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HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER

POET LAUREATE IN TONASKET

HIGHLIGHTS

Kenn Nesbitt at Middle School fundraiser/dinner Friday, Sept. 27, 5:15 p.m.

Pages A11

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School board asked to give up $180K incentive Company said it overbuilt Oroville High School HVAC BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Ameresco, the company contracted to built Oroville High School’s new geothermal heating and cooling system, said the project cost more than anticipated and asked the

school board to consider signing over better than designed. When asked they $180,000 in energy incentives the district said it was just “coincidence” that the may be receiving. amount of the cost overuns was equal to Representatives of the company said the incentives. they had built a “The project more robust system will save the dis“I’m not seeing how you and that the price trict $32,000 a missed by so far. “ of equipment, well year in energy savdrilling and trenchings and pays for Rocky DeVon, ing were partly to itself in just under Oroville School Board Chairman blame for a nearly a ten year period,” $180,000 higher said Ameresco’s than expected cost. They said Okanogan Randy McPhearson, who added that the County PUD had promised incentives of project, originally slated for completion $180,000 because the system was even over the summer, would be complete as

Oroville council conducts business in the dark

soon as the “shed” was complete. The $180,000 in PUD incentives were not part of the equation when the projects costs were originally considered and were available now only because what the district was getting was much more “robust,” a theme the Ameresco representatives repeated several times. “On the other hand bids came in at $180,000 above bid. However, Ameresco guaranteed the project cost,” said McPhearson. “We are asking for the acceptance of the PUD rebates be given to us to make us whole.” The company said that they based

their costs on the cost of the system at the Oroville Elementary School which was installed six years ago. They said that they added some money in to negate increases due to the passage of those six years, though. The board was shown some figures the company said represented why the project ended up being so much more than anticipated. However, several members of the school board, led by Chairman Rocky DeVon said they were not detailed enough to explain why there would be $180,000 more in costs.

SEE SCHOOL | PG A4

IT’S NOT EASY BEING GREEN

Power outage forces Sept. 17 meeting to be finished by flashlight BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – While they may never have been accused of it, at least to their faces, the Oroville City Council conducted business in the dark - literally - when the power went out about halfway through their meeting Tuesday, Sept. 17. After stopping to collect some flashlights, the council barely skipped a beat and continued with their agenda, including an update on the Similkameen Trailhead Grant. Chris Branch, director of Community Development, reminded the council that County Infrastructure Funds, often referred to as .09 funds, were used to buy the property for the trailhead. The property was then turned over to the county for further trail development as part of their Okanogan County Trail System. Branch said there is still money remaining from the $180,000 grant to further enhance the trailhead, especially for restrooms and parking development. However, according to Branch, the current Okanogan County Commissioners do not see the same value in tourism as their predecessors. “They’d like us to take it back over,” Branch said. “Some of the smaller items have been completed, but the bigger components are more costly like the restrooms, a shelter and excavation for parking.” Much of the matching funds required for grants that are being used for trail development have come from volunteers through

the Pacific Northwest Trails Association and through the Oroville High School wood shop and metal shop classes, as well as the Okanogan Borderlands Historical Society. Branch said he just wanted to make the council aware of the potential for the city to take back the trail and said he hoped the county would continue to allow the city to use its engineer for permitting purposes. The Similkameen Trail follows the old Great Northern Railroad line starting in Oroville on Kernan Road and moving parallel to the Similkameen River to a point near the old Enloe Dam Powerhouse. There is also a trailhead at Taber Vineyards near the old railroad bridge that is part of the trail.

VETERANS MEMORIAL PARK In a tourism related issue, Rod Noel, superintendent of Public Works, reported the project to bring electrical and water hookups to 18 additional camping spots at Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park, will begin in this fall. The electrical service will be upgraded from 400 amps to 800 amps, trenches will be dug to each site and Vassar Electric will do the electrical work, according to Noel. “It looks like the cultural study will be okay,” said Noel, who answered council’s question that the study was $6765 of the project’s $57,714 cost. Currently there is only one campsite with water and electrical hook ups. In the past it has

SEE COUNCIL | PG A4

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Green Okanogan held a metal drive last Thursday, Sept. 19 at their location off Western Ave. in Tonasket. The GO organization plans a similar event every third Thursday of the month. GO will be accepting all metals including tin, steel, aluminum and scrap. GO also accepts e-cycle materials including: computers, monitors, laptops, towers, and TVs. Doug “Free Store Doug” Bovard was manning the collection site on Thursday. He said it had been relatively busy with more e-cycle material coming in than metals that day. For more information on Green Okanogan and metal and e-cycling call (509) 486-2389.

Review of Buckhorn mine water quality permit begins All comments must be submitted by Oct. 21 THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

YAKIMA – A draft renewal to the wastewater discharge permit at the Buckhorn Mountain Mine near Chesaw is available for review and comment from the state Department of Ecology. Crown Resources, a division of Kinross Gold Company, operates the gold mine under a water quality permit known as a federal National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit

(NPDES). The permit acts in accordance with provisions of the state’s Clean Water Act and the state’s Metals, Mining and Milling Act, according to Ecology Crown was cited for failing to maintain its groundwater capture zone for a total of 94 days during during 2011 and 2012. Violations in 2011 include allowing water discharges causing slope instability and erosion, and for discharging water at an unauthorized point. The mine is required to capture contaminated groundwater from around mine excavations and tunnels and under surface stockpiles, and pump it to a treatment plant. “Crown Resources is required

to establish and maintain a groundwater capture zone at all times to protect water quality outside the capture zone,” explained Lorraine Powell, an Ecology hydro-geologist at the time of the penallty “Water has to be pumped out of the mine workings and surrounding capture zone areas and treated onsite so water quality is protected while mine operations continue.” According to Ecology’s investigation, the violations occurred primarily because the mine didn’t have adequate capacity to capture the contaminated water generated by the underground mine workings during the 2011 and 2012 spring seasons. Water gen-

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Volume 109 No. 39

erated in the underground mine can carry high concentrations of heavy metals such as copper, lead and zinc that must be captured and processed before being discharged at approved outfalls. In addition to heavy metals, the mine must meet standards for sulfate, nitrate, and acidity and must manage stormwater. Ecology says the new permit will be more protective of water quality and the environment. As part of the five-year renewal, the mining company will have a year of interim pollution discharge limits to come into compliance with the more rigorous standards. The permit also authorizes new outfalls where the mine is allowed

Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

to discharge treated mine water from its wastewater treatment plant back to the environment. Under the permit, the mine must address failures to capture and contain contaminants from the mine that resulted in a penalty in 2012. The draft permit would allow the discharge of treated mine water to surface waters in Gold Bowl Creek, Nicholson Creek and Marias Creek. It would also allow the discharge of untreated non-industrial stormwater to the ground, in compliance with Ecology’s water quality standards. Ecology will make a final determination on the permit after it receives and evaluates all timely

comments. The draft permit and fact sheet may be viewed at the Ecology website. To obtain a copy of the draft permit and related documents or to arrange to view copies, call Roger Johnson at (509) 4547658, e-mail roger.johnson@ecy. wa.gov, or write to the address below. All comments must be submitted by Oct. 21, 2013, to be considered for the final determination. Comments should be sent to: Cindy Huwe, Department of Ecology, Central Regional Office, 15 W. Yakima Ave., Suite 200; Yakima, WA 98902. E-mail comments should be sent to cynthia. huwe@ecy.wa.gov.

INSIDE THIS EDITION Valley Life Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion

A2 A3 A5

Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Sports Obituaries

A10-11 A12


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Planner talks about tourism, trees, mosquitos and pot By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Lisa Evers, owner of Ship Happens! cuts the ribbon on her new warehouse at the shipping and receiving center located on Main Street in Oroville. Also taking part in the ceremony are Roxie Pelton, manager of the business; Debbie Graham, who owns the property and Mark Robanske of K.E.E. Constrution, which built the warehouse.

OROVILLE – Oroville’s director of Community Development, Chris Branch, spoke with the chamber of commerce at their Thursday, Sept. 13 meeting. In discussing the state’s lodging tax, commonly referred to as the Hotel/Motel Tax, which is levied on people who rent a place to stay for less than 30 days, Branch said there have been some changes. “The state added more requirements... there was a movement to take it away from the communities and use it elsewhere. For now people applying for the tax from the city or county have got to show how many people your event is going to bring to the community,” said Branch.

Branch explained about Oroville’s Tree Board and how they were doing an inventory of trees that fall under the city’s jurisdiction and how the board should be consulted prior to someone doing anything that would affect those trees. This subject has gotten renewed interest after the Oroville School District removed nearly a dozen trees from the city’s right of way by the elementary school without consulting the city first. Branch said that a plan to form a Mosquito Taxing District was in the works and that Oroville, Tonasket, Riverside, Omak and Okanogan were being asked to join. The district would impose a tax to take preventative measures and spray for mosquitos each year. Oroville is still deciding how

the new legalized marijuana law will affect the city, according to Branch. Decisions on where grows and stores can be located will be part of the process. He said stores that sell marijuana will probably be treated like bars and stores that sell liquor. They are limited to locations depending on their proximity to schools, churches and parks. The state is only going to allow five stores to be located in Okanogan County.

Breadline (at the Beach) and Paula and her crew,” said Neal. “And a good job was done by Veranda Beach Resort... Jim Hammond was there and very supportive as was his staff.” The dinner was hosted by Veranda Beach Resort on the east side of Lake Osoyoos. Although there was some concern the weather might work against them, Neal said it was perfect and the live auction was held out on the deck. The silent auction took place in the resort’s game room. “We made over $9,000 on the live auction and $1000 on the silent auction. One highlight was

Susan Smith’s cookies which went for almost $200,” said Neal, who added that about 100 people were in attendance for the dinner, with more joining afterwards for the auction. Neal said they also had at least a dozen of Veranda Beach homeowners, mostly Canadian residents, come out too support the Booster Club. “We had a couple of last minute donations from them and several made bids on auction items,” said Neal. The next event will be at the Oroville American Legion Hall on Saturday, Nov. 2.

Editor’s Note: This is a continuation of last week’s article about Chris Branch’s presentation to the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. Branch is Oroville’s director of Community Development and was at the meeting to discuss a variety of topics of interest between the city and the business organization.

Ship Happens! builds Booster Club Dinner/Auction new shipping warehouse raises over $10k for activities Second event set for Nov. 2 at American Legion

By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE - Ship Happens! is a shipping/receiving solution for home and business which originated in Sumas, Wash. in 1998 taking advantage of its proximity to the Canadian border on the west side of the state. The Oroville outlet was opened August 2010. The Oroville office outgrew their accommodations so a new warehouse has just been completed. The grand opening for the new warehouse took place on Wednesday, Sept. 18 Lisa Evers, the business’ owner cut the ribbon while property owner Debbie Graham blew a party horn. Also present were Roxie Pelton, Oroville manager and Mark Robanske, owner of K.E.E. Construction, who built the warehouse. The new warehouse has transformed that neck of the woods. A huge tree was removed, also by K.E.E. Construction, so the freight trucks can have easy access in and out. Graham and her daughter Madeleine worked much of the summer hauling off the tree and building-site scrap and doing painting and improvements as well. “Ship Happens! is useful to Canadians who order items and need a U.S. address. The business deals with all items, ranging from envelopes to shower stalls and motorcycles. They also deal in contracts with businesses and in pallet loads. They have forklift services to accommodate all a customer’s freight requirements. Ship Happens! can receive your eBay win, Amazon order, UPS parcel, U.S. Postal or FedEx item. They also deal with most other couriers. Ship Happens! is one of Washington’s largest UPS shippers and they say their rates are

By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE – Calling it a “fantastic dinner and auction,” long time Oroville Booster Club Auctioneer Ken Neal said the event raised more than $10,000 to help youth athletics and academics. “The dinner was fantastic, a great job was done by the

Ecology makes seasonal water level changes at Osoyoos Lake Submitted by Sandra Partridge Wash. State Department of Ecology

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Roxie Pelton, manager of Ship Happens!, standing by for your shipping and receiving needs. unbeatable. The business is the only authorized UPS outlet in Oroville. For more info about Ship Happens, go onto their website myshiphappens.com or stop in to visit at 1920 Main St. Oroville, just north of Trino’s Restaurant.

Ship Happens! is open every day but Sundays and holidays. Their phone number is (509) 476-3995. Call them for a free estimate on your specific needs. They service northern Washington, Okanogan Valley, B.C. and Alberta.

YAKIMA – Water levels in Osoyoos Lake in north central Washington are being lowered over the coming weeks in anticipation of the changing seasons. The lake will be gradually lowered to winter operational levels at Zosel Dam and maintained at about 909.5 feet until spring. Lowering lake levels in the fall provides more storage area for winter rain and melting snow and prevents shoreline damage from winter freezing and flooding. In

March, dam operators will raise the lake to the prescribed level of 911.5 feet for normal summer operations. As recreational activity on the lake begins to slow down in the fall, the Washington Department of Ecology lowers the level of the lake from its summer (March 1-Oct. 31) levels to winter operational levels. These levels are mandated under orders put in place by the International Joint Commission, a board made up of representatives from the United States and Canada. Originally developed in the

Out On The Town your guide to

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

CORRECTION In an article in the Sept. 12 issue of the Okanogan Valley GazetteTribune we erroneously identified the Ellisforde business that was robbed based on statements from the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s office. What the article should have said was that on Sunday, Sept. 8 a masked bandit held up Dan’s Market, one of two stores located on Highway 97 in the tiny community of Ellisforde. “A Hispanic male with a box

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cutter came into the store wearing a hat, mask and gloves last Sunday afternoon demanding money,” said Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers. “He took $1500 and locked up the woman working there....” The man was wearing black jeans, a dark hoody, a cap and a red bandana over his face, according to the clerk’s grandmother, who added that her granddaughter was locked in the

1940s, the orders have been adjusted twice, most recently in January 2013. Adjustments have been small and will not materially change the way the dam and lake levels are operated throughout the year, especially in winter. For more information on the operation of Zosel Dam or Lake Osoyoos, contact Al Josephy at Ecology, (360) 407-6456, or by email atajos461@ecy.wa.gov. To track the progress of lake levels in “real-time,” as well as find additional information, go to the U.S. Geological Survey web page for Osoyoos Lake.

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB

beer cooler, not in a closet as reported earlier, until someone came into the store, heard her and let her out. “When he locked her in there she blocked the door so he couldn’t open it again,” she said. Rogers said that since the man was basically covered from head to toe and the woman did not see a vehicle it will be hard to find out who the robber is.

Thank You

Doug Sklar and Uncle Ben Buchert of Edward Jones for buying my market lamb at the fair!

starting at 5 pm.

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Hattie Ray Buchert

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SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

COPS & COURTS Compiled by Zachary Van Brunt

Superior Court Criminal

Kevin Earl Devine, 42, Oroville, pleaded guilty Sept. 19 to forgery and thirddegree theft. In a separate case, he pleaded guilty to first-degree trafficking in stolen property. He was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $1,100.50. The crimes were committed in March and April of 2013. James Michel Gee, 59, Omak, pleaded guilty Sept. 16 to second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon). Gee was sentenced to 139 days in jail and fined $500. The crime occurred April 20. Brandy M. Summers, 37, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Sept. 16 to seconddegree possession of stolen property. She was sentenced to 16 days in jail for the May 22 crime. In an unrelated case, Summers also pleaded guilty to POCS. She was sentenced to 17 days in jail to run concurrently. That crime occurred Aug. 31. Alberto Montejano-Rangel, 32, Omak, pleaded guilty Sept. 12 to three counts of delivery of a controlled substance. Montejano-Rangel was sentenced to 12 months in prison for the crimes that occurred in March and April of 2013. The court found probable cause to charge Karilyn Ann Cline, 23, Oroville, with second-degree theft (access device) and third-degree theft. The court found probable cause to charge Timothy Nicholas Taylor, 23, Omak, with first-degree assault (DV) and harassment (threats to kill) (DV).

Juvenile

A 16-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Sept. 19 to MIP/C. She was sentenced to 20 days in detention with credit for 19 days served and fined $100. The crime occurred Sept. 1.

District Court Justin Kiel Smith, 29, Riverside, guilty of third-degree theft. Smith was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended and fined $808. He also had a second-degree criminal trespass charge dismissed. Tracy Lynne Smith, 26, Tonasket, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Zaphett Akein Spears, 36, Okanogan, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Spears was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended and fined $1,033.

page of survivors to help encourage newly diagnosed. Robinsons Celebrate 65ththeAnniversary

Lyle Jack Stanczak, 42, Okanogan, guilty of operating a motor vehicle without an ignition interlock device and third-degree DWLS. Stanczak was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended and fined $768. Lynn Michelle Stanley, 43, Omak, guilty of use/delivery of drug paraphernalia. Stanley was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 81 days suspended and fined $858. David A. Stewart, 59, Oroville, guilty of second-degree criminal trespass. Stewart was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 82 days suspended and fined $358. Sabrina A. Storm, 36, Omak, had a charge dismissed: allowing an unauthorized person to drive. Storm was fined $400. Auston Riley-Marie Strieck, 20, Oroville, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Cameron John Taylor, 18, Omak, guilty of violating a no-contact/protection order. Taylor was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 355 days suspended and fined $483. Melissa Marchel Torgerson, 45, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Beau Brandon True, 29, Omak, guilty of obstructing a law enforcement officer. True was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended and fined $508. He also had a disorderly conduct charge dismissed. Tommie Bernard Tucker, 44, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Tucker was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended and fined $818. William H. Vance, 47, Omak, had a charge dismissed: littering greater than one cubic yard. Dawn Jewel Walters, 54, Oroville, had five charges dismissed: first-degree criminal trespass, second-degree criminal trespass, resisting arrest, deposit of an unwholesome substance and third-degree malicious mischief. Jeffrey Van Weitman, 33, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Forrest Tyler Williams, 67, Loomis, had a hit-and-run (unattended property) charge dismissed. Amanda Louise Yaksic, 25, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, Sept. 16, 2013 Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Theft on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Theft on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Wal-

let reported missing. Non-injury motorcycle accident on Lookout Mountain Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on Montvue St. in Riverside. Burglary on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Computer and guns reported missing. Threats on N. Cordell Rd. near Oroville. Disorderly conduct on W. First St. in Tonasket. Burglary on Okama Dr. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Jasmine St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. Cherry St. in Omak. Harassment on W. Apple Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Harassment on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Michael Wayne Hunter, 37, booked for DUI. Jesus Dominguez-Martinez, 30, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for first-degree DWLS/R. Morgan Lynn Roloff, 21, booked for two counts of first-degree burglary and two counts of third-degree theft. Luis Antonio Orosco, 29, booked for two counts of first-degree burglary and two counts of third-degree theft. Kai Michael Marcellay, 31, booked for two counts of first-degree burglary and two counts of third-degree theft. William Alexander, no middle name listed, 66, booked for unlawful possession of a weapon. Christopher Buck Ellis, 36, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 Threats on Stage Coach Trail near Riverside. Harassment on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. No injuries reported. Theft on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Meat reported missing from freezer. Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Harassment on S. Seventh Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Alfred Floyd Oliver II, 38, booked for POCS (heroin).

See COPS | PG A12

There is life after cancer October is please contact For additional information Charlene at 476-3602 or chelm@gazette-tribune.co Breast Cancer To be included on the feature page, fill out the Awareness form belowMonth or pick one up at our office.

Are you a survivor?

(Pick up forms and / or drop them off by Sept. 28

ase pridaynt intoformat about yourself in the form below. (fromPleone manyionyears)

Then submit the form, with your PHOTO, to Gazette-Tribun

On Oct. 4 we wil publish our feature pageNAME:_____________________________________________ of survivors to help encourage the newly diagnosed.

ADDRESS:_________________________________________

TherePHONE:____________________________________________ is life after cancer.

For additional information please contact EMAIL: ____________________________________________ Charlene at 476-3602 or chelm@gazette-tribune.com

DAYS, MONTHS, YEARS AS A SURVIVOR :_____________

To be included on the feature page, fill out the form___________________________________________________ below or pick one up at our office.

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Please print information about yourself in the form below. (list your favorite):__________________ Then submiINTEREST/HOBBY t the form, with your PHOTO, to Gazette-Tribune Submitted by Dee Keisecker

Dean Robinson and Jean Moulton met at the movie house in Oroville, Wash. and were married on Sept. 27, 1948 in Oroville. They moved around a lot and eventually settled in Longview, Wash where he worked for Weyerhaeuser and she worked for Don’s Gas Station until they moved back to Oroville. In Oroville Dean went to work for the Old Peerless until he retired and Jean worked for warehouses for many years. Now that they are retired, Dean loves working in the yard and Jean loves reading, as well as visiting with grandchildren and great grandchildren. They have four daughters, ten grandchildren, 21 great grandchildren and four great-great grandchildren.

___________________________________________________ NAME:_______________________________________________ I have approved by signature to have this information published on the ab descriOctober bed feature page made by tis he Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune ADDRESS:____________________________________________ Breast Cancer Awareness Month SIGNED:_______________________________DATE:_______ PHONE:______________________________________________

Are you a survivor? Please submit this form by Sept. 28

(from one day to many years)

On Oct. 34 we will publish our feature EMAIL: ______________________________________________ Brent Baker/staff photo

Jerry Anderson (right) was installed as the Tonasket Kiwanis president for the upcoming year at last Tuesday’s annual banquet. Division 9 Lt. Governor-Elect Robert Stone of the Pacific Northwest Kiwanis made the presentation.

Tonasket Kiwanis hold installation banquet TONASKET - The Tonasket Kiwanis held their annual installation banquet on Tuesday, Sept. 17, highlighting the service of longtime members and officially installing their officers for the year, which runs Oct. 1 to Sept. 30. Jerry Anderson was installed as president for the new year, with Aaron Kester taking over Anderson’s spot as president-

elect. Outgoing president Susannah Perry, the outgoing president, named Jack Gavin the Kiwanian of the year for his support during her term. Incoming directors include Terri Orford, Marjorie Dean, Chuck Weller and John Colbert. Bertha Wandler will continuing as secretary and will be assisted

by Julie Conkle. The new treasurer will be Sara Bartleson and will be assisted by Samuel Nau. Receiving service pins were Emert Verbeck (64 years), Wayne Verbeck (49 years), Ralph Longanecker (46 years), Rob Nau (30 years), Herb Wandler (25 years), Chuck Weller (14 years), Bertha Wandler (10 years) and Susannah Perry (4 years).

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Hunting prospects l Braggin’ Rights l Hunting Specials!

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page of survivors to help encourage the newly diagnosed.

is AS life after cancer. DAYS,There MONTHS, YEARS AP.O.SURVIVOR :_______________ Box 250  1422 Main Street For additional information please contact Charlene at 476-3602 or chelm@gazette-tribune.com Oroville, WA 98844 To be included on the feature page, fill out the ______________________________________________________ Ph. 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712 form below or pick one up at our office. (Pick upup forms bySept. Sept.28) 27) (Pick formsand and/ /orordrop dropthem them off off by

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I have approved by signature to have this information published on the above ______________________________________________________ OCCUPATION:_________________________________________ described feature page made by the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune. INTEREST/HOBBY (list your favorite):_____________________

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______________________________________________________ I have approved by signature to have this information published on the above described feature page made by the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune.

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Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

SCHOOL | FROM A1 “We engineered a more robust system. The wells were deeper than anticipated and the cost for trench work came in as double,” said McPhearson, who also pointed to it being harder to get bidders “up here.” “Our ultimate goal is to give the best system we can, we used the elementary as a basis,” said Shelly Pittman with Ameresco. “You would still get incentive dollars and there would be no increase in cost... basically it was the same price,” said Ameresco’s Paul Ristow. “If the tides were turned and came in so far under budget would we be getting the savings,” asked Superintendent Steve Quick. “Yes, we have a guaranteed price. We would have given back the savings,” said McPhearson. DeVon said looking at the few figures supplied by the company he just wasn’t seeing $180,000 in overages. “I’m not seeing how you missed by so far. I’m going to need a lot more information,” said the school director. The board was asked whether they recall the fact for several years the PUD was only collecting about half the actual cost of the power usage at the high school because of a faulty meter installed during the building’s remodeling. The PUD informed the school district that this money would have to be recovered and it was unlawful for them to give ratepayers money even to a school district which was funded by taxpayers who were some of those very same ratepayers. The district has for several years paid extra each month because of that glitch. The person asked, wouldn’t that apply to this situation, how could the district give $180,000 of money, money that would otherwise have to come from the district taxpayers to fund projects, to a company that guarantees their price? Kirstan Willson, with the Department of General Administration represents the school district on the project. She said in her professional capacity she would not recommend pay-

Prescribed burning to begin in Tonasket Ranger District

Oroville High School welcomes new staff

Submitted by Shannon O’Brien USFS Public Affairs Specialist

Submitted photo

Joining the staff at Oroville High School are P.E. Specialist and Boys Basketball Coach Jay Thacker, junior high Social Studies teacher Ryan Frazier, junior high Math teacher Jan Ottman and junior-senior high counselor Steve Gunderson. Submitted by Kristin Sarmiento Oroville High School Principal

OROVILLE - There are new faces amongst the staff here at Oroville High School and we are very pleased with all of the new staff members that have joined us. They are all passionate about their jobs and enjoy working with our kids. In the Middle School we would like to welcome Jan Ottman and Ryan Frazier. Ottman is teaching seventh and eighth grade math and comes to us from Tonasket Middle School where she has taught for the last 16 years. Frazier is a former Oroville High School graduate and he comes to us with a background in Alternative Education. He is currently teaching seventh and eighth grade Social Studies as well as one section of High School U.S. History. In the High school, we have hired Jay Thacker as our PE Specialist. Thacker comes to us from Goldendale School District where he has spent the last eight years. He is also our Head Boys Basketball coach. Our last new hire works in both the middle and high school and is our Counselor. Steven Gunderson comes to us originally from the Bellingham area, but most recently from Spokane. He graduated from the MA in Counseling program through Gonzaga University. We would like to extend a warm welcome to all of our new staff members. We are very excited to have you working with us. the board not even consider the issue until the work on the system was completed and the board agreed. Ameresco promised to give more detailed information on the cost overruns so they can

better make there decision at that time. McPhearson added that whatever decision the board makes the company stands behind its guarantee.

no mention of the transfer station as being a collection point. “I’d like to have it here, but can understand when there is another so close,” said Councilman Walt Hart III.

Free Tire Collection Event After hearing that the transfer

station was going to be used for the free tire collection event sponsored by the state Department of Ecology, the council decided since the Ellisforde Transfer station was a collection site, one would not be located in town. In fact, other than Brewster, none of the cities in the county have agreed to locate a collection site. The other sites will be the Twisp Transfer Station and the Central Landfill. There was concern that locating the collection site here would require extra time from the city crew, as well as open the city to liability if one of the volunteers got hurt. “Why have two sites within five miles?” asked Noel. “I would be more comfortable with this option. They (the county) have more equipment to handle the tires,” said Councilman Tony Keopke. Jones said that when the city was asked if they would allow a collection site, the request made

Oroville Substations.... over 4500 accounts.” The contact between the transmission and the fiber pole happened about 7:20 p.m. and caused the pole to catch on fire. The Tonasket Fire Department was dispatched to the scene and a photo of the burning pole has been posted on their Facebook page. Devries said that two BPA transmission lines come out of

Omak, one goes to the Tonasket Substation and terminates there. The other continues on to Oroville and is no longer BPA, it is tapped and goes to Loomis and the Whitestone Substation and then is tapped again to go to the Ellisforde Substation. Most people made due with candles and flashlights when the power went out and patiently waited for it to resume. In Oroville most of the businesses

were closed with Akiens Harvest Food and Prince’s Ace Hardware still running on backup generators. Devries said that a lightning storm that occurred around the same time as the power went out also cause some of the utility’s customers in the Tonasket area to suffer intermittent outages.

ing more than what the “guaranteed price” was. However, personally, she said, she could see the district allowing for some extra recompense. Director Todd Hill suggested

council | FROM A1 been offered to the campground host. Kathy Jones said that the contract for reservation system the city has been using, the same system used by the state when the park was theirs, ran out last year. She said the new contract calls for a $500 set up fee and is for one year, while the first contract was for three years and required no set up fee. Jones recommended the city renew the contract for one year and then look into other options that may be less expensive. She pointed out, however, there is value in the fact that it is the same system the state uses as many people who have camped at Veterans Memorial are used to making their reservations there. Rosa Snider spoke to the council about the concession stand that was rented by her son at the park. “I apologize for not being able to finish out the last couple of

weeks. We have been doing a lot of work out at the market,” said Snider, who offered suggestions for the next person or persons that rent it. She said she could supply a vendor list and added that Pat Davidson of Frontier Foods had been very helpful, as was Mike at the health department. “We would also be happy to help whoever you find in the future. We would even help in finding equipment. This was a wonderful opportunity you offered to a young couple,” said Snider. “We really appreciate you stepping up and helping to run it through the summer,” said Mayor Chuck Spieth. Jones said that with the second months receipts, even though the concession stand got opened late in the season, made more than the last renter did all summer.

North End Reservoir Noel updated the council on the new reservoir being built to serve the North End Water Users, as well as ensuring enough water for fire protection of the new U.S. Border Patrol Station. “They’ve (the contractor) have got started out there. They are excavating the site and so far they haven’t hit any rocks, it appears there is a nice shelf there to locate on,” said Noel. Noel said it looked like the project is moving forward and the pipe installation should begin next week. “They are going to keep the road watered to keep the dust down as they were told they need to respect the neighbors,” said Noel.

TONASKET - Shorter days and cooler temperatures mean it’s time to start looking for opportunities to accomplish fall burning on the Tonasket Ranger District of the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. The 2013 fall prescribed fire season is likely to begin in midSeptember and continue into November. Conditions, like weather forecasts, humidity levels and the moisture of branches and debris on the forest floor are being evaluated by fuels specialists. This season, prescribed burning is being considered east of the City of Tonasket in the area around the Fir Mountain as part of the Frosty Fuels Reduction Project, as well as near Lost Creek and Dugout Mountain as part of the Lost Fuels Reduction Project. West of Conconully prescribed burning is being considered in the Middle Mountain area as part of the Mutton Integrated Resource Project and north of Conconully, Schalow Mountain will also be evaluated for fall burning. For the Schallow burn, specialists are watching for just the right mix of conditions needed to prevent inadvertent impacts to riparian nesting species, while achieving ecosystem restoration objectives. In addition to the planned underburns, the district has piles to be burned. The piles are made up of small diameter trees and branches that were cut during thinning or fuels reduction activities. Pile burning is expected to last into November. “Prescribed burning will not begin until smoke dispersal and weather conditions are favorable, and burn plan objectives can be accomplished,” said Jen Croft, Fire Management Officer for the Tonasket Ranger District. Each element that affects the success of a prescribed fire is evaluated prior to ignition. Smoke dispersal and minimization of smoke impacts to public health are of primary concern. Monitoring weather conditions,

long term forecasts, forest fuel moistures, and neighboring prescribed fire activity are all part of the evaluation process. The District’s prescribed fire program emphasizes reducing forest fuel accumulations and wildfire potential in areas of the National Forest nearest private lands and those lands managed by other agencies. Lower to midvalley elevations are of highest concern. Historically, these areas experienced frequent fire, about every 5-35 years, from both human and natural causes. The historic fires were low to moderate in intensity, and reoccurred frequently enough to limit how fire burned on the landscape. Successful prevention and suppression of fires during the past century has resulted in a change from historic forest conditions and fire potential. As part of the comprehensive Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest Restoration Strategy, Tonasket Ranger District is working to reduce increased fire potential by lowering forest fuel accumulations using commercial and pre-commercial thinning along with the reintroduction of fire back into the ecosystem. Additional benefits of prescribed burning include habitat restoration, maintenance of species diversity, stimulation of forage for browsing species, and return of nutrients to the soil. To get involved with prescribed fire planning efforts, please contact Shawn Plank at the Tonasket Ranger District. To speak with a prescribed fire specialist or obtain updates during the burn season, please call the District’s prescribed burning information line at (509) 486-5158. Ignition updates are also sent out on twitter at www.twitter.com/ OkaWenNF. The Washington State Department of Natural Resources regulates smoke management and must approve smoke for all controlled burns on national forests within the state. OkanoganWenatchee N.F. fire specialists closely coordinate with the state’s air quality managers, after they receive burn approval.

COUNTY FAIR RESULTS, CONT. From the Swine barn: Overall FFA Barn Herdsmanship: Pateros FFA Overall 4H Barn Herdsmanship: Methow Cascaders Senior Grand Champion Herdsmanship: Jorge Caballero Senior Reserve Grand Champion Herdsmanship: Cooper Routien Senior Spirit of the Pavillion: Dakota Salcido Intermediate Grand Champion Herdmsmanship: Dakota

Andrews & Mylan Andrews Intermediate Reserve Grand Champion Herdsmanship: Joe Ogborn and Madilynn Larson Intermediate Spirit of the Pavilion: Madeline Serles Junior Grand Champion Herdsmanship: Katie Serles and Tegan Brady Junior Spirit of the Pavilion: Jacie Wilson Pre-Junior Grand Champion Herdsmanship: Chase Barroca Pre-Junior Spirit of the Pavilion: Logan Silverthorn

‘Weird winds’ led to outage 4500 customers lose power for over an hour last week By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE – A windstorm knocking a transmission line into a fiber optic pole is being blamed for an 80 minute power outage on Tuesday, Sept. 17 that affected the Oroville, Ellisforde and Whitestone areas, according to the Okanogan County PUD. “That night we were having those weird winds and a transmission line near Epson Salt Road got blown into a fiber pole and shorted out,” said Tim Devries, director of Engineering and Operations for the PUD. “The system saw that as a fault and opened the breakers and that caused the shut down for all the customers served by the Whitestone, Ellisforde and

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BIRTHDAY of

~ Betty Kommer ~ at the Oroville Legion on Sept. 28th from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.


SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER

Mosquitoes: Time to bite them before they bite you?

Each year it seems our city councils get bitten by the same bug – mosquitoes, or make that complaints from the constituents about mosquitoes. The little biters just don’t seem to be a problem until they’re a problem and by that time there isn’t a lot that can be done other than bombing them with insecticide. That’s something everyone would like to avoid and keep as our last line of defense. There are plenty of good reasons to want to keep mosquitoes under control. Besides being an itchy pest, mosquitoes can be a health hazard, especially now that more cases of West Nile Virus have been found in Washington State. Although there were no known human infections of West Nile this year, there were horses, birds and mosquitoes found in Grant, Yakima, Benton, Franklin and Spokane County this year with the virus. And, according to the state Department of Health, these 18 cases were based on very small samples due to a lack of funds to pursue greater testing. Most of us would prefer we didn’t have pestiOut of cides bombed on us, so what is the answer? One My Mind answer that puts it in the hands of the people is Gary A. DeVon a mosquito control district. Currently, according to a pamphlet entitled the Mosquito Messenger, most cities face the dilemma each year and if it isn’t budgeted for, then by biting time its may be too late. Omak found themselves in just such a situation and Oroville, Riverside and Okanogan, which rely on Omak’s spray permit, got caught up in their town’s failure to budget for mosquito control at budget time. Of course the bugs are easy to forget after they’re gone, but when they’re back they can be topic number one on the constituents’ minds. So what does a mosquito control district do for a city? It can make paying for control more consistent with dedicated funds and spreads the cost over more people so that the price per those gaining the value of having fewer mosquitoes is less. The pamphlet says, “Working together through a Mosquito Control District can provide mosquito-free neighborhoods for the whole season.” A mosquito district would be a positive for any community and the surrounding area. First of all when treating for mosquitoes you normally within the boundaries of the city, as well as areas surrounding the town that are mosquito prone. In Oroville, surrounded by water, that means treatment needs to be in more than just in town or it won’t work. More people benefit from mosquito treatment than those who live in town so more people should be helping to shoulder the burden. Also another positive is biological methods are used in waterways early in the mosquito’s lifecycle making areal spraying rare. And these biological agents only attack mosquitoes, midges and gnats. The only negative we see here would be for birds and bats that include mosquitoes as part of their diet. Perhaps the biggest positive of course is we wouldn’t have to rely on cities whose budgets are tight and whose projects are many to have to decide on the mosquito control issue each year. The voters will still have to decide if mosquito control is important enough to impose a small tax on themselves and only by a majority of votes in favor would it be levied. We think a mosquito control district is an idea whose time has come. Now it is up to your town to decide whether they want to be included as part of a district. If this is something you think would be a good idea let your local council people know – otherwise don’t complain next mosquito season.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Commissioners’ actions disturbing Dear Editor, The unexpected announcement of the December auction of the county lands around the Whistler Canyon Trailhead is disturbing to the many users of the trail, but also should concern citizens of the whole county. The northern part of the county needs increased tourist spending, as well as easy public recreational access to the federal lands along the valley. Since it’s establishment in 2008 Whistler Canyon Trailhead has been increasingly popular as a year round destination with all sorts of people for all sorts of recreational activities, from hiking to horseback riding, mountain biking and rock climbing to trail running, snow shoeing, hunting and geo-caching. The proposal to sell the lands around the trail could diminish the value of these activities by limiting public access and degrading the natural beauty of the area. The trailhead was purchased in 2008 from Gold Diggers Orchards by the county using Title 2 and 3 federal funding. It was intended to be transferred to federal ownership, but due to the Great Recession there were glitches in the plan. The BLM is still actively trying to negotiate with the county to complete this process, but the current commissioners have obviously now abandoned that commitment and are selling the land in two parcels, one as irrigible agricultural, the other as undevelopable “scab lands”. The fear of the trail users is that the only possible commercial value of the cliffy scab lands will be for a rock quarry/gravel pit. Obviously the current commissioners have ideological differences with their predecessors. They may well have good intentions of increasing the county’s tax base through this sale, but they are also being short sighted to the much greater benefit the Whistler Canyon Trailhead brings to the community; economic and esthetic. At this point these arguments are moot. The commissioners have announced that the sale of the lands will be in December. It is now up to the local community to pull together and buy them for public preservation. The Pacific NW Trails Association is coordinating this effort, with contributions being refundable if they do not win the bid. To donate please contact PNT.org or call 877-8549415. Thank you, James Moore Tonasket

Vote for candidates, not against them Dear Editor, I have seen several letters in various papers criticizing Sen. John Smith, obviously written by supporters of his opponent, Brian Dansel. I have seen one in support of Sen. Smith which explained the source of the bizarre criticisms that have been thrown at him and his family. It says look at his Senate record and make your decision. I have seen Sen. Smith’s voting record, the bills he authored and co-authored. I have heard him speak on KOMW’s “Live from Olympia”, one time in particular praising the “Public” schools in the 7th District for their outstanding achievement despite getting only a fraction of the money allotted to schools on the other side of the mountains, (once again proving simply throwing more money at a problem will NOT fix it!) I have emailed him with my views on things, and asked his opinion on Constitutional and state issues. I ALWAYS get a prompt reply, as opposed to when I contact our national Senators! I have seen practically no information on his opponent, Brian Dansel. However, as a voter I feel it is my duty to find out about him if I am to replace a Senator who appears to be doing a good job for the 7th District. The letter from Mr. Slusher about slime-slinging politics makes a good point. As a voter, I am to vote for candidate B simply because he is not candidate A is a well

COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

I will finish out the year using the Molson Leader for the “90 Years Ago” portion below. I hope you will enjoy it.

90 YEARS AGO: September 19-26 1923: John Widell, who lives about two miles southeast of Molson, was in town getting repairs for two binders which were smashed up in a peculiar accident recently. After cutting about 300 acres of wheat without trouble of any kind and having only 10 more to cut, a team hitched to the binder ran away, pulling the machine in two and running over another, smashing it badly. A grain fire on the John Sohn’s place, 14 miles south of town, last Wednesday, destroyed 400 bushel of wheat, 250 new grain bags, and a straw pile and burned over considerable stubble. The McDonald Grain Co., shipped a car of wheat to the Seattle warehouse, Saturday afternoon. The shipment consisted of 1350 bushels of mixed wheat purchased from W. S. Chamberlin, came off the Chamberlin ranch and brought 80 cents per bushel. The basic price for the week-end was 82 cents for soft white and 78 cents for red, in the local warehouses, the market falling. It is now definitely decided that a new creamery will be built by the Hazelwood people in the immediate future. The new building will be larger with concrete floors and up to date in every way. The work will be rushed in order that the building can be finished before cold weather begins. Another chapter in the attempt of the heirs of John H. McDonald to gain possession of the government townsite of Molson, was closed a few days ago when the McDonald heirs again lost as a result of the decision of the State Supreme Court. When the late John H. McDonald posted homestead notices on the old Molson townsite about 20 years ago, it was the beginning of one of the longest legal battles that has ever been waged in the United States and one that has been carried through some of the highest courts of the land. Scott’s Garage, in Oroville, has new Fords on the floor. Touring, $498, Roadster, $468 and truck, $480. Used, include 1921 touring, $300, 1920 touring, $275, 1919 touring, $225, 1918 touring, $200 and 1914 touring, $175.

worn style of campaigning that is frankly too flimsy to make such an important decision over. Not knocking Mr. Dansel, but that style of campaigning got us the present occupant of the White House for eight years now and we are unfortunately finding out all kind of surprises about him and his agenda. David Wolosik Oroville

Kill the IRS Dear Editor, The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has been abusing their power. This is tyranny. It is also unjust, unfair, and un-American. The IRS had as their target the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, Samaritans Purse which is directed by Billy Graham’s son Franklin, and Dr. James Dobson, formally Faith For the Family; also many Tea Party groups. The IRS has attacked conservative and religious groups. President Obama calls these “phony scandals”. They are not phony scandals to these people and organizations. They are real harassment. Because of their bad actions the IRS should die, it should be abolished, bury the IRS, and put it to death. The Bible says in Psalm 119:30: “I have chosen the way of truth...” The IRS will not stand for truth as it has unjustly targeted Christians and Christian organizations. Many people will not trust the IRS. Yes, I am in favor of paying taxes, and I pay them. Let us create a new and fair tax gathering group. We should do away with

ITEMS FROM THE PAST

the IRS. I suggest, we start a flat tax or another similar way to collect taxes. The IRS has engaged in intimidation and persecution of American Christian people. On a side note, I have returned from preaching at a Bible conference in Los Angles, Calif. at the Fundamentalist Baptist Tabernacle. The church people are protected by uniformed armed security guards with guns who are members of the church. I felt very safe. Dr. Arthur Houk Colville, Washington

PUD ‘rate adjustment’ To the Editor, I got m PUD bill Saturday: $61.80. A bit surprised I read their little message box: “This statement reflects the September rate adjustment.” This adjustment was actually a 50 percent increase ($21.64) over August’s bill! Seems I remember some scuttlebutt from a few years ago how PUD users would have to pay rates comparable to those across the nation (14 cents/KWH Alaska; 18 cents Mississippi, etc.) Well we didn’t have steady rate increases, but went to a basic charge, followed by cost of power adjustment then got slapped with our old KWH charge of 4-1/3 cents on top. Now if you add all of that, divide by the KWH usage (mine was 584), my cost was 10.6 cents per KWH! Now I”m wondering if I’ll be reading that little message box in October: “This statement reflects the October rate adjustment.” Salley Bull Oroville

Miss Dorothy Roberts, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lester Roberts, is one of 14 students chosen as a member of the EWSC “Collegians” vocal group to make an 8-week USO-National Music Council tour of the Pacific Command.

50 YEARS AGO:

25 Years Ago

September 19 – 26, 1963: The Molson Grange Booth placed first at the Okanogan County Fair last weekend. Plans are now underway to take the display to the Waterville District Fair this weekend. A moose of a bull moose vamoosed after punching an extra nine or ninety holes in the fairways and greens of the Oroville Golf Course Friday morning of the past week. A photographer from the Oroville Gazette scoured the hills around the golf course and swore that there was no sign of him. Seven girls won Omak Sewing Center’s $5.00 awards for their 4-H sewing entries and rated top in their class. Anita Condon of Nespelem, won the grand sweepstakes, a county 4-H scholarship and a chance to enter the state competition contest. The seven girls are: Sharman Rise, Kristin Landreth and Sandra Harper, Oroville; Cindy Phillips and Joan Hubbard, Malott; Janice Pickering and Loretta Pickering, Chesaw. Weather Wise by Marge Frasier, Official Observer: Sept. 11, 88 degrees maximum and 52 degrees, minimum; Sept. 12, 83 and 56; Sept. 13th, 79 and 55; Sept. 14, 73 and 44; Sept. 15, 67 and 45; Sept. 16, 67 and 52 and Sept. 17, 73 and 43. Grocery prices: Large eggs, $.57 doz; Pancake flour, 4 lb., $.45; shoulder cut pork roast, $.39 lb.; Tomato soup, per can, $.10; 3 lb. sausage rolls, $1.09; Chuck steak, $.43 per lb.; Sugar, 5 lb. $.49; Ground Beef 3 lb. 1.09. The Oroville Junior-Senior High Schools will close during the week of Sept. 30 through Oct. 4 for apple harvest vacation. The change in dates for the release of students to pick apples was made because of the many requests from growers and students that wish to have apples harvested during that week. The annual “threshing bee” at the Evan Jones Ranch on South Pine Creek, will be held Sunday, Sept. 29. Potluck dinner at noon with everyone bringing their own eating utensils. The annual affair is conducted under “old time” conditions, that is, old harvesting equipment, which will include a steam engine, that will be used in all operations. This is an excellent spot for all shutter bugs, so bring your camera and plenty of film. An Oroville student at Eastern Washington State College,

September 22nd - 29th, 1988: Except for a few glitches, it looks as though Tonasket will be getting 20 units of senior housing in the near future. Construction of a one story structure is slated for next summer. According to the architect for the housing, “these will be high quality units.” The project runs into the glitch when its builders talk about its proposed site. Last week, the Crest Construction Co. approached the mayor and council about obtaining the land where the Tonasket Youth Center now sits. The 1988 Tonasket Junior Miss competition. Competitors for the honor awarded last Saturday, were Tonasket High School Seniors Michelle Musgrave, Jennifer Bird and Wendy Hanson. A radiant Wendy Hanson was chosen to represent Tonasket as the 1988-89 Junior Miss. New or renew, $8.88, announces an ad in the G-T. As the year begins to Fall, the price of the G-T will rise. Effective Oct. 1, 1988, the G-T will cost $13.00 per year, (in Okanogan County), so renew now or become a new subscriber while the price is low and news is hot. The Chesaw Rodeo Club will hold their annual play day Sept. 24, with a potluck dinner at 11:30 a.m. and the games will begin at 1 p.m. It was cold in these Chesaw hills Saturday evening. White frost was all over but it was more than a frost, it was a freeze. Temperatures ranged from 27 degrees above to 17 above. The Hornet squad was jubilant following their victory over Quincy last Friday night. “It was pretty loud on the bus” Coach Payne explained, “at least until we got to Wenatchee and got them fed.” No one is quite sure why but there seems to be less Eurasion Water Milfoil choking Lake Osoyoos this year, according to a newsletter recently distributed by the Washington State Department of Ecology. Luckily, the year the grant money dried up, so did the milfoil. This refers to the fact that the lake was lowered last spring to do the work on the new Zosel’s Dam, leaving many of the milfoil beds high and dry. The annual Jones Threshing Bee was held last Sunday, in which steam power is used to run the old time threshing machines that remove the wheat from the chaff. Wood was cut by hand and fed into the boiler of the turn of the century steam tractor that would power the belts that run the thresher.


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Heavy frost in the Highlands Only four days left in September. Folks from the “Highlands” have reported heavy frost. Seems too early for that, but it seems the whole country is having strange weather at strange times. Whether we like it or not fall is upon us. You never miss the electricity until you don’t have any and we got a good taste of that last week. We are a pretty helpless lot when the power suddenly goes off. We had a little light from an oil type candle, about the size of a baseball, with a faint yellow glow. And to think that is close to what I used to read by and do my school work, until we got “ritzy” and had an Aladdin lamp, with its fragile little mantle, but they did give off a good light, or so we thought at the time. Driving by Beatle’s used car lot, which usually didn’t have room for another car, seems to be totally empty, indicating that part of the business is closed. Time will tell, I guess. The 1944 graduating class in Oroville

had only four boys left in it by the end of the school term. All others had either been drafted or had enlisted in the military. Among those four was one very quiet, nice young man, from Nighthawk, Joe Allemandi. A while after graduation my husband and Joe went into the army together. So, they had been classmates, army buddies and friends for a lot of years. It is on a sad note that we announce the death of Joe. Just a year ago, both of the guys were recovering from serious surgeries and “comparing operations” and Joe has had multiple issues since that time, and died peacefully, at home Sept. 17. Joe was a very successful rancher/orchardist at Palmer Lake, where he lived with his wife, Shirley and they raised their three children. At his request there will be no formal services, and his ashes will be placed where he wished them to be, as told to me by his wife, Shirley. Condolences go out to all the family. Judy Beanblossom has been called to Arkansas where she has three close fam-

ily members, all battling cancer. heard of such a thing! Utah has the lowest deaths related to The Mariners won a game from cancer in America. Detroit… 8 to 0. Wonders It was announced at the never cease! And Sunday Senior Center that Delores they won another one. The Baker will be moving away season is just about over and from Oroville. Her health they’re finally getting the has been deteriorating for hang of it... once in a while. quite some time, and her Name change for Sterling smiling face will be missed Bank. It was announced Sept. from the center. 11th of the sale of Sterling There are other friends in bank to Umpqua Holdings the area that need prayers, Corp., based in Oregon. With cards, phone calls or per- THIS & THAT this sale if makes Umpqua haps a visit. Beverly Holden the largest community bank Joyce Emry has health issues again, on the West Coast with 394 Barbie Firemuth, fell, was locations. in the hospital, and Bob Hirst is again I wonder just how many name changin Wenatchee hospital, while something es have been made in the existing two can be determined to better his situation, local bank buildings. Some day when and Betty Hall had surgery. May all I don’t have anything better to do, I’ll these folks soon be in better health. have to work on that. Word has been received from Mary Pear and apple harvest is moving right Ellen Lemmond of Michigan that she along. Was given some ripe pears and has arrived safely home and enjoyed they were so good… and I don’t even her visit with friends she made when like pears. Try one, with cottage cheese, she lived in Oroville. She traveled by a dollop of mayo and some grated chedAmtrak and I doubt that she will be mak- dar on top, and of course some paprika ing any commercials for the company as to perk up the pale colors. Salad with a she had a few “bumps” in the road while different twist. riding the rails. I really like Mary Ellen, Chili is the official state dish of Texas. but there is something wrong with her Betcha didn’t know that. that I just don’t understand. She doesn’t Mr. and Mrs. Dave Carlson were at like chocolate, not even a little bit. Never the Oroville senior center last week for

Area quilters to hit the road for Shop Hop By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

NORTH CENTRAL WASHINGTON - Quilters who also have a love for travel are invited to take part in the North Central Washington 12th Annual Quilt Shop Hop, featuring nine quilting shops from Tonasket to Wenatchee to Reardan. Each of the participating shops will be open from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sept. 26-Oct. 5 (though closed on Sunday, Sept. 29). Visitors will

be able to collect different quilt block at each of the nine shops. Altogether they can be crafted into a quilt designed for this year’s Shop Hop by the Attic Window Quilt Shoppe of Wenatchee. There is also a grand prize of a Pfaff Ambition 1.5 sewing machine with a $1,500 value. Buena Vista Quilting (1326, Highway 7, eight miles north of Tonasket) is the most local participant. Other quilt shops include NANA’s Quilts & More (located in Almira); Woven Threads

(Chelan); Experience Quilts! (Odessa), Needalyn Time (Omak); The Buggy Barn (Reardan); The Quilting Hive (Twisp); Yesteryear Quilting (Waterville); and The Attic Window Quilt Shoppe (Wenatchee). There is no cost (other than for what shoppers may purchase) and thank you gifts will also be available. For more information contact Patti Middleton at (509) 4862341 or email: patti@buenavistaquilting.com.

BLUE STAR MOTHERS

observance of National Gold Star Mother’s Day on Sunday, and concluding with the stars and flag being removed on Veteran’s Day. As you drive by the memorial on Highway 97 south of Tonasket and see the gold stars contrasted against the walls black granite, please say a prayer for each one our community has sent and lost to war and remember the mother and family that contributed dearly towards our freedom.

Gold Stars at U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck NCW Blue Star Mothers

This Saturday, Blue Stars will be honoring Gold Stars. The mothers of the active duty military in our area will be adorning the plaques of those Killed in Action (KIA) and Missing in Action (MIA) with stars of gold. A mother’s star turns from blue to

gold if their child is killed while serving. During the month of October the US Armed Forces Legacy Memorial in Tonasket will be featuring the Blue Star Mothers commencing with the placing of the stars and raising of the Blue Star Banner this Saturday,

Looking forward to REI catalog

HILLTOP COMMENTS

By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

Did you happen to see all of the activity up in Old Molson Ghost Town last week? The front page of the paper let us know that the world-renowned Seattlebased outdoor outfitter was in the Oroville area shooting for one of their upcoming 2014 catalogs. Damon Parrish location photog-

rapher along with his crew and models took many photos for us to watch for in the upcoming catalogs. Robin Stice along with Linda Darrow catered a nice lunch for the group at the Molson Grange Hall. Fiona will have their last week end for the year on Sept. 28 and 29. Get in on the last of the home

Colder weather is on its way Submitted by Sue Wisener Tonasket Eagles #3002

Last Sunday was the beginning of fall. Colder weather is on its way. Be sure to clean your filters in your furnace and clean out any chimneys you may have. We are desperate for volunteers to help in the kitchen and for bingo. At this time we would like to thank all of you that have volunteered you. You are very special people (Great Job). Sunday Breakfast will be starting soon, look for more information on starting date. Pool League is coming up, so come in and sign up at the Tonasket Eagles. there will be a meeting Wednesday, Oct.16 at 7 p.m. at the Shop Tavern in Oroville. Sponsor and Players Fees need to be paid at that meeting.

TONASKET EAGLES Meeting nights at the Tonasket Eagles are first and third Wednesdays at 7 p.m. for the Aerie and first and third Thursday at 6:30 p.m. for the Auxiliary. We would like to see more people show up and ask questions and or just become informed as to what we are all about. Would like to see some new faces. We are saddened by the loss of Brother Sam Swager. Grave site Services will be Sept. 28 at 11 a.m. luncheon to follow at the Tonasket Eagles. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: First place Ken Cook, second place Delia Hagen, low score Ted Zachman and Last Pinochle went to Dale Byers. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

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“.. because every soldier has a mother.” grown fruits and veggies. There will be the first of the many Pancake Feeds to come for our Hilltop on Sept. 29th from 11 a.m. to 2 pm. Wow! that’s this coming Sunday. I am sure many of you will be there. Did you know that the Molson Grange won the First Place Award at the Okanogan County Fair. This years theme was “Traditions Ride On.” Thanks to the Hilltoppers who took on the job of decorating for us this year. Thank you. Until next week.

lunch. They are from Loomis and he is a delight to visit with. He knows everyone. The average flea can jump up to 150 times its own length. To match that a human would have to jump 1,000 ft. while an elephant cannot jump at all. Amazing! Shirley Roberts told me their granddaughter, Hannah Hilderbrand, got hit by an apple limb and knocked off the fourwheeler she was riding, ended up in the hospital with a broken collarbone, which will surely put a “crimp” in her athletic abilities for a while. Guess what? Yard Sale at the United Methodist Church, tomorrow and Saturday. Come and see and find a good buy. Also Habitat for Humanity is providing good entertainment at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, Saturday 7 p.m. The Touch of Grace Bell Choir and others will be sharing their musical talents. Another cougar sighting was seen coming up from the orchards on Highway 97 N. near the old Linger Longer Lodge sign. Perhaps the same one that was seen recently, near Ehler’s road, at the “Y.” Myrtle Wood had her sister-in-law from the Seattle area visiting her last week. Do you know what is the strongest part of your body? Your tooth enamel... be kind to it.

OROVILLE EAGLES Those who haven’t paid need to re-enroll Submitted by Jan Hansen Oroville Eagles #3865

The Auxiliary had a Hawaiian dinner on Saturday, Sept. 21. The turnout was not as good as expected but the food was delicious. Anyone who has not paid annual dues must now re-enroll. If you have paid but have not picked up your current card, please stop by, say Hi and pick it up. Oroville hosts the District 10 meeting on Oct. 20. Meeting starts at 1 p.m. and is always followed with dinner. All members are invited to attend. Starting this month we will be sending, via e-mail, updates, current and future events to our members with current e-mail addresses. If you want to be

Kinross classes are a big hit By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

Don’t miss out. If you have not taken a Kinross class, it’s time to consider it. Just ask anyone who has participated in one of these tours. We are so fortunate to have these amazing offerings by Kinross staff, and they are so worth the time to take them. Oct. 3 and 5 are the dates for the Geology and Gold Mine Tour. There is a long and colorful history of gold exploration and development in north central Washington. You will learn about the geological principals of mineral deposit formation and you will explore a working underground gold mine. The second session will be held at the Kinross mine at Buckhorn Mountain. Your instructor is Peter

Submitted photo

A beautiful pig! Debra and Leea show off a cake made by Harvest Foods’ baker Sam Montoya. included let us know and we will add you to our list. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesdays of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day and Seahawks games are always Happy Hour. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and

eat Burgers and More. Friday is Taco Night (until Steak Night comes back) and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what’s happening at your club and join in. As always, We Are People Helping People.

THE LEARNING TREE

pound bar of gold! Coutney Gill, Metallurgist, will be your instructor. These classes fill up quickly. For more information and to register call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email her at community.schools@oroville.wednet.edu or sign up online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

Cooper, Chief Geologist at the Kettle River operation. The next Kinross class is also two sessions, on Oct. 17 and 21. This one, however, requires that you sign up by Oct. 2 to allow time for background checks. You will learn about extracting the metals from ores, metallurgical processing of gold-bearing ores and the specific processes that Kinross Kettle River-Buckhorn uses to extract these precious metals. Then there’s crushing, grinding, particle sizing and flotation, and the role of cyanide in gold leaching. The second session is a tour of the Kettle River Mill and a gold pour in Republic. Imagine holding (if you can lift it) a 60+

Sat. Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY AT 7:30 P.M.

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

You probably have thought about what you’d like to do during your retirement years. But all your plans probably depend, to at least some extent, on your financial situation. What happens if you reach the age at which you wish to retire and you just don’t have the money you thought you’d have? If this occurs, it’s time for “Plan B.” What does that look like? Here are a couple of possibilities: Continue working. If you like your job, you may not mind working an extra year or so. You’ll be bringing in more income and contributing more to your 401(k) or other retirement account — and, perhaps almost as importantly, you may be able to avoid tapping into these retirement accounts, thus giving them more time to potentially grow. (However, once you turn 70½, you’ll need

But while it’s important to put in as much as possible to your retirement accounts, you need to do more than that — you also must put the money in the right investments within these accounts. Your exact investment mix should be based on your individual risk tolerance and time horizon, but, as a general Adjust your retirement lifestyle. It’s pretty rule, these investments must provide you with simple: If you don’t save as much as you had the growth potential you’ll need to accumulate planned for retirement, you probably can’t do sufficient resources for retirement. all the things you wanted to do as a retiree. For example, you may not be able to travel Of course, as you know, investments move as much, or pursue your hobbies to the extent up and down. You can’t prevent this, but you’ll certainly want to reduce the effects of you’d like. volatility as much as possible when you enter Clearly, you’d like to avoid these “retirement retirement. Consequently, during your final contingency plans.” To do so, though, you’ll working years, you may need to adjust your need to take steps well before you retire. And retirement accounts by shifting some of your the most important move you can make may assets (though certainly not all) from growthbe to contribute as much as you can possibly oriented vehicles to income-producing ones. afford to your IRA and your 401(k) or other It’s a good idea to have contingency plans employer-sponsored retirement plan. in place for virtually every endeavor in life During the last several years before you wish — and paying for your retirement years is no to retire, you may be in a strong position to different. But if you can make the right moves “max out” on these plans because, at this to avoid the contingency plans in the first stage of your life, your income may be at its place, then so much the better. highest point, your children may be grown and you may even have “retired” your mortgage. If This article was written by Edward Jones for you still have money left with which to invest, use by your local Edward Jones Financial you may want to look at other tax-advantaged Advisor. vehicles that can be used for retirement. to begin taking withdrawals from your 401(k) and a traditional IRA.) But if you are really not enamored with the idea of working any longer, you might find that even the ability to “beef up” your retirement plans for another couple of years isn’t much consolation.

*

September, 2013 Programme Enjoy your evening out, taking in a movie at the Oliver Theatre!

Visit our website

Regular Showtimes

*

Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

OLIVER THEATRE

in a movie at the Oliver Theatre!

*

*

Regular Showtimes (Unless otherwise stated) Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M.

Phone 250-498-2277 Oliver, Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 B.C. P.M. (Unless otherwise stated)

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues.

Sept. 21 - 22 - 23 - 24

Phone on 250-498-2277 B.C. September, 2013 ProgrammeShowtimes Sat. at 7:00 & Oliver, 9:10 p.m.

www.olivertheatre.ca Visit our website

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Sept. 21 - 22 - 23 - 24 Showtimes on Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. Sept. 5 - 6 - 7 ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY AT 7:30 P.M. Showtimes on Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

What’s Your Retirement “Contingency Plan?” FINANCIAL FOCUS

OLIVER THEATRE

Enjoy your evening out, taking Sat. Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

www.olivertheatre.ca

Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. Sept. 5 - 6 - 7 Showtimes on Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

At the

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

Oliver, B.C. Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Sun. - Mon. - Tues., Thurs. Sept. 8 - 9 - 10, 12 Closed Fri.-Sat.................7:00 Closed & 9:00 P.M. Thurs. - 250-498-2277 Fri. - Sat. Sept. 26 - 27 - 28 Violence, coarse language.

Violence, coarse language. Sept. 8 - 9 - 10, 12 Sun. - Mon. - Tues., Thurs.

PLANES DISNEY

Violence, coarse language.

(re-opens Sept. 13)

Violence, coarse language.

(re-opens Sept. 13)

Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. Sept. 26 - 27 - 28

Fri. - Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Mon. - Tues. Sept. 13 -Fri. 14--Sat. 15 -- Sun. 16 - -17 Sept. 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 - 17 Showtimes on Fri. & Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

Showtimes on Fri. & Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

THUR.-FRI.-SAT. SEPT. 26 - 27 - 28

G

+ MATINEE ON THE SAT 2P.M. SEATS ONLY $6. IN REAL D 3-D

will also a matinee thisshow show on on the There There will also be abematinee of ofthis theSat. Sat. Violence. Violence. at p.m. 2:00 p.m. All seats $6.00for forthe the matinee. matinee. at 2:00 All seats $6.00

THE WORLD’S END

- Mon. - Tues. Sept. Sept.29 29 -- 30, 30, Oct. Sun.Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Oct.1 1

Coarse and sexual language.

Coarse and sexual language.

- Fri. Thurs. - Fri.Thurs. Sept. 19 -Sept. 20 19 - 20

14+

SUN. - MON. - TUES. SEPT. 29 - 30, OCT. 1

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL Violence.

Coarse language.

Programme subject to unavoidable change without notice

Violence.

Coarse language.

Programme subject to unavoidable change without notice

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2

Animation/Comedy.Family PG Starring Bill Hader, Anna 111 min Faris, James Caan, Andy Sandberg. Fri. 6:45, 9:15 Sat.*4:15,6:45,9:15 Sun. *4:15,6:45. Wkdys: 6:45

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

PRISONERS

153min

R

Starts Friday. Crime/Drama.Thriller Starring Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Viola Davis, Paul Dano. Fri.6:30 & 9:45. Sat.*3:15,6:30,9:45. Sun.*3:30, 7:00. Wkdys 7:00.

THE FAMILY

R

Insidious 2

PG13

Action/Comedy/Crime Starring Robert De Niro, Tommy Lee Jones, Michelle Pfeiffer Fri. 6:45, 9:30. Sat.*4:00,6:45, 9:30. Sun.*4:00,6:45 Wkdays. 6:45 105min

Horror/Thriller Starring Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, Barbara Hershey. Fri. 6:45, 9:30. Sat. *3:45,6:45,9:30. Sun. *3:45,6:45. Wkdys 6:45. Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

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SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life Submitted by Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

Plans are underway for a fine dining experience on Saturday evening, Oct. 12. Dinner to start at 4 p.m. and end about 7 p.m. Price for the meal is $7.50. Hosts for the evening are Leanne and Richard Hairston. They will be serving Ralph Patterson’s famous Spaghetti and Meat Sauce. Plans are being made for our

OROVILLE SENIORS annual bazaar for the weekend of December 7. Plan now for a table. Still room for more exercising seniors. Come join us; we have fun while doing so and the program is geared toward us Seniors. Go at your own pace. There is a Stroke Support Group that meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 10:30 a.m. at the Youth Center adjacent to the Free Methodist Church.

This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome! Pinochle Scores for Sept. 14: Boots Emry won the door prize; Judy Ripley had the most 300 pinochles and was the high scoring woman for the evening; Ken Ripley had the high score for the men. Pinochle Scores for Sept. 21: The door prize was won by Debbie Thompson; most pinochles by Larry Smith; high woman score by Danny Weitrick and high man scorer was Ed Craig.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Stroke Support Group

OROVILLE - A support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago, will take place on Thursday, Sept. 26 at 10:30 a.m. at the YAC Youth Center at 607 Central Ave. in Oroville. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be welcome.

Tonasket Farmers’ Market

TONASKET - Tonasket Farmers Market is held on Thursdays, from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. The next market is Thursday, Sept. 26. Come join us for some of the best in local produce, crafts, personal care products, homegrown music and farmstead cheeses. Whether you make a quick spin to pick up supper ingredients or hang out for hours, you’re sure to get what you want. For more info call (509) 486-1199.

Steve Kinzie Performing at Winery

OROVILLE - Esther Bricques Winery will host Steve Kinzie on stage on Thursday, Sept. 26. Kinzie will perform his original vocals accompanied by banjo and guitar. Doors open at 6 p.m. Light refreshments available. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more info call (509) 476-2861.

Poet Laureate at TMS Benefit

TONASKET - Children’s Poet Laureate and author Kenn Nesbitt will visit Tonasket as part of a Tonasket Middle School fundraiser on Friday, Sept. 27. Nesbitt will give a presentation during a dinner theater hosted by Tonasket Middle School students, a fundraiser for the middle school students who are planning to visit Washington D.C. next summer. The evening event will be held at Tonasket High School with the meal being served at 5:15 p.m. Mr. Nesbitt will take the stage for one hour beginning at 6 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend whether or not they purchase meal tickets. Tickets for the meal will be available at U.S. Bank, North Valley Hospital, Shannon’s Cafe & Deli, and the Tonasket Elementary School Library until Sept. 20.

OCSRA Special Events

Peter Diedrick, Legislative Coordinator for Washington State School Retirees’ Association, and Rohn Rutledge, Representative for Association Member Benefits Advisors, will present important legislative and retirement benefit information for all working and retired school employees at 3:45 p.m., Friday, Sept. 27, at the Virginia Grainger School Cafeteria, 1118 5th Ave S., Okanogan. This event is sponsored by Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association. OHS Senior Parents will provide a taco dinner for $7.50 following the program. RSVP for dinner by Sept. 17 to Jennie Hedington at (509) 4222954 or Carol Payne at (509) 8265068. More info (509) 422-2954.

Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE - The Oroville Farmers’ Market is Saturday, Sept. 28, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Oroville Community Library located at 1276 Main St. Purchase art, crafts, plant starts, fresh baked goods and tamales plus the best produce on the planet. The Oroville Farmers’ Market continues each Saturday through October 26 and new vendors are welcome. Call (509) 476-2662 for more information.

Music at the Market

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will host “Music at the Market” each Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. during the Farmers’ Market season. The next Music at the Market is Saturday, Sept. 28 featuring an open stage. If you would like to volunteer to showcase your acoustic talents, please call Barbara Pollard at (509) 476-2662.

Celebration in Music

In honor of World Habitat Day, Celebration in Music worship concert is planned for Saturday, Sept. 28, 7:00 p.m., at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir Street in Oroville. The concert will feature Touch of Grace bell choir directed by Lynn Chapman and many other musicians.

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It will be an inspirational evening with audience participation in song. An offering will be taken and refreshments served.

Gold Stars at Legacy Park

TONASKET - Saturday, Sept.28 at 11 a.m. the NCW Blue Star Mothers will be placing gold stars in honor of those mothers who lost children in the service of our country on the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy plaques in Tonasket designated K.I.A. and M.I.A. We will also be hoisting the Blue Star Flag which will fly until Veteran’s Day.

Hometown Soldier Calendar

Military Mothers and Families send 1-3 photos of your soldier, airman, sailor, or guard to the North Central Washington Blue Star Mothers group to be published in next year’s Hometown Soldier Calendar. Contact Blue Star Mothers at (509) 485-2906 or email them at ncw.bluestars@yahoo. com. Deadline is Monday, Sept. 30. While you’re at it, drop off your old or broken cell phones at Discount Sewing and Vacuum in Okanogan, the KOMW Radio Station in Omak, the Tonasket Legacy Memorial office, and at the Oroville Pharmacy. Proceeds go to supporting our local military families.

African Music Piano Recital

TONASKET - Ghanaian American pianist William Chapman Nyaho will perform a recital, “Music by Composers of African Descent,” at the music studio of Roz Nau in Tonasket on Friday Oct. 11, at 7 p.m. He will also offer a workshop and master class on Oct. 12 at the same location, 42 E. Winesap. Please call Nau at (509) 486-4673 for more information about any of these events.

Taking Pie Orders

OROVILLE - The Immaculate Conception Catholic Church is taking orders for its Sixth Annual Apple Pie Fund Raiser. The pies will be freshly made the day of the sale of Oct. 14. However, organizers ask that you order before Monday, Oct. 7. Order all you’d like, the pies freeze well they say and can be backed when you’re ready. For more info call Jane Lynch (509) 476-2177 or Jo Mathews (509) 476-3819.

Health Care Coverage Workshop TONASKET - Statewide Health Insurance Benefit Advisors (SHIBA) will be putting on an free workshop for the public at the North Valley Hospital Board Room on Monday, Oct. 28 and Friday, Nov. 1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. They will be providing three volunteers and assistance is available on a “first come first serve basis”. Please bring a list of your medications with you to the workshop. Washington state’s SHIBA can help you: Understand your health care coverage options and rights; find affordable health care coverage and evaluate and compare health insurance plans. They provide free, unbiased and confidential assistance with Medicare and health care choices. Their volunteer advisors are trained to give you the latest Medicare and health care coverage information.

TONASKET GARDEN CLUB

Marjorie Williams voted Lifetime membership Submitted by Audrey Holmes Tonasket Garden Club

Betty Holmes, newly elected president, called the meeting to order at the home of Barie Colbert on Sept. 9. Wendy Taylor, vice president, asked for the roll call. “What fruits and vegetables did you produce this growing season?” Betty asked the group. She also wanted to know, “What do you want from your garden club meetings?” Some replied that they wanted

Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Your Complete Eyecare Centre

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

WATERFRONT

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service

The Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission designated CenturyLink as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier within its service area for universal service purposes. CenturyLink’s basic local service rates for residential voice lines are $13.50 per month and business services are $30.00 per month. Specific rates will be provided upon request. CenturyLink participates in a government benefit program (Lifeline) to make residential telephone service more affordable to eligible low-income individuals and families. Eligible customers are those that meet eligibility standards as defined by the FCC and state commissions. Residents who live on federally recognized Tribal Lands may qualify for additional Tribal benefits if they participate in certain additional federal eligibility programs. The Lifeline discount is available for only one telephone per household, which can be either a wireline or wireless telephone. A household is defined for the purposes of the Lifeline program as any individual or group of individuals who live together at the same address and share income and expenses. Lifeline service is not transferable, and only eligible consumers may enroll in the program. Consumers who willfully make false statements in order to obtain Lifeline telephone service can be punished by fine or imprisonment and can be barred from the program. Lifeline eligible subscribers may also reliable home High-Speed Internet to 1.5 Mbps for $9.95* per month for months of service. Further details are centurylink.com/internetbasics.

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

OKANOGAN

OMAK

CLINIC

Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health (509) 826-6191

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

(509) 826-5600

 Anti

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

 Radiology

Psychiatric Services

 Behavioral

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

(509) 826-6191

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line (509) 826-6191

Toll Free

www.wvmedical.com

509-826-1800

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

 Walk

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology

YOUR AD HERE

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602 OPTICAL

Advertise In The

qualify for service up the first 12 available at

If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call 1-888-833-9522 or visit centurylink.com/lifeline with questions or to request an application for the Lifeline program.

Okanogan Valley

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Call Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 Ext 3050

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

TONASKET

1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Phone and Internet Discounts Available to CenturyLink Customers

Anniversary on Sept. 10. We received an invitation to attend their celebration. Wendy presented a program to us about lemons and how valuable they are to some foods to enhance thieir flavor. You can wash the lemon and dry it and put it in the freezer. You can grate it or squeeze the juice to put on icing for cakes or cookies or use them for salad and vegetables or whatever you want. A thank you note was passed from member Margaret Brengle’s family for our Expression of Sympathy in the passing of Margaret in Puyallup, Wash. The next meeting will be held at the home of Barbara Johnson. We welcome guests and new members. The number to call for time and place is (509) 223-3427.

FAMILY DENTISTRY

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

Food Banks

TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480. OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

more programs like we used to have and more fruit and vegetable garden tours and to learn about flowers that they have never grown before. A motion was made and passed to make Marjorie Williams, our historian, a Lifetime Member of the club. Marjorie joined in 1946 and her mother-in-law, Winnie Williams, was a Charter Member of the club and would take her to the meetings. The Twisp Garden Club celebrated their club’s 75th

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Special dinner planned for Oct. 12

*CenturyLink® Internet Basics Program – Residential customers only who qualify based on meeting income level or program participation eligibility requirements, and requires remaining eligible for the entire offer period. First bill will include charges for the first full month of service billed in advance, prorated charges for service from the date of installation to bill date, and one-time charges and fees described above. Qualifying customers may keep this program for a maximum of 60 months after service activation provided customer still qualifies during that time. Listed High-Speed Internet rate of $9.95/mo. applies for first 12 months of service (after which the rate reverts to $14.95/mo. for the next 48 months of service), and requires a 12-month term agreement. Customer must either lease a modem/router from CenturyLink for an additional monthly charge or independently purchase a modem/router, and a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee applies. A one-time professional installation charge (if selected by customer) and a one-time shipping and handling fee apply to customer’s modem/router. General – Services not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change or cancel services or substitute similar services at its sole discretion without notice. Offer, plans, and stated rates are subject to change and may vary by service area. Deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions – All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges – Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, carrier cost recovery surcharges, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or governmentrequired charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. ©2013 CenturyLink. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink. All other marks are the property of their respective owners.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000


Page 8 A8

Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 OOkanogan KANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • September 26, 2013

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

For Rent ONE BEDROOM APT $650 per month. Garbage, water, sewer & electricity included. Furnished. No smoking or pets. References and credit check req. CALL SPENCE 509-429-4722.

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Okanogan Co Corrections & Dispatcher

www.gazette-tribune.com

26. Birdlike 28. “Dig in!� 29. Black and white bear 30. Repeat a game against the same opponent 32. Insane 34. Appearance

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Puzzle 39 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

48. A la King 49. Clever tactic 50. Deliberate deception 52. “Trick� joint 53. “Much ___ About Nothing� 54. Small hinged window above a door 56. Vina ___ Mar, Chile 57. British soldier during the American Revolution

16. Decrease gradually 17. Lively and playful 18. Moray, e.g. 19. Designate 21. “___ any drop to drink�: Coleridge 22. Pacific 24. Devotion 25. Anger, with “up�

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Help Wanted

45. Exposed 46. Hangup

Across 1. ___ Tuesday, voting day 6. Ancient colonnade 10. Operation on the user’s premises 13. Illuminated by stars

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www.gazette-tribune.com

36. Remote Automated Weather Station (acronym) 37. Die (2 wds) 41. Covered with liqueur and set afire

ANSWERS

Found

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

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Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602 9

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ADOPTION: P Laughter, Music, Beaches, Creativity, Unconditional LOVE, Financial Security awaits your baby. P Expenses paid P 1-800-352-5741. P Jordan & Andy P

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each Puzzle 39 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41) column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

7

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

www.gazette-tribune.com

Sudoku 5

www.gazette-tribune.com

Business/Office space for lease 1000+ sq.ft. Prime spot Main St. Oriville. $650/month. (509)486-1682 or 429-0873.

Business/Office space for lease 900 sq.ft. Prime spot downtown Tonasket. $650/month. (509)486-1682 or 429-0873.

JOHN DEERE 5020 Diesel Tractor with Case 90 Loader. $4000 OBO. Ford 8000 Tractor - Turbo - Diesel. $3500 OBO. Both need batteries. From the Franklin Nelson Estate. Call (509)476-2888 or (509)560-3205.

Student Services Specialist

Commercial Rentals

Furnished Log Cabin, $575; 2 bedroom house in town, $650; Private, on the river with heat pump, $720; 3 bedroom, 1 bath, $795; 3 bedroom, 2 bath apartment, $725; 1 bedroom, 1 bath apartment, $510; Lakefront furnished 3 bedroom, 2 bath $1595. Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

Farm, Fencing & Equipment

Health General

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TONASKET - 1 bedroom house, yard & shed. Close to town, quiet. $550/ month. 509-486-1682 or 429-0873.

For Rent

Help Wanted

ADOPT: Loving home to provide a lifetime of joy & opportunity for your baby. No age or racial concerns. Expenses paid, Call 1-866-440-4220

OROVILLE LAKE FRONT HOME 3 BR, 2 BA. 5 appliances. Pets? References $875, first, last. 509476-2438.

www.gazette-tribune.com

1

Announcements

5

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

59. Aerial circus act 61. Ancient galley 62. Frying pan 63. Art subject 64. Twosomes

Down 1. Motorcycle attachment 2. Ravel 3. ___ Johnson, “Darwin on Trial� author 4. Long, long time 5. “How ___!� 6. Alibi 7. Chitchat

8. Crumb 9. Arranging parallel (var. spelling) 11. High-five, e.g. 12. Like “The X-Files� 13. Disperse 14. “Tristan and ___,� Wagner opera 15. Sewer line? 20. “Beowulf� beverage 23. Sweet Madeira wine 25. Plunder 27. Water nymph 29. Hinged catches that fit into a ratchet notch 31. Churchyard tree in “Romeo and Juliet� 33. Churchill’s “so few�: Abbr. 35. Recount 37. Andy Warhol style (2 wds) 38. More old (Scottish) 39. Substituted (for) (2 wds) 40. 10 jiao 42. Nelson ___, former South African president 43. Blew lightly 44. Grommets 47. Wrecks 50. Body build 51. Jerk 54. Pigeon-___ 55. Domestic 58. French vineyard 60. Carry on

(Academic Coordinator, Upward Bound-Central) This .75 FTE position is responsible to assist in the ongoing development and implementation of the Upward Bound program in Omak and Okanogan high schools. The Coordinator supports students in completing high school, enrolling in higher education, and achieving academic success. Duties include coordinating program services, assessing student needs, developing an academic service plan for each student, serving as liaison with high schools, building positive relationships with key stakeholders, providing counseling, academic advising and tutoring, tracking student contacts, entering data, and conducting orientation workshops.

Firewood

Rebate Sale on all Pacific Energy pellet and woodburning stoves, fireplace inserts and fireplaces. See at www.pacificenergy.net Now We are dedicated to our through Sept 30. ALJU employees’ job satisfaction Stove & Fireplace, Omak and take pride in providing a 509-826-2736. place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Beautiful nice rooster free to Community Health Center good home. (509)486-1682 or 429-0873 dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following Buying Silver, Gold, Jewelry, opportunities available: Coins. Best prices are Local, not out of towners! Call Okanogan: Spence 509-429-4722. Registered Dietitian Salary $2,325/month, DOE. Full time. English/Spanish Position open until filled. For bilingual preferred. full description of position reMedication Assistance quirements and to apply, visit Program Spec. www.wsujobs.com Full time. English/Spanish biWSU is an EO/AA Educator lingual required. For Sale: Straw. Call 509and Employer. 476-3862 Pharmacy Manager Full time Promotor(a) 4 Per Diem positions; Okanogan & BrewsterEnglish/Spanish bilingual required Oroville United Methodist Patient Registration Rep. Church 9th & Fir. Fri Sept 27th 2 Full time. English/Spanish 9am-6pm. Sat Sept 28th 9ambilingual required. 2pm Roomer Full time. English/Spanish bilingual required. WIC Peer Counselor 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 2 part time; one for Brewster 1987 FORD Crown Victoria Oroville, WA 98844 & one for Okanogan. Both LX 4 Door. Runs good, 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 are .25/10 hours a week. comes with 4 extra snow gtads@gazette-tribune.com tires. $800 OBO. Call Brewster (Indian Ave): (509)476-2888 or (509)560CNA or Roomer 1 Full time. English/Spanish 3205 Bilingual required. 1974 FORD F750 5 Ton MA – Registered or Truck, Automatic, 2 speed Certified or LPN with Hoist, PTO and Dump 2 positions. Full time Bed. Runs good. Would make a great firewood or hay Brewster (Jay Ave.): truck. $2500 OBO. 1975 KenPharmacist worth Cabover Sleeper Semi Full time Truck with Hoist and Dump MA – Registered or Bed. Diesel, 13 speed. Runs Certified or LPN NAC good. Needs Batteries. Full time $6000 OBO. Call (509)476Licensed NAC needed to Patient Accounts Rep. 2888 or (509)560-3205. provide in-home care to pa- Full time tient in Riverside/Tonasket area. Experience preferred Tonasket: but not required. Duties include heavy patient care. Clinic Operations Mgr. Must have NAC license Full time from WA State See www.myfamilyhealth.org 1-800-637-9998 for job descriptions. inquire@availhome.com Submit cover letter and EOE resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. www.gazette-tribune.com Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer. American

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Join us and make a difference!

Free

Wanted

Livestock & Poultry

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Garage & Yard Sale

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Automobiles

Health General

FOR RENT

Legion Housing 1105 Appleway, Oroville

Now Accepting Applications

for 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

6XEVLGL]HGIRU,QFRPH4XDOLÂżHG+RXVHKROGV z Great Oroville Location z Picnic area z Spacious Floor Plans z On-site laundry z Park-like setting

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

Call for information and application

509-476-2808 TTY 425-562-4002

Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

— D & D CALENDAR —

Saturday, Sept. 28.......Okanogan - Estate Saturday, Oct. 5.0DQVÂżHOG$QQXDO Saturday, Oct. 12.7RQDVNHW)DOO&RQVLJQPHQW

(Call Now to get your Item Advertised) Several Big Equipment Items already Consigned!

Saturday, Oct. 192PDN)DUP(VWDWH

D & D AUCTION SALES LICENSE NO. 2241

DAL DAGNON 486-2570

LLC

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138


...

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SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune September 26, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Page A9 9

Public Notices

Statewides

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF SEPT. 23, 2013

Weekly Options. EOE. days/week! 866-725-9669

This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

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Public Notices PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 Date of Auction: October 1, 2013 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1992 FORD EXPLORER LIC. AJP3091 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 26, 2013. #513731

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: LOLA ARLENE BURTON, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00082-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representatives named below have been appointed as copersonal representatives of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representatives or the personal representatives’ attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representatives served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not present-

ed within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: September 9, 2013. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: September 19, 2013. PAMELA LEE MAIER-BURTON MONA VICTORIA BURTON Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Burton Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 19, 26, October 3, 2013. #512790 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of ERVIN FREIMUTH, Deceased. Case No.: 13-4-00090-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Ruby Manker as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to Ruby Manker at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: September 19, 2013 Ruby Manker 63 Spring Meadow Lane Oroville, WA 98844 /s/Dale L. Crandall, WSBA 32168 Attorney at Law Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 19, 26, October 3, 2013. #513880

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Notice of General Election Okanogan County, State of Washington Tuesday, November 5, 2013 A General Election will be held in the below mentioned districts for the purpose of submitting to the voters for their approval or rejection the following candidates and issues. Initiative Measure No. 517, Concerns initiative and referendum measures, Initiative Measure No. 522, Concerns labeling of genetically-engineered foods, Advisory Vote No. 3, Substitute Senate Bill 5444, Advisory Vote No. 4, Senate Bill 5627, Advisory Vote No. 5, Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1846, Advisory Vote No. 6, Second Engrossed Second Substitute House Bill 1971, Advisory Vote No. 7, Engrossed House Bill 2075, State Senator 7th District; Hospital District No 1, Commissioner Pos 2, Commissioner Pos 3, and Commissioner Pos 4; Hospital District No 3, Commissioner Pos 5; Hospital District No 4, Commissioner Pos 1 and Commissioner Pos 5; Hospital District No 6, Commissioner Pos 1, Commissioner Pos 3, and Commissioner Pos 5; City of Brewster, Mayor, Council Pos 1, Council Pos 2, Council Pos 3, Council Pos 4, and Council Pos 5; City of Brewster, Sales and Use Tax Levy within the City of Brewster for Criminal Justice Purposes; Town of Conconully, Mayor, Council Pos 1, Council Pos 2, and Council Pos 3; Town of Coulee Dam, Mayor, Council Pos 1, Council Pos 2, and Council Pos 3; Town of Elmer City, Mayor, Council Pos 1, Council Pos 2, Council Pos 3, and Council Pos 5; Town of Nespelem, Mayor, Council Pos 1, Council Pos 2, and Council Pos 4;City of Okanogan, Mayor, Council Pos 1, Council Pos 2, Council Pos 3, and Council Pos 5; City of Omak, Mayor, Council Pos 1, Council Pos 2, and Council Pos 3, City of Omak, Sales and Use Tax Levy within the City of Omak; City of Oroville, Mayor, Council Pos 1, and Council Pos 2; City of Pateros, Mayor, Council Pos 1, Council Pos 2, Council Pos 4, and Council Pos 5; Town of Riverside, Council Pos 1, Council Pos 2, and Council Pos 3; City of Tonasket, Mayor, Council Pos 1, Council Pos 3, Council Pos 4, and Council Pos 5, City of Tonasket, Sales and Use Tax Levy within the City of Tonasket;Town of Twisp, Council Pos 1, Council Pos 2, and Council Pos 5; Town of Winthrop, Mayor, Council Pos 1, and Council Pos 2; Nespelem School District No 14, Director Pos 2, Director Pos 4, and Director Pos 5; Omak

School District No 19, Director Pos 1, and Director Pos 4; Curlew School District No 50J, Director Pos 1, and Director Pos 3; Bridgeport School District No 75J, Director Pos 2, and Director Pos 5; Okanogan School District No 105, Director Pos 2, and Director Pos 5; Brewster School District No 111-203J, Director Pos 2, Director Pos 3, and Director Pos 5; Pateros School District No 122-70J, Director Pos 3, and Director Pos 4, Pateros School District No 122-70J, Bonds for Health, Safety, Educational and Infrastructure Improvements; Lake Chelan School District No 129J, Director District 1 and Director District 3; Grand Coulee Dam School District No 301-304J, Director Pos 1, and Director Pos 2; Republic School District No 309, Director Pos 1, and Director Pos 5; Methow Valley School District No 350, Director Pos 2, and Director Pos 4; Tonasket School District No 404, Director Pos 1, and Director Pos 4; Oroville School District No 410, Director Pos 1, and Director Pos 4; Coulee Area Park and Recreation District, Commissioner Pos 5; Cemetery District No 1, Commissioner Pos 2; Cemetery District No 2, Commissioner Pos 1, and Commissioner Pos 3; Cemetery District No 3, Commissioner Pos 2; Cemetery District No 4, Commissioner Pos 3; Fire District No 1, Commissioner Pos 2; Fire District No 2, Commissioner Pos 3; Fire District No 3, Commissioner Pos 3; Fire District No 4, Commissioner Pos 1; Fire District No 6, Commissioner Pos 2; Fire District no 8, Commissioner Pos 2; Fire District No 11, Commissioner Pos 3; Fire District No 12, Commissioner Pos 2; Ferry-Okanogan Fire District No 13, Commissioner Pos 3; Ferry-Okanogan Fire District No 14, Commissioner Pos 2; DouglasOkanogan Fire District No 15, Commissioner Pos 3; Fire District No 16, Commissioner Pos 1; Okanogan County Transportation District, Funding Public Transportation The registration deadline for online registrations, mail-in registrations and transfers is October 7, 2013. Any qualified elector who is not registered to vote in the State of Washington may register to vote in person at the Auditor’s Office up to and including October 28, 2013. You can register or obtain registration forms at the Auditor’s Office, on line at www.vote.wa.gov, and Department of Licensing. The Okanogan County Auditor’s Office, 149 3rd Ave N, Room 104, at the County Courthouse, will be open so voters may obtain replacement ballots, drop off voted ballots, obtain provisional ballots, and use the Accessible Voting Units, at the following times.

Monday - Friday 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM October 18 - November 4, 2013 On Election Day only, November 5, 2013, 9:00 AM - 8:00 PM. Drop boxes are in 3 locations around the county. Tonasket - Tonasket City Hall/Library Complex, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket Omak - Next to Police Station, 8 N Ash, Omak Pateros -180 Pateros Mall in parking lot, Pateros Drop boxes will close at 8:00PM on Election Day Voters needing additional information or assistance with voter registration forms or voting may call (509) 422-7240. Voters unable to use the mail-in ballot may use the Accessible Voting Unit available at the County Auditor’s Office. Ballots require sufficient first class postage and must be postmarked by the day of the election. Check with your local Post Office for deadlines to have your ballot postmarked properly. For additional information on the election or regarding voter registration. vote.wa.gov/okanogan myvote.wa.gov, Local newspaper, radio, and TV www.pdc.wa.gov Meetings of the Okanogan County Canvassing Board are open, public meetings and shall be continued until the activities for which the following meetings are held have been completed. Canvass Board meetings are held in the Okanogan County Auditor’s Office, 149 3rd Ave N, Room 104, at the County Courthouse, in Okanogan. Friday November 15, 2013 at 11:00 AM to determine the status of any provisional or challenged ballots Tuesday, November 26, 2013 at 11:00 AM to canvass the votes cast and certify the election This notice is in accordance with RCW 29A.52. Dated at Okanogan, Washington this 10th day of September, 2013. Laurie Thomas, Okanogan County Auditor and Ex-Officio Supervisor of Elections By Mila M Jury, Chief Deputy and Certified Election Administrator Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 26, 2013. #510040

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

SPORTS

Monroe, Swanson lead Tigers

DOWN TOO FAR

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

SPOKANE VALLEY Tonasket raced in the 1A/2A division at the Erik Anderson/ Runners Soul Invitational on Saturday, Sept. 21, with Amber Monroe and Hunter Swanson leading the way for the Tigers. Monroe finished 23rd in the 1A/2A division with a time of 23:18.4, while Swanson led the boys with a 48th place time of 20:11.4 “Hunter Swanson ran his best race of the year,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “He is learning to race - not just run races - and it is showing. “Amber Monroe and Johnna Terris both competed well in their races. I was pleased with how well they competed against the other runners in the second half of the race.” Terris finished close behind Monroe, 26th with time of 23:19.5. Lea Berger (4th, 26:49.6) also ran for the Tigers. Other Tonasket boys included Adrian McCarthy (55th, 20:31.3); Tim Jackson (70th, 21:35.6); Smith Condon (71st, 22:00.8); Bryden Hires (74th, 22:06.3); and Abe Podkranic (77th, 23:08.7). Tonasket next races at Lake Chelan on Thursday, Oct. 3, followed by the Can Am Invitational on Oct. 5 in Kettle Falls.

Speiker outpaces Spokane field By Brent Baker

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s defense stepped up its intensity in the second half of Friday’s game at Brewster, but it wasn’t enough to overcome a 14-point halftime deficit. The Tigers forced three fumbles after halftime, but weren’t in position to recover any of them while the offense was unable to sustain much against Brewster’s defense.

Tigers frustrated at Brewster

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

By Brent Baker

SPOKANE VALLEY - Oroville’s Sierra Speiker stayed unbeaten for the cross country season, winning the Erik Anderson/ Runners Soul Invitational hosted by Spokane Community College on Saturday, Sept. 21. Racing against 110 runners from all school class sizes - including more than 30 from Class 3A/4A schools, Speiker was the only athlete to break the 19 minute mark on the course with a time of 18:55.8. While billed as a 5k race, Oroville coach Doug Kee said that the course was between 50-100 meters longer than that. “She ran really well,” he said. Finishers were ranked in three divisions: 1B/2B, 1A/2A and 3A/4A. Speiker’s time was 16 seconds faster than the 1A/2A winner and nearly 45 seconds faster than the 3A/4A champ. Also racing for the Oroville girls was Phoebe Poynter (22nd in 1B/2B, 31:32.5). For the Hornet boys, Diego Santana (24th in 1B/2B, 22:10.2); Javier Castillo (30th, 23:08.0); Nahum Garfias (34th, 24:01.8); Emmanuel Castrejon (35th, 24:06.2); and Daniel Castrejon (40th, 25:31.4) competed. The Hornets next race at the Can-Am Invitational on Oct. 5 in Kettle Falls.

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Smith gets WIAA nod OROVILLE - Oroville’s Tanner Smith, a senior playing football at Oroville High School, was selected as the Washington Interscholastic Athletic Association’s Athlete of the Week for the opening week of the season. One boy and one girl are selected for each WIAA classification each week of the season, though Tanner Smith the first week featured only boys as football was the only sport in full swing. Smith rushed for 117 yards on 10 carries with a game-clinching touchdown and caught four passes for 53 yards as the Hornets beat Brewster 18-7 in their season-opener. He also had seven solo tackles and four assists on defense.

Terris completed 4-of-14 passes for 44 yards, with Juarez catching two balls for 27 yards (as well as the 50-yarder that was wiped out by penalty). The Tigers (2-1, 0-1 Caribou Trail League) continue their run of four straight road games Friday, Sept. 27, at unbeaten Okanogan, which knocked off Chelan on Friday despite playing without injured quarterback Clay Ashworth. “The ‘Road Show’ continues,” Hawkins said. “Hopefully we’ll learn from this, rally up and see what we can do. (We) know what’s in front of us.”

Oroville’s trip to Seattle called off BREWSTER - Playing outstanding defense for one half wasn’t enough to save Tonasket’s Caribou Trail League football opener on Friday, Sept. 20. The Tigers, playing a fired up Brewster squad celebrating its homecoming, didn’t match the Bears’ energy or focus in the first half while falling behind 21-7. An inspired defensive performance kept Brewster pinned back on its end of the field for the entire second half - the Bears’ only plays on Tonasket’s side of the 50 came after the Tigers turned the ball over on downs in the final minute of play - but the Tigers were never able to get untracked offensively. “You don’t know the kids’ mindset,” said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. “Sometimes it’s hard to tell, but my best guess is that they weren’t as tuned in as they needed to be. “But I give Brewster a lot of credit. They ran hard to the ball. The big plays we got were cutback because they were running so hard to the ball. Our not being able to establish the run game (kept us from) where we could run some play action (passes).” Tonasket’s inability to dig out of a deep hole led to the Bears’ first touchdown. A Brewster punt pinned the Tigers back on their own 2-yard line, and when the Tigers eventually punted from their own end zone, Brewster took possession at the Tonsket 28-yard line. Hayden Bayha’s 25-yard run

Brent Baker/staff photo

Brewster’s defense had Tonasket quarterback Trevor Terris constantly under siege throughout the Tigers’ Caribou Trail League loss to the Bears on Friday. set up Raf Varelas’ first touchdown of the game, a 2-yard plunge with 4:09 left in the first quarter. Tonasket tied the game on Michael Orozco’s cut-back 69-yard run early in the second quarter, but that one play accounted for nearly half of the Tigers’ offense for the whole night. “They closed down lanes and got to places really quickly,” Hawkins said. “The two Hunters (Riggan and Back) are really good players. It appeared as the Tonasket was poised to take the lead after Trevor Terris hit Roberto Juarez for a 50-yard pass that put the

ball inside Brewster’s 25-yard line. But that play was erased by a penalty and swung the momentum Brewster’s way for the rest of the half. Varelas capped a 49-yard, four-play drive with an 11-yard touchdown midway through the second quarter. Brewster made it 21-y with a on a 3-yard pass from Mitch Boesel to Raul Olvera with 25.7 seconds left in the half that was set up by a 33-yard pass play on 3rd-and-7 from Boesel to Cade Smith. The Tiger defense repeatedly pressured Boesel in the second half as Collin Aitcheson, Jacob Cory and Austin Knowlton repeatedly disrupted the Bears’

Tigers fall in CTL opener TONASKET - Tonasket’s volleyball team lost its first Caribou Trail League match of the season on Tuesday, Sept. 17, in three sets to Okanogan, 25-23, 25-16, 25-20. “(This) was a tough loss for us,” said Tonasket coach Jackie Gliddon. “We’re playing better with each game the girls play

Tonasket stats: Rachael Sawyer 9/9 serving, 2 aces, 1 kills; Savannah Clinedinst, Cassie Spear, Tori King, Carissa Frazier 1 kill ea.

“We have to get over the mental errors to compete,” Gliddon said. “I am hoping the girls will start to believe in themselves and know they can do this.”

Liberty Bell 3, Tonasket 1 TWISP - The Tigers lost at Liberty Bell on Thursday, Sept. 12, 25-20, 21-25, 24-26, 16-25.

Tonasket stats: Carissa Frazier 20/23 serving, 6 aces; Jenny Bello 14/18 serving, 3 aces; Cassie Spear 10/12 serving, 2 aces; Savannah Clinedinst 8 kills.

together. We will get it together.”

Hornet volleyball suffers loss By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

CURLEW - Oroville’s volleyball team lost on the road at Curlew on Tuesday, Sept. 17, the Hornets’ first loss of the season.

Curlew won the match in four games; individual game scores and statistics weren’t available. “All of the varsity games were close,” said Oroville coach Carrie Rise. “The team just didn’t have the energy they’ve had recently.”

Rise added that the JV team won its match 3-0. The Hornets (2-1) open Central Washington League North Division play on Thursday, Sept. 26 at home against Lake Roosevelt.

offense. But the Tigers were unable to recover any of the three Bears’ fumbles in the half. Orozco’s leaping interception of a Boesel pass also went for naught as the Tigers were unable to gain a first down on their ensuing possession. “We got knocked around a bit in the first half,” Hawkins said. “We got centered at halftime and talked about getting back to playing together. The second half was just a hard hitting son of a gun.” Tonasket edged out Brewster in hard-earned yardage in the defensive stalemate of a second half, 75-71. Orozco led the Tigers with 119 yards rushing on 20 carries.

Hornets’ Game Cancelled OROVILLE - Oroville’s game at Seattle Lutheran on Saturday, Sept. 21, ended up not happening at all. Seattle Lutheran called to cancel the game Tuesday evening due to a lack of healthy players, according to Oroville athletic director and football coach Tam Hutchinson. The Hornets attempted to fill the date with a non-league game against Liberty Bell, which also had a bye week and hasn’t even played a game yet, but were unable to make that happen. They ended up playing blue vs. white scrimmage Friday evening. Meridian, a 1A school from the west side, contacted Hutchinson Friday afternoon inquiring as to whether or not the schools could “meet in the middle” for a Saturday game, but Hutchinson said much of the team had already made plans to disperse for the weekend and scheduling buses would have been problematic on such late notice. The Hornets (2-0) travel to Kittitas on Friday, Sept. 27 for their Central Washington 2B League opener.


SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A11

SPORTS

Everything but the scoring touch

Oroville soccer squad fires off 30 shots in 4-1 loss

Football

Caribou Trail 1A Lge. Overall W-L W-L Okanogan 1-0 3-0 Cascade 1-0 2-1 Cashmere 1-0 2-1 Brewster 1-0 2-1 Tonasket 0-1 2-1 Chelan 0-1 1-2 Omak 0-1 0-3 Quincy 0-1 0-3

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - The Oroville girls soccer team generated plenty of offense in its home opener on Saturday, Sept. 21. Finishing off their multitude of scoring chances hopefully is something that will come with time, but for a youthful squad trying to learn how to win, a 4-1 loss to Eastmont’s C squad was nothing to hand their heads over. “I’m very proud of how we played,” said Oroville coach Laura Kinman. “We’re a very young team, but we’re coming along. We have a lot to learn but we’re already seeing some of that.” The Hornets had only 11 players available for Saturday’s contest - missing, most significantly, starting center midfielder Kali Peters, who injured her ankle in Thursday’s game at Bridgeport - but managed to get off 30 shots while winning the possession battle. That they did so while playing four eighth graders, three freshmen and two sophomores along with two juniors for the full 80 minutes was not lost on the coach. “Our young kids, our eighth graders, they played really well,” Kinman said. “Our senior leaders have done a great job of bringing them along. Kaitlyn Grunst is just a rock back there on defense, and Meagan Moralez got off a ton of shots and made some great passes inside that could have turned into goals.” The Hornets took an early lead as Faith Martin tucked a 20-yard shot inside the left post to give the Hornets their first advantage of the season. Eastmont tied the score shortly before the half and added three goals in the second half. The Hornets had plenty of chances to score, hitting more than one shot off the post and with Eastmont’s keeper making a dozen saves. Moralez herself got off 12 shots. Eastmont scored three of its four shots on breakaways. “I hope the girls are encouraged by games like this,” Kinman said. “We played very well, especially on offense, in the second half; we just didn’t score. The way the game was played, it didn’t seem like a 4-1 game at all.” The Hornets next host Entiat on Thursday, Sept. 26.

Bridgeport 4, Oroville 0 BRIDGEPORT - The Hornets lost their season-opener at Bridgeport on Thursday, Sept. 19, against a Fillies team that had already played twice. “I thought we really hustled,” Kinman said. “Losing Kali Peters when she got hurt didn’t help us at all. But as a first game it was a good learning experience.”

Cent. Wash. 2B Lge. Overall W-L W-L Oroville 0-0 2-0 Lk. Roosevelt 0-0 2-1 White Swan 0-0 2-1 Kittitas 0-0 0-2 Manson 0-0 0-2 Bridgeport 0-0 0-3 Liberty Bell 0-0 0-0

Girls Soccer

Caribou Trail 1A Lge. Overall Pts W-L W-L-T Cashmere 6 2-0 3-0-0 Cascade 6 2-0 2-2-0 Okanogan 3 1-1 1-2-0 Tonasket 3 1-1 2-1-0 Omak 3 1-1 2-2-0 Brewster 3 1-2 2-2-0 Chelan 0 0-1 1-2-0 Quincy 0 0-2 0-3-0 Cent. Wash. 1B/2B Lge. Overall Pts W-L W-L-T Bridgeport 0 0-0 2-1-0 Liberty Bell 0 0-0 2-2-0 Entiat 0 0-0 1-0-0 Oroville 0 0-0 0-2-0 Manson 0 0-0 0-3-0

Volleyball

Caribou Trail 1A Lge. Overall W-L W-L Cascade 2-0 6-1 Quincy 2-0 2-1 Chelan 1-0 6-0 Okanogan 2-1 2-1 Omak 1-1 1-1 Brewster 1-2 1-2 Tonasket 0-2 0-4 Cashmere 0-3 0-3 Cent. Wash. 2B No. Lge. Overall W-L W-L Liberty Bell 0-0 3-0 Oroville 0-0 2-1 Lk Roosevelt 0-0 1-1 Manson 0-0 1-1 Bridgeport 0-0 0-2

Clockwise from top, Yessica Nemecio (4) scrambles after a ball deflected by Eastmont’s keeper; Meagan Moralez (5) fires off one of her 12 shots during Saturday’s game; eighth grader Kambe Ripley battles for possession.

Thursday, Sept. 26 GSoc - Entiat at Oroville, 5 pm Vball (JV/Var) - Lk. Roosevelt at Oroville, 5/6:30 pm Friday, Sept. 27 FB (Var) - Tonasket at Okanogan, 7 pm FB (Var) - Oroville at Kittitas, 7 pm

Rain, lightning contribute to loss at home to Bulldogs

Saturday, Sept. 28 GSoc - Tonasket at Cascade, rescheduled for 10/12 Vball (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Cascade, rescheduled for 10/12 Vball (Var) - Mansfield at Oroville, 11 am

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

312 S. Whitcomb

Schedule Sept. 26 - Oct. 5

Brent Baker/staff photos

Tigers bounce back for road win QUINCY - The longest road trip in the Caribou Trail League proved fruitful for the Tonasket girls soccer team on Saturday as the Tigers earned their first league victory of the season, 3-1 over the Jackrabbits. “I thought we passed the ball a lot better than we did (in a loss Tuesday to) Okanogan,” said Tonasket coach Darren Collins. “We still have to get better there, but it was a definite improvement.” Kylie Dellinger and Kayla Willis scored in the first half as the Tigers took a 2-1 lead. Kathryn Cleman added the Tigers’ final goal in the second half. Quincy scored its goal on a direct kick late in the first half. “It could have been a five, six, seven goal game,” Collins said. “Quincy got a lot of free kicks right in front of the goal and we were never sure why. “The best thing for us is that we got good minutes from all of our subs. When you’re able to get everyone in, and then get quality minutes from all of the girls, that’s a great thing.”

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES

Monday, Sept. 30 FB (JV) - Okanogan at Tonasket, 5:30 pm Tuesday, Oct. 1 GSoc - Brewster at Tonasket, 4:30 pm GSoc - Oroville at Liberty Bell, 5 pm Vball - Brewster at Tonasket, 5/6:30 pm Vball (JV/Var) - Oroville at Liberty Bell, 5/6:30 pm

Brent Baker/staff photos

Left, Tonasket freshman Ashlyn Willis (14) beats a pair of Okanogan defenders downfield during last Tuesday’s 1-0 loss; right, Jaden Vugteveen (4) controls a pass that came her way. The Tigers (2-1, 1-1 CTL) traveled to Okanogan on Tuesday. Their Sept. 28 game at Cascade was rescheduled for Saturday, Oct. 12.

Okanogan 1, Tonasket 0 TONASKET - Tonasket gave up the lone goal in a rain-soaked

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contest on Tuesday, Sept. 17, after sitting out a half hour lightning delay that interrupted the second half of the contest. The Tigers had several chances to score early, but couldn’t find the back of the net. “I thought it was a game we should have won,” Collins said.

“We could have played a lot better soccer. Usually Okanogan is one of the better teams in the league, and this year they’re pretty young. “We didn’t take advantage of their inexperience; we did way too much kicking and chasing rather than passing the ball.”

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Collins said the Tigers weren’t quite the same after sitting in their storage shed through the lightning delay. “It wasn’t really made for that,” he said. The Bulldogs scored in the final two minutes to take the victory. “I wish we’d have been able to score when we had the chance to in the first few minutes,” Collins said. “That would have been a game changer.”

Thursday, Oct. 3 GSoc - Chelan at Tonasket, 4:30 pm GSoc - Oroville at Bridgeport, 4 pm Vball (JV/Var) - Chelan at Tonasket, 5/6:30 pm Vball (Var) - Entiat at Oroville, 6:30 pm XC - Tonasket at Chelan Invite, 4 pm Friday, Oct. 4 FB (Var) - Tonasket at Cashmere, 7 pm FB (Var) - Manson at Oroville, 7 pm Saturday, Oct. 5 GSoc - Oroville at Eastmont “C,” 1 pm XC - Tonasket & Oroville at Kettle Falls (Can Am), 11 am Vball (JV/Var) - Pateros at Oroville, 11 am/12:30 pm

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Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

Obituaries 2013 at 2 p.m. at the Havillah Cemetery with Dave Wildermuth, officiating. A Celebration of Life and potluck will follow at the Oroville Eagles at 5 p.m. Please share your thoughts and memories by signing Ralph’s online guestbook at www.berghfuneralservice.com.

Vickie Reese

Vickie Lynn Reese

Vickie Lynn Reese passed away suddenly on August 14, 2013 at Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee, her mother and sisters by her side. She was born July 18, 1953 at Tonasket to parents Robert and Ruby Reese. She grew up in Oroville and graduated in 1971. She later moved to Omak and worked at State Farm Insurance and the Western Restaurant. Seven years later she moved back to Oroville and went to work at VIP Insurance for Mike Bourn. She was very devoted to her job and met a lot of people in doing so. We want to remember her pleasant personality and her laughter! Vickie’s love for horses started at an early age and she always had one or two of her own. She grew up with her very special uncle, Darrell Reese, and special cousin, Linda Kitterman, who named Vickie her “sister chick.” She always spent as much time as possible with her great niece and nephew Skyler and Reese Noel. She made sure Skyler had a horse (Sadie) and Reese claimed “Buck” as his own. Vickie loved God, her family, her relatives and special friends. Vickie is survived by her mother, Ruby Reese; sisters Janet and Peggy Reese; her partner of ten years Matt Thacker; daughter Lisa Oliver, Brewster; Grandma Trenton, Omak and nephew Jason Reese, Oroville. She was proceeded in death by one son Troy Glenn Rairdan, her father Robert Reese, niece Melissa Reese Noel, nephew Justin Reese and her grandparents. We all love and miss her very much. At Vickie’s request there will be no service.

Ralph Fitzthum

Ralph Delvin Fitzthum

Ralph Delvin Fitzthum, age 81 of Oroville, died on Saturday, September 21, 2013 at Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee. He was born on December 22, 1931 in Tonasket to parents Alvin and Frieda Fitzthum. Ralph grew up on Siwash Creek where he worked with his father in the family sawmill. He entered the U.S. Army and served in Korea. Following an honorable discharge, he moved home where he met the love of his life, Ardith, and worked as a logger and catskinner. On July 17, 1955 he married Ardith Carlquist in Oroville. Together they lived in Tonasket, Spokane and then moved to Renton where Ralph worked as a mechanic at Boeing for 32 years. Following retirement, they moved to Oroville. Ralph enjoyed the outdoors; he especially loved hunting with family in the Bonaparte area. He was a member of the Eagles and was a Past Worthy President and a life member of the Grand Aerie. He is survived by his wife Ardith, at home in Oroville; four children: Cory Fitzthum of Oroville, Ralph Arthur Fitzthum, Jr. and wife Jennifer of Oroville, Tracy Brown and husband Daryl of Renton and Kelly Fitzthum of California; one brother: Don Fitzthum of Spokane; five grandchildren and five great grandchildren He was preceded in death by three brothers, Royce, Dover and Randy and one sister, Evelyn. Graveside services will be held on Saturday, September 28,

Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013 Warrant arrest on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Vehicle crash on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. No injuries reported. Lost property on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Theft on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Computer reported missing. Drugs on W. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Pine St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Automobile theft on 10th Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on E. Fifth St. in Tonasket. Deanna Jean Davis, 30, booked on an FTA warrant for distribution of a controlled substance and two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: second-degree vehicle prowl and third-degree theft. Alisa Doreen Rice, 38, booked on four Superior Court FTA warrants: DUI, third-degree DWLS and two for POCS; and a Grant County FTA warrant for DUI. Theodore Kurtis Storm, 26, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Anthony Ray McFarlane, 44, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Tommie Bernard Tucker, 45, booked for third-degree theft and two counts of third-degree DWLS. Kristina Marie Gipson, 30, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Luis Rosendo Benitez-Lopez, 22, booked for third-degree DWLS, making a false statement to a public servant, a Douglas County FTA warrant for DUI, and a USBP hold. Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013 Warrant arrest on B&O Rd. near Okanogan. Fraud on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Alcohol offense on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Weapons offense on San Aton Lane

Samuel Swager, age 76 of Tonasket, died Wednesday, September 18, 2013 at home. He was born March 18, 1937 in Cherokee Co. Kansas to Samuel and Mary Swager. As a young man Sam began farming in Missouri with his father. He then traveled, doing machinist and carpentry work, later working for the Gulf Oil Company. In 1968 he and his family moved to Tonasket where he worked in the apple and logging industries for many years and later for the county from which he retired. Sam was a member of the Tonasket Eagles and an hon-

Samuel Swager orary member of the Tonasket American Legion. He volun-

CHURCH GUIDE

Joseph A. Allemandi Joseph A. Allemandi, 86 of Loomis, Washington, died September 18, 2013 at his home near Palmer Lake. Joe was born March 31, 1927 to Joe and Hazel Allemandi in Nighthawk, Washington. He attended high school in Oroville and served in the U.S. Army in the Asiatic Theater and Japan from June 1945 until being honorably discharged in December of 1946. Joe was a cattle rancher almost his entire life and served 20 years on the Okanogan County ASCS Committee. He is survived by his wife, Shirley Allemandi of Palmer Lake; two sons, Mike Allemandi of Wenatchee and Monte Allemandi of Palmer Lake; one daughter, Johnna Buchert of Eagle, Idaho; four grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents and three sisters. A family gathering is being planned for a later date. Precht-Harrison-Nearents Chapel and the Okanogan Co. Crematory of Okanogan are caring for the arrangements.

6th Annual Apple

Friday, Sept. 20, 2013 Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. in Omak. Threats on Miller Rd. near Omak. Threats on Stage Coach Trail Rd. in Riverside. Drugs on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Harassment on N. Cordell Rd. near Oroville. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Wine reported missing. Warrant arrest on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Shannon Dawn Edwards, 40, booked for third-degree DWLS and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Luis Antonio Rojas-Resendiz, 39, booked for DUI and a USBP hold. Darryle Clint Gua, 29, booked on a Department of Corrections Secretary’s warrant. Christopher James Johnson, 26, booked for possession of a stolen vehicle. Bradley Scott Peters,23, booked for DUI and third-degree DWLS. James Everett Davis, 56, booked on a Department of Corrections Secretary’s warrant and POCS (methamphetamine). Rachel Dawn Morales, 32, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Travis Wesley Orr, 29, booked for POCS (cocaine). Jose Cruz Alcala-Manjarres, 39, booked for DUI. Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013 Vehicle prowl on S. Main St. in Omak. Motorcycle theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Conconully Rd. in Okanogan. Electronics reported missing. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Engh Rd. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on N. Second Ave. in

Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Malicious mischief on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Structure fire on W. Central Ave. in Omak. John Michael Hendrickson, 30, booked for a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Bruce Leroy Wisner, 50, booked on a Department of Corrections Secretary’s warrant. Joseph Kenneth Shawl, 42, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and harassment (DV). Gordon Joseph Harry Jr., 48, booked for second-degree criminal trespass. Eric Lea Reid, 40, booked for DUI and third-degree DWLS. Sunday, Sept. 22, 2013 Domestic dispute on Sage Hills Rd. near Tonasket. DUI on Hwy. 97 in Tonasket. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. DWLS on Engh Rd. in Omak. Illegal burning on Soren Peterson Rd. near Omak. Disorderly conduct on Jasmine St. in Omak. Burglary on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Harassment on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Threats on S. State St. in Tonasket. Larry Edward Siltman, 58, booked for violation of a protection order (DV). Jerome Franklin Callum, 68, booked for DUI. Tyler Dayne Whitney, 19, booked for minor driving after consuming alcohol.

Pie Fundraiser

at the

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

Our apple pies will be freshly made the day of sale

October 14, 2013 $

7.00 each

Place your order before Oct. 7th Order as many as you like, they will freeze very well and you bake them when you are ready. For more info. call Jane 476-2177 or Jo 476-3819

OROVILLE

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 5:30 p.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Oak St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Ash St. in Omak. Trespassing on Omak Ave. in Omak. Burglary on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Violation of no-contact order on W. First Ave. in Omak. Theft on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Burglary on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Juan Antonio Hernandez-Adan, 29, booked for no valid operator’s license without ID and a USBP hold. Sebastian Joseph A. Martinez, 22, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for MIP/C and three OCSO FTC warrants: thirddegree malicious mischief, MIP/C and obstructing. Jesse Daniel Ray Lightely, 19, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV).

He was preceded in death by his parents, one brother and one sister Graveside services will be held Saturday, September 28, 2013 at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Cemetery with the Tonasket American Legion and the Tonasket Eagles officiating.

Okanogan Valley

Joseph Allemandi

COPS | FROM A3 Kerri Lynn Boyle, 36, booked for residential burglary. Dustin Hale Jones, 37, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Cheyenne R. Lezard, 18, booked on theft of a firearm, second-degree vehicle prowl, and second degree theft (access device). Oscar Torres-Gomez, 20, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Lisa Kay Williams, 26, booked for firstdegree criminal trespass. Blane Scott Moore, 19, booked for first-degree trafficking in stolen property and third-degree possession of stolen property.

teered a good deal of time to these organizations, giving them the benefit of his carpentry skills. Sam is survived by his darling Ruth, at home; son, Marty (Tami) Swager of Spokane and one son and two daughters in Missouri who he hasn’t seen for many years; brother John (Collene) Swager of Missouri; sister, Fanny (John) Rainey of Missouri; two grandsons in Spokane and numerous nieces and nephews.

Samuel Swager

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Fill your home with freshly baked pie aroma! Part of the proceeds will be donated back to the community!

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist INLAND MONUMENT CO.

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10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, September 26, 2013  

September 26, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, September 26, 2013  

September 26, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune