session to finalize details for the levy and bond issues that will be put up for public vote next spring. “We’ll be talking and hopefully finalizing ideas and numbers,” Turner said. “One of the things we need to meet is 1080 hours (school year - the “full day” the board has been advocating) by next fall. That’s our premise to get these going.” Two items will be on the ballot: a renewal of the maintenance and operations levy, which is set to expire; and a bond for work on school facilities accommodate the longer school day and growing enrollment. “I think the bond is the better way to go (for capital improvements),” Turner said.

Non-union salaries adjusted

Oroville Ambulance is recruiting Submitted by Debra Donohue

Tonasket for the project’s community impact. “Fifty homes were connected to the City’s wastewater system, providing the basic infrastructure the residential area needed necessary to preserve local source of drinking water and natural resources and to attract and retain people to live, work, raise families, and retire in the area.” Jeff Moran, Varela’s project manager, nominated Plumb for his leadership on the project. “Mayor Plumb’s leadership in actively seeking and obtaining the funds necessary to extend the City sewer system to serve this area was instrumental in both the success of the project and the improvement in the creek water quality,” Moran wrote in his nomination. “His leadership and willingness to never accept “no” is not better exemplified than in the following example: After construction bids were received and it became apparent the funding would be short by over $100,000; Mayor Plumb, who was in Seattle at the

By Brent Baker

State Department of Health. We are also teaming with Oroville Fire Department to urge our citizens to identify their homes with reflective address markers, so as to help locate those of you in need. We thank the Mayor and Oroville City Council for all their help in working with us to make sure we have everything needed to better serve our community. We also thank our community for the support we receive from you to keep our service going and to provide the incentive to serve you, as we live in one of the best communities there is, and we are proud to be of service. For those of you that would like to join our service, receive child car seat information, or purchase an address marker, call (509)476-4320. Applications to our service can be obtained and returned to Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood.

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board approved adjustments to non-union employees that hadn’t seen pay increases since 2006 at their Monday, Oct. 14, board meeting. Those employees include office staff and supervisory positions. Superintendent Paul Turner said he used a variety of sources, including state salary pay scales for similar school districts and numbers from other districts in the region, to make his recommendations. “The salary adjustments there aren’t all the same,” Turner said, pointing out that it depended on what had happened with the salaries of similarly-defined positions in other districts. “It will be reviewed again in 2016-17. Over the years what hasn’t happened

night, October 31 ume contest Prizes Thrills, Chills, Frights & Fun

Downtown Trickonly) or Treat 21 patrons

OROVILLE - It’s Halloween! Kids Trick or Treat downtown businesses on Thursday, Oct 31 from 3-6 p.m. Look for Green Trick or Treat signs posted on doors and windows of local businesses. You will find treats for the kids and a smile! Your Oroville Chamber of Commerce thanks businesses for participating in the festivities! Happy Halloween!

Community Cultural Center

TONASKET - Thursday, Oct. 31 – CCC Halloween Party! For all kids! Finger food, candy, games, and a haunted house in the back room. Starts at 5 pm. Call Sabrina Norrell at (509) 486-1421 for more info or to volunteer to help out with this.

The Kuhler Bar & Grill

TONASKET - Halloween Costume Party on Saturday, Oct. 26. Enjoy music by Bad Habits starting at 9 p.m. Costumes and prizes. Good Times!

The Plaza Restaurant & Lounge

203 S. Western Ave. on Thursday, Oct. 31 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Have a safe and happy halloween!

Members and Guests

A Spooktacular Haunted Hayride

Dinner 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

~ ROAST PORK ~

Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Carrots, French Bread Salad & Dessert

Dinner: 10. $

KARAOKE

Adult Costume Contest at 9 p.m.

EAT EAT DRINK DRINK AND BE SCARY AND BE SCARY

(Over 21 patrons only)

OROVILLE

A spooktacular

Haunted Hayride Lake and Country For info. call Cindy DeVon at 476-4444

I LP APLSA TS ITMI ME E AND

G R I L L

B A R AND G R I L L OROVILLE - Eat, Drink and Be Scary! Thursday, Oct. 31. Cos-1307 MAIN STREET, OROVILLE, WA 476-3007 1307 MAIN STREET, OROVILLE, WA 476-3007 tume Contest and prizes (over 21 patrons only).

North Valley Hospital WA 476-3007 T, OROVILLE, TONASKET - Trick or Treat

 Choose

costumes made of flame-retardant materials.  Carry a flashlight and/or glow sticks.  Establish boundaries and a curfew.  Accompany younger children.  Go to will lit homes, accept treats at the door and never go inside.  Check treats before eating them.

Plaza Restaurant & Lounge the

Annual

HALLOWEEN PARTY Sat., Oct. 26

9 pm until closing

Music: North Half Prizes for

brought to you by

STIME

Halloween Safety Tips

BEST COSTUME

Sat., Oct. 26  6 to 9 p.m.

Vicki’s Back Door Club

B A R

00

Kids 8 & under eat FREE

OROVILLE - Annual Harvest Dinner on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 6 to 8 p.m. There will be Karaoke. Adult costume contest at 9 p.m. Members and guests.

OROVILLE - Costume Party on Friday, Oct. 25 from 7 to 9 p.m. Live music with the Wilder’s Band. Bring snacks to share. Families Welcome!

North Valley Hospital located at

Sat., Oct. 26th

Oroville Eagles Harvest Dinner

Thursday night, October 31 Thursday night, October 31 Costume contest Costume contest Prizes Prizes (Over 21 patrons only)

#3865

Harvest Dinner

OROVILLE - ReMax Lake and Country and Taber’s Taste of Summer annual Haunted Hayride Saturday, Oct. 26 from 6 to 9 p.m. Local Boy Scouts will be selling hot dogs! Please bring a non-perishable food item for our local food bank.

OROVILLE - Annual Halloween Party on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 9 p.m. until closing. Music by North Half. Prizes for Best Costume!

A N DPastimeGBar &R Grill

Oroville Eagles

Taber’s Taste of

and

Summer

Location: Taber’s Taste of Summer Hwy 97 N., OROVILLE 2 mi from Canadian Border

Local Cub Scouts

will be selling Hot Dogs!

Please bring a non-perishable food item for our local food bank.

1st, 2nd & 3rd.

1412 Main St., Oroville

476-2664

HAPPY HALLOWEEN

Make Halloween a fun, safe and happy time for your kids and they’ll carry on the traditionthat you taught them to their own families some day!

Trick or Treat Thursday, Oct. 31st at North Valley Hospital from 3:30 to 5:30pm

North Valley Hospital District 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org


OCTOBER 24, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Setting record straight

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Geoff and Hilarie Klein and their girls enjoy a trip to the Okanogan Family Faire. The couple hails from West Seattle but enjoy coming out to the Okanogan when they get a chance. Geoff is the co-founder of the Tumbleweed Film Festival which takes place the first Thursday, Friday and Saturday of August in Oroville.

Will always be the ‘Barter Faire’ to me

The Okanogan County Family Faire celebrated it’s 40th Anniversary last weekend and although I’ll probably always think of it as the “Barter Faire” it continues to be something that every one should see at least once. It was made even more special because it was a chance to help introduce the faire to my friends Geoff and Hilaries’ two and a half year-old twin girls. I’ve lost count of how many faires I’ve been to. Not counting the few times I went when I was a kid, I’ve probably been most years over the 25 plus years at the newspaper. Geoff must be getting to the point where he’s been to half a dozen, although he’s missed the last two for obvious reasons – namely having twins. Hillarie has been two or three times before and both were excited to get to introduce their kids to the Out of faire and the Okanogan in general. My Mind While the faire in many ways is like some sort Gary A. DeVon of fantastical small city come to life in the hills above Tonasket, one can only imagine what it must look like through a child’s eyes. The kids and grown ups spent a lot of time in Youthtopia this year. The swings and the slides made for lots of activity among the twins. And you know us Godfathers never get tired of pushing one’s Godchild in the swing. Perhaps the next favorite thing for the twins was the music and dancing – most of the kids dancing by the stage seemed to never tire out. Everyone at the faire is very welcoming and most you meet leave you with a “have a good faire” as you move on to the next sight, sound or vendor. People from all walks of life can be seen taking in the sights, enjoying the food and checking out what the vendors have to offer. And this year the weather was great with blue skies, sunshine and just a hint of the winter to come as day turned to evening. While I limited myself to a 40th Anniversary T-Shirt as far as purchases go, there were lots of items that beckoned me.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Dear Gary, I feel it necessary to clarify a couple of statements that were printed in a recent mailout brochure in town that I believe could be misleading to the reader. In August of this year, the City Council did authorize the transfer of Oroville’s remaining 2010 FAA Non-Primary Entitlement Funds of $100,500 to Felts Field in Spokane, which assisted that airport in completing a project that they were working on. Council’s decision was based on the following facts: 1. It is common policy with FAA that if an airport does not have a shovel ready project that is eligible for the use of non-primary entitlement funds, they promote and request a transfer the funds to another small airport project. Their theory is that if all the money is not used, then less Federal Aviation monies will come to Washington State for use by small airports. 2. FAA projects require a 10 percent match. Oroville’s next major airport project identified by FAA is moving the existing run-way 75’ closer to the hill in order to meet FAA’s required hangar and taxiway setbacks. Project cost estimate was $2,000,000 in 2007. It will take Oroville several years to save our required participation share. And, when Oroville does start the runway relocation project, it is anticipated that we will receive “transfers” from one or two other small airports as a “Thank you” for helping us help them in the past. 3. FAA non-primary entitlement funds are not “grant dollars” per se, but an annual distribution from the federal government. Primary airports, such as Spokane International and SeaTac, receive a minimum of one million dollars each year. Smaller airports, such as Oroville’s Dorothy Scott International Airport, receive $150,000 each year. Eligible projects must be identified on the Airport Layout Plan, which State Aeronautics complete every 10 years, and on the city’s Airport Capital Improvement Plan, which needs to be approved by both State and Federal Aeronautics. Thank you for allowing me space to set the record straight. Sincerely, Chuck Spieth, Mayor Oroville

Spieth for mayor Dear Editor, We are writing to endorse Charles F. (Chuck) Spieth as the incumbent Mayor of Oroville. With Chuck as Mayor, along with a competent City Council, the City of Oroville is on very stable financial ground. During the U.S. recession of the last five years, the City

90 YEARS AGO: The Molson Leader OCTOBER 24-31, 1923: Report of the Molson Schools for six weeks ending Oct. 19, 1923, listed high school enrollment at 36 with total days attendance of 766 1/2 Total days of absence, 46 1/2 and number dropped, three. Elementary, first through eighth grades; total enrollment, 78; total days of absence, 317 1/2, total dropped, two. A party of young people from Molson motored out to the Clark place last Thursday evening and chivarived Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fread, who were married in Okanogan a few days ago. Grain is coming into the local warehouses in large quantities these days and the problem is to find floor space in which to store it. The MacDonald Warehouse received 994 sacks last Saturday and the other are getting their share. Several carloads a day are now being shipped out. From 1800 to 1860, the country burned sperm whale oil at a cost of $2.40 or tallow candles at a cost of $5.00 per 1000 hours of candle power. In 1923, the average American pays from seven to 12 cents per 1000 candle hours, depending on the type of electric lamp used. “Do you know that 20 million women of America toil every day? 18 million of them without help in the greatest single industry in American, the management of the American home?” asked Dean Florence Harrison of the Home Economic Department of Washington State College. Half page ad for the Molson Mercantile Co., lists, among other things, a 5 lb. pail of Imperial Coffee, $1.98; 49 lb. sack of Peach Blossom Flour, $1.79 or a bbl. of same for $7.35; Bavarian Dinner Sets, in six patterns, 42 pieces per set, $18.85. NOTICE: To the owners of stock running at large. You are hereby notified to take up all stock now running at large in Molson, in accordance with the herd law of the district, s/s Meredith McCoy, Deputy Sheriff. While looking through the car of two men, who gave their names as Lewis Fox and O. L. Wilson, both of Okanogan, Thursday evening, Customs Officer, Floyd Loomis, found four bottle of whiskey. He took the men before Justice McKee and fined Wilson $25 and costs. D. E. Leake and J. W. Geoghegan and daughter, Mayo, ended their fishing season at Bonaparte Lake last Sunday afternoon and succeeded in landing eleven fine Colorado Brook Trout, weighing exactly 20 pounds. The largest fish was 19 1/2

of Oroville has not laid off or furloughed any employees, or denied cost of living increases to any staff. As part of being financially responsible to the citizens of Oroville, the Council has declined to accept grants that required matching funds (taxpayer money) to utilize the grants. Several years ago, with Chuck as Mayor, the city acquired ownership of Osoyoos Lake State Park. The state was giving up ownership as they were losing money on the park. Ownership by the city has resulted in a positive cash flow to the extent Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial City Park income funds all of Oroville’s park system. During Mayor Spieth’s tenure, the city has expanded both water and sewer systems, built sidewalks on Main Street north to the city limits, annexed property on the east side of the Okanogan River and acquired new police cars, an ambulance and a fire truck. Chuck’s leadership style has brought together all city departments into a comprehensive unit all working for the betterment of our community and it’s citizens. So please join us in re-electing Charles F. (Chuck) Spieth, Mayor of Oroville. Walt and Vicki Hart Oroville

Disappointing answer Dear Editor, On Thursday, Oct. 10, candidates for the 7th District Senate seat were at the Oroville Chamber of Commerce meeting. When asked about the “Affordable Care Act, Mr. Dansel said, “if you don’t like Obamacare, then come up with a better idea.” That was an answer? To the biggest control grab in American history? To an unconstitutional law based on how it was created and supported by an unconstitutional Supreme Court decision? With a President whose sworn duty is to implement a law, not choose which parts he will enforce by giving thousands of exemptions? To a plan designed to snare America into socialized medicine by destroying the private health care system through costly regulations and practices? Britain and Canada started along the same lines! Now, according to Canadian news, people are dying in waiting

ITEMS FROM THE PAST inches long and weighed 3 1/2 pounds.

50 YEARS AGO: The Oroville Weekly Gazette October 24-31, 1963: For over a year, the Oroville Public Library has been open two evenings a week. Gail Worthington, Librarian, has reported the response to the evening hours has not justified staying open. Now, with the coming of cold weather and the cost of heating the building, it has been decided to return to the hours of a year ago. The circulation has increased in the past year, but it has been recommended to change the hours from Tuesday through Saturday from 2 - 6 p.m. The Oroville City Council Monday night, appointed their Senior Councilman, Walter Hart, Jr. to fill the unexpired term of Mayor Del Black. Black resigned his city position on Oct. 25 prior to his leaving for Alaska where he has taken employment. The Oroville Public Schools are planning to offer a variety of evening courses designed for adults of the community, starting the week of Nov.18. Robert Drummond, Superintendent of Schools, announced this week, that the courses have a threefold purpose, to improve vocational and recreational skills, to increase enjoyment of life by improving yourself and the community and to establish credit toward a high school diploma. A full page of Hornet Headlines contains stories compiled by the Jouralism Class. This is in recognition National Newspaper Week and some 25 stories by the students make up the page. Some 27 students are taking part in this endeavor. Contestants from Chelan, Ferry and Okanogan, which constitutes District 12, in the “Make it with Wool” contest, met at Omak for the judging and Kris Landreth of Oroville and Anita Condon of Nespelem, were chosen as first place winners and will go to the state contest in Yakima on Nov. 9 and 10. Grocery prices: apple, peach, boysenberry and cherry 8” frozen pies, 3 for $1.00; Columbia bacon, 2 lbs. $.89; Fresh oysters, 12 oz. jar, $.59; 2 1 lb. boxes brown sugar, $.29; 1963 crop turkeys, $.33lb.

rooms, there is a massive shortage of prescription drugs, and at least 30,000 Canadians a year come to the U.S. to pay cash so they don’t have to wait for months for procedures. A family of four signing up for the “Affordable Care” found their premiums will go from $800 a month to $1,700 and their yearly deductible from $3,000 to $24,000! “If you have a better plan, bring it forward.” Obviously Mr. Dansel, even considering it’s irrefutable flaws, we already have one. You just don’t realize it. Where are the “new ideas?” David Wolosik Oroville, WA

Dansel fiscally responsible Dear Editor, Today when the financial soundness of our nation is in peril, fiscal responsibility is of the utmost importance and often a rare trait in our elected officials. Luckily we have someone running for 7th district senator that truly embodies fiscal responsibility: Brian Dansel. As Ferry County Commissioner, Brian has passed a fiscally conservative budget each year he has been in office. He and fellow commissioners have run a budget surplus with diminished revenue – in an economically depressed county where only 17 percent of the land is even taxable. Ferry County commissioners have cut spending by combining purchasing, eliminating credit cards, and reducing government waste. Is this not the behavior we want in our state legislature? Our current state representatives want more money, more taxes, and another legislative session. I think it is high time we send someone like Brian Dansel to the state senate. Join me in voting for Brian this November. Sincerely, Glen Thompson Kettle Falls, WashingtonOur machinery of government needs a good set of repair persons. About all we’re seeing right now is a bunch of incompetent grease monkeys who are ruining the engine and making a terrible mess of the vehicle’s interior! Frank Goheen Camas, Washington

25 YEARS AGO: North Okanogan County Gazette-Tribune October 20 - 27, 1988: There are four lovelies are competing for the 1989 Tonasket Rodeo Queen and the lucky one will be chosen at the Tonasket Eagles on Oct. 29. The ladies are: Sue Veehuizen, a senior; Tiffany Wilson, a junior; Kristi Walker, a junior and Christy Holmdahl, a junior. A picture of some 25 first year students at the Oroville Catholic Church. The Immaculate Conception Parish extends an invitation to everyone in the community, especially those who attended St. Mary’s School, to a special celebration of the 80th anniversary of the Catholic Church in Oroville. The regular business meeting of the Oroville Grange on Nov. 3. Plans will be finalized for the booster meeting and harvest dinner. This will also be a time for collecting food for the local food bank. Reminder to all our members that we need your input and ideas to make our organization a vital part the community. Local equestrian, Nikki Will, missed the Okanogan County Fair this year for the first time in 10 years. Instead, she was in Santa Rosa, Cali. participating in the Western Counties Wine and Roses Futurity. Nikki and her Chesnut filly, Barpassers Oakie, competed in the 2 year old non-pro, western pleasure futurity, along with 16 other horses. Five day later, Nikki and Oakie came away with first place ribbon in hand with a silver mounted saddle, valued at approximately $2,000 and checks totaling $6,000. Real Estate for sale: 3 bdrm, 2 bath home, remodeled and in like new condition. Home has a heat pump, dbl garage, asking $52,000; 5 Bdrm, 2 bath home for $75,000. Both of these homes can be yours, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, good central locations, screened in front porches, single garage, $18,000 and $23,900, low down payments and monthly payments. Emi Craig, Tonasket restaurant owner, displays her award/ribbon winning breads and cakes. 1988 has been a wonderful year for Emie. She has captured a total of 40 ribbons or awards. She received 25 at the Waterville Fair and 15 at the Okanogan County Fair. Weather Wise: Oct. 11 - 71 degrees maximum and 43 minimum: Oct. 12 - 74 and 42; Oct 13 - 70 and 47; Oct. 14 - 70 and 51; Oct. 15 - 65 and 41; Oct. 16 - 64 and 48; Oct. 17 - 62 and 30. Total precipitation for the week, .05 inches.


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 24, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Watching them make pies a learning experience Another month down the tube! And the colors are getting even more brilliant, but still no killing frost in a lot of places, and the sunshiny days are just gorgeus. What a work day at the Catholic Church, last week, when the many diligent folks gather to form the production line that turns out hundreds of apple pies. I was told this is the sixth year for making the pies and some of the folks actually look forward to doing their job. It is a real learning experience to go to the basement of the church and see how smoothly everything works, with folks

from the age of very young to more mature. Three little girls, earning “points” for whatever group they belong to, were not only doing that but they were seeing how things happen when all pull together to get things done, they learned the meaning of volunteering, and they learned what it means to help out in the community in which they live. There are many who never learn those basics. The death of Judy (Thrasher) Coonfield has been reported to me by one of her classmates. Judy had strug-

gled with cancer for quite sometime. Her home had been in Wenatchee since moving from Oroville, where she grew up, graduated from high school and lived with her husband, Skip, for a number of years. I don’t have any information about the memorial service. Some people try to turn back their odometers. Not me. I want people to know “why” I look this way. I’ve traveled a long way and some of the roads weren’t paved. I just heard on the radio that Oroville won the football game by winning from

Book signing to benefit Legacy Author to appear in Omak on Saturday By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OMAK - Robert Brownbridge, a Korean War veteran, will be signing his memoir about his war experiences at Corner Shelf New and Used Books, 6 Main Street, Omak, on Saturday, Oct. 26, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. “Into War With an Empty Gun: A Korean War Story,” details his experiences as a draftee into the Korean War, during which he and his comrades of the 13th Combat Engineers Battalion survived their time in the Pork Chop Hill Sector. Brownbridge will be donating the proceeds from books sold at the signing - about $9 out of

the $14.95 per volume - to the Tonasket Armed Forces Legacy Park. He routinely donates the proceeds from his book sales to veterans organizations. “I have grave concern over the welfare of veterans, young and old,” Brownbridge wrote to George Frank, who helped coordinate the signing for the Legacy organization. “Far too many are committing suicide or are homeless and destitute ... “After writing the book I committed myself to doing whatever

I can as one person to raise the public’s awareness to this plight of literally millions of veterans.” Brownbridge will also be offering copies of the biographical write-ups of the four Medal of Honor winners currently honored at Legacy Park. They are Gregory “Pappy Boyington, Ty Michael Carter, Lewis Albanese and Clinton Romesha. He will be collecting the names and addresses of those who want the bios and send the materials to those who request them later.

NVCS receives grant award from Community Foundation Submitted by Jackie Valiquette

North Valley Community Schools

NORTH COUNTY - North Valley Community Schools announced that it has received a $3000 grant award from the Community Foundation of North Central Washington. NVCS is a non-profit organization that offers educational, recreational and cultural classes for all ages in Oroville, Tonasket and the surrounding community during fall, winter and spring quarters. The program typically serves more than 300 people each year who come from as far away as Osoyoos and Oliver BC, Omak and beyond. While nominal registration fees are charged for classes, this revenue represents approximately 60 percent of the funds needed. Community Schools depends on business advertising, fund-raising, volunteer and financial donations and grant awards to sustain the program. This $3000 award provides the funds to help pay for operating expenses including our paid

NVCS gets help with funding By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

The NVCS Board of Directors is very excited about the news that we will receive a grant award for $3000 from the Community Foundation of North Central Washington. It will help keep us ‘in business’ for the next few months. In 2012 the Foundation awarded nearly $3 million in grants to 147 nonprofits and distributed more than $341,000 in scholarships to 260 students in Chelan, Douglas and Okanogan counties. Funding is a continuing challenge for the North Valley Community Schools program. While nominal registration fees are charged for classes, they do

TONASKET EAGLES Halloween Costume Party Saturday Submitted by Sue Wisener Tonasket Eagles #3002

It’s almost that time a year again to set your clocks to standard time (fall back). Lots of us will be going to work in the dark and getting home in the dark. The Annual Halloween Costume party is this Saturday, Oct. 26. There will be a potluck starting at 7 p.m., karaoke at 9 p.m. and costume judging at 10

office employee, instructor costs, supplies and materials. The Community Foundation of North Central Washington supports strong communities throughout Chelan, Douglas and Okanogan counties. Established in 1986, the organization currently manages over $50 million in assets in more than 300 individualized funds. In 2012, the Foundation received $3.4 million in gifts, awarded nearly $3 million in grants to 147 non-profits across the region, and distributed over $341,000 in scholarships to 260 students. “We are thrilled to be the recipient of this grant award from the Community Foundation,” said Linda Colvin, NVCS Executive Director. “Our Board members are breathing a collective sigh of relief as we go forward with enough funds to help cover operating expenses for the next few months.” Colvin noted that, while financing is a continuing challenge, the community schools program has been successfully funded since its inception as a non-profit in 2007.

THE LEARNING TREE not begin to pay for our operations costs. We have one paid employee, instructor costs, supplies and materials, and more. Hence, individual and business donations, fundraisers, catalog advertising and grant awards are needed to help sustain the program. We appreciate that the Community Foundation Board of Trustees recognizes the value of the program and thank them for this grant award. This year NVCS is a recipient of the Foundation’s generosity and we are all smiles. We will continue to offer educational, p.m. Stop by, stay awhile and enjoy yourself. On Nov. 2 we are having a Benefit Dinner and Auction in honor of Bev Montanye, she is a dedicated person to our community. Fried chicken dinner starting at 5 p.m. with auction to follow, also karaoke at 9 p.m. All proceeds will go towards Medical Expenses. To bring auction items or offer help with dinner or cleanup contact Pat Lawler at (509) 422-1068. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Neil Fifer, second place Dave Russell, low score, Penny Smith and last pinochle went to Cindy Jones. We wish all of those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

recreational and cultural classes for adults and children in our surrounding community and we invite you to participate. Fall class catalogs, goldenrod in color, can be found in many stores in Oroville, Tonasket and beyond! We invite you to participate – as an instructor, or as a student. Our office number is (509) 476-2011.

the Lake Roosevelt Raiders 42 to 14. meal. As I’ve said numerous times I don’t Are you finding that your skin doesn’t know the game of football fit as well as it used to? but always cheer when the BEAUTY… A six letter home team wins. word that drives people crazy. Have you got your The only beauty there is, is Halloween costume picked what comes from the inside. out? It’s next week, you Don’t make yourself feel bad know. if you don’t like what you see. It is squash time, and Look deeper and that is all you many are sharing. Only need. The outside is secondary, one thing wrong with the no matter what anyone says. Lois Jean (Morris) hubbard squash and that is Flemming was visiting friends that they are so difficult and family in Oroville, last to get cut up into smaller THIS & THAT week spending time with portions. Just ask the cook Joyce Emry Myrtle Wood. She was raised at the Senior Center what in Molson, daughter of Chet can happen. He has now learned that a better way to cut a big and Florence Morris, but spent most of squash is to use an electric chain saw… her adult life in Canada, but now lives how about that? A serving of squash with in Arizona. She played pinochle at the a lot of butter and a bit of brown sugar senior center and renewed a few friend(and cinnamon) is a nice variation for a ships.

Harvest Dinner will be Saturday, Oct. 26 By Jan Hansen Oroville Eagles

We just got back from the Fall Leadership Conference in Wenatchee. There was a lot of information both in the meetings and just talking to other Aerie officers. I will report on the conference at our joint meeting on Nov. 5 at 6 p.m., as well as our regular Aerie meeting that follows at 7 p.m. All Aerie and Auxiliary members are welcome at these meetings. Our Harvest Dinner will be held on Saturday, Oct. 26. Oroville hosts the District 10 meeting on Oct. 27. These meet-

Chesaw Christmas Bazaar Nov. 2 By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

This past week was beautiful with all of the Forrest trees changing into their fall colors. As we look south from our house toward Bonaparte the combination of green, yellow, orange and brown have been spectacular. The skies have been bright blues with white wispy clouds. There has not been much wind, but there has been some chilly times, days and at night. We had an active week with lunch on Monday with Ladies in

A bountiful harvest being shared By Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

Thank you to all who have shared their friendship as well as gifts of squash, trout, mushrooms, apples, apricots, peaches and turkeys. Doris Hughes and Evelyn Dull have been sharing the proceeds from their gardens for our own Farmer’s Market at the Center. On Thursday last week, Doris announced that the market is now closed since she has cleaned up the remains of her garden.

EAGLEDOM AT WORK ings are always interesting and we all learn something new. Meeting starts at 1 p.m. and is always followed with dinner. All members are invited to attend. Auxiliary News: Candy will be given out at the door on Halloween to all the trick or treaters. Wednesday night Pool League will start on Nov. 6th and we need some help on the kitchen to fix and serve food. Please Ladies, don’t forget your Secret Sister. Some have not been receiving theirs. We also need more attendance at our Aux. meetings and we need your sup-

HILLTOP COMMENTS Oroville, Tuesday was Bingo at the Senior Center, Wednesday was a trip to Wal-Mart for medication, On Thursday the ladies from church gathered for lunch and a craft project. On Friday evening we went to BINGO at the Molson Grange. Saturday was the 60th Anniversary Party for Jean and Ottie Hennigs. They truly were surprised when their children, grandchildren, brothers, sisters, other relatives, friends and neighbors began to arrive. It was a beautiful day and everyone was glad to see Ottie and Jean as they were to

OROVILLE SENIORS The Senior Bazaar is scheduled for the first weekend in December, as per our tradition from many past years; Dec. 7 to be exact. Boots is in charge this year and she said that she already has four vendors signed up. The Sunday afternoon pinochle players meet every Sunday after church to play cards and enjoy snacks; however, on the first Sunday of the month they have a potluck. So come join them. On the other weeks of the month they have snacks before

Don’t Get “Frightened” by These Scary Investment Ideas FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

Halloween is upon us. Of course, whether you’re navigating the dark corridors of a “haunted house” or just dealing with the “creepy” characters coming to your door demanding candy, you’re probably not too fearful of the sights of the season. But as you go through life, you’ll want to avoid some things that really are scary — such as these investment moves: Chasing after a “hot” investment — By the time you hear about a supposedly “hot” investment, it may already be cooling off. But even more importantly, it might not have been appropriate for your diversification needs in the first place, especially if you already own similar investments. Investing too aggressively — To achieve your long-term goals, such as a comfortable retirement, you will

unquestionably need to own a reasonable percentage of growth-oriented investments in your portfolio. However, the greater the potential reward, the greater the risk, so you don’t want to go overboard by investing too aggressively. Investing too conservatively — Some types of investments can offer a high degree of preservation of principal. But they carry their own type of risk — the risk of not keeping up with inflation. Consequently, just as it’s not a good idea to invest too aggressively and own only growth-oriented investments, it’s also not wise to invest too conservatively by owning only those vehicles that sacrifice growth potential for principal protection. Following the crowd — In many arenas of life, you’ll find that it may make sense to go your own way rather than “follow the crowd.” And that’s usually the case with investing, too. It’s quite common for the “crowd” to collectively make an unwise investment decision — so, make your choices based on your individual needs, goals, risk tolerance and time horizon. Taking a time out from investing — After sustaining big losses during the financial crisis of 2008, many investors decided to take a “time out” from investing — which meant they may have missed out on the rally that began in 2009 and ultimately resulted in the financial markets achieving

record highs. The best investors just keep on investing right through market downturns — and, quite often, their persistence is rewarded. Overreacting to the headlines — Too often, people will make long-term changes to their investment strategy in response to short-term news events, such as political turmoil, a bad economic report and even natural disasters. You’ll likely help your cause tomorrow by not overreacting to the headlines today. Underreacting to changes in your life — You will experience many changes in your life, such as a new job, new spouse, new children, new home, the “empty nest” and so on. Many of these changes may require changes in your investment strategy. You could jeopardize your progress toward your financial goals by not reviewing this strategy regularly — at least once a year, in consultation with your financial advisor — and making the necessary adjustments in response to your evolving life. By staying away from “scary” investment moves, you may well find that investing can be a positive, productive experience. And that’s not a frightening thought at all. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

port at our home District Meeting coming up Oct. 27 Our meeting will follow the joint meeting at the American Legion at 2 p.m. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesdays of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day and Seahawks games are always Happy Hour. We have free pool every Sunday. Monday is Taco Night, Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Steak Night and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what’s happening at your club and join in. As always, We Are People Helping People.

see them. Sunday, was a day in the woods cutting wood for our friends down the road. Again, a beautiful day. Just in case you did not get the word... It is Pinochle Season again at the Molson Grange on Monday Night, starting at 7 p.m. Bring your friends and neighbors and join in the fun. The Chesaw Christmas Bazaar will be on Saturday, Nov. 2, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Country Kitchen will be serving “Walking Tacos” for lunch along with baked goods, drinks and lots more. Venders are welcome, $10 will rent you a table. There will be home made items, books dried flowers, jewelry and more. Call Marianne (509) 485-2103 for more info or a table. Until next week. card playing. Pinochle Scores for Oct. 19: Danny Weitrick won the door prize; Sally Eder had the most pinochles; Neoma VanDiver was the high scoring woman and Neoma and Wilma Coburn had 1500 Trump; Leonard Paulsen was the high scoring man. More next time.

At the

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OCTOBER 24, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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Okanogan Valley Life COMMUNITY CALENDAR GMO info movie night

Kicking Cancer (Soccer Edition) OROVILLE - Kaitlyn Grunt’s OHS Senior project is to raise awareness and show support for those who have cancer or have a loved one with cancer through a soccer game to be held Thursday, Oct. 24. Wear your cancer support colors. There will be a donation box and all proceeds go to ‘Our House’ (a home for cancer patients and familes that are going through treatment). Spread the awareness by donating $5 or more and recieve your choice of a wristband or magnet. For More info about Our House come to the game or go to www.braintrust.org/cancer_care.htm. Randy Battle Bluz Boys at Esther Bricques Winery OROVILLE - The Randy Battle Bluz Boys, will perform at Esther Bricques Winery Thursday, Oct. 24. Doors open at 6 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861. Community Health Fair At North Valley Hospital, 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket, Oct. 24-25, 8 a.m.-noon both days. Free weight and blood pressure checks. $5 lipids and glucose lab tests. Doctor’s orders not required. For lab tests; no food or drink (except water or black coffee only) after midnight the night before. Contact Terri Orford at busdev@nvhospital.org or (509) 486-3163. NVH Surgical Center Open House TONASKET - The public is invited to visit the Open House for North Valley Hospital’s new surgical center on Friday, Oct. 25, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Take a tour; enjoy refreshments; learn about NVH surgical services. Those with questions may contact Terri Orford at (509) 486-3163 or busdev@nvhospital.org.

Oroville Farmers’ Market for the season is Saturday, Oct. 26, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Oroville Community Library located at 1276 Main St. Purchase art, crafts, plant starts, fresh baked goods and tamales plus the best produce on the planet. The Oroville Farmers’ Market will resume in the spring according to organizers.. Call (509) 476-2662 for more information.

Book Signing for Legacy Park Robert Brownbridge will be signing his book, “Into War With an Empty Gun: A Korean War Story,” on Saturday, Oct. 26, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at Corner Shelf New and Used Books, 6 Main Street, Omak. Brownbridge will be donating all proceeds from book sold at the signing to the U. S. Armed Forces Legacy Park in Tonasket. Slow Food GMO Info & Movie Night TONASKET - A GMO Information Night is planned at the Community Cultural Center, 411 Western Ave., Tonasket, for Saturday, Oct. 26. The event is sponsored by Slow Food Okanogan. Information about genetically modified organisms, what foods they are in now, plans for future use, scientific facts and health risks will be available, plus information about the upcoming ballot issue in Washington State, I-522, which would require labeling of products containing GMOs. The doors will open at 6 p.m. and a movie about GMOs will be shown at 7 p.m. Snacks and baked goods will be available for sale. Attendance is free; however, donations of $5 per person will be welcome to help offset the cost of the building rental. Call Clare Paris at (509) 486-1199 for more information. Molson Grange Harvest Supper MOLSON _ The Molson Grange Harvest Supper and Grange Booster Night will be Saturday, Oct. 26 at 6:30 p.m. This is a potluck and the Grange is supplying the meat. Everyone is invited for this \evening of fellowship and fun, we are looking forward to a good time. OCSRA Meeting OMAK Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association meets 11 a.m., Friday, Oct 25, at the Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala Ave, Omak. Guest speaker is Omak School District Superintendent, Dr. Erik Swanson. For more information call (509) 826-5068.

Matsura Centennial Book Social OMAK - Okanogan County Historical Society is holding a Matsura Centennial Book social Friday, Oct. 25 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at RockWall Cellars, 110 Nichols Rd., Omak. Hors d’oeuvres will be provided by the Historical Society. There will be a no host wine bar. Those who have preordered the coffee table book will be able to make the final payment and pick up their book at this event. This is a special handmade limited edition printing; however, there are a few books still available. If you know anyone who didn’t reserve in advance, but may be interested, please invite them to the social. If you are unable to attend the event, but are interested in purchasing one of the books, contact OCHS at (509) 422-4272 or e-mail: ochs@ncidata.com to make arrangements.

Health Care Coverage Workshop TONASKET - Statewide Health Insurance Benefit Advisors will be putting on a free workshop for the public at the North Valley Hospital Board Room on Monday, Oct. 28 and Friday, Nov. 1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. They will be providing three volunteers and assistance is available on a “first come first serve basis.” Please bring a list of your medications with you to the workshop. Washington State’s SHIBA can help you: understand your health care coverage options and rights; find affordable health care coverage and evaluate and compare health insurance plans. They provide free, unbiased and confidential assistance with Medicare and health care choices. Their volunteer advisors are trained to give you the latest Medicare and health care coverage info.

Breast Cancer Awareness Night (Football Edition) OROVILLE - OHS Senior Ashley Marcolin would like to invite you to attend the Oroville Hornets football game on Saturday Oct. 25 where she will hosting a Breast Cancer Awareness Night as part of her senior project. Kick off will be at 7 p.m. At the game there will be brochures on Breast Cancer as well as giveaways. Please help support Breast Cancer awareness and your Oroville Hornets by wearing your pink!

Daily Dose of English OROVILLE – La mayoria de la clase estara en ingles para ensenar los participantes como commicarse en ingles. You will learn basic forms of English and we will translate to Spanish only when absolutely necessary. There will be visual aids and, yes, a little homework. Six sessions begin Wednesday, Oct. 30 at North Valley Community School. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011 or email community.schools@ oroville.wednet.edu to register.

Rocky Horror OVOC Fundraiser TONASKET - There is a Rocky Horror Picture Show fundraiser for the Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Choir on Friday, Oct. 25. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the movie starts at 7 p.m. at the Tonasket CCC. There are concessions, costume prizes and a silent auction. “Time Warp Bags” available for audience participation for $5 and tickets are $10 each or two for $15. Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The

final

Stroke Support Group OROVILLE - Their will be a Stroke Support Group meeting on Thursday, Oct. 31 at 10:30 a.m. at the Youth Center at 607 Central Ave. in Oroville (Adjacent to the Free Methodist Church). This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be a guest speaker and refreshments. Hydes Perform for Halloween Party OROVILLE – Come celebrate

Halloween at Esther Bricques Winery. The Hydes are performing, costumes are encouraged and potluck is planned for Thursday, Oct. 31. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Highland Wonders Highland Wonders returns to Tonasket with “David Douglas in the Okanogan Country,” a presentation by naturalist teacher and author, Jack Nisbet, Friday, Nov. 1, at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. The presentation begins at 6:30 p.m. with desserts, tea and coffee; the dinner benefiting the CCC begins at 5:00 p.m. The meal is $7 for CCC members or $8 for non-members. Between 1826 and 1833, Scottish naturalist David Douglas visited the Okanagan six different times, including an epic 1833 trip that took him north to the Thompson and Fraser Rivers. In this slide presentation we will compare the landscape and people that Douglas described with what lives in the Okanogan today. For more information, email julie@okanoganhighlands. org, call (509) 433-7893 or or visit okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw . Chesaw Christmas Bazaar CHESAW - The Chesaw Christmas Bazaar will be Saturday, Nov. 2, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Country Kitchen will be serving “Walking Tacos” for lunch along with baked goods, drinks and lots more. Venders are welcome, $10 will rent a table. There will be homemade items, books dried flowers, jewelry and more. Call Marianne (509) 4852103 for more info or a table. Oroville Booster Club Auction The Oroville Booster Club’s annual auction at the American Legion Hall will be held Saturday, Nov. 2. The silent auction starts at 5 p.,m., live auction at 6:30 p.m. Lots of fun and great auction items. Snacks are provided and all are welcome. The Legion Hall is located at 314 14th Ave. Children’s Author to Speak at Oroville School OROVILLE - Author Jack Gantos will be speaking at the Oroville Elementary School on Tuesday, Nov. 5. Gantos has written books for people of all ages, from picture books and middle grade fiction to novels for young adults and adults. His work include Hole in My Life, Joe Pigza Loses Control and Dead End in Norvelt. Food Worker Class OKANOGAN - Starting Nov 7 the Okanogan County Public Health Food Worker Class are offered every Thursday afternoon at 3:30 p.m. Okanogan County Public Health is located at 1234 South Second Ave., Okanogan, WA. Computer stations for the online Food Worker Class are available at Okanogan County Public Health Monday – Friday 7:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. For more information call (509) 422-7140. Scouting for Food Oroville Cub Scouts and Girl Scouts are doing their “Scouting For Food Drive.” They will be dropping off grocery bags with donation information on Nov. 9. Filled bags may be left by doors and will be picked up on Nov. 16 by the scouts. All food collected will be donated to the Oroville Food Bank. Contact Karrie at (509) 560-9037 for more information. Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Deb Roberts at (509) 486-2192. Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 4763978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386. Listing Your Item Mail your events to GazetteTribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844 or email to gdevon@ gazette-tribune.com. Items may also be placed online at our website www.gazette-tribune.com by clicking the calander button on the homepage and selecting “add an event.”

Submitted by M. Clare Paris

Slow Food Okanogan

TONASKET - Are you confused about genetic modification of foods? Are you wondering what to believe about these practices and how to vote on the labeling issue, I-522, coming on the November ballot? The big chemical companies, giant agri-biz and even the federal Food and Drug Administration would like you to think that genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in our food are perfectly safe and that they provide a way to feed the world. Others call them “frankenfoods,” and think the practice should be banned from our commercial food production. There are stories of farmers not being allowed to save seed, of farmers being sued when GMO seed gets in their fields accidentally and of health risks, either knowingly suppressed or deliberately unexplored. Meanwhile, GMO supporters claim greater crop yields, less farming expense and scoff at health risks. Here in Washington, we will

be asked to vote on I-522, which, if passed, will require the labeling of many genetically modified foods and processed foods containing GMO ingredients. Those who promote this labeling law believe that consumers would be better off if products were clearly labeled, allowing them to make a choice. The opposition, backed by Bayer Cropscience, Monsanto and the Grocery Manufacturers Association, claim the result would be sky-high taxes, rampant regulation, complex and confusing labeling enforcement and less information to the consumer. Info and Movie Night: On Saturday, Oct. 26, Slow Food Okanogan will present an informational movie called Genetic Roulette, which contains clear information about GMOs, the extent to which they are already present in our food system, plans for future use, scientific facts and both suspected and known health risks. There will be tables of takehome information about GMOs in general and I-522 specifically. There will be time for lively discussion and opportunities to

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

discover how to join a nationwide effort to keep the control of our food supply and our family farms in the hands of our family farmers and food consumers. Please come to the Community Cultural Center, 411 Western Ave., Tonasket, to get help sorting out all the information being blasted our state, so that you can vote with confidence on Nov. 4. With all the propaganda flying around, collecting some facts of your own will be the best way to arm yourself for the ballot, as well as for shopping for food. Snacks and information will be ready when CCC doors open at 6 p.m. The movie will be shown at 7:00 with time for discussion afterwards. Attendance is free; however, a donation of $5 per person to offset the cost of the building rental will be gladly accepted. Slow Food Okanogan is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting local, family farms and enhancing all our enjoyment of the taste of the Okanogan. For further information, please call Clare Paris at 509-486-1199.

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Tonasket Farmers’ Market TONASKET - Tonasket Farmers Market is held on Thursdays, from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. The next market is Thursday, Oct. 24. Come join us for some of the best in local produce, crafts, personal care products, homegrown music and farmstead cheeses. Whether you make a quick spin to pick up supper ingredients or hang out for hours, you’re sure to get what you want. For more info call (509) 486-1199.

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Page A8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 24, 2013

Candidates share their thoughts, views City of Oroville

Oroville Mayor (4-Year term) C.F. “Chuck” Spieth Tell us about yourself I have lived in Oroville all my life and have been married to my wife Emily for over 50 years. Always interested in my community, I was appointed to the City Council in October 1992 and served in that position until I became Mayor in January 2002. My career includes 20 years in municipal law enforcement and I have owned and operated an insurance agency for the last 22 years. Spieth Why do you want to be reelected? I want to continue working with and for my community as we face funding and revenue declines, while the “wants” and demands for service increase. I would like to see several projects that the city has recently started become realities. I’m particularly proud of how the city has handled assuming ownership and has expanded operations of Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial Park; the city’s involvement with the Similkameen Trailhead project; Main Street sidewalk improvements for pedestrian safety and the installation of perimeter safety fencing and helipads at the airport. What are three issues facing our city? It’s not easy to select just three, but those that come to mind most quickly are: 1.) Promoting economic stabilization and development to not only create but to help keep family wage jobs here in town; 2.) The maintenance, replacement and expansion of the city’s infrastructure systems so that economic stabilization and growth can happen; and 3.) To continue to find ways to operate quality criminal justice and emergency response services with today’s declining revenue source base. Police, Fire and Ambulance Services consume a substantial portion of city income. The costs of the criminal justice system are huge; therefore, we need to ensure that the limited numbers of officers we are able to support are effective and well trained. The same is true with Oroville ambulance and fire departments. We rely on a system of volunteers so we need to ensure that those citizens that step up to do the work are well supported with training and equipment. Attracting and maintaining quality police and emergency response personnel also requires care in selection and hiring to avoid turning what may appear to be a valuable asset into a serious liability. We have an excellent team of officers and volunteers here. As we grow, I believe we will attract an even greater team of health and safety professionals. City officials and staff work constantly trying to find ways to operate as efficiently as possible without always having to raise or impose new taxes and fees, but it isn’t that easy with today’s funding challenges and loss of state shared revenues. So, I need to add a 4th issue, which is probably the most important of all: Oroville has been able and needs to continue to be able to operate in a sound, financially responsible fiscal manner. No one wants Oroville to become one of those bankrupt communities that we all read about, nor do we want to have to start laying off people or cutting back on services due to the lack of funds. Our community is relying on us to do that for them. If re-elected, I will continue to work with the city staff to maintain a cooperative and robust effort to improve our economy, our parks and trail systems, expand educational opportunities and to make this community a safer, more comfortable place to live.

Chris Allen Tell us about yourself: I was born in Tonasket and grew up in Oroville. I have always known I would raise my children here. I have a wife Heather, one daughter Bailee, two sons Cacey, and Hunter. I am currently an EMT with Tonasket Emergency Medical Services. Why do you want to be elected? I am very concerned with challenges facing our community today. I am seeking the office of mayor as to be a driving factor for answers and solutions to the public safety crisis facing our community. I believe we have a great opportunity to push change for our future. We will have to work together as a community if we are to move forward. My immediate concerns are public safety, accountability, and availability. I want the Allen people to know their opinion matters to me. I want them to know that I am available and interested in their concerns. I will investigate them immediately. What are three issues facing our city? 1. The need for additional qualified EMTS for our local ambulance service to improve response times (not first responders). Your current council recently approved a class be given for first responders, however, this does not address the underlying problem which is the lack of EMT’S. Since a first responder must be accompanied by a state certified EMT at all times. The correct class for us is an (EMT Basic class). 2. An internal review of our city to improve public service and accountability. 3. I will be meeting with our local housing authority. I will be asking for help with a study with the intent of placing an senior assisted living facility in our community.

Council Position 1 (4-Year Term) Jon Robert Neal Tell us about yourself I’m married to my wife Traci and we have three children Tiffany, Chelsea and Zachary and four grandchildren. He currently holds the post on the Oroville City Council in Position 1 and is a member of the Masonic Lodge, as well as the Oroville Booster Club. Neal has owned his own business, Neal Auto Body and Glass for 22 years. He has volunteered as a coach for youth football,youth football, basketball, baseball and hockey. He has also served as a volunteer fireNeal man with the Oroville Fire Department for the past seven years. All of which gives me an insight to the economic, cultural and civic issues in our community. Why do you want to be reelected? I’d like to get elected to continue to improve the City of Oroville, I was born and raised here and feel we need to find ways to improve without putting an undue burden on those that live here. What are three issues facing our city? 1.) Continued expansion and/ or improvement of Lake Osoyoos Veterans Memorial Park. 2.) Looking for ways to bring people to Oroville whether through tourism or permanently by attracting new forms of employment, and 3.) Looking for affordable ways to continue the services we have in the ever changing economy. Russell R. Rounds After several attempts to contact the candidate by email, phone and at his home, there was no response to our election questionnaire.

Council Position 2 (4-Year term)

Anthony “Tony” Koepke Tell us about yourself I was born and raised here. I am married to my wife Peggy and we raised our children here. I worked for Heavy Pack for many years, then worked for Chamberlin Distributing and then for David Simpson in the evenings and at the reload in Tonasket. I also served on the fire department for many years before retiring in May of 2006. Why do you want to be reelected? I want to save the city money and make sure the people get their monies worth for their tax dollar. I hate to see money wasted. What are three issues facing your city? 1.) Try and get more business and industry to our area. I want to see the storefronts reopened and bring back jobs. I want us to work on something for the kids to do too. There was so much to do when I was a kid, we used to have a movie house and a drivein, among other things. 2.) I am constantly working on improving the ambulance situation. We need more volunteers for the ambulance crew. 3.) I would like to see continued improvements to Veterans Park. Paul E. Bouchard Tell us about yourself: I have lived in Oroville since 2000. My wife’s name is Lenore and my dog is Jackson. I have been a volunteer for Oroville ambulance department for five years. Why do you want to be elected? Over the years I keep hearing members of this community stating that we need a chance. By being a member of the council I hope to find out why our local business keep closing and what can be done to help if any. What are three issues facing our city? Over the years it seams that it is easier to find drugs in this community. I would be proud to put a stop to this. We also need to improve our Ambulance service by finding a way to increase the numbers of volunteers and keeping them.

North Valley Hospital (District 4) Commissioner Pos. 1 (6-Year term)

Dick Larson Tell us about yourself I was born and raised in Oroville, my dad bought the Oroville Pharmacy in 1940 and I bought it from him in 1976 and have been working here as a pharmacist ever since. I have a 26-year-old daughter and she works at Boeing. Why do you want to be reelected? I have been on the hospital board for 28 years and I think the hospital has a lot of things going on that are going to take some time and experience. I know about healthcare and welcome continuing to take on the challenge of providing quality healthcare to this area. What are three issues facing your district? 1.) Continuing to pay down the warrants and to offer as many services as we can afford to provide. By paying down the warrants from $3 million to $278,000 that opens up a lot of opportunities for a hospiLarson tal. When they were at $3 million no one would finance us for anything, but we need to look at updating our MRI and CAT-scan and to do so when we can afford to improve our equipment. 2.) The emergency room, hospital and extended care are important to our community and we need to continue to provide the best healthcare we can. Our hospital is special, we treat everyone, the old, the sick and the broke... but that’s not necessarily a good way to run a business. But

ELECTION | FROM A1 will meet in the November election. Both positions are for sixyear terms. In Tonasket it’s a walk in the park for the four incumbents looking for a return to city government positions. Mayor Patrick Plumb, Position 1 Councilman Dennis Brown, Position 3 Councilwoman Jill Vugteveen and Position 4 Councilwoman Jean E. Ramsey will all be returned to office. Claire Jeffko, a recent appointee, is running for Council Position 5. This marks a return of the Jeffko name to

the council as her late husband Ed was a councilman for a number of years. However, the seats are changing somewhat with Brown and Vugteveen running for four year terms and Ramsey and Jeffko running for two-year unexpired terms. Two members who have served on the Tonasket School Board for several years filed for four-year extensions – Lloyd E. Caton Jr. for Director Position 1 and Ernesto Cerrillo for Director Position 4. For Oroville School Board Todd Hill wants a return to

Director Position 1 for the twoyear unexpired term and Travis Loudon for Director Position 4 for a full four-year term. No one filed for the seat vacated by David Nutt who moved from the area. A volunteer has yet to come forward to fill the open position. In the Seventh District Legislature, recently appointed Senator John Smith of Colville has two challengers for a oneyear unexpired term. Fellow Republicans Mike Brunson of Springdale and Brian Dansel of Republic also want the office.

we have to have a hospital. The hospital is important to any area and is a big part of the economy, both in jobs at the hospital and for people looking to move to an area. Having a good hospital is tied to having good land values. And as for extended care, my mom was in extended care for three and a half years so I know how it works. 3.) I’d like to see joint replacement and for that we need the right equipment and the right doctors. We will continue to provide the scopes and colostomies and the things we do well now.

Rosa Snider Tell us about yourself Being fifth generation, I was raised in Oroville, many people know me as ‘Rosa McCoy.’ My husband John was raised in Tonasket. Community involvement was instilled at an early age whether that meant helping at a service organization or on a more personal level when someone was experiencing a difficult time. Though I don’t ever remember thinking of this as ‘service.’ I’ve always seen it as the very nature of our community. It’s what we do and who we are. As an adult, I have 19 years of experience in advocacy for some of our most vulnerable populations including homeless families, children, elderly and the disabled through many organizations, i.e. Washington P A V E , Snider Dadsmove, etc. Professionally, I have over 17 years of experience in various areas of the medical field in both private and non-profit settings. My experience includes but is not limited to; clinic management, consulting, clinic and hospital multi-specialty billing, physician recruitment, contracting and credentialing, human resources, practice and program development, marketing, strategic planning, team building, fundraising, grant writing, mediation and facilitation. Why do you want to be elected? I want to use my deep understanding and appreciation for our community’s unique culture and diverse economic structure in addition to my vast experience to serve and bring our local healthcare and community back to the table, working together. What are three issues facing the district? 1.) Rebuilding community trust through honest communication, true transparency, honest action and accountability is imperative. We could address the functional issues but without rebuilding community trust the majority of our community will continue to seek care elsewhere. 2.) Utilizing our community’s collective knowledge and resources is vital. There has been a very disturbing lack of communication between the board and the community. Our community history shows that when community members are actively engaged and fully informed they have made very sound decisions that have allowed our health services to grow in a responsible and positive way. 3.) Financial stability is also of the utmost importance. Many generations have been willing to tighten their belt and roll up their sleeves not only to maintain services but expand our district services to meet our community’s needs. I believe no less should be expected of those who are entrusted with overseeing the management and operations of our community’s healthcare services and assets. Commissioner Pos. 2 (6-Year term)

Lael Duncan Tell us about yourself I am a native of Washington

with two grown daughters and a grown son. I attended the UW and have lived in Okanogan County for 27 years. For the last 11 years I’ve served as the Executive Director of Okanogan County Community Action Council. In connection with this work I have been active in efforts to reduce homelessness and poverty. Issues of poverty and homelessness directly affect the financial status of the hospital. I also served six years as President of the Board of the Economic Alliance and was a founding Board member and subsequently served two years as the Executive Director of the NCW Business Loan Fund. Prior to my non profit work, I spent 20 years in for profit industry including casualty, comDuncan mercial real estate, and banking. I have also served on the board of The Support Center and assisted with various community projects. Currently I am a member of Rotary. Serving my community is my privilege and I believe in the motto that we should all leave things better than we found them. Why do you want to be reelected? My parents taught me that I had a civic duty to give back to the community I lived in if you look at my record, you will see I have done that and I want to continue to   improve medical services for the people of our district through my role as a Commissioner.  This requires a  substantial   finance and business background. The business of the hospital - financial, political, and management issues - are unique and extremely complicated. It takes several years to really become thoroughly knowledgable about the administrative oversight responsibilities of board members. We have accomplished many good things in the last six years including the hospital addition (I served on the steering committee that brought this project in on time and on budget, VA Clinic and new re-purposed surgery suite. The change of the Assisted Living Facility was painful and stressful, but after working for years at alternative solutions, we had to make this difficult decision which was forced on us by inadequate reimbursements for the services we provided. I want to be a voice for our rural community and the special needs that we have as a result of our low population and remote location. The hospital can become stabilized and take advantage of opportunities to grow our revenue streams if we take the time to develop analyze and evaluate a major business plan. With warrants paid down significantly, many of the steps taken that were questioned by the public have now proven themselves to be positive in the long run. I hope to engage the community in a planning process that can reflect our needs and be widely supported by the residents of the district. What are three issues facing the district? 1.)Financial Stability - getting warrants paid off and keeping them paid off - this requires close attention to reports and requests for special allocations - It also means that the community is engaged in the realities of running the hospital. We will need to develop a substantial depreciation account to cover improvements as they are needed rather than having to borrow. This is going to require increased community communication and I urge everyone to attend board meetings as teh best way to learn the business of the hospital. 2.) Affordable Care Act - We

are all in this together and the hospital along with the public will be challenged to make this new system work for the community - this can be accomplished if we all work together. There have already been glitches and that is predictable. We will have to work together to achieve the goals of the act. I also want more opportunities to educate the public about the services of the hospital, and opportunties for personal health and wellness education - this will all be part of a comprehensive Medical Home as the act calls for. 3.) Care for the most vulnerable. We need to support our Veterans Clinic and Extended Care facilities. The difficulty in supporting Assisted Living with medicaid residents is heartbreaking, and, as someone who could will need such a facility in the next decade or so, it is a real concern to me that we figure out how to provide for senior citizens here in the community. I dont have answers to this question but look forward to working on this with other committed residents and finding a solution. Teresa Hughes Tell us about yourself Family: I am a single parent raising my daughter, Sierra who is attending SCC and my son, Jordan who is a sophomore at Tonasket High School. Experience/Background: I have lived in Tonasket for 40 years and consider it home. I have over 23 years of Federal Government Service that I can utilize as a guide in performing the fiscal duties of a Hospital Commissioner. To this point in life, I have focused on raising my family, and now I feel it is time to get involved in my community and believe that being a Hospital Commissioner is a great place to start. Why do you want to be elected? Hughes I would like to bring fiscal responsibility to the forefront of the Board of Commissioners. After the closing of the Assisted Living Facility, I realized that it was time for me to start participating in how our community resources are managed. I intend to be the voice for the community on the Hospital Board of Commissioners. What are three issues facing the district? 1.) The Affordable Care Act is the biggest issue facing all of health care at this time. Knowledge and understanding of the law and applying it appropriately, as it pertains to the North Valley Hospital district will be key for success. 2.) Finding effective ways to increase revenue and reduce the warrants with the county is always an important issue. I have some ideas on this, but I will welcome the comments and ideas from the community on how to handle this issue. We need to listen to the people who we represent and strive to maintain a quality health care facility for. 3.) Paying for the multi-million dollar geothermal heating and cooling system that the current Board of Commissioners is proposing to install. I am unsure where the funds will come from to pay for this system upgrade considering that in the past year the Hospital district closed the Assisted Living Facility and sold the Oroville Clinic in an effort to stay solvent. This is another issue where utilizing community input could generate a viable solution. Note: There are a number initiatives also on the ballot that will be reviewed in our Oct. 31 issue.

UTILITIES | FROM A1 system to other bills like for the ambulance and the airport,” Jones added. While moving toward online billing may eventually help to cut down on the number of people coming in to city hall to pay their bills, the current computer systems are struggling to keep up with current needs, according to Jones. She said that customers are experiencing long wait times at the counter while the computer retrieves their billing information. It’s time the city upgrade their systems she said. “We got a quote, currently we are using Microsoft Office 2003 and XP, which are no longer supported. It will cost $18,500 to upgrade with it all set up and the old data transferred... that includes the server and four work stations

and the counter,” said Jones. “We also will contract with them for maintenance as we do now, which includes 24-hour service.” Councilman Naillon, who is the tech specialist for the Oroville School District and a computer programming instructor, said “That price really is not out of line for that number of workstations... plus the database conversion.” Jones said that this year’s budget has some of the money in it to use toward the upgrade and the rest can be budgeted for next year. “We currently have almost 1500 water accounts,” said Jones. Councilwoman Roley made a motion to approve the upgrades and it was seconded by Naillon and approved unanimously.

Insuring Parking Lot At the Oct. 1 council meeting Clyde Andrews, president of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, asked the city if they would look into carrying the insurance for a parking lot the chamber was looking at renting to provide offstreet parking. Jones reported that the city’s insurer advised the council not to add the lot to its policy unless it was under direct control of the city. “If it was under our direction and control then we could provide the coverage. He said on the phone that the chamber should be able to pick up coverage for not much cost because it is not a big piece of property. The insurer would look at the maintenance and quality of lighting, etc.,” said Jones.


OCTOBER 24, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT

pended, and fined $858.

SUPERIOR COURT

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS

Jan Majella Freeman, 52, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Oct. 18 to POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams), use of drug paraphernalia and obstructing a law enforcement officer. Freeman received a 364-day suspended sentence for two years, and was fined $1,860.50 for the Mar. 8, 2012 crimes. The court declined Oct. 11 to press fourth-degree assault charges against Noel Lockett, no middle name listed, 46, Oroville. Charges are expected to be filed in Okanogan County District Court. The court found probable cause to charge Aleshia Marie Murray, 24, Tonasket, with 23 counts of forgery. The court found probable cause to charge Garret Victor James Elsberg, 24, Okanogan, with eight counts of first-degree unlawful hunting of big game, one count of second-degree unlawful hunting of big game, seven counts of second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm, six counts of spotlighting big game, six counts of waste of wildlife, and five counts of unlawful hunting on another’s property.

Monday, Oct. 14, 2013 Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Structure fire on Benton St. in Omak. Illegal burning on No Name Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Juvenile problem on W. First Ave. in Omak. Lost property on N. Ash St. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Utility problem on Deerpath Dr. in Oroville. Cable lines down. Two-vehicle crash on Golden St. in Oroville. No injuries reported. Warrant arrest on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Mary Christina George, 23, booked on two FTA warrants: thirddegree theft and first-degree criminal trespass. Mitchell Ray Hofferber, 53, booked on a Tonasket Police Department warrant for first-degree negligent driving. Jackson Wyllie Squetimkin, 26, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Kenneth Alan Russell, 29, booked for second-degree malicious mischief.

CRIMINAL

JUVENILE

A 13-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Oct. 16 to second-degree theft (access device), seconddegree vehicle prowl and third-degree theft. She had two additional charges dismissed. The girl was sentenced to 12 days in detention with credit for four served, and fined $100. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Dec. 18. The crimes occurred Sept. 24.

CIVIL MATTERS

Montanye Logging of Tonasket and its owners, Ken M. and Beverly A. Montanye, were ordered to pay $86,292.06 in taxes, fees and interest to the state Department of Revenue.

DISTRICT COURT Josephine Marie Sandoval, 42, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Sandoval was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $808. Sarah Sandoval Polina, 36, Omak, guilty of reckless driving. Sandoval Polina received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $1,058. Jackson Wyllie Squetimkin, 26, Omak, guilty of making a false statement to a public servant. Squetimkin was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 178 days suspended, and fined $808. Thomas Squetimkin, no middle name listed, 58, Omak, guilty of obstruction. Squetimkin was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $558. Andrew Jack Starkey, 35, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. David A. Stewart, 60, Oroville, guilty of first-degree criminal trespass. Stewart was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 342 days suspended, and fined $558. He also had a POCS without a prescription charge dismissed. Jennifer Ilene Stone, 36, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Stone received a 90-day suspended sentence and was fined $658. Natasha Lee Nicole Swan, 24, Okanogan, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Swan received a 90-day suspended sentence and was fined $858. Kieann Rose J. Teall, 22, Riverside, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Rebecca Ann Timentwa, 44, Omak, guilty on two counts of thirddegree theft. Timentwa was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined $1,366. Tommie Bernard Tucker, 44, Oroville, guilty of third-degree theft. Tucker was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined $808. Marelino B. Valdovinos, 37, Omak, guilty of no valid operator’s license without identification. Valdovinos received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. Thomas Joseph Valentine, 57, Oroville, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Valentine was fined $400. Luis Gallegos Villegas, 28, Omak, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief. Villegas was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended, and fined $1,033. He also had to charges dismissed: fourth-degree assault and violation of a no-contact order. Cruz Viveros, no middle name listed, 19, Oroville, guilty of minor intoxicated in a public place and POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams). Viveros was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. Norman Edward Whited, 62, Tonasket, guilty of first-degree negligent driving. Whited was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $1,158. Jeffery I. Wilson, 60, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: animals at large. Andrew Curtis Wynecoop, 22, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Wynecoop was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days sus-

Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013 One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Injuries reported. Theft on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Assault on Hwy. 20 near Republic. Three-vehicle crash on Omak Ave. in Omak. DWLS on S. Main St. in Omak. Threats on Prior Loop Rd. near Oroville. Two reports of malicious mischief on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Cherry St. in Oroville. Donovan Rae Nysti, 20, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Joshua Curtis Carpenter, 22, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for DUI. Tasha Ann Vickers, 27, booked on an FTA bench warrant for harassment (threats to kill). Roman Pacheco Delgado, 30, booked on a USBP hold. Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013 Automobile theft on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Malicious mischief on Spring Meadow Lane near Oroville. Disorderly conduct on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Hazardous material on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft at East Side Park in Omak. Burglary on Elm St. in Oroville. Found property on 11th Ave. in Oroville. George Kenney Ling, 61, booked for theft of a motor vehicle. Linda Beth Clark, 54, booked for two counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 Public intoxication on Koala Ave. in Omak. Theft on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Tools reported missing. Trespassing on Miller Rd. near Omak. Theft on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Medication and credit cards reported missing. Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Weapons offense on Bluebell Lane near Tonasket. Harassment on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle collision of Riverside Dr. in Omak. Injuries reported. Assault on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Cedar St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ninth St. in Oroville. Theft on Orchard St. in Oroville. Cell phone reported missing. Warrant arrest on Sawtell Rd. near Oroville. Wesley Faron Anderson, 52, booked for four counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Xavier Lewis Smith, 22, booked on a FTA bench warrant for residential burglary. Roland Ray Wolff, 57, booked on a Department of Corrections secretary’s FTC warrant for POCS, a Chelan County FTC warrant for probation violation, and two Omak Police Department FTC

312 S. Whitcomb

warrants: DUI and hit and run (unattended property). Ryan William Adolph Louie, 29, booked on a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Josephine Marie Sandoval, 42, booked for DUI. Bill Cephas Bedard, 44, booked on a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. David Lee Fitzgerald, 55, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: third-degree malicious mischief (DV) and fourth-degree assault (DV). Victor G. Bojorquez, 18, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for no valid operator’s license without ID. Friday, Oct. 18, 2013 Domestic dispute on S. Birch St. in Omak. Credit card fraud on Harvest Way near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Public intoxication on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Weapons offense on Darkmoon Way near Wauconda. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication at East Side Park in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Juvenile problem on Apple Lane in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Hwy. 97 in Oroville. Public intoxication on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Daniel Ray Oliver, 59, booked for DUI and an ignition interlock violation. Kurtis Camron Bishop, 26, booked on six OCSO FTC warrants: three for second-degree vehicle prowl, third-degree theft, and two for malicious mischief; three Okanogan County Prosecutor’s Office probable cause warrants for POCS; and a Ferry County Department of Corrections commitment. Rocky Allen Smith, 48, booked for DUI, an ignition interlock violation, first-degree DWLS and a Department of Fish and Wildlife FTA warrant for second-degree DWLS. Ryan Glenn Casey, 42, booked on an FTA warrant for fraud. Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013 Disorderly conduct on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Medical transport on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Violation of no-contact order on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. No injuries reported. Trespassing on Jasmine St. in Omak. DWLS on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Public urination on Fig Ave. in Omak. Harassment on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Cherry St. in Oroville. Public intoxication on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Bruce Leroy Wisner Jr., 50, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Albert John Glassmeyer Jr., 46, booked for felony harassment and disorderly conduct. Joseph Allen Thompson, 36, booked for felon in possession of a loaded firearm and carrying a concealed weapon without a permit. Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013 DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Assault on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Assault on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Chopaka Rd. near Loomis. Assault on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Nicholson Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Public intoxication on N. Jackson St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Domestic dispute on E. Cherry Ave. in Omak. Lost property on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Cash reported missing. Harassment on Main St. in Oroville. Found property on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Jacob Nicholas Wilson, 33, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Michael Scott Maloney, 26, booked for first-degree assault. Kevin Donald Edwards, 35, booked for third-degree DWLS. Nicolas Gutierrez Lopez, 56, booked for second-degree assault and third-degree attempted rape. Fernando R. Torres-Rodriguez, 28, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV).

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

STORR’S NECKLACES & EARRINGS

JADE - PEARL -ABALONE

Made in Canada – Good Selection!

Submitted photo

The Okanogan Habitat for Humanity celebrated the dedication of the Lopez family’s home in Omak last week.

Habitat dedicates Lopez home SUBMITTED BY ARLENE JOHNSON

OKANOGAN CO. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

OMAK - What a joy it was to gather for the dedication service of the seventh Habitat for Humanity home, on Sunday, Oct. 20, at 701 Willow Lane in Omak. Several members of the board for Okanogan County HFH were there as well as the Lopez family, Ramon, Maria and their three children, Jazmine, Ramon and Jorge. Pastor Maggie McNett opened with prayer and a beautiful sharing of what it means to have a home. She also had refurbished a beautiful chair for the family. A photo album of the work in progress, a vacuum cleaner and

a bilingual Bible were presented to them. Shirley Devereaux, Ben and Sally Hylton sang the traditional “Bless This House.” Father Jake Morton led those present in a walk through as he blessed each room and closed the service with a prayer of blessing for the home and family. Community support has come from all over the county including businesses in Oroville, Tonasket, Okanogan and Omak. The house was filled with joy, laughter and gratitude as appreciation was shared for all the many volunteer hands and hours of labor that led to the completion of this home. Community Foundation of North Central Washington got the build started with a grant of $2100.

Grant donations and materials have been received from Safeway, Home Depot, Walmart, Ace Hardware, Midway Building Supply, Valley Lumber, Naylor’s Air Conditioning & Heating, All Valley Insulation and Tonasket Interiors as well as regular donations from area churches and individuals. It has been a long journey getting this home built, but in the midst of ups and downs, so many people stepped forward to offer their special skills to solve a problem at just the right time. Thank you to all who have had a share in the building of this HFH home through prayer, money, time or resources. Working together in Christian love is what HFH is all about.


Page 10 A10

Okanogan 24, 2013 2013 OKANOGANValley VALLEYGazette-Tribune GAZETTE-TRIBUNE| •OCTOBER October 24,

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent 2 Bedroom House, In Town, $650. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Lakefront Apartment, $725. Darling 1 Bedroom Apt, $495. Deluxe Lakefront Home, Furnished, 3 Baths, $1595. OTHERS. Call Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

For Rent

Announcements FIRST Aid and CPR Class will be held on October 28th, 29th, & 30th, 7:00pm to 10:00pm in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow the first night. For information call Ben Hylton 509223-3412, leave message

Commercial Rentals

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

REPUBLIC 3500 SF COMMERCIAL BUILDING for lease on 2.5 Subscribe to the... Acres. 14’ and 12’ Bay Doors, 1 bath, wood and propane Heat. $700 per month plus utilities, first and last month. 2 year minimum. Nice 3 bedroom 2 bath mo- Highway 21 North, Republic www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 bile 1st plus deposit. $695/ WA. 425-822-2901. Oroville, WA 98844 month. Pets negotiable with 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 deposit. No smoking. Tengtads@gazette-tribune.com nent pays utilities. Call or email for more information. WE WOULD like to Thank 509-476-2087. everyone who helped and riveroaksrv@hotmail.com supported us during the illness and passing of our husOROVILLE band, father, and grandfaFOR SALE OR RENT: 3 ther. To the EMS Crew, NVH Bedroom, 2 Bathroom Mobile ER Staff, Med Star Crew, and Home. This Unit Needs CWH Staff - Thank You for Some TLC. $500 Per Month. your excellent care of Dave. Ideal For A Handy Man. ReTo the relatives and friends duced Rent For Someone who called, visited, brought Willing To Do Some Painting, food, sent cards and flowers, Etc. Call: 1-250-498-3200 or COUPLE SEEKING TO ADOPT gave donations, hugs and Loving couple seeking to ADOPT an inEmail Us At: olivertw@eastfant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of prayers, you are so apprelink.ca opportunity, humor, adventure and ciated and the reason we financial security. We will provide a happy Similkameen Park Apartlove this community. Thank home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, ments Oroville, WA. Farm you to Pastor Yaussey-Alband sports. Let us help worker Preference 1, 2, 3, support you right for the beautiful service with your adoption plan. Contact us at direct at and 4 bedroom Starting and the ladies of the Brethren 206-920-1376, toll-free at 877-290-0543 @$365 per month + security Church for the great lunchor email AndrewCorley@outlook.com deposit. Water, Sewer, GarYou can also contact our attorney at eon. 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376. bage, Washer and Dryer. Air The Family of Dave Caddy conditioning, Play area, Storage Space. For more information contact Similkameen www.gazette-tribune.com Park Office 301 Golden St. www.gazette-tribune.com #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

Help Wanted Middle School Secretary The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Middle School Secretary. Position will remain open until filled with a screening date of October 24. To apply, applicants must complete an on-line application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed. An Equal Opportunity Employer

Announcements

Found

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310 Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Crosswords

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

www.gazette-tribune.com

21. “___ bitten, twice shy� 22. Pinocchio, at times

4. Darn, as socks

24. Gift tag word

5. Succinct

25. Butt

6. Academy Awards

26. ___ tube

7. Daisy-like plant

28. Barber’s motion

8. Shakespeare, the Bard of ___

30. “How ___!�

9. Amscrayed

31. Fit together

10. About (2 wds)

33. A late riser

11. Young Simba (2 wds)

35. Kind of triangle 37. More flashy, as in clothes

12. Destruction of the environment

40. Bundle

13. Backed out of a promise

44. Coastal raptor

14. Nemo’s dad

45. Excursion

20. Draftee

47. Harder to find

23. Stop working

48. Dumfries denial

27. Medical advice, often

49. “Beowulf,� e.g.

29. Soft, moist part of fruit

51. Harp’s cousin

30. ___ Flatts

52. Gossip, slangily

32. “Go ahead!� (2 wds)

54. Bag

34. Reverse, e.g.

56. A.T.M. need (acronym)

36. A musical composition in someone’s honor

57. Iridaceous plant with fragrant one-sided clusters of flowers

ANSWERS

Across 1. Rhyming word game 7. Christmas song singer 14. Lamenters

State cheer) (2 wds)

37. Summon (2 wds)

59. Turned away

38. “Little House on the ___�

61. South American, dark, nocturnal bird

39. Alone, used with “by�

62. Teapot covering (2 wds)

42. Supremely spooky

63. Sports official

43. Chic

64. Off the mark

46. Plagiarist

41. Atomic number 36

50. Speleologist

15. Cupidity

53. Daughter of Zeus

16. Producing a photochemical effect

Down

17. Seasonal wind in southern Asia

1. Addictive narcotic

58. “Dear� one

18. Backstabber

2. Canes made from palm stems

60. ___ Victor (acronym)

19. Church official

3. “Gimme ___!� (start of an Iowa

54. Cork’s country 55. Brandy flavor

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Migrant Education Program (MEP) Recruiter The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Migrant Education Program (MEP) Recruiter. Applicants must have an AA degree, 72 quarter or 48 semester college credits, or documentation of successfully passing the State Assessment. Position will remain open until filled To apply, applicants must complete an on-line application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed. An Equal Opportunity Employer

Health General

NAC

Licensed Nurse Aide Certified needed to provide In-Home Care Riverside/Tonasket area Experience preferred but not required. Duties include heavy patient care. Shift Times Flexible Must have NAC license from WA State 1-800-637-9998

inquire@availhome.com

EOE

Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Join us and make a difference! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: Okanogan: MA-R, MA-C, LPN or CNA Full time Registered Dietitian Full time. English/Spanish bilingual preferred. Promotor(a) 4 Per Diem positions; Okanogan & BrewsterEnglish/Spanish bilingual required Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN 2 positions. Full time Brewster (Jay Ave.): Pharmacist Full time MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Patient Accounts Rep. Full time Tonasket: MA-R, MA-C, or LPN 2 per diem positions See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Antiques & Collectibles Collectibles For Sale - Inside. Call for appointment, 509486-4344

Estate Sales TONASKET EUROPEAN & JAPANESE ANTIQUE ESTATE SALE! Danish carved side board with green glass doors, Neoclassical carved Empire table and two chairs set, carved wardrobe, French caned bed, French Provincial chairs, paintings, Oriental rugs, Japanese thick Shoji doors, Tokonoma Alcove, Buddha Bust, standing gong, fine porcelain and glass, bronzes, lots of miscellaneous!! Doors open 9 am. Cash & credit cards only. Saturday, October 26th located at 28 East Winesap, North End before bridge. No earlies.

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF OCT. 21, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA

Statewides reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS OWNER OPERATOR Dedicated Home Weekly! Solos up to $175,000/year. Sign-on Bonus! Teams up to $350,000/year. $5,000 Sign-on Bonus. Forward Air 888-652-5611 DRIVERS -- Tired of Being Gone? We get you Home! Call Haney Truck Line one of best NW heavy haul carriers. Great pay/benefits package. 1-888-414-4467 or www.gohaney.com DRIVERS -- Whether you have experience or need training, we offer unbeatable career opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 centraldrivingjobs.com GORDON TRUCKING, Inc. A better Carrier. A better Career. CDL-A Drivers Needed! Up to $1500 sign on bonus! Dedicated Fleet Options. Home weekly available in some area.. EOE. Call 7 days/week! 866-725-9669 LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices Notice of the Intent to Adopt an Election Resolution The Okanogan Conservation District Board of Supervisors will hold a meeting at 4:00 PM on November 7, 2013 at the USDA Service Center, 1251 S. 2nd Ave, Okanogan, WA to adopt a resolution setting the date, time, location and manner of an election to fill a Conservation District Supervisor’s expiring term. Post in the Public Notices in the Gazette-Tribune on October 24, 2013 and October 31, 2013. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 24 and 31, 2013. #522267 PUBLIC NOTICE DIRECTOR POSITION The Whitestone Reclamation District will have two Director positions to be filled at the annual election to be held on December 9, 2013. Candidates interested in being a Director on the District Board must file a Petition of Nomination declaring their candidacy with the Secretary of the District no later than November 4, 2013. Forms for the Declaration of Candidacy and Petition of Nomination for Director of the Whitestone Reclamation District are available from the District Secretary. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 24, 31, 2013. #519816 Determination of Non-significance under SEPA Critical Areas Ordinance Official Date of Notice: October 24, 2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Tonasket, Washington has completed review of draft regulations known as a Critical Areas Ordinance intended to protect critical areas as required under the Growth Management Act and the City’s Comprehensive Plan. These regulations if adopted will be applied city wide and used as guidance for all lands within the City’s Urban Growth Boundaries. The City of Tonasket is primarily located in Section 16, Township 37 N., Range 27

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PUBLIC NOTICE On January 26, 2006, K207DC was granted a license by the Federal Communications Commission to serve the public interest as a public trustee until February 1,2014. Our license will expire on February 1, 2014. We have filed an application for license renewal with the FCC. A copy ofthe application is available for public inspection during our regular business hours. It contains information concerning this station’s performance during the last seven years. Individuals who wish to advise the FCC offacts relating to our renewal application and to whether the station has operated in the public interest should file comments and petitions with the Commission by January 2, 2014. Further information concerning the Commission’s broadcast license renewal process is available at PO Box 942 Tonasket, WA. (public file address) , or may be obtained from the FCC, Washington, D.C. 20554. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2013. #517177

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 43 (Easy, rating 0.42) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY JUDITH ANN DE VON, Plaintiff, v. Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. Defendants. CASE NO.

Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 707 Okanogan, WA 98840 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 17, 24, 31, November 4, 14, 21, 2013. #520168

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13-2-004901-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The State of Washington to the said Defendants, Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the17th day of October, 2013, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled courts, and answer the complaint of the Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, at his.office below stated; and in case ofyour failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of this action is to quiet title in Plaintiff to the following described real property situated in Okanogan County, State of Washington, to-wit: Lot 18, Block 4, Plat of ORO, Washington, as per plat thereof recorded in Book”A” of Plats, page 17, records of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington. DATED this 3rd day of October, 2013. /s/ PATRICK J. MORRISSEY PATRICK J. MORRISSEY, WSBA#3045

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E. WM., Okanogan County, Washington. The Planning Commission of the City of Tonasket will conduct an open record public hearing on the proposed updated plan during their regularly scheduled November 19, 2013 meeting. This meeting is to begin at 3:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber Room, City Hall, 209 Whitcomb Avenue, South, Tonasket, Washington please consult the agenda as to what order of business the hearing is. The purpose of this hearing is to take testimony relative to the proposed updated plan. The Planning Commission will forward a recommendation to the City Council who will make the final decision on the proposed regulations. The City of Tonasket Building & Permits Department, who is the lead agency for this proposal, has determined that it does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required under RCW 43.21C.030(2)(c). This decision was made after review of a completed environmental checklist and other information on file with the lead agency. This information is available to the public on request. This DNS is issued under 197-11-340(2); the lead agency will not act on this proposal until after December 23, 2013. The complete text, related drawings and documentation is available on the city’s web site at www.tonasketcity.org and follow the links for Public Notices. For inspection and/or copies of the proposal may be obtained

by purchase or electronically by request at the City of Tonasket Clerk’s Office during normal business hours. Any person desiring to express their views on this proposal or attain party of record status and be notified of any subsequent record decisions on this application must notify in writing Christian Johnson, Permit Administrator, Box 487, Tonasket WA 98855 or cjohnson.oroville@nvinet.com Written comments on the proposal for the Planning Commission Hearing must be filed no later than 3:00 p.m. November 19, 2013. Issued this date: October 16, 2013 /s/ Christian D. Johnson Christian D. Johnson, Permit Administrator This notice is given pursuant to Section 18.04.180 of the Tonasket Municipal Code. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 24, 2013. #522260

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OCTOBER 24, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune October 24, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 6 7

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Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 24, 2013

SPORTS

Quincy wears out Tigers By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Diego Santana pushes through to the finish at Saturday’s Home Invitational at Veterans Memorial Park.

Hornets’ Speiker, Quincy’s Elmore win Oroville Invite By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - There couldn’t have been a greater contrast between the boys’ and girls’ races at Saturday’s Oroville Invitational. The Hornets’ Sierra Speiker cruised to a decisive win in her final race on her home course, shattering her own course record by more than 1:15. But in the boys’ race, Quincy’s Spencer Elmore rode a strong late surge to overcome a big early lead by the trio of Ben Klemmeck and Liam Daily of Liberty Bell and Republic’s Duncan Forsman to win the 3.0-mile race. Speiker shot out to a big early lead - chasing the clock, not the other runners - and finished in 17:42, shattering her home course record of 18:58 set two years ago. Coming on the the hilly, sandy course at Oroville’s Veterans Memorial Park, it was probably as impressive as her 17:10 at Omak two weeks ago. Tonasket’s Amber Monroe - the Tigers’ firefighting, threesport athlete homecoming queen - tried to go out with Speiker for the first mile, and finished 10th in 22:05. “We knew she was exhausted after all the homecoming stuff,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “We decided to send her out with Sierra and then just see how things played out. So she didn’t finish as well as she might have but today she did exactly what we decided to do.” Johnna Terris took ninth in 21:53, while Lea Berger was 25th in 24:19. For the boys, Bryden Hires finished 40th in 19:38. “Bryden ran his best race of the season,” Thornton said. “He is getting faster every race. Though we were tired this week we will be ready for the Caribou Trail League meet at Chelan on Thursday.” Also running for Tonasket were Abe Podkranic (43rd, 19:44), Smith Condon (46th, 19:51), Tim Jackson (47th, 20:00); and Hunter Swanson (48th, 20:16). Oroville’s boys were led by Diego Santan (42nd, 19:42). Also finishing were Nahum Garfias (53rd, 20:58), Javier Castillo (57th, 21:25), Emmanuel Castrejon (59th, 21:49), Daniel Castrejon (66th, 23:20) and Dakota Haney (69th, 24:28). For the Oroville girls, Phoebe Poynter (34th, 26:28) and Kaylee Foster (43rd, 32:39) also ran. Omak dominated the girls race with 26 points to halve the score of runner-up Republic (52). Liberty Bell, led by the 2-3 finish of Klemmeck and Daily, finished with 36 points to Quincy’s 49. Klemmeck, Daily and Republic’s Forsman cruised to an early lead and seemed to be set up for a breakneck finish between them for the invitational title, but Quicny’s Spencer Elmore, a good 30 meters behind at the two mile mark, overcame them all and sprinted to the finish in 16:00, four seconds ahead of Klemmeck. Tonasket races at the CTL finals meet on Thursday in Chelan, while the Hornets travel to Liberty Bell on Saturday for the Central Washington League meet. With a small field of girls at the CWL meet, the boys and girls races will be run together, which should suit Sierra Speiker’s quest for ever-lower times well.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Lea Berger leads a midrace pack at Saturday’s Oroville Invitational. Speiker watch Sierra Speiker’s Oct. 5 run of 18:11.0 at the Can-Am Invitational still ranks eighth in the state in all classifications this season. Alexa Efraimson of Camas still ranks first at 17:28, but Alexis Fuller of Union moved into the No. 2 spot at 17:56.2. Speiker hasn’t run a full 5k since her Can-Am run. Speiker’s 17:10.4 still ranks as the state’s fasted 3.0-mile time. Lindsay Bradley of Richland is second at 17:22.9. Nationally, Speiker ranks 141st in the 5k and 30th in the 3.0-mile. Her 3.0-mile time, if translated to 5k, would place her at about 41st on the national list. Tonasket Middle School finishes season

OROVILLE - Tonasket’s middle school runners finished their season with a one-point win over Republic. Thornton said that the girls team avenged a pair of defeats to Republic from earlier in the season and has won 12 of 14 meets over the past two years. “The only team that they never beat was a team from Hermiston, Oregon.” Thornton said, listing teams from Moses Lake, Colville, Royal, Omak, Deer Park, Jenkins, Liberty Bell, Springdale, Republic, Oroville, Lake Roosevelt and Coeur d’Alene, Idaho that the middle schoolers have beaten. “The first question after each race that these girls asked was ‘Did we win as a team,’” Thornton said. “Their goal in every race was not only to run well themselves but to win as a team.”

Girls - Tonasket 27, Republic 28. 1. Tiffany Byington (Republic), 9:23.8; 2. Camille Wilson 9:41; 3. Katie Henneman, 9:44; 6. Kaylee Bobadilla, 10:10; 10. Megan Bolich, 10:39; 11. Morgan Tyus, 10:52; 15. Noni Alley, 12:23. Boys 1. Gideon Bolton (Omak), 8:09.89; 9. Justin McDonald, 9:26; 10. Samuel Strandberg, 9:28; 15. Caeleb Hardesty, 10:20; 16. Adam Steinshouer, 10:33.

TONASKET - Quincy plays a close-to-the-vest, grind-it-out brand of football that isn’t spectacular, but gives an opponent few chances to take advantage of self-inflicted wounds. Tonasket hung with the Jackrabbits for awhile, but Quincy physically hammered on the smaller Tigers until Tonasket made its own set of mistakes, which the Jacks happily availed themselves of. The result was a 44-7 bummer of a homecoming loss for the Tigers, who for a quarter looked like they could make a game of it. “They’re solid with what they do,” said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. “For us to be successful we had to check a lot of boxes ... they overwhelmed us with their defense. Physically they just wore us down.” Early on the Tigers did what they had to in order to stay in the game. That meant a pair of clockchewing drives that, while they didn’t lead to points, get the ball in Tonasket’s hands for nearly six minutes at a stretch with drives of nine and 12 plays. They also avoided giving up the big play early. Quincy took a 12-0 lead midway through the second quarter, but did so on lengthy drives that featured efficient, if not spectacular, inside running of five or six yards a play. The Tigers weren’t able to stay on track as Quincy broke off a couple of big plays late in the first half. John Lindquist’s 72-yard run set up one score. A Quincy interception, followed by a 39-yard pass to Lindquist set up the real emotional dagger - a 10-yard Dallas Bassett to Connor Trevino pass as time expired in the half for a 24-0 Quincy lead. “We had a couple drives where we kept the clock running and got some first downs,” Hawkins said. “And then we had some silly little penalties that put us into some bad situations. We suffered with some drives we might have been able to sustain. That kind of led to those explosive plays, especially right at the end of the half. “That last play really deflated the guys. We had to do some rallying at halftime.” The Tigers’ defense actually played better in the second half, particularly in bouncing back to force Quincy to punt after its first

Above, the Tigers’ Collin Aitcheson tries to hang on as Quincy’s Connor Trevino pulls the Tonasket defense downfield during Friday’s 44-7 homecoming loss to the Jackrabbits. Left, Isaiah Yaussey-Albright (rear) pulls down a Quincy ball carrier as the ball bounces free late in Friday’s game. Yaussey-Albright scored Tonasket’s only touchdown of the night.

Brent Baker/staff photos

possession of the third quarter. But the offense wasn’t able to maintain the grind-it-out modus operandi of early in the game, turning the ball over on its first four possessions of the second half. Three scoring drives traversing a total of less than 90 yards turned the game into a rout. “Defensively we played a lot better in the second half, but we kept giving them short fields,” Hawkins said. “We made a couple subtle adjustments at halftime that helped us. “It was weird - offensively we were OK in the first half and the

defense wasn’t very good. In the second half, the defense played better but the offense stunk. Watching them defensively in the second half, they brought lots of blitzes at us and just overwhelmed us.” Isaiah Yaussey-Albright scored on a six-yard run with 6:36 left in the game to get the Tigers on the scoreboard. Michael Orozco led the Tigers with 52 yards rushing on 12 carries, with Collin Aitcheson adding 36 yards on 11 carries. Quincy piled up 331 yards on the ground to the Tigers’ 110

and held a 422-132 edge in total offense. Tonasket (2-5, 0-5 Caribou Trail League) travels to winless Omak on Friday, Oct. 25, hoping to snag their first CTL win of the season. As Hawkins noted, there’s even a bit more on the line than that. “Basically whoever wins gets a crossover (with a non-playoff Northeast A League team),” he said. “Mentally, it will be who can handle it upstair. It would be great to extra to get another home game. So with something on the table, it will help.”

Hornets grind out win at LR White Swan looms with playoffs on line By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

COULEE DAM - Lake Roosevelt is never an easy place to pick up a road victory. The Hornets, who might have been caught up in one of those dreaded “trap” games - a weaker opponent sandwiched between two contenders - managed to grind out a 42-14 victory on the Raiders’ home field Friday night. It wasn’t as easy as the score looked - it was 21-14 heading into the fourth quarter - but Oroville used its dominance on the ground and solid ball control offense to keep Lake Roosevelt at bay until breaking loose with 21 points in the fourth quarter, including two touchdowns in the final two minutes of play.

Oroville held the ball for 24 minutes - half the game - on its six scoring drives alone and outgained the Raiders 383-166 on the ground as well as allowing just 10 passing yards. The Hornets took a 14-0 lead after one quarter on touchdowns by Tanner Smith (10 yards) and Dustin Nigg (15 yards). The Raiders stayed within shouting distance, though, until Smith added his second touchdown on a 13-yard run with 10:03 left in the third quarter to extend the Hornets’ lead to 28-14. A 7-yard Luke Kindred run and a 20-yard pass from Kindred to Smith in the final minutes put the game out of reach. Nigg also had a 4-yard run in the second quarter as Oroville led 21-6 at the half. Kindred finished with 153 yards rushing on 18 carries and completed 2-of-4 passes for 23 yards and a touchdown. Smith added 80 yards on 10 rushes, Logan Mills ran for 64 yards on 11 attempts and Nigg picked up 64 yards on 10 tries.

VOTE TONY KOEPKE for

— Oroville Council Pos. 2 —

l Proud life-long resident of Oroville l Vested interest in our town’s future l Commitment to public safety and service l Not afraid to stand up for what is right l You can count on me to do what is right for you and Oroville l 40+ years of public service, 33+ years as volunteer fire fighter, 9 years City Council member

“I would be honored to again have the opportunity to fight for what is right for you, what is right for Oroville, and what is right for our future.” Paid for by Tony Koepke

As often happens on the road, penalties were an issue for the Hornets, who were hurt by nine flags on for 90 yards, while the Raiders (3-4, 0-3) were penalized for 20 yards. With the win in hand, though, Oroville (5-1, 3-1 Central Washington League) faces its second huge game in three weeks this Friday as White Swan (5-1, 3-0) will try to rain on the Hornets’ homecoming parade.

A victory for the Hornets virtually assures them of one of the league’s two state playoff spots. A loss won’t necessarily end their playoff hopes, but the Hornets will then need plenty of help (specifically, a White Swan victory over Liberty Bell and a Liberty Bell win over Kittitas) in the coming weeks to force a three-way mini-playoff that would give them one final chance to get in.

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OCTOBER 24, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A13

SPORTS

Hornet volleyball is playoff bound after edging Liberty Bell By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Jaden Vugteveen gets ready to rip a shot as Oroville goalkeeper Xochil Rangel slides in to make the pointblank save last Thursday. Vugteveen later scored a goal during the Tigers’ 11-0 victory.

Tigers clinch playoffs By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s soccer team bounced back from its toughest stretch of the season over the weekend, clinching at least a spot in the Caribou Trail League’s district play-in game with a dominant 6-0 victory over Quincy on Saturday, Oct. 19. The Tigers controlled Saturday’s game from the outset, scoring four goals in the first half. Kylie Dellinger scored four goals - giving her seven in two games - with Jaden Vugteveen scoring twice for the Tigers. Kayla Willis had two assists, with Ashlynn Willis, Kathryn Cleman and Vugteveen each adding assists. Baylie Tyus made four saves in goal, including on on a penalty kick that was Quincy’s only significant scoring threat. The Tigers (8-4, 6-4 Caribou Trail League) are currently in fourth place in the league with a two-game lead over fifth-place Brewster with three games to play. By holding onto at least fourth place the Tigers can avoid the play-in game altogether and advance directly to the district tournament in November. Tonasket hosts Cascade (9-3, 9-1) on Saturday, Oct. 26.

Tonasket 11, Oroville 0 TONASKET - Kylie Dellinger and Kathryn Cleman each tallied hat tricks as the Tigers rolled past Oroville 11-0 on Oct. 17. Cleman also had four assists to go with her three goals as Tonasket led 6-0 at the half. Jaden Vugteveen, Rose Walts, Ashlyn Willis, Norma Ornelas and Christa McCormick each tallied single goals. Selena Cosino and

OROVILLE - After more than a decade battling just to stay out of last place in whichever league they were playing in, the Oroville volleyball team is suddenly playing for much bigger prizes. The Hornets, after edging Liberty Bell 25-22, 22-25, 24-26, 25-18, 15-11 on Thursday, Oct. 17, have clinched a berth in the district playoffs and still have a shot at winning the Central Washington League North Division title heading into their final two matches of the regular season. For that to happen, Liberty Bell (8-3, 3-2 CWL North) needed to beat leading Bridgeport on Tuesday. If that happens, the Fillies’ match on the Hornets’ home floor this Thursday, Oct. 24, has a share of first place on the line. But first things first. Oroville had to play its best match of the season - or many seasons, for that matter - to take down the Mountain Lions, and did just that. “(They) played an incredible match,” said first-year coach Carrie Rise. “Andrea Perez led our serving, Rachelle Nutt and Andrea led our defense, and Rachelle and Mikayla Scott had the highest number of attacks.

Mikayla alone had 14 kills. “Brittany Jewett’s sets were spot on, and her ability to cover and dive for Liberty Bell’s tips helped secure our win.” The victory improves Oroville’s overall record to 6-6 - matching their most wins in a season since the 20th Century. Heading into Tuesday’s game, Bridgeport leads the league with a 6-0 mark, with the Hornets at 4-2 and Liberty Bell (with an additional game still to play) 3-2.

Playoff picture Even if the Hornets lose both their remaining matches, they can finish no worse than third in the CWL North Division. If that happens, they will play the South Division’s second-place team (likely Riverside Christian) for a spot in the district third-place game. Finishing second earns an automatic bid to the third-place game. That match is a winner-tostate, loser-out contest in Ephrata on Nov. 9. The North Division winner clinches an automatic bid to the state 2B volleyball tournament. That team also would be headed to Ephrata on Nov. 9 to play the South Division winner for the District 5/6 championship, as well as state tournament seeding. Oroville volleyball’s only appearances in the state tourna-

ment came at the end of the 197778 and 1978-79 seasons. Oroville stats: Rachelle Nutt 11/15 serving, 3 aces, 26 attacks, 4 kills, 4 blocks, 20 digs; Brittany Jewett 14/14 serving, 1 ace, 2 attacks, 10 digs; Bridget Clark 5/5 serving, 1 ace, 2 attacks, 2 kills, 7 digs; Monica Herrera 13/14 serving, 7 attacks, 1 kill, 8 digs; Andrea Perez 23/27 serving, 3 aces, 7 attacks, 21 digs; Nadia Maldonado 10/11 serving, 1 attack, 1 kill, 11 digs; Jessica Galvan 8/9 serving, 2 aces, 4 attacks, 2 kills, 5 digs; Mikayla Scott 12/13 serving, 19 attacks, 14 kills, 12 digs.

Oroville 3, Lake Roosevelt 1

Oroville stats in their 25-9, 16-25, 2514, 25-20 win: Rachelle Nutt 12/15 serves, 3 aces, 4 blocks, 7 attacks, 2 digs; Brittany Jewett 17/17 serves, 1 ace, 1 block, 1 attack, 2 digs; Bridget Clark 9/9 serves, 1 block, 8 attacks, 3 digs; Monica Herrara 4/4 serves, 1 dig; Andrea Perez 8/8 serves, 1 ace, 4 attacks, 1 kill, 1 dig; Nadia Maldonado 2/3 serves, 2 attacks, 1 dig; Jessica Galvan 12/16 serves, 3 aces, 4 attacks, 1 kill, 4 digs; Mikayla Scott 15/17 serves, 8 attacks, 1 kill, 3 digs.

Entiat 3, Oroville 2

Oroville stats in their 20-25, 25-13, 13-25, 25-14, 15-12 loss: Rachelle Nutt serves 6/6, 1 ace, 2 blocks, 6 attacks, 7 kills, 9 digs; Brittany Jewett serves 9/11, 1 ace, 2 attacks, 1 kill, 4 digs; Bridget Clark 16/16 serves, 3 attacks, 3 kills, 4 digs; Monica Herrara 11/11 serves, 2 aces, 5 attacks, 2 kills, 3 digs; Andrea Perez 3/3 serves, 1 attack, 1 kill; Nadia Maldonado 9/9 serves, 3 attacks; Jessica Galvan 9/11 serves, 4 digs; Mikayla Scott 8/9 serves, 6 attacks, 4 kills, 6 digs.

Closer matches for Tigers

Brent Baker/staff photo

By Brent Baker

Saturday, Oct. 26.

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Tonasket stats: Carrisa Frazier 3 aces; Vanessa Pershing 1 ace; Cassie Spear 2 aces, 1 kill; Savannah Clinedinst 8/8 serving, 5 kills; Alissa Young 2 kills; Rachael Sawyer 2 kills; Jenny Bello 3 aces, 1 kill; Tori King 1 kill.

TONASKET - Tonasket’s volleyball team gave Quincy a run for its money on Saturday, but even after holding a big lead in the third set ended up absorbing a 25-13, 25-20, 25-20 defeat. “The girls didn’t show up the first game,” said Tigers coach Jackie Gliddon. “They started pulling together the final two. Missed serves and errors cost us the game.” Gliddon said that Savannah Clindinst, Alissa Young and Rachael Sawyer played well.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Rachael Sawyer gets in a hit against Quincy on Saturday, Oct. 19. The Tigers (0-12, 0-10 Caribou Trail League) host Cascade on

Okanogan 3, Tonasket 1 OKANOGAN - The Tigers won their first Caribou Trail League set of the season in a 25-18, 25-11, 23-25, 25-22 loss to the Bulldogs on Tuesday, Oct. 15. Tonasket stats: Savannah Clinedinst 5 kills, 1 ace; Tori King 13/14 serving, 3 aces, 2 kills; Jenna Davisson 3 block kills; Jenny Bello 8/9 serving, 3 kills; Rachael Sawyer 2 kills.

Tonasket midfielder Daniela Capote snuffs out a Quincy attack during the Tigers’ 6-0 victory over the Jackrabbits on Saturday that clinched a district playoff spot with three games still to play in the regular season. Kayla Willis each had assists and Baylie Tyus had one save in goal. Oroville (2-9) also lost a nonleague contest at Eastmont on Saturday, 3-1.

Okanogan 2, Tonasket 1 OKANOGAN - The Tigers’ frustration against Okanogan continued on Tuesday, Oct. 17, as Tonasket dropped its third straight one-goal decision, dating to last year’s playoffs, to the Bulldogs.

“It was tough, back and forth,” said Tonasket coach Darren Collins. “We had 10 shots on goal; plenty of chances, but we couldn’t find the back of the net.” Ashlynn Willis scored the Tigers’ goal while Baylie Tyus had nine saves. “Both teams played a lot better game than the first time we played,” Collins said. “We usually play them pretty well, but we haven’t been able to get over the hump.”

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Football Caribou Trail 1A League Overall W-L Cashmere 5-0 Okanogan 4-1 Cascade 3-2 Quincy 3-2 Chelan 3-2 Brewster 2-3 Tonasket 0-5 Omak 0-5

W-L 6-1 6-1 4-3 3-4 4-3 3-4 2-5 0-7

Central WA 2B League Overall W-L White Swan 2-0 Kittitas 3-1 Oroville 3-1 Liberty Bell 2-1 Manson 1-3 Lk Roosevelt 0-3 Bridgeport 0-3

W-L 6-1 3-3 5-1 2-1 1-5 3-4 0-7

Volleyball Caribou Trail 1A League Overall

W-L W-L-S Cascade 10-0 19-3-0 Chelan 8-1 13-1-0 Omak 6-4 6-4-0 Brewster 5-4 5-4-0 Quincy 5-5 5-6-0 Okanogan 4-6 4-6-0 Cashmere 1-9 1-9-0 Tonasket 0-10 0-10-0

Okanogan 18 6-4 7-5-0 Tonasket 18 6-4 8-4-0 Brewster 12 4-6 5-7-0 Quincy 6 2-8 2-10-0 Omak 6 2-9 3-10-0 Chelan 3 1-8 2-9-0

Central WA 1B/2B League Overall

ket, 1/2:30 pm XC - Oroville at CWL Finals (Liberty Bell), 1 pm Monday, Oct. 28 FB (JV) - Omak at Tonasket, 5:30 pm

Pts. W-L W-L-T Bridgeport 12 4-0 10-1-0 Liberty Bell 9 3-1 6-6-0 Entiat 6 2-2 4-7-0 Oroville 3 1-3 2-9-0 Manson 0 0-4 0-8-0

Tuesday, Oct. 29 GSoc - Tonasket at Brewster, 4:30 pm Vball (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Brewster, 5/6:30 pm Vball (JV/Var) - Oroville at Manson, 5/6:30 pm

Schedules Oct. 24-Nov. 2

Thursday, Oct. 31 GSoc - Bridgeport at Oroville, 4 pm

Thursday, Oct. 24 Vball (JV/Var) - Bridgeport at Oroville, 5/6:30 pm GSoc - Entiat at Oroville, 4 pm XC - Tonasket at CTL Finals (Chelan), 4 pm Friday, Oct. 25 FB (Var) - Tonasket at Omak, 7 pm FB (Var) - White Swan at Oroville, 7 pm Saturday, Oct. 26 GSoc - Cascade at Tonasket, 1:30 pm GSoc - Oroville at Manson, 11 am Vball (JV/Var) - Cascade at Tonas-

Friday, Nov. 1 FB (Var) - Chelan at Tonasket, 7 pm FB (Var) - Oroville at Bridgeport, 7 pm Saturday, Nov. 2 GSoc - Cashmere at Tonasket, 1:30 pm Vball - Cashmere at Tonasket, 1/2:30 pm XC - Oroville at 1B/2B Regional (Wenatchee - Walla Walla Pt.), 1/1:30 pm XC - Tonasket at 1A Regional (Spokane - Plantes Ferry), 12:20/1 pm

CWL 2B North League Overall W-L W-L-S Bridgeport 6-0 8-2-0 Oroville 4-2 6-6-0 Liberty Bell 3-2 8-3-0 Lk Roosevelt 0-5 2-9-0 Manson 0-5 2-7-0

Girls Soccer Caribou Trail 1A League Overall

Pts. W-L W-L-T Cashmere 30 10-0 11-1-0 Cascade 27 9-1 9-3-0

Fundraiser

Friday, October 25 • 7 p.m. • Doors open at 6 p.m. • • • •

Concessions! Costume Prizes! Silent Auction! Time Wrap Bags $5 ea.

(Audience participation items)

Tonasket CCC • $10 ea or 2 for $15

Sponsored by Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus

Life is better when your doctors and your Medicare health plan work together. Good news for area residents on Medicare! Now you can enjoy the highest quality in health care and your Medicare health plan through the new partnership of Confluence Health, Wenatchee Valley Medical Center and Health Alliance Medicare. All three organizations are driven by the philosophy that patient and member needs come first. Through this partnership, you’ll enjoy: High-quality care from local doctors and hospitals you know and trust Benefits you really want and need in a high-quality Medicare health plan • $0 a month Medicare health plan option* • $0 Preferred Generics at Walmart & Sam’s Club** • •

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Page A14

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 24, 2013

Obituaries

Highland Wonders series returns to Tonasket Submitted by Julie Ashmore Okanogan Highlands Allliance

TONASKET - On Friday, November 1, Jack Nisbet, acclaimed teacher, naturalist and author, will share, “David Douglas in the Okanogan Country,” as the first event of the upcoming indoor Highland Wonders season. Between 1826 and 1833, Scottish naturalist David Douglas visited the Okanagan six different times, including an epic 1833 trip that took him north to the Thompson and Fraser R i v e r s . During those journeys, he not only collected plants, birds, animals, and tribal information, but also drew an important early map of the river’s Jack Nisbet main stem. In this slide presentation we will compare the landscape and people that Douglas described with what lives in the Okanogan today. Jack Nisbet is the author of several books that explore the human and natural history of

the Intermountain West, includ- munity to steward natural habiing “Purple Flat Top,” “Singing tats and resources, by helping to Grass Burning Sage,” and “Visible develop an informed and empowBones.” His work on ered population. Northwest fur agent Okanogan and geographer David Highlands Thompson resulted in Alliance is a “Sources of the River” non-profit that and “The Mapmaker’s works to eduEye.” Nisbet’s recent cate the public projects have focused on watershed on Scottish naturalist issues. Highland David Douglas. “The Wonders preCollector” follows his sentations are adventurous life, while offered free of “A Naturalist charge to the at Work” community, and aims to condonations are nect Douglas’s Daniel Macnee 1829, welcome. The o b s e r v a t i o n s Portrait of David indoor eduto the pres- Douglas, Linnean Society, cational series ent and future is offered by London. Northwest. OHA, at the “David Douglas: Community A Naturalist at Work” is Cultural Center, the “CCC,” of also a museum exhibit Tonasket (411 S Western Avenue, currently on display at Tonasket, WA). The Nov. 1 preTacoma’s Washington sentation begins at 6:30 p.m. with State History Museum, desserts, tea and coffee; the dinwhere it will run through ner benefiting the CCC begins February 24, 2014. at 5:00 p.m. (the meal is $7 for The Highland Wonders CCC members or $8 for nonindoor educational series members; a dessert and one brings the natural history of the beverage is included for dinner Okanogan Highlands and sur- guests). Details are provided on rounding areas to Tonasket OHA’s website: www.okanoganfrom November through May highlands.org/education/hw. For (skipping December). OHA’s more information, email julie@ Education Program is designed okanoganhighlands.org or call to build the capacity of the com- 509-433-7893.

Water Ranch to break ground Friday The Gazette-Tribune

TONASKET - The Tonasket Water Ranch will be hosting its ceremonial ground breaking at Chief Tonasket Park on Friday,

Oct. 25, 12:00 p.m. The event, according to organizer Linda Black, will feature the installation of the first piece of art work, have a ribbon cutting ceremony, and show how a little

bit of water can make kids very happy and active. There will be about 75 kids attending, a VIP tent, and a full illustration of the completed park on hand.

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Visitation for friends will be held on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013 from 3 p.m. to 5 p. m. at the Bergh Chapel in Oroville. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested memorial donations be made to The American Cancer Society. Bergh Funeral Service Oroville/ Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Judy Coonfield

Judy May Coonfield Judy May Coonfield, 74 of Wenatchee, Washington, passed away peacefully on October 15, 2013, with her husband of 54 years, Skip Coonfield, at her side. Judy was born in Oroville Washington on October 2nd, 1939. She married Skip Coonfield on August 30th 1959. Judy worked many years in the fruit industry and was an avid collector of antique glassware and pottery. Judy is survived by her husband Skip Coonfield and their children: Skip (Cindy) Coonfield, Lee (Loretta) Coonfield, Cindy (Larry) Fluke and grandchildren: Conner, Eban Fluke and Molly Coonfield. A graveside service will be held on Friday, Oct. 25, 2013 at 2 p.m. at Oroville Riverview Cemetery with Pastor Leon Alden, officiating. A reception will follow for family and friends at Oroville United Methodist Church.

Gertrude Rubert

Gertrude Fountain Rubert Gertrude Fountain Rubert, age 96, passed away on October 19, 2013 in Spokane, Washington at Fairview Assisted Living due to complications of a hip fracture. Gertie was born on November 16, 1916 to Gus and Jessie Bell Fountain at the homestead near Wauconda, Washington. She attended the Bell and Wauconda Schools through eighth grade. She married Claude Rubert on Sept. 24, 1938 at Omak, Wash.; he preceded her in death on April

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17, 1989. Gertie spent most of her life on the farm on Hwy. 20, they moved to the Tonasket area in 1960, in February of 2013 she moved to Fairview in Spokane. She enjoyed hunting, fishing, gardening and her beloved mountains. She belonged to various organizations throughout her life, worked on the election board for many years, in apple sheds and the school cafeteria. Gertie was a devoted wife, mother and friend. She leaves many nieces and nephews as well as special friends with fond memories of her life. Gertie is survived by her children, Virginia Cook, Lawrence (Pam) Rubert, Allen (Mary) Rubert and Ellen (Dave) Lang; eight grandchildren, 13 great grandchildren and two great great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, husband, two brothers, a sister, a grandson and a great grand-daughter. A memorial will be held at Bergh Funeral Home in Oroville on Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Fairview Assisted Living, 1617 N. Calispel, Spokane, WA 99205 or the charity of your choice. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements

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Understanding Breast Cancer Breast cancer is an issue that extends be-

yond the month of October, and many people might be surprised to learn of breast cancer’s prevalence. In the United States alone, breast cancer incidence in women is 1 in 8, or roughly 13 percent. In fact, among women in the U.S., breast cancer rates are higher than those of any cancer besides lung cancer. With such staggering figures, it’s important for both women and men (who can also suffer from breast cancer) to gain a greater understanding of this deadly disease. What Is Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is an uncontrolled growth of breast cells. Any type of cancer is the result of mutations in genes responsible for regulating the growth of cells and keeping them healthy. In a healthy body, the cells replace themselves in an orderly fashion, as healthy new cells take over as old ones die out. When mutations occur, changed cells gain the ability to keep dividing without control or order, producing more similar cells and forming a tumor. In the case of breast cancer, cancerous cells gradually invade nearby healthy breast tissue and make their way into the underarm lymph nodes, which are small organs that filter out foreign substances in the body. If the cancer reaches the lymph nodes, it then has a pathway into other parts of the body. Upon diagnosis, a patient will be told what stage of breast cancer they are in, which tells how far the cancer has spread beyond the original tumor. Is Breast Cancer Hereditary? According to BreastCancer.org, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing reliable, complete and current information about breast cancer, only 5 to 10 percent of cancers are due to an abnormality inherited from a parent. While all breast cancers are caused by a genetic abnormality, roughly 90 percent of breast cancer cases are the result of genetic abnormalities that are a result of the aging process and the wear and tear of everyday life. Can Breast Cancer Be Prevented? Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is always an ideal approach, but breast cancer is

never the fault of the individual. A balanced diet, a lifestyle that includes abstaining from smoking and drinking alcohol in excess and regular exercise are all ways to stay healthy, but none will guarantee a woman or man will not get breast cancer. Are There Risk Factors for Breast Cancer? BreastCancer.org notes that there are factors a woman or man can control that might lessen their risk for breast cancer. Those risks include: * Weight. Post-menopausal women in particular can reduce their risk of breast cancer by maintaining a healthy weight. Fat tissue is the body’s main source of estrogen after menopause, and having more fat tissue means higher estrogen levels, which increases breast cancer risk. * Diet. Many cancers are linked to diet, but studies have yet to show for certain which types of foods increase the risk for breast cancer. In general, it’s good to restrict sources of red meat and other animal fats, such as fats from dairy products. Some studies have shown that eating a lot of red and/or processed meats is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer. Eating a diet low in fat and rich in fruits and vegetables is often recommended to reduce cancer risk. * Exercise. The American Cancer Society recommends engaging in 45 to 60 minutes of physical exercise 5 or more days per week, as evidence continues to mount that exercise can reduce breast cancer risk. * Alcohol and smoking. Alcohol limits the liver’s ability to control blood levels of estrogen, which can increase risk of breast cancer. Similarly, smoking has been associated with a small increase in breast cancer risk. BreastCancer.org also notes additional risk factors for breast cancer can include recent oral contraceptive use, stress and anxiety and exposure to estrogen. While all of the mentioned risk factors are within an individual’s control, there are a host of additional factors beyond a person’s control that can increase risk of breast cancer. These factors include age, family history, personal history, and race among others. For more info. on breast cancer, visit www.breastcancer.org.

Don’t become a statistic. Start annual mammograms at age 40.

It only takes a few moments of your time–moments that could save your life. Our experienced staff is dedicated to creating an environment where patients will receive the highest technical skill coupled with excellent customer service.

To schedule your annual mammogram or for more information, call us at the following locations. Omak Clinic

Tonasket Clinic

Oroville Clinic

Brewster Clinic

916 Koala Dr. Omak, WA 98841

17 S. Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855

1617 Main St. Oroville, WA 98844

418 W. Main St. Brewster, WA 98812

509.826.1800

509.486.2174

509.476.3631

509.689.8900

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

Schedule your mammogram today. (1) Mammograms can detect lumps in the breast long before they are discernible any other way.

(2) Properly performed by trained technicians, it takes only minutes from your day.

(3) It’s covered by most insurance plans, but if yours doesn’t, special financial arrangements can usually be made.

An affiliation between Central Washington Hospital & Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

(4) It can save your life.

We can think of several more reasons why women should have regular mammograms. But we can’t think of a single reason not to. Can you?

confluencehealth.org

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 24, 2013  

October 24, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 24, 2013  

October 24, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune