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ANOTHER BUSY SPORTS

AFRICAN MUSIC PIANO RECITAL

WEEK

Friday, Oct. 11, 7 p.m. at Roz Nau’s studio in Tonasket

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SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2013 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Council asked to form ‘Destination Oroville’

DESTINATION: OROVILLE AND BEYOND

GARY A. DEVON

MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Chamber of Commerce President Clyde Andrews asked the Oroville Council to consider the formation of a Destination Oroville Committee to help the city designate recipients of lodging tax money for tourism promotion. At the council’s Tuesday, Oct. 1 meeting, Andrews said that the Chamber had already formed a special Tourism Committee, but suggested Destination Oroville as an advisory committee, similar to the Okanogan County Tourism Advisory Board. OCTAB helps the county award grants of Hotel/Motel Tax money collected in the unincorporated portions of the county for tourism development. “I realize it would not be a require-

ment of the state law to form a committee, that’s for cities over 5000 in population. However, we have a unique tourism area and we’d like to give input on spending lodging taxes if that’s what you folks decide you’d want.” Andrews said the make up of the committee could include members of the three places that offer lodging where the tax is collected, the City of Oroville (at Veterans Memorial Park), the Camaray Motel and River Oakes RV Park, as well as other interested members of the community. “There are those who are resistant to seeing more tourists come through, but this is one of the cleanest industries an area can have,” said Andrews, who added his organization was leaving it in

SEE COUNCIL | PG 4

Baker wins four WNPA awards

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Above, members of the Valley Riders Motorcycle Club took over Oroville’s Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial Park campground last weekend for their Last Chance Campout. The group, which has several campouts in British Columbia each year, saves Oroville for lasts, thus the “Last Chance” moniker. Over two dozen riders and their machines, mostly BMWs, but all brands were welcome, camped Friday and Saturday, leaving for various destinations on Sunday morning. There were riders from B.C., Eastern and Western Washington, as well as one rider from Idaho. Right,Valley Riders from Canada, Idaho and Tonasket, plan out their route for a ride on Saturday. The group chose to ride from Oroville to Loomis and from Loomis on to Tonasket. After a lunch at the Kuhler they went up the Havillah Road and stopped at the Old Molson Museum for some history, before heading back to Veterans Memorial Park.

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OLYMPIA - Okanogan Valley GazetteTribune reporter/photographer Brent Baker won four awards at the annual Washington Newspaper Publishers Association Convention held in Olympia last week. Baker, an integral part of the GazetteTribune team, took first place in the Best Feature Story, long form, category for his article “Tonasket veteran donates kidney to daughter.” “Great article! It really grabbed my attention from the ‘lede’ to the final paragraph....” wrote the contest judge. He also took a first place win for Best Personality Profile, long form for his article “Hyde’s masterpiece comes to life.” “Visually engaging narrative and quotes from Hyde that move the story

and capture his personality and emotion,” said the judge. Baker, who covers sports for the Gazette-Tribune as well as general news, also won a third place for Best Sports News Story for “Mat Mettle.” In the Color Sports Photo – Action category, Baker took second place for “Close Encounter.” The judge writes, “This rodeo photo is strong because even though you can’t see the cowboy’s face, his hands do all the talking and what they are expressing is desperation. Also, the bull’s look is telling, almost like his eyes are lifeless, showing little sympathy for the cowboy.” This year the newspapers in the Sound Publishing Group won 218 awards overall, 75 first place awards, 72 second place, 67 third place and had four finalists, two for News Writer of the Year and two for Sports Writer of the Year.

Man arrested for Riverside robbery Orovillle man also suspected in Dan’s Market robbery BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OKANOGAN – A suspect in the armed robberies of two small grocery stores was arrested following several tips from people who recognized him from a video of the robbery of the Riverside Grocery released by the sheriff ’s office. On Monday, Sept. 30 the Riverside Grocery was robbed by a suspect who assaulted the clerk and stole approximately $600 in cash Sheriff Frank Rogers from the till. From the information obtained at the time and a video of the robbery that was put out to the public, the sheriff ’s office received several calls in reference to the suspect in the video. On Wednesday, Oct. 2, Alex A. Sanchez, 37, of Oroville, was arrested and booked for the robbery. “We had received numerous calls from citizens stating that they had watched the video and told us that the suspect

Alex A. Sanchez in the video was Sanchez. We also knew that Sanchez drove a van which had been described to us by the victim of the robbery,” said Sheriff Frank Rogers in a press release. Rogers continued, “When we felt we had enough on Sanchez we put out the information to local law enforcement to look for him. At around 5:30 p.m. last night Chief Clay Warnstaff of the Oroville Police Department spotted Sanchez who got out of the van and went

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 41

into an apartment in Oroville.” Deputies were responding to the scene when Sanchez left the apartment and got back in the van and started to leave. Chief Warnstaff stopped the vehicle and arrested Sanchez at the scene without incident. Sanchez was transported to the Okanogan County Jail and booked for robbery in the first degree. “The case is still under investigation and we believe that Sanchez was possibly the one that robbed the Ellisforde store last month. Sanchez is well known to law enforcement and has extensive criminal history. We are also looking into other possibilities,” said the sheriff. In that theft a masked man with a box cutter, described as a Hispanic male wearing a red bandana over his face held up Dan’s Market on Sunday, Sept. 8. “A Hispanic male with a box cutter came into the store wearing a hat, mask and gloves last Sunday afternoon demanding money,” said Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers at the time. “He took $1500 and locked up the woman working there….” The man was wearing black jeans, a dark hoody, a cap and a red bandana over his face, according to the clerk’s grandmother, who added that her granddaughter was locked in the beer cooler until someone came into the store, heard her and let her out. “She blocked the door from the inside

so he couldn’t get to her if he decided to try to get in to the cooler,” said the grandmother. Sanchez is known to travel between Douglas County, according to Sheriff Rogers. “I give a lot of credit to everyone involved, they put a lot of time and effort

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Riverside Grocery Store was robbed on Sept. 30 by a masked suspect who assualted the clerk and stole $600 in cash. Tips from a videow that was released by the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office led to the arrest of Alex A. Sanchez as the alleged perpetrator.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

in this case to make an arrest before someone less was robbed or hurt. But we are extremely grateful and want to thank the citizens of Okanogan County, for all who called in with information. Because they took an interest we were able to make a speedy arrest in the case and for that, we thank you,” Rogers said.

Valley Life Arts Letters/Opinion

A2 A3 A5

Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Cops & Courts A9 Sports A10-11 Obituaries A12


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 10, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life NVH CELEBRATES AWARENESS Tonasket FFA earns summer, early autumn honors State Horse Judging (Top 10 and Tonasket) Sweepstakes (Team) 1. Reardan #1 2. Prosser 3. Tonasket 4. Stanwood 5. Lind-Ritzville #1 6. Chelan 7. Medical Lake #1 8. Ellensburg 9. Wilson Creek 10. Kiona-Benton

Submitted photo

North Valley Hospital kicked off its celebration of the national Breast Cancer Awareness campaign last week. Pictured are (back row, l-r) Shane Pyper (Imaging Manager), Linda Michel (CEO), Dr. Roos (Radiologist), Brenna Beltrami (Technologist), (front) Michelle Beattie (Technologist), Kelsey Speiser (Technologist), and Surachit “Tim” Thomas (Technologist).

Food drive to highlight Tonasket homecoming Submitted by Anita Asmussen Tonasket HS ASB Advisor

TONASKET - Homecoming 2013 will be held the week of Oct.14-18. Our theme is “Your World Our World.” The thought behind the theme is, no matter what your culture or point of view is we all live in the world together. As always we are trying to do our best in our community service project; therefore, this year we are holding a canned food drive during homecoming week. We’ll do that by having a week long food drive competition. Each class will have a shopping cart that they must decorate, and fill with collected canned food. We encourage our community to help out Wednesday night at the annual Powder Puff football game by bringing canned food, and Friday during our Homecoming parade and evening football game. Please bring a can of food to show your support for our local food bank. We will push our shopping carts decorated (with supplies by Grant’s) through the parade on Friday, and during halftime Friday night. We are using shopping carts instead of making banners this year. Shopping carts will be in the high school commons starting Monday, Oct 14.

More homecoming information: The yearly Homecoming Parade will take place on Friday, Oct. 18, at 12:40 p.m. We will drive the usual pattern through the bus lane, down through town, and then return to the high school parking lot. The THS Homecoming Assembly will fol-

low. Kick off is at 7:00 p.m. Friday, as the Tigers take on the Quincy Jackrabbits. The cost will be $6.00 for adults and grades 9-12. Visiting schools and home grades K-8 are $4.00, or free with your THS ASB card. Senior citizens (age 65 or older) price is $4.00 per game or Golden Oldies Cards $10.00 available at the gate or the THS Office and good for home games and all Caribou Trail League games. Activities for the week: Monday Oct. 14 (PJ and Crazy Hair Day) Noon activity - Bed Race Evening activity - JV Football at Lake Roosevelt, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15 (Formal Fancy Day) Day activity - Taco Eating Contest Evening activity - Soccer at Okanogan, 4:30 p.m.; Volleyball at Okanogan, 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16 - (Color Day) Noon activity - Tug of War Evening activity - Powder Puff football, 7:00 p.m. (Cost $2.00). Includes shopping cart judging; bring canned food to help out your class. Thursday, Oct. 17 (Sports / College Day) Noon activity - Centipede Race Evening activity - Soccer (home) vs. Oroville, 4:30 p.m.; Car bash and bonfire a the soccer field, 7:00 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18 (Blue and Gold Day) Daily activity - Parade, 12:40 p.m.; Assembly, 1:30 p.m. (bring canned food to help out your class) Evening activity - Football vs. Quincy, 7:00 p.m.

1299 1265 1263 1261 1249 1234 1229 1225 1218 1218

Individual

Submitted photo

The team of (l-r) Elizabeth Jackson, Kathryn Cleman, John Symonds, Vanessa Pershing and Brisa Leep took third in state horse judging, with Symonds taking second in individual competition. By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s FFA program added to its alreadyextensive collection of banners in late-summer and early-autumn competition as they participated in state horse judging, the Central Washington State Fair and the Adams County State Fair. Tonasket took third in state horse judging competition in Othello, with John Symonds placing second individually. Tonasket also took third in livestock juding and fifth in horse judging at the Central Washington State Fair and finished third in dairy judging at the Adams County Fair. “Everyone is doing exceptionally well in all the areas they’re performing in,” said Kathryn Cleman, who was part of the state horse judging team that included Symonds, Vanessa Pershing, Brisa Leep nd Elizabeth Jackson. “At state horse judging you judge six classes of horses in halter, performance, showing and riding,” Cleman said. “You take individual things like putting horse shoes and match them to a scenario. We did colors of horses.

One of our halter classes we had to publicly speak to a judge as to why we placed them that way. “Livestock judging we had our four classes and you assessed them on how they’re looking, muscling and that kind of thing. We did dairy and poultry judging as well.” At the Central Washington State Fair livestock competition, Tonasket claimed five of the top nine team spots. In dairy judging, Tonasket brought home its third place team finish behind the efforts of three (Chelsea Vazquez, Wyatt Pershing and Morgan O’Brien) that finished in the top seven individually. “At Yakima with horse judging, we didn’t have our original state team there,” Cleman said. ‘But everyone did very well.” The FFA will continue to be busy this fall as the first trap shoot takes place on Nov. 9 and the shop contest will be held Nov. 22 in Bridgeport. Tonasket FFA is also putting on the high school Tolo dance on Nov. 16 And, of course, the state champion rituals team will be heading to the national convention in Louisville, KY, Oct. 30-Nov. 2.

1. Morgan Meyers, Stanwood 334 2. John Symonds, Tonasket 333 3. Jenna Essary, Prosser 329 4. Tatum Najar, Ellesnburg 325 5. Rebecca Carstens, Reardan #1 323 5. Rachel Schell, Lind-Ritzville #1 323 5. Kayley McGhan, Kiona-Benton 323 8. Katie Emerson, ACH 321 9. Mollee Gray, Medical Lake #1 320 10. Emma Parrish, Centralia 319 19. Elizabeth Jackson, Tonasket 311 40. Brisa Leep, Tonasket 295 43. Kathryn Cleman, Tonasket 294 43. Vanessa Pershing, Tonasket 294 (out of 90+)

Central Washington State Fair (Top 10 and Tonasket)

Dairy Team

1. Kamiakin 2. Selah 765 3. Wapato 4. Mabton Gold 5. Chiawana #1 6. Prosser #2 7. Waitsburg 8. Chiawana #2 9. West Valley 10. Mossyrock 15. Tonasket 21. Tonasket #3 22. Tonasket #5 23. Tonasket #2 24. Tonasket #6 26. Tonasket #4 28. Tonasket #1

1. Prosser #2 788 2. Toppenish 777 3. Tonasket #9 770 4. Tonasket #2 769 5. Waitsburg 758 6. Tonasket #4 756 7. Prosser Alt. 749 8. Tonasket #3 748 9. Tonasket #8 745 10. Grandview Blue 745 12. Tonasket #1 744 17. Tonasket #5 740 28. Tonasket #10 722 48. Tonasket #6 650 Class 1: Ellensburg #1 144; Tonasket #4 142 Class 2: New Horizons 150; Tonasket #2 147 Class 4: Naches 144; Tonasket #9 142 Class 5: Tonasket #8 148; Toppenish 144

Horse Judging 559 536

Team 1. Stanwood 2. Othello #2 3. Tonasket #5 4. Othello 5. Tonasket #2 6. Ellensburg #4 7. Wilbur-Creston 8. Ellensburg #2 9. Ellensburg #3 10. Chelan 12. Tonasket #3 13. Tonasket #1 15. Tonasket #6

752 744 740 739 729 727 720 717 692 667 653 643 639 611 587

745 723 715 708 708 700 698 694 694 686 665 661 326

Individual 1. Chelsie Roberts, Stanwood 194 2. Jonathan Bernard, Stanwood 191 3. Chesea Vazquez, Tonasket 198 4. Wyatt Pershing, Tonasket 187 4. Tatum Sparks, Othello 187 6. Tyler Bise, Wilber-Creston 186 7. Morgan O’Brien, Tonasket 184 7. Jordan Ewald, Ellensburg 184 9. Beau Lewis, Othello 183 10. Zac Goodin, Othello 181 10. Katie Johnson, Ellensburg 181

HUGHES North Valley Hospital District #4 - Board of Commissioners Seat 5

Restore fiscal responsibility to our hospital. Paid by Don Atchison, Tonasket

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 or 888-838-3000 www.gazette-tribune.com

788

Adams County Fair Results

Teresa

OKANOGAN VALLEY

508 507 505 479

Individual John Symonds, Tonasket, tied for 7th with 178 points.

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531 527 527

Dairy Judging

Livestock Teams

Team Scoring 1. Kamiakin 2. Finley

3. Toppenish 4. Ellensburg 5. Tonasket 6. Selah 510 7. Ellensburg #3 8. White Swan 9. Prosser 10. Columbia-Burbank

What does this mean to Okanogan County? Attend the meeting to find out.

OKANOGAN COUNTY FARM BUREAU


OCTOBER 10, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

CCC to host OVOC fundraiser ‘Rocky Horror Picture Show,’ complete with dress-up, invades Community Cultural Center

SUBMITTED BY LYNN HOOVER OVOC COORDINATOR

OVOC photo

The Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus features local musicians performing fine music at the Omak Performing Arts Center (PAC). OVOC is scheduled to put on four concerts and one musical over the next eight months.

First OVOC concert Oct. 20 SUBMITTED BY LYNN HOOVER

OVOC COORDINATOR

OMAK - Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus present their Fall Season Premiere Concert which will be held Sunday, Oct. 20, at 3:00 p.m. at the Omak Performing Arts Center, 20 S. Cedar St., Omak. The orchestra, under the direction of Don Pearce, will feature Symphony No. 9 in E Minor by Antonin Dvorak as well as other masterful selections. The chorus, under the direction of Jonathan McBride, will feature highlights from Gilbert and Sullivan’s operetta HMS Pinafore,

Mendelssohn’s Lerchengesang (“The Lark’s Song”), and other great numbers. Artists of the Okanogan (AOk) will be sponsoring an art display at the OVOC Season Premiere Concert from an hour before the concert (2 p.m.) and during intermission. There will be a nice display of art work by local artists and several of the artists will be doing demos during this time to show the public how they do what they do. To contact AOk about showing some of your art during the show, please contact Barbara Conner-Reed at AOk1@ live.com. Concert prices are $12 (adults),

$10 (seniors), and $8 (youth over age 12. Children 12 and under get in free. Tickets are available at Rawson’s (Okanogan), The CornerShelf (Omak), Roy’s Pharmacy (Tonasket), Oroville Pharmacy, Brewster Drug, online at www.brownpapertickets.com or at the door. Season tickets for all four concerts will also be available at the door. Coulee Dam Federal Credit Union is the concert sponsor. For more information about the concert, contact OVOC Coordinator Lynn Hoover at (509) 322-0261 or by email at ovocinfo@gmail.com.

October events at the CCC SUBMITTED BY AURORA JONES

COMMUNITY CULTURAL CENTER

TONASKET - Wednesday Oct. 9 - Children’s Theater Registration and Auditions - 4-7 p.m. Children’s theater will meet every Wednesday in October from 3:30-5:30 p.m. Tuesday Oct. 15 - CCC Board of Director’s Meeting - 6 p.m. Oct. 18 -20 - Okanogan Family Faire - 40 Years to Celebrate! - at the Barter Faire Site. Sunday Oct. 20 - Artist’s Paint In from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. Call Claire Jeffko at (509) 486-1119 for more info. Friday Oct. 25 - Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Choir fundraiser. Presenting “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” Show starts at 6 p.m. For more info call Lisa Lindsay at (509) 560-3828. Saturday Oct. 26 - Slow Food Non GMO Movie Night - Doors open at 6 p.m. and movie starts at 7 p.m. Snacks and beverages available for purchase. Call Clare Paris at (509) 486-1199 for more info.

Sunday Oct. 27 - CCC Annual Membership Meeting - Meeting starts at 4 p.m.. Please bring a dessert or finger food to share. Call (509) 486-1328 for more info. Sunday, Oct. 27 - Free Community Dinner - Sunday dinner provided by the CCC and others. Dinner served from 2-4 p.m.. Free for those who need it, by donation for others. Call Janet at (509) 486-2061 for more info. Thursday Oct. 31 - CCC Halloween Party - For all kids! Finger food, candy, games and a haunted house in the back room. Starts at 5 p.m. Call Sabrina Norrell at (509) 486-1421 for more info or to volunteer to help out with this. Friday November 1 - OHA’s Highland Wonders Presents “David Douglas in the Okanogan Country.” Soup, salad, bread and dessert dinner provided by the CCC starts at 5:00 and costs $7 for members and $8 for the general public. Presentation starts at 6:30 p.m. and is free. Saturday November 2 - CCC Annual Fundraising Auction.

Okanagan Symphony Orchestra Concert SUBMITTED BY ROSEMARIE FULBROOK

OKANAGAN SYMPHONY SOCIETY

PENTICTON, B.C. - The Okanagan Symphony Orchestra opens their 54th season with music to lift the human spirit from three composers at the height of their creative power. Rossini’s rambunctious “William Tell Overture” starts the program which is followed by Franz Schubert’s unfinished “Symphony No. 8.” The expressive melodies and vivid harmonies of these two movements combine flawlessly in this beautiful composition which is considered to be one of Schubert’s finest works and which continues to perplex musical scholars as to why it remained uncompleted. The concert closes with Johannes Brahms’ last major orchestral work, the “Concerto for Violin, Cello and Orchestra,” a sweeping lyrical piece with the challenging difficulty of balanc-

ing two solo instruments with similar symphonic usage but dissimilar sounds. Distinguished guest artists Dale Barltrop, violin and Joseph Johnson, cello elaborate on the strong orchestral themes in a fusion of Romantic sternness and delicacy. Please join the OSO for this stellar season opening which will be dedicated to founding symphony member and supporter Bev Gay. The concert takes place on Saturday, Oct. 19 at 7:30 p.m. at the Cleland Theatre. For additional insight into the musical selections, join Music Director Rosemary Thomson for the preconcert talk one hour prior to the performance. Tickets are available from the Penticton & Wine Country Information Centre, 553 Railway Street, Tel:250-276-2170 or 1-800-663-5052. For additional information on this concert and the Okanagan Symphony Orchestra, please visit the website www.okanagansymphony.com.

SUBSCRIBE OKANOGAN VALLEY

Details to be announced. We are seeking donations for our live and silent auctions. Please call Janet Culp at (509) 486-2061 for more info. Also: Children’s Play Group for kids age 0-5 and their caregivers is open from 9:30-11:30 a.m. every Tuesday morning. Contact Aldona at (509) 485-2477 for more info.

TONASKET - Everyone is invited to attend the Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus Rocky Horror Picture Show fundraiser at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center on Friday, Oct. 25.

“This is the perfect opportunity to come out and show your support for OVOC as well as have a great time dressing up and making a ‘toast’ to Halloween,” says OVOC Coordinator Lynn Hoover. Doors will open at 6:00 p.m. with the movie beginning at 7:00. “Audience participation and interaction, as well as costumes are highly encouraged,” Hoover says. Cost is $10 per person or two for $15. For more information, contact Hoover at 509-322-0261 or at ovocinfo@gmail.com. Audience participation bags will be available for $5 each.

Concessions will also be available and OVOC will be holding a silent auction throughout the evening. Halloween and Rocky Horror Picture Show costumes are available for rent through OVOC “Costume Mistress” Susan Graves. “We have costumes of every kind, in every size - we have something for everyone,” says Graves. The OVOC Costume Rental will be open Wednesdays through Sundays, Oct. 23-27 and Oct 30-Nov. 2 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Courtyard Downtown, 28 N. Main St., Omak or by calling 509-429-7786.

‘Wizard of Oz’ auditions upcoming in November SUBMITTED BY LYNN HOOVER OVOC COORDINATOR

OMAK - Auditions for the Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus (OVOC) performance of “The Wizard of Oz will be held the Omak PAC, 20 S. Cedar St., on Saturday, Nov. 16, with doors opening at 9:00 a.m. The cast will consist of 10-15 women, 10-15 men and 15-20 children. We encourage anyone and everyone to audition. All roles include dancing and expressive movement. If you wish to audition for a lead singing role: (such as Dorothy, Glinda, Cowardly Lion, Tin Woodsman, or Scarecrow) be prepared to sing a 30-60 second piece of their signature song. For Dorothy that would be, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow;” Glinda, “Come Out, Come Out;” Cowardly Lion, “If I Only Had the

Nerve;î Tin Woodsman, “If I only Had a Heart;” and Scarecrow, “If I Only Had a Brain.” Contact Janelle Cutuli, Kim Harriman or Judy Johnston to get a copy of the sheet music. The following schedule is a guideline for the day: 9:30 - Registration; 9:50 (Mandatory) Meet in theater for opening remarks; 10:00 - Vocals onstage; 10:30-11:30 - (Mandatory) Choreography for the dance audition in Multipurpose room; 12:00 Practice dance onstage; 12:15 - Perform dance onstage; 12:30 Lunch; 1:30 - Script reading for roles; 3:30 - Closing remarks. You may copy a few pages from the script (check local rules of the library for making copies) but you may not take the script from the library. At auditions, you will be asked to list the part or parts you are most interested in so it is

good to familiarize yourself with the characters. The registration form will include a space for you to write down your schedule for the months of March, April and the last two weeks of February. If you are cast, the director will rely on your availability according to the information on this form so be sure to bring a list of all unavailable dates and times so you can be as thorough as possible on this extremely important subject. The production staff includes Janelle Cutuli (director), Kim Harriman (producer), Judy Johnston (scenery design), Susan Graves (costume design), Lisa Cutuli (choreographer), Cari Zachow (stage manager), and Nicole Leese (tech director). Performance dates for “The Wizard of Oz” are slated for May 2-4 and May 9-11.

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To schedule your annual mammogram or for more information, call us at the following locations. Omak Clinic

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418 W. Main St. Brewster, WA 98812

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St. Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 888-838-3000

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confluencehealth.org Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in our Real Estate Guide


Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 10, 2013

Council | FROM A1 the councils’ hands to decide how they wanted to proceed.

Downtown Parking

submitted photo

The Rumble in the Valley Returns to Richter Pass Motorplex in Osoyoos on Oct. 13.

It’s rumble time again for area drag racers Rumble in the Valley, Oct. 13. Submitted by Shana Cachola Wine Country Racing Association

OSOYOOS - The seasons are changing yet again in our Okanagan Valley. Along with Autumn comes The Rumble in the Valley. Wine Country Racing Association (WCRA) hosts the last event of the 2013 racing season at Richter Pass Motorplex in Osoyoos, on Oct. 13. This last race is always a fun one to take in for racers, fans and volunteers alike. Three car clubs from up and down the Okanagan come out in force to prove which one is the fastest. Along with these fun-loving car enthusiasts comes a real treat for the fans. It’s not every day that a person gets to see beautiful, classic cars pulling up to the starting lights. Ian Haryatt, of the Kelowna Kustoms, sped the trophy away from the Okanagan Rodtiques last season. Oliver’s Coachmasters

club will be itching to slam the peddle down, since they have yet to reign victorious in this event. The good-humoured grudges make this race day one for everyone to look forward to. Gates open at 9 a.m. Anyone interested in racing needs to come early to register and get your vehicle passed through a technical inspection. Time trials begin at 11 a.m. Final elimination rounds start at 1 p.m. Concessions and grand stands are available on site. Fans are welcome to bring their lawn chairs and coolers. Please remember events are alcohol-free. Cost at the gate is $10, with people 12 and under admitted free when accompanied by an adult.

Sept. 22 Results: Rain may have kept a few away from the track last Sunday, but the the threat couldn’t keep the die-hards away. It turned out to be a perfect day of racing for 35 race cars. The fans that ignored Mother Nature’s threats were treated to 135 separate drag races

and a day of fun. Glenn Taylor from Osoyoos won the Sportsman’s Bracket. He drove his black 1951 Mercury pick-up to victory over Osoyoos’ Blair Ogilvy, in his white 1981 Chevrolet pick-up. The Pro Bracket final was a battle among Oliver residents. Shana Cachola (in her pink 1972 Nova) barely ripped the victory from the grasp of Doug Blatchford in a close race. Blatchford drove his red 1969 Chevelle. The Super Pro victory belongs to Peachland’s Phil Walter. Walter zipped his 1986 Nissan by Dick Warren of Tonasket. Warren races a purple 1972 AMC Hornet called Rant ‘n Rave. David Madsen of Summerland took the trophy home in the Bike/Sled class, with his 2003 black Arctic Cat snowmobile. He defeated Osoyoos’ Steve Macor on his purple 2002 Kawasaki motor cycle. The fastest reaction time trophy went to Chip Sabyan of Oliver. Go to www.winecountryracing.ca for more information.

Andrews also discussed the vacant lot behind the Old Peerless Restaurant and the Chamber’s plans to rent the lot for free parking for shoppers and those with large vehicles. He said several local businesses have agreed to contribute in order to help pay the rent and maintain the lot, but wanted to know if the city could put the lot under its liability insurance and maybe help with signage directing people to the free parking. The idea is to get RVs, trucks and even employees of nearby businesses to park there, as well as offering an easily accessible parking area for downtown shoppers. “The Chamber will maintain the lot taking care of the weeds and snow removal and also control who parks there and for how long,” said Andrews. “The chamber would pick up the cost of

maintenance and whatever the extra cost it would take for the city to insure it.” Kathy Jones, Oroville City Clerk, indicated to the council that she had contacted the city’s insurance provider about whether they city could carry the liability for the lot, but hadn’t heard back yet.

Guest Rooms Lastly, Andrews said that as manager of the Camaray Motel, he would love to be able to develop a Guest Room program where local homeowners would make rooms in their homes available to rent. “There are days when the city park is full, we’re full and so is the River Oakes, if we establish Guest Rooms in a number of homes... clean accommodations... people would be glad to pay $60 to $100 a night,” said Andrews. He added he would be happy to start training people and set up a network and help with the

bookkeeping. “It’s a great way to serve the public when there are times we are full and we have no where to send people. It is also a great way for people to make some extra money,” he said. The city is investigating whether sprinkler systems would be required as that would most likely put an end to the plan. “Pullman had what they called ‘bed finders’ and we stayed two or three times and there were no requirements for sprinklers,” said Councilman Jon Neal. “I think we’ve heard some good ideas tonight,” said Mayor Chuck Spieth to the Chamber president.

Race to the Top Oroville High School Principal Kristin Sarmiento requested and got the support in the schools bid for a Race to the Top Grant. She said the funding would focus on rural schools to make online education and technical improvements at the school,” she said.

Charlene Helm/staff photo

Bell, Hook & Spindle will be hosting its Grand Opening in Tonasket, Oct. 15-19.

Bell, Hook & Spindle opens in Tonasket Funding available for forest landowners in Okanogan and Ferry Improve forest health, reduce wildfire risk Submitted by Janet Pearce DNR Communications Manager

OLYMPIA – During the 20132015 biennium, the Washington State Legislature appropriated over $1 million in forest hazard reduction funding for private landowners in the Forest Health Hazard Warning Area in Okanogan and Ferry counties. This funding is administered through the Washington State

Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The funds are an investment by the state to help landowners cover a portion of the cost (up to 50%) for practices such as thinning, slash disposal and pruning that improve forest health by reducing tree density and target wildfire risk by removing fuels. Many forest stands in the region are too dense, which weakens the trees and makes them more susceptible to damage agents such as western spruce budworm or pine bark beetles. DNR foresters are available to meet with landowners, assess the health of their forests and make recommendations for how landowners can best achieve their

goals and objectives. Landowners interested in having a forester assess their forest or applying for cost-share practices such as thinning, pruning, or slash disposal should contact: Steve Harris, Landowner Assistance Manager, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Colville, WA or call (509) 684-747 or email steven. harris@dnr.wa.gov Forest landowners may also apply for cost-share funding online at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/dnrcostshare. To learn more about the Forest Health Hazard Warning issued for portions of Okanogan and Ferry counties, visitwww.dnr. wa.gov/foresthealth.

OCHS annual meeting Nancy Cole: Brass Bell author to speak The Gazette-Tribune

MALOTT - The Okanogan County Historical Society will hold its annual membership meeting on Saturday, Oct. 19 at the Malott Grange Hall from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. At 11 a.m. there will be a featured speaker followed by a potluck luncheon and a Board of Trustees meeting. The public is invited. The speaker will be author Nancy (Camille) Cole, a resident of Portland, OR, who will talk about her book—The Brass Bell—which is the life story of her great aunt, Marion Parsons. Cole’s narrative non-fiction account of Parson’s life begins in Omak, where Parson had gone by train from Syracuse, NY, in 1924 to teach for two years at the Omak school. Parson left the people in Omak she had come to

love, the place in the frontier she had learned to call home and she did it all with courage and stature when her father asked her to take the helm of a new school back home in upstate New York. She had wanted to stay in Omak, but was obligated to fulfill her father’s wishes. In the end, her dreams were realized in ways she never could have imagined. Cole wrote the book from journals her aunt kept, letters that were written to her, newspaper

articles, and the many stories told to her by her Aunt Marion when she was a child, and by Parson’s former students who are still alive today. For more information about Camille Cole see the author’s website: www.camillecole.com. Here is the book project blog: http:// cherryroadschool.blogspot.com/ For more information call OCHS at 509-422-4272 or OCHS president Sandy Brightbill at (509) 486-1903.

TONASKET - A new retail fiber art supplies shop recently opened at 315 S. Whitcomb in Tonasket. But the business itself isn’t actually new. Bell, Hook & Spindle, owned by Lindy and Rick Weber, has been active as an online enterprise since mid-2012 (and still is check out www.bellhookandspindle.com) but recently expanded into its new “brick and mortar” location in August. The shop’s primary product is fiber art supplies for knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners, needle felters and more. Supplies include soft goods (such as yarn, roving and fabric) and hard goods (drop spindles, spinning wheels). Quilting cottons, hand-dyed fabric, embroidery and notions round out the selection. Bell, Hook & Spindle also offers lessons for beginner through expert levels; a gallery; a third-arm quilting machine for quilters’ use; and a woodworking and repair shop for spinning wheels, sewing machines, sergers and other equipment. Lindy is fiber artist renowned in multiple venues, including juried art shows, regional art galleries, the Wenatchee Quilting Guild’s Art Show and the first Irish International Fiber Arts Show in Dublin Ireland. In addition to showcasing her gifts and allowing her to share her skills with other, the core of the business is its “conversational pit” featuring comfortable chairs, tea, snacks, knitting, crocheting and “just plain talk.” It is also the only North Central Washington store offering locally produced wool and buffalo products. Visitors entering the store are greeted by Bell, Hook & Spindle’s own angora production depart-

Charlene Helm/staff photo

Lindy Weber and “Slippers” hope to be hosting plenty of visitors in their new Tonasket shop. ment. Slippers, an Angora/Rex bunny, provides fluff that is handspun into the softest-imaginable yarn. Children are invited to chase Slippers throughout her domain. Lindy grew up in Wenatchee and his lived in many places throughout Washington State but now considers the Okanogan to be her home. Rick was born and raised in Seattle but has family roots in the

Okanogan dating to the 1800s. He retired here in 2000 after spending his career as an administrator and college instructor. He was also pastor of the Okanogan and Malott United Methodist Churches for seven years. Bell, Hook & Spindle will have a Grand Opening Tuesday, Oct. 15-Friday, Oct. 19 featuring special pricing, live demonstrations and lessons, drawings for door prizes and free refreshments.

OKANOGAN PUD SCHEDULES BUDGET WORKSHOPS

The Board of Commissioners of Public Utility District No. 1 of Okanogan County will hold the following budget workshops in the PUD Auditorium located at 1331 2nd Avenue North in Okanogan:

October 15, 2013

Workshop will commence following regular 12:30 p.m. Board Meeting. Subject: That section of the budget dealing with Normal Operations and Maintenance.

October 29, 2013

6:30 p.m. – Subject: That section of the budget dealing with Normal Operations and Maintenance.

November 5, 2013

6:30 p.m. – Subject: That section of the budget dealing with the Enloe Dam Project.

315 S. Whitcomb Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-0563

Art by Muri


OCTOBER 10, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Veterans Services available

Gary DeVon/staff photo

A few of the members of the Valley Riders motorcycle club take in the sights at the Old Molson Museum last Saturday. Those in this group made the loop from Oroville to Molson, stopping to eat at the Kuhler in Tonasket before heading up the Havillah Road and then to Molson and back to Oroville again.

Some riders still give ‘bikers’ a good name

I know motorcycle riders who hate to be called “bikers” and from what we’ve seen on the news in New York recently they may have a point. Many of those who ride motorcycles have experienced times when they’d like to kick the car that cut them off -- especially if you can see the driver was busy chatting away on their cell phone. There’s an old saying, ride like you’re invisible and that all the four wheeled vehicle drivers, “cagers,” are out to kill you. Sometimes it feels like it’s true. However, what took place in New York City recently, with the large group of motorcyclists where a few members broke the windows of a family’s SUV in order to extract some sort of punishment was totally uncalled for. If the video is to be believed the driver can’t be faulted for Out of wanting to get his wife and young child to safety. My Mind Despite his large vehicle he was outnumbered Gary A. DeVon by riders, some of who wanted to do him harm. There are “bikers” who travel in groups who aren’t like that and are a benefit to the areas they visit. Take the Valley BMW Riders which is made up of Canadians and some Americans, mostly from the Okanagan/Okanogan Valley. About 25 members (on a variety of motorcycle brands) and a few visitors from other motorcycle clubs, made the annual trip to Oroville for the “Last Chance” Campout at Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park. This year we had mixed weather, but the group seemed to enjoy themselves. While here they not only ate and drank at the local restaurants, from here to Tonasket, they also spent money at the grocery stores and other businesses. A few, non-campers, even stayed in the local motel. But most of all they enjoyed travelling around Okanogan County, visiting Molson, Chesaw, Havillah, Loomis and several points in between. They raved about the sights they saw and enjoyed the history of our area. These, and those who participate in the annual Run for the Border Charity Ride are the type of “bikers” we should think about when we see someone on a motorcycle. Most who ride are among the 99 percent and not the few who give motorcycle riders a bad name. So remember, put down your cell phone and watch out for your twowheeled companions on the road like me.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Dear Editor, Eden Valley Guest Ranch has had the privilege to provide lodging and trail rides for professionals performing services for persons with blindness. I was pleased to learn more about their services to provide devices and teach persons to use them available to veterans and non veterans at no charge. The representatives asked that I share their information with you so the Gazette-Tribune can share it with their readers. Veterans who have low vision or blindness can receive independent living training in their homes by the VA. They must be enrolled in the VA to receive services. Kelly Golden provides instruction in all areas of daily living skills, computer training and cane training. She meets with the veteran and provides an assessment to determine the areas that they need training in, including any low vision devices that will assist them in reaching their training goals. The VA also provides low vision exams to enrolled veterans. Interested veterans may contact Kelly by email or phone listed below. Kelly Golden, M.Ed, CLVT, COMS, CVRT, Blind Rehabilitation Specialist, Dept. of Veterans Affairs, (509) 434-7214, Kelly. Golden@va.gov Non Veterans may contact Cheryl Martin at Lilac Services for a similar program. She can be reached at Lilac Services for the Blind 1-800-422-7893. Their web site is www. lilacblind.org. Their home page provides an

overview of their program including information for persons needing assistance and also how groups or individuals can donate to support this program. It is based in Spokane and has outreach to many counties. In this time with shrinking budgets to help persons with blindness and low income, it is wonderful to know about these programs. I hope some of your readers will benefit from this information. Robin Stice Eden Valley Ranch

A mystery

Dear Editor, On Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, the annual lasagna dinner and silent auction for our library was held at the American Legion Hall

in Oroville. It was a truly enjoyable and funfilled evening. For a donation, you got to experience many different types of tasty lasagna, a side of salad, bread, delicious homemade cookies, coffee and punch. The creativity of each individually decorated table is always a pleasant surprise.The silent auction had many terrific items on with to bid. Live music was provided by Cheat Grass, always a treat. Thank you. Thanks also to all the volunteers who worked hard to pull this together, the donors of the auction items and the patrons who attended to show support for our local library. Oh yes, the mystery.... There was one thing missing. The plethora of people who use the services of our library. Linda Heagy Oroville

ACA offers new opportunities OPINION BY PATTY MURRAY U.S. SENATOR (D-WASH.)

From Murray’s Web Video on Washington Health Insurance Marketplace highlighting the benefits of enrolling in Washington state’s new health insurance marketplace, “Washington Healthplanfinder.” Washingtonians will be able to purchase health coverage by visitingwww.WAHealthplanfinder.org and enrolling in a plan that best fits their budget. Coverage for Washington State residents begins January 2014 with open enrollment concluding March 2014. Ensuring access to quality, affordable health care is one of the most critical challenges facing our nation. We’ve already seen some incredible changes in the three years since passage of the Affordable Care Act. And today, I’m here to talk about another exciting new opportunity in health care coverage in Washington State. Starting Oct. 1st, Washingtonians will be able to purchase affordable, quality health coverage through Washington’s new health insurance marketplace, Washington Healthplanfinder. Washington Healthplanfinder is an easily accessible online marketplace for individuals, families, and small businesses to compare and enroll

COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

90 YEARS AGO:

Molson Leader Oct. 10–17, 1923: W. E. Morris, who lives about three-quarters of a mile south of town, has a crop of oats which averages 102 bushels to the acre. The grain is from extra fine imported seed and is the heaviest yield ever reported in this section. The number of high school pupils is increasing. There are now 35 enrolled and we expect several more in the near future. Monday morning, Floyd Burnham, Keith Ross, Jack Geoghegan, Sidney Sneve and Wm. Priest joined our studious group. As a result of a booze affray, five men were arrested in Molson Monday and taken to jail in Okanogan. Late Sunday night, three drunken men, Ed Almey, better know as “Red,” Chas. Johnson, alias Harry Smith and Torry Allstot, who had previously come into possession of a half-case of Gorden’s Gin, started a rough house at the residence of Miss Nellie McNeil, kicking in the door, breaking windows and finally chasing her out in her night clothes. She appealed for help and was given clothing by some of the neighbors. Chesaw News: The Raymond Mack threshing machine and crew is at Bolster this week, threshing for the Pickering’s and Lind’s, while the Jenson-Davidson Threshing machine is south of town, being at present at Martin Larson’s. The grain is now being moved to local warehouses more rapidly and outgoing shipments are also rapidly increasing. Several trucks are being used for hauling grain to the warehouses. A gang of men have been working on the OrovilleMolson Road the past week, dragging, filling holes and generally repairing it. This is a much needed improvement and autos can now make the trip between the two towns easily in 45 minutes. The O.H.C. of the Molson High School gave a wiener roast on the shore of Molson Lake Friday evening from 7 p.m. to midnight. The evening was passed singing, playing games and toasting marshmallows and wieners. The pupils of the school and four teachers were present. Oscar Morris, who was arrested here last week for selling liquor, pleaded guilty and was sen-

in quality health insurance plans and access important cost savings. Healthplanfinder will ensure sure you have all the information you need to be confident in choosing the plan that best fits your needs and your budget. Families and small business owners will continue to benefit from better access and more choices, and insurance companies will be forced to compete for the business of Washington state families. No one will be denied coverage because they are sick or have a pre-existing condition. And most health plans are not allowed to have annual benefit limits and none are allowed to have lifetime benefit limits. I’m confident that Washington state is going to lead the way nationally in offering competitive and quality choices for consumers. I encourage you to find out what options are available to you and your family, when open enrollment begins October 1st. Simply visit www.WAHealthPlanFinder.Org. Washington Healthplanfinder is an easily accessible online marketplace for individuals, families, and small businesses to compare and enroll in quality health insurance plans and access important cost savings. Families and small business owners will continue to benefit from better access and more choices,

ITEMS FROM THE PAST tenced to pay a fine of $500 and to serve six months in the County Jail. Advertisement of Citizens State Bank in Molson: Teachers, and others holding school warrants, we will be glad to take your warrants on deposit at par, giving you immediate use of the money through your checking account!

50 YEARS AGO:

Oroville Weekly Gazette Oct. 10–17, 1963: The Officers of the Oroville P.T.A. got together at the last meeting, to discuss plans for the organization with John Haskell, President; Inez Robbins, Second Vice President; Barbara Kammers, Treasurer; Elenore Gausman, First Vice President and Myrtle Wood. Pictured on the front page in the Oroville State Bank, are Miss Novelyn Claiborne and Mrs. Lloyd Mathews, ready to explain the “Sunny Okanogan” to you. New teachers to the Oroville School System, who were in attendance at the reception held in their honor on September 24: Mrs. Mary McEldery, Mrs. Esther Sorenson, Miss Janice Archer, Mrs. Julia Forsberg, Mrs. Dona Jones, Miss Elaine Johnson, Mrs. Emma Job, Mrs. Sandra Hagen, Dale Gill, Garry Sorenson and Tom Jones. Following a discussion, which went well beyond the usual adjournment, the Oroville Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday, voted to go on record as opposing the proposed Wilderness Bill. This bill would establish a Wilderness Area of the Cascade Range from the Canadian Border to Yakima. It was the feeling of the Chamber that the Forest Service has been administering this area for the benefit of all for several years and should continue. Grocery Prices: 22 oz. Frisbies Pancake Syrup, $.29; MJB coffee, 3# tin, $ 1.98; Red Snapper fillet, $.39 per #; Thick #1 Sliced Bacon, 2# $1.09; Celery, $.05 per #; Fresh Oranges, 2 # $.29; Fresh grade A fryers, $.32 #; Yellow Sweet Spanish dry onions, $.05 #; Biscuits, 8 oz. $.09; Nestles Chocolate Quik, 1 lb. pkgs, 3 for $1.00. Weatherwise by Marge Frazier:

and insurance companies will be forced to compete for the business of Washington state families. Fast Facts: Washington and the Affordable Care Act: • More than 835,000 uninsured Washingtonians are eligible to enroll in the new health insurance marketplace • 91% of eligible uninsured Washingtonians may get tax credits or Medicaid • 62,000 more young adults in Washington now have coverage through their parents’ plan • Washingtonians received more than $806,497 in rebates from insurers—an average of $512 per family • In Washington, seniors on Medicare saved $113 million on prescription drugs because of the Affordable Care Act • More than 1,095,000 women in Washington will now have guaranteed access to additional preventive services without cost-sharing Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) serves on the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions and the Appropriations Committies. She is chairman of the Budget Committee and also serves on the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs and Committee on Rules and Administration.

Sept. 25th, 82 degrees maximum and 40 degrees, minimum; Sept. 26th, 83 and 42; Sept. 27th, 80 and 42; Sept. 28th, 80 and 54; Sept. 29th, 84 and 54; Sept. 30th, 82 and 50. No precipitation for the week.

25 YEARS AGO:

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune Oct. 6 -13, 1988: The Sept. 27 continuance of the previous Tonasket Town Council meeting here was adjourned without a decision as to whether the town will declare the Youth Center land surplus and sell it to a builder for senior housing. Crest Construction, the contractor who is planning to build 20 units of senior housing in Tonasket, had approached the council in an attempt to purchase the site where the Tonasket Youth Center is located. Crest had offered to move and/or help rebuild the youth center at a new site. The Omak Pioneers invaded Tiger Country in Tonasket last Friday in a Caribou Trail League contest. Both teams were fresh from wins and ready to do battle. With 1:27 left in the first half Bayley powered his way to pay dirt to end the half at 6 - 6. Omak applied the pressure in the second half and at the final bell, the score was 17 – 14 in favor of the Pioneers. The Oroville Hornets dropped a tough game to the Lake Roosevelt Raiders and came out on the losing end of a 28–7 score. The Hornets only score came in the final minutes of the fourth quarter when Brad Scott completed a 20-yarder to Dave Howe for the TD. The Washington State Liquor Control Board announced today that it will distribute excess funds for the first quarter for the fiscal year in the amount of $10,000,000. The state will retain $5,000,000 with $4,000,000 to the incorporated cities and $1,000,000 to the counties. Tonasket’s share will be $1,811.22 while Oroville will get $2,690.23 and the county $7,651.31. Travelers of State Hwy. 97 between Oroville and Ellisforde are greeted by a patch of pumpkins decorated for the upcoming Halloween holiday. They can be seen sitting upon the guard rail near the Gerth family’s “One Horse Ranch.” Real Estate listings: 4 bdrm, 2 bath home built in 1982, sunken living room, wet bar, located on 3 lots, approx. 2200 sq. ft. of living space, $55,000.


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 10, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Still some apples left to be picked Into October and just a wee bit of frost, in some places. My poor straggly flowers are just waiting for the “big one” and then out they go ‘til next spring and we’ll start the cycle all over again. I’m just catching up with yesterday. By tomorrow I should be ready for today. Do you ever feel like that? Thank goodness for big grandsons to give the mattress a turn. Now we’ll get the winter blanket out and be ready if and when winter comes. When we reach the “golden years” everything seems so much heavier, have you noticed? Folks have asked me about Ben Prince II. Jim tells me he sleeps most of the time. Doesn’t seem to have pain, just slowly slipping away, from the effects

of cancer. Nancy Zimmerman, Olympia, has been spending some time with her sister, Barbara Shaw, and checking up on her brother Bill Greene, who is recovering from heart surgery. Bill is doing very nicely and finding that apple harvest can go on without him at the helm. Geese are such spectacular birds. They are so regal looking and even their sound system offers quality sounds. Of course they do have one bad habit, but we won’t go into that. Have you seen the flocks all “vee’d” up and heading south? But, maybe they’re just practicing. Everything is electronic these days. But even if you’re stupid there’s one thing you can do that the most brilliant

computer can never do and that is Smile. partner, for over 60 years and the other Remember the fun times at the Legion close knit family members, and his preson Wednesday night while ence will be greatly missed. you devoured one of the tasty Junior Eder has been on burgers the M&M’s fixed for another hunting expedition you while you visited with and returned with an elk. His friends? The two Marilyn’s wife says the basement is are gonna’ do that again getting full of the trophies. starting Oct. 23 from 5 p.m. Our neighbors, the Gary to 7 p.m. Thorntons, are getting a new Janae (Haney) Chyrst and roof on their house. First her husband David, made time I ever saw a roof being their annual “apple run” from put in place with a radio on Issaquah, gleaning the left- THIS & THAT top of the house while the overs, and spent some time Seahawks played football. Joyce Emry with her parents, the Lance So far no one has fallen off, Haney’s. but they have a lot of roof to Just after the deadline for last week’s do yet. paper, word was received of the death Do you know who gave our country of Dick Robbins. As per his request the name, United States of America? It there were no formal funeral services. was Thomas Paine, and I’ll bet he never For those who aren’t familiar with the would have believed it could become the name, Dick was the father of Becky mixed up condition it is today. from Hometown Pizza, and many of the We played a couple of games of paintings in the restaurant were done by pinochle with the Bob Hirsts last Sunday him. Condolences go out to Pat, his life afternoon. He is so glad to be out of the

Red Hat Ladies met in Chesaw By Marianne Knight

Highlands Correspondent

We are one week into a new month and the weather is still a little unsettled. After a week of thunder and lightening and lots of wind and rain we ended this past week with sunshine and blue skies and a day or two of wind with falling trees. The Red Hat Ladies had a really good turn out for their annual fall Tea/Luncheon with about seventy Red and Purple clad Ladies at the Chesaw Community Building participating in a wonderful Buffet and Silent Auction. There were ladies from Chesaw, Molson, Oroville, Submitted photo

Standing with the Tonasket Elementary Terrific Kids is member Herb Wandler and new treasurer Sara Bartleson. The Tonasket Kiwanis are looking forward to another exciting year with our Terrific Kids. Sumitted by Bill Dean TONASKET KIWANIS

Once again another year rolls around for the Kiwanis Club of Tonasket and the Tonasket Elementary school Terrific Kids program. We were honored to be invited to attend the elementary school assembly and participate

BC Citizens choose NVCS classes By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

True, the majority of people who register for classes are from Oroville and Tonasket. And, there would be no program without you! But, many Canadian citizens have taken our classes, as well. They shop in our town, pick up a catalog from one of our stores, and sign up for classes. Since ours is the only community education program for miles around, we want to encourage

Center’s Spaghetti Dinner this Saturday Submitted by Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

The Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Dinner is scheduled for Oct 12, at the Center. Price is $7.50. Dinner starts at 4 p.m. and ends about 7 p.m. Correction from last week: John and Joy Lawson and Friends will be playing at the Center every third Friday of the month starting Oct. 18. We will be having our annual

TONASKET KIWANIS with the Terrific Kids program. As part of the assembly the raffle to raise money for the Terrific Kids program took place with the help of the principal, teachers

THE LEARNING TREE our B.C. friends to participate in the classes we have to offer. I decided to visit Osoyoos businesses last week. Walking down Main Street with a bag full of class catalogs and flyers, I talked with store owners, restaurant managers and bankers. Without exception, they were delighted to place our catalogs on their counters. They asked questions, offered suggestions as to busi-

OROVILLE SENIORS Halloween costume party on Oct. 31. This is always a fun event, so put on your thinking caps. You may win a prize. For those in need of wheelchairs, commode risers, bath chairs, canes, etc., please check with the Center as we usually have a supply of each available. No charge, just return when they are no longer needed. Pinochle Scores for Saturday, October 5: The door prize was won by Sally Eder, most

and staff. The following were the four lucky winners and their prizes: Scott Olson #430 - the Nu Wave cooker; Bob Stone #37 - the BBQ; Jim Detru #142 - the children’s bike; and Forest Brender #419 the Beyers gift certificate. We wish to thank all those who supported this program. nesses I should visit, and most were happily reading a catalog when I left them. I was reminded that snowbirds will be arriving in December and January, just in time for winter quarter classes. You can bet I’ll bundle up and head to Osoyoos with my bag of catalogs. We thank you for your support of this valuable program. Remember, if you can’t find a catalog in the store you’re visiting, you can call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email her at community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu or find everything you need on our website at www. northvalleycommunityschools. com. pinochles by Ken Ripley, high scoring man for the evening was Zane Gazaway and high scoring woman was Myrtle Wood. More next time.

President returns from fall conference Submitted by Lyle Anderson Tonasket Eagles #3002

Well fall is definitely here and winter is close behind. The temperatures have been cooler and we hope all are staying nice and warm and getting those racks ready for those leaves hitting the ground. We would like to welcome our president back from the fall

Fall Leadership Conference informative By Jan Hansen Oroville Eagles

Anyone who has not paid annual dues must now re-enroll. If you have paid but have not picked up your current card, please stop by, say HI!, and pick it up. We just got back from the Fall Leadership Conference in Wenatchee. There was a lot of information both in the meetings and just talking to other Aerie officers. I will report on the conference at our joint meeting on November 5th at 6:00, as well as our regular Aerie meeting that follows at 7:00. All Aerie and Auxiliary members are welcome at these meetings.

hospital, but still needs to regain more strength. Still some apples to be picked. I guess the Fugis are about the last, except for the Granny Smith and I don’t hear mention of those around here, but lots of them in the Brewster area. So much of the production goes out of town to be packed…why did this happen? About this time of the year, when my mother was alive, we always had our last picnic of the year on the Sunday nearest her birthday, going up into the mountains to view the fall colors. Sometimes it was cold and we’d have to eat in the car and other years, like this one, it was nice and we’d sit on a log. Nature paints some beautiful pictures with colors that just can’t be matched with oil paints and a brush. Have you had the new cereal called Krave? It’s little pillows of crunch, filled with real chocolate. Just what we need another cereal. Hairdresser Peggy is back in her shop... Yeah.

HILLTOP COMMENTS Tonasket, Osoyoos, Republic, Curlew, Similkameen, Okanogan, Penticton and Omak and they all enjoyed themselves. Our bow hunters for this year have come and gone. They went home happy again this year with not only the deer but also a Black Bear. It was quite a week. Stand by for another night of BINGO at the Grange on Friday night, Oct. 18 at 6 p.m. Buy in is $10 and at least $10 winner pot. The next meeting for the Knob Hill Club in Chesaw will be on Wednesday Oct. 23 at noon (potluck).

TONASKET EAGLES conference that he attended last weekend. This Friday we will be having our weekly bingo at 7 p.m., so get on in here and enjoy a fun filled night and do not forget bingo is open to the public. The kitchen will be open at 5:30 p.m. to serve up some of those great hamburgers and other hot items. Karaoke will be this Saturday at 9 p.m. by Linda and will be a terrific time to test out those

EAGLEDOM AT WORK Our Harvest Dinner will be held on Saturday, October 26th. Oroville hosts the District 10 meeting on October 27th. These meetings are always interesting and we all learn something new. Meeting starts at 1:00p.m. and is always followed with dinner. All members are invited to attend. Starting this month we will be sending, via e-mail, updates, current and future events to our members with current e-mail addresses. If you want to be included let us know and we will add you to our list. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesdays of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays. Happy Hour is 4:30 p.m. to

What Does Government Shutdown Mean to Investors?

investment portfolio or even take a “time out” been “factored in” during the past few weeks, from investing. It’s highly likely that, like all as the possibility of a shutdown increased, we political/economic traumas in the past, this may still see some significant price gyrations. Sandra Rasmussen one, too, shall pass. Try not to overreact to these price swings, Financial Advisor if they do occur. If you feel you must do To gain some perspective, you might be 32 N Main St. Suite A interested in knowing that the current situation something with regard to your investments, Omak, WA 98841 is not unique. We’ve had 17 government why not take this opportunity to look over 509-826-1638 shutdowns in the past, most recently in 1996. your long-term strategy to make sure it’s www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC And the overall effect of these shutdowns still properly aligned with your goals, risk on the financial markets has not been tolerance and time horizon? Over time, Reported by Edward Jones particularly negative. Stocks dropped during your personal situation can change in many You probably have thought about what nine of these shutdowns and rose during the ways, so it’s always a good idea to review you’d What Does Government Shutdown other eight. Once the shutdowns ended, the your investment portfolio, and to make those Mean to Investors? average stock market gain was 2.5% over the changes that can help you continue making following three months and 13.3% over the progress toward your objectives, such as a As you’re well aware, a partial government following 12 months, according to an analysis comfortable retirement. shutdown began on Oct. 1. No matter what of the S & P 500 stock market index. Submitted by Marta Reed 1234, So. 2nd Ave., Okanogan. one’s views are on the political issues that Computer stations for the Furthermore, if we do see some price Okanogan Co. Public Health led to this event, it’s probably fair to say that Of course, as you’ve no doubt heard, “past declines, you may well be presented with the online Food Workers Class are a shutdown is not particularly good news, performance cannot guarantee future opportunity to buy quality investments at good OKANOGAN - Starting Nov. 7, available at that location Mondayon many fronts. Although essential services results,” so you shouldn’t necessarily expect prices, so stay alert for these possibilities. Friday, 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. the Okanogan County Public Health will continue, including Social Security and the market to turn in similar results once For more information call Food Workers Class is offered every Medicare payments, other governmental this current shutdown is over. Nonetheless, Above all else, don’t let the headlines of today Thursday afternoon at 3:30 p.m., at (509) 422-7140. functions will be disrupted, and hundreds of the history of the market’s performance scare you away from investing for tomorrow. www.gazette-tribune.com thousands of workers will be furloughed. So, following government shutdowns does tell us With patience, discipline and the ability to as a citizen, you may well have concerns something about the tremendous ability of the maintain a long-term perspective in spite of about the shutdown. But how will the financial markets to absorb short-term crises short-term events, you can develop good shutdown affect you as an investor? investment habits that will serve you well for — and then move on. a lifetime. First of all, you may want to take to heart This isn’t to say that you won’t see some Subscribe to the... the slogan popularized by the British volatility in the days and weeks ahead if the This article was written by Edward Jones for OKANOGAN VALLEY in World War II: “Keep calm and carry shutdown continues for a while. The financial use by your local Edward Jones Financial on.” You don’t need to panic, nor do you markets do not like uncertainty, and while Advisor. 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 need to make massive changes to your some of this uncertainty may already have

Food workers class Thursdays in Okanogan

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

FINANCIAL FOCUS

The first of this years Christmas Bazaar will be in Chesaw at the Chesaw Community Building on Nov. 2 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tables are available for $10 each. Call Marianne at (509) 485-2103 to reserve yours, now. Lots of good stuff. The Country Kitchen will be open for food and drinks, baked goods. Get Well Wishes go out to Harry Stockwell, Glenn Richardson and Nita (Mountain Momma) Myrick. Welcome home, Marilyn Cross from Yellow Knife. Glad to have you back. There will be a Surprise 60th Anniversary Party at the home of Ottie and Jean Hennig by Sidley Lake on Oct. 19 from noon to 4 p.m. More information next week. Until next week. dance moves and your singing voice. Sunday at 1 p.m .will be our weekly pinochle tournament and there is always a seat open for any wishing to come play. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows. Nellie Paulsen grabbed first place and Jo Porter ran off with second place. Low score of the day was taken by Ken Cook.The last pinochle of the day was won by Leonard Paulsen and Jo Porter. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State. 7 p.m. every day and Seahawks games are always Happy Hour. We have free pool every Sunday. Monday is Taco Night, Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Steak Night and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what’s happening at your club and join in. As always, We Are People Helping People.

At the

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

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Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

THE FAMILY

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14+

THURS. - FRI. OCT 10-11 SHOWS ON FRI. @ 7&9:10 PM

THE BUTLER

PG

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THURS. - FRI. - SAT. OCT 17,18,19

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 Animation/Comedy.Family PG Starring Bill Hader, Anna 96 min Faris, James Caan, Andy Sandberg. Fri. 6:45, 9:15 Sat.*4:15,6:45,9:15 Sun. *4:15,6:45. Wkdys: 6:45

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS 134min

PG13

Starts Friday. Action, Drama, Thriller Starring Tom Hanks, Catherine Keener, Barkhad Abdi. Fri.6:45 & 9:45. Sat.*3:45, 6:45,9:45. Sun.*3:45, 6:45. Wkdys 6:45.

GRAVITY

91min

PG13

Drama/Mystery/Sci Fi/Thriller. Starring Sandra Bullock,George Clooney,Ed Harris. Fri. 6:45,9:15 Sat.*4:15,6:45, 9:15 Sun. *4:15,6:45. Wkdys: 6:45

RUNNER RUNNER 91min Crime/Drama/Thriller Starring Justin Timberlake, Ben Affleck, Gemma Arterton.

R

Fri.7:00, 9:30 Sat. *4:30,7:00,9:30. Sun. *4:30, 7:00. Wkdys 7:00. Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


OCTOBER 10, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life

Royal Neighbors to surprise local woman with a $2,500 check Submitted by Lynnette Tarchinski Royal Neighbors of America

Submitted photo

These kids were recognized for our Tiger P.R.I.D.E award. The acronym signifies characteristics of perseverance, respect, integrity, discipline, and excellence. Students and teachers nominate other students for demonstrating district’s P.R.I.D.E habits each month. At the end of the month we recognize them at an assembly, where they receive a Tiger Pride t-shirt. Pictured are Rachael Silverthorn, Lucas Vugteveen, Tiffany Ferdon, Amanda Johnson, Jordan Hughes, Chyna Kinkade, Tim Freese, Brenden Asmussen and Collin Aitcheson.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Pacific Northwest Trail Special Meeting

be completed by Thanksgiving. After this time growers are advised to open their grower valves.

OROVILLE - There will be a special meeting of the Oroville Chapter of the Pacific Northwest Trail Association on Wednesday, Oct. 9 at 6 p.m. at the Pastime Bar & Grill, 1307 Main Street, Oroville. The group will get caught up on all the goings on for the summer and most importantly discuss the impending sale of the Whistler Canyon trailhead by the county. A public auction of the property is scheduled in December. We stand to lose everything. Please attend to hear the news and possible consequence. If your are unable to attend look at the article at www. pnt.org. If you are able PNTA is accepting donations towards purchasing the property.

Oroville Farmers’ Market

Candidates at Oroville Chamber OROVILLE - The next Oroville Chamber of Commerce General Meeting will be Thursday, Oct. 10, 1 p.m. at The Plaza. Speaking will be the two candidates for the senator for the Seventh Legislative District - incumbent John Smith and Brian Dansel. As with all Chamber General Meetings, the public is welcome to attend. This will be a “presentation” and not a “debate”. Each candidate will be given a total of 25 minutes to present and that includes taking questions.

Tonasket Farmers’ Market TONASKET - Tonasket Farmers Market is held on Thursdays, from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. The next market is Thursday, Oct. 10. Come join us for some of the best in local produce, crafts, personal care products, homegrown music and farmstead cheeses. Whether you make a quick spin to pick up supper ingredients or hang out for hours, you’re sure to get what you want. For more info call (509) 486-1199.

Latin Jazz at Esther Bricques OROVILLE – Tonight’s performance at Esther Bricques Winery, Thursday, Oct. 10, will feature Latin Jazz performed by Sam Howell on bass clarinet, Mark Kubiak on guitar and Tim Allie on drums. Doors open at 6 p.m. with light nibbles available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. Call (509) 476-2861 for further details.

OTID Water Turn Off NORTH COUNTY - The Oroville Tonasket Irrigation District has set Friday, Oct. 11, 2013 as the water system turn off date for the irrigation season. Draining of the system will begin the following Monday and should

League sign-ups on Oct. 16 Submitted by Jan Hansen

OROVILLE - North Okanogan Valley Pool league holds its next meeting on Wednesday, Oct.

OROVILLE - The Oroville Farmers’ Market is Saturday, Oct. 12, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Oroville Community Library located at 1276 Main St. Purchase art, crafts, plant starts, fresh baked goods and tamales plus the best produce on the planet. The Oroville Farmers’ Market continues each Saturday through October 26 and new vendors are welcome. Call (509) 476-2662 for more information.

African Music Piano Recital TONASKET - Ghanaian American pianist William Chapman Nyaho will perform a recital, “Music by Composers of African Descent,” at the music studio of Roz Nau in Tonasket on Friday Oct. 11, at 7 p.m. He will also offer a workshop and master class on Oct. 12 at the same location, 42 E. Winesap. Please call Nau at (509) 486-4673 for more information about any of these events.

Beginning Piano Classes OROVILLE – Six sessions of Beginning Piano start on Wednesday, Oct. 16. If you have ten fingers and some motivation you can learn to play this beautiful instrument. Our talented instructor, Jeff Gee, will teach you about the keyboard, pitches and melodies, and just how to use your fingers and hands. This class is for beginners, adults and school students. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email her at community.schools@oroville.wednet. edu or register online at www. northvalleycommunityschools. com.

NVH Surgical Center Open House TONASKET - The public is invited to visit the Open House for North Valley Hospital’s new surgical center on Friday, Oct. 25, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Take a tour; enjoy refreshments; learn about NVH surgical services. Those with questions may contact Terri Orford at (509) 486-3163 or busdev@nvhospital.org.

Health Care Coverage Workshop TONASKET - Statewide Health Insurance Benefit Advisors (SHIBA) will be putting on an free workshop for the public at the North Valley Hospital Board Room on Monday, Oct. 28 and Friday, Nov. 1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. They will be providing three volunteers and assistance

POOL LEAGUE 16, at the Eagles in Oroville. Sponsors, team captains and all interested parties are invited. All

is available on a “first come first serve basis”. Please bring a list of your medications with you to the workshop. Washington state’s SHIBA can help you: Understand your health care coverage options and rights; find affordable health care coverage and evaluate and compare health insurance plans. They provide free, unbiased and confidential assistance with Medicare and health care choices. Their volunteer advisors are trained to give you the latest Medicare and health care coverage information.

ROCK ISLAND, ILL Members of Royal Neighbors of America Chapter 9500, Oroville, will meet at noon at the Plaza Restaurant for a meeting featuring guest speaker, Jackie Daniels. Daniels will be surprised with a check for $2,500 to help her enhance the Child Passenger Safety Program she launched on behalf of the city. The funds are being awarded from Royal Neighbors’ 2013 Nation of Neighbors Program. Daniels is a licensed massage practitioner and a volunteer Emergency Medical Technician. When she was approached by city officials to develop the program,

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

Children’s Author to Speak at Oroville School OROVILLE - Author Jack Gantos will be speaking at the Oroville Elementary School on Tuesday, Nov. 5. Gantos has written books for people of all ages, from picture books and middle grade fiction to novels for young adults and adults. His work include Hole in My Life, Joe Pigza Loses Control and Dead End in Norvelt.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 4762386.

Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazettetribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

sign up sheets for teams must be turned in with all fees, team members, sponsors, and table locations. If your sign-up sheet is not turned in on or before this meeting, your team will not be included in the schedule of play. We will start play on Nov. 6. Be there!

families and individuals in reaching their goals and rebuilding their lives through its Nation of Neighbors Program. The program, which was launched in 2007, demonstrates Royal Neighbors’ vision of protecting women financially and empowering them to improve their lives, families and communities, the philosophy on which Royal Neighbors was founded in 1895. Headquartered in Rock Island, IL, with a branch office in Mesa, AZ, Royal Neighbors serves more than 200,000 members and is licensed to do business in 42 states and the District of Columbia. To learn more about Royal Neighbors and its Nation of Neighbors recipients, visit www. royalneighbors.org or call (800) 627-4762

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Your Complete Eyecare Centre

OCSRA Meeting OMAK Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association meets 11 a.m., Friday, Oct 25, at the Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala Ave, Omak. Guest speaker is Omak School District Superintendent, Dr. Erik Swanson. For more information call (509) 826-5068.

which educates parents about the importance of the correct car seats for children, she accepted with enthusiasm. In the past year, she has applied for grants to fund car seats, purchased educational materials, and hosted car seat safety checks. Additional funding will allow Jackie to purchase more seats and educational tools and host more safety presentations. During the event, the Oroville chapter also will be presenting a check for $4,103.85 to the Friends of the Oroville Library. The money was raised through various fund-raisers and matched by Royal Neighbors’ corporate office. Focusing on its history of standing strong for women, Royal Neighbors has given nearly $1.5 million to more than 1,000

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

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OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

WATERFRONT

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New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

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Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 10, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • October 10, 2013

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent

Lots & Acreage

Help Wanted

ONE BEDROOM APT $650 per month. Garbage, water, sewer & electricity included. Furnished. No smoking or pets. References and credit check req. CALL SPENCE 509-429-4722.

ASPEN SPRINGS

Oroville School District has the following Coaching positions available

www.gazette-tribune.com Oroville. Large, Nice 1 bedroom apartment. Upstairs. No pets or smoking. $400 + Utilities. 509-476-3145

Absolutely the best deer hunting in Washington! 20 treed acres, very private, great access, close to National Forest and 100’s of fishing lakes! Just $1000 down on guaranteed seller contract. Call TLC 1-888-440-9824 Ref: AS10

Announcements

For Rent

COUPLE SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeking to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of opportunity, humor, adventure and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at direct at 206-920-1376, toll-free at 877-290-0543 or email AndrewCorley@outlook.com You can also contact our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Sudoku

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 41 (Easy, rating 0.41) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

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Puzzle 47 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

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Sponsored by

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DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

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ANSWERS

Closes October 15, 2013 Please send a letter of interest/application to the district office: 816 Juniper Oroville, WA 98844 Oroville School District is an equal opportunity Employer.

Health General

2 Bedroom House, In Town, $650. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Lakefront Apartment, $725. Darling 1 Bedroom Apt, $495. Deluxe Lakefront Home, Furnished, 3 Baths, $1595. OTHERS. Call Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

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JH Boys Basketball Coach Head JH Wrestling Coach Assistant HS Girls Basketball Coach Assistant HS Softball Coach

Across 1. Extend, in a way 6. Eastern ties 10. Arise 14. Howler 15. Santa ___, Calif. 16. 100 cents 17. Katarina Witt, Olympic skater, e.g. 19. Bone-dry 20. Allot 21. Sometimes done with a check 23. Antiques and ___

Down 1. Perlman of “Cheers� 2. Nestling falcons 3. 1987 Costner role 4. Attract 5. Wheeled vehicle drawn by a tractor (British) 6. “Catch-22� pilot 7. Melon-shaped ice cream dessert 8. Bartender on TV’s Pacific Princess

9. Safe places 10. One who does not pay his debts 11. Acoustic 12. Correspond 13. Bumps 18. Beat the draft? 22. Certain sorority woman 24. Carpenter’s machine 25. Strengthen, with “up� 26. Assistant 28. Place 30. Moray, e.g. 31. Tom Sawyer author 33. Climb 34. Arid 35. “... ___ he drove out of sight� 37. From first to last (3 wds, hyphenated) 38. Actress Winona 39. Catch, as in a net 44. Knickknack 46. “Om,� e.g. 47. Closed 48. Nautical pole 49. Kidney waste product 50. Range rover 51. Found a new tenant for 52. ___ flu 55. 15-ball cluster 56. Carve in stone 57. The Beatles’“___ Leaving Home� (contraction) 60. Badge-earning girls’ org.

NAC Licensed NAC needed to provide in-home care to patient in Riverside/Tonasket area. Experience preferred but not required. Duties include heavy patient care. Must have NAC license from WA State 1-800-637-9998 inquire@availhome.com EOE Now Hiring Health Clinic Manager/Receptionist Seeking part-time clinic manager/receptionist at small, private Natural Health Clinic in Okanogan.

Auctions

Statewides

FALL CONSIGNMENT

ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details.

TONASKET RODEO GROUNDS - TONASKET, WA.

Equipment - Vehicles - Tools Household - Collectibles

SAT., OCT. 12, 2013 -10 a.m.

* * *EARLY * * *CONSIGNMENTS *********

THERE WILL BE MUCH MORE!! * 1979 Case 1150 Dozer, 8-way Blade, 3-prong Ripper, 90% Tracks & Pins, 2519 Hrs * 1976 JD 1020 Tractor, Diesel, Runs Good, New Injectors & Head Gasket *MF 35 Tractor, 3-pt, Clean, Good Rubber * JD 750 Diesel Tractor, 4WD, #67 Loader & Bucket, 3-pt, Lights, Very Clean * Ferguson 35 Tractor * 1993 Jeep Cherokee * 6-ft Grass Mower * 1988 3-axle HD Equipment Tlr, Fold down Ramps, 15-ft Bed * 2000 2-axle 20-ft Pull Tlr, Good Rubber * 5th Wheel Neckover 18-ft Horsetrailer (hauled draft horses) * 2 Landini 6560F Tractors, 4WD, Diesel * MF20C Tractor w/loader & bucket * Kubota 7030N Tractor, 1991, 4WD * Goldini Star 75 Tractor, 4WD * Perfect Rotary Mower * Verminator Gopher Machine * Brillion Brush Mower * Kuhm Brush Rake * Brush Forks * Loader Forks * Preumatic Pruners * Woodsman PTO Wood Saw * Ford 2-ton Truck, 1975, 18-ft Bed * Ford F150 Pickup, 4WD, Auto * 1987 Chev 1/2-ton Pickup * 2 Dodge Dakota Pickups, 1992 & 93 * 1992 Ford 350 1-ton Flatbed * 1990 Toyota 4WD Pickup * 1962 Ford Dump Truck w/Plow * Myers SnowPlow, frame, lifts, lights * 4 sections good Spring Tooth Harrow w/ Hitch * Single Axle 5th Wheel Dolly * JD Back Blade * 3-pt ForkLift * 3-pt Fresno * Powder River Livestock Head Catch, Auto * 10-ft Wilderness Pickup Camper * Wade Drag Saw * Tulsa 18,000# Winch * Economy Hit & Miss Motor * LOTS OF POWER & HAND TOOLS * 4-Wheeler, 250cc, Only 100 miles * 2ianj Motorcycle, 250cc, 600 miles * M-1 Carbine * Samurai Sword * Collectible Jack Knives in Boxes * 2 Wood & Glass Display Cases, Very 1LFH 6HWV  LQ7LUHVRQ5LPVÂżWV GM Product * Various Collectibles CALL & WE WILL MAIL, E-MAIL, OR FAX YOU A COMPLETE HANDBILL NO BUYERS PREMIUM * SALES TAX WILL BE CHARGED

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC Licensed & Bonded / LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 DAL DAGNON: 486-2570 DARYL ASMUSSEN: 486-2138

Minimum 2 year commitment. Qualified Candidates must have basic accounting knowledge and be proficient in QuickBooks and Microsoft Beautiful nice rooster free to Office applications. Medical good home. background preferred!! (509)486-1682 or 429-0873 Wages depend on experience. Call 509/422-3700 for more information.

Free

Auctions RAYMOND SMITH ESTATE AUCTION 967 Conconully Hwy - Approx. 9.5 miles from Omak/ Okanogan

SAT., OCT. 19, 2013- 10 a.m.

***************

PARTIAL LISTING: * Woods CO 80 Offset Mower * 6 & 7-ft Rhino Back Blades * * 2-bottom Plow * Fresno * 3-pt Forks * Oxy-Act Set w/Cart * Craftsman Table Saw * * Honda EG2200 Generator * Craftsman 295 Welder * Craftman Tool Boxes * * Honda 2600 psi Power Washer * Craftsman 3HP, 20-gal Air Compressor * * Various Shop Items & Tools ** Buggy Foot Warmer * Cream Cans * Old Lard Press * Coffee Grinder * Hay Knife * old Boiler * RR Lantern * Shoe Tree * Flat Iron * old Chicken Scales w/Weights * Several Iron Wheels ** VERY NICE FURNITURE - Recliners * Loveseat * 27-in Color TV * Corner Cabinet * Glassware * * Maple Dining Set, 6 Chairs * Hutch, 5-drawer, 2-door * Dressers * Nightstands * Queen Bed w/Temper-pedic sleep mattress * Spindle Leg Table, small * Elec Range * Refrig * Chest & Upright Freezers * Dryer * Craftsman Riding Lawnmower, 6-speed * Craftsman Rototiller * Toro Lawnmower * ABOVE IS A SAMPLE OF ITEMS MUCH MORE - CALL AND WE WILL MAIL, E-MAIL OR FAX YOU A COMPLETE HANDBILL- NO BUYERS PREMIUM - SALES TAX WILL BE CHARGED

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC Licensed & Bonded / LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 DARYL ASMUSSEN: 486-2138 DAL DAGNON: 486-2570

www.gazette-tribune.com

Garage & Yard Sale

TONASKET 2 FAMILY SALE! BAKED GOODS, office decor, great back to school clothes, clothes for all ages!! New, never used toys & jewelry boxes! Saturday, October 12th, 8 am to 3 pm & Sunday, October 13th, 8 am to noon. 110 East First St, Tonasket.

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF OCT. 7, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310 Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HEALTH/MEDICAL PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL Mesh? Did you undergo transvaginal placement of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence between 2005 and the present? If the mesh caused complications, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Charles H. Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727 HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS DRIVERS -- Looking for Job Security? Haney Truck Lines seeks CDLA, hazmat/doubles required. Paid Dock bump/Benefits. Bonus Program, Paid Vacation! Call Now. 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com DRIVERS -- Whether you have experience or need training, we offer unbeatable career opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 centraldrivingjobs.com GORDON TRUCKING, Inc. CDL-A Drivers Needed! A better Carrier. A better Career. Up to $1500 sign on bonus! Dedicated Fleet Option Home weekly available in some areas.. EOE. Call 7 days/week! 866-725-9669 FOR SALE -- LAND ASPEN SPRINGS -- 20 treed acres, very private, great access, close to National Forest and 100’s of fishing lakes! Absolutely the best deer hunting in Washington! Just $1000 down on guaranteed seller contract. Call TLC 1-888-440-9824 Ref: AS10 LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices Notice of Rescheduled Public Hearing City of Oroville The Oroville Planning Commission will hold a public hearing at its regularly scheduled meeting on Wednesday, October 16, 2013 beginning at 4:30 pm in the City Council Chambers to consider zoning text amendments to Chapters 17.12, 17.56 and 17.84 of the Oroville Municipal Code. These amendments address general provisions and interpretation guidance for the zoning code with the objectives of eliminating redundancies and providing clarity. This hearing has been rescheduled as a result of lack of quorum at the Oct. 2 meeting. The proposed amendments are available on the City website at www.oroville-wa.com; direct questions to Community Development Director Chris Branch at 509-5603535. Persons with special needs, including access and language assistance, should call JoAnn Denney at City Hall at 509-476-2926 ext. 13 to make arrangements for accommodations at the hearing. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 10, 2013. #518242 PUBLIC NOTICE On January 26, 2006, K207DC was granted a license by the Federal Communications Commission to serve the public interest as a public trustee until February 1,2014. Our license will expire on February 1, 2014. We have filed an application for license renewal with the FCC. A copy ofthe application is available for public inspection during our regular business hours. It contains information concerning this station’s performance during the last seven years. Individuals who wish to advise the FCC offacts relating to our renewal application and to whether the station has operated in the public interest should file comments and petitions with the Commission by January 2, 2014. Further information concerning the Commission’s broadcast license renewal process is available at PO Box 942 Tonasket, WA. (public file address) , or may be obtained from the FCC, Washington, D.C. 20554. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2013. #517177

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OCTOBER 10, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A9

Cops & Courts Compiled by Zachary Van Brunt

Superior Court Criminal

Adam Charles Luntsford, 39, Omak, was found guilty Sept. 19 of third-degree malicious mischief. Luntsford was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended for two years and credit for 30 days served. He was fined $1,010.50. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Nov. 15. The crime occurred July 5. David J.L. Condon-Soderberg, 19, Omak, pleaded guilty June 10 to first-degree trafficking in stolen property, third-degree possession of stolen property and making false or misleading statements to a public servant. Condon-Soderberg was sentenced Sept. 26 to three months in jail and fined $1,110.50. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Oct. 15. The crimes occurred in January 2013. In a separate case, Condon-Soderberg pleaded guilty Sept. 26 to POCS, use of drug paraphernalia and thirddegree DWLS. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail for the June 21 crimes and fined an additional $2,360.50. Emily Marie Stokes, 26, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Oct. 3 seconddegree introduction of contraband. Stokes was sentenced to two months in jail and fined $1,110.50. The crime occurred March 24. Marvin Keith Lezard, 48, Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 4 to seconddegree trafficking in stolen property. Lezard was sentenced to three months in jail for the Aug. 7 crime and fined $1,110.50. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Nov. 12. Kyle Steven Scott Cates, 21, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Oct. 4 to first-degree trafficking in stolen property, third-degree theft and obstructing a law enforcement officer. Cates was sentenced to three months in jail and received a 274-day suspended sentence for the Aug. 3 crimes. He was fined $1,110.50. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Jan. 3, 2014. Cates also had a first-degree burglary charge dismissed. Raini Michelle Pichette, 26,

Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 7 to third-degree assault (of a law enforcement officer). Piechette was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $1,110.50. The crime occurred Dec. 8, 2012. The court dismissed Oct. 7 a first-degree assault charge against Gary Henry Griffiths, 81, Okanogan. Griffiths had recently passed away. The court found probable cause to charge Jason David Harder, 42, Okanogan, with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. In a separate case, the court also found probable cause to charge Harder with additional counts of second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The court found probable cause to charge Diana L. Armstrong, 46, Omak, with second-degree identity theft. The court found probable cause to charge Robert Brian Bradshaw, 26, Okanogan, with POCS (methamphetamine) with intent to deliver and use of drug paraphernalia. The court found probable cause to charge Jerry Ray Mears, 48, Riverside, with theft of a motor vehicle and second-degree theft. In a separate case, the court also found probable cause to charge Mears with three counts of harassment (threats to kill), three counts of intimidating a witness and two counts of tampering with a witness. The court found probable cause to charge Jarred Clayton Naclerio, 22, Oroville, with POCS (hydrocodone).

Juvenile

A 17-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Oct. 2 to minor in a public place exhibiting effects of liquor. He was sentenced to six days in detention with credit for one served and fined $100. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Oct. 2 to fourth-degree assault. In a separate case, the same boy pleaded guilty Oct. 2 to first-degree theft and seconddegree trafficking in stolen property. He was sentenced to 15 to 36 weeks in state detention with credit for 26 days served, and fined a total of $200. A 14-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Oct. 2 to no valid opera-

tor’s license without identification. He was sentenced to two days in detention and fined $75.

District Court Wayne Alan Goff, 51, Omak, had a charge dismissed: second-degree recreational fishing without a license or catch card. Shavonna Lee Gorr, 23, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Gorr received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $118. She also had a separate third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Ricardo Guia Alvarez, 21, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief (physical damage) and disorderly conduct. Guia Alvarez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 244 days suspended and fined $1,641. Destiny M. Hamilton, 32, Oroville, guilty on two counts of thirddegree DWLS. Hamilton was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended and fined $1,636. Gordon Joseph Harry Jr., 48, Omak, guilty on two counts of seconddegree criminal trespass. Harry was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended and fined $316. Ryan Matthew Heim, 27, Tonasket, guilty of DUI. Heim was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended and fined $1,681. Danielle Ranae Hendren, 24, Okanogan, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. Hendren was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended and fined $1,401. Juan Hernandez, no middle name listed, 29, Tonasket, guilty of no valid operator’s license without identification. Hernandez was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended and fined $758. Aaron Cesslie Jacobs, 23, Riverside, guilty of first-degree DWLS. Jacobs was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended and fined $1,058. Adam Shaun Jennings, 26, Oroville, guilty of no valid operator’s license without identification. Jennings received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $858. Julia Maria Johns, 35, Omak, guilty

of third-degree malicious mischief. Johns was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 336 days suspended and fined $358. Johns also had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Jessica June Kitterman, 23, Tonasket, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. She was fined $500. Ashley Nichole Knowles, 22, Okanogan, had a charge dismissed: use or possession of a loaded firearm. Jodi Lea Landt, 39, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Edward Gene Lawrence, 39, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: hit and run (unattended property). Jose Lopez Ballesteros, 19, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Lopez Ballesteros was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 353 days suspended and fined $558. Daniel John Love, 29, Oroville, had a disorderly conduct charge dismissed. Michael J. Lynch, 19, Oroville, guilty of DUI. Lynch was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,681. He also had two charges dismissed: third-degree DWLS and attempted MIP/C. Raul Marcelo Pozar, 22, Loomis, guilty of DUI. Marcelo Pozar was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 347 days, suspended and fined $1,681.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, Sept. 30, 2013 Theft on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Fuel reported missing. Trespassing on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Littering on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Robbery on Main St. in Riverside. Found property on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Bicycle recovered. Burglary on W. Broadway in Conconully. Theft on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Disorderly conduct on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Koala Dr. in Omak. Eva Lily McKinney, 24, booked for four counts of POCS (heroin) and one count of POCS (metham-

phetamine). Joseph Gregory Shearer, 41, booked for DUI. Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013 Warrant arrest on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Mill St. in Okanogan. Theft on Siwash Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Trespassing on Queen St. in Okanogan. Littering on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Ash St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Apple Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Ash St. in Omak. Assault on Jasmine St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Drugs on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Christopher Michael Cornett, 18, booked for disorderly conduct and two counts of fourth-degree assault (revoked). Seth Jared Harris, 27, booked for third-degree DWLS. Terrance Jonathan Randall, 24, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for violation of a protection order. Edward Robert Simpson, 33, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for DUI. Abraham Lee Poole, 34, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Jennifer Juanita Skillings, 23, booked on three Superior Court FTA bench warrants: POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams) and two for POCS with intent to deliver. Martin Ray Hoffman, 48, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourthdegree assault (DV). Dustin Thomas Hayes, 25, booked for POCS and on a Tribal FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS, an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS, a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS, and two Omak Police Department warrants: third-degree DWLS and DUI. Hector M. Meza de la Cruz, 18, court commitment for DUI.

DWLS on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Harassment on Spring Meadow Lane near Oroville. Trespassing on Buzzard Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Vehicle theft on Pickens Valley Rd. near Oroville. Backhoe reported missing. Theft on Lyman Lake Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Omak Ave. in Omak. Theft on Maple St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Miguel Angel Hernandez-Avalos, 35, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), obstruction and USBP hold. Alex Anthony Sanchez, 37, booked for first-degree robbery, thirddegree assault, felony harassment and unlawful imprisonment. Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 Drugs on Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. Fraud on Pine St. in Okanogan. Stabbing on Horse Spring Coulee Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle accident on Omache Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Omak Ave. in Omak. Drugs on Omak Ave. in Omak. Fraud on Engh Rd. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle accident on S. Main St. in Omak. Threats on Omache Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Antwine Ave. in Tonasket. Lynn Marie Arnhold, 36, booked on a Department of Corrections warrant for probation violation. Kelby James Renkert, 26, booked on a bench warrant for residential burglary. Cody Lee Payne, 18, booked on a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant for drive-by shooting. Robert Wade Flatbush, 21, booked on two OCSO FTC warrants: harassment and possession of another ID. Dylan Thomas James Counts, 19, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Cory Stephen Lee Counts, 19,

See COPS | PG A12

Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013

REAL ESTATE GUIDE Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! SUN 1411 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 LAKES Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

REALTY

h i l lt o p r e a lt y TONASKET HOME

NEW LISTING - 3-bdrm, 1-bath. Close to School. Sliding Glass Doors to Patio & Nice Back Yard. 2 Ponds. Fruit Trees. Big Lot. Not Much on the Market for this Price - $142,900.00

ORO BEACH RV RESORT

Beautiful Park Cabin located on the sandy beach steps from the water. Lounging deck, open floor plan, boat launch/ ramp and dock. 2 Lots included ONLY $225,000

Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com l 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

HANNA REALTY

DAVID HANNA - BROKER, DUANE WILSON ASSOC. BROKER, GLEN GROVE & STEVE CLARK AGENT Where good deals are not extinct! 509-486-4528 or 509-429-8322 This is a very nice well maintained home on a quiet dead end street. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, kitchen, dining and living room on main floor. The full basement has 2 finished rooms, a 3/4 bath and a utility room. The basement has inside and outside entrances. $118,900 MLS #466102 PICTURES - www.hannarealty.com email: dave@hannarealty.com

Check out our real estate section today! OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

1422 Main St.,Oroville, WA. 98844 Ph. 509-476-3602

306 Hwy. 7 S., Tonasket Toll Free 1-877-593-7238

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Beautiful young orchard! Well cared for! Great income potential. Nearly 20 acres of cherries: 6 acres of Chelan cherries planted in 2008, 4 more acres planted in 2011. 10 acres of Coral Champagne cherries planted in 2009. Trees planted on 16x9 spacing on Mazzard rootstock. Some equipment available for additional sale. MLS#488534 $275,000

www.windermere.com

509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

REDUCED! 4 Lakeshore Dr., Oroville - Amazing lake access with nearly

new multi-level home with lake/mountain views. Slate, tile, oak floors. Stone gas fireplace. Granite counters, pantry. Master suite has walk-in closet, double sink vanity, separate tub/shower. Daylight basement has gas fireplace in rec room, two bedrooms, full bath. Half bath, laundry room on entry level. Oversized two car garage with cabinets/sink. Wonderful home. NWMLS # 377262 $359,000

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

- 24 Hour Service Licensed & Bonded

509-486-2692

Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES All of your Automotive & Upholstery needs

Civil Criminal

Busted Knuckle

Attorney at Law

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Auto & Upholstery

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

Seats  Headliners  Door Panels Convertible tops / Vinyl roof covers — Auto & Small Engine Service — We Do Tire Repair & Balance! 124 Chesaw Rd, Oroville 509-476-2611

Pumps

Septic Service

Excavation and Septic Service

Over 25 Years experience! Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

Midway Building Supply

RYAN W. GUNN

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

— Fred Cook —

Building Supplies

Insulation

Concrete

Quality Supplies Since 1957

P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

Got Water?

Auto / Upholstery

Thank you for your continued support!  Septic Pumping

 Septic Installation  Portable Toilets

509-422-3621 Cell: (509) 322-4777 MORGASE983JS

HOURS: Mon. - Sat., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

www.osoyoosreadimix.com

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Oroville Building Supply 33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

Installed Insulation

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 10, 2013

Faster, and faster yet

SPORTS

Hornets’ Speiker cracks all-class top 10 with personal best run at Can-Am and track season to this summer putting an average 70 miles a week in and I have kept my mileKETTLE FALLS - Sierra age up since the season started Speiker wasn’t satisfied with her as well.” Sports in which the clock is two state titles and her perch atop the pack of area distance runners. a bigger opponent than living, So the Oroville High School breathing opposition often focus senior spent last summer with a on topping previous bests, and renewed and more focused sense for Speiker that has been no of purpose, started off the season exception, week to week and race with some of the fastest times of to race. So even in races where her high school career and has there hasn’t been competition at just continued to get faster as the her level, there is always a time to beat. And in cross country, where season has gone on. At Saturday’s Can-Am very course is different, that usuInvitational in Kettle Falls, at about ally means comparing last year’s the mid-point of the cross country time on the same course. “I have just been trying to PR season, Speiker broke her personal 5k best by eight each meet from my best time seconds with a (on the same course) from the tie of 18:11, a previous years,” Speiker said. “I mark that had mainly focus on getting my first stood since run- mile around 5:50 and my second ning an 18:19.8 one right there, too.” The middle portion of the race, at Connell in she said, is what she has been 2010. It’s no lon- focusing on improving the most. Sierra Speiker “At practices we have been ger a matter of running working on keeping my pace by the fastest time in Class 1B/2B, doing mile intervals with one minwhich will be the competition ute breaks in between,” she said. she faces at the state finals meet “(That) has helped a lot for me.” With all the additional training, in November. This is about chasSpeiker didn’t ing the fastlike an est time in the “Every week I can’t wait sound athlete in danstate for any girl at in any for the weekend just ger of burning out on her sport. high school. so I can get out there In fact, she said Speiker curthat her love for rently ranks and race.” running has only sixth overall, Sierra Speiker increased. eight seconds “I’d honestout of the No. ly have to say 2 spot. The top overall time belongs to Alexa I love running so much more Efraimson of Camas who ran a this year than previous years,” Speiker said. “Every week I can’t 17:28.7 on Sept. 13. It didn’t hurt that Speiker had wait for the weekend just so I can some legitimate competition at get out there and race. Trying to break 18 is what’s the Can-Am meet. McCall Skay of West Valley (Spokane) ran the motivating me a lot this year. I state’s 10th fastest time (18:34) to want to go into state with a 5k in the 17s.” take second in the race. And as her times have dropped, “This season breaking 18:00 is my main goal, Speiker said. “I interest has risen from colleges would love to be in the 1s. I’m so wanting to add someone with her close to the 17s that if I can just resume to their squad. Speiker, push a little harder I’ll be where though, is focused on what is I want to be at. Which is my goal right in front of her more than for this coming meet in Richland.” the future. “Various schools have been The Richland meet last year was the fastest, deepest field contacting me,” she said. “But Speiker faced all year; she fin- right now I’m focusing on the ished eighth there, and it appears season and don’t know where I that at least three runners that want to go next year just quite beat her last year will be in the yet.” 2013 field. As solid as Speiker has been More Can-Am results Other Oroville girls who - spectacular, even - moving up amongst the state’s elite was ran last Saturday were Phoebe going to require more from her Poynter (52nd, 28:28) and Kaylee than what she had done to pre- Foster (66th, 39:15). Running for the boys were pare in the past. “I focused a lot on increasing Diego Santana (62nd, 20:45); my mileage over the summer Nahum Garfias (76th, 22:02); and getting a good base in,” she Javier Castillo (78th, 23:00); said. “(Then) when cross country Emmanuel Castrejon (79th, season started I could start speed 23:37); Dakota Haney (82nd, work. I went from doing 30-40 25:09); and Daniel Castrejon miles a week last cross country (83rd, 25:12). By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

KETTLE FALLS - Seven Tigers ran personal bests at the Can-Am Invitational on Saturday. “It was a new flat and fast course,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “The weather was perfect for running and some fast times were produced.” Amber Monroe led the Tonasket girls with a 16th place finish in a personal-best 21:46. Johnna Terris (20th, PR 24:14), Jenna Valentine (35th, PR 24:41); Kallie Mirick (37th, PR 24:45), Lea Berger (38th 25:17)also competed for the Tigers. Running for the boys were Adrian McCarthy (48th, 19:55), Tim Jackson (59th, PR 20:21); Abe Podkranic (61st, PR 20:41);, Smith Coondon (63rd, 20:46), Bryden Hires (66th, PR 20:52) and Dallin Good (46:00 after being during the race). “The high school team’s legs were feeling the results from running hard on Thursday at Chelan,” Thornton said. “They were still able to run fast times. I continue to be impressed with the fact that everyone on the girls team is racing, not just running races. Everyone is improving

race to race, staying focused and racing.” The Tigers originally were scheduled to race at Lake Roosevelt on Saturday, but that meet was cancelled. The Tigers instead will host a meet on their home course on Friday, Oct. 11, with a middle school race at 4:00 p.m. and the high school races beginning at 4:30.

Tigers race at Chelan CHELAN - The Tigers also ran a 2.3-mile race at Chelan on Thursday, Oct. 3. Amber Monroe won the race with a time of 16:33. “We focused on racing, not just running,” Thornton said. “I was happy with how they all did. We are gaining experience.” Others for the girls included Johnna Terris (6th, 17:10); Lea Berger (13th, 18:46); Jenna Valentine (17th, 19:13) and Kallie Mirick (18th, 19:53). Hunter Swanson paced the boys with an 11th-place finish in 14:24. Also finishing were Adrian McCarthy (15th, 14:35); Tim Jackson (18th, 15:05); Smith Condon (26th, 15:21); Bryden Hires (27th, 15:24); Abe Podkranic (30th, 15:49); and Dallin Good (38th, 24:00).

Tigers’ hot start to be challenged this week By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s girls soccer team is on an early-season run none of the girls have experienced before. Tigers coach Darren Collins hopes that can keep their momentum in high gear, though the level of difficulty for their schedule increases significantly in the coming days. The Tigers, 5-1 overall (4-1 Caribou Trail League) dominated Chelan on Thursday, Oct. 3, in a 7-0 victory, but this week face perennial state powers Cashmere and Cascade, both on the road, as well as a third road game rematch at Chelan. “It’s a little better feeling this year,” Collins said. “We’re scoring more goals, which is nice. Last year it seemed like we were going to a shootout every other game. Either that or our wins were all by a goal or two, and our losses seemed like they were a goal or two.” Many of the goals have been notched by names familiar to Tonasket soccer fans in the past few seasons. Against Chelan, Kylie Dellinger and Kathryn Cleman each had a pair of goals, with another scored by senior Selena Cosino. But younger players have stepped into play critical roles as well. Freshman twins Ashlynn and Kayla Willis have been in the middle of the action from the start of the season. Their speed on the outside and ability to get accurate crossing passes into the goal box has set up numerous scoring opportunities. Ashlynn Willis had three assists in the Chelan contest, while Kayla added an assist and a goal.

Sophomore Jaden Vugteveen added an assist and scored a goal when her corner kick glanced into off a Chelan player. “The Willis girls really have great footwork,” Collins said. “We’ve got another freshman that’s not eligible yet that is of that quality too.” The “one that got away,” a 1-0 loss to Okanogan, still irked Collins, though. “We just didn’t bring it that game like we could have,” he said. “But hopefully we can play against Cascade and Cashmere they way we played them at home last year.” The Tigers beat the Kodiaks at home and kept it close against Cashmere until the late-going. “Everyone goes in to Cashmere scared of what’s going to happen to them,” Collins said. A big thing is not being scared to play them. We’ve played them tough a couple of times the past couple of years, so hopefully we can have the right attitude when we go down there.” The Tigers’ next home game is Oct. 17 against Oroville which starts a run of five of six games on their own pitch to close out the regular season.

Tonasket 2, Brewster 1 TONASKET - The Tigers edged Brewster 2-1 on Tuesday, Oct. 1, to temporarily left themselves into a second place tie in the Caribou Trail League. Ashlynn Willis and Kathryn Cleman scored for the Tigers, with Cleman and Jaden Vugteveen picking up assists. “We got 20 shots off and (goalkeeper) Baylie Tyus kind of got the night off with just two saves,” Collins said. “We just had trouble finding the back of the net.”

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Kayla Willis attacks the ball during the Tigers’ victory over Chelan last Thursday.

Hornet football swamps Manson Face key home contest with Liberty Bell this week By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE – After last week’s gut-wrenching loss, the Oroville football team needed a “get well” game. The Hornets got just that on Friday, Oct. 5, steamrolling winless Manson for 32 first quarter points on the way to a 59-6 victory, Oroville’s first Central Washington League win of the year. Luke Kindred and Tanner Smith combined to rush for 355 yards and five touchdowns on just 14 carries as the Hornets led 46-0 at the half. Kindred started the onslaught with a 47-yard run to cap a twoplay 50-yard drive with 8:37 left in the first quarter. Less than two minutes later, Smith returned a Manson punt 37 yards to the Trojan 6-yard line. Dustin Nigg scored on the next play.

Kindred added a 21-yard touchdown run, Smith had a 50-yard score and Nigg returned an interception 14 yards to paydirt before the first quarter was done. Smith added scoring runs of 41 and 72 yards in the second quarter. Sean DeWitte and Logan Mills each added 5-yard touchdown runs in the second half. Smith finished with 207 rushing yards on six carries, while Kindred added 148 yards on eight carries. The Hornets, who didn’t attempt a pass all night, totaled 454 yards rushing to Manson’s

72. The Trojans added 64 yards through the air, but needed to attempt 30 passes (completing eight) to do it. Smith, Lane Tietje, Nigg and Kindred led the defensive effort. Oroville (3-1, 1-1 CWL) hosts Liberty Bell (2-0, 2-0) on Friday, Oct. 12, in a game that will go a long ways toward sorting out the league’s playoff picture. With only two state playoff spots available, the game is critical for the Hornets’ post-season hopes. The Mountain Lions, who didn’t play any non-league games thanks to an initially low turnout,

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nonetheless have rolled through their first two CWL games of the year, ripping Manson 50-7 and Bridgeport 61-13. 884544 2

Tonasket PRs fall at Can-Am

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Kathryn Cleman controls the ball against Chelan during the Tigers’ 7-0 victory on Thursday, Oct. 3. Cleman scored twice against the Goats and also scored during the Tigers’ 2-1 victory over Brewster earlier in the week.

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OCTOBER 10, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A11

SPORTS

Cashmere trounces Tigers By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

CASHMERE - Any hope that Tonasket’s football team held of staying with perennial power Cashmere was put to rest within minutes of opening kickoff as the Bulldogs scored early and often on the way to a 55-6 victory on Friday, Oct. 4. Cashmere (4-1, 3-0 Caribou Trail League) took just four plays to drive the length of the field with its first possession to score the opening touchdown, and after holding the Tigers to a threeand-out on their first possession, returned the ensuing punt for a score and a quick 14-0 lead. Three touchdowns in the final three minutes of the first half including two set up by Tonasket turnovers - gave Cashmere a 49-0 lead at the half. Cashmere just ran over and around us and didn’t let us get any rhythm on offense,” said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. Michael Orozco scored on a 63-yard run in the third quarter for Tonasket’s only score. The Tigers (2-3, 0-3 CTL) play their fourth straight CTL road game on Friday, Oct. 11, at Cascade.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Michael Orozco tries to fend off a Cashmere defender during Friday’s loss to the Bulldogs. Orozco accounted for the only Tonasket points of the game with a 63-yard touchdown run in the third quarter.

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Football Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Alissa Young (7) and Jenna Davisson (8) go up for a block against Brewster on Tuesday, Oct. 1.

League play rough for Tonasket volleyball team By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Chelan’s volleyball team rolled into Tonasket on Thursday, Oct. 3, not having lost a set all season. The Goats returned home with that record intact after sweeping the Tigers 25-11, 25-10, 25-12. “(We) put up an adequate fight,” said Tonasket coach Jackie Gliddon. “We had trouble with serve receive and covering the middle. “We’ll get back in the gym tomorrow, lick our wounds and try it again next week.” The Tigers (0-7, 0-5 Caribou Trail League) face a rematch with Chelan (10-0, 5-0) on Thursday, Oct. 10.

Caribou Trail 1A League Overall W-L Okanogan 3-0 Cashmere 3-0 Cascade 2-1 Quincy 2-1 Brewster 1-2 Chelan 1-2 Tonasket 0-3 Omak 0-3

W-L 5-0 4-1 3-2 2-3 2-3 2-3 2-3 0-5

Central WA 2B League Overall W-L Kittitas 2-0 Liberty Bell 2-0 White Swan 1-0 Oroville 1-1 Lk Roosevelt 0-1 Bridgeport 0-2 Manson 0-2

W-L 2-2 2-0 4-1 3-1 3-2 0-5 0-4

Volleyball Caribou Trail 1A League Overall W-L W-L-S Cascade 5-0 14-3-0 Chelan 5-0 10-0-0 Omak 5-2 5-2-0 Brewster 4-2 4-2-0 Quincy 2-4 2-5-0 Okanogan 2-4 2-4-0 Tonasket 0-5 0-7-0 Cashmere 0-6 0-6-0

CWL 2B North League Overall W-L W-L-S Bridgeport 3-0 5-2-0 Liberty Bell 1-1 5-2-0

Oroville 1-1 3-4-0 Lk Roosevelt 1-2 2-4-0 Manson 0-2 2-4-0

Girls Soccer

Caribou Trail 1A League Overall Cashmere Okanogan Tonasket Cascade Brewster Quincy Omak Chelan

Pts. W-L W-L-T 18 6-0 7-1-0 15 5-2 5-3-0 12 4-1 5-1-0 12 4-1 4-3-0 9 3-4 4-5-0 6 2-5 2-7-0 3 1-6 2-7-0 0 0-6 1-7-0

Central WA 1B/2B League Overall Pts. W-L W-L-T Liberty Bell 3 1-0 4-3-0 Bridgeport 3 1-0 4-1-0 Entiat 3 1-0 3-4-0 Manson 0 0-1 0-5-0 Oroville 0 0-2 1-5-0

Schedules, Oct. 10-19 Thursday, Oct. 10 GSoc - Oroville at Entiat, 7 pm GSoc - Tonasket at Chelan, 4:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Chelan, 5/6:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Manson at Oroville, 5/6:30 pm Friday, Oct. 11 FB (Var) - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 7 pm FB (Var) - Tonasket at Cascade, 7 pm

OROVILLE - A tense match that went down to the wire with Entiat ended up going the Tigers’ way on Thursday, Oct. 3. Each set was decided by four or fewer points in Entiat’s 26-24, 24-26, 21-25, 25-23, 15-11 win over the Hornets. “There were some great rallies,” Rise said. “(The Hornets) hit well and often but had trouble returning Entiat’s hits. “We’re looking forward to playing them again (Oct. 10).” Oroville stats: Brittany Jewett 12 serves; Rachelle Nutt 9 serves, 14 attacks, 9 kills; Nadia Maldonado 8 serves, 12 digs; Mikayla Scott 7 attacks, 7 digs; Andrea Perez 7 attacks,

Tuesday, Oct. 15 GSoc - Bridgeport at Oroville, 4 pm GSoc - Tonasket at Okanogan, 4:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Okanogan, 5/6:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Lake Roosevelt, 5/6:30 pm Thursday, Oct. 17 GSoc - Oroville at Tonasket, 4:30 pm VB - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 5/6:30 pm Friday, Oct. 18 FB (Var) - Oroville at Lk. Roosevelt, 7 pm FB (Var) - Quincy at Tonasket, 7 pm Saturday, Oct. 19 GSoc - Quincy at Tonasket, 1:30 pm VB - Quincy at Tonasket, 1/2:30 pm XC - Tonasket at Oroville Inv., 11:45 am

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Carrisa Frazier led the Tigers with 14-of-15 serving and two aces during Tonasket’s CTL loss to Brewster last Tuesday.

Oroville volleyball drops pair of close matches By Brent Baker

Monday, Oct. 14 FB (JV) - Tonasket at Lake Roosevelt, 5:30 pm FB (JV) - Okanogan at Oroville 5:30 pm

your guide to

Brewster 3, Tonasket 0 TONASKET - The Tigers gave Brewster a scare in the first set of the Monday, Oct. 1, CTL match, but couldn’t sustain their momentum in a 25-21, 25-6, 25-13 loss. “Senior libero Cassie Spear played very consistent for us tonight in the back row,” Gliddon said. “I appreciate her hustle and on-target passes. Carrisa Frazier served well for us.”

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Saturday, Oct. 12 GSoc - Tonasket at Cascade, 12 pm VB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Cascade, 11 am/12 pm VB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Entiat, 12/1:30 pm XC - Oroville at Richland Invite, 9:45 am

Out On The Town

Tonasket stats: Savannah Clinedinst 1 ace, 1 kill; Cassie Spear 1 ace; Alyssa Young 7/7 serving, 1 ace; Carrisa Frazier 1 kill; Yasmin Cervantes 1 kill.

Tonasket stats: Cassie Spear 5/6 serving, 1 ace; Carrisa Frazier 14/15 serving, 2 aces; Savannah Clinedinst 6/6 serving, 1 ace, 3 kills; Jenny Bello 1 ace, 1 kill; Rachael Sawyer 1 ace, 1 kill.

XC - Tonasket home meet, 4:30 pm

4 kills; Monica Herrera 7 attacks, 3 kills; Bridget Clark 8 digs.

Liberty Bell 3, Oroville 1 TWISP - Liberty Bell handed Oroville its first league defeat of the season on Tuesday, Oct. 1, 25-15, 22-25, 312 S. Whitcomb

25-17, 25-17. “The highlight of this match was Brittany Jewett and Rachelle Nutt at the net,” Rise said.

Oroville stats: Brittany Jewett 13 serves, 25 attacks, 8 digs; Rachelle Nutt 23 attacks, 8 kills, 4 blocks, 9 digs; Andrea Perez 8 digs.

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Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | OCTOBER 10, 2012

Obituaries Lee, Austin, Alexandria, Isabella, Adalyn and Carson. He was proceeded in death by his parents, five siblings, sisterin-law Phyllis, numerous nieces and nephews and daughter-inlaw Nancy Robbins and son-inlaw Robert Haydon. Husband, father, grandfather, great grandfather, friend of many, he will be greatly missed. At his request there will be no services. Donations made to the Oroville Friends of the Library or the United Methodist Church of Oroville, Wash.

Richard Robbins

Richard Leroy Robbins

Richard L. Robbins was born in Seattle, Washington on March 6, 1928 to Annie and Stanley Robbins and passed away peacefully in Tonasket, Washington on September 30, 2013 with his wife and family at his side. He enjoyed many years of sailing out and around Puget Sound and golfing in the Seattle area. Upon retiring he moved to Oroville with his wife in July of 2000. Among his activities he began his paintings again and sold many among the area. He also was active in community affairs such as the Visitor Center, the Oroville Museum, a member of the Oroville Golf Club, Hometown Pizza’s accountant and was the treasurer of the Friends of the Library. He enjoyed being a rebel rouser at Friday lunches. He is survived by his wife Patricia Mitchell Robbins of 63 years, whom he had known since 1940; his four children, Richard Blair Robbins, Nancy Haydon, Rebecca (John) Desjardins and Ken (Mary) Robbins; his three grandchildren, Shannon (Steve) Rollins, Scott Robert (Hort) Haydon, Megan Robbins and his six great grandchildren, Ryn

Vickie Reese

was very devoted to her job and met a lot of people in doing so. We want to remember her pleasant personality and her laughter! Vickie’s love for horses started at an early age and she always had one or two of her own. She grew up with her very special uncle, Darrell Reese, and special cousin, Linda Kitterman, who named Vickie her “sister chick.” She always spent as much time as possible with her great niece and nephew Skyler and Reese Noel. She made sure Skyler had a horse (Sadie) and Reese claimed “Buck” as his own. Vickie loved God, her family, her relatives and special friends. Vickie is survived by her mother, Ruby Reese; sisters Janet and Peggy Reese; her partner of ten years Matt Thacker; daughter Lisa Oliver, Brewster; grandson Eric Farley; great-grandson Trenton, Omak; and nephew Jason Reese, Oroville. She was proceeded in death by one son Troy Glenn Rairdan, her father Robert Reese, niece Melissa Reese Noel, nephew Justin Reese and her grandparents. We all love and miss her very much. At Vickie’s request there will be no service.

Thomas Bryan Leep Sr.

Vickie Lynn Reese

Vickie Lynn Reese passed away suddenly on August 14, 2013 at Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee, her mother and sisters by her side. She was born July 18, 1953 at Tonasket to parents Robert and Ruby Reese. She grew up in Oroville and graduated in 1971. She later moved to Omak and worked at State Farm Insurance and the Western Restaurant. Seven years later she moved back to Oroville and went to work at VIP Insurance for Mike Bourn. She

Thomas Bryan Leep Sr., born June 21, 1925 passed away on August 15, 2013. There will be a Military Service at 3 p.m. at The White Stone Church of the Brethren, Loomis Highway. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the church or your favorite charity. He lived his life as the Golden Rule, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

COPS | FROM A9 booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Friday, Oct. 4, 2013 Domestic dispute on N. Ash St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Automobile theft on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Omak. Burglary on Golden St. in Oroville. Structure fire on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Burglary on Omak Ave. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Kenwood St. in Omak. Power tools reported missing. Burglary on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. No injuries were reported. Harry South, no middle name listed, 58, court commitment for DUI. Dacia Lee Mackarness, 40, booked for harassment. Pedro Jacuinde-Nambo, 45, booked for DUI and a USBP hold. Jesus J. Romero-Aviles, 36, booked for DUI, reckless endangerment and a USBP hold. Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013 Domestic dispute on Duck Lake Rd. near Omak. Threats on Hwy. 7 near Oroville.

One-vehicle crash on Columbia River Rd. near Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. DWLS on Apple Way Ave. in Okanogan. Public intoxication on Ross Canyon Rd. in Omak. Burglary on N. Main St. in Omak. Littering on Omache Dr. in Omak. DWLS on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Jasmine St. in Omak. Structure fire on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Theft on Apple Way Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Bjarne Matthew Olson Jr., 34, booked on three State Patrol FTA warrants: DUI, third-degree DWLS and ignition interlock violation. Aaron Ashley Arlotta, 24, booked for third-degree DWLS and an OCSO FTA warrant for possession of a loaded firearm in a vehicle. Glenn Laverne Gorr, 31, booked for obstruction and a Tribal FTA warrant for theft. Zane Allen Marchand, 35, booked for DUI, third-degree DWLS, reckless driving and three OCSO warrants: failure to pay fine for interfering with reporting (DV), FTA for DUI and FTA for thirddegree DWLS. Angel Avila-Navarrete, 44, booked on a USBP hold. Teresa Ann Moomaw, 36, book on two Omak Police Department

k n i Th ! n e e Gr

FTA warrants: DUI and seconddegree DWLS. Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013 Domestic dispute on Crumbacher Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Robbery at East Side Park in Omak. Domestic dispute on Apple Lane in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Harassment on Pine St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Birch St. in Omak. Harassment on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Harassment on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Theft on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Jessee Owen Jane, 37, booked for first-degree DWLS and ignition interlock violation. Daryl Anthony McCraigie, 24, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Ward Allen Cooper, 46, booked for refusing to comply, first-degree DWLS and third-degree escape. Shannon Lee Schweitzer, 32, booked for third-degree DWLS. Larry Edward Siltman, 58, booked for violation of a no-contact order. Diana Lynn Kenealy, 53, booked on a Prosecutor’s material witness warrant. Trevor Warren Armstrong, 28, booked for third-degree theft.

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Recycled Paper Excess paper recycled for gardens, fire starter & more! OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

Estate Executor Gerald Oakes, wife Peg, and daughter Michelle make the presentation of a $125,000 check from the estate of Marjorie Harper to Gail Mackie executive director of SpokAnimal C.A.R.E.

Submitted photo

SpokAnimal gets donation Submitted by Shelley Sharp

SpokAnimal C.A.R.E.

SPOKANE – Executive Director of SpokAnimal C.A.R.E. Gail Mackie accepted a check for unrestricted funds from the estate of Tonasket resident Marjorie Harper for $125,000 on Wednesday, Oct. 2 The private donation, one of the largest in the 30-year history of SpokAnimal, comes at a time when the non-profit organization loses its long-standing contract for Animal Control Services with the City of Spokane, which has resulted in a loss of over 50 percent of the shelter’s annual revenue. Estate Executor Gerald Oakes, wife Peg, and daughter Michelle made the presentation to Mackie

at the entrance to the Dawg House, which kennels adoptable dogs. “This month and next we are in the process of evaluating and assessing what programs and services we can keep, and which ones we can’t,” said Mackie. “This very generous gift may mean we don’t have to do that.” The unrestricted money will be used to fund the many important services of SpokAnimal including: the Dorothy Clark Animal Clinic, which performs low-cost spay/neuter and microchip services to the public; the successful Prison Dog and Farm Livin’ barn cat programs; Crusin’ Critters, a transfer service which shuttles adoptable animals between shelters state-wide; education in the schools; senior pet-therapy visits; and training programs for volun-

teers working to socialize largebreed dogs.

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Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 5:30 p.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 10, 2013  

October 10, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 10, 2013  

October 10, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune