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HORNET FOOTBALL NABS WIN;

FLU SHOTS OFFERED

VOLLEYBALL GOES PINK

Okanogan Co. Public Health, Thursday, Oct. 17, 7:30 am-4 pm Call (509) 422-7140 for info.

See Pages A10-11

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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Time to talk swimming pool

BRINGING IN THE APPLE CROP

Report details options for proposed Tonasket project; projected costs range from $1-2.5 million BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Another load of bins of Golden Delicious leaves an S&D leased orchard north of Oroville along Highway 97. The tractor driver will stack the bins and they will go by truck to Gold Digger Apples packing facility in Oroville. The apple harvest is expected to go on for about another 10 days..

HARVEST TIME

Short crop for Wenatchee District, especially so for north end of Okanogan Valley

SEE POOL | PG A3

Senator candidates speak at Oroville Chamber meeting

BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

While the rest of the apple producing states are having a bumper crop, the situations are reversed from last year for Gold Digger Apples and growers in Washington. Gold Digger’s general manager, Greg Moser, predicts with about 10 days of a harvest that started nearly two weeks early this year, the crop will be down between 20 and 30 percent overall for the growers’ cooperative. “The crop is picking short because we had so much frost damage in the spring. It appears our end of the valley got hit the worst,” said Moser, who adds that the crop is down statewide, but more so in the Wenatchee District that his cooperative is part of. Moser described the crop as a “shell crop,” where the trees didn’t look so bad because the outsides appeared normal, but the frost damage was much worse for the apples nearer the center of the trees. “We originally thought we were going to be down 10 to 20 percent, but it looks much more like the 20 to 30 percent number will apply by the time we’re all done,” he said. They’re predicting a statewide crop of 119 million tons, while last year that number was 126 to 129 million, according to Moser. While other growing states like Michigan and New York, as well as Canada, had crops that were severely down last year, these areas are predicting bumper crops this year. Moser thinks overall the market prices should still be strong though. He says that harvest started about 10 days earlier than normally this year, with picking beginning the third week of August with Galas. Gold Digger growers then harvested

TONASKET - The initial report is in. Now the real work begins. Late last summer the City of Tonasket contracted Pool World (Spokane) to evaluate the site of the current (and proposed future) city swimming pool and provide options, including features and costs, for building a new pool. Pool World’s book-length report, including four basic pool design options and hundreds of optional features, was recently delivered to the city. The Tonasket City Council discussed, in broad terms, the contents of the concept design and what the next step is in involving the community in the decision about how to move forward at its Tuesday, Oct. 8, meeting. “They provided us with four alternatives,” said city planner Kurt Danison of Highlands Associates. “The lowest cost is a little under $1 million. That’s to remodel the pool building and to replace the existing pool almost exactly the way it is today. There’s not a lot of amenities; there’s no zero entry (for handicapped swimmers), nothing like that. That was an option they threw in as an extra. “The other three alternatives include a new pool building and new pool, ranging from $1.5-1.6 million, to $2.5 million. “They give a rundown of what the basic thing is, and a bunch of costs for additions and options.” All of the options were for a seasonal outdoor pool, on various scales similar to the pool that Tonasket had before the current one was condemned.

“I know the answer to this question,” said council member Scott Olson. “But what do we tell people who want an indoor pool?” “We can’t pay for it,” Danison said. “It would cost, depending on the size, 10-15 times more on an annual basis than an outdoor pool. Even if someone walked in the door and gave us money to build it, we should say, ‘No.’ Because we couldn’t afford to take care of it. We cannot charge enough money (in pool entry fees or memberships). “Places like Federal Way and Eastmont are closing indoor pools. It would be a wonderful addition but it’s not Tonasket’s deal.” Danison and the council agreed to set up a public meeting at a neutral site, such as the school or the Community Cultural Center, to share information and get feedback from the public. “I’ll explain why we are where we are, how we got here, this is what we have, and see what kind of support we get,” Danison said. “We’ve reached the point where we need to make a decision whether or not to pursue a pool. I’m not sure we can get Linda Black to do 15 fundraisers like she did a couple of weeks ago.” Black has spent the past year raising money for the Tonasket Water Ranch spray park, which has been funded entirely with private money and will cost less than 10 percent of what it will cost to build a pool. The water ranch will also have negligible maintenance costs compared to the pool.

BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Guadalupe Reynoso and Leovijilda Rodriguez (above) are working the harvest at the S&D leased orchard. Reynoso’s father, Inocencio (below) picks Golden Delicious apples last Friday. their Honey Crisp, Golden and Red Delicious and will be finishing up with Grannies and Fujis. “Overall the quality is good, but like the pears, we have some heat damage. For pears we do pressure tests on three sides of the fruit and have found one of three will be lower... that’s the side that was facing the sun. The apple quality is good, but some show heat damage... it just depends on what orchard and which block,” he said. And even though it has been a short crop, for apples, the area is still experiencing a labor shortage, which the GM said would have been much worse this year if cherries, apples and pears were up to normal numbers. He said the company is going to try and secure even more H2A labor through the federal guest worker program next year.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 42

What’s on the way Gold Digger Apples’ Growers have been harvesting Galas, Honey Crisps, Gold and Red Delicious, Granny Smith and Fuji Apples

Positive Outlook The small growers’ cooperative, the last left in Oroville, continues to expand, even north of the border, according to Moser. Gold Digger Apples Inc. had one grower from Canada that came on board last year. This year Gold Digger added three more Canadian growers and three more local growers, he said. Gold Digger members grow primarily apples, pears and cherries. The co-op is slowly phasing out its winery business. And on another positive note, Moser said next year will probably one of the cooperatives bigger crops. With more growers coming into the Gold Digger family and young acreage starting to produce, Moser sees even better days ahead for the cooperative and its grower members.

OROVILLE – The candidates for senator for the Seventh Legislative District spoke at the Thursday, Oct. 10 Oroville Chamber of Commerce meeting. Incumbent Senator John Smith and Brian Dansell, a Ferry County Commissioner, were each given 25 minutes to discuss why they should be elected to the senate seat which Smith has held since being appointed to replace the retiring Bob Morton. Smith, a Republican, said that it was a real honor to be appointed last January when Sen. Bob Morton retired after 22 years in the legislature. He said he went through a selection process and his appointment was unanimously approved by the county commissioners in all five counties encompassed in the Seventh District. He said that he was a part of a bipartisan coalition that united on the issues of jobs, education and sustainable budget. “It’s the first time there has been bipartisan agreement in a decade,” said Smith. “We all know the biggest issue in the Seventh District is the economy.” The incumbent said he came to Washington State from Idaho when he and his wife had the opportunity to work a cattle ranch in Colville. He also said he had worked for a firm in California where he was asked to come in and “fix stuff.” “If I could fix one of four projects it would pay for my time,” he said. Smith said that one piece of advice that Sen. Morton gave him was to not just look for ways to add laws, but also ways

SEE CANDIDATES | PG A3

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

to get rid of some of them. He said he had worked closely with Okanogan County Auditor Scott Furman, as well as a pilot program to use biomass to heat schools. “In cases where schools have gone from propane to pellets, they’ve saved 60 percent,” he said. “They are highly efficient and sustainable, while saving education dollars.” Smith said using biomass can also create jobs in the forest and for wood product manufacturers. The senator told those at the chamber that he lived under the largest wolf pack in the state. “They weren’t there when I moved there 24 years ago,” said Smith, who added that the wolves make him worry about his and other families, pets and livestock. Smith said he reached out to the cattlemen of the five counties he represents and asked for their input and in attempting to get the wolf delisted by the federal government, like it has been in Montana and Idaho. “A rancher once told me, you’ll never see the wolf, just the results,” said Smith. “Our efforts here have altered the state conversation and as a result the Feds are considering delisting.” Smith wants to see a policy that includes removal, compensation for losses and the ability to take preventative protection. Dansel, Smith’s challenger for the senate seat, is also a Republican. He said he got into politics after he was unable to get a permit to do some building on property he owned in Ferry County because

Valley Life A2 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9 Sports A10-11

Cops & Courts Obituaries

A12 A12


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 17, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Personal experience gives Massart a feel for patients’ pain

BRUCE’S MOOSE?

BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Bruce Thornton/submitted photo

Bruce Thornton photographed this moose munching on apples near his family home south of Oroville. Thornton said the moose not only was eating the apples, but trying to eat the trees as well. Moose have been reported in several locations around the north county, as well as an increase in the elk sightings in the highlands.

OVOC gears up for new season BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OMAK - The Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus’s mission is to present fine music to the people of the entire county. Its music and concerts are both produced by and for county residents, and the organization is hoping to reconnect with artistically inclined (or even just artistically appreciative) denizens of the northern half of the county. “We’re here provide opportunities for county musicians to perform, and to promote music education and appreciation,” says OVOC president Karen Schimpf. “That’s why we’re here; that’s what we’re all about.” OVOC, which has been a 501(c)3 non-profit organization since 1984, was founed in the 70s as a outreach of Wenatchee Valley College. It’s now the biggest user of the Omak Performing Arts Center, putting on four concerts and one musical theater production annually. “We started out with five concerts,” said Schimpf, who first connected with the organization in 1983 when she was invited to a concert and decided to get involved with the chorus. “We did them in the Okanogan gym. “We also didn’t start our Broadway musicals until we got into the PAC in the early 1990s.” This year’s opening OVOC orchestral performance is Sunday, Oct. 20, at the PAC (20 S. Cedar, Omak). “Our concerts are countywide,” Schimpf said. “Whoever wants to come from the county - or the region, we even have people coming down from Canada or up from Wenatchee - to play in the orchestra, can do so. Our concerts are the orchestra and chorus.” The February performance is a little different than the other three. “Second Strings is a family con-

cert,” Schimpf said. “It’s Roz Nau’s group and we are her umbrella. She brings in young people, especially through strings.” The musical has also been a big attraction over the years. Next spring’s performance will be “The Wizard of Oz.” Last year’s performance of Monty Python’s “Spamalot” was a little different than some previous offerings. “We are lucky if we make money or break even,” Schimpf said. “We took a big chance on “Spamalot” trying to attract younger people to the organization, and we did. We made just a little bit of money. And now we have some younger people active on the board and working in the organization.” Schimpf noted that there is one board position currently open. She said that one of OVOC’s big goals moving forward is to improve its funding. Prices have gone up for almost everything over the years, but ticket prices haven’t gone up since 1999. “We’re in a very poor county,” Schimpf pointed out. “Our ticket sales don’t come close to covering the cost of the concert - we lose money on each one. We have a stable donor base, but as the years go we lose more ans more through ticket sales, so we need more donations to make up for that.” To that end OVOC has been applying for grants and just last week was awarded $2,500 from

the Community Foundation of North Central Washington in support of one of its four concerts. The PAC itself separately received a $5,000 for lighting. As well as providing an opportunity for more formal artistic expression and enjoyment, OVOC also has its own costume department which runs out of the Courtyard in Omak, run by Susan Grant. “They can be for any occasion,” Schimpf said. “We have thousands of costumes and she is incredibly creative.” She added that Coleman Oil has donated storage space to the organization, where props for both OVOC and Omak High School’s drama department are stored and built. Also upcoming is a fundraiser for the OVOC that is being hosted by the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket on Oct. 25: a showing of the Rocky Horror Picture Show, with costumes and audience participation included. “OVOC is now a CCC member,” Schimpf said. “It has a little theater, lots of arts and culture promotion, and that’s what we do. So the Rocky Horror Picture Show fundraiser is a testament to that. “The service that we provide is good. There isn’t another organization that produces fine music like we do, and we do as big a variety of fine music as we can.”

Brent Baker/staff photo

Jeff Massart helping people, helping them get back to doing the things they love. I know what it’s like to be injured and not be able to do the things you want to do, whether it’s getting out of bed or playing basketball.” Massart started at NVH about five months ago after completing his graduate courses at the University of Puget Sound. He met his wife, Whitney Moser, at Eastern Washington University. “Whitney’s from here; she calls me an import,” Massart said. “She’s from here. I’ve been visiting here for about three years, so I knew what I was getting into

Services offered for homeless THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET - Okanogan Community Action will be hosting its annual afternoon of services for the homeless at the Tonasket Community Church (UCC), 24 West Fourth St., on Tuesday, Oct. 22, 1:30-4:30 p.m. Free services and items will include: • warm clothing • blankets • sleeping bags • free hair cuts • flu shots • warm meals • bagged lunches

Help will be available to help connect people with: • housing applications • basic food and cash assistance programs • educational opportunities • identification • work opportunities • help with resumes • veteran and social services • crime victim services • information on the Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare). There is a large homeless population, including seniors, veterans and teenagers in the North county and one of OCCAC’s goals in bringing their newest VISTA vol-

unteer, Jenyfer Reese, was to have her help to expand this service model throughout the county. In the past a similar Day of Service was held in Omak in January. The hope is to give folks a hand up before the winter gets too cold to come out. Community members wishing information on services and volunteer opportunities may attend whether they are homeless or not. For more information contact Jenyfer Reese at (509) 422-4041; toll free (877) 641-0101; or email Lael Duncan and laeld@occac. com.

Metal collection, Faire clean-up Get free Okanogan Family Faire camping pass TONASKET - Metal drive and e-waste collection will occur Thursday, Oct. 17, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the corner of Western Ave. and Division St. in Tonasket.

We are accepting all metals and the following e-cycle materials: TVs, computers, towers, monitors and laptops. This is the last collection until spring so gather it all up and bring it down. Green Okanogan will also be doing the recycling and clean-up at the Okanogan Family Faire (Barter Faire). If you would like to

volunteer to help with this effort, please call Mariah Cornwoman at (509) 429-6337. Six hours of volunteer time will give you a weekend camping pass to the faire. There are volunteer slots available from Thursday noon to Monday afternoon. Tickets are limited so call soon if you would like to help.

 ELECT Teresa

HUGHES North Valley Hospital District #4 - Board of Commissioners Seat 5

Restore fiscal responsibility to our hospital. Paid by Don Atchison, Tonasket

R E TA I N

Senator

John Smith STATE SENATE

ENDORSED BY: • • • •

TONASKET - It can be frustrating, working to recover from an injury and wondering if those overseeing your recovery really know what you are experiencing. Jeff Massart, North Valley Hospital’s newest physical therapist, knows from first hand experience what that’s like, maybe a little too well for his own liking. Massart, who played basketball and baseball while in high school at Seattle’s Bishop Blanchet and later played some basketball in community college, dealt with the aftermath of four herniated disks during his playing days. “I had a lot of injuries,” he said. “The big one for me is when people come in with back problems. People might think, ‘Oh, he’s just telling me these things, or he doesn’t really understand.’ But I have a great idea when it comes to back pain. And pretty much everybody experiences back pain at some point in their lives.” It actually was Massart’s personal experience with those kinds of injuries that on one hand ended his basketball career, but on another launched him into his career. “I had to start doing physical therapy in eighth grade all the way through college because of injuries,” he said. “It’s nice

(as far as not being close to a big city). “It’s great to have her family here, and I like the outdoors. I got sick of the traffic and crowds. It’s a lot more relaxed up here, which is nice.” Massart said his job is twofold, involving both recovery and maintenance. “If it’s not a specific incident, we look for what caused the injury and whether it’s long term issue, like ... how you lift things, or how you turn.” he said. “If you roll your ankle, we know exactly what’s wrong, versus just figuring it out. “Then it’s helping the body through the healing stages, and guiding the healing stages so that once the body is fully healed, it doesn’t just come back to where it was before... A huge goal is to not have to do physical therapy forever. We want to get past the injury, but then also give the tools to help keep yourself from getting that injury again.” Massart, who enjoys the outdoors, said the best way to get him talking is to ask about his job. “I like hiking, riding my inlaws’ horses when we can, fishing when I can, just enjoying the wilderness,” he said. “I’m a pretty quiet guy. But if you get me started talking about physical therapy and the human body then I can go on for days.”

NRA Dino Rossi AWB All 23 Republican State Senators

DIST 7

GOP

VOTE

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OCTOBER 17, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

POOL | FROM A1 “It’s not easy to cough up ($1.5-2.5 million),” Danison said. Mayor Patrick Plumb referred the Pool World report to the city parks committee. A town hall meeting will be scheduled for the public to attend and discuss what and how to pursue the project.

AD VALOREM DECISION DELAYED The council opted to delay a decision on the 2014 ad valorem tax until the next scheduled council meeting. Last year the city council raised Tonasket’s ad valorem propety tax for the first time in three years, raising it two percent. By law the tax can be raised one percent per year, but if the tax is not raised, past years can be “banked” for future consideration. “At this point I put in the one percent,” said city clerk Alice Attwood. “The total received for 2013 in property taxes was $118,399. So the most we can collect in 2014 on top of that $1183.” “Last year we were able to increase it two percent because we had ‘banked capacity,’” Plumb said. “Which is why I wanted to discuss this first, because we didn’t use all of that.” Attwood said she would research how much banked capacity was still available should the council choose to pursue a

Just giving credit where it’s due BY R. CLAY WARNSTAFF CHIEF - OROVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT

Hello again, I just wanted to clarify some recent news that came out concerning the capture of a robbery suspect. In the local papers it was said that I captured the suspect, which is partially true but I would like to share the credit with fellow Oroville Police Officer Jacob Herrick who in fact initiated the traffic stop on the suspects vehicle and consequently found the suspect in the vehicle. I would also like to mention that without the information from Detective Eric Mudgett of the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Department, we would not have known where to look for the suspect. We certainly like to be

CANDIDATES | FROM A1 bigger hike. “I don’t have a new property valuation yet,” Attwood added. “I’m waiting to get a new figure on that since we had the (Mill Drive/Bonaparte Creek) annexation that should be changing soon.” Attwood also said that, separately, sales tax collection was on par with last year. “We collected $252,000 in 2012,” she said. “At this point as of the end of September we’d received $179,000, so we’re at about 72 percent (of the 2012 year-end total).”

PERMIT DENIED The council denied the application for a peddler’s permit to sell wood inside the city limits due to the applicant not completing the paperwork properly. The issue was that a portion of the application left incomplete involved the applicant’s criminal history. Council member Claire Jeffko, who said that as a landlord she has rejected potential tenants based on their refusal to answer that question, was disturbed by the fact that the applicant had started to complete that portion of the form before opting not to answer the question. “Clearly... they crossed it out, thought better of it,” she said. “It bothers me, the significance

FROM THE CHIEF’S DESK recognized for our efforts but, I like to make sure that the people that deserve the credit get the recognition that they deserve. The next subject I have is one that touches a lot of people in our community and that is the treatment of animals. I wanted to bring to light that there is a new animal rescue organization that is giving much needed help to our equine community. The organization is called The Nourishing Hand which has set up a rescue service for horses that owners have not been able to afford to feed or who have just plain neglected to take care of horses in their care.

of this question that he didn’t answer.” Rejected applicants for peddlers permits may re-apply after six months.

COP CAR SHUFFLE In addition purchasing a good-condition used vehicle to replenish the Tonasket Police Department’s aging fleet, Chief Rob Burks said that the department will also receive a vehicle from the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Department. The 2003 Ford Crown Victoria has 97,000 miles on it but comes fully equipped. “We’re also getting a free paint job out of it too,” Burks said. “I’ll take it for a test drive to make sure the kinks are worked out.” Two of the current vehicles will be designated for surplus, with a third to be exchanged for the city’s airport courtesy car. SCHEDULE CHANGES The Tuesday, Oct. 22, city council meeting will be cancelled due to a scheduling conflict with a conference in Wenatchee. A budget workshop scheduled for that evening has been rescheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 5. Also, a workshop on the comprehensive plan, also scheduled for Oct. 22, was moved to Nov. 12, prior to the regular council meeting that evening. In talking with Deputy Dave Yarnell who is the County Sherriff ’s animal control officer he has advised me that the Nourishing Hand is in need of donations of hay for this upcoming winter season. In talking with Deputy Yarnell, he stated that the hay need not be from this years cuttings but may be from years past as long as it is usable. I know that hay is a valued commodity and brings a rather high price but if you should have some that your are not going to feed this year or maybe want to make a donation of a sack of feed this may be an opportunity for you to help this organization. Contact information for the Nourishing Hand is Janice Andrew at (509) 556-2753. The Nourishing Hand is a non-profit organization and any donations that you make are tax deductible. Thanks.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Brian Dansel speaks with local businessman and former Okanogan County Commissioner Scott Furman at last Thursday’s Oroville Chamber of Commerce meeting. the property was near a 10 foot wide stream. “I went to get a building permit and they said ‘no’ because it was possible salmon habitat, even though it never had salmon in it before,” said Dansel. “I asked for a variance and they said ‘no’ and I went to the county commissioners and they said they didn’t have the ability to help me.” Dansel said he studied the issue and eventually sold off his property at a considerable loss of money. That inspired him to run for Ferry County Commissioner, a seat that he won. He said one of his goals is to stop the state from pushing unfunded mandates on the county. “My opponent voted no on the budget, so I can not see how he can take credit for helping to form the same budget agreement,” said Dansel. “I actually got the endorsement of the people who are actually affected by the wolf pack,” he said. Like Smith, Dansel said he is a big supporter of Kinross Gold, which has operations in Ferry and Okanogan County. “I support less regulation and more streamlining of the permitting process,” Dansel said. “I didn’t ask Kinross for any money, but I guarantee I have 90 percent of those that work for Kinross.”

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Senator Scott Smith shares his vision with the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. And as far as Affordable Care Act goes, Dansel said, “if you don’t like Obamacare, then come up with a better idea.” Dansel describes himself as a “working class guy.” “I don’t have the political connections my opponent has... not in with the good ol’ boys. “I’m, not their guy, I don’t want lobby-

ists coming to my office, I want constituents.” The candidate concluded, “Our best investment is our kids and I want to keep them here. “Me, I’m going to get myself two terms if I get elected and then get out. I’m going to go back to Republic and I’m going to die in Republic.”

LOCAL HEALTH CARE. LOCAL HEALTH PLAN. INTRODUCING AN EXCITING NEW PARTNERSHIP! The physicians of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center are now partners with Health Alliance to bring you health care and health coverage. We have a lot in common—intense focus on quality and service, led by doctors and here to stay.

Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

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• #1 Private HMO/POS Health Plan in Illinois • Washington State 2011 Corporation for and Iowa* Communities recognition for making community • #1 Medicare Advantage PPO Plan in Illinois** involvement a priority. • 4.5 out of 5 stars from the Centers for Medicare & • Inpatient rehab center’s CARF distinction, Medicaid Services for HMO and PPO plans*** representing the highest standard of clinical quality. • Commission on Cancer accreditation, to ensure a high-quality, comprehensive cancer treatment program.

WE HAVE PEOPLE FOR THAT Want to Know More?

Give us a call at 1-509-662-0736 or stop by for a visit and a cup of coffee. Our home is your home at 316 Fifth St., just down Chelan Avenue from Wenatchee Valley Medical Center.

HAheretostay.org * Based on NCQA’s Private Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2012-2013. Health Alliance Medical Plans ranks 35th nationally for HMO/POS. ** Based on NCQA’s Medicare Advantage Plan Rankings, 2012-2013. Health Alliance Medicare ranks 32nd nationally for PPO. *** Medicare evaluates plans based on a 5-star rating system. Star Ratings are calculated each year and may change from one year to the next.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 17, 2013

Don’t forget, October is

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month We have all been touched in some way or know someone who has been affected by breast cancer. Because of this, it is important to offer support to those in every stage of this disease as well as those who are beating the odds and now stand as survivors.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) shares the following statistics:

    

1 in 8 women will get breast cancer. Every 3 minutes an American is diagnosed with breast cancer Breast cancer is the leading cause of death for women 35-50. With diagnosis, the 5 year survival rate is over 90%. Every 12 minutes a woman dies from breast cancer; many because breast cancer was not detected in time..

WHY WAIT? SET A DATE.

Women ages 40-65 should get annual mammograms because breast cancer incidence increases with age. 8 TIPS FOR A GOOD MAMMOGRAM by the ACS: 1. Facilities that meet the highest standards of safety and quality for mammography have an FDA certificate. 2. Use a facility that benefits from the experience of doing many mammograms. 3. If you are satisfied with the quality of the facility, use the same faculty annually so that the mammograms can be compared from year to year. 4. If you change facilities, ask for your old mammograms so they can be compared with the new ones. 5. If you have sensitive breasts, have mammograms at a time of the month when your breasts are less tender, such as after your period. Avoid the week before your period. 6. Avoid underarm deodorant or cream as they may interfere with the quality of the exam. 7. Bring a list of places and dates for previous mammograms biopsies or other breast treatments you’ve had before. 8. If you do not hear from your provider in 10 days from the date of your mammogram, call them for results. Do not assume that hearing nothing is equal to a negative mammogram.

• Performing Mammograms 5 days a week in October (Monday-Friday). • Our Imaging Center has the leading technology in Digital Mammography. • Get your mammo before October 31st and you will be entered into a drawing for 1 of 3 prize baskets! To schedule your appointment call 509-486-3124 North Valley Hospital 203 S. Western Ave. Tonasket www.nvhospital.org

Awareness and knowledge are your friends when fighting breast cancer

Don’t become a statistic. Start annual mammograms at age 40.

It only takes a few moments of your time–moments that could save your life. Our experienced staff is dedicated to creating an environment where patients will receive the highest technical skill coupled with excellent customer service.

To schedule your annual mammogram or for more information, call us at the following locations. Omak Clinic

Tonasket Clinic

Oroville Clinic

Brewster Clinic

916 Koala Dr. Omak, WA 98841

17 S. Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855

1617 Main St. Oroville, WA 98844

418 W. Main St. Brewster, WA 98812

509.826.1800

509.486.2174

509.476.3631

509.689.8900

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

An affiliation between Central Washington Hospital & Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

confluencehealth.org

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W

hen diagnosed with breast cancer, women are often filled with questions. What is the survival rate? Can breast cancer spread to other parts of my body? What does this mean for my family? Such questions are common, and it’s perfectly alright and even beneficial for women diagnosed with breast cancer to ask as many questions as possible to better understand the disease. Though each individual’s experience with breast cancer is unique, upon diagnosis the doctor will determine which stage that cancer is in. Determining the stage of the cancer is based on: * the size of the cancer * if the cancer is invasive or noninvasive * whether or not the cancer is in the lymph nodes * if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body Upon diagnosis, the doctor will also discuss if the cancer is local, regional or distant. Local means the cancer is confined to the breast, while regional means the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, most likely those in the armpit. If the doctor says the cancer is distant, that means it has been found in other parts of the body. If the tumors involve the breast skin, the underlying chest structures, have changed the breast’s shape, and enlarged the lymph nodes, the doctor will then likely determine the cancer is locally advanced or regionally advanced. Survival rates have increased dramatically over the last 30 years. Much of this is thanks to research, but increased awareness of breast cancer has also played a role in the significantly improved survival rates. Part of that awareness includes taking steps as a young woman to reduce risk for breast cancer. Steps such as adopting a healthier diet, learning about family history with breast cancer and undergoing routine checkups can greatly improve a woman’s chances of beating breast cancer. Survival rates depend on a host of factors, including the stage of the cancer at diagnosis. Women who understand the stages of breast cancer and the role they play in surviving the disease might be more inclined to take steps that reduce their risk. * Stage 0: Though the best breast cancer diagnosis is no diagnosis at all, women diagnosed with stage 0 breast cancer can breathe somewhat easy. Stage 0 means the cancer is noninvasive and there is no evidence that the cancer cells or the noncancerous abnormal cells have spread beyond the part of the breast where they originated. * Stage I: A stage 1 diagnosis means the cancer is invasive, and the cancer cells are beginning to invade normal cells around the breast tissue. However, a stage 1 diagnosis means the lymph nodes have not been invaded. * Stage II: Stage II is divided into the

subcategories of IIA or IIB. A stage IIA diagnosis can mean any of the following: - no tumor has been found in the breast, but cancer cells are in the lymph nodes under the arm; or - the tumor in the breast is 2 cm or smaller and has spread to the lymph nodes under the arm; or - the tumor in the breast is between 2 to 5 cm but has not spread to the lymph nodes under the arm. A stage IIB diagnosis means the cancer is invasive and: - the tumor is between 2 to 5 cm and has spread to the lymph nodes under the arm; or - the tumor is larger than 5 cm but has not spread to the lymph nodes under the arm * Stage III: Similar to stage II, a stage III diagnosis will be divided into subcategories. But stage III breast cancer will be diagnosed as IIIA, IIIB or IIIC. In stage IIIA breast cancer: - no tumor is found, but cancer has been found in the lymph nodes under the arm; these lymph nodes will be clumped together or sticking to other structures or the cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone; or - the cancer is any size and has to spread to the lymph nodes under the arm, which are clumped together and sticking to other structures A stage IIIB diagnosis means: - the cancer may be any size and has spread to the skin of breast and/or the chest wall; and - the cancer may have spread to the lymph nodes under the arm, where they will be clumped together or sticking to other structures; or the cancer may have spread to the lymph nodes near the breastbone. Symptoms of stage IIIB breast cancer can include reddening of a significant portion of the breast skin, swelling of the breast and a warm feeling at the touch. A stage IIIC diagnosis means: - there may be no sign of cancer in the breast - if the there is a tumor, it can be any size and may have spread to the chest wall and/or the skin of the breast; and - the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes above or below the collarbone; and - the cancer may have spread to the lymph nodes under the arm or near the breastbone. * Stage IV: A stage IV diagnosis means the cancer has spread beyond the breast and local lymph nodes to other organs of the body. This can include the skin, bones, liver, lungs, distant lymph nodes, or even the brain. A stage IV diagnosis might be a recurrence of a previous breast cancer, but it’s also possible to get a stage IV diagnosis at first diagnosis. More information is available at www.nationalbreastcancer.org. Visit www.nationalbreastcancer.org

Early detection, through self-exams and mammograms, is your best chance in overcoming the disease. Do yourself and those you love a favor. Make an appointment with your doctor to have a mammogram and find out what you can do to decrease your risk factors.


OCTOBER 17, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ‘Obamacare’ not right, not good for country

Bruce Thornton/submitted photo

‘Bullwinkle” is so big he can’t really hide himself in an orchard located between Oroville and Ellisforde. The moose has been spotted eating apples as well as crossing the highway. Be careful: it’s that time of year when wildlife, especially deer, like the proverbial chicken are crossing the road.

Watch out for the local wildlife

Imagine my surprise when I headed out toward Wenatchee a week ago today and nearly ran into the moose, or one that looked a lot like the one above. It was still nearly pitch dark just before 6 a.m. when I encountered said animal in the northbound lane as I passed by, heading southbound. A few seconds sooner and we might have both been moose meat. It was so dark out I could hardly believe my eyes as I continued on for a doctor’s appointment. I did a mental double check in my mind – really long legs, longer than a horse – yep... big body, big, big like one of the Budweiser horses, yep.... Bullwinkle-type antlers, not deer or elk – yep. Well, I was still trying to rectify in my mind what I saw when I pulled up for my appointment with a few minutes to spare. Moose don’t cross our highway; this isn’t Maine or something. Out of I wish I had had the time to stop and chase My Mind after it with my camera, but it was too dark and Gary A. DeVon I was going to cut my appointment too close to not venture on. Fortunately, that same day Bruce Thornton captured several images of the moose feasting in the nearby orchard. The animal was not only eating the apples, but also trying to eat the trees, according to Thornton. The animal was not far from where his daughter and new son-in-law had some of their wedding photos taken recently, he said. Always look out for wildlife in Okanogan County, not only because it can be beautiful, but also can play havoc with your day, your vehicle and even your life if you hit it. Especially on a motorcycle. This time I was in the pickup – but a moose, that’s a different story then hitting a deer. Just ask those who do have them regularly crossing the road in states like Maine. Anyway, my old hunting buddy, Greg Helm, would probably be proud – I actually spotted something. Although nearly running over it with a truck probably doesn’t count.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Dear Editor: After reading the article, ACA offers new opportunities by Patty Murray, I am disappointed. The new health insurance program is not good for the country, it will put us further in debt. The best deal I can find through Washington Healthplanfinder will cost me $217 more a month than I currently pay, $369 up to $586. My wife’s cost stays about the same, except her deductible goes up to over $6,000., this is not good. I would hardly call this” important cost savings”. I do not mind paying for my wife and myself, but I do not want to pay for others, it is not right. I encourage everyone to look carefully at the ACA, or in my case, the unaffordable care act, contact your representatives, and ask them to repeal Obamacare. It is not right for the government to require/force individuals to buy insurance or fine them if they don’t. This is government control at its best. What happened to the land of the free? Michael Sterling Tonasket

They are our biggest cheerleaders Dear Editor, As a coach of the Tonasket middle school volleyball team, I want to extend a heartfelt “thank you” to a set of parents who have been ardent supporters all season: Craig and Sharon Loftus of The Fathers Ranch. These parents, though they homeschool their daughter, attend every volleyball match and support every single young woman on the team. Craig and Sharon are our biggest cheerleaders. They support the players, coaches and bus drivers, going so far as bringing us Subway sandwiches, pizzas, and treats for our bus trips. To top it off, they have blessed our team with their daughter who is an athletic, kind, coachable team player. Craig and Sharon’s involvement extends far beyond the volleyball team. They support every sport, every kid, and our community as a whole. Thank you Loftus family for blessing our team and our community with your love and light. Pam Leslie Tonasket

Supporting her father, Sen. John Smith Dear Editor, I am writing this letter in support of my father, Senator John Smith. As his daughter, I was able to observe more than most this Legislative session, and I would like to express some of that here. One thing that many, on both sides of the aisle, noticed about my father was how respectful he was to other Legislators, constituents, and staff, even if they were of differing opinions. This year he was able to listen to people, without giving an inch on his small-government values and Judeo-Christian beliefs. This winter I heard him speak to thousands of young people at the March for Life on the capitol steps. He didn’t just tell them what he was going to do for the Pro-Life cause, he spoke to them of how they were the ones,

even though they were young, who where going to turn this county and state around, and how the only way to do that was to return to our founding principles. Since I was a small child, my father has instilled in me the idea that anyone can make a difference in the world around them. I saw how hard he worked to make Washington state and the 7th District a better, freer, safer place, and even though some do not recognize that, he will continue working just as hard when he goes back over to Olympia next year. My father is one of the most hard-working, intelligent, and inspiring people I have ever known. From the bottom of my heart, I would say, well done Senator and good job dad! Sincerely, Abigail Smith Colville, Washington

Smith not businessman he claims to be Dear Editor, Public records indicate that John Smith is not the successful businessman and consultant that he claims. There is an extensive history of tax warrants, seriously delinquent property taxes, debt to investors and businesses unpaid for services provided. Showing 12 businesses registered with Washington State; LLC’s, non-profits, profits, sole-proprietors, all of which are currently expired or revoked (this explains his experience with corporations and charities). His “Colville Farmers Market” expired in 2006 and the non-profit status revoked in 2007, is still running, although non-compliant with state rules and regulations and without a business license for the City of Colville. None of this information is slanderous or hearsay, it is documented. It’s time that the constituents know who they are voting into office and not vote someone in who has a blatant disregard for rules and regulations. The constituents against John Smith know his background or have had direct dealings with him and feel that he is not qualified to be making decisions that will affect the rules and regulations in which we, the constituents have to live by. Running a Christian platform, one should uphold all Christian values in every aspect of family, business and community. Ed Gann Colville, Washington

Coalition supports Dansel for state senate Dear Editor, We are a coalition of neighbors and friends, residents of Stevens County and the City of

Colville, who stood together to protect our homes, land and livelihoods from becoming an airport. We called our group, CAAAP, Coalition Against the Aladdin Airport Project. For nearly three years we kept our faces in front of the Colville City Council (some attending every meeting during that time), met monthly with our commissioners, met with our state representatives and senator, gathered petition signatures against the proposed airport and used the media outlets available to us to help keep the public informed and up to date. We worked hard to preserve and protect our private property rights and prevent the city from using eminent domain to obtain our homes/land for an airport. Our efforts paid off as the proposed airport project went to an advisory vote and was soundly defeated with 76.35 percent of Colville residents voting “NO” (23.25 percent YES). The mayor who was spearheading this proposed airport project was also defeated in his bid for re-election receiving only 25.53 percent of the votes while his opponent won with a majority vote of 74.47 percent. During this time period, we listened to many speak, some over and over and over again. One of those speakers was the now “appointed” senator, John Smith. He had aligned himself with those wishing to push this project through to fruition. “Appointed” Senator Smith did not care about our private property rights nor did he care that the use of eminent domain would take away homes from retirees, from those who had just built their homes with hopes of retiring in them someday, those who have moved here for a lifestyle change or those who currently work the land and live in the homes that have been passed down to them while hoping to continue that tradition with future generations. We have met with Mr. Brian Dansel who is running for the 7th District Senate position against “appointed” Senator John Smith. We are confident that Brian Dansel will fight for and help us all protect our private property rights. Therefore, we are giving our support and our votes to Brian Dansel in his bid to become the next elected Washington State Senator from the 7th district Thank you, Bill Depo, Pauley Depo, Barbara Hawkins, Velmer Hawkins, Regina Driggs, Ray Driggs, Jayne Evans, Jack Smith, Cecil McNinch, Edith McNinch, Glenn Vannice, Anne Vannice _________________________________ Editor’s Note: Letters of support for candidates are published on a space available basis. Next week’s newspaper, Oct. 24, is the last in which we will consider these letters. This gives one week, Oct. 31, for candidates to respond to issues that may have been brought up in a letter the previous week. G.A.D.

Shooting solution Shortly after the Newtown school massacre, I wrote on FaceBook: “The anti-2A (Second Amendment) klan seems positively orgasmic to have photos of dead kids’ faces to wrap their political bigotry in, but here’s what’s going to happen: The anti-2A fanatics will celebrate the tragedy as conclusive, slam-dunk, undeniable, case-closed, gospel proof that they’ve always been right about guns being self-animated kid-killing obscenities to be wiped from the planet yesterday. Politicians will feel immense political pressure to appear aggressively responsible in the wake of the tragedy, and most of them will be anxious to follow Rahm Emanuel’s famous dictum of never letting a crisis go politically unexploited. So they will pontificate about ‘gun control!!!,” whatever that’s supposed to mean, because they know it’s what most grieving voters want to hear right now, as it is always the cheap, easy cop-out for doing anything real about American gun violence. Business as usual. Remember, it’s not about kids. If it were, there are far more effective but politically difficult means of protecting them. No, sadly it’s all for political exploitation. But after all the drama has run its course, things will drift back to ‘normal.’ Yes, mark my words, in a shamefully brief time even this latest atrocity will become obscured by the next hype-of-the-week news bytes and politically darling fads. It’ll happen for two reasons: For one, rational people, including rational politicians (and yes, many of them are), know that gun violence is... not... “epidemic in America!!” as anti-2A hysterics bray. They know that in fact (as the Washington Post and Seattle Times have reported per the FBI), gun ownership, gun crime and gun violence have

all been going... down... in America for many years and still are. This despite (perhaps because of) the proliferation of right-to-carry laws in all but a tiny handful of backward city-states like New York, Washington DC and Chicago (which predictably suffer kill rates that rival Ciudad Juarez). The politicians will figure, why risk a proven bloody political loss to the NRA (and those 80,000,000 lawful gun owners on the right and left) for a grossly exaggerated gun problem that’s fixing itself regardless? The second reason all those young faces will fade away is that the public has no appetite to take the difficult measures necessary to correct America’s 50 year deterioration as a national culture, of which nut mass killings are but a symptom. About half of America has no will to revoke cancerous moral relativism, economic recklessness, and endless psychobabble excuses for irresponsible behavior. This is exemplified by most of Hollywood which piously deplores America’s imaginary ‘gun culture’ while making fortunes churning out preposterous movie magnifications of the very worst of that ‘culture’.” End quote. That was then. Yet today, anguished and uninformed citizens still wring their hands and wail: “How many more children must die before we ban guns!? Why do we never do anything about it!?” There are two more reasons here as well: First, when all the hysteria and the political posturing calm down after these tragedies, most of the powers that be repeatedly and reasonably arrive at the conclusion that gunban laws won’t do any good. In fact, such bans would only open up yet another massively profitable criminal black market where there would be no registration, no permits, no type control, no traceability, no records, and no accountability, just more gang death and

rich thugs. All the while, suicides and nuts and terrorists would just carry on with black market guns. Think the drug cartels selling guns. That is why we don’t “ban guns!” for the law abiding after these tragedies. It... won’t... help. In reality, bans would just make the American gun abuse problem metastasize. Second, the anti-2A jihadis aren’t dedicated to saving kids from gun violence, despite all their sleeve-worn melodrama. Sure they love kids like the rest of us, but what they’re far more interested in is hijacking such tragedies as the Newtown school killings as a lever to validate their partisan political bigotry against the entirely lawful 2A community. Many on the political left evidently view that community as a threat to their obsessive fetish for political omni-control over everyone and all facets of society. They’re accidentally right about that threat. Yet the safety of our children cannot intelligently be morphed into partisan politics, can it? How’s that worked out so far? When NRA president Wayne LaPierre said after the Newtown massacre that “the only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is with a good guy with a gun” he was hysterically vilified by the anti-2A political bigots and their puppet media, yet ... guess who now has armed personnel in all their schools? The Newtown School District, and increasingly many others all over the country. William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. Enjoy his nonpartisan Pacific Northwest political comedy: CASCADE CHAOS, or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse (Amazon or your local bookstore). He may be contacted at williamslusher@live.com.


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 17, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Time for country to get back on track The middle of October, already. Lots of troubling “stuff” has been happening, in our country the past few weeks. Hopefully, “things” will get back on track, soon. Pinochle games at Molson Grange started last Monday. A bit earlier than in the past but folks were getting anxious, so majority rules and they decided to “let the good times roll”. Some folks we hadn’t seen since last spring when the series ended, so it was good to get back “in the groove” “It’s not the miles it’s how you live them” On returning home from Molson two deer were sighted in Myrtle Woods yard, which is across the street from us. That is the second time we’ve had that pleasure. A big moose was seen at the John Lawson residence. It seems more and

more wildlife is being seen in the valley. Surprise visits are usually great and the one that I had with Deanna (Jennings) Fuller, certainly falls into that category. Like the rest of us, as we reach a certain age, the past becomes more important than it did when we were young. Knowing that I came from Missouri, as did her dad and other family members we were putting together memories from the past. What a great way to spend a few hours. Deanna is a graduate of Oroville High School and classmate of our daughter, who unfortunately was out of town during our “visit down memory lane.” “What’s so funny about getting old?” Some examples: Wearing two different shoes and thinking they are a matching pair. Going to the doctor’s office at 1:30 p.m. and your appointment is at 4 p.m. Buying a gift for a daughter in Sept.

when her birthday was in June, but I are so good, as the juice runs down your knew one of them had a birthday, I just chin. Some like them dried, but fresh is had the wrong one best, or so it seems to me. Sometimes I believe the Did you remember to pick country is going totally up your “Catholic pies” on “nuts.” A 12-year-old girl Oct. 14? They usually have stayed out after her curfew to chase me down, but not and came home after drinkthis year. ing alcohol. Her mother gave Dick Robbins, wished to her a spanking with a wooden not have a formal funeral, spoon and the mom is being it was nice to have his famtried for child abuse. I guess ily members on hand at the I would have been locked up United Methodist Church, forever. You needn’t beat a THIS & THAT last Sunday. Those present child but when you introduce shared an excellent brunch, Joyce Emry them to a little wooden spoon conveyed condolences at an early age, just mentionand many memories were ing it usually does the trick. renewed while looking at the family How many have wondered whose van photo display, that took us “through the is parked across the street in the Senior years” with Dick and Pat. Center parking lot? When the old gent May you never forget what is worth asked if he could park it there we didn’t remembering, or ever remember what is know he meant “forever.” best forgotten. Here goes the country again about What a beautiful fall day was last sports team names, this time the Sunday. Still “shirtsleeve” weather when “Redskins.” To me it doesn’t seem like just the night before, snow could be seen a big deal, but I guess it does to some. If falling on a nearby mountain. I get called a “hillbilly” it doesn’t bother It was good to have Bob and Margaret me, because I am one and I’m proud o it. Hirst at church last Sunday. It has been a We’ve had some oriental pears… they long confinement for them, during Bob’s

New Grange roof now a reality

HILLTOP COMMENTS

By Marianne Knight

The Grange will be warm and toasty for the events that will be happening in the next few weeks. BINGO will be the next event on Friday, Oct. 18 at 6 p.m. This is a family event so bring your family and join in the fun. The Harvest Dinner on Oct. 26 will be the big event starting at 6:30 p.m. This is always a wonderful dinner. Bring the family, relatives, friends and neighbors and your favorite dish. The Knob Hill Club of Chesaw will have their October potluck meeting on Oct. 23 at noon. All are welcome.

Highlands Correspondent

With the generosity of the Grange Members, private donations, the fundraisers, the Ladies Auxillary and Kinross, the Grange has reached it’s goal and the “New Roof” is now a reality. Thank you all. Our Hilltop was a busy place this last week especially on Sunday at the Grange Hall in Molson with 22 folks cutting wood for the winter. As it happened they figure they have enough wood cut for the next two years. Thank you to all that helped.

Saddened by loss of Jack Gavin

TONASKET EAGLES

Submitted by Sue Wisener

We will be having our Annual Halloween Costume Party, it is a pot luck, so bring your favorite dish . Judging for costumes will be around 10 p.m. and Karaoke with Evica McKinney will start at 9 p.m. Come early stay late and have lots of fun. Don’t feel like cooking breakfast well come to the Eagles from 9 a.m.-11 a.m., we will fix you one of the best breakfasts you’ve ever had. Lots of items to choose from and the price is right. There is a new juke box in house your favorite tones (you need to hear it to believe it).

Tonasket Eagles #3002

Submitted photo

Jeremiah Loftus with Sensei Terry Cariker

Lofthus earns Tae Kwon Do black belt Submitted by Craig Lofthus

TONASKET - Some things in life are given to you right from the beginning: your name, your family, and your heritage for example. Other things in life must be earned. On Saturday, Sept. 21, after 10 years of hard work and study under Sensei Terry Cariker, Jeremiah Lofthus was awarded his Tae Kwon Do black belt from Cariker Academy of Self Defense, which is a branch of Okanogan Valley Martial Arts.

Taking a tip from the squirrels and chipmunks SUBMITTED By Suzanne Dailey Howard Tonasket Farmer’s Market

Have you noticed squirrels and chipmunks scurrying about of late, searching for seeds and nuts to cache for winter? We should take a tip from them. Even though the autumn harvest is abundant, it doesn’t last. Neither does the Tonasket Farmers’ Market season; the final market day is set for Thursday Oct. 31, when at 6 p.m. the market goes into winter hibernation until next May. Take advantage of the remaining Thursdays this month to stockpile your winter supplies of produce and crafts. Winter squash is in abundance right now. Leaping Sheep Farms is among the many vendors offering a great selection, including our favorite variety, delicata. Squash will keep for months in a cool, dry environment. Potatoes, carrots, beets, cabbage, and apples are good keepers, too. We have the advantage of being able to use shopping bags and therefore don’t have to stuff our winter cache into chipmunk cheeks to carry it home!

Jeremiah’s accumulative test included nine katas, 14 selfdefense one-steps, weapons, floor drills, board breaking, brick breaking as well as performing a black belt kata that he was required to create. “If youíre looking for a quick way to get a black belt to show off, then this isnít the school for you,” Jeremiah said. “But if youíre looking for practical, real life instruction for self defense and personal discipline, then I would highly recommend it. One of the most rewarding aspects of Okanogan Valley Martial Arts is

TONASKET MARKET REPORT If you are looking to squirrel away nuts, you are in luck. Two new market vendors, mother and daughter team of Mary Eiffert and Donna Alba are selling shelled walnuts in decorative canning jars. While this duo is new to Tonasket, they have many years of market experience in Twisp. They also offer homemade baked goods. Dare I say...Christmas is coming! If you’ve had your eye on crocheted items or uniquely crafted jewelry for those on your list, now is the time to buy and squirrel away for the holiday gift-

progressing through the 11 different levels knowing that at the end of the road, a ranking of black belt awaits.” Cariker Academy of SelfDefense continues to hold Tae Kwon Do classes every Monday and Thursday from 5:30-6:30 p.m. for kids and 6:30-8:00 p.m. for adults. The school can be reached at (509) 486-2024. Terry Cariker has been involved with martial arts for over 50 years and has owned and operated Okanogan Valley Martial Arts since 1985.

giving season. Check out Jude “the dog treat” lady’s selection of crocheted bags and hats in sure to please colors. Tonasket Farmers’ Market Association has been preparing for winter, too. The fall membership meeting was held at the Community Cultural Center on October 6. After enjoying a hearty soup dinner, important topics were discussed, such as market opening and closing times, rules, and suggestions to improve next year’s market season. Election of board members occurred, with Wayne Verbeck, Val Welles, Mark Overton, and Tanya Palomares elected to a two year term. Alternate is Morningstar and Matt Welles, Clare Paris, and Jack Murray have a tear remaining on their term. Margie Miller was soundly congratulated for another successful year serving as market manager.

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time of health issues. “Age is mind over matter. If you don’t mind it doesn’t matter.” I thought Bob Hope said that, and he did but my little book of “stuff” says that is a Mark Twain quote. Another thing Mark Twain said is this, “When I was 14, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be 21, I was astonished by how much he had learned in seven years”. Last Saturday evening a spaghetti dinner was enjoyed at the Oroville Senior Center, hosted by Leann Hairston, using her dad’s (Ralph Patterson’s) famous spaghetti sauce. Proceeds from the dinner will go to the “coffers” at the Center. Like getting the front door fixed, again. Swift winds have damaged the door multiple times, making it necessary to use the back entrance. Thanks to Leann and her crew, especially the “little waitresses” who kept your cup full, whether you needed it or not. I suspect apple harvest is winding down and will soon be finished for another season. Don’t let your age get you down. It’s too hard to get back up again.

Hope everyone is being safe while hunting for deer and staying warm in the mornings. A big thanks to the Trustees for re-striping our parking lot. Looks great and now you can see where you are parking. The bake sale was a great success thanks to all that brought their goodies. Everyone who visits the beer garden will be a little warmer because all proceeds are going towards propane for the heater.

Spaghetti fundraiser a big success

OROVILLE SENIORS

By Dolly Engelbretson

judging will be held Thursday, Oct. 31. This is always a fun Thanks to LeaAnn Hairston event so put on your thinking and her crew of helpers, our caps and come up with a costume Spaghetti Dinner fund raiser that will win. Doris Hughes has was a success: daughter Sarah, won this event the last two or Lisa Bordwell, John and Shelby three years. You may even win Mason, Stacy and Sierra Moser a prize. Plans are already being made and Nancy Gilbertson. They did for our annual Christmas Bazaar a great job. Joy and John Lawson and their which is to be held here at the Canadian Friends will be back Center on Saturday, Dec. 7. playing their music here at the Boots Emry is in charge this year Center on Friday, Oct. 18 and and she says she already has four every third Friday of the month table reserved. Pinochle Scores for Saturday, until further notice. We always Oct. 12: BettyMake Steg won enjoy Why their toe-tapping not start amusic. new holiday tradition? this the thedoor prize for andaalso tiedcollege with Neoma Justtime a of reminder year thatthat you the help save child’s Halloween Party and costume Vandiver for the most pinochles; education.

The first Christmas Bazaar will be in Chesaw on Nov. 2 starting at 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Lots of good stuff. Books, jewelry, dried flowers, hand made items. The Country Kitchen will be open for food, drinks,and lots, lots more. There will also be baked goods. Vendors are welcome, $10 will get you a table. Call Marianne at (509) 485 2103. See you there. Shhhh, it’s a Suprise 60th Anniversary Open House for Jean and Ottie Hennig on Oct. 19 from noon to 4 p.m. at their home near Sidley Lake. If you happen to see them before then, please don’t spill the beans. Happy birthday wishes go out to two very special ladies - on Oct. 7 for Ruth Leslie and on Oct. 22 Nita myrick will celebrate hers. ‘Til next week. There is still time to come in and get some free warm wear from Bonniejean Thursdays starting at 9 a.m. If you have brought a dish for a event, your dish is washed and awaiting your pick-up. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Gladys Fifer, second place Nellie Paulson, Low score for the day Dale Byers and last Pinochle went to Penny Smith and Dave Russel. We are saddened by the loss of Brother Jack Gavin, he had been a member of the Tonasket Eagles since 1971. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

Evelyn Dull was high scoring lady and Ed Craig again was the high scoring man. He says it is just luck! More next time.

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OCTOBER 17, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life Annual coat drive

COMMUNITY CALENDAR OKANOGAN - Okanogan County Public Health is offering adult flu shots on Thursday, Oct, 17 from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost is $20 No appointment is necessary. For more information call (509) 422-7140.

War Story,” on Saturday, Oct. 26, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at Corner Shelf New and Used Books, 6 Main Street, Omak. Brownbridge will be donating all proceeds from book sold at the signing to the U. S. Armed Forces Legacy Park in Tonasket.

Breast Cancer Tonasket Farmers’ Awareness Night Market (Football Edition) TONASKET - Tonasket Farmers Market is held on Thursdays, from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. The next market is Thursday, Oct. 17. Come join us for some of the best in local produce, crafts, personal care products, homegrown music and farmstead cheeses. Whether you make a quick spin to pick up supper ingredients or hang out for hours, you’re sure to get what you want. For more info call (509) 486-1199.

OROVILLE - OHS Senior Ashley Marcolin would like to invite you to attend the Oroville Hornets football game on Saturday Oct. 25 where she will hosting a Breast Cancer Awareness Night as part of her senior project. Kick off will be at 7 p.m. At the game there will be brochures on Breast Cancer as well as giveaways. Please help support Breast Cancer and your Oroville Hornets by wearing your pink!

Ruby Rust to Rocky Horror Perform at Winery OVOC Fundraiser OROVILLE - The band, Ruby Rust, featuring vocals and instrumentals, will perform at Esther Bricques Winery Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013. Doors open at 6 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Family Bingo at Molson MOLSON - Family bingo at Molson Grange on Friday, Oct 18 at 6 p.m. Everyone is welcome come and have a good time, bring a snack to share at break time.

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The Oroville Farmers’ Market is Saturday, Oct. 19, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Oroville Community Library located at 1276 Main St. Purchase art, crafts, plant starts, fresh baked goods and tamales plus the best produce on the planet. The Oroville Farmers’ Market continues each Saturday through Oct. 26 and new vendors are welcome. Call (509) 476-2662 for more information.

County Parks & Rec Meeting OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Parks and Recreation Board is requesting a Special Board Meeting at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds, in the Annex, on Wednesday, Oct. 23 at 7 p.m. The public is welcome to attend.

NVH Surgical Center Open House TONASKET - The public is invited to visit the Open House for North Valley Hospital’s new surgical center on Friday, Oct. 25, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Take a tour; enjoy refreshments; learn about NVH surgical services. Those with questions may contact Terri Orford at (509) 486-3163 or busdev@nvhospital.org.

Matsura Centennial Book Social OMAK - Okanogan County Historical Society is holding a Matsura centennial book social Friday, Oct. 25 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at RockWall Cellars, 110 Nichols Rd., Omak. Hors d’oeuvres will be provided by Okanogan County Historical Society. There will be a no host wine bar. Those who have preordered the coffee table book will be able to make the final payment and pick up their book at this event. This is a special handmade limited edition printing; however, there are a few books still available. If you know anyone who didn’t reserve in advance, but may be interested, please invite them to the social. If you are unable to attend the event, but are interested in purchasing one of the books, please contact OCHS at (509) 4224272 or e-mail: ochs@ncidata.com to make arrangements.

Book signing to benefit Legacy Park Robert Brownbridge will be signing his book, “Into War With an Empty Gun: A Korean

TONASKET - There will be a Rocky Horror Picture Show fundraiser for the Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Choir on Friday, Oct. 25. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the movie starts at 7 p.m. at the Tonasket CCC. There will be concessions, costume prizes and a silent auction. There will be “Time Warp Bags” available for audience participation for $5 and tickets are $10 each or two for $15.

Slow Food GMO Info & Movie Night TONASKET - A GMO Information Night is planned at the Community Cultural Center, 411 Western Ave., Tonasket, for Saturday, Oct. 26. The event is sponsored by Slow Food Okanogan. Information about genetically modified organisms, what foods they are in now, plans for future use, scientific facts and health risks will be available, plus information about the upcoming ballot issue in Washington State, I-522, which would require labeling of products containing GMOs. The doors will open at 6 p.m. and a movie about GMOs will be shown at 7 p.m. Snacks and baked goods will be available for sale. Attendance is free; however, donations of $5 per person will be welcome to help offset the cost of the building rental.Please call Clare Paris at (509) 486-1199 for more information.

Molson Grange Harvest Supper MOLSON _ The Molson Grange Harvest Supper and Grange Booster Night will be Saturday, Oct. 26 at 6:30 p.m. This is a potluck and the Grange is supplying the meat. Everyone is invited for this \evening of fellowship and fun, we are looking forward to a good time.

OCSRA Meeting OMAK Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association meets 11 a.m., Friday, Oct 25, at the Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala Ave, Omak. Guest speaker is Omak School District Superintendent, Dr. Erik Swanson. For more information call (509) 826-5068.

Health Care Coverage Workshop TONASKET - Statewide Health Insurance Benefit Advisors (SHIBA) will be putting on a free workshop for the public at the North Valley Hospital Board Room on Monday, Oct. 28 and Friday, Nov. 1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. They will be providing three volunteers and assistance is available on a “first come first serve basis”. Please bring a list of your medications with you to the workshop. Washington state’s SHIBA can help you: Understand your health care coverage options and rights; find affordable health

care coverage and evaluate and compare health insurance plans. They provide free, unbiased and confidential assistance with Medicare and health care choices. Their volunteer advisors are trained to give you the latest Medicare and health care coverage information.

Oroville Booster Club Auction The Oroville Booster Club’s annual auction at the American Legion Hall will be held Saturday, Nov. 2. The silent auction starts at 5 p.,m., live auction at 6:30 p.m. Lots of fun and great auction items. Snacks are provided and all are welcome. The Legion Hall is located at 314 14th Ave.

Children’s Author to Speak at Oroville School OROVILLE - Author Jack Gantos will be speaking at the Oroville Elementary School on Tuesday, Nov. 5. Gantos has written books for people of all ages, from picture books and middle grade fiction to novels for young adults and adults. His work include Hole in My Life, Joe Pigza Loses Control and Dead End in Norvelt.

Submitted by Joanne Morris Oroville Royal Neighbors

The Oroville Chapter of Royal Neighbors Of America will be holding their fifth annual Community Coat Closet at the Depot Museum on Saturday, Nov. 2 from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monetary donations as well as gently used winter jackets for adults and children can be dropped off at Sterling Bank.

BC chooses NVCS By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

True, the majority of people who register for classes are from Oroville and Tonasket. And, there would be no program without you! But, many Canadian citizens have taken our classes, as well. They shop in our town, pick up a catalog from one of our stores, and sign up for classes. Since ours is the only community education program for miles around, we

With the continued support of the community the Oroville Royal Neighbors fulfill their mission of “Neighbors Helping Neighbor.” We have a number of annual or on-going programs designed to make a difference and provide personal support to other local organizations when requested. And a correction to last

LEARNING TREE want to encourage our BC friends to participate in the classes we have to offer. I decided to visit Osoyoos businesses last week. Walking down Main Street with a bag full of class catalogs and flyers, I talked with store owners, restaurant managers and bankers. Without exception, they were delighted to place our catalogs on their counters. They asked questions, offered sugges-

week’s article about Royal Neighbors of America presenting a check to Jackie Daniels for the Child Passenger Safety Program. Oroville Ambulance Coordinator Debra Donahue and the entire ambulance crew saw the need for the program and asked Daniels to apply for a grant and implement it – it was not the city as stated. As in any organization, it takes a team of dedicated workers. We seek and welcome new members to join us in our effort. For more information please call Joanne Morris at (509) 476-3882. tions as to businesses I should visit, and most were happily reading a catalog when I left them. I was reminded that snowbirds will be arriving in December and January, just in time for winter quarter classes. You can bet I’ll bundle up and head to Osoyoos with my bag of catalogs. We thank you for your support of this valuable program. If you can’t find a catalog in the store you’re visiting, you can call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email her at community.schools@oroville.wednet.edu or at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

Food Worker Class OKANOGAN - Starting Nov 7 the Okanogan County Public Health Food Worker Class are offered every Thursday afternoon at 3:30 p.m. Okanogan County Public Health is located at 1234 South Second Ave., Okanogan, WA. Computer stations for the online Food Worker Class are available at Okanogan County Public Health Monday – Friday 7:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. For more information call (509) 422-7140.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 4762386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune. com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

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OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

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Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 17, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • October 17, 2013

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Commercial Rentals REPUBLIC 3500 SF COMMERCIAL BUILDING for lease on 2.5 Acres. 14’ and 12’ Bay Doors, 1 bath, wood and propane Heat. $700 per month plus utilities, first and last month. 2 year minimum. Highway 21 North, Republic WA. 425-822-2901.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Announcements

www.gazette-tribune.com

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

www.gazette-tribune.com ONE BEDROOM APT $650 per month. Garbage, water, sewer & electricity included. Furnished. No smoking or pets. References and credit check req. CALL SPENCE 509-429-4722.

Middle School Secretary

The Community Cultural Center is seeking a part-time

Migrant Education Program (MEP) Recruiter COUPLE SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeking to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of opportunity, humor, adventure and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at direct at 206-920-1376, toll-free at 877-290-0543 or email AndrewCorley@outlook.com You can also contact our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376.

FIRST Aid and CPR Class will be held on October 28th, 29th, & 30th, 7:00pm to 10:00pm in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow the first night. For information call Ben Hylton 509223-3412, leave message Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Migrant Education Program (MEP) Recruiter. Applicants must have an AA degree, 72 quarter or 48 semester college credits, or documentation of successfully passing the State Assessment. Position will remain open until filled To apply, applicants must complete an on-line application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed.

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Crosswords

Across 1. Honors 7. Blowgun ammo 11. Chester White’s home 14. Slight 15. “I had no ___!� 16. “MS. Found in a Bottle� writer 17. Park, for one 18. Neither good nor bad (hyphenated) 19. Sad 20. Concerned for one’s own welfare (hyphenated) 23. Jimmies

An Equal Opportunity Employer Oroville School District has the following Coaching positions available JH Boys Basketball Coach Head JH Wrestling Coach Assistant HS Girls Basketball Coach Assistant HS Softball Coach Closes October 15, 2013 Please send a letter of interest/application to the district office: 816 Juniper Oroville, WA 98844 Oroville School District is an equal opportunity Employer.

24. Bluster 25. The “O� in S.R.O. 27. Caribbean and others 28. ___ de deux 29. Herod’s kingdom in biblical times 30. Manned artificial satellite (2 wds) 34. Astern 37. “... ___ he drove out of sight� 38. Appear, with “up� 39. Follow 40. Learned good indoor puppy habits 44. Overthrow, e.g. 45. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir. 46. Units of work 50. List of restaurant selections 51. “God’s Little ___� 53. Animal catcher 54. Defensive maneuver (hyphenated) 57. Blue 58. “Iliad� warrior 59. Central and South American weasel-like mammal 60. Do-it-yourselfer’s purchase 61. ___ list (2 wds) 62. Swiss canton 63. 1969 Peace Prize grp. 64. Carbon compound 65. Rutabagas

Down 1. Understands 2. Idolize 3. ___ Island, Fla. 4. Admit

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Health General

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Found

ANSWERS

Help Wanted

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Middle School Secretary. Position will remain open until filled with a screening date of October 24. To apply, applicants must complete an on-line application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed.

For Rent 2 Bedroom House, In Town, $650. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Lakefront Apartment, $725. Darling 1 Bedroom Apt, $495. Deluxe Lakefront Home, Furnished, 3 Baths, $1595. OTHERS. Call Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

Help Wanted

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Join us and make a difference! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: Okanogan: MA-R, MA-C, LPN or CNA Full time Registered Dietitian Full time. English/Spanish bilingual preferred. Medication Assistance Program Spec. Full time. English/Spanish bilingual required. Promotor(a) 4 Per Diem positions; Okanogan & BrewsterEnglish/Spanish bilingual required Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN 2 positions. Full time

PARTIAL LISTING: * Woods CO 80 Offset Mower * 6 & 7-ft Rhino Back Blades * * 2-bottom Plow * Fresno * 3-pt Forks * Oxy-Act Set w/Cart * Craftsman Table Saw * * Honda EG2200 Generator * Craftsman 295 Welder * Craftman Tool Boxes * Honda 2600 psi Power Washer * Craftsman 3HP, 20-gal Air Compressor * Various Shop Items & Tools ** Buggy Foot Warmer * Cream Cans * Old Lard Press * Coffee Grinder * Hay Knife * old Boiler * RR Lantern * Shoe Tree * Flat Iron * old Chicken Scales w/Weights * Several Iron Wheels ** VERY NICE FURNITURE - Recliners * Loveseat * 27-in Color TV * Corner Cabinet * Glassware * Maple Dining Set, 6 Chairs * Hutch, 5-drawer, 2-door * Dressers * Nightstands * Queen Bed w/Temper-pedic sleep mattress * Spindle Leg Table, small * Elec Range * Refrig * Chest & Upright Freezers * Dryer * Craftsman Riding Lawnmower, 6-speed * Craftsman Rototiller * Toro Lawnmower **1990 26-ft Terry travel trailer, 5th Wheel, All new Flooring * Like New 2008 Can-Am Outlander 4-wheeler, 4x4 ABOVE IS A SAMPLE OF ITEMS - MUCH MORE CALL AND WE WILL MAIL, E-MAIL OR FAX YOU A COMPLETE HANDBILL- NO BUYERS PREMIUM SALES TAX WILL BE CHARGED

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC Licensed & Bonded / LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 DARYL ASMUSSEN: 486-2138 DAL DAGNON: 486-2570

Garage & Yard Sale COLLECTIBLE SALE Inside By Appointment Only Call 486-4344 - 1 Week

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

www.gazette-tribune.com

SAT., OCT. 19, 2013- 10 a.m.

***************

Beautiful nice rooster free to good home. (509)486-1682 or 429-0873

Tonasket: MA-R, MA-C, or LPN 2 per diem positions

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

967 Conconully Hwy - Approx. 9.5 miles from Omak/ Okanogan

Free

Brewster (Jay Ave.): Pharmacist Full time MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Patient Accounts Rep. Full time

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RAYMOND SMITH ESTATE AUCTION

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF OCT. 14, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310 Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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Statewides $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED SIDERS WANTED. Year-round work in Puget Sound area for successful company. Immediate work for individuals with experience, tools and equipment. Call (360) 239-0500. HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS DRIVERS -- We value our drivers as our most Important Asset!You make us successful! Top Pay/Benefits Package! CDL-A Rrequired. Join our team! Call Now 1-888-414-4467 www.gohaney.com DRIVERS -- Whether you have experience or need training, we offer unbeatable career opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 centraldrivingjobs.com GORDON TRUCKING, Inc. CDL-A Drivers Needed! A better Carrier. A better Career. Up to $1500 sign on bonus! Dedicated Fleet Option Home weekly available in some areas.. EOE. Call 7 days/week! 866-725-9669 LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices Public Notice City Of Tonasket The City Council of the City of Tonasket has canceled the regular Council meeting scheduled for October 22, 2013. The Budget Workshop Hearing that was to be held on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 during the regular Council meeting will now be held on Tuesday, November 5th, 2013 at 5:15pm for the purpose of a Budget Workshop Hearing. Anyone with special language, hearing or access needs should contact City Hall 24 hours prior to the hearing. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on October 17, 2013. #520934 PUBLIC NOTICE On January 26, 2006, K207DC was granted a license by the Federal Communications Commission to serve the public interest as a public trustee until February 1,2014. Our license will expire on February 1, 2014. We have filed an application for license renewal with the FCC. A copy ofthe application is available for public inspection during our regular business hours. It contains information concerning this station’s performance during the last seven years. Individuals who wish to advise the FCC offacts relating to our renewal application and to whether the station has operated in the public interest should file comments and petitions with the Commission by January 2, 2014. Further information concerning the Commission’s broadcast license renewal process is available at PO Box 942 Tonasket, WA. (public file address) , or may be obtained from the FCC, Washington, D.C. 20554. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2013. #517177

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OCTOBER 17, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune October 17, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

www.gazette-tribune.com

Sudoku

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 42 (Easy, rating 0.44) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

Seats  Headliners  Door Panels Convertible tops / Vinyl roof covers — Auto & Small Engine Service — We Do Tire Repair & Balance! 124 Chesaw Rd, Oroville 509-476-2611

P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Pumps

Septic Service

Got Water? — Fred Cook —

Excavation and Septic Service

Over 25 Years experience! Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

Insulation

Concrete

Thank you for your continued support!  Septic Pumping

 Septic Installation  Portable Toilets

509-422-3621 Cell: (509) 322-4777 MORGASE983JS

HOURS: Mon. - Sat., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

www.osoyoosreadimix.com

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Installed Insulation

SUPPLIERS OF:

Quality Readi-Mix Concrete, Concrete Sealers and Accessories & Aggregates! – Pumping Truck Available –

Serving Oroville, Tonasket & Area! Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 Credit Cards Accepted!

11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

&

Garage Doors  Installed

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

Storage

Subscribe

Well Drilling

Lakeside

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN VALLEY

“The Water Professionals”

STORAGE Boat, RV & More! Weatherization with lease Rent unit for project  Contractors store tools / product  Additional Business space available  

Located at: 124 Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-421-7168 lakesidestoreit@gmail.com

www.gazette-tribune.com

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington... 509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store  Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Zimmatic Pivots  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com

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Very cute, fully remodeled home right in town! New laminate flooring, new vinyl windows and fully finished basement. Located 1/2 block from tennis courts. Features 2 car detached garage, underground sprinkler system, 3bd, 1.75 bath and 1,584 sqft of living space! MLS#453753 $139,000

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1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

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LAKE AND COUNTRY

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Auto & Upholstery

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

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Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

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33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

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132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Oroville Building Supply

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509-486-2692

Civil Criminal

Attorney at Law

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Licensed & Bonded

All of your Automotive & Upholstery needs

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- 24 Hour Service -

RYAN W. GUNN

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l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

Midway Building Supply

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Sponsored by

Quality Supplies Since 1957

GUNN LAW OFFICES

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Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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– WANTED –

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Still have 3 people wanting irrigated acreage for Alfalfa production. 25 to 80 acres. Home Optional Oroville to Riverside. Price dependent on Amenities.

1422 Main St.,Oroville, WA. 98844 Ph. 509-476-3602

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HILLTOP REALTY Check out our real estate section today! OKANOGAN VALLEY

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find out what property is for sale or lease in your area and much, much more in our real estate guide!

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Don’t miss out on that dream home...

1019 Golden St, Oroville, 2bd/1 -1/4 bath- Great investment property, could be rented right away. Freshly painted, repaired, new slider, some new windows, new tub surround ready for occupancy. Chain Link full fenced yard, close to town. NWML# 496168 $88,600

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Beautiful Park Cabin located on the sandy beach steps from the water. Lounging deck, open floor plan, boat launch/ ramp and dock. 2 Lots included ONLY $225,000

Sandy & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

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ORO BEACH RV RESORT

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509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

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REALTY

www.windermere.com

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! SUN 1411 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 LAKES Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

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NOTICE The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) intends to chemically rehabilitate Spectacle Lake in Okanogan County with the aquatic pesticide rotenone during the week of October 28th through November 1st, 2013. Typically, lake rehabilitations only take one to three days to complete, however, treatments may take more time depending upon weather, equipment break-

Statement of Nondiscrimination Skyline Telecom is the recipient of Federal financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The USDA prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 7209410, or call (800) 795-3272 (voice), or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). “USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender”. The Equal Employment Opportunity Coordinator is responsible for coordinating this organization’s nondiscrimination compliance efforts and may be contacted at Skyline Telecom PO Box 609, Mount Vernon, OR 97865, (541) 932-4411. Any individual, or specific class of individuals, who feel that this organization has subjected them to discrimination may obtain further information about the statutes and regulations listed above from and/or file a written complaint with this organization; or the Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington DC 20250; or the Administrator, Rural Electrification Administration, Washington , DC 20250. Complaints may be filed within 180 days after the alleged discrimination. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 17, 2013. #520185

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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fice (509) 456-2926. These pesticides have been approved for this purpose by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington Department of Agriculture. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 17, 2013. #519569

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downs, logistical constraints, and/or water quality conditions. Rotenone is a naturally occurring and organic compound classified as a pesticide by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) due to its relative toxicity to fish. Rotenone is non-persistent in the environment and non-toxic to humans, livestock, and other warm-blooded animals at concentrations used to eradicate fish. The two formulations of rotenone that will be used during treatment include liquid and powdered. The percentage of active ingredient in each formulation is 5.0% for liquid and ranges from 6.0-8.0% for powdered. Target concentration of rotenone in Spectacle Lake will be less than or equal to 2.0 parts per million. Rotenone toxicity normally lasts one to four weeks, but may persist for up to eight weeks depending upon water quality conditions. The target fish species for eradication in Spectacle Lake is yellow perch, bluegill sunfish, smallmouth bass, and largemouth bass. Rainbow trout will be planted into these lakes the following spring. Notices will be posted along the shorelines, public boat launches, and other areas of normal access to the water. Please obey the following use restrictions within the posted treatment area: 1) No fish can be taken and eaten from the lake during the treatment period. 2) Do not use water to irrigate crops during the treatment period. 3) Do not use as a potable water source during treatment period. 4) Do not swim in the lake until the rotenone product is thoroughly mixed. The above list details the water use restrictions applicable to Spectacle Lake for the duration of rotenone toxicity. Rotenone toxicity will persist for 3 to 8 weeks. Assays will be done to determine lake toxicity, and water use restrictions will be removed when the lake detoxifies. For more information concerning the treatment, contact the applicator, WDFW, Region 2 Fish Program Manager, Jeff Korth at (509) 754-4624 ext 224 or District 5 Fish Biologist, Chad Jackson at (509) 754-4624 ext 250. This pesticide treatment is regulated under permit by the Washington Department of Ecology Water Quality Program, Eastern WA Regional Of-

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The State of Washington to the said Defendants, Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the17th day of October, 2013, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled courts, and answer the complaint of the Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for Plaintiff, Judith Ann De Von, at his.office below stated; and in case ofyour failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of this action is to quiet title in Plaintiff to the following described real property situated in Okanogan County, State of Washington, to-wit: Lot 18, Block 4, Plat of ORO, Washington, as per plat thereof recorded in Book”A” of Plats, page 17, records of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington. DATED this 3rd day of October, 2013. /s/ PATRICK J. MORRISSEY PATRICK J. MORRISSEY, WSBA#3045 Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 707 Okanogan, WA 98840 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 17, 24, 31, November 4, 14, 21, 2013. #

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY JUDITH ANN DE VON, Plaintiff, v. Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle Siegrist, his wife, if living, and if deceased their heirs, namely Patrick (Pat) S. Siegrist, Molly Sudre and Andy Siegrist, and all unknown heirs at law of Ellis (Bill) O. Siegrist and Myrtle and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described herein which is the subject matter of this action. Defendants. CASE NO. 13-2-004901-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

Public Notices

2

Basic Service Annual Ad Skyline Telecom is a quality telecommunications services provider that provides basic and enhanced services at reasonable rates within its service territory. Basic services are offered at the following rates: Single Party Residence Service, Monthly Service Charge, $19.50; Single Party Business Service, $25.00; Federal Subscriber Line Charge - Single Line, $6.50: Access Recovery Charge-Single Line $1.00 Touch Tone Service: Touch Tone service is provided as a part of local service rate. Toll Blocking: Available at no charge; Emergency 911 Services: Surcharges for 911 services are assessed according to government policy. Low-income individuals may be eligible for Federal and State Lifeline telephone assistance programs that include discounts from the above basic and local service charges. Basic services are offered to all consumers in the Skyline Telecom service territory at the rates, terms and conditions specified in the Company’s tariffs. If you have any questions regarding the Company’s services, please call us at (888) 7824680. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 17, 2013. #520188

Public Notices

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Public Notices

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Public Notices

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 17, 2013

SPORTS

Speiker runs state’s top 3-mile time (80th, 24:56) for the boys.

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Charles Arrigoni tries to hold on to slippery Liberty Bell quarterback Chip Jones in the fourth quarter of Friday’s 30-27 Hornet victory over the Mountain Lions. Jones escaped on this play. Jones’ elusiveness gave the Hornet defense fits, but Oroville had the last laugh in the last-second win.

One wild finish

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - The ball seemed suspended in the chill of a dark October night, the hopes and dreams of Oroville’s football season dependent on the course it had been set upon off the foot of the Hornets’ Dustin Nigg. As the ball traversed its perilous, 41-yard course, a single voice could be heard on the field - “Yes ... YES!” - and with that it slipped over the crossbar, an unforgettable exclamation point on a wild and woolly game. Well, almost. There were still four seconds remaining, but Nigg came up big again at the final gun as he picked off one last desperation pass to preserve the Hornets’ 30-27 victory over Liberty Bell on Friday, Oct. 11. Nigg insisted that kicking a game-winning field goal, even from 41 yards out with four seconds left in a tie game, was pretty much like practice. “I kept my head down and kicked it, just like practice,” he said. Though, he admitted, “It’s not quite the same. But all I did was go out there and think, ‘Like practice.’” It helped, he said, that in practice he’d nailed a few 50-yarders. Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson said it hadn’t originally been his call to kick the field goal. He had at least one more play in mind, even with just nine seconds left and no time outs remaining, but the Hornets convinced him otherwise. “The kids really wanted Dustin to kick it,” Hutchinson said. “I knew he could nail it from that distance. He hadn’t had the greatest game, but when I asked him, he said he could do it. The kids had confidence in him and I wanted him to have that opportunity. “I was concerned about keeping (Liberty Bell’s defenders) out of there. But (Luke) Kindred (the holder on the play) set up about 10-11 yards back (instead of the standard 7-8 yards). That gave him a little more time, but added an extra few yards.” Liberty Bell called a time out, as well, to try to add to the pressure. “It was the best thing that could have happened,” Hutchinson said. “He was a little over-excited, but that gave him a chance to calm down.” The field goal capped a topsyturvy final five minutes that ultimately kept the Hornets’ playoff hopes alive. The Hornets had a promising drive stifled when Kindred was stopped short of a first down on fourth-and-inches on the Liberty Bell 36 with 2:50 left. The Mountain Lions moved smartly downfield, using a long run by quarterback Chip Jones and a pair of passes to Chase Kurtz to advance as far as Oroville’s 35. But the Hornets came up big on the second completion to Kurtz, stripping the ball away, which Lane Tietje recovered with 1:57 left. “He was so excited,” Kindred said, “that he ran off the field, forgetting we needed him on offense.” The Hornets launched their

Brent Baker/staff photo

Dustin Nigg (7) boots the game-winning, 41-yard field goal Friday with four seconds remaining to defeat Liberty Bell 30-27. own two-minute drive, surprisingly and effectively all on the ground. “Luke (16 rushes 147 yards) ran really well,” Hutchinson said. “Tanner Smith (16 rushes, 94 yards) and Sean DeWitte (15 rushes 90 yards) both ran really well, especially late in the game. Our interior line blocked well, too. “I get kind of stubborn about running it and trying to dominate that way, but we were confident we had time to do it that way.” Smith ripped off consecutive runs of 15 and 11 yards and DeWitte picked up another first down with a 13-yard run with 23 seconds left. “We knew we had to march down and score,” Kindred said. “We just tried to keep our composure and wits about us and do it as a team. Our passing wasn’t going so well, so we worked the run. We had to focus on getting getting out of bounds and calling time outs, but we kept getting first downs. Resetting the chains gave us just enough time to get our next play in and get it running.” Two more plays - a pass up the middle that was dropped, and a two-yard Smith run - set the ball up for Nigg’s winning kick. That the game would turn into a thriller seemed improbable at the start as Kindred ripped the Mountain Lions for 116 yards and two touchdowns on the Hornets’ first two plays from scrimmage. Kindred hit a wide open Connolly Quick for a 39-yard touchdown pass on the first play of the second quarter for a 20-0 Oroville lead and it seemed that the rout was on. But if the Mountain Lions had been shell-shocked by the quick start, they put that aside and began to move the ball up and down the field as the elusive Jones

(23-of 34 passing, 335 yards and three touchdowns) started picking apart the Oroville defense. “We’re not like sharks when there is blood in the water,” Hutchinson said. “We tend to let up a little bit.” With as many as five receivers criss-crossing the field out of the Mountain Lions’ spread offense, Jones started picking up big chunks of yardage with short passes in the middle of the field, which also set Liberty Bell up with the occasional big play. Milo Holsten’s over-the-shoulder catch of a Jones pass in the corner of the end zone with 2:29 left in the half cut the lead to 20-7. “They were crossing their receivers and we had trouble staying in our zones,” Kindred said. “We got caught following the man instead of staying in our zone. You can bet we’ll be working on that (in practice). “I’ve been playing strong safety, which usually means I come up and make the hit. I wasn’t doing such a great job of staying in my zone. But we got it figured out.” “I was impressed with Liberty Bell’s offense,” Hutchinson said. “They surprised us with how well they passed the ball. They didn’t have any nonleague games and they didn’t have to throw in their first two games, so we didn’t really know much about their offense. “Their quarterback impressed me. He was always looking downfield, and he was really elusive. And that receiver, Holsten, impressed me too. They are an exciting team.” The Mountain Lions came out on fire in the second half, needing just three plays to move 68 yards, most of that coming on Jones’ 57 yard scoring strike to Holsten. Suddenly it was 20-14 and Liberty Bell had all the momentum.

Again, the Hornets couldn’t move the ball, but the Mountain Lions could. Jorge Lara’s 12-yard run capped an 80-yard drive that tied the score with four minutes left in the third quarter. But a key play that was long-forgotten by the time the game ended was Kindred’s break through the Liberty Bell line to block the extra point, keeping the score deadlocked at 20-20 and dictating the way the rest of the game played out. The Hornets got their ground game untracked on their next drive, with Kindred finishing off a 75-yard drive with a 12-yard run for his third touchdown of the night for a 27-20 lead. Jones and the Mountain Lions answered as he fought through Kindred’s attempted tackle for a 6-yard scoring run to re-tie it with 5:40 left and setting up the dramatic finish. The game was almost a mirror image of last season’s 28-27 victory, in which the Hornets came back from a three touchdown deficit to win. This time it was Liberty Bell with the big comeback, but Oroville managed to pull out the win again. “They’re a physical, hard-hitting team like we are,” Kindred said. “We’re pretty well-matched.” The Hornets (4-1, 2-1 Central Washington 2B League) travel to Lake Roosevelt (3-3, 0-2) this Friday, Oct. 18. But this win also sets up a huge showdown with White Swan (2-0 in league) on Oct. 25 as Oroville, the Cougars, Liberty Bell (2-1) and Kittitas (2-1) all jostle for the league’s two playoff spots. “All our games are necessary now,” Hutchinson said. “White Swan beating Kittitas was good for us because it puts us in control of our own destiny. Overall, I’m pleased that the guys were able to get it together when it counted.”

No longer unbeaten RICHLAND - It would be terribly unfair to say that Sierra Speiker “lost” her first race of the season Saturday in Richland. But for the first time she didn’t cross the finish line ahead of everyone else. Lindsay Bradley, running on her home course, finished the race in 17:48.1, with Speiker (18:05.68) taking second. McCall Skay (18:10.46) of West Valley (Spokane) was third. “She ran three tough races in eight days,” Kee said. “You just don’t recover completely from that. She was pretty ‘hot.’ But she should be bawling out her coach more than anything.” Kee said he intended the Omak race to be run at a slower pace, but that all changed once Cascade and Mullins made it a far more competitive situation. “That turned into a barnburner,” he said. “So to turn around and go to Richland, which is also a grassy (slower) course with a couple of good hills, is tough.” Speiker stayed with Bradley for the first half of the race, but once Bradley kicked it into a higher gear for the second half, Speiker wasn’t able to respond as she had in races where she’d been better-rested. But, Kee pointed out, it’s hard to say Speiker’s performance was less than outstanding, even if she herself wasn’t happy with it. “She beat her PR on that course by 50 seconds,” he said. “You expect kids at the back of the pack to make those huge improvements, not the front runners. “It’s just that her expectations are so high. I’m so proud of how hard she’s worked this year.” Four Oroville boys ran in the Division 2 race at Richland as well: Nahum Garfias (153rd, 22:50.4); Emmanuel Castrejon (155th, 23:09.09); Javier Castillo (156th, 23:10.42); and Daniel Castrejon (157th, 24:20.92). Also, Phoebe Poynter ran on Friday at Tonasket’s mini-meet, finishing 10th in 24:50.

OMAK - When coaches are checking their watches to see if they’re broken, you know you’ve run a good race. Oroville’s Sierra Speiker ran the state’s fastest 3.0 mile time this year at 17:10 while breaking her own course record by 1:40 at the Omak Invitational on Tuesday, Oct. 8. While the 5 kilometer race (about 3.1 miles) is the official distance for high school cross country, Speiker’s 3-mile time is 37 seconds faster than the second-best at that distance, 17:47 by West Valley’s McCall Skay, whom Speiker has run against twice this season. That time also translates to at 17:49 5k, which would be second only to Alexa Efraimson of Camas (17:28). “She found a whole new gear she didn’t realize she had,” said Oroville coach Doug Kee. “After her first mile (5:18) and mile 2 (11:00), the coaches thought their watches were broken.” Speiker’s closest competition came from Cascade’s outstanding freshman, Erin Mullins, who came in at 17:59.8. “(Mullins) was out for blood,” Kee said. “She stayed right with Sierra for the first half of the race, and then (Speiker) kicked it in.” Also running for the Oroville girls were Phoebe Poynter (36th, 26:51) and Kaylee Foster (46th, 32;26). The boys were led by Javier Castillo (45th, 20:21). Diego Santana fought off an injury to finish 53rd in 20:58. “Diego sprained an ankle during the first mile,” Kee said in pointing out that he was the Hornet not to PR on the day. “The kid’s tough.” Also running were Phoebe Poynter (36th, 26:51) and Kaylee Foster (46th, 32:26) for the girls and Nahum Garfias (52nd, 20:51), Emmanuel Castrejon (61st, 21:54); Daniel Castrejon (71st, 22:55); and Dakota Haney

OROVILLE

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OCTOBER 10, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A11

SPORTS

Not the same Tigers were a different team against Kodiaks

Rachel Nutt (4) blocks a Manson hit during the Hornets’ four set victory over the Trojans last Thursday. Oroville wore pink and white uniforms as part of Nadia Maldonado’s senior project to raise money for breast cancer research.

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville volleyball fights cancer, beats Manson By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Oroville’s volleyball team, clad in pink uniforms as part of team member Nadia Maldonado’s senior project that helped raise funds for breast cancer awareness, pulled out a fourset, 25-15, 24-26, 25-20, 25-19 victory over visiting Manson on Thursday, Oct. 10. The two squads split the opening two sets. Oroville broke away from an 11-11 tie to make a big run to close out the opening set. But Manson took a 16-12 lead in the second set from which the Hornets couldn’t recover. Rachelle Nutt made a number of key saves early in the third set to keep the Hornets from falling further behind, and made a big block at the net late in the set which ended in a Jessica Galvan ace.

Brittany Jewett’s strong serving late in the fourth set keyed the Hornets’ final push that clinched the victory. “Each game we have something we’re really strong in that we won’t be strong in the next game,” said Oroville coach Carrie Rise. “Like serves - they’ll be on fire with their serves, then only one of them will be, like Brittany was tonight. “But I’m liking that they are more and more instead of just two hitters, we have five hitters. Instead of just two that we can dig, we have five. It’s a much nicer spread.” The Hornets (4-5, 2-2 Central Washington 2B League) host Liberty Bell on Thursday, Oct. 17, in a key league match.

Bridgeport 3, Oroville 2 BRIDGEPORT - The Hornets played what was in many ways

their best match of the season in a five set loss to the Fillies, with Bridgeport taking the final set 15-13. “It was so fun,” Rise said. “Other than one game when they creamed us, their serves were excellent. We had awesome rallies that went on and on. The team was really scrappy. Bridgeport would think we were done if we shanked the ball, but someone would run and get it.” Rise said one of the good things about the match was that, while one or two fewer errors might have meant a victory instead of a loss, mistakes were so evenly distributed she didn’t feel any of the Hornets could individually feel responsible for that. “It’s a funny thing to say, but they all played well and the errors were spread evenly,” she said. “No one missed any more than anyone else, and that’s a good thing.”

Tigers girls win home meet By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s cross country team took advantage of a rare opportunity to measure its improvement with a second race on its home course Friday, and coach Bob Thornton was pleased with the Tigers’ results. “Everyone on the team improved their times from when we ran this same course a few weeks ago.” Each cross country course features its own unique combination of terrain and distance, so comparing times from race to race is usually an apples-to-oranges comparison. So having the chance to race the same course twice gave most of the participants that chance to measure their progress. One who was most pleased with that second chance was Duncan Forsman of Republic, who missed out on the 2.8-mile course record by just one second at the Tonasket Invitational in September. This time he left no room for doubt, running a 15:04 to break former Republic runner Nik Michel by 11 seconds. Amber Monroe had the best

Tonasket finish, taking runnerup honors in 19:55. Also running were Johnna Terris (3rd, 20:10); Jenna Valentine (6th, 22:37); Kallie Mirick (7th, 23:03); and Lea Berger (8th, 23:15). Running for the boys were Hunter Swanson (5th, 17:47); Bryden Hires (9th, 18:27); Tim Jackson (11th, 18:34); Smith Condon (12th, 18:53); Abe Podkranic (15th, 20:50); and Keeton Hoines (18th, 21:55). “Tim Jackson, despite having the flu, knew the team needed him,” Thornton said. “So he toughed it out and still ran a PR. Bryden Hires is really improving every meet.” Republic won the boys meet with 16 points, taking five of the top six spots as Swanson prevented a perfect score for the orange and black Tigers. Tonasket (52) was second and Brewster (63) third. For the girls, Tonasket was the only full team running. Republic’s Shania Graham won in 18:14. The Tigers next run at Oroville on Saturday, Oct. 19.

Tonasket Middle School results (1.4 miles): Girls - Hanna Smith (1st,

9:29); Katie Henneman (3rd, 9:51); Camille Wilson (4th, 9:57); Megan Bolich (6th, 10:30); Kaylee Bobadilla (10th, 11:05); Abby Duchow (11th, 11:33); Morgan Tyus (12th, 11:36); Noni Alley (13th, 12:06). Boys - Justin McDonald (8th, 9:50); Eric Owsley (11th, 10:36); Caeleb Hardesty (12th, 10:46).

Tigers run at Omak OMAK - Tonasket’s girls finished third while the boys took sixth at the Omak Invitational on Tuesday, Oct. 8. Amber Monroe and Johnna Terris earned top-six finishes for the Tigers. Monroe finished third overall on the 3.0-mile course with a time of 20:51.4, while Terris was sixth in 21:16. Also running were Jenna Valentine (23rd, 24:09); Lea Berger (27th, 25:07); and Kallie Mirick (34th, 26:01). Running for the boys were Hunter Swanson (24th, 18:51); Bryden Hires (37th, 19:38.8); Tim Jackson (38th, 19:44); Smith Condon (47th, 20:26.6); Abe Podkranic (51st, 20:39); and Keeton Hoines (78th, 23:33).

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Football

Caribou Trail 1A League Overall W-L Cashmere 4-0 Okanogan 3-1 Cascade 3-1 Quincy 2-2 Brewster 2-2 Chelan 2-2 Tonasket 0-4 Omak 0-4

W-L 5-1 5-1 4-2 2-4 3-3 3-3 2-4 0-6

Central WA 2B League Overall W-L White Swan 2-0 Kittitas 2-1 Liberty Bell 2-1 Oroville 2-1 Manson 1-2 Lk Roosevelt 0-2 Bridgeport 0-2

W-L 5-1 2-3 2-1 4-1 1-4 3-3 0-6

Volleyball

Caribou Trail 1A League Overall

W-L W-L-S Cascade 8-0 17-3-0 Chelan 8-0 13-0-0 Omak 6-3 6-3-0 Brewster 5-4 5-4-0 Quincy 3-5 3-6-0 Okanogan 2-6 2-6-0 Cashmere 1-7 1-7-0 Tonasket 0-8 0-10-0

CWL 2B North League Overall

W-L W-L-S Bridgeport 4-0 6-2-0 Liberty Bell 3-1 7-2-0

Oroville 2-2 4-5-0 Lk Roosevelt 1-3 2-5-0 Manson 0-4 2-6-0

Girls Soccer Caribou Trail 1A League Overall Cashmere Cascade Okanogan Tonasket Brewster Quincy Chelan Omak

Pts. W-L W-L-T 24 8-0 9-1-0 18 6-1 6-3-0 15 5-3 6-4-0 15 5-3 6-3-0 9 3-5 4-6-0 9 3-5 3-7-0 3 1-7 2-8-0 3 1-8 2-9-0

Central WA 1B/2B League Overall Pts. W-L W-L-T Bridgeport 9 3-0 7-1-0 Entiat 6 2-1 4-6-0 Liberty Bell 3 1-1 4-6-0 Oroville 3 1-3 2-6-0 Manson 0 0-2 0-6-0

Oct. 17-26

GSoc - Oroville at Eastmont “C”, 1 pm VB (JV/Var) - Quincy at Tonasket, 1/2:30 pm XC - Tonasket at Oroville Invite, 11:45 am Monday, Oct. 21 FB (JV) - Tonasket at Okanogan, 5:30 pm FB (JV) - Lake Roosevelt at Oroville, 5:30 pm Tuesday, Oct. 22 GSoc - Omak at Tonasket, 4:30 pm GSoc - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 4 pm VB (JV/Var) - Omak at Tonasket, 5/6:30 pm VB (Jv/Var) - Oroville at Waterville, 5 pm Thursday, Oct. 24 XC - Tonasket at CTL Final (Chelan) GSoc - Entiat at Oroville, 4 pm GSoc - Bridgeport at Oroville, 5/6:30 pm

Thursday, Oct. 17 GSoc - Oroville at Tonasket, 4:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 5/6:30 pm

Friday, Oct. 25 FB (Var) - Tonasket at Omak, 7 pm FB (Var) - White Swan at Oroville, 7 pm

Friday, Oct. 18 FB (Var) - Quincy at Tonasket, 7 pm FB (Var) - Oroville at Lake Roosevelt, 7 pm

Saturday, Oct. 26 GSoc - Cascade at Tonasket, 1:30 pm GSoc - Oroville at Manson, 11 am VB (JV/Var) - Cascade at Tonasket, 1/2:30 pm XC - Oroville at CWL Final (Liberty Bell), 1 pm

Saturday, Oct. 19 GSoc - Quincy at Tonasket, 1:30 pm

TONASKET - The score doesn’t always tell the story, and that was certainly the case regarding Tonasket’s 49-10 loss at Cascade on Friday, Oct. 11. While the numbers look similar to the Tigers’ 55-6 loss to Cashmere a week earlier, it was a much different game this time around. “We played with great effort,” said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. “The first 40 minutes we played really good football. We kind of fell apart the last eight.” A week earlier, the Tigers were bulldozed by Cashmere for 49 first half points and were never in the game.

This time, it was a 21-10 game at the half and the Tigers actually struck first. Michael Orozco’s 14-yard run with 5:07 left in the first quarter, along with his PAT, gave the Tigers a 7-0 lead that held until the final seconds of the quarter. That capped a six-play, 82-yard drive. It was the Tigers’ passing game, clicking as it hadn’t all season, that kept them in the game until the second half. “We made big plays on both offense and defense,” Hawkins said. “We were hit and miss with our run game, but had our best night throwing and catching.” Trevor Terris completed 8-of16 passes for 132 yards. Derek Sund caught three balls for 62 yards and Roberto Juarez had two receptions for 63 yards. Sund also booted a 38-yard field goal on the final play of the half to pull the Tigers to within 21-10 at the break. With all that went right for the

Tigers, however, Cascade (4-2, 3-1 Caribou Trail League) running back Dennis Merritt proved to be unstoppable. He rushed for 327 yards, just shy of the Kodiaks’ school record, and had touchdown runs of 64, 42 and and 52 yards. “We spent a lot of energy trying to catch him,” Hawkins said. “He is really good.” Orozco led the Tigers in rushing with 63 yards on 23 carries, with Collin Aitcheson adding 40 runs on 10 carries. Aitcheson added nine tackles and eight assists to lead the defense, with Jacob Cory adding seven tackles and four assists. The Tigers (2-4, 0-4 CTL), after four straight road games, will celebrate their literal homecoming in a number of different ways Friday, Oct. 18, against Quincy. “We are excited to be coming home,” Hawkins said. “There will be plenty of energy. We need to win plays and seize opportunities.”

on Thursday, Oct. 10, to a Chelan squad that hasn’t lost a set in a best-of-five match this year. “Although our scores were low I believe the girls played well together for the first time,” said Tonasket coach Jackie Gliddon. “Chelan is a good team, that’s a fact. My libero, Cassie Spear, dug the ball well for us and my front row blocked and hit. We simply struggled making the ball fall in their court for the final point after a long volley. “I am proud of how we played together tonight.” Clinedinst and Bello each had two kills.

The Tigers finished out the week in Leavenworth, where they fell to Cascade 25-5, 25-5, 25-8. The Kodiaks and Chelan, who have yet to play one another, are tied atop the Caribou Trail League. “Now that it is the turn of the season,” Gliddon said, “we just have to get it together. I know they can compete; they just have to believe it.” Spear and Tori King each had one kill and Bello had an ace. The Tigers (0-10, 0-8 CTL) host Quincy on Saturday, Oct. 19.

Trail League) faced a key match at Okanogan (with whom Tonasket is tied for third place in the league) on Tuesday, then return home to face Oroville on Thursday and Quincy on Saturday.

Tuesday, Oct. 8, edging Manson 1-0. The Hornets followed that up with a 3-1 loss at Entiat on Thursday. No other details were available at press time. Oroville (2-6, 1-3 CWL) is at Tonasket on Thursday and hosts Liberty Bell on Tuesday, Oct. 22.

Long road trips for Tigers By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s volleyball team spent all week on the road, losing matches at Cashmere, Chelan and Cascade. The Tigers fell 25-15, 25-13, 25-19 at Cashmere on Tuesday, Oct. 8. Jenna Davisson had two blocks and two kills; Rachael Sawyer added two kills, one block and one ace; Jenny Bello had two kills; Savannah Clinedinst added one kill; Alissa Young had one kill; and Carissa Frazier added three aces. The Tigers lost 25-4, 25-5, 25-8

Soccer squads each win one The Gazette-Tribune

TONASKET - Tonasket went 1-2 in its toughest stretch of the girls soccer season last week, losing 4-1 at league-leading Cashmere, defeating Chelan 3-1 and losing at Cascade 6-0. No other details were available at press time. The Tigers (6-3, 5-3 Caribou

Hornets split OROVILLE - Oroville picked up its first Central Washington League victory of the season on

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Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 17, 2012

Obituaries

Alvin Steinbach

Alvin A. Steinbach

Alvin A. Steinbach, 92, a resident of Moses Lake passed away Sunday, October 13, 2013 at Columbia Crest Care Center. Alvin was born on November 3, 1920 to Otto and Emilie Steinbach in Jarvis, Missouri. He served in the Army from 1945 to 1947. On May 6, 1950 Alvin married Maurine Mundt. They lived in Seattle for 14 years where Alvin worked as a carpenter doing interior finish work on new homes. In 1964 Alvin and Maurine and their four daughters moved to the family ranch in Okanogan County near Molson where they raised beef cattle, hay and grain along the Canadian border. They retired to Moses

Lake in 1993 to be close to family. Alvin was a member of Grace Lutheran Church. Alvin is survived by his loving wife of 63 years, Maurine; sister Edna Pooker of Festus, Mo., brother Lorenz Steinbach of Hillsboro, Mo; four daughters, LeAnn (Frank) Duchow of Moses Lake, Jan (Ken) Roach of Tacoma, Carol Macro of Winnetka, Calif. and Diane (Greg) Paul of Boxford, Mass. and nine grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. Alvin was preceded in death by his parents, two brothers and two sisters. Viewing will be held from noon to 7 p.m., Friday, Oct. 18, 2013 at Kayser’s Chapel with family greeting friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Graveside services will be held at 11 a.m., Saturday, October 19th at Guarding Angels Cemetery, 2595 Rd. L NE. Please sign the online guestbook or leave a note for the family at www.kayserschapel.com. Arrangements are in care of Kayser’s Chapel and Crematory.

Utigard and Kathy (Mark) Maden; brother, Roy Gavin and 12 grandchildren, many great grandchildren and one great great grandchild. Graveside services will be held on Saturday, October 19, 2013 at 1 p.m. at the Tonasket Cemetery with Pastor Leon Alden and the Tonasket American Legion, officiating. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Jack M. Gavin

Jack M. Gavin was born September 23, 1924.He passed away October 12, 2013 at age 89. Jack was a very caring person and was an avid volunteer in the community and his church. He is survived by his wife Nora; sons, Jack (Kim) Gavin, Jim (Linda) Gavin and Joe (Bonna) Gavin; step children Mike (Annie)

Mary Alfano

Mary Kathleen Alfano

Tia Lenee Meshelle, 24, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Oct. 7 to third-degree theft and two counts of forgery. Meshelle was sentenced to six months in jail, and fined $1,110.50. She also had two charges dismissed: an additional count of fraud and a second-degree possession of stolen property (access device). The crimes occurred July 5. In a separate case, Meshelle pleaded guilty Oct. 7 to POCS (methamphetamine). She was sentenced to six months in jail to run concurrently with the above sentence, and was fined $2,110.50 for the July 28 crime. Lois Elaine Perez, 52, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Oct. 8 to thirddegree retail theft (extenuating circumstances). Perez was sentenced to 24 months in prison, and fined $1,110.50. The crime occurred May 18, 2012. Leaysha Lamariah Louis, 19, Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 8 to seconddegree TMVWP. Louis was sentenced to 25 months in prison and fined $1,311.58 for the Aug. 3 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Nov. 12. Antonio Allen LaGrou, 25, Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 11 to POCS (methamphetamine). LaGrou was sentenced to 12 months and one day in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the Aug. 30 crime. Jacob R. Roth, 32, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Oct. 14 to first-degree criminal trespass and thirddegree malicious mischief. Roth was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended and credit for one day served, and fined $510.50. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Nov. 11. Roth also had a third-degree attempted theft charge dismissed. The crimes occurred Dec. 15, 2010 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Eva Lily McKinney, 24, Omak, with four counts of delivery of a controlled substance (heroin) and one count of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). The crimes allegedly occurred in Omak between January and March of 2013. The court found probable cause to charge Dustin Thomas Hayes, 25, Omak, with POCS (heroin). The crime allegedly occurred Oct. 1 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Alex Anthony Sanchez, 37, Oroville, with first-degree robbery. The crime allegedly occurred Sept. 30 at Riverside Grocery. In a separate case, the court also found probable cause to charge Sanchez with third-degree assault, unlawful imprisonment and intimidating a witness. Those crimes allegedly occurred in September in Okanogan. The court found probable cause to charge Sunnie Fae Leapaldt, 36, Omak, with second-degree burglary and first-degree trafficking in stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 7 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Larry Edward Siltman, 58, Omak, with four counts of violating a no-contact order (DV) and resisting arrest. The crimes allegedly occurred in September in Omak.

Juvenile

A 15-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Oct. 9 to fourth-degree assault (DV). The boy was sen-

tenced to 10 days in detention with credit for 10 days served, and fined $100. The boy committed the crime May 26, 2012, and had entered a stipulated order of continuance on Oct. 10, 2012. That order was revoked Oct. 9, 2013. The same boy pleaded guilty Oct. 9 to third-degree malicious mischief. He was sentenced to five days in jail with credit for five days served, and fined another $100. That plea was subject to the same stipulated order of continuance. The second crime occurred June 26.

District Court

Matthew Hunter Marquez, 28, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Marquez received a 90day suspended sentence and fined $618. David Ernest Matt, 36, Omak, guilty of second-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Matt was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,518. Jennelle Lee McCormick, 21, Tonasket, had an charge dismissed: minor intoxicated in a public place. McCormick was fined $500. Darwin J. McDonald, 25, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. McDonald received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. Anthony Ray McFarlane, 45, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. McFarlane was sentenced to 90 days with 87 days, suspended and fined $858. Jerry Ray Mears, 48, Riverside, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Mears received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $658. Jeremy Lewis Moore, 26, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Moore received a 90-day sus-

and John. She liked the warmer winters and beautiful Okanogan Valley summers with the wildlife and trees down by the river. For over 40 years she raised horses and a wide variety of livestock and pets. She made her home there among her wonderful neighbors. Mary was preceded in death by her husband Francis in 1989 and son Stephen. She is survived by her daughter Mary Francis of the Spokane Valley and son John of Oroville. Four grand children Alex J. White of El Paso TX., Jessica M. Richardson of Oroville, WA., P. J. Richardson of Wenatchee, WA., and Ricky Stembaugh of Atlanta, TX. Also four great grandchildren – Baylee Richardson of Omak, Michael Griffith Richardson of

pended sentence and fined $618. Walter Douglas Moore, 40, Omak, guilty of reckless driving. Moore received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $1,358. Rachel Dawn Morales, 32, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Morales was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $658. Rhonda Joyce Olsen, 59, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Olson received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $618. Roger Lee Owen, 59, Oroville, guilty of harassment. Owen was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 335 days suspended, and fined $658. Crispin Emanuel Ramirez, 22, Tonasket, guilty of reckless driving. Ramirez received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $1,218. He also had an obstruction charge dismissed. Zane Michael Rehmke, 19, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree theft, POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams), and MIP/C. Rehmke was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 358 days suspended, and fined $1,308. Morgan Lynn Roloff, 21, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Roloff was fined $200. Marcos Florention Rosas, 28, Omak, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief. Rosas was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined $908. He also had a violation of no-contact order charge dismissed. Alex Anthony Sanchez, 37, Oroville, guilty of two counts of thirddegree DWLS. Sanchez was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $1,316. For this week’s 911 Calls and Jail Bookings, visit us online at www. gazette-tribune.com.

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 5:30 p.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus 

          

     

  Special thanks to our concert sponsor:

www.cdfcu.com 800-572-5678

Wenatchee, Valyn Richardson of Wenatchee and Logan Chase Stembaugh of Texas. We love and miss her very much! A Rosary service will be held at Immaculate Conception Parish at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 17th. Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 19th, reception to follow and interment in Oroville Cemetery in the afternoon. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in charge of arrangements. In lieu of flowers, Mom would have appreciated a gift to a horse rescue organization. Mom was a cancer survivor and suffered from heart disease later in life, so a gift to help other would be a blessing.

Okanogan Valley

Mary Kathleen Alfano, 91, beloved mother and grandmother, passed away peacefully in her sleep Oct. 3rd, at NVH with her son at her side.

Cops & Courts Superior Court Criminal

Mary had a true pioneering spirit, love of farm life and horses. She was born November 29, 1921 to Aton Felix and Anna Marie Loser in Havre, Montan awhile he was an employee of the Great Northern Railroad. She was the only daughter of six children. Mary was a graduate of Havre High School and excelled in handwriting and accounting. Her family later moved to the Glacier Park area with her father employment but they returned to Havre and Aton died there in 1941. Her mom Anna Marie preceded her in death in 1972 and her brothers have now all gone on to their rest. Mary married Francis Peter Alfano on Aug. 14th, 1954 in Great Falls, Montana and they started their lives together with Frank serving with U.S. Customs Service along the U. S.- Canadian border. Soon they started their family. They both enjoyed horses and established Chief Mountain Arabians while at the Port of Piegan, Montana in the late 1960’s. The Alfano’s moved to our current family residence down on the river, south of Oroville in 1970. Mary enjoyed being a housewife and mother to her three children Mary, Stephen

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 17, 2013  

October 17, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 17, 2013  

October 17, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune