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OCTOBER 9 - 15, 2013 I VOLUME 38 I NUMBER 41

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM I FREE

FACTUALLY MODIFIED ARGUMENTS AGAINST I-522 PAGE 6 | THE BEST OF DECIBEL FEST PAGE 33

ROBBER’S REVENGE

Shon Hopwood was a no-good deadbeat crook, until a federal judge sent him to the big house for armed robbery. Now the most powerful judges in the land know his name. BY ELLIS E. CONKLIN


Now through November 17

THIS WEEK’S CONCERTS: Wednesday, OctOber 9 LangstOn HugHes PerfOrming arts institute, 8Pm

Yosvany Terry Quintet

The Harlem-based Cuban saxophonist addresses both the ancient and the immediate, in a sonic world of Afro-Cuban polyrhythms and sophisticated jazz. With Michael Rodriguez, trumpet, Osmany Peredes, piano, Matt Brewer, bass, and Clarence Penn, drums. tHursday, OctOber 10 seattLe art museum LObby, 5:30Pm

Kareem Kandi Group

The savvy south-Sound saxophonist shows his stuff in Seattle. Free9 tHursday, OctOber 10 POncHO cOncert HaLL, cOrnisH cOLLege, 8Pm

Ken Vandermark & Nate Wooley

World-renowned Chicagoan, and 1999 MacArthur Fellow, performs improvised works with trumpeter Nate Wooley of the booming Brooklyn improv scene. Free masterclass, PONCHO Concert Hall, noon. friday, OctOber 11 rOyaL rOOm, 8Pm

The Westerlies Play Horvitz / The Royal Room Collective Music Ensemble Having taken New York by storm, these two original projects now charm Seattle.

saturday, OctOber 12 POncHO cOncert HaLL, cOrnisH cOLLege, 8Pm

Dave Douglas Quintet / The Westerlies

As the recent Time Travel and Be Still recordings show, the new ensemble of the everexploring trumpeter delivers transporting, lyrical, and hard-swinging jazz renditions of melodies old and new. Jon Irabagon, saxophone; Matt Mitchell, piano; Linda Oh, bass; Rudy Royston, drums. Also on the bill: The Westerlies, a new brass quartet for the ages! (See October 11, above.) sunday, OctOber 13 POncHO cOncert HaLL, cOrnisH cOLLege, 8Pm

Chris Speed, Dave King & Chris Tordini Trio / Bad Luck

Three seasoned innovators join forces: Chris Speed (reeds, Human Feel), Dave King (drums, The Bad Plus), and Chris Tordini (bass). The “hard-edged and audacious” duo of drummer Chris Icasiano and saxophonist Neil Welch opens. sunday, OctOber 13 KirKLand PerfOrmance center, 8Pm

DakhaBrakha

Mixing the fundamental structure of folk music with soulful, free improvisation, the Ukrainian “ethno-chaos” band creates a mesmerizing world of unexpected and engaging new music. (A Kirkland Performance Center co-presentation.) Wednesday, OctOber 16 triPLe dOOr, 7Pm & 9:30Pm

Mehliana: Brad Mehldau & Mark Guiliana SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

Mehldau, one of the greatest of modern jazz pianists, debuts this piano-less duo, extending his range to Fender Rhodes and a battery of synthesizers with one of the most exciting young drummers on the scene.

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COMING UP... John Medeski, The Bad Plus, SFJAZZ Collective, Dafnis Prieto Si o Si, Patricia Barber, Bill Frisell’s Big Sur Quintet, Charles Lloyd, Manhattan Transfer, Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra, Philip Glass, Roosevelt High School Jazz Band, Seattle Symphony’s [untitled] series, Peggy Lee / Skerik / Wayne Horvitz Trio, Steve Lehman Trio, George Colligan Organ Trio, Nicole Mitchell and more…

More than 50 events in venues all around Seattle Buy tickets at www.earshot.org & 206-547-6763 Charles Lloyd photo by Dorothy Darr


choose your car. choose your adventure. With a Zipcar membership, you can book the car you want, when you want it. Choose from sedans, hybrids, luxury cars, SUVs, even large cargo vans. So you can fit the car to the trip. Not the other way around.

Sign up at zipcar.com/seaweeklyOCT for $25 free driving.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

cars and vans by the hour or day. gas and insurance included.

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Are you ready to run for your life?

Enjoy an exciting “life-changing” adventure run through the streets of Seattle. Challenge yourself to see if you can escape death and remain human from a rapidly growing Zombie population that is infecting the city.

ALL REGISTERED PARTICIPANTS RECEIVE THE FOLLOWING:

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

- Event bib and glow collar - Event shirt - Checkpoint coordinates (day of event) - Entry to after-death party and post race beer garden (21 and over) - Participants also receive one beer provided by Deschutes brewery

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Africa Mama ethnic art & gifts gallery

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Hours: M - Th 10-7 • F & Sa 10-9 • Sun 12-7 A portion of our proceeds will be going to our Urgent Africa Charity


inside»   October 9–15, 2013 VOLUME 38 | NUMBER 41

» SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

»9

news&comment 6

CHANGE OF HEART

Rethinking the $15-an-hour minimum wage. 7 | SPORTSBALL

9

GOING TO POT

BY NINA SHAPIRO | The story behind

the bravado of Seattle’s biggest would-be recreational-marijuana entrepreneur.

food&drink 19 DIS-ORIENTING

BY JAY FRIEDMAN | Asian desserts can seem odd to American palates. But don’t let that stop you. 19 19 20 21

| | | |

FOOD NEWS TEMPERATURE CHECK R.I.P. MARCELLA HAZAN THE BAR CODE

arts&culture

»19 Editor-in-Chief Mark Baumgarten EDITORIAL Managing Editor in Charge of News Daniel Person Senior Editor Nina Shapiro Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle Arts Editor Brian Miller Entertainment Editor Gwendolyn Elliott Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert Staff Writers Ellis E. Conklin, Matt Driscoll, Kelton Sears Editorial Intern Alicia Price Contributing Writers Rick Anderson, Sean Axmaker, Sara Billups, Ma’Chell Duma LaVassar, Steve Elliott, Margaret Friedman, Zach Geballe, Andrew Gospe, Megan Hill, Robert Horton, Sara D. Jones, Isaac Kaplan-Woolner, Seth Kolloen, Sandra Kurtz, Dave Lake, Beth Maxey, Duff McKagan, Terra Clarke Olsen, Kevin Phinney, Keegan Prosser, Mark Rahner, Michael Stusser, Jacob Uitti

23 ISKA DHAAF

Production Manager Christopher Dollar

and hip-hop behind.

Art Director Karen Steichen

BY KELTON SEARS | Leaving math rock

23 ARTS

23 | THE PICK LIST 26 | OPENING NIGHTS | Italian farce,

political comedy, and the plight of a Kansas City family. 27 | PERFORMANCE/EAR SUPPLY 29 | VISUAL ARTS/THE FUSSY EYE

30 | SEATTLE LESBIAN & GAY FILM FESTIVAL | Four standout docs, including

tributes to Mark Bingham and Divine. 31 | OPENING THIS WEEK Tom Hanks held hostage, a Disney World vacation gone wrong, and cannibals in New York. 32 | FILM CALENDAR

35 MUSIC

Jazz freedom, folk ballads, a Ramones revival, and more. 36 | SEVEN NIGHTS

odds&ends

33 | THE GEEKLY REPORT 42 | CLASSIFIEDS

»cover credits

Graphic Designers Jennifer Lesinski, Sharon Adjiri ADVERTISING Advertising and Marketing Director Jen Larson Advertising Sales Manager, Arts Carol Cummins Senior Account Executives Terri Tinker, Krickette Wozniak Account Executives Peter Muller, Sam Borgen Classifieds Account Executive Matt Silvie DISTRIBUTION Distibution Manager Jay Kraus OPERATIONS Administrative Coordinator Amy Niedrich PUBLISHER Wendy Geldien

Our Signature Solitaire (also available in Platinum) Open seven days a week.

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news&comment»

2013-2014

University of Washington PUBLIC

LECTURE

SERIES

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

for these upcoming public lectures, offered to you by the Graduate School of the University of Washington.

October 10 - 6:30pm, Free

JILL LEPORE

SOLD OUT!

Professor of American History, Harvard University

Unseen: A History of Privacy

Things Have Changed I first scoffed at a $15 minimum wage. But I don’t any longer. BY MATT DRISCOLL

W

e all have moments we’re not particularly proud of. For me, one surrounds an issue that’s front and center in this year’s election: the debate over a $15-an-hour minimum wage. Back in May I wrote a quick blog post for Seattle Weekly at the onset of one of

percent of the jobs lost in the last recession were middle-income, while 59 percent of the new positions during the past two years of recovery were in low-wage industries that continue to expand such as retail, food services, cleaning, and health-care support. By 2020, 48 percent of jobs will be in those service sectors.” Not only are more and more

October 15 - 6:30pm, Free

MICHAEL PHILLIPS

Director of the Suicide Research and Prevention Center and the Research Methods Consultation Center of the Shanghai Mental Health Center at Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine

Mental health in the People’s Republic of China: an epidemiological journey

October 22 - 7pm, $5

SOLD OUT!

JUNOT DÍAZ - Signature Speaker

GOOD J

Professor of Writing, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

OBS SE

An Evening with Junot Diaz - sharing readings from his latest book: This is How You Lose Her

SEYLA BENHABIB

Professor of Political Science and Philosophy, Yale University

Hannah Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem, Fifty Years Later

October 31 - 6:30pm, Free

LAWRENCE BUELL

Professor of American Literature, Harvard University

Environmental Imagination at the Crossroads

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

November 7 - 6:30pm, Free

6

Rear Admiral (RADM) BORIS D. LUSHNIAK, M.D., M.P.H.

An Evening with Acting U.S. Surgeon General

November 13 - 7pm, Free

AMY CUDDY

Associate Professor of Business Administration, Harvard University

Connect, Then Lead

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED, please register online at

www.grad.washington.edu/lectures

As a courtesy, stand-by seating will be offered. It doesn’t guarantee admission.

ALL LECTURES WILL TAKE PLACE IN KANE HALL ON THE UW SEATTLE CAMPUS

ATTLE

October 24 - 6:30pm, Free Marchers demanded a higher minimum wage across the country this summer.

the first fast-food-workers strikes in our area. Without much thought I expressed the overall sentiment of our newsroom that morning: The $15 an hour demand was “probably a bit steep.” While our office’s take was no doubt common—sharing our opinion were at least three ladies I heard discussing the matter on my bus ride home that evening—I’ve since come to believe we were all wrong. Here’s why: My first job was at a McDonald’s in Federal Way, making $5 an hour taking the orders of hungry (and often moderately terrible) people heading to Costco or Wild Waves. It was one of the most thankless and exhausting jobs I’ve ever had. But as a 16-year-old high-school student entering the workforce—an economic status that most of my co-workers shared—I considered it a rite of passage, par for the capitalist course. Why should I have been making enough to support a family when I was still in high school and my only real qualification for the job was an ability to legibly fill out an application? I was a skill-less kid, after all—the kind of person who should have a low-paying job. But things have changed, and my initial reaction to the demand for $15 an hour failed to take this into account. The fast-food worker of today is not the fast-food worker of the past. More and more, today’s burger-flippers are not just skillless kids. As $15-minimum-wage supporter and venture capitalist Nick Hanauer wrote for Bloomberg: “Low-wage jobs are fast replacing middle-class ones in the U.S. economy. Sixty

fast-food workers exceptions to the high-schoolkid stereotype, but the discrepancy of wealth distribution in this country has exploded. As The New York Times recently noted—citing a study by economists Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty—the top 10 percent of earners raked in over half the country’s total income in 2012, and the top 1 percent brought home more than one-fifth. It’s obvious something needs to change, and raising the minimum wage for the low-wage workers on whom this country’s economy has grown increasingly dependent seems like as good a place to start as any. Admittedly, there are real questions about the impact of raising the minimum wage, both on our economy as a whole and on small businesses trying to survive. Along with an inaccurate view of who is working in fast food these days, my initial reaction to the call for a $15-an-hour minimum wage was based on the premise that it would be an incredible hardship on small businesses inadvertently caught up in a battle with McDonald’s, Walmart, and their ilk. I’m no longer so sure this is the case. It seems that for every stance on the subject, there’s a study to back it up. Those in favor of raising the minimum wage, like Hanauer, cite studies showing that the move would “inject about $450 billion into the economy each year” and “directly affect 51 million workers and indirectly benefit an additional 30 million”—giving them the ability to buy more stuff, in turn bolstering the economy and helping businesses prosper. Others worry that raising the minimum wage would mess up our already-vulnerable


sportsball» economy, leading to more outsourcing and fewer jobs. While it’s easy to vilify McDonald’s and Walmart—because, you know, fuck ’em—an across-the-board minimum-wage hike’s impact on small businesses is still a legitimate concern. After some months of consideration, however, I’m siding with the Hanauers of the world. Yes, a minimum-wage hike would need to be thoughtfully established, but I’ve come to believe it can be done without dooming small business, and is in fact very necessary. Socialist Alternative Seattle City Council candidate Kshama Sawant, for instance, would tax the area’s ridiculously wealthy huge corporate entities to help subsidize any small businesses unable to afford a minimum-wage hike. Others have suggested an expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit as a way to provide more support for low-wage workers without placing so much burden on small businesses. I’m not sure what the exact solution should look like, but I now believe today’s workers deserve that we try to find it. The road we’re headed down goes nowhere. Lastly, some historical perspective is helpful: The fact of the matter is, $15 may be a bargain for today’s leaders of industry and commerce. As Hanauer wrote: “If the minimum wage had simply tracked U.S. productivity gains since 1968, it would be $21.72 an hour—three times what it is now.” In a very real sense, a failure to protect the minimum wage has helped decimate the middle class—so much so that many people today can’t imagine a world where low-wage workers aren’t relegated to substandard living and government assistance. But it doesn’t have to be this way, and

The fast-food worker of today is not the fast-food worker of the past. More and more, today’s burger-flippers are not just skill-less kids.

Y

ou know how bad things happen to good people? Well, bad things also happen to good football teams. And not every downer of a play is worth an angry tweet. With the Seahawks, plays that seem atrocious are sometimes just consequences of the team’s style of play. So . . .

Don’t get mad when: The Seahawks give up a touchdown drive of more than 10 plays.

The Seahawks play a “bend-but-don’t-break” defense. The goal is to force offenses to execute perfectly on many plays in a row to reach the end zone. Usually the opponent will screw up a play and have to punt. Sometimes they will score. But if it took 10 plays, Seahawks defenders actually did what they were supposed to. Hug a friend! Do get mad when: The Seahawks give up a play of more than 30 yards.

S E AT T L E ’ S B E S T D A M N

The “bend-but-don’t-break” strategy is designed to prevent big plays. Seahawks defenders are trained to be disciplined. When big plays happen, someone screwed up. Punch a wall!

HAPPY HOUR

Don’t get mad when: Russell Wilson is tackled for a loss.

Most NFL quarterbacks are taught to throw the ball away when pressure comes. But Russell Wilson is quick and throws well on the run, so it makes sense for him to try to escape oncoming defenders. Sometimes he spins away and makes a big play. Sometimes he gets sacked. It’s a risk the Seahawks are willing to live with. Kiss a cat! Do get mad when: Marshawn Lynch is tackled for a loss.

The Seahawks running game is designed to gain positive yards on every play. Running backs like Lynch are instructed to hit the line of scrimmage quick, rather than stutter-step behind the line looking for the perfect moment to burst. If Lynch or any other running back loses yardage, it’s because he ignored instructions or someone missed a block. Throw a chair!

S E A T T L E

C E N T E R

A R M O R Y

Third Thursday, 5pm – 8pm Seattle Center Armory Beer • Wine • Cocktails • Food Specials Music • Games • Prizes

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Don’t get mad when: The refs call the Seahawks for holding or pass interference.

seattlecenter.com

Seahawks offensive linemen and defensive backs play a physical style that intentionally toes the edge of illegality. Occasional penalties are an inevitable consequence of this style. In fact, if the Hawks don’t get at least one holding or P.I. during a game, they probably aren’t being aggressive enough. Do a cartwheel! Do get mad when: The refs call the Seahawks for a false start.

False starts are purely mental mistakes indicative of lassitude or fatigue. No strategic advantage pertains since refs rarely miss them. Kick an appliance! E

sportsball@seattleweekly.com

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City of Seattle

Event/date/time subject to change More information at 206.684.7200 or seattlecenter.com Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St., Seattle, WA 98109 © iStockphoto.com/chrisgramly

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

mdriscoll@seattleweekly.com

BY SETH KOLLOEN

KELLY BAILEY

having a serious conversation about the necessity—and our societal obligation—to provide livable wages is an excellent place to start. If you’ve made it this far (and, really, bless your heart if you have), one question that’s probably on your mind is: Why now? None of the information presented is new; proponents have been making these arguments for decades, after all. For me, the reasons are twofold. Most important, an election is fast approaching in which SeaTac and Seattle voters will be making important decisions about what direction the minimum-wage discussion will go. These decisions are not to be taken lightly—they will have a very real impact. Less important but still relevant: I hope my shift will provide a catalyst for others to do the same—or at the very least, inspire readers to examine the reasons they believe low-wage workers don’t deserve more of the pie, and ask real questions about whether those reasons hold water in today’s economic landscape. For me, they just didn’t anymore. And I felt obligated to say so on the record. E

Anger Management for Seahawks Fans

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SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

10

I

n late May, former Microsoft manager Jamen Shively called a press conference on the 40th floor of the Columbia Tower. It was six months after the passage of Initiative 502, which legalized recreational marijuana. And Shively, who with partners had founded a pot company called Diego Pellicer, said he had big news. Shively’s Microsoft credentials guaranteed major press coverage. Big business has discovered marijuana! went the storyline, which was aided immeasurably by the hype Shively was spouting for his company, named after a greatgrandfather who had been a 19th-century vice governor and hemp farmer in the Philippines. “We are going to mint more millionaires than Microsoft with this business,” he told The Seattle Times the day before the press conference. It was the “dot-bong” era, he proclaimed earlier to Fox Business. And in an interview with KING-5 TV, he enthused about “a hundred-

billion-dollar industry in search of a brand.” He went on: “Never in the history of capitalism— forget American, in the world—has such a giant vacuum existed.” He said Diego would be that brand, one that offered a “premium” pot product akin to luxury cigars. As if all that wasn’t sensational enough, Shively brought a megawatt star to his press conference: Vicente Fox, the former president of Mexico, a critic of the drug war who said he hoped that the developments in Washington state would serve as an example to his home country. Shively got to know Fox when the entrepreneur was running a chain of cybercafes and computer centers in Mexico prior to his work at Microsoft. During the press conference, Shively, looking sharp in a dark jacket and striped dress shirt, beaming confidence and congeniality, wrapped his arm around the former president’s back. The room was packed. Reporters and camera crews turned out in droves. Not only Fox but a

dozen or so activists, lawyers, and businesspeople involved with marijuana flanked Shively, as did State Rep. Roger Goodman, a legalization advocate. Well-dressed figures, some speaking Spanish, made chitchat and traded business cards. Shively opened the affair by quoting the illustrious astronomer Carl Sagan on the outrageousness of marijuana prohibition, then got to the business at hand. “We are moving forward with plans to build a national and eventually international network of cannabis businesses,” he declared. Yet all the ambition and glamour did not obscure some pressing questions about Shively’s plans. Despite I-502, distribution of marijuana is still a federal crime. Was Shively brazenly announcing he intended to launch an interstate conspiracy? reporters asked. “We are actually conspiring to obey the law,” Shively responded, but he didn’t explain the seeming contradiction. Similarly, he said Diego

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

DANIEL BERMAN

Jamen Shively speaks at the late-May Diego Pellicer press conference, flanked by Vicente Fox (left) and John Davis (right).


For more information on our organic growing programs, visit www.sfntc.com

CIGARETTES Š SFNTC 4 2013

Seattle Weekly 10-09-13.indd 1

10/1/13 2:30 PM


» FROM PAGE 10

Like the original Gold Rush, the frenzy for marijuana riches is turning out to be an arduous affair, attracting a wide array of schemers and dreamers. Failure—even for a man Dope Magazine suggested might be the “Bill Gates of cannabis”— is entirely possible, especially given the complex legalities involving marijuana. Shively set himself on a path that will require navigating a fluid and restrictive set of state rules, a tricky financial climate in which banks are largely out of the picture, possible federal interference, and, to top it all off, the mores of the marijuana subculture. “A lot of people who don’t know what they’re doing are rushing in,” says Henry Wykowski, a San Francisco attorney who represents the country’s largest medical-marijuana dispensary, Oakland’s Harborside Health Center. “It’s bad for them and it’s bad for the industry.”

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

I

12

Shively planned an “international network of cannabis businesses.”

NINA SHAPIRO

had come up with a “risk-mitigated investment vehicle” that would allow the company to raise $10 million, yet declined to provide specifics of how investors in what the feds considered a criminal enterprise could possibly avoid risk. Indeed, he declined to provide many specifics at all about his business plan. The event was a strange mixture of attention-grabbing and secretiveness. It set off not only a frenzy of media coverage around the country, but a backlash among figures including I-502’s backers, government officials, and longtime marijuana activists. Critics attacked Shively for provoking the feds, for muscling into an industry he didn’t understand, even for insufficient experience being stoned. Perhaps the most stinging criticism came from Mark Kleiman, the UCLA public-policy professor hired last spring to serve as the state’s n mid-August, Shively shows up at a West top consultant on I-502 implementation. On his Seattle medical-marijuana dispensary that is blog The Reality-Based Community, Kleiman one of two owned by the Northwest Patient used Shively as an example of “insensate greedResource Center (NWPRC), with which heads” flocking to the marijuana industry. What’s Diego has a close alliance. The sleek-looking more, Kleiman said, Shively had “now painted a dispensary is one of the most established in town. target on his shirt-front.” Its lobby, with a suite of leather furniture and Kleiman came to harbor even darker thoughts. flat-screen TV, resembles any professional waitYou’d have to be “completely crazy” to hold a ing room—except for the ATM, a symbol of the giant press conference announcing you were sellcash-only nature of marijuana businesses, and the ing pot, he told Seattle Weekly recently. So he has a products attractively displayed on shelves behind hunch that’s not the Diego gang’s actual intention glass windows. Bottled in jars, the goods carry at all. “My real suspicion is that they intend to names like “Lemon Kush,” “Magic Moments,” fleece investors,” he says. and “Island Sweet Skunk,” all strains of mari“You get a lot of juana. Also on sale: potmoney, you pay yourself infused sodas, gummies, a lot in salaries—and and “white chocolate then you announce that bon bons.” the business has failed. The 45-year-old “My real suspicion is You saw The Producers,” Shively is dressed casuKleiman says, referring ally in cargo shorts, a that they intend to to the movie/musical in long-sleeved shirt, and which two Broadway loafers. A backpack fleece investors . . .  producers raise lots of completes the ensemble, money for a flop. which gives him a You get a lot of money, His hunch has parslightly nerdy air. An ticular resonance given early Diego business you pay yourself a lot the track record of Diego plan describes Shively co-founder Douglas as retaining “an endearin salaries—and then Anderson, who has, at ing childlike wonder,” least until recently, been and there’s something you announce that the handling the company’s apt about that, even fundraising. In the early as the entrepreneur aughts, Anderson sold spins tales of marijuana business has failed.” investments in a tax shelmillions. With neatly ter scheme connected clipped blond hair and with a horse-breeding a ready smile, there’s farm in Kentucky. A a boyish quality to his federal judge found the zeal. scheme to be a swindle Taking a seat in a in 2011, and one of its principals later went to corner of the room where press clippings about federal prison on charges of tax fraud. the Diego press conference are tacked to the Anderson was not charged, but was found in wall, he explains that he was originally a student a related civil judgment to have engaged in some of civil engineering at Berkeley and MIT until unsavory practices. “I was the victim,” he says the book The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing nevertheless. He filed for bankruptcy in 2010. changed his life. In recent weeks, Anderson’s role at Diego has What he learned, he says, is that “you create become murky. Indeed, the company has gone value by creating a whole new category and then through a series of shakeups. Most strikingly, dominating.” And if you can’t do that, if you’re Shively has stepped down as CEO, although he not the “first to mind” in a given category, then says he will continue being the company’s “face” you have to go in the opposite direction to make a and “visionary.” name for yourself.

Which brings us to his work at Microsoft, where Shively started in 2003. He says he served as a corporate strategy manager whose job was to come up with new categories of products and services. “What can we do to leapfrog Google?” was the question that he says preoccupied him. He took note of Google’s dominance in the field of connecting businesses to consumers, and decided that Microsoft could find its “opposite direction” by connecting businesses to other businesses. Specifically, he says he wanted to create an online trading marketplace. Micrososft wasn’t interested. “It was a huge disappointment,” he says. Alex Gounares, a former corporate vice president and chief technology officer at Microsoft who was once Shively’s boss, confirms that his underling worked on a project that didn’t pan out, but says he is not at liberty to discuss details. “He definitely was an idea guy—creative, optimistic, and entrepreneurial,” Gounares says. So Shively took another angle. He says he proposed a design for Bing, the search engine Microsoft was about to launch, going head-to-head with Google, that would “humanize” searches. If you were searching for a business, you’d see an icon saying a representative was online and ready to chat with you. Microsoft took a pass on that one too. Shively chafed at the rejection. “Microsoft has stopped creating new things,” he says. “That part of Microsoft’s DNA has been lost.” So in 2009, he left the company and started his own. He ran with his idea of an online marketplace, focusing on the food business. Despite what he admits now is a “terrible” name—Findood—the company got “some good traction,” he says. Yet it ran out of steam, especially after Alibaba, the successful international trading site, came on the scene. “I was exhausted,” he says. He went to California to look after a sick uncle. “Then,” he recounts, “I saw this opportunity starting to develop.” Shively was one of those rare pot users who got turned on to the drug in his 40s. The pivotal moment was a walk he took one day with a programmer friend from Microsoft. “Look, Jamen, I’ve done the research,” Shively recalls his friend telling him. “I’m convinced that within five years cannabis is going to be sold as a health food.” “I was fascinated,” Shively recalls. So he did his own research, and became convinced that what he’d been told about marijuana in the “just say no” era was a lie. Then he started using pot. “I started having some of the best brainstorming sessions ever, and I was able to connect to people in whole new ways,” he says. For instance, he explains, he found himself able to express love more freely to people, including his brother, with whom a sibling rivalry had long flourished. So when a friend called as I-502 was sailing to passage asking whether Shively would be

interested in starting a marijuana business, he was eager to brainstorm. They did so with what Shively calls, referring to a variety of pot reputed to get the creative juices flowing, some “really, really good sativa.” The passage of I-502 launched a frenzy of entrepreneurial activity that people like to compare not only to the Gold Rush, but to the end of Prohibition. An entirely new market suddenly came into being, and all types of people— whether archetypal stoners or professionals, young or old, bearing tattoos or clad in suits—wanted to get in on the ground floor “It’s been really, really insane,” says Hilary Bricken, who has quickly become the go-to lawyer for these emerging entrepreneurs. She’s speaking in the office building where she runs the Canna Law Group, which is targeted specifically at the marijuana industry and was carved out of a larger corporate law firm called Harris & Moure. Just since January, the 29-year-old Bricken has built a contact list that boasts more than 1,000 names, most of them current or potential clients. They include a middle-aged aerospace professional whom Bricken describes as “superdorky,” the former CEO of a Philadelphia waste-management company, and a 58-year-old French-trained chef who wants to create highend marijuana-infused pastries. The chef and the former CEO both moved to Washington for the sole purpose of getting into the marijuana business. They’re not alone. Bricken says she also has clients who are newly arrived from Alaska, California, Iowa—even Colorado, which also passed a ballot measure legalizing recreational marijuana last year. Colorado has made it difficult for newcomers to break into the cannabis business there because


it has given first dibs on licenses to existing medical-marijuana operations. Like Washington state, medical marijuana has long been legal in Colorado; both states have allowed patients to access the drug for more than a dozen years. But the recreational market is expected to be exponentially bigger and more lucrative. Washington—whose fledgling pot entrepreneurs are trying to take over an illicit market which consultant Kleiman values at about $1 billion—is giving no such preference to medical dispensaries. That’s not to say that dispensaries, which fear they will be put out of business once I-502 is fully implemented, don’t want in on the action.

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edical-marijuana entrepreneur John Davis, the CEO of NWPRC, says Shively reached out to him at a time that the Diego founder was getting discouraged. Business associates were warning Shively away from the marijuana industry, given its “shady” reputation and the risks posed by federal drug laws. Davis presented another view. He told Shively about what he says is known in the medicalmarijuana industry as the “Davis method.” Whereas other dispensary owners try to keep as under-the-radar as possible so as not to invite law-enforcement action, Davis says his philosophy is to be as open and above-board as possible in an effort to convince authorities that his business is legitimate. “You want to see my books? I’ll show you my books,” he says of his attitude. He also serves as executive director of a group called the Coalition for Cannabis Standards and Ethics, which preaches self-regulation. Robert Calkin, CEO of the Cannabis Career Institute, a California-based group that holds classes for marijuana entrepreneurs around the country, including in Seattle, says he hasn’t heard of the “Davis method” per se. But Calkin says Davis, who has taught Institute classes, is at the “forefront” of efforts to “put a good face on the industry” and normalize its business practices. Thomas Jun, until recently a partner in NWPRC, elaborates that Davis never sold marijuana to minors, always did background searches on suppliers, and rejected pot from suspicious locations. Even if such pot was free, Jun says, Davis “wouldn’t touch it.” Now Shively was coming to Davis for advice. “He asked me what he should do,” Davis recalls. I said basically we should team up.” Davis says he was eager to expand into the recreational market, felt he had valuable experience to offer Shively, and believed the entrepreneur had “resources” that exceeded his. How wealthy is Shively? Davis says he doesn’t know exactly. Shively’s tenure at Microsoft was long past its go-go era, when almost anybody who walked through the door became a millionaire. Davis says he believes Shively “comes from money” and “did some things down in Mexico” that were lucrative. Rumors abounded. Jun says he heard that Shively was worth $38 million. Shively declines to elucidate, other than to confirm that he is a millionaire, his wealth derived from “different stages of my life.” Whatever his degree of wealth, it was good

enough for Davis. Jun, a gas-station owner who provided much of the money behind NWPRC, says his business partner was fired up by the talks with Shively. “We got this great deal,” Jun says Davis told him one day. A rich entrepreneur, Shively, wanted to buy an option to purchase the medical-marijuana operation, Davis explained. Eventually they were all going to go national. “We’re going to make a lot of money,” Davis gushed, according to Jun. “That’s the way you talk to investors,” Davis says now when asked about the conversation. But Jun says he didn’t like what was happening to NWPRC, or Davis. “He changed,” Jun says, explaining that money seemed far more important to Davis now. One indication of that: Davis raised his salary by 40 percent, according to Jun. Davis declines to talk specifics. But a partnership proposal Davis submitted to Diego in April says that he would make $120,000 a year as the company’s “chief political strategist.” Jun also felt that Davis’ alliance with Shively was putting NWPRC’s partners at risk. As a medical-marijuana operation, NWPRC was not immune from federal law-enforcement action. The feds have raided some dispensaries and ordered others to shut down. But it seemed to Jun that the business was inviting much more risk with its grandiose plans under Diego’s wing. In May, around the time of Diego’s Columbia Tower press conference, Jun was presented with a formal “option purchase agreement,” which required the signatures of both him and his wife. It made him nervous. “If this thing blows up, who’s going to be holding the bag?” asks Jun, talking one day this summer in his lawyer’s Pioneer Square office. Ultimately he decided not to sign the option agreement, and to disassociate himself entirely from NWPRC. “I don’t think he can handle the idea of success,” Davis says of Jun. Davis, on the other hand, can. While he says the fight for full marijuana legalization motivates him more than riches, he also concedes, “Yes, I want to be big.” In his partnership proposal to Diego, Davis pitched NWPRC as an entity “uniquely positioned to successfully dominate the market.” That’s because NWPRC, with 3,000 customers, was already up and running as a medicalmarijuana operation, and could therefore “secure I-502-compliant real estate before competitors.” Once I-502 was implemented, NWRPC could switch its holdings to the recreational market. The strategy calls to mind Joseph Kennedy’s actions in the waning days of Prohibition. As the end was near, relates Daniel Okrent, author of Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition, the Kennedy patriarch got a license to import brandname “medicinal liquor” from Britain—legally prescribed in the U.S. to treat everything from cancer to old age. He brought in “huge quantities” of scotch and gin and set up a system of warehouses, Okrent says by phone. The very day after Prohibition was repealed, Kennedy started distributing his booze. Diego’s option to buy NWPRC would cost $3 million, according to Davis’ proposal—an investment that could be paid in real estate that would fund NWPRC’s expansion as it readied for the launch of the recreational market. Another $1.5

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feds, wary about Washington and Colorado marijuana leaking across state borders, but to prevent corporate business practices like aggressive advermillion, paid in Diego stock, would eventually tising to youth, Holmes explains. Alison Holgo toward buying NWPRC itself. “Having an comb, the former campaign manager of I-502 option as opposed to buying at this time keeps and its author, says she also opposes corporate Diego one step removed from anything that domination because it would likely squeeze out could be considered potentially illegal,” Davis businesses run by minorities and those currently added. catering to the illicit market, both of whom she But Diego did not intend to hide in the backwould like to see enter the legal market. ground waiting for a green light. The company’s Longstanding marijuana activists and entreearly business plan stressed the need for “bold preneurs, meanwhile, are also skeptical. “Some and decisive” marketing “in order to capture of us have worked for 20–30 years on this,” mind share and market share early on.” Part of says Andrew DeAngelo, the general manager Diego’s strategy, the business plan continued, was of Oakland’s Harborside Health Center. It was to create a public perception of marijuana as a uncomfortable, he says, “to see people with a lot “social and creative elixir, analogous to how fine of money jumping in, making intense moves.” wines, spirits, craft beers, and tobacco products Especially when they compare marijuana to were elevated to such statures centuries prior.” To that end, the business plan gave an example tobacco, DeAngelo adds. Shively’s analogy with “luxury cigars” goes against the grain in a culture of how it would market one of Diego’s “flagship that presents pot, in DeAngelo’s words, as an varieties.” “Diego Reserva came originally from “agent of wellness.” the heart of the Guatemalan highlands, where Yet amid the press-conference backlash, special plants were carefully selected over many Shively reached out to a number of activists, generations,” the description would begin. “The including DeAngelo; his brother Steve, Harbouquet has a sweet, floral aroma with woody borside’s executive director; and their attorney, hints, and also subtle undertones of sour lemon.” Wykowski. The lawyer says client/attorney priviThe marketing would also note that the strain’s lege prevents him from discussing details. “But “flowers ripen with impressive purple and redmy position is, if you want to be in the industry dish colors” and that its properties provide an and you want me to be your lawyer, you have to “energetic high, perfect for an open-minded, creative, and active lifestyle.” do it appropriately,” The business plan also he says. “It’s more shed light on how Diego than about just intended to become a making money.” national enterprise despite DeAngelo says federal drug laws and the he and his brother fact that only two states have were encouraged legalized recreational mariby Shively’s will“If you want to be juana. “If, as we expect, more ingness to engage, U.S. states legalize cannabis and helped him in the industry . . . for social use, we intend to put on another scale our business operations press conference you have to do it from state to state following in San Francisco, legalization trends as they also attended by appropriately. It’s occur.” Each store would Fox. The entreearn $1.44 million a year, the preneur and the more than about just business plan estimated. former president Shively says Diego has announced they making money.” changed its business plan would hold a since that draft was writthree-day sympoten, but declines to say how. sium in Mexico Certainly he has followed devoted not to the blueprint for “bold and business oppordecisive” marketing. tunities but to the consequences of the drug war and re you Big Marijuana?” possible legalization policies around the world. a reporter asked Shively at his showy press DeAngelo says he thought the Mexico conferconference back in May. “Yes, we are Big ence, held in July, was a “brilliant” idea. Holcomb, Marijuana,” he responded. Asked later who participated in the event despite her initial whether he’s made mistakes, Shively cites that reservations about Shively’s outsized ambitions, answer. He doesn’t elaborate. He doesn’t have to. says she came away feeling “much more positive” “I don’t think he impressed anyone,” says about the entrepreneur. Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes, one of the Yet just a month later, Shively concedes he will sponsors of I-502. Shively’s “Big Marijuana” no longer be serving as Diego’s CEO. He says he statement, the national operation he described, never wanted the top job, and is happy with the the talk of eventually going international, all that “flies in the face of what I-502 intended,” accord- role of company “visionary.” But it’s obvious he has been curtailed. Before talking, he says he has ing to Holmes. He says the initiative is aimed at to check with Davis. creating “a completely homegrown operation”— At this point, it isn’t clear who is really callone geared for “smaller local entrepreneurs.” ing the shots at Diego. Davis returns phone That’s not only to assuage the concerns of the

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calls when inquiries about the company are made. A new CEO from Colorado, with experience in the medical-marijuana business there, is waiting in the wings, but cannot yet be named, according to Davis. The man identified on Diego’s website as its board chair, a Wall Street trader named Alan Valdes, is nowhere to be seen. Then there’s Anderson, a Diego co-founder. While never mentioned publicly, the Bellevue resident has, at least until recently, been playing a central role by selling investment in Diego through a private offering. Financing marijuana businesses is a tricky proposition. Banks won’t give loans to such businesses, or, in many cases, even bank accounts. In part that’s because federal laws require financial institutions to report on money linked to suspected drug activity. In theory, private investors could fill the gap. Davis says he’s had meetings with lots of them. “They all say NWPRC’s John the same thing: ‘Wow, I really want Davis now to get into this!’ ” Davis recounts. But answers questions then, he says, they consult their lawabout Diego Pellicer. yers and get cold feet. Anderson, however, seems to have had some success in overcomthe ClassicStar marketing over to him. ing this resistance, judging by Diego’s tally. In “He presented himself well,” Feek recalls by August, Shively says the company has $10 milphone. “He dresses well. He’s good-looking, not lion in “verbal commitments,” if not in hard a hair out of place.” He also represented himself cash. Anderson is “a fantastic fundraiser,” Davis as a “big shot,” someone who routinely dealt enthuses. with “affluent people from around the world,” You’d expect nothing less after reading AnderFeek says. son’s bio, posted to the website of an investment Wining and dining investors, Anderson raised firm called Wall Street Capital Partners, which lists Anderson as its CEO and Valdes as its chair. millions of dollars for ClassicStar, according to the court record. In return he received $2.1 million in Educated in part at Harvard, a former Marine, commissions, a share of which he was supposed Anderson started various companies, including to turn over to Feek’s firm. But after ClassicStar an unnamed one that brought in more than $20 reneged on promised compensation terms, Andermillion in revenue, according to the bio. It also son—“furious,” according to the judge’s descripsays Anderson co-chairs a cattle company that tion of the case—stopped paying Feek. focuses on “strategic beef systems in China and “They did no work nor fronted any expense,” Russia.” Anderson fumes in one of several long e-mails to Court documents, however, paint a less Seattle Weekly. He also claims Feek Justice should impressive picture. have exerted its influence over ClassicStar to In June 2009, King County Superior Court make the horse-breeding company live up to its Judge Susan Craighead presided over a civil obligations. trial held to determine whether Anderson In a scathing 29-page findings of fact, the had cheated business associates out of roughly judge countered that Anderson himself—not $80,000 in commissions. Jim Feek and Gary Feek Justice—was the ClassicStar insider. “He Justice (the former KIRO news anchor) had a had a close, personal relationship with Clasfirm that sold life insurance and helped wealthy sicStar’s David Plummer, and traveled to Claspeople invest. In the early aughts, Feek Justice sicStar’s operation in Kentucky frequently,” Financial heard about a tax-shelter program in Craighead wrote. which investors would lease thoroughbred horses The judge—who noted that Anderson’s body raised on a Kentucky farm and write off the language and speech patterns diminished his expenses of the animals’ care. credibility—went on to find that Anderson had Big money was involved. Investors paid anydefrauded Feek Justice by commingling business where from $1 million to $28 million, according and personal funds—funds that had been used to to the court record. The company running the pay for Anderson’s home (roughly 5,000 square program, ClassicStar, promised generous comfeet and valued at $1.2 million, according to missions to those pitching investors. Feek Justice county property records), as well as his Mercedes, began marketing the program with a series of BMW, Hummer, and Nissan. meetings. At one, Anderson turned up. Eventually Anderson talked Feek Justice into turning » CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

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» FROM PAGE 15 Craighead entered a judgment of $845,000, including interest, against Anderson—a ruling that prompts him to speculate that the judge’s “business experience is limited to paying the guy who does her lawn.” Shortly after losing the case, he declared bankruptcy. “He hasn’t paid a nickel,” Feek says, although Anderson contests that. Craighead made one more finding of note. Anderson, she wrote, “was in a better position than anyone else to see the telltale signs of a Ponzi scheme.” She’s referring to ClassicStar, whose shady operations were fully brought to light by a lawsuit in Kentucky. In 2011, a federal judge there found that ClassicStar was a ruse that funneled investors’ money to a parent company involved in natural oil and gas exploration. ClassicStar didn’t even have enough thoroughbreds to satisfy investments. The judge ordered ClassicStar’s principals—including David Plummer, the man Craighead described as having a “close, personal relationship” with Anderson—to pay $65 million. Anderson denies that he knew ClassicStar was a fraud. “The feds certainly did not think this was the case because they would have charged me,” he says. He’s talking about yet another court case involving ClassicStar, which last April resulted in Plummer being sentenced to 18 months in prison for tax fraud. Anderson says he helped prosecutors build their case, spending “countless hours with federal agents in deposition.” Still, Anderson’s history with ClassicStar hardly reassures investors considering his latest pitch. Instead, his past calls to mind Kleiman’s initial suspicion, which is not isolated. “This whole thing looks very much like a penny stock scam,” says longtime marijuana activist and lawyer Douglas Hiatt, who represents former NWPRC partner Jun. Yet in early September, responding to questions about his past and his role with Diego, Anderson says that he has “moved on” from the marijuana company. Davis says the same, stressing: “Doug is not a director, not a stockholder; he’s nothing.” Davis says the split was prompted in part by state rules requiring everyone who has anything to do with a licensed marijuana company, including investors, to be local. While broad wording in I-502 suggested as much, the state Liquor Control Board, which is charged with implementing the initiative, has made the matter crystal-clear in its detailed proposed rules. While Anderson is local, Davis says, “It’s easier for him to not have the restriction of just raising money from Washington state.” Valdes, the Wall Street trader who chaired Diego’s board, is also no longer involved with the company, Davis says. Asked who is on the board, Davis says he doesn’t know, adding that there is a possibility that he’ll become a board member himself. Anderson, however, has continued to promote Diego. Medical-marijuana activist and dispensary owner Steve Sarich says he had an “informational” meeting with Anderson days after the pitchman was described as having made a break with Diego. Anderson talked up his marketing plans for the company, according to Sarich.

“I am happy to meet with anyone about Diego Pellicer,” Anderson says when asked about ongoing meetings. He adds that he wishes Shively, “a good friend,” success.

I

n the late summer and early fall, Shively mostly stayed out of the limelight. He could be found at Hempfest staffing a Diego booth, his smile as broad as ever as he chatted with an organic-fertilizer supplier. But the booth was just one of many, undistinguished by either crowds or cameras. He also seemed to be backing away from his initial hype. Recognizing that federal legalization of pot may take a while, he said that Diego will be building its brand by going into hemp apparel and accessories. The company is still pursuing cannabis, he said, but added that such is a “longterm” strategy. His goal, and that of countless other pot entrepreneurs, was furthered by a Department of Justice announcement in late August that it would not challenge Washington’s and Colorado’s legalization laws, even though marijuana would remain illegal federally. Less than a week later, however, the state dealt Diego a blow in its updated version of proposed rules for marijuana businesses, which can begin to apply for licenses in mid-November. The LCB, saying it wanted to avert a corporate takeover, stipulated that no business could get more than three licenses, undermining Diego’s plan for a vast retail chain. Nevertheless, Davis, whose medical-marijuana business is not bound by LCB rules, says he’s busy acquiring “multiple” new locations. He is also looking at venturing into other states where medical marijuana is legal. The expansion falls in line with the blueprint laid out in his partnership proposal to Diego, which envisions NWPRC building its infrastructure before being acquired by the recreationalmarijuana brand. Davis declines to say whether Diego is funding the real-estate acquisitions, as also laid out in his proposal. “All you need to know is this,” Davis says. “I’m funded in the seven figures. We are moving forward. And Jamen will be a part of it.” Shively even seems back in hype-spouting mode. As the featured speaker at a webinar last week put on by a new web network called 420 Investor, he called attention to the “worldwide news” Diego made with its May press conference, saying that his “brand is out there more than anyone else in the entire industry,” and claiming his July symposium in Mexico “literally changed the course of Mexican history” by opening discussion on the wisdom of the drug war. He also talked about holding an IPO in six months to a couple of years, and purported to be in discussion with a New York TV producer about creating a reality show, presumably about Diego. He did interject his remarks with what he calls an “important disclaimer.” “Look, I’m going to talk about rules and concepts, some of which might not be practical or possible today given the rules and regulations,” he said. Anything he asserts “outside of those bounds,” he continued, “is nothing more than speculation.” E nshapiro@seattleweekly.com


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Sweet Tooth, I.D. Style How to learn to love—or at least try—Asian desserts.

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The use of tofu in tofu-fa illustrates another difference: Asian sweets tend to be made with legumes, vegetables, and herbs, with the latter often serving a medicinal purpose. Take taro, for example: This starchy tuber is found in a number of Asian sweets, like the green tea, honeydew, and taro mousse cakes our tour group sampled at A Piece of Cake (514 S. King St.). Colorful, light, and not too sweet, these cakes are easy to eat for most Westerners, and therefore a good gateway into the realm of Asian desserts. Let’s call it a “beginner” sweet—much like the popular cocktail bun at Mon Hei Bakery (669 S. King St., proclaimed the oldest Chinese bakery in Seattle), which is light and fluffy and filled with flavors of cream and coconut. A Piece of Cake offers a “wife cake,” an “intermediate” sweet typically made with winter melon, almond paste, and a touch of fivespice powder. It may sound like a strange combination, but I enjoy

FoodNews

BY SARA BILLUPS

Cupcake Royale’s new Queen Anne shop launches this Thursday, Oct. 10 at Queen Anne Avenue and Crockett Street. It will be open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week. Copperworks Distilling Company opened last weekend on the waterfront at 1250 Alaskan Way. The retail space and distillery produces small-batch spirits, including all-malt vodka and London Dry-style gin. Bartell Drugs in Greenwood is getting a growler fill station. Taking a hint from the whopping success of its first brewski dispensary in South Lake Union, Bartell plans to launch its second in-store station later this month. Mobile Food Rodeo’s Second Annual Winter Mobile Feast is planned for Sunday, Nov. 17 at the Fremont Sunday Market. The roster will feature more than 20 area food trucks, including Nosh and Barking Frog. Capitol Hill’s Monsoon is gaining 30 seats and a cocktail bar, with construction scheduled to be completed by spring 2014. Over in Bellevue, Monsoon East is teaming up with Everett’s Bluewater Distilling and Woodinville’s Pacific Distillery to host a cocktailcentric dinner Monday, Oct. 21 at 6:30 pm. Tickets are $75 and available online.

Temperature Check »From Zach chambers

KAREN STEICHEN

Chef, Anchovies & Olives and Bar Cotto

sort of Japanese molasses with a slight bitterness (well, it seems I do like some bitter with sweet after all) that pairs well with matcha. Unfortunately, the stores closed in 2008, as not enough Westerners embraced the concept—though many did like Starbucks’ green-tea latte, perhaps because it was sweeter, with sugar premixed into the matcha powder and melon syrup added. Matcha. Kuromitsu. The words are foreign, as are the desserts. So just like learning a new language, it’s all about immersion. A good place to start, I think, is with one of my favorite Asian desserts: tofu-fa. This steamed tofu pudding sometimes comes with ginger syrup (ginger helps with digestion, which gets at the function of some Asian desserts), but at Sub Sand (419 Sixth Ave. S.) you can get it with adzuki (red) beans and syrup. Tofu-fa is comforting and refreshing, though some may initially scoff at the idea of tofu for dessert.

Top, cocktail buns; far left, taro mousse cake; center and far right, Fuji Bakery.

the complex, herbal flavor these ingredients lend. At Chinese bakeries like these two, I’m always on the lookout for a more “advanced” sweet (or should I say savory?) like the one I found to the north in Richmond, B.C.: a preserved duck egg in lotus-paste pastry, with a slightly sulfuric odor and a gooey interior. My craving continues as I search in despair for this in the Seattle area. This pastry exemplifies two other elements of Asian sweets that make them hard for some to swallow: smell and texture. At Phnom Penh (660 S. King St.), you can challenge yourself, as our group did, to try a durian shake. Start with its odor, which I describe as stinky cheese that’s been rotting inside an old sneaker stored in a sweaty locker-room; if you can get past that, you’ll note how uniquely sweet the fruit actually tastes. (If this is too daunting, Phnom Penh’s subtler jackfruit smoothie might better suit you.)

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Southern food. I’m seeing Southern-steeped restaurants and bars popping up more and more. I love the food! The Wandering Goose, Witness, and Bar Sue are just a few in my neighborhood, and all seem to be doing a solid job of dishing out delicious food and drink.

Gastropubs. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a huge fan of good food and good drinks in a well-designed space, but I feel like the model has been established at this point. In a city where great food and great drinks are the norm, the concept is a given.

Elevated mac ’n’ cheese. The basic model is sound—and delicious—but the froo-froo versions just seem like a cop-out when a thoughtful dish is really the answer. Truffles, lobster, and pork belly deserve a better fate.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

ne of the more fascinating threads in the Chowhound online fooddiscussion forum is entitled “Asian desserts . . . why don’t I like them?” As a non-Asian who’s slowly come to appreciate many, but not yet all, Asian sweets, I’ve often wondered what makes them less appealing to Westerners. What better way to figure it out than to sample a good swath of sweets from Seattle’s International District? It’s there that the Wing Luke Museum offers its Chinatown Discovery Tours, including the popular Bitter and Sweet Tour that draws on the success of the bestselling book Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet. Not needing Bitter, I was interested in the Asian Sweet Tour that kicked off this summer to coincide with the museum’s kid-friendly SWEET exhibit, which explores the role of sweets in the traditions and celebrations of Asian cultures. So off I went with a handful of locals who said they’d often walked by many of the tour stops, wondering about the food but never venturing inside. When I asked the guide what he thought the obstacle was, he guessed a lack of familiarity with Asian sweets. Taking this a step further, I think it’s specifically the difference in form, flavor (sometimes smell), and maybe even function of Asian sweets compared to Western ones. After all, chendol with green “worm” noodles, grass jelly, balls of tapioca, and durian anything can be quite intimidating (and very foreign) to those who’ve yet to experience them. Thinking back to childhood birthday celebrations of chocolate cake topped with a big scoop of ice cream, I’m reminded that Western desserts tend to be very rich and sweet, with more use of dairy products than in most Asian desserts. Granted, some Asian desserts are sweet as well (Indian ones in particular), but most are light and less sweet, which explains why many of my Japanese friends roll their eyes at the cupcake craze. They’re simply startled by the amount of sugary frosting, which they scrape off before eating a “bald” cake. That’s why Fuji Bakery (526 S. King St.) is a sensible stop on the Asian Sweet Tour, as the products demonstrate that Asian pastries are less sweet than their Western counterparts, yet still delicious. Japanese bakeries like Fuji combine Asian ingredients with Western (especially French) ingredients and techniques. The forms are familiar (think croissants, danishes, and brioches) and the aesthetics are gorgeous, but the flavors may be new to some. Matcha (green-tea powder) is a good example. At Fuji, our group sampled the green-tea danish. Made with croissant dough, its swirl of green comes from matcha powder, which lends an earthy, delicious flavor. I was glad to see this, as green tea hasn’t always been a success in the Seattle area. In 2006, a partner in Tully’s Japan opened Koots Green Tea with much fanfare in Bellevue, followed by a location in Seattle. I loved Koots’ green-tea latte with kuromitsu, a

BY JAY FRIEDMAN

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food&drink

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And then there are all those chewy desserts, like Filipino pichi-pichi and Vietnamese rau câu ( Jell-O cake). The best way to break into this gelatinous genre? Bubble tea. The Asian Sweet Tour stops at Oasis Tea Zone (519 Sixth Ave. S.), where we sampled lavender-colored taro slush bubble tea. At the bottom are the “bubbles,” which you suck up with a fat straw. These tapioca balls are made in a fairly intricate process, and are all about texture. They’re a bit addictive, though once you know the calorie count, you might be tempted to instead use them as spitballs. Walking into Oasis or a similar bubble-tea shop can be like walking into any unfamiliar Asian shop or restaurant: overwhelming. They can feel like a foreign country, full of teenagers hanging out and speaking different languages, perhaps with K-pop blaring in the background. Even the menu board can be bewildering, with all the “exotic” flavors and options: hot, cold, slush, juice, smoothie, add-ons, mix-ins, whirled, shaken, etc. But the challenge is to embrace the difference. Ask for help. Despite occasional language barriers, I.D. store and restaurant owners are usually proud to show off their products and tell you more about them. And those kids in the bubbletea shops are all right. Ask them what they’re drinking if you don’t want to face the front counter cold. If you do, you may even find out what grass jelly really is. E

Seattle Chefs on the Late, Great Marcella Hazan BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

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ookbook author Marcella Hazan, considered by many the Julia Child of Italian cooking, died September 29 at age 89. The New York Times asked readers to share their favorite recipes, and 277 people replied. National culinary stars like Mario Batali and Lidia Bastianich weighed in on her influence as well. We asked some Seattle chefs who cook Italian food how Hazan affected them.

food@seattleweekly.com

ASIAN SWEET TOUR Wing Luke Museum, 719 S. King St., 623-5124, wingluke.org. $25–$35 (includes samples and museum admission). 3 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19. SWEET, in the KidPLACE Gallery, ends Jan. 5.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

Located on the Ship Canal near the Fremont Bridge 3014 3RD AVE N SEATTLE | 206-284-3000 | www.pontigrill.com

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My picks for Asian sweets outside the I.D.: Joule (3506 Stone Way N., 632-5685, joulerestaurant.com): Here you’ll find seasonal desserts that integrate Asian ingredients, as well as the popular “Joule box” with tapioca pearls, ruby grapefruit brûlée, and coconut—a refreshing way to end a meal at this Korean-inspired restaurant. Miyabi 45th (2208 N. 45th St., 632-4545, miyabi45th.com): Soba maker Mutsuko Soma finds fascinating ways to bring buckwheat and other Asian ingredients into her desserts. Perfect example: the green-tea ice-cream sandwich, with buckwheat cookies, kuromitsu, and kinako powder that was offered at press time.

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Yunnie Bubble Tea (4511 University Way N.E., 547-9648): There are all kinds of bubble tea at this U District hangout, but my favorite is fresh avocado, poured into a cup lined with chocolate syrup. An intriguing and delicious flavor combination!

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Hiroki (2224 N. 56th St., 547-4128, hiroki.us): This longtime Japanese bakery in Tangletown gets worthy praise for its green-tea tiramisu, which is served at a number of area restaurants, but also look for Hiroki’s versions of the French mont blanc (puréed sweetened chestnuts in cake or tart form), as well as the Hawaiian haupia, with coconut, mango, and more atop chiffon cake.

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Stuart Lane, chef de cuisine at Spinasse:

“I have two of her cookbooks, and I still return frequently to The Essentials of Italian Cooking. It has such a complete list of Italian dishes from all over. I wish people would read her books more. Last week, we featured a dish of hers at Spinasse: her tomato sauce, with just tomatoes, raw onion, and butter served with her potato gnocchi, made with only potatoes and flour (no egg). This dish is so emblematic of her; it really boils down a dish to its simplest ingredients. And her description of making pasta with a rolling pin is the best there is. It’s 100 percent accurate. Her technique of rolling the dough on a pin . . . when I went to Italy in 2005, that was exactly how I learned to make it.” Mike Easton, chef/owner at Il Corvo Pasta:

“The Essentials of Italian Cooking was one of my first-ever Italian cookbooks. Every Italian chef has her books. The first chapter alone is a mustread for anyone trying to cook Italian. It truly outlines what the key ingredients are, why the Italians love them, and how to use them.” Rudy LaValle, owner of Tinello: “She’s the person I look to for the way I do things, for the simplicity. She shows that it doesn’t take a lot of things to make a fabulous dish. She’s a touchstone in the sense that she wasn’t just someone trying to be creative. She cooked the dishes, did the research, and understood the heart and soul of what Italian cooking is all about.” E

nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com


food&drink»The Bar Code Pumpkin Beer and Cider Season BY ZACH GEBALLE

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cider a slightly bitter flavor and a more pronounced florality—especially useful when, on its own, the cider might be sweeter than desired. Finnriver Farm & Cidery in Chimacum on the Olympic Peninsula does a very nice job with their Dry Hopped Cider. While pumpkin beer doesn’t have quite

the same connection to American history, geographically it’s an even more essentially American drink. Pumpkins (and all other squashes) are native to the Americas, but it wasn’t until the arrival of European brewing techniques that anyone really made a pumpkin beer. Because they can include almost any style of beer, wildly different amounts of pumpkin, and differing levels of sweetness, richness, and spice, there’s probably a pumpkin beer out there for almost any drinker. In most cases, brewers add pumpkin at some point in the fermentation process, along with a host of spices that we associate with pumpkin pie: nutmeg, clove, cinnamon, allspice, and a bunch of others. In fact, some rely on just those spices to flavor the beer, leaving the pumpkin itself out altogether. Going relatively light on the pumpkin and spices and using a lighter beer as the base will give you a crisper, clean-tasting pumpkin ale, like the Fall Hornin’ from California’s Anderson Valley Brewing Co. or Elysian Brewing’s Night Owl. Both measure around six percent ABV (alcohol by volume), making them suitable for a fall picnic in the woods. On the other hand, if you’re lavish with the pumpkin and spices and start with a porter or stout, you wind up with a kind of beer that will comfort in the midst of a raging windstorm. For me, Pike Brewing’s Harvest Harlot, deep and rich with a wealth of spices and sweet vanilla notes on display, is the perfect beer for wrapping myself in a blanket, staring at the drizzling rain, and being really glad that I didn’t have any greater ambition today than taking a nap. For more information on this season’s apples, visit our blog at seattleweekly/voracious, or check out last week’s Bar Code to find out which wines pair best with apple preparations. E

thebarcode@seattleweekly.com

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t’s undeniably fall, with leaves everywhere, the signature gray gloom, and just about everyone’s thoughts turning to cozy sweaters, fireplaces, and the bounty of the season. For most people, the fall harvest means apples and pumpkins for pies. For me, though? Skip the crust—I just want to know how you can ferment them! While pumpkin beer can be the perfect drink for a cold, dark fall afternoon, apple cider is more about a stroll down a leaf-strewn country road: crisp, clean, and refreshing. The common misconception is that hard ciders are sweet just like non-alcoholic ones, but in fact most of the best ciders have a brisk acidity and a pleasant dryness that just gives a hint of apple fruit without overwhelming the palate with too much sugar. The delights of drinking cider are manifold, but for me several stand out. The first is the opportunity to drink as simple an alcoholic beverage as there is. While of course there are exceptions, many ciders consist of little more than fermented apple (or pear, cherry, apricot, etc.) juice and some water. Unlike beer, which is the confluence of multiple grains, hops, and possibly malt, or wine, which is often influenced by the vessel in which it’s aged, ciders tend to be solely about the quality and type of fruit that goes into them. Cider is also an essential part of American history. It was often the main drink of pioneers, frontiersmen, and settlers, as it was safer and more potable than water. It took advantage of the vast array of apple trees planted and disseminated by John Chapman (better known as Johnny Appleseed) and others. It also helped establish Americans as different from their European forebears, even sometimes to ill effect. Despite its status as an occasional indulgence, it was once among the most common beverages in the country. Of course in the Pacific Northwest we have an almost endless bounty of apples, so it’s little surprise that a number of different ciders are made in the area. A personal favorite is the Wild Washington apple cider from Tieton Cider Works in Yakima. With a wealth of interesting tropical notes and a pronounced minerality, it makes an interesting wine replacement with pork or cheese courses. Blurring the line between cider and beer are dry-hopped ciders. As in beer, hops are added during the fermentation process to give the

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arts&culture

Learning to Let Go

Two Seattle musicians move past their musical reputations and find new life in Iska Dhaaf. BY KELTON SEARS

ThisWeek’s PickList WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9

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Jesmyn Ward

KELTON SEARS

en Verdoes pulls up to the Park & Ben Verdoes (left) and Ride lot in Stanwood wearing a miliNathan Quiroga channel tary green tank top and a fresh closeApocalypse Now while cropped haircut. filming in Stanwood. “Welcome, soldiers,” he says softly to the group of friends, acquaintances, and random kids waiting for him. “Uh . . . thanks so much for coming out. We’re going to take you over to . . . boot camp now. The set is looking great, you guys, I’m really excited. Thanks so much for . . . reporting for duty.” I am one of about 50 or so extras who have voluntarily driven to Snohomish County on this late-summer Saturday to help film a new music video for Verdoes’ band Iska Dhaaf. Half of local hip-hop group Kingdom Crumbs is in attendance, as is John Van Deusen from indie-rock group The Lonely Forest and members of a slew of Bellingham bands, including Specters and the now-defunct Cat From Hue. The shoot is for the song “Everybody Knows,” a tune yet to be released but which is still stuck in my head from a house show the band played a couple weeks prior in a Central District basement. Verdoes, the group’s drummer, is an exceedwith Quiroga, best known in Seattle for his ingly polite man—a tall blond whose softpolarizing antics as a shit-starting rapper. spokenness likely lends itself well to his day job In 2010, Quiroga graced the cover of City as a teacher. As he explains what all we extras Arts, rotten tomatoes smashed into his hair, the are about to get into, his pleasant demeanor is headline blaring “What it’s like to be HATED.” undermining his drill-sergeant shtick. Indeed, Quiroga and his crew of hip-hop hedo“All right, soldiers,” Verdoes says, doing his nists, Mad Rad, earned the title “notorious” over best R. Lee Ermey impression. “We’ve got unitheir five-year career, getting banned from five forms ready for you over at camp. So you all best Seattle venues for their debauchery. One incisuit up and . . . uh . . . yeah! Thanks again for dent, a brawl that broke out at Neumos in 2009, coming. Seriously, it means so much to us.” briefly landed Quiroga and two bandmates in The video-shoot turnout is a testament to jail for drunkenly picking a fight with the club’s Iska Dhaaf ’s rapid rise. After releasing only four security guards. songs, the duo of Verdoes and guitarist/singer “Every show was like a battle between me and Nathan Quiroga has played shows in Alaska, the crowd,” Quiroga says. “I had to go as hard as at the Capitol Hill Block Party, and in live sesI could to make them love it, whatever it took.” sions on KEXP and The End. Nearly everywhere The group went as hard on the street as the band has gone, they’ve been met with rave onstage, battling postering teams for prime real reviews and rapturous crowds. Both times I’ve estate on the poster wall at 11th and Pine. An seen the band, a mosh pit erupted—quite a feat enormous “MAD RAD” wheatpaste loomed considering Iska Dhaaf ’s existence was someover Capitol Hill for the better part of two thing of a secret until this July, when they suryears thanks to the group’s unyielding diligence. prised everyone with the release of the incredibly “People would come and take it down, so we’d hooky debut single “All the Kids.” put it up bigger. Then they’d take it down again, A lot of things about Iska Dhaaf are surprisso we’d put another one up that was even bigger,” ing, actually. Chief among them is the unlikely Quiroga says. friendship that led to the formation of the 1 10/1/13 2:04 PM Due to a mix of this insanity and the band’s punked-outBOD_WKLY_Whiskey_10-1-13.pdf two-piece: Verdoes, a family man uncanny knack for self-promotion, Mad Rad from a math-rock background, finding kinship

Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. 7:30 p.m. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

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sold out shows and raked in press, their chirpy, electronica-influenced take on hip-hop receiving notice from Spin and NPR. Quiroga rapped lines like “Pills, powder, going under/The world’s a whore and I’ll always love her,” while articles detailed his love affair with whiskey and Rainier. As Quiroga was cultivating an image as an alcohol-swilling poet of the putrid, Verdoes was earning a very different reputation. Before playing a single show, his math-rock group Mt. St. Helens Vietnam Band received national media attention for the few songs it had uploaded to Myspace and the goofy promotional videos it had released—fake Public Service Announcements featuring flying cheeseburgers and purposefully awful green-screen effects. The band was soon out on long national tours. Over three years Verdoes oversaw the release of two full-lengths and an EP of highly complex indie-rock tunes, full of sudden time-signature shifts and byzantine song structures, that earned them local praise and national notice. The momentum was incredible for a project that had started as a way to teach Verdoes’ adopted brother Marshall, who calls Verdoes his legal guardian, how to play drums. He was only 13 when Mt. St. Helens Vietnam Band initially

“Men’s bodies litter my family history,” writes Ward in the first chapter of her new memoir, Men We Reaped (Bloomsbury, $26). Her greatand great-great-grandfathers were both shot; another relative stepped on a land mine in Vietnam. Grim as this introduction is, Ward has yet to tell the saddest part of her story: Five young men she knew well, including her brother, all died in a four-year period. Ward was raised by a philandering dad and a collective of “inhumanly strong” women in the poor, black community of DeLisle, Mississippi. There, violence and addiction regularly claimed the lives of young men— leaving only women, children, and “the few old, as in war,” she observes. This was a reality most folks accepted, or fled. In the author’s case, she was the first in her family to leave home for college— Stanford, followed by the University of Michigan. Yet she returned home to write, compelled by family and place, and earned a 2011 National Book Award in for her novel Salvage the Bones, about Hurricane Katrina. Back in DeLisle, Ward was struck by the growing quiet of the neighborhood streets where she once heard the sounds of life and music from friends’ cars. Probing the issue that inspired the book, she asks, “I wonder why silence is the sound of our subsumed rage, our accumulated grief. I decide this is not right, that I must give voice to this story.” Town Hall, 1119

Ward previously visited Seattle with Salvage the Bones.


arts&culture» Music Learning to Let Go » FROM PAGE 23

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

took off, and Verdoes home-schooled Marshall on the road and between concerts. At showtime, Marshall would climb behind the drums and pound out the complicated time signatures that anchored the band. Not only was Verdoes a rockstar, but he was also effectively a father, juggling separate but related identities that often weighed heavily due to their respective responsibilities. Verdoes and Quiroga both charged ahead in their lives and their musical careers at full speed. Yet, despite their respective success, both musicians wanted something different, something more. Quiroga found himself in a creative roadblock with Mad Rad, unhappy with the party-hard environment he’d locked himself into and the limits he felt the band was beginning to place on his songwriting. Meanwhile, Verdoes was looking for a musical outlet that felt a bit freer, where he could focus fully and solely on the music. He found himself wanting to make hiphop beats, fascinated with Quiroga’s songwriting in Mad Rad and the band’s similar work ethic. “Mad Rad and Mt. St. Helens were the two best promoters of our own shit,” Verdoes explains, chumming it up with Quiroga in a Capitol Hill coffee shop weeks after their video shoot. “We were working the hardest. I had this appreciation for Mad Rad on the basic level of strategy and promotion. I was just like, ‘These guys are fucking killing it.’ ” After an introduction by KEXP DJ Sharlese Metcalf, the two artists started a friendship. Verdoes played guitar with Mad Rad at the Capitol Hill Block Party in 2011. In one fateful moment, Verdoes remembers turning to Quiroga’s girlfriend. “He doesn’t know it yet, but I’m going to start a band with Nate,” he remembers telling her. “He’s the best songwriter in town.” Within a few months, Verdoes and Quiroga were practicing and writing almost every day. They did this for the better part of two years as their other bands dissolved, holing up in secret, painstakingly sending songs back and forth. The long incubation period was due in part to the high standards the two set for each other. “I’m just glad I met someone who can keep up with me,” Verdoes says. “I have a hard time keeping up with Nate a lot of the time.”

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Verdoes has been learning Somali for years. A former teacher for bilingual students at Bailey Gatzert Elementary School, located in a largely Somali neighborhood, Verdoes began to notice how difficult learning English was. “I saw how hard they were working to learn English, and when I started learning some of their words, I saw how much of a connection language forms,” Verdoes says. “But then I just fell in love with the sound of it; the words will get stuck in my head like songs do.” Verdoes initially met his girlfriend, Ifrah Ahmed, at Bailey Gatzert, where she was also teaching at the time. The two hit it off, bonding over Walt Whitman. When Verdoes found out Ahmed was also Somali, he asked her to help him learn the language. She was the one who taught Verdoes the phrase “Iska dhaaf.” Loosely translated as “Let it go,” the phrase quickly found its way into the band’s early practices and writing sessions.

“We would get into situations where something would be really difficult in a song, and we would just obsess over it,” Verdoes says. “One of us would start to crack and get to that point where you start telling yourself, ‘I can’t do this, I can’t do this.’ We would tell each other that phrase ‘Iska dhaaf ’ a lot as a way of being, like, ‘Forget it.’ And then we’d just go ‘All right,’ and move on.” When the group started talking about band names, the name stuck, its meaning emblematic of the project’s cathartic, redemptive quality. “All the Kids,” Iska Dhaaf ’s unreasonably catchy first single, doesn’t sound like an attempt at redemption upon first listen. Musically, the surfy guitars, pumping Farfisa bass, and skittering punk drums feel more like cruising through the Sahara on a motorcycle with your shades on. Only when you listen closely to the words do you realize the song’s hidden heft. All the kids I kicked it with were drunk. We sniffed the stars away and hate the sun. All we ever did was get fucked up. The planet spins another friend falls off. “I was really just trying to purge myself through that song,” Quiroga says. “I’m trying to get rid of all the guilt I have from the shit I did when I was fucked up.” If the duo’s first batch of songs was an attempt at inward purification, their next project is decidedly outward in its aims. This winter, Iska Dhaaf will release an EP themed on the subject of drone warfare. The video shot in Stanwood, along with at least two others, will function as an accompanying piece, a narrative saga with fully fleshed-out characters and interlocking plots. “I had just gotten the Internet,” Quiroga says. “So I asked Ifrah, ‘Hey! What should I read on here?’ She sent me an article about drones.” Verdoes nods. “And then we got obsessed.” Soon Quiroga and Verdoes were exchanging passages from apocalyptic T.S. Eliot poems, Jarhead, parts of the Biblical book of Isaiah, and scenes from Ishmael Beah’s A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier as potential sources for the ambitious project. “I was reading all this stuff and starting wondering, what would happen if someone blew Nate’s brains out in front of me?” Verdoes says. The feeling was intensified by Verdoes’ interactions with his his students from Somalia, a center for many U.S. military drone strikes. “I read these kids’ writings for class where they talk about these insane things they’ve been though,” Verdoes says. “It feels very close to me.” Back on the music-video set in Stanwood,

Verdoes and Quiroga are behind their instruments, poised in front of a giant mock-up of the American flag. A painted backdrop riffing on the opening helicopter scene from Apocalypse Now sits next to them. To confront the wars in Somalia, Quiroga and Verdoes are evoking the Vietnam war. The director instructs all of us pretend soldiers to start hooting and hollering when the shot begins. After about four or five run-throughs, an extra sitting next to me starts humming the chorus to “Everybody Knows.” It’s not only stuck in my head, but his too.

ksears@seattleweekly.com ISKA DHAAF Barboza 925 E. Pike St., 709-

9951, thebarboza.com. With Budo. 8 p.m. $10 adv. 8 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 10.


arts&culture» Pick List title character crawls into bed with his pregnant wife after cheating on her with a waitress in the dunes. The bartender thinks “last night’s indulgence felt for the moment harmless, forgivable, and behind them both.” But nothing’s forgiven or forgotten in Dubus’ stories. Dirty Love isn’t about sin and atonement, but there’s always a moral reckoning, a bill to be paid. Dubus will appear with local memoirist and recent SW cover girl Nicole Hardy (Confessions of a LatterDay Virgin) and former SW staff writer and memoirist Claire Dederer (Poser). Town Hall,

The Wizard of Oz

Whatever your feelings about Andrew Lloyd Webber, there’s only so much damage he and lyricist Tim Rice can inflict with this turbocharged adaptation of the L. Frank Baum tale, known to most via the 1939 movie. As an evening of musical theater, Dorothy’s journey from Kansas to Oz and back should be well-suited to kids making their first foray into the audience. If there’s some whispering and fidgeting, the amplified sound will easily overwhelm such potential interruptions. Crucially, Lloyd Webber has kept all the core songs that entered the American songbook via The Wizard of Oz. And you can never go wrong with eye-misting standards by Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg like “Over the Rainbow” and “If I Only Had a Heart.” The show originated in London two years ago and is now touring the U.S. (Danielle Wade plays Dorothy.) Tweaks have been made to update the book and broaden the demo; for instance, acknowledging the movie’s considerable camp following, the Cowardly Lion is now gay, even declaring “I’m proud to be a friend of Dorothy.” And you know what? So are we all. (Through Sun.) The Paramount, 911 Pine St.,

1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

Carrie: The Musical

For a teen still best remembered for being drenched in pig blood, Stephen King’s telekinetic heroine is now quite the queen of the prom. Brian De Palma immortalized her in his 1976 adaptation starring the translucent Sissy Spacek, and Kimberly (Boys Don’t Cry) Peirce’s remake arrives October 18 with Chloë Grace Moretz, the Kick-Ass girl, as its star. As in King’s 1974 novel, Carrie is the victim of school bullying, now such a hot news topic; and for that she has her revenge. Carrie: The Musical was a notorious 1988 Broadway flop, with an amateurish book by the first film’s screenwriter (Lawrence D. Cohen); and the songs, by Oscar-winning pop pros Dean Pitchford and Michael Gore, make Carrie into an edgy Disney heroine. (There’s a lot of soaring “What’s going on deep in me?” blather.) Still, the show has an adolescent urgency, if not self-awareness (shades of Spring Awakening), and it gives mother Margaret some room to breathe as a real human being. That bodes well for this Balagan/STG production, since director Louis Hobson, a former Seattle stage vet, tempted Tony-winning Alice Ripley, his Next to Normal co-star, to play mom to Keaton Whittaker’s Carrie. Ripley can really tear it up in the right role, and Bothell teen Whittaker is already a Broadway vet who played Catherine Zeta-Jones’ daughter in the recent revival of A Little Night Music. And during Balagan’s season preview last June, she proved she has the pipes for the show by blazing through its title song. (Through Oct. 26) The Moore, 1932

877-784-4849, stgpresents.org. $25 and up. 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER THURSDAY, OCT. 10

Chamber Dance Company

As elsewhere in our culture, gender has been a topic of animated conversation in the dance world. Hannah Wiley’s programming for In-Gender lays out a variety of positions on the subject. During the early part of the last century, modernist choreographer Doris Humphrey gave us the ideal female in Air for the G String and a history lesson in Shakers. By the end of that millennium, choreographers like Zvi Gotheiner (Brazilian Duets) and Doug Varone (Possession) have a much more slippery relationship with boys and girls. In between is Twyla Tharp, striding forward as always, as she breaks down our expectations of what men and women want in The Fugue. (Through Sun.)

Second Ave., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.com. $17.50–$50. 7 p.m. STEVE WIECKING

Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, meany.org. $10–$22. 7:30 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ

The four long stories—novellas, almost—in Dirty Love (Norton, $23.95) are set in a working-class New England where good jobs are scarce and reliable families even harder to find. Adults carry with them the resentments and damage wrought by their parents. A younger generation drifts from one reckless sexual encounter to the next. Then there’s the lure of drugs and cyberporn (working both sides of the camera). Dubus’ characters are mostly disillusioned and post-romantic, though lacking the self-awareness to consider themselves such. Yet they grope toward human connection under the umbrella definition of what we call love, which usually leads to doomed marriages. Then that wreckage follows them into seaside bars and cheap motel rooms. It’s a cycle you see repeated among these four tales, in which a few characters also recur. In one story, about a philandering bartender who fancies himself a poet, the

JEFF CARPENTER

Andre Dubus III

Whittaker (right) and Ripley prepare for blood.

There have been practically as many adaptations of Bach’s Goldberg Variations as there are variations in the original. Bach blew up a simple chord progression into a collection of 30 keyboard vignettes that range from the blackest tragedy to the giddiest flamboyance. Subsequent musicians have reworked the entire set for chamber ensemble, string orchestra, organ, guitar, harp, and more. (In a brilliantly imaginative recordSchiff is no stranger ing, pianist to the Goldbergs. Uri Caine even crosspollinated Bach with genres ranging from electronica to smooth Eurojazz.) Among the classical-music public, the legacy of Glenn Gould looms large; he recorded the Goldbergs twice, in 1955 and 1981—one album launching his career, the other, as it happened, capping it. But as strongly as the work has been publicly identified with Gould, other pianists have naturally found its riches irresistible; Schiff has also recorded the Goldbergs twice, and has devoted increasing attention in his concert schedule to Bach, to increasing critical acclaim. He’ll play the entire set, 80 minutes or so, tonight. (By coincidence, another pianist who’s made her mark with the Goldbergs, Simone Dinnerstein, is playing a Mozart concerto with the Seattle Symphony on Thursday and Saturday.) Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony. org. $19–$112. 8 p.m. GAVIN BORCHERT

TUESDAY, OCT. 15

Anything Goes

I am not one to argue that P.G. Wodehouse’s original book for this 1934 musical, built around Cole Porter’s impeccable songs, needed updating. Still, that is what happened with this 2011 redo (written by Timothy Crouse and John Weidman, directed by Kathleen Marshall), which earned a Tony for best revival. On a posh London-bound steamship are a gaggle of gangsters, socialites, deadbeats, golddiggers, swells, and the unstoppable evangelist-turned-songstress Reno Sweeney (Rachel York). Do these characters behave like careworn denizens of the Great Depression? Of course not. Porter’s bubbling tunes—“You’re the Top,” “It’s De-Lovely,” “Anything Goes,” etc.— defy those hard times. And, 80 years later, as we stand uncertainly on the far edge of a recession, it feels good to celebrate, to indulge in turkey dinners and derby winners, to savor Waldorf salads and Berlin ballads. Accordingly, the former choreographer Marshall has amped up the dancing in Anything Goes; the hoofing now gets equal weight with the belting. And when the ship reaches shore and the house lights go up, Reno gets her man and everyone goes home happy. (Previews begin tonight; opens Thursday; runs through Nov. 3.) The 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308

Fifth Ave., 625-1900, 5thavenue.org. $29 and up. 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER E

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SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

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Pick List » FROM PAGE 23

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arts&culture» Stage

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Broke-ology SEATTLE PUBLIC THEATER AT THE BATHHOUSE, 7312 W. GREEN LAKE AVE. N., 524-1300, SEATTLEPUBLICTHEATER.ORG. $10–$30. 7:30 P.M. THURS.–SAT., 2 P.M. SUN. ENDS OCT. 20.

An ill, aging parent determined to stay in the old family home. Two grown sons pulled in opposite directions—one to stay close (with a pregnant girlfriend), the other hoping to stay away. The King household happens to be black in Nathan Louis Jackson’s ghost-haunted 2008 family drama, set in Kansas City, Kansas, though the pressures felt inside are universal. In a short prelude on Craig Wollam’s homey set, pregnant Sonia (Amber Wolfe Wollam) hopes for a better future and a house with no bars on the widows. The lights dim to purple

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

PAUL BESTOCK

Johnson as the haunted patriarch.

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and Motown music swells until widowed William (Troy Allen Johnson) wakes some 30 years later. Same bars, same windows, same house. Nothing has changed, except that William has multiple sclerosis and a bad eye as he hobbles stiffly about the place. And what of Sonia’s old hopes? Her sons bound in, full of enthusiasm that will wane over two acts. Jovial firstborn Ennis (Corey Spruill) is trapped in a restaurant job, pressured by his baby mama to work extra shifts. He’s quite aware, even resentful, that his carefree days are about to end. Studious Malcolm (Tyler Trerise), meanwhile, has the prospect of a career in KC, but he’d rather be back in Connecticut, where he got his master’s degree. So who’s going to take care of William during the coming decline? He’s forgetting his meds and starting kitchen fires. “I want to go,” says Malcolm. “We need you here,” Ennis insists. The conflicts and characters here aren’t terribly fresh, though director Valerie Curtis-Newton and her likable cast do their best with the hand they’re dealt. Written at Juilliard, Broke-ology feels very much like a first-time effort, which it is. The pacing is slack, and Jackson doesn’t bring much outside pressure into the Kings’ home. Ennis gets a few cell-phone calls from his irate girlfriend—which, incredibly, he takes outside. (Note to aspiring playwrights: The audience wants to hear those calls.) William and Sonia are pretty much saints, working-class folk who raised their boys right. And if Ennis and Malcolm can’t

be mad at their parents, could they at least attack the system that both has them feeling so stuck? No, Jackson doesn’t bother with context, even when Sonia’s ghost makes us think of the big economic picture. “This is not the life I dreamed I’d be living,” she says. “This is not where I thought I’d end up.” Looking at the past three decades, most Americans would agree with her, which gives the play an almost accidental topicality. BRIAN MILLER

The Servant of Two Masters SEATTLE REPERTORY THEATRE, 155 MERCER ST. (SEATTLE CENTER), 443-2222, SEATTLEREP.ORG. $12–$80. WED.–SUN. ENDS OCT. 20.

In this rendition of Carlo Goldoni’s mid-18thcentury romp (adapted by Constance Congdon, directed by Christopher Bayes), the plot exists mostly as an excuse to get a bunch of toy-like commedia dell’arte characters together to let rip. Two couples—one thwarted by parental tyranny, the other by a disguise and logistics— have to sort things out with the questionable assistance of free-agenting servant Truffaldino, whose single true loyalty (to filling his belly) provides many of the laughs and whatever tension there is. Bayes has assembled a large, crackerjack cast of able improvisers—some of whom appeared in the original Yale Rep production. All are more than capable of executing the shticky lazzis (gags), slapstick, and rhythmic accidents that become dances. The timing of these bloopers-by-design is crucial, as many are coordinated with sound effects (some provided by a live onstage duo) or with multiple actors who can’t see one another. There’s much to admire in the craftsmanship here, but the two-and-a-half-hour show still drags. (At Intiman three years back, Bayes’ pithier A Doctor in Spite of Himself ran only 80 minutes.) Even Truffaldino, lithely played by Steven Epp in three-quarter mask and baggy harlequin pajamas, complains about this repeatedly. Fortunately, as per commedia tradition, the performers ad-lib local and contemporary references (including the viaductreplacement tunnel, “that fucking government shutdown,” and the Heart song “Barracuda”). This helps goose the centuries-old stock characters and plot machinery. If you’re going to theater to forget you’re at theater, forget it. Katherine Akiko Day’s lovely crumbling marble proscenium and a stage curtain on the stage make that impossible. The point here is frank, savvy artifice, presented in a long barrage. Still, there are memorable pieces: Comic killjoy dad Pantalone (Allen Gilmore) jiggles to get out of a pretzel pose; the sky lights up with Chuan-Chi Chan’s fireflies and stars. If you love light and zany more than dense and intense, this mostly-peanuts nut mix may be for you. MARGARET FRIEDMAN

RICHARD TERMINE

Opening Nights

Epp leads the buffoonery.

help, especially in liberal Seattle.) ArtsWest’s canny young cast pitches into the acid whimsy with gusto, directed by Tammis Doyle. When Republican senate staffer Patricia (Dayo Anderson) wakes up in a hotel room with Bianca (Anna Townes), a liberal blogger “truesading” for the welfare of a shrew species endangered by the senator’s bill, we expect a familiar hostage plot. But it emerges that both players—costumed by Jocelyn Fowler in the red and blue of their respective teams—have been captured by Miss Georgia contestant Katherine ( Justine Rose Stillwell), whose aspirations for the lofty platform go way beyond shaking her peaches. Indeed, she has forced the polarized reps to this bunker to help her redraft the U.S. Constitution. Predictably, both resist; but unpredictably, amid the clever sniping, they glimpse their own inanities and blind spots. It’s an attitude so refreshingly bipartisan my brain needed to build some new receptors to process it. Two whole acts would be too long for the hotel room, but fortunately the three gals get catapulted back to 1787. Suddenly they find themselves wigged as James Madison (Anderson), George Washington (Stillwell), and ignoble slavery defender Charles Pinckney (Townes). Part of the play’s efficacy comes from this clever reversing of political poles, as the foes are forced to sniff the other side’s snuff. This diversion works without explanation. Some other plot twists are more dubious, but so confident and entertaining is the writing that Gunderson gets away with them. They’re justifiable guerrilla infractions in the war against bull-headed despair, and since they result in a gridlock-busting vision many are hungry for— huzzah! MARGARET FRIEDMAN E

stage@seattleweekly.com

PThe Taming ARTSWEST, 4711 CALIFORNIA AVE. S.W., 938-0339, ARTSWEST.ORG. $15–$34. 7:30 P.M. WED.–SAT., 3 P.M. SUN. ENDS OCT. 19.

Riffing on Shakespeare, playwright Lauren Gunderson (Exit, Pursued by a Bear) has created a rare specimen: a political comedy that’s fair-handed and funny. In an era when singleperspective pummeling usually rules the ring, she actually gives a little advantage to the conservative side. (Goodness knows it needs the

MICHAEL E. BRUNK

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Stillwell in pageant mode.


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REWIRED The Phoenix and The Frog present an “immersive

B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

ANYTHING GOES SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 25. •  THE BACCHAE GreenStage’s “Hard Bard” series (classics

with the gore turned up to 11) goes Greek with Euripdes’ tragedy. Stage One Theater, 9600 College Way N., 800838-3006, greenstage.org. Free. Opens Oct. 12. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sun. Ends Nov. 2.. THE BIKE TRIP Martin Dockery’s solo storytelling show recounts Dr. Albert Hofmann’s pioneering LSD experience. West of Lenin, 203 N. 36th St., 352-1777, westoflenin. com. $15. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 9. CAFE NORDO Reprising their inaugural innovative dinnerplus-theater show, “The Modern American Chicken.” Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave., cafenordo.com. Opens Oct. 11. 7:30 p.m. Thurs. & Sun. ($65–$80), 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat. ($75–$90). Ends Nov. 24. CARRIE: THE MUSICAL SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 25. DARK OF THE MOON A reading of this 1945 hit about the love of a “witch boy” for Barbara Allen. Stage One Theater, 9600 College Way N., endangeredspeciesproject. org. Donation. 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 14.

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ESE ORO: CLASSICS FROM THE GOLDEN AGE OF SPAIN eSe Teatro presents readings (“with a twist,”

they warn) of plays from from Spain’s theatrical peak: Cervantes, Lope de Vega, and others. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., eseteatro.org. 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11–Sat., Oct. 12. FAMILY AFFAIR Jennifer Jasper’s monthly cabaret. JewelBox/Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., jenniferjasper performs.com. $10. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 16. FLAME IN THE MIRROR Eclectic Theater presents John Ruoff’s exploration of the Irish experience in America. Eclectic Theater, 1214 10th Ave., S., 800-838-3006, eclectic theatercompany.org. $12–$25. Opens Oct. 10. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 3. THE LIFE EROTIC Subtitled “A Very Wes Anderson Cabaret,” burlesque, music and more celebrate the director’s work. Hosted by Simon Kornelis. (“Team Zissou” hats will be on sale.) JewelBox/Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets.com. $20–$35. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11. Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

EarSupply

»  By Gavin Borchert

Feinting Spells

performance project” (geez, we’re gonna hafta do stuff?) on the theme of “mental health and life on the periphery.” Teatro de la Psychomachia, 1534 First Ave. S., 800-8383006, brownpapertickets.com. $18. Opens Oct. 11. 8 p.m Fri.–Sat. plus Thurs., Oct. 31. Ends Nov. 2. SHREK, THE MUSICAL “Everything you liked about the movie plus more.” Bainbridge Performing Arts, 200 Madison Ave. N., Bainbridge Island, 842-8569, bainbridgeperformingarts.org. $19–$27. Preview 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 10, opens Oct. 11. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 3 p.m. Sun., plus 3 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19 & 26. Ends Oct. 27. SUGAR DADDIES The U.S. premiere of the 2003 British hit, directed by its prolific author, Sir Alan Ayckbourn. It’s not quite a comedy, though the setup might suggest mirth: Sasha saves Val, a sidewalk Santa, from a hit-and-run, then unwisely invites him home. But Val is not what he seems. BRIAN MILLER ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 2927676, acttheatre.org. $41 and up. Previews through Oct. 9, opens Oct. 10. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 3. TROUBLE IN FAIRYTALEZANIA Taproot presents this free reading. Seattle Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., taproottheatre.org. Free. 2 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. THE WIZARD OF OZ SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 25.

• 

H A P P Y HO U R

• 

CURRENT RUNS

ANNIE Lyric Light Opera presents the Depression-set fave.

Kirkland Performance Center, 350 Kirkland Ave., Kirkland, 425-893-9900, kpcenter.org. $24–$34. 7:30 p.m. Sat., 2 p.m. Sun., plus 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 18. Ends Oct. 20. BLAK CLOUD The Crucible meets improv. Wing-It Productions, 5510 University Way N.E., 781-3879, jetcity improv.com. $12–$15. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Fri., Oct. 3–18 and Oct. 31–Nov. 22. THE BRICK AND THE ROSE Ten actors portray 46 characters in Lewis John Carlino’s “collage for voices.” Runs in various area venues Oct. 8–10; see arouet.us for complete info. BROKE-OLOGY SEE REVIEW, PAGE 26. CAMPFIRE Spooky stories, improvised. Market Theater, 1428 Post Alley, 800-838-3006, unexpectedproductions.org. $10. 8:30 p.m. Thurs. Ends Halloween. CANNIBAL! THE MUSICAL! The tale of Alferd Packer, written by those South Park guys. Unexpected Productions Market Theater, 1428 Post Alley, 800-8383006, unexpectedproductions.org. $12–$15. 8:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Nov. 2. AN EVENING OF CHRISTOPHER DURANG Fantastic.Z presents four short plays. JewelBox/Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., 800-838-3006, fantasticz.org. $15–$20. 7 p.m. Wed. Ends Oct. 30.

or even decent, composer is going to play with and subvert expectations, few works by Mozart open with quite such a weird feeling of what’sgoing-on-where-are-we?. Ironically, the piece by Shostakovich—a composer from whom we expect such mind games—is his Piano Quintet, which opens in a solid, severe G minor, like a Bach prelude. The Emerson, in its annual visit (its first with new cellist Paul Watkins), plays both these works, plus Mendelssohn’s Quartet in F Minor. For the Shostakovich, they’re joined by UW pianist Craig Sheppard. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries.org. $10–$43. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Oct. 15.

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SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

If it were slower and a bit gloomier, you might almost mistake the serpentine, chromatic opening of Mozart’s String Quartet in E-flat for a piece by a fellow composer on next week’s Emerson String Quartet concert, Shostakovich. Mozart’s bare melodic line (naked, without accompaniment) seems to curl around the home key but, teasingly, never quite land there. The music then passes to a different chord but briefly forgets to keep going, pedaling in place for a moment; and just as it sounds like it’ll settle on a clear cadence in E-flat, the second violin interrupts with a mocking little tag. Then the process is reversed: The two pedaling-in-place bars are repeated verbatim and lead back to the opening sinuous curl, this time lushly harmonized. All these feints and destabilizations take up a mere 15 bars; though any great, LISA-MARIE MAZZUCCO

ING

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arts&culture» Performance 5TH OF JULY Lanford Wilson’s play about a post-Vietnam

Dance

HELLO DARLIN’S: MOM’S GOT SOMETHING TO TELL YOU! Josephine Howell’s solo show relates the life of

HEATHER KRAVAS Her dance piece the quartet is “a

reunion of Berkeley alums. West of Lenin, 203 N. 36th St., theatre22.org. $10–$20. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Oct. 26.

comedian “Moms” Mabley. Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center, 104 17th Ave. S., 800-838-3006, langston institute.org. $10–$25. 7 p.m. Thurs.–Sun., 2 p.m. Sat.–Sun. Ends Oct. 26. JULIUS CAESAR They come to stage Shakespeare, not to praise him. Is this ambition? The Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., handwrittenproductions.org. Pay what you will. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Oct. 12. THE MATCHMAKER The great aims of Thornton Wilder’s classic 1954 farce, set in the 1880s, are embodied by widowed marriage broker Dolly Levi Gallagher (played boldly and joyfully by Pam Nolte). With a thick Irish brogue and twinkling eye, she encourages the ridiculous adventures of the tale’s naive working-class adventurers to achieve her ultimate goal: marrying her client, the tight-fisted half-millionaire widower Horace Vandergelder (Robert Gallaher). Wilder peppers his hit play with expertly crafted dialogue that makes us empathize with his characters’ crushing loneliness or economic plight, but the cast generally fails to deliver on such moments; Wilder’s subtle strokes are skipped over as setups for broad laughs. Thankfully, those laughs land consistently. MARK BAUMGARTEN Taproot Theatre, 204 N. 85th St., 781-9707, taproottheatre.org. $15–$40. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Extended through Oct. 26. MIRROR IMAGES The premiere of Scott Timmons’ mother/ daughter drama. DownStage Theatre, 4029 Stone Way N., 800-838-3006, playwrights-theatre.org. $16. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 26. THE MYSTERY OF IRMA VEP Two actors play all the characters in Charles Ludlam’s horror-melodrama spoof. Second Story Repertory Theatre, 16587 N.E. 74th St., Redmond, 425-881-6777, secondstoryrep.org. $22–$27. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., plus 2 p.m. Oct. 19 & 20. Ends Oct. 20. THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS SEE REVIEW, PAGE 26. SHE’S COME UNDONE Wally Lamb’s 1992 novel is another in the endless trove of novels intended to buttress the belief that baby boomers were the first selfaware generation. And if the source material ain’t great, She’s Come Undone gets a thoughtful and sensitive staging, particularly from Kelly Kitchens, the director who labored to keep the novel in a hazy netherworld, neither a word-for-word recitation of Lamb’s text nor a strict dramatization. His ever-kvetching ne’er-do-well heroine Dolores Price is played by Jocelyn Maher, who makes the trek from preteen to 40-something with dogged believability. She gets fat and loses it; she endures physical and emotional traumas; and, unlike so many of her generation, she gets over them. Supporting players give the play much of its warmth and halting forward motion; but, perhaps wanting to include too much of the book, Kitchens’ adaptation often makes dramatic turns with battleship speed. KEVIN PHINNEY Center House Theatre, Seattle Center, 216-0833. $24–$38. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see book-it. org for exact schedule. Ends Oct. 13. THE TAMING SEE REVIEW, PAGE 26..

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

TEATRO ZINZANNI: HAIL CAESAR: FORBIDDEN OASIS Frank Ferrante returns as the flamboyant chef

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STGPRESENTS.ORG (877) 784-4849

The Oldest New Theatre in Town EST. 1907 • 2ND & VIRGINIA

GROUPS OF 10 OR MORE CALL (206) 315-8054 FOR SINGLE TICKETS CALL (877) 784-4849

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Caesar, a sort of omnisexual Liberace/Chazz Palminteri mashup. The sharpness and speed of his wisecracking improv skills are impressive, as would be expected from a performer who’s earned acclaim impersonating Groucho Marx. Slinky Dreya Weber, equally skilled as an aerialist and singer, plays a resurrected Cleopatra. You pay a lot more at TZZ than you might for a show at Re-Bar or the Pink Door, but the whole immersive experience still seems a bargain: You’re not just buying dinner and a show, but a lavish evening-length party. GAVIN BORCHERT Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015. $108 and up. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see dreams.zinzanni.org for exact schedule. Ends Jan. 26. THE WALWORTH FARCE New Century Theatre Company presents Enda Walsh’s absurdist tale of an Irishman and his two sons. New City Theater, 1404 18th Ave., 271-4430. $20–$30. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sun., plus some Mon. & Wed., see wearenctc.org for exact schedule. Ends Oct. 27. XANADU What makes this production spring to life are the two perfect leads. Dane Stokinger plays Sonny Malone, Venice Beach’s resident chalk artist/bandanna’d lunkhead/roller-disco visionary. Like, say, Brendan Fraser, Stokinger is more adorable the dimmer he gets. Kira, the muse who descends to Earth to inspire him, is played by Jessica Skerritt, aglow with charisma. GAVIN BORCHERT Village Theatre, 303 Front St. N., Issaquah, 425-392-2202, villagetheatre.org. $30–$65. 7:30 p.m. Tues.–Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 7 p.m. Sun., plus some 2 p.m. weekend matinees. Ends Oct. 20; moves to Everett Oct. 25–Nov. 17. YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN Mel Brooks’ follow-up to his The Producers. Burien Actors Theater, S.W. 146th St. and Fourth Ave. S.W., Des Moines, 242-5180, burienactorstheatre.org. $7–$20. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 27.

The Oldest New Theatre in Town EST. 1907 • 2ND & VIRGINIA

kaleidoscopic ballet, a mutating folk dance and a titillating cheer . . . a cult, an essence, a machine, a snowflake, a Utopia, and a quotation mark.” On the Boards, 100 W. Roy St., 217-9886, ontheboards.org. $20. 8 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 10–Sun., Oct. 13. SPECTRUM DANCE THEATER Donald Byrd starts his second decade at the company with his usual intensity, opening Spectrum’s fall season with his take on Balanchine’s Prodigal Son. SANDRA KURTZ Madrona/ Spectrum Dance Studio, 800 Lake Washington Blvd., 3254161, spectrumdance.org. $20–$25. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 6 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 20. IM.PERF.ECT Under a name derived from IMpromptu PERFormances projECT (which is genius), Cornish’s Institute of Emergent Technology + Intermedia presents an evening of sound, movement, and video. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., cornish.edu. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. CHAMBER DANCE COMPANY SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 25.

• 

Classical, Etc.

MET OPERA AT THE MOVIES Tchaikovsky’s Eugene

Onegin, starring Anna Netrebko, opened the Met season with offstage controversy. See metopera.org for participating theaters. 6:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 9. • COMPOSER SPOTLIGHT Composer/clarinetist Beth Fleenor discusses her improvisational music/dance work SILT. Jack Straw Studios, 4261 Roosevelt Way N.E., jack straw.org. Free. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 9. • SEATTLE SYMPHONY After a self-financed debut recording that came out of nowhere to stun critics, and a recent thoroughly successful collaboration with roots singer Tift Merritt, pianist Simone Dinnerstein arrives to play Mozart’s limpid Piano Concerto no. 23. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $19 and up. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 10; 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. • SEATTLE SINGS 27 choirs from near and far convene for this inaugural festival. See seattlesings.org for full schedule. Saint Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, 1245 Tenth Ave. E. Fri., Oct. 11–Sat., Oct. 12. NORTHWEST SINFONIETTA Mozart’s Symphony no. 38, plus romantic bonbons for piano and orchestra with soloist Joel Fan. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 866-833-4747, nwsinfonietta.org. $10–$55. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11. SEATTLE SYMPHONY An hour of Tchaikovsky and Mozart, with 13-year-old pianist Alexander Lu. Chief Sealth International High School, 2600 S.W. Thistle St., seattlesymphony.org. Free. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11. ANDRAS SCHIFF SEE EAR SUPPLY, PAGE 27. •  JEAN-BAPTISTE ROBIN The French organist in recital, program TBA. St. James Cathedral, 804 Ninth Ave., 3824874, stjames-cathedral.org. $15. 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11. SYNTHESIZER NIGHT Experimental/ambient/soundscapes for electronic instruments. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., waywardmusic.blogspot.com. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11. AUBURN SYMPHONY Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and pianist Mark Salman. Auburn Performing Arts Center, 700 E. Main St., Auburn, 253-887-7777, auburnsymphony.org. $10–$34. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12, 2:30 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13. OPUS 7 From this choir, Gesualdo, Schubert, Britten, and much more. St. James Cathedral, 804 Ninth Ave., opus7. org, 382-4874. $18–$20. 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. SEATTLE BAROQUE ORCHESTRA Opening the Early Music Guild’s season with virtuoso sonatas from both sides of the Alps. Elizabeth Blumenstock conducts. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 325-7066, earlymusicguild.org. $20–$42. 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. • SEATTLE CHAMBER PLAYERS Known for bringing the best new music from around the world to Seattle, they’ll play works by Alexander Raskatov, Helena Tulve, and more. Seattle Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., seattle chamberplayers.org. Free. 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13. DEMARRE MCGILL Demarre, we hardly knew ye: The Seattle Symphony’s recently departed principal flute gives a master class and a recital of French music.Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, seattleflute society.org. $10–$20. 3 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13. RUSSIAN CHAMBER MUSIC FOUNDATION Prokofiev’s quizzical Cello Sonata and lighter works. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 425-829-1345, russian chambermusic.org. $13–$28. 5 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13. • A CELEBRATION OF TOBY SAKS Honoring the Seattle Chamber Music Society’s founder and longtime director, who passed August 1, with music from Bach to Rachmaninoff. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 748-7800, seattlechambermusic.org. Free. 5 p.m. Mon., Oct. 14. • EMERSON STRING QUARTET SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 25.


arts&culture» Visual Arts B Y K E LT O N S E A R S

Openings & Events • BELLTOWN ART WALK Neighborhood galleries

(including Northwest Woodworkers Gallery, Form/ Space Atelier, A/NT Terminal Gallery, and others) and non-galleries (Cyclops, Black Bottle, Bedlam Coffee, etc.) extend their hours. See belltownartwalk.com for details. Second Friday of every month, 6 p.m. BLITZ! CAPITOL HILL ART WALK Galleries and stores on Pike and Pine Streets include Vermillion, Ltd. Gallery, True Love Art Gallery, and Photo Center NW, Fetherston Gallery, and Rosebud. Info: blitzcapitolhill. com. Second Thursday of every month, 5-8 p.m. TRACY BOYD Into The Wild: Paintings on Reclaimed Tarps finds Boyd utilizing castoff coverings for machinery and engines as canvas in an attempt to tackle unfair hierarchies in our society. Second Thursday reception: 7:30 p.m. to midnight. Vermillion, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, vermillionseattle.com, Tues.-Sun., 4 p.m.-midnight. Through Nov. 9. VINCENT CAPDEPUY Territories is the first Seattle exhibition for the French painter, who moved to town four years ago. The show explores the artist’s shifting notions of home and nationality. Opening reception: 6-9 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 10. Essence Wine Shop, 415 E. Pine St., 324-0188, Tues.-Sun., noon-1 a.m. Through Nov. 12. CENTRAL DISTRICT ART WALK Local artists with studios along E. Cherry St. (between 23rd and 24th Aves.) invite you to come in and see what’s brewing. Venues include Autumn Thing, Doubt Us Artwork, Miss Cline Press, Outside In Studio, and Coyote Central. Info: centraldistrictartwalk.com. Second Saturday of every month, 1-5 p.m. DIVINITY Divinity is a group show exploring various forms of divination throughout time. Opening reception Oct. 12, 6-9 p.m. Krab Jab Studio, 5628 Airport Way S, 715-8593, krabjabstudio.com, Tues., Thurs., 2-5 p.m. Through Oct. 31.

• 

• 

Send events to visualarts@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

TheFussyeye

»  By Brian Miller

Gone to the Dogs

LINDA HODGES GALLERY

includes Jim Woodring at Fantagraphics, paintings by romance-novel illustrator Franco Accornero at District, ceramics by Aaron Murray at All City Coffee, and caricature paintings by Amber Marie Austin at Georgetown Liquor Company. As always, artist studios are open at Equinox and Nautilus, and the evening continues at local bars. Info: georgetownartattack.com. Second Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. KATHY GORE FUSS In Forested Energy, she creates beautiful, fragmented visions of Northwestern forests by painting on layered, chopped-up canvas constructions. Opening reception: 6-9 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 10. Blindfold Gallery, 1718 E. Olive Way, 328-5100, blindfoldgallery.com, Weds.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Through Oct. 31. FRAN HOLT Carousel Horses: Celestial Mythologies is exactly what it sounds like: large, epic paintings of carousel horses. Opening reception 5-8 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 10. Ghost Gallery, 504 E. Denny Way, 832-6063, ghostgallery.org, Mon., Weds.-Sun., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Nov. 11. INTERSTITIAL THEATRE POP-UP Curated and run by Interstitial Theatre, this Seattle Storefronts temporary space is the city’s only gallery dedicated to video art. Opening reception: 6-9 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11. Belltown Collective, 2231 First Ave., Seattle, storefrontsseattle. com. KYLE JORGENSEN In the Salt Lake City artist’s first Seattle show, Kinetic Theories, geometrically patterned drawings and paintings resemble video game environments, graphic data charts, and surreal representations of nature and topography. Opening reception: 6-9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. LxWxH Gallery, 6007 12th Ave. S., 697-5156, lengthbywidthbyheight.com, Sat., 12-3 p.m. Through Nov. 2. PATTI WARASHINA The venerated Northwest ceramics artist talks about her 50-year career and ongoing retrospective at BAM with poet Alan Lau. KOBO at Higo, 604 S. Jackson St., 381-3000, koboseattle.com, Sat., Oct. 12, 4-6 p.m. WEST SEATTLE ART WALK Several venues showcase local art, including Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, ArtsWest, Alki Arts, and more. Details: westseattleartwalk.blogspot.com. Second Thursday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

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Dance-illusionists perform Botanica

OCT 31-NOV 2

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and line that shows a special affinity for critters. There are many dogs in this show, and I love the way he captures their sideways, skittering insouciance, their nonchalant, herky-jerky energy that can abruptly collapse into a shady nap in the dust. Hansen conveys the essential canine form—and that of other creatures—in a way that reminds you of cave paintings. Those Paleolithic artists had more of an equivalence with animals; there were no notions of domesticated or wild, of our dominion over nature. Hansen’s dogs are on a more friendly footing with us now, but he grants them an ancient dignity, a freedom never quite surrendered. Linda Hodges Gallery, 316 First Ave. S., 624-3034, lindahodgesgallery.com. Free. 10:30 a.m.– 5 p.m. Tues.–Sat. Ends Nov. 30.

EMERSON STRING QUARTET | with pianist Craig Sheppard

OCT 15

MARIZA | Portuguese fado singer in concert

OCT 25

AT MEANY HALL ON THE UW CAMPUS 206-543-4880 | UWWORLDSERIES.ORG

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

Still actively painting at 92, it seems like Gaylen Hansen has been around forever. Based in eastern Washington, given a 30-year retrospective at SAM six years back, and widely collected, he’s a guy whose productivity and familiarity can paradoxically work against him. Like clockwork, he has an annual show at Linda Hodges, and many of his new canvasses haven’t even been framed yet. It’s like he just put down the brush that morning, then packed up the car and drove over the pass to show us what he’s done. The creative cycle continues; there’s a stubborn tenacity to it, like the sun coming up over the Palouse, where Hansen settled in the ’50s to teach at WSU. He was born in Utah, and he’s certainly a Westerner who puts horsemen and frontier themes into some of his work. But he’s no Remington-style cowboy artist; dogs and horses and birds often figure in his paintings because they share the same Western environment. I often categorize artists as indoor or outdoor, depending where they seem most comfortable and where they generally depict their subjects. Hansen is in the latter camp, with a kind of sophisticated-yet-rustic use of color

• GEORGETOWN ART ATTACK This month’s shindig

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arts&culture» Film

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its 18th edition, it’s occasion to cheer, but also a chance to peer outside our smugly enlightened Waters and Divine at the 1988 Baltimore little bubble. premiere of their biggest hit. Down in Fort Worth, Texas, for instance, that fading cow town was inching toward tolerance in 2009 when a new club opened to serve The Rugby Player (Pacific Place, 12:30 p.m. Sun., the LGBT community. But as we see in Robert Oct. 20). An unabashed fan of hair metal and L. Camina’s doc Raid of the Rainbow Lounge action movies as a late-’80s teenager, the tall, goofy Bingham we see in home movies is a wel(Pacific Place, 11:30 a.m. Sun., Oct. 20), local come rebuttal to the notion that being born gay law enforcement was not quite so welcoming. automatically gives you perfect taste, Wildean A contingent of cops and state liquor-control wit, and a command of Streisand trivia. We see agents came crashing through the door, arrested Bingham grow into his hulking body, captain his a half-dozen patrons, and cracked one guy’s skull high-school rugby squad, lead his fraternity at on the concrete floor. Was this, 40 years after Cal, then finally, inevitably come out to his famStonewall, Stonewall all over again? Not quite. ily and friends. And a heartbreaking 9/11 footEven in the heart of Red-statelandia, activists note I’d forgotten: His mother, Alice Hoagland, quickly got their cause into the media, a gay city was a United flight attendant he called from the councilman championed it, hearings followed, hijacked plane. “It’s terrorists,” she told him. “If and the blue wall began to crumble. If you’re a fan of drawn-out municipal process—and who in you can, try and take over the aircraft.” She’ll attend the screening. Prepare to be hugged. Seattle isn’t?—all the protests, citizen testimony, But enough sadness. Let us celebrate Harris and police-disciplinary depositions are oddly Glenn Milstead, though dead for 25 years. He reassuring. The authorities are held accountable, expired at the peak of his career, untouched by and cops actually lose their jobs. Maybe Texas AIDS, perhaps the most unlikely movie star in ain’t so red after all. alternative-become-Hollywood screen history. Another state in transition? Delaware. The Opening the fest is I Am Divine (Cinerama, 7:30 New Black (Northwest Film Forum, 7:30 p.m. Mon., Oct. 14) follows its ballot referendum p.m. Thurs., Oct. 10), followed by a gala afterQuestion 6 last year, asking voters to uphold party at the Belltown Community Center. Jeffrey or affirm the Democratic legislature’s new Schwarz’s documentary is rooted in Baltimore marriage-equality law. As with our Referendum and the recollections of John Waters, benevolent 74 and California’s Proposition 8, out-of-state Svengali to the late, great drag queen. It may money and the religious right invested in a local be hard to recall now, after Hairspray has been fight; but what makes Yoruba Richen’s film so adapted into a stage show and movie musivaluable is its focus on the black faith comcal (cue John Travolta), what a disruptive force munity. She treats both sides non-judgmentally: Divine was. He went beyond “passing” or pretty Pastors fret about the rise from slavery to or burlesque into a nether realm of exaggerated, respectability being tainted by scandalous sex messy revenge—“to use that anger from all his talk; activists patiently doorbell households that high-school traumas,” says Waters. In a way, are inclusive inside, but Scripture-spouting on Divine’s triumphant story is Revenge of the Nerds the stoop. Propriety is important. The topic is still before nerds, sadistic glee before Glee. Before fraught for African-Americans—“dual oppresthe 1988 Hairspray and his death that year, he sion” versus “black first,” says one advocate. Even said “cult status isn’t enough.” He wanted to be a preacher who’s come around to the pro-equality a character actor, like Charles Laughton, who camp can joke of the traditional black church’s transcended drag. And though the clock ran out view of homosexuality as “a white man’s disease.” at age 42, just when he got his first part on a TV A better-known story is that of the airline series, he’s a role model to this day. E passengers who fought back against the 9/11 bmiller@seattleweekly.com terrorists. Maybe you remember United 93, in which Cheyenne Jackson played Mark Bingham, SEATTLE LESBIAN & GAY FILM FESTIVAL who helped storm the cockpit and avert a much Cinerama, Harvard Exit, Pacific Place, and greater loss of life. That docudrama was thrilling Northwest Film Forum. Tickets and info: Primary yet grueling conjecture, but now we get to meet threedollarbillcinema.org. $9–$12 individual, $85– the real Bingham in Scott Gracheff ’s doc $225 passes. Runs Thurs., Oct. 10–Sun., Oct. 20.

Palette


arts&culture» Film

Opening ThisWeek

T. Nelson mold, but with a distinct weakness for perving on teenage French girls and believing urban legends about the bedroom habits of Disney “princesses.” His journey eventually goes off its funhouse rails and enters a surreal realm, with a Shining-esque hint that maybe Jim was always meant to be here. Escape doesn’t entirely hold together, and its more baffling moments— did that Disney nurse just say something about “cat flu”?—suggest that it was never meant to. That Moore and his cast shot a movie under Mickey Mouse’s nose is a fun factoid, and there are some “How’d they do that?” moments, for sure. But the guerrilla-moviemaking stunt is just the beginning. What’s really exposed here isn’t Disney World, but us. ROBERT HORTON

Captain Phillips

Hanks’ skipper remains cool during the crisis.

We Are What We Are OPENS FRI., OCT. 11 AT VARSITY. RATED R. 105 MINUTES.

Captain Phillips is both a worrier and a realist. Driving to the Vermont airport with his wife (Catherine Keener), he frets about their kids being unprepared for the hyper-competitive globalized economy. “Big wheels are turning,” he says. “You gotta be strong to survive out there.” He should know, since his job is to shepherd container ships from one port to another. The route from Oman to Mombasa runs through dangerous waters, and his freighter is equipped with “pirate cages” and water cannons—but no actual weapons—to keep small boats off the hull. Phillips demands that his torpid crew prepare for the worst, and their drill is interrupted by the worst: Muse (Barkhad Abdi) and three fellow pirates, the youngest a teenager. (All are firsttime performers cast from Minneapolis’ SomaliAmerican community.) Muse is the second captain of the film, insisting the ransom racket is “just business . . . taxes” for foreign nations using Somali waters; the third later arrives on a U.S. warship. All three captains understand their intermediary role. The big wheels are above them. Navy Captain Castellano (Yul Vazquez) has the White House on his neck. Muse says of the warlords who stake him, “I got bosses.” “We all got bosses,” replies the weary Phillips, who flatters Muse by treating him as an equal. If not quite cogs, they’re bit players in the global nexus of commerce and power. (Nowhere is jihad mentioned; the pirates have nothing to do with al-Shabab.) Still, their conflict is starkly asymmetrical: all

our American military might versus four skinny guys with AK-47s. And here are two models of crew-and-command: the fractious Somalis versus the unified SEALs, each carrying a very different price tag. A better film on the subject was released in July, the Danish A Hijacking, but Captain Phillips reinforces the same point. Muse and Phillips are both small men ferrying large assets in the international supply chain. And if they don’t like the job, plenty of others will take their place. BRIAN MILLER

Escape From Tomorrow RUNS FRI., OCT. 11–THURS., OCT. 17 AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS. NOT RATED. 90 MINUTES.

ESCAPEFROMTOMORROW.COM

Turns out those kids who dread going inside Space Mountain or the scary Cinderella Castle have been right all along. Something sinister lurks inside the Magic Kingdom; scratch the surface and evil comes leaking out. That the “Happiest Place on Earth” might hide a shadow beneath the sunshine isn’t an especially bold idea, and—to its credit—the brand of creeping horror found in Escape From Tomorrow is more than a specific attack on a rather easy target. First-time filmmaker Randy Moore shot his movie at Disney World and Epcot Center without asking permission, an act of bravado that made it instantly notorious at Sundance this year. (You’re seeing the film now because the trademark-protective Disney folk have decided to ignore it as much as possible and weather the storm.) Although this suggests an underground aesthetic, the black-and-white result is sharply composed, tightly scripted, and dense with digital effects. Abel Korzeniowski’s grand score, peppered with soundtrack nuggets from other films, is another unexpected touch. And while the movie does have fun letting the air out of certain beloved Disney balloons—did those vapidly grinning puppets in “It’s a Small World” just flash a fang-baring grimace?—the nightmare that unfolds has more to do with a general human tendency to retreat into fantasyland than with a slam on Walt Disney. We are following Jim (Roy Abramsohn) and Emily (Elena Schuber) as they escort their two kids The Disney World through a final day of fun at Disney’s vacation turns weird. two Orlando theme parks. Jim’s a beefy American Dad from the Craig

Teenage vampires have had their day (Twilight ad nauseam), Carrie’s about to arrive again, and even a teenage zombie fell in love in Warm Bodies. So what new twist can be added to the canon of adolescent romance/body-horror? Iris (Ambyr Childers) suddenly finds herself second-incommand in the curious Parker family following the death of her mother. There’s also a son of about 6 and 14-year-old Rose ( Julia Garner) in the upstate New York household, which any census taker would classify as rural and poor. Out in the shed, grieving patriarch Frank (Bill Sage) repairs antique watches and keeps an eye on the trap door below, whence plaintive female cries are sometimes heard. What’s he keeping down there? Why does Frank force his family to fast before their annual Sabbath dinner? And why does no one recognize the scripture he recites at his wife’s grave? It’s the Testament of Alyce Parker, we eventually learn, an 18th-century forbear whose diary of near-starvation during colonial times has now become a very peculiar family creed. This remake of a 2010 Mexican horror movie (a fable of urban inequality) has been given a leafy Catskills treatment; the early scenes of nature and pregnant rain clouds are almost Thoreauvian in their serenity. And director Jim Mickle takes a leisurely hour before detailing the dietary facts of the Parker family. They are strict locavores, leaving the food miles to their prey. This isn’t the kind of movie where people are cleanly killed with guns. Shovels, hammers, tire irons, and teeth are the preferred instruments of slaughter. The Parker sisters have been raised in a violent home where rebellion is inevitable. “I just wish we were like other people,” says Rose. “We aren’t,” snaps Iris, though she has eyes for a handsome town cop. Meanwhile, a local MD (Michael Parks) begins to follow the bones— unearthed by torrential rains—back to Frank. Unlike most modern horror flicks, the shocks here come only at the end; and the movie is too slow and somber for its own good. (Frank is also a disappointingly dull Biblethumper.) The cell phones belong to the ’90s, and Frank dresses his clan in frontier fashions. Yet their solemn anachronism becomes comic when a friendly/nosy neighbor drops by with a casserole. “It’s vegetarian lasagna!,” says a cheerful Kelly McGillis. Yes, Kelly McGillis. Needless to say, the Parkers don’t eat vegetarian. BRIAN MILLER E

film@seattleweekly.com

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

Tom Hanks has taken a lot of abuse in his screen career. He was stranded on a desert island in Cast Away, suffered AIDS in Philadelphia, marooned in space in Apollo 13. And worse, there was Bosom Buddies. Now he’s hijacked and held hostage by Somali pirates, as actually happened to Richard Phillips in 2009, upon whose book this film is based. If you read that account or the newspapers, there’s nothing surprising here, though expert director Paul Greengrass—of the Bourne movies and United 93—adds as much tension as he can, chiefly through jittery cameras, screaming pirates, and the late-film addition of lethal Navy SEALs. But if I may jump to the end of the movie first: Greengrass and screenwriter Billy Ray do make the interesting decision not to treat that ending triumphantly. We know things will go badly for the pirates. We know the Navy will do its job with complete professionalism (those are real ships, meaning a military-approved script). But what we could not guess is that after more than two days of cool thinking, protecting his crew, calm negotiating, and even coaching his captors, Captain Phillips would finally lose his shit. The film’s most startling scenes are of his blind confusion and shock, the terror that one associates with Michael Haneke torture porn. Weakness and fear are not what we expect of our leading men, but Hanks has never played the conventional action hero. Can you name a movie where he’s driven a car into opposing freeway traffic, walked unflinchingly away from an exploding orange fireball, or leapt through the air while firing two pistols in slo-mo? Part of his durable appeal, which almost makes him a throwback to the old studio era, is his commitment to type—a suburban decency and propriety, a respect for the unshowy norms it takes to survive in an often cruel, capricious world. He’s like Walter Mitty without the fantasies, but aware of life’s fantastic turns and twists. (“Oh, great, I fell in love with a mermaid . . . ”)

JASIN BOLAND/COLUMBIA PICTURES

OPENS FRI., OCT. 11 AT GUILD 45TH AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG-13. 132 MINUTES.

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arts&culture» Film BY BRIAN MILLER

Local & Repertory

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

CRONOS The 20/20 Awards presents Guillermo del

Toro’s 1993 breakthrough, in which a device bestowing immortality becomes a dangerous object of contention. (R) Grand Illusion, $5-$8, Tue., Oct. 15, 8 p.m. DEAD ALIVE Peter Jackson’s 1992 horror comedy has a poor lad caring for his zombie mother. (R) Central Cinema, $6-$8, Thu., Oct. 10, 8 p.m. ROBERT K. ELDER The author will discuss The Best Film You’ve Never Seen: 35 Directors Champion the Forgotten or Critically Savaged Movies They Love, followed by a screening of the 1988 Killer Klowns From Outer Space. (PG-13) Grand Illusion, $5-$8, Mon., Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m. A FIERCE GREEN FIRE Mark Kitchell’s star-studded doc calls for action on global warming via a meandering look at environmental movements of yore. But this doc is so filled with eco-stereotypes that it plays like a Christopher Guest parody, something best suited to a Sierra Club fundraiser. For what it’s worth, the doc features narration from celebrities including Meryl Streep, Robert Redford, and Ashley Judd. The title comes from a quote from Aldo Leopold (1887-1948), the man credited with establishing ecology as a modern field of study. He said he saw a fierce green fire in the eyes of a wolf he’d just killed, a transformative moment that began his long journey toward conservationism. By contrast, this film will only make your eyes glaze over. (NR) DANIEL PERSON Keystone Congregational Church, 5019 Keystone Place N., 632-6021, keystoneseattle.org, Free, Fri., Oct. 11, 7 p.m. IRISH REELS FILM FESTIVAL A half-dozen titles are screened, with ancillary parties and events. Beginning the fest at 6 p.m. is the new romantic comedy Run and Jump. See irishreels.org for full schedule and details. (NR) SIFF Film Center, Oct. 11-13. LOST HIGHWAY In David Lynch’s 1997 puzzle picture, Bill Pullman plays the guy who ends up being two guys (later played by Balthazar Getty), both of them troubled by Patricia Arquette. ( Pullman is charged with killing his wife but beats the rap, being Getty.) The whole thing’s an unsatisfactory career midpoint between Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive. Lynch works through many of the same ideas—doubles, obsessions creating their own dark-mirror reality, the fickleness of love— without creating a consistent tone of dream logic. The film gains an extra layer of creepiness thanks to the presence of future wife killer Robert Blake. (R) BRIAN MILLER Harvard Exit, $8.25. Midnight. Sat., Oct. 12. REEL ROCK FILM TOUR A handful of climbing and skiing documentaries are screened in this traveling collection of films. Notable among them is High Tension: Ueli Steck and the Clash on Everest, about the conflict between professional climbers and their low-paid guides. See reelrocktour.com for full lineup. (NR) Guild 45th, $20, Wed., Oct. 9, 8 p.m.; Thu., Oct. 10, 7 p.m. RIDE THE NIGHT Continuing SAM’s fall film noir series, Humphrey Bogart looks into the disappearance of an old Army buddy, finding Lizabeth Scott instead, in the 1947 Dead Reckoning. (NR) Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org, $63–$68 series, $8 individual, Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through Dec. 5. SAMURAI CINEMA Toshiro Mifune stars in 1967’s Samurai Rebellion, in which an aging warrior picks up a new cause. (NR) $6-$11, Mondays, 7 p.m. Through Oct. 21. SEATTLE LATINO FILM FESTIVAL The GI, SIFF, and other venues are being used for this mini-festival. Topics include old school buses being repurposed in Guatemala, idle youth in Lisbon, and the infamous skyscraper-become-slum in Caracas. See slff.org for info. (NR) Grand Illusion. Through Oct. 13. SEATTLE POLISH FILM FESTIVAL Crime thrillers, documentaries, and more are screened. The fest opens with Roman Polanski’s 1962 marital thriller Knife in the Water, which proved his calling-card to America. Several directors and actors will visit the fest. See polishfilms.org for full schedule and details. (NR) SIFF Cinema Uptown, Oct. 11-20. SEATTLE SOCIAL JUSTICE FILM FESTIVAL Over 60 titles will be screened, mostly documentaries, plus a visit on Saturday from Sister Helen Prejean, played by Sudan Sarandon in Dead Man Walking. She’ll introduce the acclaimed new doc The Central Park Five, about the black teenagers wrongfully convicted for the Send events to film@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

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1989 assault on a white woman in Manhattan. Danny Glover will visit on Sunday with his new historical drama Tula: The Revolt, about an 18th-century slavery uprising. Venues include the Cinerama, Majestic Bay, and Market Theater. See socialjusticefilmfestival.org for full schedule and details. (NR) $6-$15 individual, $89-$100 series, Oct. 10-13. SEATTLE SOUTH ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL With screenings taking place at SIFF Cinema Uptown and the UW Bothell campus, this annual fest will screen over a dozen features and documentaries, plus many short films. Topics include political tension in Kashmir, sex trafficking, and film preservation in India. Mira Nair’s very topical new The Reluctant Fundamentalist is also on the bill. Various live musical events, forums, visitors, and parties are also planned. See tasveer.org for full schedule and details. (NR) $10-$12 individual, $60-$250 series, Through Oct. 13. THE SHINING Stanley Kubrick’s slow, eerie 1980 adaptation of Stephen King’s The Shining has a primal, fairy-tale quality laced with Oedipal conflict. It matters less if Jack Nicholson’s blocked writer is demonically possessed (or Indian-cursed or evil reincarnated or whatever) than that he’s simply a bad father—rough and impatient with son Danny, cruelly dismissive of his wife (Shelley Duvall), selfish in his writerly ambitions. A failure at the typewriter, his imagination turns inward, rotting inside its own topiary maze. (Also screening this week is the King-derived Pet Sematary.) (R) Central Cinema, $6-$8, Oct. 11-12, 7 p.m.; Mon., Oct. 14, 7 p.m.; Wed., Oct. 16, 7 p.m. SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN The classic 1952 movie musical is a film about movies, and about our love of movies—including all their fabulous artifice. Gene Kelly, Donald O’Connor, and Debbie Reynolds sing, dance, and put on a show in fabulous Technicolor, set to the memorable Adolph Comden-Betty Green score. This is also the GI’s annual fundraiser gala, with refreshments served. (G) Grand Illusion, $25, Sun., Oct. 13, 5 & 8 p.m. TOTALLY ‘80S TUESDAYS Valley Girl and Desperately Seeking Susan are screened. (PG-13) SIFF Cinema Uptown, $6-$11, Tuesdays, 7 & 9:15 p.m. Through Oct. 22.

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Ongoing

BLUE JASMINE There’s nothing comic about the

downfall of Blanche DuBois in A Streetcar Named Desire, the inspiration for Woody Allen’s miscalculated seriocom. Blue Jasmine is an awkward mismatch of pathos and ridicule, less fusion than simple borrowing. Grafted onto the story of delusional trophy wife Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is a Madoff-like fable of the recent financial crisis. In flashback, we see her husband (Alec Baldwin) buying her consent with luxury while he swindles the Montauk set. In the present timeframe, Jasmine is broke and living with her sister Ginger (Sally Hawkins) in a shabby San Francisco apartment. Jasmine is a snob who needs to be brought low, a task relished by Ginger, her boyfriend (Bobby Cannavale), and her ex (a surprisingly sympathetic Andrew Dice Clay). Perhaps because her heroine isn’t entirely Allen’s creation, he doesn’t finally know what to do with her. Jasmine is more foolish than evil, but there’s nothing funny about her final punishment. (PG13) BRIAN MILLER Kirkland Parkplace DON JON Joseph Gordon-Levitt wrote, directed, and stars in Don Jon, the story of a porn addict who’d be right in place amongst the braying loudmouths of Jersey Shore. However, the likable Jon is also a ladies’ man, prowling the disco with his buddies and searching for a “dime” (a “10,” on the immortal scale) to take home on a Saturday night. An encounter with the lushly named Barbara Sugarman (Scarlett Johansson, in a deft caricature) suggests that our boy may have found authentic love, but Gordon-Levitt throws in some reasonably fresh variations on the tale of an addict redeemed. One of them comes in the form of a nightschool classmate (Julianne Moore) who’s got more honest life experience than most of the people in Jon’s circle. All this is in service of a very simple message, of the kind an earnest young filmmaker might feel is important to say for his generation. Which is maybe more endearing than insightful. (R) ROBERT HORTON Bainbridge Cinemas, Cinebarre, Varsity, Meridian, Thornton Place, others ENOUGH SAID Nothing much happens in a Nicole Holofcener film, and that’s OK. Enough Said is yet another well-wrought example of her focus on the problems intelligent women create for themselves through their constant worry. Ten years divorced, her daughter soon to leave for college, Eva (Julia LouisDreyfus) wearily lugs her massage table from client to client, hearing their petty complaints without comment, seemingly resigned to a single woman’s slide toward

menopause. The large, hairy obstacle in that path is Albert (James Gandolfini), also divorced with a college-bound daughter. Eva has a secret pipeline to confirm her doubts about him: Albert’s ex-wife Marianne (Catherine Keener) is one of her clients. If there is a Hippocratic oath for masseuses, Eva knows she’s broken it tenfold. Yet she continues to knead and befriend the cynical poet while allowing Marianne’s complaints to poison her relationship with Albert. In his last screen role, Gandolfini conveys a lumpy shyness and decency; his Albert is genuinely hurt by the fat-shaming of Eva’s yoga-toned cohort. Eva’s BFF (Toni Colette) tells her to learn to compromise in a relationship, even while constantly dissing her husband (the excellently indignant Ben Falcone). For the women of Enough Said, too much candor has its risks, but remaining silent can bring disaster. (PG-13) BRIAN MILLER Pacific Place, Ark Lodge, Lynwood Theater (Bainbridge) FRUITVALE STATION By an accident of timing, if not craft, Ryan Coogler has made one of the most important movies of the year. His docudrama chronicles the last 24 hours in the life of Oscar Grant (played by Michael B. Jordan), a 22-year-old black man shot to death by overzealous transit cops on an Oakland BART platform in 2009. Less covered by the national media than the Trayvon Martin case, in part because Grant had a criminal record, his killing was actually witnessed and filmed on cellphones by New Year’s revelers returning home on the same BART train from which he was dragged by the cops. Fruitvale Station leads up to that incident with a day-in-the-life format. It’s overly sentimental and possibly too soft on Grant, who goes out of his way to do favors for everyone he encounters. He’s respectful of his mother (The Help’s Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer), kind to dogs, loving to his girlfriend (Melonie Diaz) and 5-year-old daughter. Yes, it is possible in America to be a petty drug dealer and an upstanding family man. After showing us the actual cellphone video before the credits, Coogler spends a relaxed hour humanizing Grant; then comes the grim rush of docudrama that loops us back to the fateful railway platform. (R) BRIAN MILLER Admiral GRAVITY George Clooney and Sandra Bullock are stranded in orbit, menaced by regular bombardments of space debris. The oxygen is running out and there’s no prospect of rescue from Earth. Their dilemma is established in an astonishing 12-minute opening sequence, seamlessly rendered via CGI by director Alfonso Cuarón (Children of Men, Y Tu Mamá También). The camera occupies no fixed position. There is no up or down in the frame as it pushes and swoops among the wreckage and flailing astronauts. (Here let’s note that the 3-D version is essential; don’t even consider seeing the conventional rendering.) Dr. Stone (Bullock) at first can’t get her bearings; and the rest of the film consists of her navigating from one problem to the next. If the shuttle is disabled, let’s get to the International Space Station. If no one’s home there, let’s try the Chinese station next door. For all its technical marvels and breathtaking panoramas reflected in Stone’s visor, Gravity is a very compact and task-oriented picture. It’s both space-age and hugely traditional, though with a modern, self-aware heroine. Gravity is a marvelously forward-thrusting film that doesn’t need much dialogue or introspection. Stone scores her biggest laugh with an exasperated aside: “I hate space.” Thanks to Cuarón’s peerless directing work, we know just the feeling. (PG-13) BRIAN MILLER Alderwood 16, Cinerama, Factoria, Woodinville, Southcenter, Ark Lodge, Cinerama, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Majestic Bay, Meridian, Thornton Place, SIFF Cinema Uptown, Sundance, others INEQUALITY FOR ALL The basis for this advocacy doc, Robert Reich’s Aftershock, was published three years ago as we were tentatively clambering out of the Great Recession, which began with the subprimemortgage collapse of 2008. The market is up today, but we also have a jobless recovery for the middle class. Why is that? Using the same graphs he employs as a UC Berkeley professor, Reich shows how the inequality curve began climbing in the ’80s, accelerating with the deregulation of financial markets during the Clinton era (when he worked in the White House). It’s a 40-year trend, with technology, globalization, outsourcing, and other causes. To counter that trend, Reich advocates federal stimulus and other policies to grow the middle class and get it spending again, to raise that median income (essentially flat since the pre-OPEC ’70s, measured in constant dollars). Meanwhile, Republican rhetoric about an “opportunity society” has become a cruel irony: Social mobility is heading in the wrong direction, making the country ever more polarized. And that is why, despite Reich’s ebullience, this is such an important, dismaying film. (PG) BRIAN MILLER Harvard Exit

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PRISONERS Crime movies about child abduction raise

the usual alarm bells. Here’s a chance for actors to shriek and curse, to pound the floor and squeeze out those Oscar-friendly tears. Yet writer Aaron Guzikowski and director Denis Villeneuve mostly tamp down the emotional explosions in this damp, depressive thriller; there’s a mood of fatigue and resignation in the struggling Pennsylvania suburb where two girls go missing on Thanksgiving. Their fathers (Hugh Jackman and Terrence Howard) join the cops in combing the woods; dirty rain turns to derelict sleet; and the mothers (Maria Bello and Viola Davis) crumple into passive grief at home. The sullen detective on the case (Jake Gyllenhaal) offers little reassurance; with his tattoos and pent-up anger, he seems not just disgusted by the kidnapping suspect (Paul Dano) but by the world in general. Prisoners runs long, and the clues and plot twists are roughly knotted into the fabric. It feels like a single-season TV series trying to develop, and the only character given room to grow is Jackman’s. Dover is a contractor whose business has been cut by the recession; he’s a disaster-prepper with a basement full of canned food and guns; and he turns into a monster when he lays hands on the prime suspect. (R) BRIAN MILLER Oak Tree, Pacific Place, others RUSH Ably directed by Ron Howard, Rush is the mostly true stories of two star drivers of the ’70s: the British rogue James Hunt and the Austrian technician Niki Lauda. Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) is a posh, privileged, oversexed product of his times. The methodical, unlovable Lauda (Daniel Brühl) has meanwhile paid his own way onto the circuit: He makes every car faster through strict engineering discipline, not panache. He and Hunt are yin and yang, a dynamic that screenwriter Peter Morgan (The Queen, Frost/ Nixon, The Damned United) repeats far more often than necessary. Howard certainly remembers the ’70s, and with cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle (Slumdog Millionaire) he gives Rush a wonderfully Camparisoaked period look. The racing scenes are excitingly conveyed with vintage cars, CGI, and snippets of real race footage among the many montages. Hemsworth, an Aussie from those Thor movies, isn’t a bad actor; and Brühl, a German-Spanish utility player, is a good actor soon to co-star in the WikiLeaks movie The Fifth Estate. I only wish the writing were up to their and Howard’s talents. Rush successfully captures the glamour and danger of its sport; only the script isn’t up to speed. (R) BRIAN MILLER Pacific Place, Bainbridge, Kirkland Parkplace, Seven Gables, Lincoln Square, others THE SUMMIT In 2008, as was widely reported, 11 mountaineers perished in a cascade of bad judgment and warm-weather-caused icefall on the 8,000-meter peak K2. (Global warming? Maybe.) Nick Ryan’s documentary uses reenactments, fresh interviews, and some original footage to chronicle that calamity, with emphasis on Irish alpinist Gerard McDonnell, his countryman, who was making his second attempt on K2. This storytelling here isn’t Into Thin Air, and the conflicting testimony among several nationalities and rival expeditions is not a model of clarity. It’s like Rashomon in the Death Zone. None of those oxygen-starved brains are ever going to agree on a sequence of events. After fixed lines are severed by a massive icefall that strands McDonnell and others on the deadly descent, there is no central, reliable Krakauer figure on the mountain. As a result, sober analysis of the incident gives way to weepy testimonials—padded with the story of Italy’s first ascent of K2 in ’54—in an avalanche of sentiment. Whenever possible, Ryan opts for tears and conjecture instead of facts. (R) BRIAN MILLER Sundance THEATERS: Admiral, 2343 California Ave. SW, 9383456; Ark Lodge, 4816 Rainier Ave. S, 721-3156; Big Picture, 2505 First Ave., 256-0566; Big Picture Redmond, 7411 166th Ave. NE, 425-556-0566; Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684; Cinebarre, 6009 SW 244th St. (Mountlake Terrace)., 425-672-7501; Cinerama, 2100 Fourth Ave., 448-6680; Crest, 16505 Fifth Ave. NE, 363-6339; Grand Illusion, 1403 NE 50th St., 523-3935; Guild 45th, 2115 N. 45th St., 547-2127; Harvard Exit, 807 E. Roy St., 323-0587; iPic Theaters, 16451 N.E. 74th St. (Redmond), 425-636-5601; Kirkland Parkplace, 404 Park Place, 425-827-9000; Lincoln Square, 700 Bellevue Way N, 425-454-7400; Majestic Bay, 2044 NW Market St., 781-2229; Meridian, 1501 Seventh Ave., 223-9600; Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 267-5380; Oak Tree, 10006 Aurora Ave. N, 527-1748; Pacific Place, 600 Pine St., 888262-4386; Seven Gables, 911 NE 50th St., 632-8821; SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996; SIFF Film Center, Seattle Center, 324-9996; Sundance Cinemas, 4500 Ninth Ave NE, 633-0059; Thornton Place, 301 NE 103rd St., 517-9953; Varsity, 4329 University Way NE, 632-6412.


the geekly report» The Myth of the Unicorn

SHOWTIM ES

OCTOBER 11 - 17

BY TERRA CLARKE OLSEN

PET SEMATARY

filtering the best of THE NORTHWEST!

FRIDAY & SATURDAY & MONDAY & WEDNESDAY @ 7:00PM

I

was once accused of being a unicorn. It happened in 2004 and was meant to be a compliment. But I was confused. I’ve never had an affinity for unicorns, so I corrected my accuser. I’m a cat or a hummingbird, but a unicorn? Nah. He explained: I’m a unicorn because I’m a girl who likes nerdy things. I like Magic the Gathering and can quote Monty Python skits;

THE SHINING

FRIDAY-Sunday & MONDAY & WEDNESDAY @ 9:30PM

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MAP THEATRE - STAR WARS ORIGINAL TRILOGY TRIVIA - TUESDAY @ 7:00PM

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TERRA CLARKE OLSEN

when suddenly a little girl walked in dressed up as a Darth Vader princess. She wore a pink tutu and cape, with a pink lightsaber in tow. She adorned the outer case of Vader’s helmet with a perfectly placed tiara. Her shirt sparkled in gemmed buttons and glittery letters, proudly declaring her “Darth Makenna.” I asked to take her picture and she gave me the biggest smile, instantly melting my heart. Darth Makenna embodied GeekGirlCon in that one smile. She found a place where she could be a princess and a dark lord. Brilliant. (Note: Darth Makenna was beloved by so many, she now has her own Facebook fan page!) Being a part of GeekGirlCon has been a marvelous experience. Besides participating in the cool geek events that GeekGirlCon hosts all year long, I’ve also formed lifelong friendships. Just a bunch of unicorns galloping in happiness. Sadly in the geek culture, women are Darth Makenna often isolated and dismissed. We all at GeekGirlCon. have war stories. People questioning our “nerd-cred” like it’s some kind of certificate you earn; asking if we even like the fandom displayed on our shirts; assuming we’re at a convention or playing an RPG to be a “good girlfriend.” The assumptions and dismissals are huge. So women are misled into believing they are alone, that their opinions don’t matter in gaming or comics since they’re “not the demographic.” But this is simply not true. Women are not apparently girls don’t do those things, and to rare in geek culture; we make up 47 percent of find one was like finding a unicorn. I reflected. gamers and 40 percent of Comic-Con InterWas I a “unicorn”? I guess I did grow up doing “nerd” things with mostly male family and friends, but was I the only one? I didn’t want Women are not rare in to believe it was possible. I just couldn’t bring myself to believe in unicorns. geek culture; we make up During my young adulthood, I connected 47 percent of gamers and with a lot of amazing women, all of whom I love and cherish, but they never understood 40 percent of Comic-Con that side of me. That nerd side. The unicorn haunted me. But then something amazing International attendees. happened the winter I moved back to Seattle. national attendees. That is almost half, people! I learned about GeekGirlCon, a convention Not really rare or mystical. Yet the unicorn that celebrates the female nerd in all aspects of myth continues, and women continue to be geek culture. And I do mean all aspects. It feamarginalized in geek culture. tures women involved in gaming, comics, pop GeekGirlCon believes that everyone culture, STEM, literature, and the arts. Geekdeserves to pursue their nerdy passions, withGirlCon provides geeky women and their supout ramifications or harassment. You won’t porters with an avenue to connect and discuss be quizzed on your fandoms, you won’t be their loves and concerns regarding the geek community. There is an exhibitor hall (featuring expected to dress in cosplay, and you won’t be harassed because of your gender, age, race, a lot of indie businesses), panels galore (talking gender identity, or sexual orientation. The only about every geek aspect you could think of ), thing we expect you to do is have fun and be a gaming dungeon (yay RPGs!), and even a respectful of others. All (yes, guys too!) are welconnections room (for professionals and those come! Glitter horn and tail optional. E school-bound). A whole convention dedicated to female nerds?! Sign me up! And I did, as a geeklyreport@seattleweekly.com staff volunteer (going on two years now). Many moments and people from my first GEEKGIRLCON GeekGirlCon stand out in my memory, but Washington State Convention Center, one person in particular I think of more than geekgirlcon.com. Kids under 5 free w/adult pass; any other. On the first morning of the con, I kids 5–10 $5. One-day pass $30, two-day $45. was helping direct attendees to the proper lines Sat., Oct. 19–Sun., Oct. 20.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

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arts&culture» Music

Exploring Brevity

SevenNights

With its third full-length album, Industrial Revelation tightens up and expands its reach.

Wednesday, Oct. 9

BY MARK BAUMGARTEN

JACCO GARDNER lives in its own sealed-off uni-

SHANNA PETERSON

Edition. 2312, 2312 Second Ave., 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13. $7 DOS. All ages. E mbaumgarten@seattleweekly.com

Send events to music@seattleweekly.com. See seattleweekly.com for full listings.

Shovels & Rope

household name, the “Big Four” of thrash metal— Anthrax, Megadeth, Metallica, and Slayer—closed a group show with a cover of its song “Am I Evil?”, a gesture that speaks volumes to Diamond Head’s influence as metal tastemakers, and which should be reason enough to check them out. With Raven. Studio Seven, 110 S. Horton St., 286-1312, studio seven.us. 6:30 p.m. $15/$18 DOS. MICHAEL BERRY

Thursday, Oct. 10

BUDO Following the long tour for his lauded 2008 album

88 Keys & Counting, Seattle MC Grieves went through something of an existential crisis, and, after doing some soul-searching, emerged with the artistically superior and chart-friendly follow-up Together/Apart. Budo was the producer on both those albums, and, it would seem, gleaned some inspiration from his MC’s bold moves. Feeling the itch to get behind the console, the noted multi-instrumentalist sound engineer entered the studio in the spring of 2012 and recorded the album he will be celebrating tonight, The Finger & the Moon. Pulsing with trumpets, strings, and Budo’s own vocals, the album is an artistically adventurous effort, an act of bravery. With Iska Dhaaf, DJ Thig Natural. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, thebarboza. com. 8 p.m. $10 adv. MARK BAUMGARTEN HAR MAR SUPERSTAR, aka Sean Tillmann, has been having a banner year. First came the April release of his fifth album, Bye Bye 17, then a summer run with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. Perhaps most notably, Minneapolis mayor R.T. Rybak named September 20 Har Mar Superstar Day in the R&B singer’s hometown. Belated celebration, anyone? With Furniture Girls, Hidden Lake. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, chopsuey. com. 8 p.m. $10 adv./$13 DOS. All ages. ACP Dublin-based LITTLE GREEN CARS is a magical quintet of 20-somethings who create an insanely intimate feeling wherever it plays the indie folk pop it made popular on its debut album, Absolute Zero. Check out “Harper Lee” and “The John Wayne” to get a taste of what to expect tonight. With Kris Orlowski. The Crocodile. 8 p.m. $10 adv. ALICIA W. PRICE The last time I saw LANGHORNE SLIM, he was conducting a burn-it-down hootenanny at a Veterans of Foreign Wars post in Bozeman, Montana. He plays a style of country expressly made to whip an audience into a fury—not to mention himself, as he’s given to being the hardest-stomping man in the hall as he rips through his sets. After that Montana show, I downloaded one of his albums, but rarely listen to it. What Slim gives you live can’t be captured; it’s fleeting and beautiful, and, most important, communal. With Johnny Fritz. The Neptune. 8 p.m. $16.50 adv./$18 DOS. DANIEL PERSON STURGILL SIMPSON A throwback to the outlaw country of Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson, Simpson’s latest LP, High Top Mountain, is equal parts ode to his birthplace (Kentucky) and deeply personal journey through his past. Most refreshingly, it’s a record nearly devoid of the typical Nashville establishment sheen. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave., 784-4880, sunsettavern.com. 9 p.m. $10. CORBIN REIFF

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

come from its simplicity—especially from Oluo’s trumpet, which does little more than repeat a phrase on the album’s shorter pieces, “Walking (without)” and “Wanting (within).” There is still room for some unhinged improvisation, though, in particular from Fender Rhodes player Josh Rawlings, who fashions his instrument into a gnarling, discordant beast for the Lewis-composed “Shadowboxing in the Wind.” Even in that song, though, the band expresses patience and restraint, never breaking the album’s aura of peacefulness. “I think the fact that we recorded so quickly over two days in such a wonderful environment, it meant that we could do things that were drastically different from one another and there would be a continuity no matter what,” Oluo says. That continuity also has a lot to do with the many years these artists have spent together, trying out ideas in search of a new kind of agreement. The journey that eventually delivered Industrial Revelation into the confines of Oak Head began eight years ago when Lewis brought together the group after noticing a certain quality in the playing of a few of Seattle’s young jazz artists, starting with Oluo, with whom he’d played as a teenager. “I noticed his freedom,” Lewis says as the waitress takes away his plate. “Even in playing a standard he was free, still. And then, with Josh, I was playing with him and we were playing in a swing band and I noticed his freedom. And with Evan, we played a standard, I noticed his freedom. I’ve played with a lot of other great musicians, but I still love the freedom of these three guys. I didn’t know exactly what we would do, but I knew that even if we were just playing standards that all three of these guys would make it somethin’.” With D’Vonne Lewis’ Limited

verse, where the year is 1967 and the baroque pop of the Beach Boys and Love tops the charts. Gardner, a 24-year-old Dutchman, fastidiously recreates the music of this era on his debut, Cabinet of Curiosities, an intricate portrait of pop music as period piece. With Parson Red Heads, Ephrata. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, thebarboza.com. 8 p.m. $10 adv. ANDREW GOSPE R&B princess JOJO first stepped onto the scene in the early aughts with breakout single “Leave (Get Out),” off her self-titled debut. A ripe 13 years old at the time, the powerhouse vocalist’s rise was cut short when the release of new music was postponed by record-label politics. Luckily, almost 10 years later, Jojo’s still got the chops—and now the life experience to back them up. With Leah LaBelle. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, the crocodile.com. 8 p.m. $14. All ages/bar with ID. KEEGAN PROSSER SHOVELS & ROPE What started as a way for married couple Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst to make a little extra money in their native Charleston, S.C., in 2010 has since become a wave-making folk-rock duo, most recently named Emerging Artists of the Year by the Americana Music Association. With Denver. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 682-1414, stgpresents.org/neptune. 8 p.m. $16.50 adv./$18 DOS. All ages. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY DISCLOSURE Guy and Howard Lawrence, the brothers who constitute this British production duo, write songs that feel like a whirlwind summary of the past 20 or so years of UK dance music. Traces of house, 2-step, dubstep, and garage are all present, but the Lawrences recontextualize these disparate genres for the stylistic free-for-all of the Internet age. Thankfully, debut LP Settle is more polymath pop record than an electronic-music history lesson, featuring contributions on nearly every song from vocalists like AlunaGeorge, Jessie Ware, and Sam Smith. As a result, the word “accessible” is sometimes used pejoratively to discuss Disclosure’s music, largely by older electronic-music heads who accuse the duo of ripping off sounds it’s too young to remember. This criticism is fair, perhaps, but easily overshadowed by Settle’s deft songwriting and production, which has vaulted the group to sold-out shows halfway across the world like this one. With T. Williams. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 652-0444, showboxonline.com. 7:30 p.m. SOLD OUT. All ages. AG

LESLIE RYAN MCKELLAR

T

he four wildly creative artists who make up the garage-jazz outfit Industrial Revelation don’t disagree—in musical terms, at least. “I mean, we have disagreements as people, but in terms of how the song should go, no,” says Ahamefule Oluo, the band’s trumpeter, as drummer and founder D’Vonne Lewis nods in agreement over a late-morning breakfast at Cafe Selam in the Central District. “And I’m never holding my tongue. If I would feel that something should sound different, I would certainly say it, but there’s never disagreement.” This likely isn’t surprising for those familiar with the band’s improvisational ethic and the great lengths to which its members go in search of musical agreement. The result has been prolonged and often frenzied sessions in which each member logs lengthy solos as the minutes tick-tock into the teens. But what happens when you take four artists used to creative sprawl and give them limitations? That was the idea that the band took to a large cabin overlooking Hood Canal a year and a half ago. “Our first album was kind of basically a studio version of our live performance; the second album was a live album; and we had been talking about doing something that was more of a studio album,” Oluo says. “Our experimentation was stripping things down a little bit and being simpler with shorter songs.” The album, titled Oak Head after the cabin where it was recorded, clocks in under 35 minutes, its eight tracks varying in length from 1:54 to 6:36 and in style from bebop to funk to Dixieland to modal jazz to psychedelia. It was, without a doubt, a tremendously successful experiment, resulting in music that’s both electrifying and accessible while managing to be just plain short. Some sacrifices were made for that brevity; in particular, upright bass player Evan FloryBarnes is without a solo throughout. And yet the album’s most goose-bump-inducing moments

E D I T E D B Y G W E N D O LY N E L L I O T T

DIAMOND HEAD While this band might not be a

35


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arts&culture» Music Friday, Oct. 11 GIFT OF GAB On the classic Blackalicious track

“Alphabet Aerobics,” Gift of Gab observes that “artificial amateurs aren’t at all amazing.” Fortunately for us, the rapper, whose real name is Timothy Parker, raps with a verbal virtuosity that will “intimidate in an instant” those imitators who idolize him. With the Good Husbands, the Hooky’s, and Vursatyl. Nectar Lounge, 412 N. 36th St., 632-2020. 8 p.m. $10. MB THE WATERBOYS Any band that presumes to set the words of W.B. Yeats to music is sure to draw weary green-eyed glances. Yet with An Appointment With Mr. Yeats, the Waterboys have produced a tasteful album that honors both the great Irish poet and the band’s own 30-year run as some of the smartest musicians in rock. Their Celtic roots are on full display, understandably, but they don’t forget to weave plenty of rock goodies into the tunes to reward those of us not familiar with Yeats. With Freddie Stevenson. The Neptune. 9 p.m. $35. DP OVERSEAS Will Johnson is a man who loves a good collaboration. Known most endearingly as the leader of excellent Denton indie-rock outfit Centro-matic, Johnson has played with Monsters of Folk, Jay

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Farrar, and Jim James in the Woody Guthrie archival project, New Multitudes, and even recorded a split album with the late (and great) Jason Molina. But it was in the church choir that Johnson’s strained whisper-tenor first tangled with the voices of other folks. Perhaps it is this liturgical background that makes him such a fitting companion to David Bazan, the former Pedro the Lion leader who has made a musical career by singing beautifully brutal songs about his struggles with belief (along with a few songs about infidelity and booze for good measure). Whatever the reason, the two introspective artists, along with Matt and Bubba Kadane, have found common cause in Overseas. The band’s debut self-titled full-length is a meditative piece of indie pop that will both please and frustrate fans. It is pleasing because both Bazan and Johnson have logged some strong new songs here, but it frustrates because their talents don’t often enough blend into something new. The exception is “Came With the Frame,” which features Bazan singing over a warped and melancholy wooziness that he’s never achieved on his own. With Radar Bros, Chris Brokaw. Neumos. 8 p.m. $15 adv. MB GWAR After a petition to have them play at the 2015 Super Bowl logged more than 40,000 signatures, the nearly 30-year-old thrash-metal jokesters finally endorsed the idea as well. And they don’t even need a wardrobe malfunction to haul out body parts— even if they’re foam and shooting gallons of fake blood. With Whitechapel, Iron Reagan, A Band of Orcs. Showbox SoDo. 7:30 p.m. $18 adv./$20 DOS. All ages. DAVE LAKE HYPNOTIKON: SEATTLE PSYCH FEST Seattle has been experiencing a recent resurgence of incredible psych-influenced bands, perhaps in part due to the excellent mushrooms growing in the Northwest’s fertile, loamy soil. Whatever it is, some smart people decided to gather local acts like Midday Veil, Fungal Abyss, and Night Beats and pair them with third-eyeopening national bands like Lumerians and Cave for a stacked two-day festival of psychedelic goodness. Explorers of the mind, and those looking to destroy their ego, have the option of buying a one- or twoday pass to the festival, which feature different lineups with overlapping DJ sets and visuals from artists

Saturday, Oct. 12

SLEIGH BELLS In popular rock ’n’ roll lore, the image

of the nagging old person beating on the ceiling with a broom while shouting “WOULD YOU KIDS TURN THAT MUSIC DOWN?” has become something of an archetype. Bothering old folks with loud music has long been foundational to the soul of rock. If that imagined old person were to attend a Sleigh Bells concert, his head would likely violently explode into a thousand bloody pieces, splattering the gleeful, leather-clad fans. This is because Sleigh Bells are, bar none, one of the loudest bands ever. They are comically loud. The duo is rumored to have explored multiple studios before recording their previous album, Reign of Terror, in a quest to find equipment that could get the gain cranked the highest—something they didn’t slack on with their new record, Bitter Rivals, either. Sleigh Bells, in their relentless search for True Shred Guitar, are truly doing God’s work. With Doldrums. Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxpresents.com. 8 p.m. $24 adv./$26 DOS. All ages. KS PROM QUEEN Seattlebased singer Celene Ramadan first caught our eye with her electrically charged performance at last year’s Reverb Fest; she has continued to impress us with her lush yet edgy ’60s-inspired pop ever since. For this intimate lounge show, Ramadan Bazan. will deliver a new batch of pleasantly messy pop rock for all the lovers (and killers, too). Vito’s, 927 Ninth Ave., 397-4053, vitosseattle.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. 21 and over. KP ZEKE When Zeke released its first single, “West Seattle Acid Party,” the band’s hardcore guitar punk was somewhat out of vogue with the predominant fraught soft/loud sound of the early ’90s. Perhaps because of that, the band has remained largely, and pleasantly, unchanged since, even continuing to package its blistering sound with the fitting imagery of combusting, screeching hot rods. Tonight the high-octane band celebrates 20 years on a bill with 30-year-old North Carolina punk group Antiseen. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 262-0482. 8 p.m. $10 adv./$15 DOS. MB BOB ANDREWS

all ages | free parking full schedule at jazzalley.com

like Christian Peterson, formerly of Seattle branding agency Dumb Eyes, responsible for churning out many of the trippy visuals and images for Shabazz Palaces. Through Sat., Oct. 12. Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, thetripledoor.net. 8 p.m. $25 for one day, $40 for both. All ages. KELTON SEARS

Sunday, Oct. 13

BONNIE RAITT In her 42 years as a musician, Bonnie

Raitt has seen and done it all. From the highs of rock stardom (with songs like “I Can’t Make You Love Me” and “Something to Talk About,” iconic tunes that helped her earn countless Grammy nominations and multiple wins) to dark days (drug and alcohol problems and being dropped from her label while recording an album), the road hasn’t always been easy for the 63-year-old blues-rock singer. Ever resilient, the fieryhaired Californian released her 19th album, Slipstream, last year, her first since 2005. It earned Raitt her 10th Grammy, and, according to Billboard, was the bestselling blues album of 2012. Yes, after more than four decades, Raitt doesn’t show any signs of stopping— and indicated as much after being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000: “[Music’s] the thing that still drives me most, and it always will. I’m never gonna get enough.” With Marc Cohn. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. 8 p.m. $50.50–$104.50. All ages. ACP K.O.E. For those who enjoy a little face paint with their rap, this showcase (short for “Klowns Over Everything”) seems like a good bet. Unexpectedly, headliner MotaMouth Jones borrows more from G-funk and trap than from Juggalo-friendly horrorcore rap, and the 11-act lineup is similarly a stylistic grab bag. Various artists. Nectar Lounge. 7 p.m. $5 adv./$8 DOS. AG

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 39


arts&culture» Music

Common People

Songwriter Vikesh Kapoor once thought folk was a joke. Now he is maintaining its greatest tradition, the story song. BY MARK BAUMGARTEN

You name it, We’ll celebrate it!

V

SW: Did you know people in Portland before you moved there?

Kapoor: No. I got out here and, as far as the music scene, I was in a new swimming pool.

How did you come to work with Adam Selzer at Type Foundry?

I knew this was a very specific kind of album and it was gonna be done over a long period of time, rather than just a two-week block. I wanted to find the right producer for that, so I went to a couple producers and sang a couple of these songs for them, just live, just to see if they would be excited about it. Adam seemed to be the best fit. Why was this album going to take some time?

I was writing it as I was going along. I had certain things mapped out, but it really unfolded in a way that a novel unfolds for some authors, in that you’re kind of discovering things as you go and you’re not quite sure where it’s going in the moment.

It was about this guy who lost his job, and basically as his life got worse, he would have to wait in line at homeless shelters for a bed. Eventually he ended up building a lean-to in the woods somewhere that nobody else knew about. And he would go there sometimes instead of waiting for a bed, and that would be the only time he would feel at peace, just under the stars there in that lean-to. And that’s how the article ended, and it was just kind of a strange, peaceful way of ending a more predictable story. And that’s why I clipped it out. How did you discover folk music?

I found a Johnny Cash LP for 25¢ at a church swap in my hometown in Pennsylvania when I was 17 or 18. It was kind of a joke at first between me and my friends about Johnny Cash. I thought he had a funny name. But I played it and he was singing stories; I remember specifically he was singing “Big River,” and that kind of piqued my curiosity. It wasn’t until a few

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Vikesh Kapoor

years later that I found people like Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie, and it was through them that I learned about turning newspaper stories into ballads. Where does your interest in social justice come from?

I had a vague interest in it from growing up a minority in a small town in Pennsylvania, and seeing where my family came from by visiting back there, in India. I never got really heavy into political theory, and I didn’t go to rallies or anything like that. I’m not interested in being outrightly political. I’m interested in telling stories.

Do you feel that the music you are writing is just for entertainment, or is there a deeper function to your art?

It’s definitely not just to entertain. I think the biggest thing is just being able to communicate ideas or offer stories of people who you don’t always hear stories about. The reason I decided to pursue this album was because of something that happened when I went on my first tour. I remember singing that song, “The Ballad of Willy Robbins,” in St. Augustine, Florida, and a kid came up to me in tears and told me that Willy Robbins was a lot like his dad. In the genre I’m working in right now, I don’t see that happening too much.

Do you mean that you don’t see many artists who are connecting in that way?

Not connecting; just not speaking about this stuff, these people. I love a lot of music that is happening right now, but I don’t see a lot of artists doing this. I love entertaining, I love putting on a show, but it’s not just that. Obviously it’s not just that; otherwise I wouldn’t be writing storysongs. The Piranha Shop, 1022 First Ave. S., 205-

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The title track is based on a story you read in the paper. What was it about that story that made you think it needed to be put into song?

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PARKER FITZGERALD

ikesh Kapoor isn’t doing anything new, really, and that might be what makes this string-plucking balladeer a little different. While so many artists are doing a variation on folk, updating it for a new generation, the 28-year-old Pennsylvania native has relied on the story song, one of the most elemental parts of the folk tradition, for his debut, The Ballad of Willy Robbins. Written and laid down during his first two years in Portland, Oregon, the album’s songs—delivered at a running pluck and sung with just enough nasal quaver and a clear, uplifting falsetto—collectively tell a tale inspired by a newspaper item about a working man who lost it all. It was this story that was swirling in his head, the young song-slinger tells Seattle Weekly, when he traveled across the country to Portland three years ago, a true balladeer with a story to tell about the folks he’s seen along the way.

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arts&culture» Music Seven Nights » FROM PAGE 36

Monday, Oct. 14 PALMA VIOLETS In the recent tradition of bands like

the Libertines, Bloc Party, and the Vaccines, Palma Violets are a brash, young, retro-leaning band that’s been heavily talked up by the hype-crazy British music press. Their pop-friendly garage trappings warrant at least some of the buzz. With Skaters. Neumos. 8 p.m. $15 adv. AG CLASSICAL REVOLUTION Loosen your tie and have a beer while enjoying some chamber music. Soprano Natalie Lerch and pianist Guinevere Saenger present music inspired by Alice in Wonderland, and the Bella Sala Trio with guest Brandon Vance (fiddle) play Borodin’s String Quartet no. 2, Vance’s “Kantor Caprice,” and fiddle tunes. The Royal Room, 5000 Rainier Ave. S., 906-9920, theroyalroomseattle.com. No cover. 8 p.m. MB

Tuesday, Oct. 15

CRYSTAL STILTS’ sepia-toned psych-pop has evolved

in terms of fidelity since the Brooklyn group formed in 2003, but much of their sound has stayed the same: Brad Hargett’s half-mumbled baritone vocals, Kyle Forester’s serpentine organ lines, and Keegan Cooke’s driving, post-punk drums. Nature Noir is

Marky Ramone’s Blitzkrieg Thursday, October 10

O

Though Ramone wasn’t the band’s original drummer, he’s their best-known, joining the group for their fourth record onward, including Road to Ruin and End of the Century. He left for personal reasons for a few years in the ’80s, but eventually returned, logging 15 years of service with the band and over 1,700 shows. He is also the only living member of their most revered lineup, which included Joey, Johnny, and Dee Dee. Even if the Ramones are timeless, its members aren’t. You should jump, or at least pogo, at the chance to hear the band’s greatest hits performed by someone who played on most of them. At 57, Ramone isn’t exactly old, at least by current rock ’n’ roll standards (McCartney is 71,

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FRI/OCTOBER 11 • 8PM

hypnotikon: seattle psych fest

w/ cave, lumerians, midday veil, fungal abyss SAT/OCTOBER 12 • 8PM

hypnotikon: seattle psych fest

w/ silver apples, cloudland canyon, night beats, jetman jet team SUN/OCTOBER 13 • 7:30PM - TRUE WEST PRESENTS

greg brown w/ love over gold

featuring pieta brown & lucie thorne WED/OCTOBER 16 • 7PM & 9:30PM EARSHOT JAZZ FESTIVAL & 91.3 KBCS WELCOMES

mehliana featuring brad mehldau and mark guiliana

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

next • 10/18 carbon leaf w/ brian wright • 10/20 the bad plus • 10/21 savoy brown • 10/24 - 31 this is halloween! • 11/1 - 11/3 the manhattan transfer • 11/5 garland jeffreys w/ lincoln barr • 11/6 garfield high school jazz band • 11/7 wesley stace w/ casey neill • 11/8 & 9 leroy bell & his only friends • 11/10 vanessa carlton • 11/13 - 11/16 the atomic bombshells...lost in space! • 11/17 michael kaeshammer • 11/19 rokia traore • 11/22 the dusty 45s • 11/23 brett dennen • 11/24 chris hillman & herb pedersen • 11/27 the buckaroos • 11/29 & 30 the paperboys • 12/3 ed kowalczyk “i alone acoustic” • 12/5 david bromberg quintet • 12/6 vaden todd lewis • 12/8 an evening with buika • 12/10 rhett miller

happy hour every day Dylan is 72), but he also isn’t likely to log 1,700 more shows. In fact, there are only eight American dates on the current U.S. leg of this tour. And if you can’t find a bit of pleasure in watching Andrew W.K. sing “I Wanna Be Sedated,” maybe you already are. With FIGO, Loud Eyes. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, neumos. com. 8 p.m. $25 adv. DAVE LAKE

• 10/9 wes weddell • 10/10 midtown groove • 10/11 ecstatic cosmic union / tokyoidaho • 10/12 karnak temples / brain fruit • 10/13 junk parlor • 10/14 monday night jazz w/ synthesis • 10/15 singer-songwriter showcase featuring: olivia de la cruz, lana mcmullen and jacob miller and the bridge city crooners • 10/16 the eric hullander group TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE · PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1 HOUR PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW · ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

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SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

n aesthetics alone, Andrew W.K. may seem an unlikely choice to sing 35 classic Ramones songs alongside longtime Ramones drummer Marky Ramone on his latest tour. W.K.’s trademark all-white getup doesn’t exactly jive with the Ramones’ signature look of ripped jeans and biker jackets, but that’s the point. Ramone didn’t want a Ramones clone to front his latest band. He wanted somebody who could handle the material and who also had their own vibe. Enter W.K., the partyobsessed, power-chordshredding frontman probably best known for his 2001 debut, the partyBlitzkrieg without metal classic I Andrew W.K. Get Wet. If early reviews are any indication, the pairing works well. Rolling Stone gave the opening-night performance a glowing review, especially W.K.: “He brought his own flavor to the Ramones’ catalogue,” wrote William Goodman. “He has a knack for igniting crowd involvement, imbuing a sense of concert camaraderie that’s infectious and admirable.”

their third full-length and first on Sacred Bones. With Zachary Cale, The Woolen Men. Barboza. 8 p.m. $10 adv. AG THE PRETTY RECKLESS Touring in advance of its upcoming sophomore release Going to Hell, this New York–based rock outfit is sure to have some sweaty tricks up its sleeve for this headlining tour. And while the four-piece is likely best known for being fronted by Gossip Girl’s “Little J,” they’ve actually got the punk-rock chops to back it up— even if they’re a bit too angsty. With Heaven’s Basement, Louna. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave., 381-3094, elcorazonseattle.com. 8 p.m. $15–$50. All ages/bar with ID. KP With their ’80s disco vibes, HOLY GHOST! fills the room with poppy vocals and peppy beats. Their second album, Dynamics, is filled with tunes to get you ready to face anything—but if you listen to just one song, check out the dance-ready vibe of “Wait and See.” With Midnight Magic, DJ Nark. Neumos. 8 p.m. $18 adv. 21 and over. AP JACK JOHNSON Recently on vacation, I found myself on a beach in Thailand. Buff, shirtless bros were everywhere drinking cheap mai tais served by scraggly beach-side bartenders who’d clearly decided their life’s work was to look as much like Captain Jack Sparrow as they could. In the background, “Banana Pancakes” was playing on a boom box. This, I suspect, is exactly how Jack Johnson pictured it all happening. With Bahamas. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 682-4837, stgpresents.com. 6:30 p.m. $70. All ages. KS

39


In beautiful downtown White Center

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Closed Monday T-F 2-9 • Sat 11-9 • Sun 11-7 9632 16th Ave SW, White Center, WA

(206) 432-9537

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109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10 KISW (99.9 FM) Metal Shop & El Corazon Present:

FUCKED UP/ TERROR with Power Trip, and Code Orange Kids Doors at 6:30 / Show at 7PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $15

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

HUGH CORNWELL (guitarist/singer/songwriter from The Stranglers)

40

with Brothers Of Brazil, Rob Benson & Tim DiJulio, and The Albert Lerner Trio Lounge Show. Doors at 9 / Show at 9:30PM 21+. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11 Mike Thrasher Presents:

THE MAINE/ANBERLIN with Lydia, and From Indian Lakes Doors at 6:30 / Show at 7PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $23 ADV / $25 DOS

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12

ZEKE (20th Anniversary Show) with ANTiSEEN (30th Anniversary Show), The Load Levelers, and Millhous Doors at 8 / Show at 9PM 21+. $10 ADV / $15 DOS

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12

THE SPITTIN’ COBRAS

with Zero Down, and Dreadful Children Lounge Show. Doors at 8 / Show at 9:30PM 21+. $10

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13

MOURNING MARKET Doors at 12PM Market Closes at 5:00pm

MONDAY, OCTOBER 14

OCTOBER 23 SHOWBOX AT THE MARKET

STEPDAD with Mario Brown’s Touch, Midnight

Atmosphere, Scarves, and Argonian Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 14

THE MAXIES with The Maxies, The Beat, Success,

The Waywards, plus guests Lounge Show. Doors at 8 / Show at 8:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

JUST ANNOUNCED 10/18 A NIGHT WITH JONAH RAY & KUMAIL NANJIANI (OF THE MELTDOWN IN L.A.) 11/5 KILL DEVIL HILL 11/9 LOUNGE RARE MONK 11/14 AMERICAN NIGHTMARE (GIVE UP THE GHOST) 12/31 NEW YEAR’S EVE WITH LEFTOVER CRACK 2/16 BOATS! 3/1 INFEST / IRON LUNG 4/12 THE PANCAKES & BOOZE ART SHOW UP & COMING 10/15 THE PRETTY RECKLESS 10/16 LIONS LIONS 10/17 LOUNGE OUT ON THE STREETS 10/19 MONSTERS SCARE YOU 10/21 EARTHLESS / THE ICARUS LINE 10/22 SUICIDE GIRLS: BLACKHEART BURLESQUE 10/25 LOUNGE ELECTRIC CHILDREN 10/26 MONETA 10/26 LOUNGE INTO THE FLOOD 10/28 OUTLAW NATION 10/31 TRAPT 11/1 DWARVES/POISON IDEA 11/2 THE STORY SO FAR 11/4 LOUNGE THE BALCONIES

with

BROTHERS OSBORNE

Tickets now available at cascadetickets.com - No per order fees for online purchases. Our on-site Box Office is open 1pm-5pm weekdays in our office and all nights we are open in the club - $2 service charge per ticket Charge by Phone at 1.800.514.3849. Online at www.cascadetickets.com - Tickets are subject to service charge

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arts&culture» Music LocaLReLeases

Night Beats, Sonic Bloom (out now, Reverberation Appreciation Society, facebook.com/ thenightbeats.u.s) If you often find yourself getting into “rumbles” and own one or more switchblade combs, Night Beats’ excellent new album is for you. Seattle’s garage-psych savants have put out what’s easily their best record yet, a 13-track journey into a land of fuzzy guitars, droning sitar, and Rat Pack sax. Sonic Bloom finds the group getting more adventurous in their arrangements and tones, delving into the lo-fi swing of “At the Gates” and the raga-saga of “Catch a Ride to Sonic Bloom,” which swirls with deliciously garbled feedback atop an opening drone. Even though Night Beats venture out a bit more here,

KELTON SEARS

The Flavr Blue, Bright Vices (Oct. 15, Flavr Records, theflavrblue.com) Each member of this synth-pop act has an extensive local-music-scene resume: Parker Joe, a prolific producer, rapper, and designer, was a member of rap group State of the Artist; Lace Cadence has staked out a career as a solo artist as well as with hip-hop group Clockwork; and Hollis Wong-Wear, in addition to her numerous other projects, sings the hook on Macklemore’s “White Walls.” Bright Vices, The Flavr Blue’s second EP, is unsurprisingly competent and professional; these three wouldn’t put something lackluster up for public consumption. But professionalism is also its biggest vice. For all its strengths—production similar to the anesthetized modern R&B made so popular by Drake; consistently interesting synth work; multiple vocalists who can carry a song—Bright Vices is strikingly anodyne and risk-averse. Synth lines enter and beats drop exactly as expected, and uniform verses dutifully segue into choruses and back again. Opener “No Remedy” is the most club-friendly track and the obvious single (the band even shot a cross-promotional video for the song involving a Microsoft smartphone), but “Hearts Racing” is more engaging. The group wisely gives the synths and Wong-Wear’s voice room to breathe, subtly and effectively processing and pitch-shifting the latter. Considering that The Flavr Blue’s collective background is hip-hop, a genre built around sampling and sonic imperfections, occasionally letting some rough edges come through would make for a more varied listen. ANDREW GOSPE

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SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

La Luz, It’s Alive (Oct. 15, Hardly Art, laluz. bandcamp.com) In the book world, the term “genre-slumming” denotes an author known for high literature trying her hand at something pulpier—a zombie novel, say, or a deep-space epic. Done correctly, the writer retains everything fun about the genre while applying enough of her writing chops to make it palatable to a refined audience. The phenomenon doesn’t really exist in music, probably because music journalists and record stores insist on neatly filing everyone into a genre to begin with, so to commit to one isn’t so much slumming as inevitable. Nonetheless, I kept coming back to this idea as I listened to La Luz’s first full-length LP, released this week on Hardly Art. If you haven’t caught any of the tremendous buzz around this Seattle fourpiece, it’s been firmly filed under surf rock, and it plays it by the book. The trick is that lead vocalist Shana Cleveland doesn’t sing surf rock; from the opening track, her pitch-perfect, hushed, and haunting vocals render the band more substantial than merely an ironic nod to the bygone era of woodies and whammy bars. Not that it’s not ironic, or for that matter contrived: The craftsmanship of Cleveland’s melodies and lyrics on It’s Alive (“Somethings I think I wouldn’t mind/ Crawling off into the ruins to die/ What good am I/ If I can’t say what’s on my mind”) is constantly winking at us, telling us that the band is in on the joke, turning a style of music hatched on carefree beaches into a vessel for far moodier material. Yet they never truly break character, delivering 11 songs of quick guitar licks heavily waa-waa’ed by one of those whammy bars. Whether you’ll find that tiresome will come down to how you feel about the Surfaris (“Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-haha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-a, wipeout!!!”). But It’s Alive leaves no doubt that La Luz is just slumming it for now—four beach bums that can move on to better things whenever they stop having fun here. (Sat., Oct. 12, Crocodile) DANIEL PERSON

there’s still plenty of the punky, listless swagger that made them cool in the first place. “Rat King” struts around over a groovy, chilled-out bass line until a screaming guitar rips the track apart. It’s perfect music for hanging out in a shady alley with your hood-rat friends. Reverberation Appreciation Society, the record imprint of Austin Psych Fest, is responsible for the album’s release, which makes sense considering Night Beats’ formidable position within the national psych zeitgeist that has given birth to groups like Ty Segall and Thee Oh Sees. Even though tides of bands have aped on 13th Floor Elevators– indebted garage-psych as of late, it’s fair to say that Night Beats just do it better than everyone else. The secret is in their swagger: Night Beats walk the very important, but incredibly fine, line between caring just enough and not caring at all. (Sat., Oct. 12, Triple Door, Hypnotikon Psych Fest)

41


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STAFF MANAGEMENT | SMX IS HIRING IMMEDIATE WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATES FOR THE AMAZON FULFILLMENT CENTER

JOIN OUR TEAM!

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APPLY ONLINE

DAY & NIGHT SHIFTS, FULL-TIME POSITIONS

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apply.smjobs.com

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MEDIA CODE: W09 JOB CODE: 704S

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • O CTOBER 9 — 15, 2013

Seattle Weekly, one of Seattle’s most respected publications and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking an Advertising and Marketing Coordinator to assist with multi-platform advertising and marketing solutions of print, web, mobile, e-newsletters, event sponsorships and glossy publications. Responsibilities include but are not limited to management of digital inventory in DFP, social media, contesting, events, house marketing, newsletters and coordinating with staff as it relates to these duties. The right individual will be a highly organized, responsible, self-motivated, customer-comes-first proven problem solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match). If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to

Employment General

43


Meds Mari

The Only Safe Access in Mason County!

Classified

Call

@ 206-623-6231, to place an ad 6th Annual Gig Harbor Film Festival

Earn $100 per donation!

If you have severe or life-threatening Allergies or an Autoimmune Disease your Plasma is vital. Learn more at www.plasmalab.com 425-258-3653

Taking place October 18th-20th, come enjoy: Independent Films; Animation and Short films; Foreign, Documentary and Features! Gigharborfilmfestival.org

Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival October 11 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 13

Fight for economic justice! Phone outreach jobs build your comm skills. Part Time M-F, Univ. District Call to set up an interview: 206.632.7734

Port Angeles, WA Annual celebration of the Pacific Northwestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diverse bounty - the seafood, agriculture, maritime traditions, and scenic coastal environment that is home to the Dungeness crab. See Graham Kerr, the iconic Galloping Gourmet prepare his favorite crab cakes; oldfashioned crab feed; fresh seafood dishes prepared by 15 local and regional restaurants; benefit Chowder Cook-Off; live music; beer & wine; craft vendors; and much more!

MOST CASH PAID 4 GOLD JEWELRY 20%-50% MORE 24/7 CASH 425.891.1385

WWW.KIRKLANDGOLDBUYER.COM

Singing Lessons

www.crabfestival.org

FreeTheVoiceWithin.com Janet Kidder 206-781-5062

WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

Event Site

Belfair

Your Hours: Mon-Sat 9a-8p Sun 9a-6p 23710 E. State Rt 3 360-275-1181

Shelton

Your Hours: Mon-Thurs & Sat 10a-7p Fri 10a-8p Sun 11a-5p 3811 St Rt 3 (Bayshore) 360-426-0420

â&#x20AC;˘ Participants should be age 18-65 with no current drug or alcohol problems. â&#x20AC;˘ Participants will be paid $15/hour for their time and provided lunch.

Please call: 206-277-1163

HOLIDAYS ARE NEAR, GET HIRED NOW! OUR GOAL IS TO KEEP TREES SAFE & BEAUTIFUL AND WE NEED YOUR HELP!

As an Order Generator for TLC4Homes Northwest you speak to Home Owners and set them to meet with our Trained/Certified Arborists. Our Arborists Provide Home Owners Free Estimates and Free Safety & Health Inspections for Tree & Shrub Trimming, Pruning & Removal Services. Work year round helping home owners keep their Trees Safe & Beautiful!

WORK OUTDOORS AND SET YOUR OWN SCHEDULE. TRAVEL, CELL PHONE, MEDICAL ALLOWANCE AVAILABLE

Harvest Fest

Requirements: Vehicle & Driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s License ¡ Cell Phone ¡ Internet Access

October 18â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20, 2013

Fill out our online application: http://www.evergreentlc.com/inside-app-order.php

i

presents the 31st Annual Hood River Valley

Massage Therapy $60 Auto & L&I with Prescription, not limited to MMJ Patients By appointment only.

VA seeks adults with schizophrenia and adults without schizophrenia for a research study investigating how genetics may affect the development of schizophrenia.

Call Recruiting Dept. for Snohomish, King, Pierce, Kitsap & Thurston County:

I-84 to Exit #63 Hood River on the Waterfront

509-227-7410 ext. 3304 or 3308

'SJEBZQNt4BUVSEBZBNQN 4VOEBZBNQN >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;}iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;>vĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160; iiĂ&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;}iĂ&#x160;7Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;<Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;it

TREE CLIMBER/ TRIMMER **$1,000 Hire on Incentive**

We have been in Business since 1986 performing Tree & Shrub Trimming, Pruning & Removals in Residential Neighborhoods.

Admission $6 / Seniors (65+) $5 / Kids 12 & Under FREE Free Parking / No Pets Please

We work Full-Time Year-Round.

Preview the Kidz Zone activities schedule at hoodriver.org

Min. 2 Years Tree Climbing/ Trimming Experience. Must have own Gear (Saddle, Spurs, Ropes & Climb Saw) Valid Driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s License & Vehicle

hoodriver.org/events-festivals

REQUIREMENTS:

Point your smartphone here to get the details.

ATTENTION:

AMAZON WAREHOUSE WORKERS A Class Action Lawsuit Has Been Filed Alleging That Many Current and Former

EMPLOYEES ARE ENTITLED TO BACK PAY Under the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act.

You may be owed wages for the time that you worked.

TIME MAY BE SHORT.

Call today: 1-855-436-1832 Email: amazonclaims@johnsonbecker.com

Rebecca Roe, Esq. Adam Berger, Esq. Schroeter Goldmark & Bender 810 Third Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 (206) 622-8000

Johnson Becker 33 S. 6th St., Suite 4530 Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612) 436-1800

$160-$200/ day + OT

Contact our Recruiting Dept. in our Corporate Office at 1-800-684-8733 ext. 3434 or 3321 **Please make sure you meet requirements listed above

10338 Aurora Ave N, Seattle ¡ www.foursquare.com

DANCING BARE Âť HOT BABES & COLD DRINKS ÂŤ

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY p ½ OFF DOOR 11PM-4PM 2,4,1 TUESDAY p2 FOR THE PRICE OF 1 @ THE DOOR BOEING RECOGNITION WEDNESDAY p½ OFF DOOR* MICROSOFT RECOGNITION THURSDAY p ½ OFF DOOR* MILITARY FRIDAY p½ OFF DOOR* *I.D. Required American Liberty Adult Store

Select from a variety of DVDs, Mags, and Toys. Buy, Sell, Trade!!!! Ask Clerk for details about how you can save $$$ on your next purchase. Find us on Facebook @ jerrywoodhead ¡ Follow us on Twitter @dancingbarestrp OPEN MON-SAT: 11AM - 2:30AM & SUN 2PM - 2:30AM

Seattle Weekly, October 09, 2013  

October 09, 2013 edition of the Seattle Weekly