Page 1

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2013 I VOLUME 38 I NUMBER 39

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM I FREE

FACTUALLY MODIFIED ARGUMENTS AGAINST I-522 PAGE 6 | THE BEST OF DECIBEL FEST PAGE 33

etarian cuis g e v ine How i d n Seatt e h p m u i le. tr WENDOLYN ELLIOT BY G T


2

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013


A TASTE OF ICELAND

IN SEATTLE OCT. 10 - OCT. 13

EXPERIENCE ICELANDIC CUISINE AND MUSIC IN SEATTLE A TASTE OF ICELAND AT DAHLIA LOUNGE FEATURING AWARD WINNING ICELANDIC CHEF THRAINN FREYR VIGFUSSON OF LAVA RESTARAUNT COLLABORATES WITH TOM DOUGLAS AND EXECUTIVE CHEF BROCK JOHNSON PRE-FIXED MENU SHOWCASING THE BEST OF ICELANDIC CUISINE FOR DINNER RESERVATIONS CALL 206.682.4142 DAHLIA LOUNGE // 2001 4TH AVE SEATTLE, WA 98121

OCT. 10 - OCT. 13

REYKJAVIK CALLING FREE SHOW 21+

ICELANDIC ARTISTS PAIRED WITH YOUR FAVORITE SEATTLE ARTISTS

OCT. 12 // NEUMOS // 8PM 925 E PIKE ST.

FROM ICELAND SIN FANG HERMIGERVILL BORKO

FROM SEATTLE KITHKIN VOX MOD KAYLEE COLE

PURE. NATURAL. UNSPOILED. FOR A COMPLETE SCHEDULE OF EVENTS DURING A TASTE OF ICELAND IN SEATTLE VISIT ICELANDNATURALLY.COM

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

PRESENTED BY KEXP

3


4

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013


inside»   September 25–October 1, 2013 VOLUME 38 | NUMBER 39

» SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

»9

news&comment 6

OMGMO!

The science of the food-labeling Initiative 522 is complicated—which side should we believe? 7 | SPORTSBALL

9

PLANTASTIC

BY GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT | The next

wave of animal-free cuisine: It’s not all about tofu and portobellos anymore.

food&drink 19 BRAVO, CARRIE

BY NICOLE SPRINKLE | This fall, chef

Carrie Mashaney will try to impress two audiences: one downtown, one on TV. 19 | FOOD NEWS 19 | TEMPERATURE CHECK 20 | THE BAR CODE

arts&culture 21 LOCAL SIGHTINGS

BY BRIAN MILLER | A preview of the

Northwest-focused film fest.

21 23 24 25 26

| | | | |

AGENDA THE GEEKLY REPORT OPENING NIGHTS PERFORMANCE THE FUSSY EYE

27 FILM

Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s porn addiction, James Gandolfini’s last movie, and the return of Richard Nixon. 31 | FILM CALENDAR

33 MUSIC

Earshot Jazz and the Decibel Festival take off—and even overlap. Plus, a New Zealand teen makes music for the people. 33 | SEVEN NIGHTS

odds&ends 73 | TOKE SIGNALS 74 | CLASSIFIEDS

»cover credits

PHOTO BY JOSHUA HUSTON

Editor-in-Chief Mark Baumgarten EDITORIAL Managing Editor in Charge of News Daniel Person Senior Editor Nina Shapiro Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle Arts Editor Brian Miller Entertainment Editor Gwendolyn Elliott Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert Staff Writers Ellis E. Conklin, Matt Driscoll, Kelton Sears Editorial Interns Alicia Price, Devon Simpson Contributing Writers Rick Anderson, Sean Axmaker, Sara Billups, Ma’Chell Duma LaVassar, Steve Elliott, Margaret Friedman, Zach Geballe, Andrew Gospe, Megan Hill, Robert Horton, Sara D. Jones, Isaac Kaplan-Woolner, Seth Kolloen, Sandra Kurtz, Dave Lake, Beth Maxey, Duff McKagan, Terra Clarke Olsen, Kevin Phinney, Keegan Prosser, Mark Rahner, Michael Stusser, Jacob Uitti PRODUCTION Production Manager Christopher Dollar Art Director Karen Steichen Graphic Designers Jennifer Lesinski, Sharon Adjiri ADVERTISING Sales Director Matthew Gaine Advertising Sales Manager, Arts Carol Cummins Senior Account Executives Terri Tinker, Krickette Wozniak

Tension-Set Rings Magically Suspended Your Diamond is Most Brilliant

Account Executives Peter Muller, Sam Borgen Classifieds Account Executive Matt Silvie MARKETING Marketing Director Jen Larson DISTRIBUTION Distibution Manager Jay Kraus OPERATIONS Administrative Coordinator Amy Niedrich PUBLISHER Wendy Geldien COPYRIGHT © 2013 BY SOUND PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. ISSN 0898 0845 / USPS 306730 • SEATTLE WEEKLY IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY SOUND PUBLISHING, INC., 307 THIRD AVE. S., SEATTLE, WA 98104 SEATTLE WEEKLY® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT SEATTLE, WA POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO SEATTLE WEEKLY, 307 THIRD AVE. S., SEATTLE, WA 98104 • FOUNDED 1976. MAIN SWITCHBOARD: 206-623-050 0 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: 206-623-6231 RETAIL AND ONLINE ADVERTISING: 206-467-4341

Exclusively at 1407 FIFTH AVENUE | FIFTH & UNION | SEATTLE, WA 98101 | 206.447.9488

turgeonraine.com TRnewspaperWeeklynewsize2013r.indd 8

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

21 ARTS

»33

5 8/6/13 6:56 PM


news&comment»

Ad Blusters

Trying to understand GMO-labeling ads? Start by getting a Ph.D. in plant sciences. BY NINA SHAPIRO

C Tickets Start at $20

Live Music • German Food • Costume & Yodeling Contests

anacortes.org

Historic Port Warehouse • 1st & Commercial Ave • 360-293-7911

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

STOREWIDE SALE

6

% OFF 50 EVERYTHING!* SEPTEMBER 27 & 28 (CLOSED SUNDAYS)

* Some items may be excluded from this sale. See store for details.

TWO DAYS ONLY! Friday & Saturday

We’re FULL to the brim at our SODO location and need to make room for more generous donations. All furniture, electronics, jewelry, clothing for the whole family, collectibles & more! Many items will be first time offered--and at 50% off our normal, already great pricing. SODO SALVATION ARMY: 1010 4th Avenue S. | Mon-Sat 9am-7pm | 206-624-0204

eggs, and meat. ontinuing to heat up after the In fact, the initiative does not exempt such millions of dollars poured into it, items. Genetically modified meat, for instance, both sides of the fight over GMOwould have to be labeled, as labeling Initiative 522 released TV Bieber allows. What it does ads last week. But don’t expect them to exempt is genetically engihelp you understand the neered seed that is given to issue, which is enoranimals—so labels would mously complicated not be required for meat and delves deeply into and dairy products that are science. The No cammade from animals fed paign’s ads are especially such seed. That’s “misleadbewildering, and someing” to consumers, Bieber what misleading. argues, because such One of the biggest puzproducts would contain zles is a statement in a No traces of the genetically ad by former state attorney modified goods. general Ken Eikenberry True? SW asked that I-522 “would require Moyer. He says no: some foods to be labeled as The seed would genetically engineered even if be “degraded and they’re not.” On the face of it, excreted” by the this seems like a ludicrous claim. animals (Bieber Asked to explain, No spokesperlater apologizes son Dana Bieber cites canola oil, for getting her which according to the law would facts “twisted” on have to be labeled. The oil would this matter). indeed be made from genetically Claims of Elizabeth Larter, modified plants, but Bieber argues exemptions are spokesperson for that processing would remove the greatly exaggerated. the Yes campaign, genetic-engineering component, asserts that the opposite side is trying to have rendering it no different than oil made from a it both ways with its contradictory arguments non–genetically engineered plant. about oil and meat. And indeed that’s true. SW called upon plant biologist James Moyer, But the debate does illustrate how tricky it can director of the Agricultural Research Center become even to identify what is a genetically at Washington State University, to find out modified product and what isn’t. whether this makes any sense. His answer, in short, is yes. Genetic engineering entails the insertion of new DNA into a plant. But the oil is purified, so the protein created by genetic engineering is no longer present. In sum, he says, Last week, the federal monitoring team over“genetic modification has no impact whatsoever seeing Seattle police reforms released the stark on the oil.” findings of a survey measuring public perception GMO skeptic Chuck Benbrook, an agriculof the Seattle Police Department. tural economist who heads a food safety and Most notable about the study was the finding research program for WSU, doesn’t buy it, saying that only 35 percent of those surveyed thought there hasn’t been enough independent research Seattle police treated people of all races and on the matter. He also argues that there are groups equally. Early on, the study’s authors note many reasons to oppose genetic engineering that the minorities the public thinks cops treat besides plant biology, including the way seeds are unfairly are African Americans, Latinos, and patented and distributed. Native Americans. And while that was just the That raises the important question of what start of the 18-page report’s discussion of policlabeling is really for: to help people keep GMOs ing and Seattle’s black and Latino communities, out of their bodies (in which case the anti-labeling it was pretty much the only mention given to folks have a point), or to enable opponents of the Seattle’s Native American community. biotech industry to avoid buying its products (in That was apparently a statistical issue: While which case they would be served by a label on 15 percent of the survey respondents were black canola oil)? or Latino, only 1 percent were Native American. Either way, most people probably won’t follow (According to the census, Native Americans likethe logic behind Eikenberry’s claim. But if they wise make up 1 percent of Seattle’s population.) do, they would then be mystified by the next Still, in a discussion about police relations with thing Eikenberry says—repeated in other ads minorities, the lack of information about Native from the No campaign— Americans is glaring given which is that the initiative the community’s recent contains “special exemphistory with the SPD: It PRINT IS GREAT, but if you want to read about how tions” for many foods. A was just over three years Hoquiam changed football forever, picture comes on the screen ago that John T. Williams, check it out on The Daily Weekly. with a variety of products, a native woodcarver hard SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM/DAILYWEEKLY including meat, chicken, of hearing, was shot and

Ask a Native

[


news&sportsball» killed by police after he failed to put down his carving knife. That shooting played a major role in the U.S. Department of Justice’s decision to open a civil-rights investigation into SPD’s use of force. That investigation eventually led to, among other things, the oversight committee that commissioned the study released last week. But that wasn’t the last Native American deadly encounter with police. In February, Jack Sun Keewatinawin was shot and killed in Greenwood after his family called police because he was having a schizophrenic episode. Police were cleared in the shooting, saying he raised a piece of rebar in a threatening manner, but his family contends it was unwarranted. Chris Stearns, a Native American and former chairman of the Seattle Human Rights Commission, says he was unsatisfied with, if not surprised by, the lean mentions of Native Americans in the report. “Almost to a person, we feel invisible,” Stearns says about Native Americans. “Every once in a while, we’ll get a heritage month, but that’s it. “I don’t think it’s that hard to go interview

“At the end of the day, when you talk about community perceptions, there’s no excuse not to talk to Native American communities.”

Seattle Sports Ownership, Ranked

M

BY SETH KOLLOEN

ariners majority owner Hiroshi Yamauchi died Sept. 19 at 85. He owned the Mariners for 21 years, but the subhead to his ownership was that he never watched a Mariners game in person. Still, when you consider the other owners in Seattle pro sports history, it’s clear that Yamauchi was among the best. Let’s rank them, worst to first. 13. Clay Bennett (Sonics, 2006–08) You know the story. Hate that guy! 12. Ken Behring (Seahawks, 1988–97) Behring wrecked the Seahawks, then tried to move them to Los Angeles. 11. Howard Schultz (Sonics, 2001–06) Schultz’ greatest sin was selling to Bennett. 10. Dewey Soriano (Pilots, 1969) Soriano and his brother Max put up the money to buy the expansion Pilots, but, facing financial ruin, secretly agreed to sell the team to Bud Selig. 9. George Argyros (Mariners, 1981–89) Argyros refused to supply the investment needed to build a good product. Then he sold the team to out-of-towners. 8. Jeff Smulyan (Mariners, 1989–92) The M’s set attendance records during Smulyan’s ownership. But he heard the siren call of south Florida, and began negotiating to move the team there. 7. Danny Kaye/Lester Smith group (Mariners, 1976–81) Their heart was in the right place, but

the M’s first owners lacked the resources and know-how to build a successful MLB team. 6. Barry Ackerley (Sonics, 1983–2001) The Sonics made the playoffs in 13 of Ackerley’s 18 years as owner. Then again, he torpedoed Seattle’s best chance of getting an NHL team, and threatened to leave Seattle. 5. Nordstrom family (Seahawks, 1974–88)

The Nordstroms hired well, ran a first-class organization, and had a winning team by year three. Then they sold the team to Behring after he agreed he wouldn’t try to move the team. Oops! 4. Hiroshi Yamauchi (Mariners, 1992–2013)

When no Seattle investor had the money to buy the Mariners, Yamauchi stepped in as a thankyou to the region. But left to flounder without consequences, Yamauchi’s designated managers have wasted a decade’s worth of his dollars. 3. Paul Allen (Seahawks, 1997–present) The Hawks have been mostly mediocre during Allen’s tenure, but he made the right move when he cleaned house and handed the keys to Pete Carroll. 2. Sam Schulman (Sonics, 1967–83) Seattle never asked for the NBA—Sam Schulman brought it to us, and gave Seattle its only major pro sports championship. 1. Joe Roth (Sounders, 2007–present) Just in the team’s first season: a playoff appearance, a U.S. Open Cup, and a new MLS single-season attendance record—a record they’ve broken every year since. The Sounders’ ownership is the envy of every American soccer fan. E

sportsball@seattleweekly.com

CHALLENGE YOUR PERSPECTIVE.

We all know that people look different. While these differences are socially and culturally real, contemporary scientific understanding of race and human variation is complex and may challenge how we think about it. RACE: Are We So Different? builds understanding of what race is and what it is not. It provides the tools to recognize racial ideas and practices in contemporary life in the U.S. I n conj uncti on wi th thi s e x hi bi t, the S e a ttl e Ra c e a nd S oc i a l Jus ti c e I ni ti ati ve i s offeri ng fre e work s hops for groups to e x pa nd the i r unde rstandi ng of raci al e qui ty i n the c ommuni ty. L e a r n more a t s e a ttl e .gov /rs j i

RACE is a Project of American Anthropological Association. Funded by Ford Foundation & National Science Foundation.

Local Exhibition Sponsor:

Pacific Science Center is committed to providing accessibility for all guests. For detailed information about our facility and services, please visit pacificsciencecenter.org.

pacificsciencecenter.org

Africa Mama ethnic art & gifts gallery

SALE!!

STORE CLOSING Everything Must Go!

75-90

%

off

Great Holiday Gifts!

Authentic Collector Masks • Ancestral Statues • Art • Jewelry Fabrics • Beads • Batik • Drums • Incense • World Beat Music Scarves • Clothing • Hand Woven Baskets Store Fixtures For Sale

Bring in ad for a FREE ceremonial mask with $100 purchase! 129 Broadway E. • Seattle • 206-856-2310 (between E. Olive & Denny, Next to Dick’s)

Hours: Mon - Sat 10-9 • Sun 12-7

A portion of our proceeds will be going to our Urgent Africa Charity

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

Native American people. If you’re doing random calling, you’re less likely [to speak with a Native American], but at the end of the day, when you talk about community perceptions, there’s no excuse not to talk to Native American communities.” Had this community been surveyed, Stearns says, perception of police discrimination likely would have been more severe than that found among other minorities. For example, the survey found that 36 percent of African Americans and 41 percent of Latinos knew someone who had “experienced racially different treatment.” “I’m almost positive that if they interviewed Native Americans, that number would have been higher,” Stearns claims. He emphasizes that by turning attention to minority perceptions of policing, Native Americans stand to benefit: “We’re only going to get help if we help others. We’re only going to do better when our brothers and sisters do better.” That said, he says Williams’ shooting underscores the unique problems faced by Native Americans. For example, many Native Americans are carvers who carry their tools. Understanding that could have perhaps prevented the tragedy. “It comes down to cultural competency. That’s important,” he says. Asked about Native Americans and the survey, the Police Assessment Resource Center, which commissioned the study, said in a statement that while the statistics did not allow the study to draw conclusions about Native American perceptions about police, the fact that 48 percent of all respondents said they didn’t feel Native Americans were treated fairly by police warrants further review. “These results will intensify our focus on the Native American population in our future research and analysis,” police monitor Merrick Bobb said. DANIEL PERSON E

SEP 28 TH 2013 THROUGH JAN 5 TH 2014

7


8

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013


As vegetarian cuisine goes mainstream, Seattle provides fertile ground for a new “vegetable revolution.”

By G wendoly n Elliott

M

CMY

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

y boyfriend and I are sitting an arm’s reach from table 1, the legendary banquette where renowned restaurateur Peter Canlis used to conduct business during dinner service.The rotary phone he used while running his eponymous restaurant hasn’t moved from the neighboring ledge—it still works, too. In this house, so attuned to the rhythms of tradition and history, I’m about to be served from a chef ’s tasting menu that costs $105 per person. That price tag might normally be reserved for a meal of caviar, lobster, and Wagyu beef, but the plates I’ll soon be devouring are fruit, vegetable, and legume-based. After a small amuse-bouche, a simple corn purée starts the meal, a rich, bisque-style soup dotted with an espelettepepper oil for a good touch of heat. A beet course comes next, with goat curd and raspberries. A clean carrot and pickled-radish salad follows; then pastry-wrapped asparagus, chanterelles, and caramelized onion; then a broccoli, white Cheddar, and ramps raviolo. After that, an embarrassing abundance of desserts: a strawberry granita-style palate cleanser; an apple tarte tatin with green apple sorbet and hazelnut; our choice of housemade macarons; and a take-home raspberrychamomile chocolate bar. The meal, with an accompanying wine flight, tax, and tip, was the most expensive I’ve ever paid for. While cost is by no means the measure of a great dinner, the elevation of plant-based cuisine into the fine-dining stratosphere is a measure of something else: The once-humble vegetarian diet, long relegated to the ranks of granola-eating hippies and bearded » CONTINUED ON PAGE 10 professors, has hit the big time.

K

9

P H O1 T6/18/13 O G R12:40 A PPMH Y B Y

BOD_WKLY_Whiskey_6-18-13.pdf

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

JOSHUA HUSTON


Salad Days

» FROM PAGE 9

Yet beyond Canlis’ nearly untouchable brand of service, in Seattle there has existed—and continues to thrive—rich, fertile ground for vegetable-based options for every kind of eater, from gluten-free and vegan to the curious omnivore. There’s Plum or St. Dames for comfort food, Sutra for more high-minded fare. Raw restaurants like Thrive, Pure, and Chaco Canyon; Silence-Heart-Nest for ’70s homestyle. Organic cuisine reigns at Tilth; it’s seasonal and rustic at Cafe Flora. There’s upscale Indian at Poppy, all-vegetarian at Pabla or Traveler’s. Great bar food at Georgetown Liquor Company and the Neighbor Lady. Jhanjay or Wedgewood for Thai, Blossom for Vietnamese—the list goes on and on, and continues to grow. Veggie Grill—the SoCal-based vegan fast-food chain and possible inspiration for the SNL “Veganville” sketch featuring Justin Timberlake—opened its third Seattle location this month. Vegan maven Makini Howell’s Plum brand continues to expand (the chef has prepared dinner for the likes of Mayor Mike McGinn, Ben Affleck, and India.Arie, and just started a food truck). Urban boutique-tour company Metropologie recently launched a vegetarian and vegan culinary tour of the city. Even Seattle native son Mario Batali is a proud champion of Meatless Mondays, citing in his syndicated column that meat is an “overused” ingredient. All that—in addition to the fact that Canlis, the pinnacle of fine dining in Seattle, recently began offering its seven-course vegan tasting menu alongside its standing vegetarian one—is a sign that Seattle is in the front lines of what Bon Appétit has called the “vegetable revolution.”

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

Above: butternut squash with lemon, capers, and brown-butter sabayon.

10

Executive chef Jason Franey introduced the vegan tasting menu at Canlis.

At Plum, Makini Howell’s plant-based menu boasts celebrity fans like Ben and Casey Affleck, India.Arie, and Tobey Maguire.

“Just in the last five years, things have changed so much with talent, the food, and chefs. And we were definitely on the ‘local’ train way before every other city.”

T

he Emerald City, unlike other foodobsessed towns like New York City and Chicago, is perhaps better-positioned for a plant-based movement to take root and flourish—much like the sprawling mint in many a pea patch—for a number of reasons: We claim a near-year-round growing season that’s offset in winter months by wonderfully fresh produce from nearby California and British Columbia. In addition to this abundant regional pantry, our famously polite urban culture would balk at bringing an unsolicited opinion about the latest restaurant concept to the table—perish the thought. In other words, here there is no stigma to being a health-conscious, earth-friendly eater—or restaurateur. The case for a plant-based diet, however, is historically a prickly one. Famous chefs are notoriously hard on the idea. Gordon Ramsey is reported as saying he’d electrocute his child if one ever said, “Dad, I’m a vegetarian,” and Anthony Bourdain wrote in his book Kitchen Confidential that “Vegetarians . . . are the enemy of everything good and decent in the human spirit.” There are stereotypes attached to the diet (see: “self-righteous hippie”); and vegetarians and vegans, in Bourdain’s view, make “bad dinner guests.” But here in Seattle, you’re more likely to be shunned for not offering your guests vegetarian dishes—damn good ones at that. With Maria Hines (of Golden Beetle, Agrodulce, and Tilth, where vegan and vegetarian tasting menus are also offered) leading the organic charge and Howell dominating the vegan scene, it’s arguable, too, that we made eating green not just palatable but downright “sexy.” Canlis executive chef Jason Franey thinks so. Speaking over the phone, he offers his impressions of Seattle’s vegetarian scene, and tells me “It’s great, the technique is top notch here. Matt Dillon does great things with vegetables, and so does Ethan Stowell. Just in the last five years, things have changed so much with talent, the food, and chefs. And we were definitely on the ‘local’ train way before every other city.”

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 13


carrie hopperstad yoga instructor Balance Yoga Studio

lululemon athletica alderwood - now open

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

strike a pose, we’re here

11


$ TOP CASH $ paid for unwanted cars & trucks $100 to $1000 7 Days • 24 Hours Licensed + Insured

Fall Edition

Win TickeTs To seaTTle’s Top Fall shoWs!

Seattle News and Events | Free Stuff

http://www.seattleweekly.com/promo/freestuff/

http://kaywa.me/jLKj7

Download the Kaywa QR Code Reader (App Store &Android Market) and scan your code!

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

ALL STAR TOWING

206-204-5289

Tours available in Seattle, Woodinville, Eastside, North of Seattle and South of Seattle.

pugetsoundbrewerytours.com

206.384.3637

With leasing specials, two ginormous topy decks a beautiful Urbanroof Luxur at the and New 999 Hiawatha One year Internet and Cable want TV included. courtyard, who wouldn’t to Reserved Parking available. indulge inGarage this Urban Luxury nestled Reasonably Priced! on the edge of Downtown and First 20 new and different floor plans. Hill medical campuses. Large selection of Floor Plans, One for everyone! Enjoy the Skyline Deck, Rainier Deck, Walk In closets, Balconies, ThisCourtyard, new treasure is everything Serene park or bike trail.

Views of Downtown or Mt Rainier.

scan heRe To enTeR:

12

You may qualify for a research study of an investigational cream. All study related medication and treatment will be provided at no cost. You do not need health insurance to participate. If eligible, you will be compensated for time and travel.

you’ve wanted.

Now Pre-Leasing forfor November Currently Pre-Leasing November 2013! 2013! Professionally managed by Realty Inc. Inc. Professionally Managed bySeavest Seavest Realty

For more info contact •206-709-0999 •Info@999Hiawatha.com

For more info contact • 206-709-0999 • Info@999Hiawatha.com


Salad Days » FROM PAGE 10

Franey, a 2012 finalist for the James Beard Best Chef: Northwest award, recently attended a “food salon” hosted by Hines. There, local chefs discussed various issues in the culinary world, including dining trends and food advocacy. He says there were “tons of conversations about how to support local farms and incorporate hormonefree ingredients, and a lot of talk about where food is going . . . and the food in the school system. Some kids don’t even know what squash is,”

sustainable, plant-based business . . . Long before ‘locavorism’ was a concept, [my mother, Niombi] taught us how to farm in a backyard pea patch, and my folks created sauces and seasoning mixes that would be the foundation for a new way of experiencing the plant world.” Howell recently returned from a cookbook tour. Nine of its 16 stops sold out. “I honestly didn’t know what to expect, but I was really happy with the turnout,” says Howell, who discussed the book and cheffed at the events. In L.A. she did a Plum “pop-up” at a restaurant called No Vacancy in Hollywood, with Casey Affleck and NBA player John Salley among her guests.

TRUNK SHOW SEPTEMBER 27TH-28TH Friday & Saturday 10am-6pm

Kathryn Neumann reflects on Carmelita’s 17-year vegetarian reign and igniting interest in vegetable-based cooking in Seattle: “I’m proud of what we’ve accomplished.”

1341 5th Ave Seattle foxsgemshop.com 206.623.2528 800.733.2528 Here in Seattle, Howell enjoys being the face of the “new vegan normal,” and says Wayward Vegan Cafe and Chaco Canyon are among her favorite spots to visit. “Seattle is a great place to be vegan,” she says.

A

corned-beef sandwich would be sensational, or one of those big, fat frankfurters, you know, with the mustard,” Woody Allen said in a recent interview in Esquire. “But I don’t eat any of that stuff. I haven’t had a frankfurter in, I would say, 45 years.” It was an off-the-cuff statement in a casual interview that didn’t cause much fuss. In Hollywood, Woody Allen is just another vegetarian. California is where, it’s rumored, the veggie burger was invented (by a surfer, no less). Vegan restaurants there are “the new normal,” reported a 2012 New York Times story. And among the celebrity set, countless high-profile personalities like Ellen DeGeneres, Alec Baldwin, and Natalie Portman are famously vocal about their plant-based diets. Anika Lehde, who runs the Seattle-based blog Vegan Score, says that’s part of the reason why interest in a plant-based diet is picking up. “President Clinton, Ellen, Joaquin Phoenix— everybody is vegan nowadays,” she says over coffee at a downtown cafe. “Celebrity advocacy, the Internet, and social media,” she says, are causing the lifestyle to gain traction. Because of the abundance of great vegan and vegetarian fare here in Seattle, she says, more omnivorous eaters are willing to take risks and sample the cuisine. And the whole pork-belly and bacon craze is arguably quick on the downturn: Diners are craving fresher, lighter foods that don’t having them reaching for the Pepto—or a pillow and a nap.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

he says. “We started to discuss how to get more fresh, healthy, chef-driven foods into schools.” (A similar initiative is already in place in all L.A. public schools, where cafeterias now go meatless on Mondays. The rule is not enforced with brown-baggers, however.) A trend Franey says he has observed at Canlis is a rise in demand for vegan fare. “We were getting more and more requests for vegan tasting menus,” he says. “We have at least four things on the menu that are always vegetarian, but there are so many more allergies and dietary restrictions these days.” “I think veganism is a lot more popular now,” he says. “There’s so many books about all these diets, there’s more education about food nowadays.” Franey says he approaches vegetable-based cooking as a unique challenge. “There’s a wide variety of things you can do. The sky’s the limit. I love being creative with vegetables.” On one recent night, the chef estimates, six to eight of the 32 tasting menus he prepared were vegetarian. Across town at Plum, the dining is less formal, but it’s 100 percent vegan. According to owner Makini Howell, the bustling bistro has 50 seats and serves on average 100–120 guests a night. When she opened the vegan restaurant in 2009, she says people advised her to “have fish or cheese on the menu,” but she decided against it. “You really have to stick with your passion,” says Howell, who was raised vegan. “I was lucky enough to grow up completely vegan and organic with two entrepreneurial, truly progressive parents,” she writes in her new cookbook Plum: Gratifying Vegan Dishes from Seattle’s Plum Bistro. “My folks fed us a completely plantbased diet that gave me the blueprint for Plum, for this book, and for the expansion of our green

13


Salad Days » FROM PAGE 13

N O VEMBE R 8

AND

9

J O I N U S T O C E L E B R AT E

“I mean, you have to wait an hour, on a Wednesday, for a table at Plum,” she says. “What’s up with that?” Lehde, a co-founder of global-marketing consulting firm Projectline, was at first a reluctant vegetarian. “You wouldn’t believe it now,” she says, “but I was one of those people that knocked the lifestyle.” The reason she went veg, she explains, had a lot to do with the Pacific Northwest’s DIY punk and hardcore scene. “I would go to shows and there would be leaflets, animal-rights literature, and vegan potlucks,” she says. For Lehde, the information was hard to ignore, and she’s been meat-free for more than 20 years.

W IN E , F O O D & T R A D I T I O N F E AT U R I NG S PEC I AL GUES TS — C HE F L O I S EL L EN F R ANK, PH . D. & C HE F KR I S TEN KI S H

AN ELEGANT & INDULGENT WEEKEND — WITH OVER 120 WINERIES, AWARD-WINNING GUEST CHEFS, & WINE SEMINARS

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

14

O

f note, then, is the closing of Carmelita, one of Seattle’s longeststanding and most beloved vegetarian restaurants, which will shutter this weekend after nearly 17 years. When Carmelita coowner Kathryn Neumann posted the news on the Anika Lehde: restaurant’s Facebook page A activist for back in June, she told Seattle animals and Weekly, “Some of my regugood food. lars told me they cried when they read it” (“Don’t Cry for Me, Carmelita,” June 26). “It’s just time. We’re a small restaurant, and we don’t have investors like a lot of restaurants these days,” Neumann says. “The reality of it is that the margins are slim in a restaurant to begin with . . . it’s hard to stay in it for that long a period.” Yet perhaps this too is a sign that plant-based cuisine has infiltrated the mainstream: Vegetarians in Seattle no longer need a place to go, because they can go anywhere. “I don’t think it [interest in vegetarian cuisine] has waned at all,” Neumann says. More and more people are eating vegetarian and incorporating meatless meals when they dine out. There are so many places that have opened up, and really nice options for people who are vegan and vegetarian. It’s easier to be vegetarian or vegan in Seattle now more than ever before.” Nat Stratton-Clarke, owner of Cafe Flora, agrees. He points to the quality of vegetarian food available at many omnivorous restaurants. “Poppy is one of my favorites—they have great vegetarian food and great vegan food,” he says. “La Medusa does a great job—their food is so fresh and seasonal. There’s great Korean food at Kimchi Bistro, amazing vegetarian pho. Seattle is a great place for vegetarians and vegans—there’s so many options.” Though he says his 21-year-old restaurant would “never incorporate meat on our menu, adapting with the times and responding to the needs of your guests, whether it’s to add more gluten-free or vegan options” is the best way to stay current on the dining landscape. Which is no problem for Flora, he adds, as trends are moving in that direction anyway. “So much food is vegetarian already,” Stratton says, “and we celebrate that here.” I probe Michael Natkin, a 12-year Adobe software engineer turned food blogger, for his observations. Natkin runs the vegetarian blog Herbivoracious and joins the chorus: It’s easy to enjoy a plant-based diet in Seattle. “Things have changed from when you’d go into a place and COURTESY VEGAN.SCORE

COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS,

2,000 Facebook likes and 7,000 Twitter followers. “Every now and then I’ll post something about animal rights or activism and think, ‘OK, this is it. This is the time when I’m going to get the hate mail. This is the time they’ll think I’m too pushy, too vegan-centric.’ ” In the time since she started her site, says Lehde, “I’ve never received one negative comment.” She admits that Seattle is a great town for vegetarians, and makes the lifestyle easy and attractive. “Even the food trucks here have at least one option for vegans. You could take all the vegetarian restaurants out of Seattle, and you still won’t have a hard time finding a great meal anywhere.”

She points to institutionalized animal-rights abuses, and information about carbon emissions from livestock production that exceed those of the transportation industry—a widely reported statistic, corroborated by the UN’s Food and Agricultural Organization. Its most recent study reports, “Greenhouse-gas emissions from agriculture, including crop and livestock production . . . are responsible for a significant fraction of human-induced emission—up to 30 percent globally.” As a Time article puts it, “a 16 oz. T-bone is like a Hummer on a plate.”

“There’s research that says the number of searches for the word ‘vegan’ online has grown exponentially over the years. Something is happening; it’s the start of something mainstream.” “With all this access to information,” Lehde says, “the evidence is overwhelming. There’s research that says the number of searches for the word ‘vegan’ online has grown exponentially over the years. Something is happening; it’s the start of something mainstream.” In Lehde’s personal experience, that something is evident when she considers the feedback from her followers. Through its social-media presence, veganscore.com, which began as a Twitter account in 2008, has gained more than

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 16


It was at that moment, Dan realized health insurance wasn’t just for pregnant ladies.

wahealthplanfinder.org

1-855-WA-FINDER

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

Don’t leave it to Chance.

Get new free or low-cost health insurance.

15


Salad Days » FROM PAGE 14

the chefs would have to figure something out at the last minute,” he says. “Now almost every restaurant has at least one vegetarian entrée. People are trying harder with these items on their menu, and it’s not just an afterthought.”

UPCOMING EVENTS! UPCOMING EVENTS! UPCOMING EVENTS! 10/26 SATURDAY SATURDAY 10/26 SATURDAY 10/26

TOKER'S BOWL & TOKER’S TOKER'S BOWL &BOWL &

MASQUERADE GALA MASQUERADE GALA MASQUERADE GALA Pumpkin carving contest, dinner,

Pumpkincontest, carvingdinner, contest, dinner, full bar & our Pumpkin carving full bar & our famous chocolate chocolate fountain. Free to Members. full bar &famous our famous chocolate fountain. Free to Members. fountain. Free to Members. THE LUXE THE LUXE THE LUXE 5220 ROOSEVELT WAYNE. NE.   5220 ROOSEVELT WAY 5220 ROOSEVELT WAY NE.  

FREE HEMP FREE HEMP FREE HEMP ROLLING PAPERS! ROLLING PAPERS! ROLLING PAPERS! 1 PER CUSTOMER THRU 9/30/13 SUPPLIESLAST LAST 1 PER CUSTOMER THRU 9/30/13 WHILEWHILE SUPPLIES 1 PER CUSTOMER THRU 9/30/13 WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

SHOP OUR RETAIL STORE & SUPPORT THE CAUSE! SHOP OUR RETAIL &THE SUPPORT SHOP OUR RETAIL STORE STORE & SUPPORT CAUSE! THE CAUSE! Pacific NW Hand-Blown Glass, Books, Accessories & More Pacifi c NW Glass, Books, Accessories Pacific NW Hand-Blown Hand-Blown Glass, Books, Accessories & More & More Open Wed - Sat, 1pm-7pm Open Wed Sat, 1pm-7pm Open Wed - Sat, 1pm-7pm 12351 Lake City Way Seattle, WA 98125 12351 Seattle,HEMPFEST.ORG WA 98125 98125 12351Lake LakeCity CityWay Way Seattle, WA 206.364.HEMP 206.364.HEMPHEMPFEST.ORG HEMPFEST.ORG 206.364.HEMP Hempfest can be 365 days - become a member! Memberships start at $15. Monthly VIP events * Tokers Bowl & Masquerade Gala - 10/26/13 Hempfest can be 365 days - become a member! at $15.* Annual 420 Fest - 4/20/14 Hempfest can be 365 days • become aMemberships member!start Memberships start at $15. Monthly VIP events * Tokers Bowl & Masquerade Gala - 10/26/13 * Annual 420 Fest - 4/20/14 Store closed 8/12-8/21 for Hempfest

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

Store closed 8/12-8/21 for Hempfest

16

Monthly VIP events • Tokers Bowl and Masquerade Gala - 10/26/13 • Annual 420 Fest - 4/20/14

Natkin is not worried about Carmelita’s closing, either. “I like eating at vegetarian restaurants,” he says, “but I tend to visit omnivorous restaurants more often. I’m more excited about quality vegetarian options than just having vegetarian things available. Places like Spinasse, Poppy, and Lark do vegetarian really well.” A longtime vegetarian, Natkin stopped eating meat at age 17. “As a kid, I couldn’t bait a fish hook,” he says. “Vegetarianism stuck immediately.” An interest in cooking inspired Natkin to start his blog, which he says allows him to “interact with chefs around the world, and improve my writing and recipes.” His site is so successful, it sparked an eponymous cookbook—shortlisted for a James Beard Award—and allowed Natkin access to stage (industry-speak for “intern”) at Cafe Flora and New York’s famous vegetarian restaurant Dirt Candy. Natkin also staged at Canlis, where he says “there was more than enough work to be done with vegetarian ingredients.” “Jason Franey makes amazing food; he and the whole Canlis team just take the food so seriously. In the past as a vegetarian, if you went to a fine-dining restaurant, you’d still spend $100 on dinner, but everyone else would get these beautifully presented dishes and you’d just get a bunch of sides. That doesn’t happen there.”

O

ver green tea, David Lee, a lean, trim man in his early ’50s with a tidy mop of salt-and-pepper hair, expresses his spiritual views on a vegetable-based diet. We’re sitting in his office, a converted Safeway dairy, at Field Roast, the vegetarian grainmeat company he started in 1997. “There is a lot of attachment to eating meat, lots of mental traps,” Lee says. “The cultural imperative is compelling. But I believe if you don’t need it to live, then you shouldn’t eat it. Life is a deep and holy thing.” Lee, like Natkin, always loved to cook and became a vegetarian at age 17. “I messed around and cooked in restaurants,” Lee says. “But I always wanted to do something [more] positive.” He went on to found a for-profit business called Common Meals, a service that connected Seattle’s homeless with nutritious food. He eventually transformed the company into the nonprofit now known as FareStart. From there, Lee started Field Roast, wishing to combine an entrepreneurial vision with his vegetarian ethics. Housed in a 14,000-squarefoot facility on South Jackson Street, it boasts a staff of 65 employees that Lee says is “growing steadily.” Maintaining a seven-day-a-week

production schedule, Field Roast will relocate to a new 40,000-square-foot facility in SoDo later this year. “We’ve gone from being a brand you’d find in natural-food stores to a brand you’ll now find in conventional ones,” Lee says, noting that his products—everything from grain-andspice-based loaves and sausage-style links to deli slices—can be found on popular retail shelves at QFC, Costco, and Safeway. Lee’s ballpark-style frankfurters are even available at stadiums like Safeco Field, Progressive Field in Cleveland, and AT&T Park in San Francisco. Lee developed all Field Roast’s proprietary recipes himself, from his restaurant background. “People are surprised when they find out they don’t contain animals,” he says. “But they taste good because they rely on the simple principle of good cooking: flavor first.”

F

lavor aside, some say a plant-based diet does not support proper nutrition. But that too is being researched, rethought, and contested, especially in a city like Seattle that prides itself on a healthy lifestyle. Plus, vegetarian diets have gained more traction in an era where food allergies and food intolerances are increasingly being diagnosed and publicized. Local business owner Terri Blair is not vegetarian, but abstains from gluten and dairy, and recently started Mademoiselle Mousse, a vegan dessert company. With a background as a registered dietician, she says, “it’s really hard to get enough protein from a vegetarian diet.” Vegetarian or not, one of her biggest clients is West Seattle’s Chaco Canyon, the second out-

“Things have changed from when you’d go into a place and the chefs would have to figure something out at the last minute. Now almost every restaurant has at least one vegetarian entrée.” post of the U District’s vegan cafe. “I’m a foodie, and I love chocolate,” Blair says. “But when I was around 40 I started to have some health issues. At the time, I was eating a lot of gluten, dairy, and eggs.” When she started to remove those ingredients from her diet, she says, “I lost 15 pounds of water weight. I had so much more energy. My adult acne cleared up.” It was then that Blair recognized a need for a healthy alternative to traditionally indulgent, dairy-based desserts, and launched Mademoiselle Mousse. “It’s important for non-vegetarians and vegans alike to have access to these kinds of foods, because so many people are learning, like I did, that we have sensitive bodies.” Health is certainly a good reason to consider eating more plant-based foods, but it’s not the only one. For Washington Post food editor, onetime “certified Kansas City barbecue judge,” and recent vegetarian convert Joe Yonan, it was something more transformative.


BREW AT THE ZOO

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3 5:30 - 8:30 P.M.

Join Woodland Park Zoo for the third annual Brew at the Zoo beer-tasting event. Sample imports, domestics, microbrews and even ciders from over 30 different breweries.

Demand and supply: Vegetarian and vegan cookbooks dominate the food literature market.

years.” He cites Eric Schlosser’s Fast Food Nation, Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma, and John Robbins’ Diet for a New America. Bittman himself, though not vegetarian, has long advocated for change to the American diet. In his weekly column, he broaches the issues surrounding big agriculture, food subsidies, and sustainable farming, and offers compelling reasons for readers to cut out processed foods and incorporate more fresh fruit and vegetables into their daily habits. That’s a message well-received by Seattleites, many of whom have been at the forefront of the sustainable-farming movement and are tireless advocates for small, local farms. Bittman’s recent book, VB6: Eat Vegan Before 6:00 to Lose Weight and Restore Your Health . . . for Good, is his approach to make the lifestyle accessible to many. “If you advocate for a strictly vegan diet, so many people are going to tune you out,” Bittman says. “I want to say something that will be beneficial for most people, and cutting out a lot of meat from your diet is something anyone can do.” The willingness to envision a culinary landscape where vegetables play the dominant role is the new vegetable revolution’s most distinguishing feature. This is not to say everyone and everything is going vegetarian, but that writers, business owners, and even traditionally meatworshipping chefs are more open to the idea. In a recent piece titled “Veganism: For a Day, Why Not?”, Bittman writes, “It’s increasingly evident that a part-time vegan diet—one that emphasizes minimally processed plant food at the expense of everything else—is the direction that will do the most to benefit human health, increase animal welfare, and reduce environmental impact. The challenge,” he writes, “is how to make such a diet the standard.” According to Bon Appétit ’s Andrew Knowlton, that may already be happening. “The true measure of a chef these days?” he wrote. “It might be his or her way with salads.” If that's the case, Seattle is a good place for any eater to call home. E

gelliott@seattleweekly.com

(exclusive tastings, buffet dinner, souvenir tasting glass and more)

Purchase tickets at www.zoo.org/brew Tickets will not be available to purchase the day of event. Adults 21 and over only. ID required.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

“I didn’t have a heart attack; my doctor didn’t tell me I needed to give up meat; there was no crisis per se,” he writes in his new vegetarian cookbook, Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook. But he does explain that “the older I get, the more difficult it has become for me to manage my weight. And the older I get, the harder it is for my body to handle overly indulgent, multicourse tasting-menu meals of pork belly, foie gras, sweetbreads, and lamb cheeks.” After spending a year on his sister’s farmto-table Maine homestead, Yonan officially announced to readers earlier this year, via a blog post, that he was vegetarian. He wrote, “The process has been organic . . . because of the environmental impact and the horrid treatment of industrial livestock, I long ago started buying only humanely raised meat from small, local farms and tried to make it less of a focus on my plates . . . But less started to become much less.” Over the phone, in a warm Southern accent, Yonan tells me that “a small number of people questioned my credentials for being food editor.” Most, he says, “were very supportive. I’ve been dropping hints for a while now.” “I don’t want to be a poster boy for anything. I’m just doing what feels right to me,” he says, but notes that a portion of his readers are “opting out of meat” along with him. “A lot of people can identity with the impulse to eat less meat, and a lot of people appreciate bringing more vegetarian recipes into the section,“ he says. “More and more people are interested in trying to eat more vegetables and realizing how great they are.” What does it mean, then, when writers like Yonan are moved to adopt a plant-based lifestyle? Mark Bittman, op-ed columnist for The New York Times and food writer for The New York Times Magazine, says, “People are starting to pay more attention. There are a lot of people hammering away at this message, that the way that we raise animals in this country is harmful to animals and to the environment. There are many journalists who’ve been talking about this for

TICKETS $25 for general admission W $65 for VIP presented by Hard Rock Café NE

17


FRESH FRESH

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

oyStERS, clamS & muSSElS We Ship We Ship WeSeafood Ship Seafood Overnight Seafood Overnight Overnight Anywhere in theAnywhere USAin the Anywhere USA in the USA or We Pack for or We Pack for or We Pack forAirAir Travel Air Travel Travel

Real Mex!

D I NI NG

DINING NEWSLETTER

Margarita Monday

The inside scoop on openings, hotspots and offers.

All signature margaritas $5 all night including our famous Avocado Margarita! Every Saturday & Sunday 4pm-6pm & 10pm-12am

Seattle’S BeSt late night Kitchen Food till 12am and 1am on Fri. & Sat.

555 Aloha St. Seattle, WA

206.218.1040

www.laredosgrill.com

1317 NE 47th, Seattle

(206) 632-3700 or (206)632-3900 1317(206) NE 47th, or Seattle 632-3700 (206)632-3900

(206) 632-3700 or (206)632-3900

PHO ANHHOUR FILM VIET HAPPY

Seattle’S BeSt tex Mex Brunch

happy hour daily

University University University Seafood Seafood &MUSIC Poultry& PoultryE VE N T S W E E KLY Seafood & Poultry 1317 NE 47th, Seattle

VIETNAMESE NOODLE SOUP & GRILL

VOLTERRA BALLARD 5411 BALLARD AVE NW SEATTLE, WA 98107 206 7895100

VOLTERRA KIRKLAND 121 KIRKLAND AVE KIRKLAND, WA 98033 425 2027201 Mo

Friday - Saturday 5-12am, Sunday HOUR 5-9pm FEATURING HAPPY Brunch Sat - Sun 9am-2pm

DAILY, NOON  6PM KIRKLAND MON  FRI 4:30  6:30PM BALLARD Featuring Happy Hour Monday - Friday 4:30-6:30pm

WWW.VOLTERRARESTAURANT.COM

AR T S AN D E N

www.phovietanh.com

Sun-Thurs 11am-9pm, Fri & Sat 11am-10pm

Try our Bánh Mì sandwiches! It is an explosion of flavors combining just enough meat, pickled carrots, fresh and cold cucumbers, cilantro, hot jalapeño peppers and those irresistible spreads of homemade pate and mayo.

6510 Roosevelt Way NE Seattle, WA 98115 • 206-466-2179

BEERS SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

ON DRAFT

18

KEGS TO GO

beers on draft

Breakfast

All Day

download our app

COCKTAILS! BURRITOS! BURRITOS! TACOS! Happy Hour DaysAaWEEK Week HAPPY HOUR 77 DAYS 4-6pm & 10pm - Midnight

4-6pm & 10pm - Midnight Food SPECIALS Specials $1 offFOOD Wells & Drafts $1 OFF WELLS & DRAFTS

WEEKEND MEXICAN BRUNCH WEEKEND&MEXICAN BRUNCH SATURDAY SUNDAY 11AM - 3PM SATURDAY & SUNDAY 11AM BOTH LOCATIONS! - 3PM BOTH LOCATIONS!

KITCHEN OPEN TIL MIDNIGHT KITCHEN OPEN TIL MIDNIGHT FRIDAY & SATURDAY

(206) 267-BIER (2437) 400 N. 35th St. Seattle, WA 98103 www.brouwerscafe.com

(206) 633-BIER 267-BIER (2437) 1710 N. 45th St. #3 Seattle, WA 98103 www.bottleworks.com

(206) 420-8943 2253 N 56th St. Seattle, WA 98103 www.burgundianbar.com

FRIDAY & SATURDAY

Phinney Ridge RIDGE 6711PHINNEY Greenwood Ave N 6711206.706.4889 Greenwood Ave N

206.706.4889 Alki Beach ALKI BEACH 2620 Alki Ave SW 206.933.7344 2620 Alki Ave SW www.facebook.com/bar.chupacabra 206.933.7344 www.elchupacabraseattle.com


food&drink

A Full Plate

FoodNews

In the same month Carrie Mashaney makes her national television debut, the chef will help open a new downtown spot for Spanish cuisine. Now that’s a challenge.

BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

I

BY SARA BILLUPS

Jason [Stratton] was the one who wanted me to do the whole thing. He’s been egging me on for three years. He’s a huge Top Chef fan. Without him pushing me, I wouldn’t have done it.

Why didn’t he do it himself?

He’s actually tried out a couple of times, but hasn’t

What were you most worried about having to cook or do on the show?

I think my biggest worry is: How can you handle the unrealistic highpressure situations you’re put in? We don’t cook like that in our restaurants. I’d also be really out of my comfort zone if I had to wrestle my own alligator.

Mar muntanya chicken and squid at Aragona.

What kind of preparation did you do?

I just tried to stay calm in my head and not be too nervous. I did a lot of recipe memorizing. You try to go through different cooking scenarios. What can you cook in 15 minutes or over several days? What are the things that you can knock out of the park? And what are those things you can knock out of the park?

I have a pastry background, so I think I’ll do good there. And of course I cook Italian cuisine [Spinasse]. My husband is from Trinidad, so I know a little about that food. And since Seattle has a strong Asian culture, I feel pretty comfortable with that too.

All eyes are on Mashaney as she opens Aragona and battles it out on Top Chef Masters.

Who are you most nervous to cook for on the show?

Honestly, I’m most nervous cooking for my family, my sisters— they’ll tell the honest truth no matter what. It’s the personal connection: The people who I’m really close to make me most nervous.

Let’s talk about Aragona. First of all, are you worried that if you fail on the show, it’ll affect people’s opinion of you as a chef here?

Of course I feel some concern about failing on the show (I’m super-competitive), but I don’t think it defines who I am as a cook. The expectations for the show aren’t realistic.

Hello, sugar rush! Sweets from Theo Chocolate, a cakelet decoration station, and a cupcake-andcotton candy mashup will be served at Saturday’s release party for Jennifer Shea’s new recipe collection Trophy Cupcakes & Parties. The 21-and-over event kicks off at 8 p.m. at 1927 Events in downtown Seattle. Check trophybookparty.brownpapertickets. com for tickets. Two dozen restaurants are taking part in Feast at the Market on October 1. The self-guided taste tour at Pike Place Market runs from 5:30 to 10 p.m. and includes eats from Seatown and Marche. All proceeds benefit Neighborcare Health’s Pike Market Medical Clinic.

Aragona is taking on quite a bit of new territory—literally. Not only is it endeavoring to do authentic Spanish food, but it’s also opening downtown, not the coolest place for restaurants these days. What’s the thought behind the location?

This Sunday’s Sustainable Ballard Festival includes a “Taste of Ballard,” featuring craft beer, fresh-pressed cider, and bites from Streetzeria, Patty Pan, and more local vendors. The all-ages event will be held at Ballard Commons Park from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. E food@seattleweekly.com

More restaurants are popping up downtown now, and I sure hope we can contribute to a better restaurant scene there. In New York, I’m driving in a cab and I see a gross convenience store right next to Momofuko, and that’s totally acceptable. In Seattle, people aren’t as comfortable with that yet; it feels odd. But RN74 is kind of in a weird spot, in the midst of Target and all that stuff, and they’re doing really good. I think we can have our cake and eat it too in that regard. And in terms of cuisine, I think Aragona is a great addition to the [culinary] landscape.

Temperature Check »From Ericka BurkE chEF/ownEr,

We’re focusing on Catalonia, the old Kingdom of Aragon—the Mediterranean coastal area of the Iberian peninsula. And even reaching out to Italy and Greece. There’s a lot of seafood there, so we’ll be doing a lot of seafood here. But we’ll incorporate our ingredients in traditional dishes. Like paella: Our version might have geoduck in it.

Fried chicken. Don’t get me wrong— I love it. But I fear the trend will result in sub-par chicken joints.

Did your research for the restaurant take you to Spain?

I went with Jason in January; we did a crazy culinary tour. It’s a great experience for us to reference. So now we’re both on the same page . . . we can both remember “that” dish we had there. Tell us about some of those dishes.

The best meal was at Restaurant Sant Pau in Barcelona, right on the ocean, from chef Carme Ruscalleda. We took a really long train ride there. It was a 13-course lunch; we added a threecourse dessert . . . The highlight was a bowl of perfectly cooked peas and thinly sliced jamón. It's really hard to get perfectly cooked peas! E nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com

VoluntEEr Park caFE

Juicing. The juice craze is spreading fast. I think juice is hot for health and revitalization. I also like working with fresh extracted juices in my cooking. Juiced veggies/fruits/herbs make beautiful clean sauces that really pop.

What is Aragona doing with its food that is special?

CHEF CARRIE MASHANEY: JUSTIN STEPHENS/BRAVO

Seattle Weekly: What made you decide to try out for Top Chef ?

been picked. I don’t know why. He’d make for way better TV than me.

The “farm to table” thing is way too played! It’s my belief that as a restaurateur/chef that is our job. Duh! We have a responsibility to our guests, to the community, and to the environment to source and prepare locally. I don’t think it’s something we should boast about— just do it. E food@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

t’s doubtful that Carrie Mashaney will have much time to watch herself on Top Chef when the 11th season of the Bravo cooking show debuts October 2. While all eyes will be on her as she competes head-tohead with other talented chefs for the approval of celebrity chefs like David Chang and Emeril Lagasse, Mashaney will be trying to win over a more immediate audience: the diners at Aragona, a new downtown Spanish restaurant she’ll be opening mid-month with Jason Stratton, her former co-worker at Spinasse. Her appearance on the hit show, which was recorded in New Orleans this summer, will no doubt create plenty of buzz for the restaurant, though Mashaney swears that the timing wasn’t planned. It also amplifies the pressure. Aragona is one of Seattle’s most anticipated fall restaurant openings. In a recent poll by Eater calculating which of 10 upcoming restaurants diners were most excited about, Aragona came in second to Brimmer & Heeltap, the gastropub that will occupy the Ballard space that previously housed Le Gourmand. Is the anticipation so high because of the show, or because Aragona is serving Spanish fare, for which Seattle has few stand-out options? Coastal Spanish fare at that. Mashaney took a break from prepping for the opening to share some thoughts on the restaurant, alligator wrestling, and her emerging fame, though she is largely mum on Top Chef details by order of the show’s contract. “I had to lie to so many people about being on it,” she says. “When it came out that I was going to be on the show, they were like, ‘You’re such a liar, but we still love you!’ ”

19


food&drink»The Bar Code Four Local Celebs— and the Drinks I’d Love to Make Them

7 ANNIVERSARY! TH

HAPPY HOUR: ALL DAY, EVERY DAY

SEPTEMBER 1ST - 30TH

DRAFT $4, SAKE WINE, WELLS, IZAKAYA COCKTAILS $4, SMALL PLATES & SUSHI $2-10 2020 2ND AVE • SEATTLE, WA 98121 • (206) 441-5637

Explore menu at www.turnpikepizza.com

Open Daily 11am - 9pm 6900 E Greenlake Way N. 206.708.1860

Buy Any Large Pizza and Get Medium 2 Topping for $7 more!* OR Add a Pitcher of Beer (4 pints) for $8 more

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

*No Need to clip, just meNtioN this offer, Not valid with other coupoNs/discouNts.

20

2

BY ZACH GEBALLE

R

ecently I had the chance to make a drink for former vice president and Nobel Prize, Oscar, Emmy, and Grammy award-winner Al Gore at the Dahlia Lounge where I work, and I was surprisingly nervous. Fortunately, he ordered as straightforward a drink as I could want: a vodka martini. It got me thinking, though: Which local celebrities would I most want to see sit down at my bar, and what would I make for them?

MIKE MCGINN, Seattle mayor: Before he became mayor, McGinn was a regular in my Saturday-morning basketball game. Now that he’s got bigger things on his mind than passing me the ball, I’d be more than happy to see him sit down at my bar if he needs a reprieve from the campaign trail. We’ve even got a convenient bike rack right outside the restaurant if he wants to ride on down. The drink: As a dyed-in-the-wool Seattleite, Mayor McGinn seems like a man who’d appreciate a locally sourced cocktail. As such, I’m opting for a local spirit, and a cocktail that befits a politician: a gin martini made with Captive Spirits’ Big Gin. A Seattle favorite, Big Gin is flavorful and complex—and it also gets a bit cloudy once it’s stirred, just like McGinn’s political future. BRANDI CARLILE, musician: With a soulful voice and a heartfelt style, Carlile is one of my favorites in the realm of country and folk. Her Live at Benaroya Hall album is a classic, and she’s also an active philanthropist. Just getting a few moments to talk to her across the bar would be great. The drink: Given her long-standing association with country and folk music, whiskey seems

like the natural choice. I’ll go with the Old Pal, a blend of rye whiskey, Campari, and dry vermouth. It’s spicy and powerful, just like Carlile’s music. Plus, her voice is rich and timeless, and it makes you feel like you’re, well, old pals. GABE NEWELL, software tycoon: The man behind Valve Corporation, the company that’s almost single-handedly changed the way digital distribution works,thanks to their Steam platform. The maker of some of the most iconic computer games of all time and a constant innovator, it’d be an honor to have him sit at my bar. The drink: Since Newell and Valve have been incredibly tight-lipped about a potential third installment of their Half-Life series (my favorite video games of all time), I figure my only chance to get information is to get the founder and CEO drunk. Thus I’m pouring him as many Mind Erasers as I can . . . vodka, Kahlua, and soda water have been known to loosen many a tongue. DINA MARTINA, performer: Best known for her hilarious, raunchy, and utterly unpredictable live shows, Martina is also a bit of an underground sensation within the Seattle restaurant community. I think my co-workers might get more excited about her walking in than anyone else on this list. The drink: Let’s see here: cool, complex, and a bit fiery. Sounds like a Hot Charlotte to me, a blend of cucumber, gin, and Tabasco sauce. As always, if you have any thoughts, comments, criticism, or suggestions, send them to the address below or tweet at me directly @zgeballe. E

thebarcode@seattleweekly.com

Wood fired pizza with quality, fresh ingredients

YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY COME HELP US CELEBRATE!

MONDAY, OCT. 7TH DOORS OPEN AT 4:30PM

· WELCOME BUBBLES · COMPLIMENTARY SMALL BITES · NEW FALL MENU & COCKTAILS · MARCHÉ OYSTER CART IN ACTION

206-402-3784 | 4520 California Ave SW | Pizzeriacredo.com

Juicy BBQ and all the sweet and savory fixins! Brisket, Jerk Chicken, Baby Back Ribs, Hot Links, Mac & Cheese, Collard Greens, Willie’s Beans, Yams, Cornbread, Pies and Cakes Also featuring daily Soul Food specials: Catfish, Oxtail, Porkchops, Chitlins and more!

CHEF DAISLEY GORDON PRESENTS THE BOUNTY OF THE PACFIC NW IN THE SPIRIT OF FRANCE.

86 PINE STREET • 206.728.2800 • WWW.MARCHESEATTLE.COM

3427 Rainier Ave S. • Seattle WA 98144 •(206) 722-3229

www.williestasteofsoulseattle.com

NOW FEATURING HEAVEN SENT FRIED CHICKEN!


arts&culture

Stress, Speed, Scripture, and Schizophrenia Four quick takes from the Local Sightings Film Festival.

Local Sightings Film Festival has become a

The Life and Death of James Chasse (3 p.m.

bmiller@seattleweekly.com

NORTHWEST FILM FORUM 1515 12th Ave., 800-838-3006, localsightings. nwfilmforum.org. Tickets $6–$12, passes $12–$150. Runs Fri., Sept. 27–Thurs., Oct. 3.

St. (Seattle Center), 441-2424, pnb.org. $25. 6:30 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ

Tharp (with back to mirror) rehearsing at PNB.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 26

Peter Bagge

How did local cartoonist and writer Peter Bagge come to the subject of Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story (Drawn and Quarterly, $21.95)? Only because “she changed the course of human civilization,” he writes in the afterword. Yet he also notes how the once-controversial Sanger (1879–1966), after winning the fight for birth control, became a posthumous casualty of the abortion wars. Since she founded Planned Parenthood, Bagge notes, the pro-life camp has smeared her as a eugenicist and even racist (among her avid audiences for birth-control lectures were the poor, immigrants, blacks, and even once a ladies’-auxiliary arm of the KKK). Born into a large Irish Catholic family, Sanger was radicalized early. In her amazingly eventful life, she worked with Emma Goldman, took lovers including H.G. Wells, was arrested dozens of times, and was among the most famous women

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

Sun.), its 42-year-old schizophrenic subject is football-tackled to the pavement by a cop for peeing in public. A dozen ribs are broken, a lung is punctured, Chasse is hogtied and taken to the station, and he soon dies of respiratory arrest. The case is like Seattle’s scandalous 2010 police shooting of John T. Williams, made even more timely by the recent Sounders stabber, Donnell D. Jackson, evidently also a schizophrenic failed by the system. Chasse was at the other end of the mentalhealth spectrum—a shy, frail, fearful man living in assisted housing who loved coffee shops and the library. Friends and family tenderly recall an avid music fan during the punk-rock ’80s who published a zine, then succumbed to schizophrenia during his late teen years. In pursuing a story that was well-reported in Portland but not quite national news, director Brian Lindstrom spent a half-dozen years following public demands for police accountability and the lawsuit against the city. Depositions and station-house videos are damning, though Lindstrom grants a police-union rep space to respond. Incoming mayor Sam Adams eventually fires the old police chief, but as in Seattle, street-level cops are maddeningly untouchable—they have all the protections and benefits that Chasse was denied in his unhappy life. These overzealous officers also inevitably recall our own 2009 case in Belltown: Christopher Harris, permanently brain-damaged by King County sheriffs with a similarly aggressive tackle. Alien Boy is a sad reminder of how, from Pioneer Square to the Pearl District to Times Square, our public places attract the indigent, the mentally ill, and those committing illegal acts. How we treat or police those people is a matter of public policy and spending priorities. The easiest option is to do nothing, making the life of James Chasse seem very cheap. E ALIENBOY.ORG

regional showcase for cinema from the greater Northwest. Now in its 16th edition, the fest has grown to nearly 20 features and James Chasse, the docs this year, plus several subject of Alien Boy, as packages of shorts, offsite a young music fan. screenings, and seminars featuring talent like Lynn Shelton (Touchy Feely, Humpday). There’s no theme per se besides low-budget indie regionalJurek, both admiringly and incredulously. With ism, so you never know what title will resonate. archival stills, newsreels, and historian interviews, Opening night, Walking Against the Wind the doc is perfectly suited to the Whatcom Museum or local public television. More impor(7 p.m. Fri.) is the black-and-white debut of tant, the race helped inspire the Ski to Sea event Seattle’s Brendan Flynn, a film “about the mar60 years later, now one of the biggest adventure ginalized,” he says, shot in Pioneer Square and races in the nation. other recognizable locations where panhandlers Venturing south down the Sound, Nicole ply their trade. One is Frank (Tom Ricciardelli), Teeny’s documentary Bible Quiz (7 p.m. Tues.) a recently widowed alcoholic trying to manage his rebellious teen daughter. His dead wife’s sister melds Spellbound and American Teen as members arrives too late for the funeral (none is planned); of the Tacoma Life Center memorize scripture the ashes are still in an urn among the empty for competitions few of us here in secular Seattle beer bottles that litter Frank’s squalid apartment. might know exist. Teeny, whose younger brother As if that weren’t bad enough, he’s being evicted is a “quizzer,” gains intimate access to the team, and is soon fired from his dishwashing job. And and she makes 17-year-old Mikayla Irl her if that weren’t bad enough, Frank is a mime. O, Claire Danes/Molly Ringwald–style heroine. the pathos of a street mime! Hardly subtle or Mikayla’s parents appear to be separated, her structured, the film reads like a chapter from mother is a drunk, and a brief home visit “is what might be called Tales From the Great Recesweird and kind of creepy,” she says. Obsessively sion. While the one percent’s stock portfolios studying the Bible with her teammates, says have now recovered, there’s no such upside for Mikayla, gives her “this love I didn’t feel like I Frank and his kid (who dreams of being a tattoo was getting at my house.” It also helps—and artist). And Flynn offers no phony deliverance torments her—that the dreamboat team captain for the pair, despite the visiting aunt’s good ( JP O’Connor) is the object of her mad crush. intentions. Of life’s unrelenting adversity, says Teeny is a savvy NYU film-school grad who Frank, “It’s a test.” So is the movie. doesn’t condescend to her subjects. Bible Quiz Considerably more cheerful is the old-timey shows us the non-angry, non-crazy home lives and mostly re-enacted sports doc The Mountain of the Beck-Palin-megachurch-red state community. These teens are likable goofballs who are Runners (5 p.m. Sat.), about a race from Bellsomewhat thrilled yet overwhelmed by a field ingham to the top of Mount Baker, contested trip to Seattle—where atheists hassle them—and between 1911 and 1913 as a promotional stunt. the national championships in Green Bay. The Commenting are modern ultramarathoners, topic is ripe for a Little Miss Sunshine treatment, including Scott Jurek, and mountain climbbut Teeny doesn’t judge. A postscript, made years ers, who marvel at the daring contestants. The later, indicates how Mikayla and JP don’t belong athletes were transported by rail and auto to the town of Glacier, where they then slogged roughly together but end up just where they belong. 30 miles to the summit and back, despite crevasses and foul weather. No ropes, no crampons, The best and most infuriating title I previewed no Highway 542—“There were no rules,” says for LSFF is a documentary set in Portland’s

trendy Pearl District circa 2006. In Alien Boy:

The stereotype is that dancers don’t really talk, but Twyla Tharp blows that assumption away the moment she opens her mouth. Alongside making some of the most radical works in the dance canon, she’s written frankly and thoughtfully about her creative practice (see her autobiography Push Comes to Shove). Those two skill sets come together in tonight’s lecture/rehearsal showcasing her newest work for PNB, Waiting at the Station. Tharp is one of the smartest people working in dance today—you’ll come away with your eyes full of astonishing movement and your head full of ideas. (If tickets sell out or you’re out of town, PNB will live-stream her talk via its website.) The full Air Twyla program, also including Brief Fling and the return of Nine Sinatra Songs, begins Friday and runs through October 6. McCaw Hall, 321 Mercer

LINDSAY THOMAS

J

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 25

Twyla Tharp

BY BRIAN MILLER

ust as the Seahawks draw fans from as far away as Anchorage and Missoula and Boise and even (gasp!) Portland, the

ThisWeek’s Agenda

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 22 21


EV E N T S

PROMOTIONS

arts&culture» Agenda

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

(9/25) Hazel Rose Markus and Alana Conner Bridging Our Cultural Conflicts

Agenda » FROM PAGE 21

due to the effects of Parkinson’s disease. Ronstadt is still a transformational figure to behold, though, and her new memoir, Simple Dreams (Simon & Schuster, $26), reveals why. She chronicles her career from singing in her Tucson home to joining the late-’60s folk-rock movement at the Troubadour in West Hollywood to leading a band that would become the Eagles. Parkinson’s isn’t part of Ronstadt’s musical story and rise to fame (the diagnosis came after she finished the manuscript); neither is any of that mistreating or cheating. But there is plenty of material from the legend who ruled the ’70s as a crossover queen, sharing stages with the likes of Aaron Neville, Ricky Skaggs, and even Placido Domingo. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave.,

(9/26) Peter Bagge with Cienna Madrid ‘The Margaret Sanger Story’ (9/26) Kenneth Pollack Our Problem with Iran (9/27) Panel Discussion A R T S A N D E N T E R TA I N M E NThe T Future of News in the Digital Age (9/29) Elliott Bay Book Co. presents Linda Ronstadt: ‘Simple Dreams’

652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $30–$35. 7 p.m. MARK BAUMGARTEN

(9/30) Nicholson Baker with Warren Etheredge ‘Traveling Sprinkler’

performances, exhibitions,

openings and special events.

(10/1) Clive Thompson Technology is Improving Our Minds TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

WWW.TOWNHALLSEATTLE.ORG

on the planet. (It’s worth remembering too that she began her advocacy for women’s rights before women even had the right to vote.) I think Sanger also has a vague kinship with Buddy in Bagge’s Hate comics of the grunge era. She’s a rebel, per the title, and almost always outraged about one thing or another. Though the word didn’t exist during her early life, Sanger was a feminist who ever raged against injustice and orthodoxy. Whatever the cause, she was quick to argue—and that’s a compliment in Bagge’s book. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhall seattle.org. $5. 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

Ride the Night

22

Who’s the equivalent of Alan Ladd today? Or, in the unlikely event of a biopic, who would play him? Brad Pitt’s too handsome, Matt Damon’s too tall, and few leading men these days are content to simply watch a scene as if he weren’t the star of it. Ladd (1913–1964) has a kind of do-less performance aesthetic; his career was ending just as the emotionalism of the Method swept into Hollywood, so he never really went out of style. In This Gun for Hire (1942), which begins SAM’s annual film noir series, Ladd plays a hired gun blackmailed by his employer. This proves to be a very bad idea, since Ladd’s icy killer will have his implacable vengeance. Veronica Lake memorably co-stars with Ladd in the first of their four elegant pairings. The Thursday-night retrospective series continues through December 5 with titles including Fritz Lang’s M, Kiss Me Deadly, and The Limey. Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First

Sometimes you feel a writer is saying “This one is for me,” as in Nicholson Baker’s obsessive past explorations of sex (House of Holes), politics (Checkpoint), and even the fate of library card catalogs (Double Fold). But Baker also has his generous side, and Traveling Sprinkler (Blue Rider, $26.95) feels like he has the reader foremost in his mind. It’s not a major new novel; it’s actually an add-on to his 2009 The Anthologist, whose poet/hero, Paul Chowder, is now an even more solitary and eccentric writer—one who worries about hardening into middle-age solitude and eccentricity. (A mid-life crisis results, leading to expensive cigars and laptop-brewed dance music.) Paul is, like his creator, a musicianturned-writer who’s very set in his ways. And his ways, like those of his creator, are keenly attuned to description. Paul is obsessed with Debussy’s “The Sunken Cathedral,” from whose chords “you can see the smoky blue water and the decayed pillars of the ruined church and the long blue fishes steering themselves down the nave and poking their snouts at the lettuce seaweeds.” But he’s also living in the now, pining for his ex-girlfriend Roz, going to the gym, and binging on pop culture. (Of The Office, Paul declares, “Dwight is simply insufferable.”) As in all Baker’s writing, this daily minutia matters, and Paul’s quotidian quirks help him endure loneliness and aging. They also bring him, and us, closer to that rare pleasure in contemporary fiction—a happy ending. (Warren Etheredge will interview Baker on stage.) Town Hall, 1119 Eighth

Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. 6:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER E

Ronstadt in 1978.

Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $63–$68 series, $8 individual. 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

SUNDAY, SEPT. 29

Linda Ronstadt

It is tragic that going to see Linda Ronstadt tonight does not come with the hope that you might hear her sing in that powerful alto about being cheated and mistreated on “When Will I Be Loved?” But that is the case, and unfortunately it’s not only because the 67-year-old artist is appearing to promote a book rather than an album. It also happens she can no longer sing,

SW FILE PHOTO

Find out about upcoming

(10/1) Third Place Books presents NicholasSparks & WarrenEtheredge ‘The Longest Ride’

Nicholson Baker PETER BAGGE

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT NEWSLETTER

MONDAY, SEPT. 30


the geekly report» Dungeons & Presumptions BY TERRA CLARKE OLSON

L

be no way he could understand, let alone enjoy, a tabletop RPG. Luckily, if you are gaming-curious, you live in the right city. Seattle is home to some amazing groups that cater to new gamers. Both Card Kingdom in Ballard and Gamma Ray Games on Capitol Hill run different game nights, and are very receptive to anyone who wants to learn to play tabletop RPGs. Seattle is also home to a D&D meetup group that is welcoming to newcomers. But it can be scary to venture into a world you don’t know or understand. It’s a lot easier to try something if you’re invited by a current gamer, which brings us back to Virginia. She and I have been friends since second grade. In my mind, she has always been the cool one (although she knows way more about Star Trek than I do). So I never thought she’d be into gaming. When I learned she’d recently bought a discounted D&D book, I was shocked that she wanted to learn to play. It turns out that one of our friends, Dan, explained D&D to her in a way I never had. He didn’t explain all the rules or talk about how complicated it is—nothing like that. Nope, Dan was brilliant. He explained that in a tabletop RPG, you work as a collective to tell a story using your imagination. Well, Virginia loves stories and using her imagination, so of course that sounded cool. Thanks to Dan, last Friday I sat around a table on Beacon Hill with three nongamers filling out character sheets so we could play together. As each of the players, all ladies, rolled one of their newly purchased dice, I was reassured. All night my fellow travelers—we’re calling ourselves Dungeons and Dames—were rolling for stats and meticulously studying race and class types. Mind you, they were more concerned about the outfits of the classes than previous groups I’ve played with, but who cares? They were making their characters, and if they wanted to make sure they looked dapper, well, that is fine by me. Long live the tabletop RPG. E

geeklyreport@seattleweekly.com

Tickets: (425) 392-2202 • Sept 12 - Oct 20 • www.VillageTheatre.org

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

ast week, a nerd fantasy of mine came true: I helped my best friend fill out a Dungeons & Dragons character sheet. That friend, Virginia, is an amazing person, but I never thought she would be interested in tabletop role-playing games. I was wrong and I shudder to think of all the potential gamers I’ve similarly dismissed. The shame. And then I thought, If tabletop RPGs are a dying industry, am I partly to blame? The decline of tabletop RPG games has been a hot topic in the gaming community for a few years now, although questions about the genre’s impending demise likely stretch back to 1974, the year Dungeons & Dragons was released and subsequently gave birth to the RPG industry. People are constantly trying to predict what the future holds for the genre. And although I don’t think the industry is “dead” by any means, I can see why the point is raised. Profit margins on new material for these dice-and-manual games are relatively slim for large companies like Wizards of the Coast, which owns the rights to D&D. That’s the problem with games in which building a character and mapping out an adventure is the product of the players’ collective imagination and not (necessarily) their pocketbooks: How do you profit off your consumers’ imaginations? Answer that and be rich. However, many hobbyists and smaller companies are still active in creating new material—you just have to look for it outside the traditional tabletop RPG titles. Most notable of these is Pathfinder, an RPG inspired by D&D and created by Redmond-based company Paizo. There’s another danger to the future of tabletop RPGs besides the lack of new material—the lack of players. With so many other kinds of games to compete with, tabletop RPGs easily can be passed by. A simple book and some dice—where’s the fun there? Or it can look too complex—all the rule books, the character sheets, the stats. A potential gamer could easily walk past a game thinking there’d

23


arts&culture» Stage On Sale Now!

Opening Nights She’s Come Undone CENTER HOUSE THEATRE (SEATTLE CENTER), 216-0833, BOOK-IT.ORG. $24–$38. RUNS WED.–SUN. ENDS OCT. 13.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

Box Office: (425) 392-2202 | www.VillageTheatre.org | Nov 7, 2013 - Jan 5, 2014

24

According to Thoreau, “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.” Women, it seems, not so much. That appears to be the case with Dolores Price, the ever-kvetching ne’er-dowell heroine of the 1992 Wally Lamb novel now staged by Book-It Repertory Theatre. The book famously took off after receiving a favorable nod from Oprah Winfrey, and it’s easy to see why: The novel jumps off the page like a Lifetime movie. Lamb’s tale is another in the endless trove of novels intended to buttress the belief that baby boomers were the first self-aware generation, and that their travails were somehow more important because of their self-reflection. The usual hackneyed boomer touchstones—the advent of TV, the Kennedy assassinations, the sexual revolution, and the moon landing—all get name-checked, but to what end? Lamb uses them as most do, to create affinity and make Dolores (here played by Jocelyn Maher) relatable. But her journey is a muddle of navelgazing, and what the World War II generation would surely dismiss as mere whining. As a

THE BARNES COLLECTION: IN AND OUT OF CONTEXT Friday, October 4, 7 pm Derek Gillman, Executive Director and President of the Barnes Foundation, discusses how Dr. Barnes built the foundation’s unrivaled collection of post-Impressionist and early modern art and the innovative way he displayed his collection. Buy tickets online at seattleartmuseum.org, by calling 206.654.3210 or at the Ticketing Desk at any of SAM’s three locations.

Seattle Art Museum Downtown 1st Avenue & Union Street

Photo © 2013 The Barnes Foundation

boomer standard-bearer, Dolores comes up short on the drama meter. Still, She’s Come Undone gets a thoughtful and sensitive staging from the Book-It artisans, particularly from Kelly Kitchens, the director who labored to keep the novel in a hazy netherworld, neither a word-for-word recitation of Lamb’s text nor a strict dramatization. Through clever use of Andrea Bryn Bush’s minimalist set, Kitchens proves herself a blocking wizard, deftly moving her players with the elegance of a chess master from one imagined locale to another. And there’s no quibbling with the fine cast assembled, either. Maher makes the trek from preteen to 40-something with dogged believability. She gets fat and loses it; she endures physical and emotional traumas; and, unlike so many of her generation, she gets over them. Supporting players give the play much of its warmth and halting forward motion; but, perhaps wanting to include too much of the book, Kitchens’ adaptation often makes dramatic turns with battleship speed. Including intermission, the show runs three hours, and that’s just too much time spent rubbernecking yet again at the supposedly larger-than-life maturation of ’60s survivors. Yes, your music was great, your TV shows sucked, free love was cool, racism and sexism were not, and your presidents were either killed or run out of office. Can we talk about something else now?

KEVIN PHINNEY E

stage@seattleweekly.com


arts&culture» Performance Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

BROKE-OLOGY Nathan Louis Jackson’s family drama.

Seattle Public Theater at the Bathhouse, 7312 W. Green Lake Ave. N., 524-1300, seattlepublictheater.org. $10–$30. Preview Sept. 26, opens Sept. 27. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 20. CAMPFIRE Spooky stories, improvised. Market Theater, 1428 Post Alley, 800-838-3006, unexpectedproductions.org. $10. Opens Sept. 26. 8:30 p.m. Thurs. Ends Halloween. DANE COOK Love him or hate him, he’ll probably fill the hall. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 1-877-784-4849, stg presents.org. $35.75–$51.25. 8 p.m. Wed., Sept. 25. 50 HEARTBREAKS (AND I’M STILL IN LOVE WITH YOUKRAINE) Jenna Bean Veatch and Nadia

Tarnawsky’s dance/theater hybrid mixes love and history—not to mention “1960s breakup songs, mournful Ukrainian ballads, stop-action animation, old family photographs, [and] gorgeous cardboard paintings.” Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre.org. $5–$20. 8 p.m. Tues., Oct. 1–Fri., Oct. 4. FUSSY CLOUD PUPPET SLAM, VOLUME VII Sgt. Rigsby & His Amazing Silhouettes, among others, star in this puppet revue. Theater Off Jackson, 409 Seventh Ave. S., 800-838-3006, FussyCloudPuppetSlam@gmail.com, brownpapertickets.com. $10. 7 & 9:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28.

HELLO DARLIN’S: MOM’S GOT SOMETHING TO TELL YOU! Josephine Howell’s solo show relates the life of

comedian “Moms” Mabley. Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center, 104 17th Ave. S., 800-838-3006, langston institute.org. $10–$25. Previews begin Sept. 25–26, opens Sept. 27. 7 p.m. Thurs.–Sun., 2 p.m. Sat.–Sun. Ends Oct. 26. JULIUS CAESAR Handwritten Productions comes to stage Shakespeare, not to praise him. Is this ambition? The Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., handwritten productions.org. Pay what you will. Opens Sept. 27. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Oct. 12. THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS Carlo Goldoni’s greatest hit. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 443-2222. $12–$80. Previews begin Sept. 27, opens Oct. 2. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sun. plus some Wed. & weekend matinees; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends Oct. 20. SECONDHAND LIONS The premiere of a musical based on the Michael Caine/Robert Duvall fantasy/adventure film. 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave., 625-1900. $29 and up. Previews through Sept. 25, opens Sept. 26. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see 5thavenue.org for schedule. Ends Oct. 6. SNAKE OIL REVUE Diva le Deviant hosts Sound and Smoke’s monthly cabaret. Unicorn Bar & Restaurant, 1118 E. Pike St., 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets.com. $13–$25. 7 p.m. Sun., Sept. 29. VIOLET DEVILLE’S BIRTHDAY BASH “Burlesque, striptease, cake, and witty irreverence.” Re-bar, 1114 Howell St., pdpr.biz/violetsbday. $10–$50. 7:30 p.m. Sun., Sept. 29. BAREFOOT IN THE PARK He’s straight-laced, she’s kooky;

can this marriage be saved? TPS Theatre 4, Seattle Center, Center House, 4th floor, 800-838-3006, localjewell. com. $12. 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Ends Oct. 5. BENGAL TIGER AT THE BAGHDAD ZOO WET’s production of Rajiv Joseph’s 2009 drama. Mike Dooly is the chatty, anthropomorphic tiger, a creature given to both savage amorality and guilt-wracked self-reflection. The tiger’s death (he then becomes a ghost) sets off a chain reaction, as one character after another gets sucked into the black abyss of war. Soon the play is populated with enough dead to open a debate with the living on the nature of war and whether there’s a point to this seemingly random carnage. Yet Joseph, belaboring his every point, ultimately fails the cast and the audience. KEVIN PHINNEY Washington Ensemble Theatre, 608 19th Ave. E., 325-5105, washingtonensemble.org. $15–$20. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Mon. Ends Oct. 7. DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS Two con men in France vie to see who’s the con-iest. Seattle Musical Theatre, 7400 Sand Point Way N.E. # 101N, 800-838-3006, seattle musicaltheatre.org. $30–$40. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun., plus 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 3. Ends Oct. 6. LES MISÉRABLES Balagan’s production replaces Broadway epicness with “intensely intimate and immersive staging.” Erickson Theatre Off Broadway, 1524 Harvard Ave., balagantheatre.org. $5–$30. 8 p.m. Thurs.– Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Sept. 28. Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

inspired Hello, Dolly! Taproot Theatre, 204 N. 85th St., 781-9707, taproottheatre.org. $15–$40. 7:30 p.m. Wed.– Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Ends Oct. 19. MIDDLETOWN Threads of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town weave through Will Eno’s wry, eerie tapestry of place. The majority of scenes are free-standing encounters between various denizens, a collection of moments that more closely approximates the rhythm of real-life experience than a more tightly escalating structure would. MARGARET FRIEDMAN ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $41 and up. Runs Tues.–Sun., see acttheatre. org for exact schedule. Ends Sept. 29. SHE’S COME UNDONE SEE REVIEW, PAGE 24. SKETCHFEST A second weekend of comedy from groups from across the country. $15. Runs Thurs.–Sat.; see sketchfest.org for schedule and venues. Ends Sept. 28. SOFT CLICK OF A SWITCH Carter W. Lewis’ play about two ordinary guys who start building bombs. West of Lenin, 203 N. 36th St., 800-838-3006, map-theatre.com, brownpapertickets.com. Pay what you can. 8 p.m. Thurs.– Sat. Ends Sept. 28.

• 

TEATRO ZINZANNI: HAIL CAESAR: FORBIDDEN OASIS Frank Ferrante returns as mad chef Caesar,

with Dreya Weber as his sultry accomplice Cleo. Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015. $108 and up. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see dreams.zinzanni.org for exact schedule. Ends Jan. 26. (On Fri., Sept. 27, TZ hosts a Latin Dance Night party, 10:30 p.m.–2 a.m. 21 and over. $15–$17.) THE 39 STEPS A cast of four plays over 150 characters in this mystery sendup. Renton Civic Theater, 507 S. Third St., Renton, 425-226-5529, rentoncivictheater.org. $15–$22. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 5. WORDS, SOUNDS, SILENCE Unexpected Productions’ show “illuminates three things present in a single moment.” Market Theater, 1428 Post Alley, 800-838-3006, unexpected productions.org. $7. 8:30 p.m. Thurs. Ends Sept. 26. XANADU What makes this production spring to life are the two perfect leads. Dane Stokinger plays Sonny Malone, Venice Beach’s resident chalk artist/bandanna’d lunkhead/roller-disco visionary. Like, say, Brendan Fraser, Stokinger is more adorable the dimmer he gets. Kira, the muse who descends to Earth to inspire him, is played by Jessica Skerritt, aglow with charisma. GAVIN BORCHERT Village Theatre, 303 Front St. N., Issaquah, 425-392-2202, villagetheatre.org. $30–$65. 7:30 p.m. Tues.–Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 7 p.m. Sun., plus some 2 p.m. weekend matinees. Ends Oct. 20; moves to Everett Oct. 25–Nov. 17. YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN Mel Brooks’ follow-up to his The Producers. Burien Actors Theater, S.W. 146th St. and Fourth Ave. S.W., Des Moines, 242-5180, burienactors theatre.org. $7–$20. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 27.

• 

ON SALE NOW!

OCTOBER 9-13 • THE PARAMOUNT THEATRE 877-784-4849 • STGPresents.org Priority seating & discounts for groups 10+ call: 888.214.6856 Tickets Available Through Tickets.com and Select Ticketmaster Locations

Additional fees may apply. All sales final, no refunds. Prices, shows, dates, schedules, and artists are subject to change.

T R O H ow S N I T MAaRvariety sh

Dance

THE FALL KICK-OFF + BIG BANG! Velocity is opening

this run with a performance-art blowout on Thursday ($10–$500), then presenting three nights highlighting Seattle’s contemporary-dance community ($20–$50)—a great introduction to a season packed with kinetic energy. SANDRA KURTZ Velocity Dance Center, 1621 12th Ave., 325-8773, velocitydancecenter.org. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Sept. 26; 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 27–Sun., Sept. 29. PNB: TWYLA THARP SEE AGENDA, PAGE 21.

• 

Classical, Etc.

• BROKEN BOW ENSEMBLE From this pathbreaking

26-piece chamber orchestra, the premiere of John Teske’s mer. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., johnteskemusic.com. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Thurs., Sept. 26. WAYNE HORVITZ The local jazz eminence is joined by Trio Pardalote and pianist Cristina Valdes for an evening of his music. Cornish College/PONCHO Concert Hall, 710 E. Roy St., 726-5066, cornish.edu. 8 p.m. Thurs., Sept. 26. THE BYRD ENSEMBLE Renaissance choral music for 40–60 voices. St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 732 18th Ave. E., 3973627, byrdensemble.com. $10–$20. 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28.

Featuring: Ed Grimley

• 

Jimin y Glick

SEATTLE/SEATTLE CHAMBER • ORCHESTRA Wagner, Strauss, Ravel, and more—includ-

And Many More

SINGERS

ing a new work from composer Carol Sams—mark the debut concert of music director Clinton Smith. First Free Methodist Church, 3200 Third Ave. W., 800-838-3006, osscs.org. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28. ANDREW YORK This guitarist plays Bach and his own works. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 297-8788. $28–$38. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28. LAKE WASHINGTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA A fundraiser/info meeting for this new ensemble rising from the ashes of the Bellevue Philharmonic. Temple B’nai Torah, 15727 N.E. Fourth St., Bellevue, lwso.org. Donation. 3 p.m. Sun., Sept. 29. TRIO PARDALOTE: CLUB SHOSTAKOVICH Slowly playing through Shostakovich’s 15 string quartets. They’re up to the brief but intense #7. Kenyon Hall, 7904 35th Ave. S.W., triopardalote.com. $5–$14. 7:30 p.m. Sun., Sept. 29.

• 

• 

OCTOBER 3 I 8 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATRE GROUPS OF 10 OR MORE CALL (206) 315-8054 FOR SINGLE TICKETS CALL (877) 784-4849

STGPRESENTS.ORG

EST. 1928 9TH AVE & PINE ST

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

CURRENT RUNS

THE MATCHMAKER The Thornton Wilder play that

PHOTO OF DANIELLE WADE BY CYLLA VON TIEDEMANN

B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

25


arts&culture» Visual Arts TheFussyeye » by brian miller

Burnt Nest

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

BRIAN MILLER

Brooklyn artists Stephen Nguyen and Wade Kavanaugh have filled the Suyama atrium with 900 pounds of black craft paper. Flat or folded, the sheets would neatly stack maybe as high as a refrigerator, something you could easily walk around. Instead, however, the pair spent two weeks twisting and heaping the paper into a knotty, undulating mass of strands. You can barely get around Drawn From the Olympics, skirting the walls surrounding the ropey structure, though there is a little alcove within. What’s being drawn, or alluded to, is the rainforest of our Olympic Peninsula, whence paper products are still extracted from wood pulp. Most of those mills have now closed, of course, and logging there is greatly diminished. Nguyen and Kavanaugh’s gnarled strands suggest unearthed tree roots, perhaps blackened after a fire. Strands reach to the rafters and

26

Experience Cirque Musica - The Arena Spectacular with your entire family. See the world’s greatest circus performers including the world famous Wallenda high wire duo, the thrilling Espanas, David Larible and more, performing LIVE to the greatest music of all time!

Sunday, Oct. 6th - 7:30pm - Tacoma Dome

Buy tickets at ticketmaster.com, (800) 745-3000, the Tacoma Dome Box Office or Ticketmaster Outlets

creep across the floors like charred tentacles. The piece seems both organic and inert, like the stumps left behind in clear cuts or a bird’s nest made of old twigs. The gnarled structure also recalls a wasp nest, those also being made of paper, on a much larger scale. It’s both delicate and massive. And when the show’s over, the whole thing can be pulped and recycled. Next year its fibers could be found in a phone book, a cereal box, or a newspaper. Suyama Space, 2324 Second Ave., 256-0809, suyama petersondeguchi.com/art. Free. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Mon.–Fri. Ends Dec. 13.


arts&culture» Film

Opening ThisWeek

makes Lee seem so harmless that it challenges belief when the bloodshed starts. For all the panic that ensued, this fictionalized prelude is both completely chilling and eerily plausible.

DANIEL PERSON

Don Jon

RUNS FRI., SEPT. 27–THURS., OCT. 3 AT SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN. RATED R. 93 MINUTES.

OPENS FRI., SEPT. 27 AT VARSITY AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED R. 90 MINUTES.

Blue Caprice is not about the Beltway sniper killings of 2002. No one was cast to play Montgomery County Police Chief Charles Moose, who became synonymous with the shootings as he updated a terrified county and voracious news cameras during the serial murders. We see none of the victims felled at gas stations, nor get any sense of the frantic efforts to find the elusive snipers. But for one blood-curdling moment, we see nary a rifle emerging from the trunk of the killers’ titular sedan. Rather, this haunting film is about two men whose last names we never learn. John (Isaiah Washington) is an older man to whom the essentially orphaned teenage Lee (Tequan Richmond) is drawn when they meet in Antigua. The two then travel to Tacoma, where in the woods Lee learns to shoot and in the city learns to kill at random. This exaggerates the true role our area played in the saga: In fact, John Allen Muhammad and John Lee Malvo did come to Tacoma, and stole from a local gunshop the Bushmaster that they’d later use for their killings. However, no Washington state murders have ever been linked to the men; their killing spree is believed to have begun in the deep South. Yet director Alexandre Moors’ powerful film isn’t meant to be a true-crime documentary. Instead, it’s about love at its most manipulative and vengeance served ice-cold. It’s about the making of a homegrown terrorist whose hatred of the United States is never explained (though it seems to come from some toxic mixture of insanity and John’s child-custody battles). The moody score casts even the most emotionally fraught moments in a melancholy light. Some may feel that Blue Caprice gives Lee a free pass. Richmond’s quiet portrayal casts him squarely as a victim who’s psychologically and physically pressed into his deadly deeds. And at the very least, Richmond’s performance

If Joseph Gordon-Levitt has spent much of his grown-up career running away from the image of a sitcom child star, he couldn’t have devised a better way to cut the cord than this. He wrote, directed, and stars in Don Jon, the story of a porn addict who’d be right in place amongst the braying loudmouths of Jersey Shore. That GordonLevitt is still as likable as he was back in the days of Third Rock From the Sun—or the more recent 50/50 and (500) Days of Summer—goes a long way toward explaining why we stick with his obnoxious character here. The movie’s first twist is that although Jon is introduced to us an Internet porn addict, he’s no antisocial nerd: He’s got local fame as a ladies’ man, prowling the disco with his buddies and searching for a “dime” (a “10,” on the immortal scale) to take home on a Saturday night. Yet that success leaves him unsatisfied, so his laptop porn rituals are repetitively chronicled in near-NC-17 detail. An encounter with the lushly named Barbara Sugarman (Scarlett Johansson, in a deft caricature) suggests that our boy may have found authentic love, but Gordon-Levitt throws in some reasonably fresh variations on the tale of an addict redeemed. One of them comes in the form of a night-school classmate ( Julianne Moore) who’s got more honest life experience than most of the people in Jon’s circle. There’s also a terrific scene in a generic department store, as Jon describes his pleasure in cleaning his own house (if you haven’t guessed, he’s got control issues). The scene becomes a revelation about Barbara, as she leaves no doubt about her own insistence on control in this relationship. Gordon-Levitt hasn’t gone completely sensitive-indie on us; his grasp of sitcom timing is abundant in family scenes. (Tony Danza and Glenne Headly are a hoot as Jon’s trashy parents.) And his own body-sculpted performance

Friday, October 4th | SIFF, Uptown Cinema | 7pm

MISS LOVELY

Opening Night Film, Free Wine Reception with Filmmaker Ashim Ahluwalia

Thursday, October 10th | SIFF, Uptown Cinema | 7pm

Spotlight Event - Centerpiece Film

TASHER DESH (The Land of Cards)

Center Piece Gala & Reception, featuring Q&A with Filmmaker Q (Qaushiq Mukherjee)

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

The mentor and his lethal instrument: Washington (driving) and Richmond.

Sunday, October 13th | Mobius Hall, Bothell | 4pm

ZINDA BHAAG Closing Night Film & Reception with Filmmakers Meenu Gaur & Farjad Nabi

Special Mention: Saturday, Oct. 12th | Mobius Hall | 8pm IFC/SUNDANCE SELECTS

THE RELUCTANT FUNDAMENTALIST

Post film discussion with award-winning Mira Nair

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

PBlue Caprice

27


arts&culture» Film

TickeTs available aT www.cinerama.com

big screen 70mm film festival INEQUALITYFORALL.ORG

Reich at the lectern.

» FROM PAGE 27 is high on aggressive macho strutting. All this is in service of a very simple message, of the kind an earnest young filmmaker might feel is important to say for his generation. Which is maybe more endearing than insightful. Don Jon is a marshmallow heart wrapped in a spicy shell. ROBERT HORTON

Enough Said

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

OPENS FRI., SEPT. 27 AT SUNDANCE AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG-13. 92 MINUTES.

28

FILM SCHEDULE ~ FINAL WEEKEND!

Wed. Sept. 25 3:00 patton 8:00 Vertigo

Sat. Sept. 28

1:30 hoW the WeSt WaS Won 8:00 thiS iS cineraMa

thu. Sept. 26

2:00 Sound of MuSic 7:00 LaWrence of arabia

fri. Sept. 27

7:30 hoW the WeSt Logos WaS Won

Sun. Sept. 29

2:00 hoW the WeSt WaS Won

SEATTLE’S WIDEST SCREEN SUPERIOR TECHNOLOGY Fresh Chocolate Popcorn, Cupcake Royale, Theo Choc & so much more

2100 4TH AVENUE, SEATTLE WA • (206) 448-6680

Nothing much happens in a Nicole Holofcener film, and that’s OK. What transpires in Walking and Talking or Friends With Money or Please Give is mainly women fretting about potential catastrophes that might ruin their lives. Earthquakes, adultery, alien invasion, ungrateful children, brushfires, horrid mothers—they’re all the same. Enough Said is yet another well-wrought example of Holofcener’s focus on the problems intelligent women create for themselves through their constant worry. Ten years divorced, her daughter soon to leave for college, Eva ( Julia Louis-Dreyfus) wearily lugs her massage table from client to client, hearing their petty complaints without comment, seemingly resigned to a single woman’s slide toward menopause. The large, hairy obstacle in that path is Albert ( James Gandolfini), also divorced with a college-bound daughter. Demographically, they’re identical baby boomers, quite conscious of their age and future prospects. Why do they click? “Our middle-agedness is sort of comforting and sexy,” says Eva by way of explanation, but even she doesn’t know for sure. Albert and Eva are set in their ways; neither is going to change the other; and Eva has a secret pipeline to confirm her doubts about him: Albert’s ex-wife Marianne (Catherine Keener) is one of her clients. If there is a Hippocratic oath for masseuses, Eva knows she’s broken it tenfold. She should be disbarred from the profession, her table burned. Yet she continues to knead and befriend the cynical poet while allowing Marianne’s complaints to poison her relationship with Albert. (“He’s a loser. Who would date a person like that?”) She’s hedging, trying to guard against a future letdown by finding all his faults upfront. It’s a terrible ethical betrayal acknowledged a third of the way into the movie; the next hour consists of the fallout—or rather, talking about the fallout. (Eva, after many lies, doesn’t confess until late.)

Holofcener often directs for television, and here she has two top-shelf TV stars—if not the benefit of sitcom writers who might’ve given the plot a few welcome kicks forward. There are few zingers in Enough Said, but plenty of inflectional humor. Is Eva serious about Albert? “Yeahhmaybe,” says Louis-Dreyfus, her face yawning with uncertainty, denial, and affection. In his last screen role, Gandolfini conveys a lumpy shyness and decency; his Albert is genuinely hurt by the fat-shaming of Eva’s yoga-toned cohort. Eva’s BFF (Toni Colette) tells her to learn to compromise in a relationship, even while constantly dissing her husband (the excellently indignant Ben Falcone). For the women of Enough Said, too much candor has its risks, but remaining silent can bring disaster. BRIAN MILLER

PInequality for All OPENS FRI., SEPT. 27 AT HARVARD EXIT. RATED PG. 85 MINUTES.

The basis for this advocacy doc, Robert Reich’s Aftershock, was published three years ago as we were tentatively clambering out of the Great Recession, which began with the subprimemortgage collapse of 2008. The film now arrives with a new paperback edition of Aftershock, in which Reich writes that real annual median household income actually declined from $51,144 in 2010 to $45,018 in 2012. That’s the opposite of a recovery. And in a widely cited new study, economists Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty found that during 2012, the top 10 percent of earners took more than half of the country’s total income; and worse, the top 1 percent took more than one-fifth of income earned. That kind of imbalance existed before the federal income tax was introduced in the progressive era; it leveled out during the postwar years, as Reich explains in Inequality for All. Then, as he shows using the same graphs he employs as a UC Berkeley professor, the inequality curve began climbing in the ’80s, accelerating with the deregulation of financial markets during the Clinton era (when he worked in the White House). Everyone’s income took a hit after 2008. But, per Saez and Piketty, since the wealthy own most investments, the Wall Street recovery has meant that the 1 percent has captured about 95 percent of the income gains since the recession ended. Directed by Jacob Kornbluth, Inequality for All isn’t a dry, stat-filled lecture. Seen in his classroom and tooling around San Francisco in his Mini Cooper, Reich is anything but boring Primary as he advocates federal stimulus and other policies to grow the middle class and get it spending

Palette


A MUST-SEE MOVIE!

– ROGER HICKEY,

again, to raise that median income (essentially flat since the pre-OPEC ’70s, measured in constant dollars). To that end, the film includes a handful of recession-impacted family profiles, including Seattle entrepreneur Nick Hanauer. “They are the job creators,” says Hanauer. “We need to replace trickle-down economics with middle-out economics.” Reich would raise taxes on carbon and the elite (particularly capital gains), and he encourages federal spending in areas like bridge repair and infrastructure that create middle-class jobs. Would the Tea Party go along? No, nor are they the likely audience for this film. It’s the same dilemma expressed in Thomas Frank’s What’s the Matter With Kansas?: Republicans misled into voting against their own economic well-being. Working two 20-hour-per week jobs, without benefits, will never get you into the middle class or beyond. Republican rhetoric about an “opportunity society” has become a cruel irony: Social mobility is trending in the wrong direction, making the country ever more polarized. And that is why, despite Reich’s ebullience, this is such an important, dismaying film. BRIAN MILLER

Our Nixon RUNS FRI., SEPT. 27–THURS., OCT. 3 AT GRAND ILLUSION. NOT RATED. 84 MINUTES.

He’s taking this fight to the street.

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT

CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES NO PASSES ACCEPTED

STARTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27!

IS THIS THE END OF REAL FOOD? SEATTLE “What Jaws and Psycho did for the WEEKLY beach and the shower, GMO OMG could do WED 09/25for the grocery store...”

2 COL. (4.83") X 3.5"

-Kimber Myers, INDIEWIRE’s THE PLAYLIST

AM/RK

“Provides a gentle, flyoverALL.IFA.0925.SW alert to obliviously chowing-down citizens...without hectoring and with no small amount of charm.”

Passion RUNS FRI., SEPT. 27–THURS., OCT. 3 AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS. RATED R. 102 MINUTES.

-Jeannette Catsoulis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

Along with its other shortcomings, Passion is woefully mistitled. This off-key exercise is drained of any authentic juice, belying its apparent place in the crime-of-passion film tradition. But then passion has never been the long suit of its director, Brian De Palma, whose strengths have been his fiendish cleverness and his often giddy intoxication with the movie-ness of cracked stories and characters. Those talents find their footing mainly in some humid dream sequences in the third act of Passion, where De Palma finally asserts himself. Until then, the film has been a bland remake of Alain Corneau’s quite dandy 2010 film Love Crime, a trim tale that mixed All About Eve with The Servant and threw a big, bloody murder into the mix.

“Illuminating!” “HHHH!” “Alarming!” -Ernest Hardy, THE VILLAGE VOICE

63

BERLIN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

-Joshua David Stein, EATER

-Alissa Simon, VARIETY

“Constantly provocative.”

BEST DOCUMENTARY

-Mark Adams, SCREEN DAILY

WINNER

BERKSHIRE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

gmofilm.com

SIFF FIlm Center Seattle Center, Northwest Rooms (206) 324-9996

STARTS FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 27

Check theatre directories or call for showtimes

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

4.81" X 3.5"

wed 09/25 seattle weekly dUe mon 6Pm

PRESENTS

Heather Emmett

AE: (circle one:) Angela Maria Josh

Artist: (circle one:) Staci Freelance 2 Steve

Tim

Philip

McCool

ART APPROVED AE APPROVED CLIENT APPROVED

Deadline:

Confirmation #: A

SKI

FILM

SEATTLE, WA | OCTOBER 3, 2013

DIPPER FILMS

Ehrlichman, once a Seattle attorney, and his Super-8 camera.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

I come from a family of rabid Nixon haters. With my grandfather I watched what seemed like all the Watergate hearings on TV. (If childhood memory serves, he bought a new color set for that express purpose, because black-andwhite wasn’t good enough for his contempt.) So while I wanted to like this found-footage archival mashup of Super-8 home movies made by Richard Nixon’s White House staffers, maybe I know too much about that era of American politics. To me, the stories of H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman, and Dwight Chapin are relatively familiar, but director Penny Lane has to interpolate lots of old TV broadcasts and afterthe-fact interviews to explain to millennials why her archival footage is so wonderful. And it is: Here is the cheerful, playful, colorful, and dare I say Nixonian optimism of the first term. Nixon crushed McGovern in ’68, and

From Robert Reich, former US Secretary of Labor, comes a humorous and enlightening exposé on America’s widening income gap.

his staffers had every reason to gloat. (It’s worth remembering that, were it not for Watergate, Republicans would’ve held the White House for 20 consecutive years; Carter was the historical aberration.) Still, Lane shrewdly overlays Nixon’s secret audio recordings—unknown to Haldeman and company—to give ominous context to their happy backstage scenes. Haldeman, then in his early 30s, was an acutely image-conscious ad man; and what we now call political stagecraft was being perfected by the Republicans of that era (Roger Ailes prominent among them). For that reason, the home movies now read like camera gaffes and sly visual commentary—Walter Cronkite framed upside down, horse shit at the Vatican, a camera zoom out the White House window to a waiting pack of reporters who smell blood after Watergate. But of course it’s Lane, with benefit of hindsight, who has control of the editing. In one priceless bit, after Nixon praises the Ray Conniff Singers at a White House concert (“If the music is square, it’s because I like it square”), a brave young woman performer holds up a Vietnam War protest sign and denounces the president. His minions didn’t realize it, but they were filming the future. BRIAN MILLER

Neptune Theatre - 2 Shows! 6:30 All-Ages 9:30 21+ Student $10, Adult $15 Adv $20 Door, GET RAD! $40* Kids 16 & Under Only $5 ALL ATTENDEES RECEIVE A FREE LIFT TICKET TO BACHELOR AND 2-FOR-1 TO STEVENS! GET TICKETS NOW AT EVO, THE NORTH FACE U-VILLAGE, STGPRESENTS.ORG OR ANY STG OUTLET. FOR MORE INFO VIST: TETONGRAVITY.COM/TOUR

29


arts&culture» Film SHOWTIM ES

SEPT 27 - OCT 3

THE VIRGIN SUICIDES

Friday & SATURDAY & WEDNESDAY @ 7:00PM

DROP DEAD GORGEOUS

“a haunting, thoroughly evocative ride.” LA Times

SEPT 27-OCT 3

GR ANDILLUSIONCINEMA.ORG ���� NE ��TH STREET | ���-����

MARS ATTACKS!

THURSDAY @ 8:00PM

WAXIE MOON IN FALLEN JEWEL - FRIDAY @ 9:30PM

GEEK GIRL CON PRESENTS - THE ADVENTURES OF BRISCO COUNTY JR. - MONDAY @ 7:00PM

JAAP BUITENDIJK/UNIVERSAL

SATURDAY & MONDAY & WEDNESDAY @ 9:30PM

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

» FROM PAGE 29

30

In this telling, set in the offices of a marketing behemoth’s Berlin office, stiletto-shod executive Christine (Rachel McAdams) takes credit for the ideas of her chief assistant Isabelle (Noomi Rapace), soothing her underling’s hurt feelings with assurances of the importance of teamwork and the occasional kiss on the lips. The backstabbing doesn’t end there, as Isabelle is sleeping with Christine’s kinked-up lover and embezzling colleague, Dirk (Paul Anderson). The levels of humiliation and subordination continue, yet De Palma (who also wrote the adaptation) doesn’t particularly savor that back-and-forth, even if those exquisite machinations are a large part of the appeal of a movie like this. What’s worse is the generally flaccid tone, and especially the awkward performances. De Palma has been accused of lacking an interest in nonhomicidal interactions between human beings, and rarely has that been more evident. McAdams never lacks sharpness, but the rest of the cast, most of them non-native English speakers, are seriously out of rhythm, and everybody’s way too busy “indicating” instead of inhabiting their thoughts and feelings. Rapace, so dynamic in the Swedish Dragon Tattoo trilogy and Prometheus, looks completely ill at ease; like De Palma, perhaps she’s comfortable only in a certain kind of heightened genre picture. Which, by description, Passion ought to be. But by the time we reach the end of a series of corkscrewing nightmare scenes, it’s hard to detect that the filmmaker of Dressed to Kill and Body Double actually believes in his own lurid plot twists any more. ROBERT HORTON

Rush OPENS FRI., SEPT. 27 AT GUILD 45TH AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED R. 123 MINUTES.

Car racing means something different in Europe. Here, NASCAR is about working-class authenticity, the legacy of Southern moonshiners, popular mainly in the red states. In Europe, Formula 1 is unapologetically elitist. That’s its brand: champagne and sex, exorbitant budgets, a V-12, VIP celebration of wealth and engineering, yet carrying the cologne of sudden death. Rush is the mostly true stories of two star drivers of the ’70s: the British rogue James Hunt and the Austrian technician Niki Lauda.

Hemsworth (left) and Brühl as dueling drivers.

Ron Howard has made and starred in some good movies about cars (Gone in 60 Seconds, American Graffiti, etc.), but here he’s a directorfor-hire. Written by Peter Morgan (The Queen, Frost/Nixon, The Damned United), this is a picture firmly set in 1976 Europe. The Cold War is still on, Thatcher is a lowly back-bencher, and it’s not clear if the hedonistic ’60s have even ended. Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) is a posh, privileged, oversexed product of his times. His wealthy backers have bought him into the big leagues, and his leonine self-confidence is suddenly undercut by this reality: Given a fast-enough car, there are no more excuses if you lose. The methodical, unlovable Lauda (Daniel Brühl) has meanwhile paid his own way onto the circuit: He makes every car faster through strict engineering discipline, not panache. He and Hunt are yin and yang, a dynamic that Morgan repeats far more often than necessary. Howard certainly remembers the ’70s, and with cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle (Slumdog Millionaire) he gives Rush a wonderfully Campari-soaked period look. The sun flares in Hunt’s golden hair; his girlfriend Suzy Miller (Olivia Wilde) is a model stepped from the pages of Cosmo; smoking and sex are still tolerated on planes—for first-class passengers only, of course. The racing scenes are excitingly conveyed with vintage cars, CGI, and snippets of real race footage among the many montages. Perhaps for the benefit of us Yanks, too many races are narrated by the TV commentators. For Europeans, the Hunt/Lauda rivalry needs no such explanation, and Lauda’s near-fatal accident at the German Grand Prix is part of racing lore. Hemsworth, an Aussie from those Thor movies, isn’t a bad actor; and Brühl, a German-Spanish utility player, is a good actor soon to co-star in the WikiLeaks movie The Fifth Estate. I only wish the writing were up to their and Howard’s talents: Hunt is made to say things like “The closer you are to death, the more alive you feel,” and after marriage, Lauda frets that “Suddenly you have something to lose.” Both may be true, but neither needs saying. Morgan’s annoyingly formulaic this-versus-that writing style doesn’t suit a movie with two heroes and no villains. Rush successfully captures the glamour and danger of its sport; only the script isn’t up to speed. BRIAN MILLER E

film@seattleweekly.com


arts&culture» Film BY BRIAN MILLER

Local & Repertory • THE BIG-SCREEN 70 MM FILM FESTIVAL Just

• 

• 

• 

Send events to film@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

TOTALLY ‘80S TUESDAYS: Krull and Dragonslayer

are screened. (PG-13) SIFF Cinema Uptown, $6-$11, Tuesdays, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Through Oct. 22. THE VIRGIN SUICIDES In her 2000 adaptation of the Jeffrey Eugenides novel, Sofia Coppola envisions suburbia as a sensual experience, with cicadas buzzing, sprinklers clicking, and sunlight streaming through leafy trees. The five blossoming Lisbon sisters, aged 13 to 17, live in a pastel world of quilted bedspreads, unicorn cologne bottles, and journals filled with bubble-like handwriting. As the siren-like Lux, with bared shoulders and eyes peering beneath long blonde hair, Kirsten Dunst is wonderful, bringing to her character the maturity of a veteran actress. On the surface, Virgin Suicides seems like a girls’ coming-of-age story, but because it’s narrated by the neighborhood boys who watch them from afar, the Lisbon girls just end up as mythical figures—their personalities unknowable to us as well. Still, Coppola knows how to use the camera, and understands how to direct actors. The result is a beautifully nuanced yet ultimately opaque film that lingers in memory. (R) SOYON IM Central Cinema, $6-$8, Sept. 27-29, 7 p.m.; Wed., Oct. 2, 7 p.m.

Ongoing

• BLACKFISH This relentless documentary circles

around the 2010 death of Dawn Brancheau, a supremely experienced SeaWorld trainer who was killed in a performing tank by Tilikum, a 12,000-pound whale. But that death is the starting point for a film that makes a couple of general thrusts: Killer whales should not be kept in captivity, and the sea parks that own them have done a suspiciously incomplete job of informing their trainers and the public about how they operate their businesses. Interviews with former SeaWorld trainers paint a sad picture of a happy-face culture that sugar-coated the containment of giant wild animals; because of the industry’s expert PR spin, the trainers themselves would hear only vague rumors about injuries in marine parks. Director Gabriela Cowperthwaite looks into fatal incidents at Victoria, B.C.’s Sealand of the Pacific and Loro Parque on the Spanish island of Tenerife. If Blackfish outrages people, so much the better. Whales and dolphins are too high on the evolutionary scale to keep captive. (PG-13) ROBERT HORTON Bainbridge Cinemas BLUE JASMINE There’s nothing comic about the downfall of Blanche DuBois in A Streetcar Named Desire, the inspiration for Woody Allen’s miscalculated seriocom. Blue Jasmine is an awkward mismatch of pathos and ridicule, less fusion than simple borrowing. Grafted onto the story of delusional trophy wife Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is a Madoff-like fable of the recent financial crisis. In flashback, we see her husband (Alec Baldwin) buying her consent with luxury while he swindles the Montauk set. In the present timeframe, Jasmine is broke and living with her sister Ginger (Sally Hawkins) in a shabby San Francisco apartment. Jasmine is a snob who needs to be brought low, a task relished by Ginger, her boyfriend (Bobby Cannavale), and her ex (a surprisingly sympathetic Andrew Dice Clay). As with Baz Luhrmann’s recent The Great Gatsby, you sense that Allen wants to say something about our present culture of inequality and fraud, but he only dabbles, never probes. Perhaps because her heroine isn’t entirely Allen’s creation, he doesn’t finally know what to do with her. Jasmine is more foolish than evil, but there’s nothing funny about her final punishment. (PG-13) BRIAN MILLER Ark Lodge, Bainbridge, Kirkland Parkplace, Harvard Exit, Majestic Bay, Sundance, others POPULAIRE In a provincial French village, circa 1958, Rose (Déborah François), a humble shop owner’s daughter, hopes to land a modern new secretarial job with an insurance broker in the nearest town. Her prospective boss Louis (Romain Duris) discovers Rose is a demon at the keys, and he demands to coach her in a speed-typing competition. What ensues in their predictable Pygmalion romance certainly looks great. The nightclubs and suburban kitchens have a slightly unreal sheen, like postcards printed too bright. Duris, of Heartbreaker and The Beat That My Heart Skipped, wears his slim-cut suits with a tiger’s predatory grace. François flounces around in her country frocks until Rose’s success graduates her to cover-girl glamour, accessorized with pink typewriter. The cars, furniture, and even the food appear as if from family photo albums taken during the de Gaulle era. Director Régis Roinsard loves the period details, perhaps too much to lampoon them. So why isn’t Populaire more fun? Unforgivably, for a movie about speed, it’s way too long and slow for a romantic comedy. It feels as though Roinsard can’t let go of the old family album; he wants us to study every page and photo. (R) BRIAN MILLER Varsity

Best Movies - No TV Commercials Seattle Weekly ~ Best of Seattle

‘Best Movie Theater 2013’ Editor’s Pick

WI

NNER

Fall Edition

Win TickeTs To seaTTle’s Top Fall shoWs!

• RESERVED SEATING - all shows all seats

• SELECT YOUR SEAT ON LINE & PRINT AT HOME • FULL BAR & BISTRO FARE

- enjoy your food & drink at your seat

• +21 AT ALL TIMES

ENOUGH SAID PASSION GOOD OL’ FREDA TOUCHY FEELY GENERATION IRON LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER IN A WORLD... BLUE JASMINE THE SPECTACULAR NOW THE WORLD’S END THE FAMILY

Seattle News and Events | Free Stuff

http://www.seattleweekly.com/promo/freestuff/

FOR SHOWTIMES VISIT:

sundancecinemas.com

scan heRe To enTeR:

PARKING $2.00 AFTER 5PM

PAY & VALIDATE AT OUR BOX OFFICE

http://kaywa.me/jLKj7

Download the Kaywa QR Code Reader (App Store &Android Market) and scan your code!

INVITE YOU AND A GUEST TO THE ADVANCE SCREENING OF

PLEASE VISIT www.GOFObO.COm/RSVP AND ENTER CODE SwEEKJmLb TO DOwNLOAD YOUR COmPLImENTARY TICKETS! SCREENING WILL BE HELD ON WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2ND AT 7 PM AT AMC PACIFIC PLACE THIS FILM IS RATED R FOR LANGUAGE AND SOME SEXUAL CONTENT.

No cellular phones or electronic devices will be allowed in the screening. Please Note: Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee you a seat at the theater. Seating is on a first come, first served basis, except for the members of the reviewing press. Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. No admittance once screening has begun. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket, and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. 20th Century Fox, Las Vegas City Life and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, recipient is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors, their employees and family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS!

IN THEATERS EVERYWHERE OCTOBER 4TH www.runnerrunnermovie.com

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P DI N I NG WEEKLY

MUSIC

SEATTLE WEEKLY WED: 09/25/13 B&W 4.83” x 2.69” HR ALL.RNR-P.0925.SW

FILM

NEWSLETTER

F I LM

The inside scoop on upcoming films and the latest reviews.

HAP P Y HO UR

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

voted Best Movie Theater in our Best of Seattle® readers’ poll, Paul Allen’s Cinerama is presenting a dozen old titles worthy of its giant screen. Classic titles include Lawrence of Arabia, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and The Sound of Music. (NR) Cinerama, 2100 Fourth Ave., 448-6680, cinerama.com, $13, Through Sept. 29. CHOSEN This new documentary relates how two Washington state girls were lured into sex prostitution, then rescued. Both will attend the event. (NR) Seattle Aquarium, 1483 Alaskan Way, sharedhope.org, $35, Thu., Sept. 26, 7:30 p.m. DROP DEAD GORGEOUS A beauty pageant goes horribly amiss in this dark comedy from 1999. Look for Kirsten Dunst, Denise Richards, and Ellen Barkin. (PG-13) Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684, central-cinema.com, $6-$8, Sat., Sept. 28, 9:30 p.m.; Wed., Oct. 2, 9:30 p.m. DUNE David Lynch’s 1984 adaptation of the Frank Herbert novel, once considered to be a movie franchise, stars Kyle MacLachlan and Sting. (PG-13) Central Cinema, $6-$8, Thu., Sept. 26, 8 p.m. GMO OMG This new documentary considers the debate regarding genetically modified foods and concerns about labeling. See siff.net for showtimes. (NR) SIFF Film Center (Seattle Center), 324-9996, $6-$11, Sept. 27-Oct. 3. THE GREAT HIP HOP HOAX Jeanie Finlay’s documentary follows two Scottish lads who seek to reinvent themselves as American rappers. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 829-7863, nwfilmforum. org, $6-$10, Through Sept. 26, 7 & 9 p.m. MOTHER OF GEORGE A Nigerian makes his way to New York in this much-praised drama, which played during SIFF this spring. Look for Isaach De Bankolé in a supporting role. (R) Seven Gables, 911 N.E. 50th St., 781-5755, landmarktheatres.com, $10, Sept. 27-Oct. 3. PINK RIBBONS, INC. An exposé in the purest, most pissed-off sense, director Léa Pool’s Pink Ribbons, Inc. digs into the bizarre elision of philanthropy, corporate sponsorship, and sanitized pseudo-activism that comprises the breast-cancer-awareness industry. The hallmark of this “movement,” of course, is the proliferation of pink doodads—everything from yogurt cups and teddy bears to cars and, incredibly, fast-food packaging—ostensibly bringing attention to the disease but mostly serving as promotional detritus for companies eager to cash in and camouflage for a few with carcinogenic product lines. The clueless, PR-challenged Susan G. Komen Foundation, whose flack offers an on-camera defense, spearheads these efforts, which Pool and experts such as Barbara Ehrenreich and Dr. Samantha King (whose 2006 book inspired the film) methodically reveal to be, like the color itself, vomitously distracting and of marginal utility. (NR) MARK HOLCOMB Keystone Congregational Church, 5019 Keystone Place N., 632-6021, keystoneseattle.org, Free, Fri., Sept. 27, 7 p.m. RAISING MS. PRESIDENT: This new doc concerns “the next generation of female political leaders.” (NR) Kirkland Performance Center, 350 Kirkland Ave., 425-893-9900, kpcenter.org, $10, Thu., Sept. 26, 7 p.m. THE ROOM Tommy Wiseau’s horrible 2003 vanity project is screened for your derision. (R) Harvard Exit, 807 E. Roy St., 323-0587, landmarktheatres.com, $8.25, Saturday at midnight. SAMURAI CINEMA Toshiro Mifune stars in the classic 1961 Yojimbo, playing the shabby, cunning ronin who turns two warring clans against each other. (NR) SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, siff.net, $6-$11, Mondays, 7 p.m. Through Oct. 21. SCREENINGS AT SCARECROW From 1982, Class of 1984 has teenage punks run amok (Michael J. Fox among them). The movie plays at 8 p.m. Friday and is followed at 8 p.m. Saturday by the sequel, Class of 1999, shot here in Seattle in 1989. The 1950 education drama Blackboard Jungle screens at 1 p.m. Sun., starring Glenn Ford, Anne Francis, and Sidney Poitier. Monday at 7 p.m. is Girls in Prison, made for the 1994 Showtime series Rebel Highways. Beer is available from VHSpresso. 21 and over for evening events. (NR) Scarecrow Video, 5030 Roosevelt Way N.E., 5248554, scarecrow.com, Free.

SEAT TLE 4500 9TH AVE. NE • 206-633-0059

31


2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 jazzalley.com

JAZZ ALLEY IS A SUPPER CLUB

dinner & show

ROCKIN’ PIANO SHOW

mainstage WED/SEPTEMBER 25 • 7PM & 9:30PM

billy cobham’s “spectrum 40” featuring dean brown, gary husband and ric fierabracci

You name it, We’ll celebrate it! DAVID GRISMAN QUINTET THUR, SEPT 26 - SUN, SEPT 29 Influential mandolinist and father of “Dawg” music, a unique blend of folk, swing, bluegrass, Latin, jazz and gypsy.

AKI MIYAFUJI KOBE’S VOCAL QUEEN MON, SEPT 30 14th Sister City Jazz Day

THU/SEPTEMBER 26 • 7:30PM

sonny landreth

w/ cindy cashdollar FRI/SEPTEMBER 27 • 8PM

THE YELLOWJACKETS TUES, OCT 1 - WED, OCT 2 Celebrating over 30 years of music with their latest release and debut project with new band member, bassist Felix Pastorius.

KARRIN ALLYSON THURS, OCT 3 - SUN, OCT 6

an evening with robert cray

“No matter what she performs, Ms. Allyson is one of the most grounded singers working today.” - New York Times

SAT/SEPTEMBER 28 • 6:30PM - DECIBEL FEST PRESENTS

DAVE HOLLAND - PRISM: FEATURING KEVIN EUBANKS, CRAIG TABORN AND ERIC HARLAND TUES, OCT 8 - WED, OCT 9

optical 3 - night vessel w/ zola jesus, jg thirlwell & margaret chardiet aka pharmakon

SUN/SEPTEMBER 29 • 6:30PM - DECIBEL FEST PRESENTS

optical 4 - black noise w/ oren ambarchi, the sight below, raime WED/OCTOBER 2 • 7PM & 9:30PM

john scofield’s uberjam

Visceral new project marking 40 years since Holland’s debut recording as a leader.

all ages | free parking full schedule at jazzalley.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

32

next • 10/3 - 5 la danse! le burlesque! l’edition francaise! • 10/6 vinicius cantuaria • 10/7 bob schneider w/ gabriel kelley • 10/8 kat edmonson • 10/9 dave simonett (trampled by turtles) • 10/10 wendy ho • 10/11 hypnotikon: cave, lumerians, midday veil, fungal abyss • 10/12 hypnotikon: silver apples, cloudland canyon, night beats, jetman jet team • 10/13 greg brown w/ love over gold• 10/16 mehliana (brad mehldau and mark guiliana) • 10/18 carbon leaf w/ brian wright • 10/20 the bad plus • 10/21 savoy brown • 10/24 - 31 this is halloween!

happy hour every day • 9/25 the seattle jazz composers ensemble • 9/26 town hall brawl • 9/27 vince mira • 9/28 mquin • 9/29 big phone • 9/30 monday night jazz w/ synthesis • 10/1 singer-songwriter showcase featuring: jaspar lepak, dana pierce and eric miller • 10/2 charles mack • 10/3 first thursday art opening w/ dave morrow / billy brandt TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE · PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1 HOUR PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW · ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

thetripledoor.net

216 UNION STREET, SEATTLE · 206.838.4333

Out of Town guests Parent’s Night Out Quittin’ Time Reunion St. Patrick’s Day Tired of the Usual Scene Valentine’s Day Why Not? Naughty X-Rated party! (Just kidding!) Don’t Wanna Miss Out Zany Fiends

Voted Best Piano Bar & Best Place to Take an Out of Town Guest.

Call or Scan QR Code for reservations

315 2nd Ave Seattle 206.839.1300 ilove88keys.com

El Corazon www.elcorazonseattle.com

109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

CELEBRATING TEN YEARS THROUGHOUT THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER!

Anniversary Birthday Corporate Event Divorce Engagement Foreclosure Graduation Happy Hour Independence Day Just Because Kicking Back Looking for Fun Marriage Night On the Town

GUTTERMOUTH with Agent Orange, Piñata Protest, The Graceland Five, and Regional Faction Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

KONGOS

with Mosquito Hawk, and Poorsport Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM 21+. FREE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 Take Warning Presents:

TEENAGE BOTTLEROCKET with The Queers, The Copyrights, and Smokejumper (Farewell Show) Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27

POWERMAN 5000 with Peratus, Sanction VIII, Letzter Geist, Syztem7, and Suction Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $18 ADV / $20 DOS

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28

THE PANCAKES & BOOZE ART SHOW Over 50 Local Emerging Artists

Exhibiting!!! Live Body Painting!!! All-UCan-Eat Pancake Bar!!! Live Audio & Visual Performances!!! Doors at 8PM. 21+. $5

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 Take Warning Presents:

CANCER BATS with Bat Sabbath, The Loss,

Head Honcho, plus guests Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30

THE VENETIA FAIR

with Survive This!, Sorrow’s Edge, Audentia, and Direct Divide Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1 Mike Thrasher Presents:

TWIZTID with Blaze, Madchild, Aqualeo, and Reklez

Doors at 6 / Show at 6:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $20 ADV / $23 DOS

JUST ANNOUNCED 10/26 MONETA 10/26 LOUNGE INTO THE FLOOD 11/30 THE DICKIES 12/2 DINOSAUR BONES 12/20 X / THE BLASTERS 12/21 X / THE BLASTERS UP & COMING 10/3 LISA DANK 10/4 BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME 10/5 HELLOWEEN 10/7 CHRISTIAN DEATH 10/8 YOU ME AT SIX 10/9 ICON FOR HIRE 10/10 FUCKED UP / TERROR 10/10 LOUNGE HUGH CORNWELL 10/11 ANBERLIN / THE MAINE 10/12 ZEKE (20TH ANNIV) 10/13 MOURNING MARKET 10/14 STEPDAD 10/14 LOUNGE THE MAXIES 10/15 THE PRETTY RECKLESS 10/16 LIONS LIONS 10/21 EARTHLESS / THE ICARUS LINE 10/22 SUICIDE GIRLS: BLACKHEART BURLESQUE 10/28 OUTLAW NATION 10/31 TRAPT Tickets now available at cascadetickets.com - No per order fees for online purchases. Our on-site Box Office is open 1pm-5pm weekdays in our office and all nights we are open in the club - $2 service charge per ticket Charge by Phone at 1.800.514.3849. Online at www.cascadetickets.com - Tickets are subject to service charge

The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: see details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html and for an application email us at info@elcorazonseattle.com


arts&culture»Music

Shifting Standards

SevenNights E D I T E D B Y G W E N D O LY N E L L I O T T

Keith Jarrett, Gary Peacock, and Jack DeJohnette step away Wednesday, Sept. 25 from the Great American Songbook. BY ANDREW HAMLIN

T

with a chuckle, that after 1983, he was on the road a great deal. Peacock and his second wife Nancy landed here after logging time in Tokyo (where they met) and Kyoto, where Peacock, taking a break from music, studied Oriental philosophy, tai chi, acupuncture, and Japanese. He enrolled at the University of Washington to study biology, left four years later just short of graduating, and in 1976 picked up a position teaching jazz at Cornish College of the Arts. He recalls his students as “very eager, and talented,” but “with a different mind-set” than the one he’d cultivated after almost 20 years of playing jazz. “They’re not listening to analog, for one thing. Microphones and speakers and all this stuff going on.” He also recalls that his charges had “almost to a man, impatience. Wanting to get from point A to point B overnight. That was a challenge for me—how to encourage them to water the lawn, let it grow by itself. If you didn’t have patience, when I was coming up, you didn’t make it through the week.” He struggled to understand their synthesizers and electronics, and he counseled a lot of garden-watering. Asked about the trio and the changes in the interplay among the three men over the years, Peacock says things have become “deeper, more intimate, in some ways more subtle. There has become a continual relaxation of any kind of tension. There’s this kind of unified understanding that goes beyond talking or conceptualizing. Allowing the music to play you. You get out of the way. The melody lives and expresses through you. “Once it’s experienced,” he finishes, “once you realized there’s no way you can grasp it except by getting out of the way, you’re continually drawn to it. You don’t want it to end.” Benaroya

Hall, 200 University St., 215-4800, earshot. org. $30–$125/$425 for full festival pass. 8 p.m. Tues., Oct. 1. E music@seattleweekly.com

original Joy Division and New Order bassist will serve two functions. First will be a history lesson. Hook and his band will perform Movement and Power, Corruption & Lies, the two albums that New Order recorded in the wake of Joy Division singer Ian Curtis’ suicide. Movement is the sound of the band still anchored to Joy Division’s darker post-punk sound, while Power, Corruption & Lies is the sound of that band finding its footing, with a little help from Italo Disco, and turning into a full-fledged dance-pop band. Which brings us to the second function of this performance: dancing. Lots and lots of dancing. With ADULT., Slaves of Venus. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, neumos.com. 9 p.m. $25 adv./free with Decibel pass. MARK BAUMGARTEN PHOSPHORESCENT The songs that Matthew Houck writes as the primary member of Phosphorescent come from his broken, battered heart. From there they go to his brain, where words are formed, first heated by the Alabama native’s Southern-rock heritage, then cooled by the indie-rock awareness granted by his current Brooklyn home, and finally baited with a casual knowledge of pop culture. This lyrical processing can be heard in “Song for Zula,” his biggest hit yet from the recent full-length Muchacho. “Some say love is a burning thing, that it makes a fiery ring,” he sings, teasing Johnny Cash over a pulsing electronic thrum. “Oh but I know love as a fading thing, just as fickle as a feather in a stream.” From the brain, his songs travel back to his lungs and then over his vocal cords, where they are imbued with a Southern twang; past the nasal cavity where a touch of pathos is applied; and then into your ear. From there they go to your brain and then straight to your heart, which they will subsequently break. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St. 682-1414, stgpresents.org. 8 p.m. $16 adv. MB BILLY COBHAM He may be 69, but he still plays drums like a young man, and he’s arguably one of the greatest the instrument has ever seen, having played with Miles Davis, James Brown, and scores of others. You won’t be disappointed. The Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, thetripledoor.net. 7 & 9:30 p.m. $25 adv./$30 DOS/$35 front row. DAVE LAKE

Thursday, Sept. 26

HAUSCHKA doesn’t like playing regular piano. Being

German and fond of all things motorik, he puts all sorts of weird junk in his piano to make his music more interesting: pingpong balls, washers, screws, rubber bands, pretty much anything. Having dutifully prepared his piano with all sorts of odds and ends, he plays brilliant, whimsical tunes that plink and buzz under the effect of all the doodads he’s tossed in. The result ranges from the wistful, soothing songs on Ferndorf to the “acoustic electronica” of Salon des Amateurs. At Decibel, Hauschka will be displaying his mad piano genius in a special project called “OPTICAL 1: KOLLABORATIONS” that will pair him with a visual artist. Hauschka’s music videos have always been incredible because his music is so evocative—adding a visual-art element to his live performance will likely result in all sorts of magic as well. With Oliveray.

Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, dbfestival. com. 5:30 p.m. $35 adv/free with Decibel pass. All ages. KELTON SEARS Inspired by the likes of Johnny Cash, Neil Young, and Nick Drake, English singer/songwriter JAKE BUGG makes the kind of music that makes you want to feel. While the structures are simple, Bugg finds strength in his bouncy presentation, spunky storytelling, and that charmingly floppy mop. His twangy, boy-next-door vocals are pretty swell too. With honeyhoney. The Neptune. 8 p.m. SOLD OUT. KEEGAN PROSSER You don’t get mentioned by name in a Daft Punk track, as Chicago-based DJ GREEN VELVET is, in “Teachers,” without having seriously schooled those Frenchies. The artist, also known as Cajmere, never achieved the height of fame of his “students,” but there’s a sense that his playful house music (like “Answering Machine” and “Preacher Man”) inspired the quirky voices the duo often wields, not to mention their use of sampling. Q Nightclub, 1426 Broadway, 432-9306. Doors at 2 a.m. $25/free with Decibel pass. 18 and over. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

Friday, Sept. 27

GHOSTLY INTERNATIONAL SHOWCASE Born of

Detroit techno and raised into international consciousness by the success of innovator Matthew Dear, the Ghostly International label has in its 15 years become a driving force in contemporary electronic music, and, as tonight’s headliner proves, is beginning to reap what it has sown. Headliner Shigeto grew up a fan of the label, which helped shape his complex sound, which incorporates dubstep, jazz, and ambient sounds. Seattle’s own Lusine will represent with his ambient, serpentine pop. Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, thecrocodile.com. 9 p.m. $17 adv. /free with Decibel pass. MB Capitalizing on the success of their previous collaboration, blues/gospel legend MAVIS STAPLES has re-teamed with Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy on a new record, One True Vine. At 74, Staples doesn’t have much left to prove, yet she’s still retained that iconic voice, and, even more impressive, the will to push the boundaries of her craft. The Moore, 1932 Second Ave., 682-1414, stg presents.org/moore. 8 p.m. $37.50. CORBIN REIFF Released in May, Nocturnes, the sophomore release by English singer/DJ Victoria Hesketh, aka LITTLE BOOTS, follows the same atmospheric synth-pop path she went down on her 2009 debut album. There’s a darker vibe to this batch of songs, though, and each one still manages to make you want to shimmy like there’s no tomorrow. With Light Asylum, Young Galaxy, MNDR. Neumos. 9 p.m. $25 adv. /free with Decibel pass. 21 and over. AZARIA PODPLESKY NICOLAS JAAR Space Is Only Noise, Jaar’s 2011 debut, is a good summation of his modern, minimalist approach to house and techno; the most interesting moments occur, he says in a 2009 Resident Advisor interview, “between the beats.” At just 23, Jaar conveys more personality and emotion through his productions than most veteran electronic musicians. With Mount Kimbie, Phaeleh, Tarik Barri. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 652-0444, showboxonline.com. 9 p.m. $35 adv. /free with Decibel pass. All ages. ANDREW GOSPE XXYYXX Teenage producer Marcel Everett hails from Orlando—not exactly a bastion of cool

Green Velvet COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

he legendary, protean, and sometimes prickly pianist Keith Jarrett heads one of the best-known and most widely acclaimed jazz groups of the past 30 years, generally though unofficially known as the Standards Trio. With bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Jack DeJohnette, Jarrett is exploring in great depth what’s loosely termed the Great American Songbook. It wasn’t always so. The trio was put together by ECM Records magnate Manfred Eicher for Tales of Another, a 1978 album of originals written by Peacock. In 1983 the three reconvened, again at Eicher’s suggestion, to record standards. And even though Peacock, for one, was wary of recording the stuff he used to teach fundamentals to jazz students, he trusted Jarrett. They cut three albums’ worth of material in a day and a half, and were on their way. Since those early days some critics, and some fans, have wished Jarrett would incorporate more of his wilder attacks, such as his whole concerts of spontaneous improvisation, into the Standards Trio. It appears that Jarrett, despite his oft-expressed indifference to the ideas of anyone save his musical peers, just might be listening. The trio’s new album, Somewhere, starts with Jarrett alone at the piano, pulling in “Deep Space” from someplace heretofore unknown. Then the band edges into “Solar,” written by Jarrett’s old boss Miles Davis, and the variations on a theme grow richer, thicker, defying definition. The extent to which this new approach will affect the trio’s appearance here remains a mystery, however. The performance at Benaroya Hall to open the Earshot Jazz Festival (Oct. 1–Nov. 17) is one of only four American stops on the Trio’s tour. This city has some resonance with the group. Peacock, reached by phone from his home in Claryville, N.Y. (“I basically live in a forest”), called Seattle home from 1972 to 1988—although he allows,

© DANIELA YOHANNES / ECM RECORDS

Jack DeJohnette, Gary Peacock, Keith Jarrett

PETER HOOK & THE LIGHT This performance by the

Decibel Festival, Seattle’s celebration of electronic music and culture, runs September 25–29. Celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, the festival takes place at venues across the city. Our recommended acts are highlighted below in red. Five-day passes start at $250. Some shows are sold out, but many individual tickets are still available. More information about ticketing, venues, and this year’s lineup can be found at dbfestival.com.

33


arts&culture»Music electronic music, but his slow-mo, R&B-sampling beats bear the hallmarks of cutting-edge UK garage, dubstep, and instrumental hip-hop. His star is rising, too, judging by his recent opening slot for of-the-moment electro-pop band Chvrches on their U.S. tour. With Machinedrum, Giraffage, Timeboy. Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxonline.com. 9 p.m. $30 adv. /free with Decibel pass. All ages. AG When THE EVENS started a decade back, it was with a one-off kiddie song called “Vowel Movement.” It was charming and all, but the collaboration between Washington, D.C., punk demigod Ian MacKaye and journeywoman drummer Amy Farina was bound for something much more serious and intensely powerful. The duo appears to have reached that zenith with its third, perfectly titled full-length, The Odds. A diverse collection of songs considering it’s all done with guitar and drums, the album is the work of two deeply talented artists expert at creating art as tense as it is poetic as it is political. “What if every single person was a deputy?” MacKaye sings over his trademark machine-steady guitar strum on the excellent “Wanted Criminals,” a song that ends with the duo chanting, in harmony, “Jails in search of prisoners.” MacKaye is in fine form and Farina is right beside him, nearly dominating the album with instrumental and vocal performances that are deep and resonant. But in the end, it is a perfect balance. Even, you could say. Vera Project, 305 Warren Ave. N., 956-8372, theveraproject.org. 8 p.m. $8 adv./$10 DOS. All ages. MB

Saturday, Sept. 28

KID SIMPL’s music is huge in a quiet way. Like the

landscapes of Iceland or an ancient forest at dawn, the Seattle producer’s atmospheric, bass-driven tunes evoke a sort of hushed reverence. Watch the swirling video for “Pulse” and try not to succumb to the majesty. With Cyril Hahn, Ryan Hemsworth, Henry Krinkle, DJAO, Domokos. Crocodile. 9 p.m. $20 adv/free with Decibel pass. All ages. KS

SLOW MAGIC is some guy in a mysterious Technicolor

fox mask who makes kaleidoscopic electronica fit for dancing underneath the moon. No, seriously—two of his songs are about moons in different waning stages. The music is called “glo-fi,” which isn’t really far off. If fireflies could DJ, they would make this kind of music. With Gold Panda, Odesza, Luke Abbott. Neumos. 9 p.m. $20 adv./free with Decibel pass. 21 and over. KS THE ORB No question “Little Fluffy Clouds” is this British ambient house group’s biggest hit, and it stands for all that’s great about electronic music: intuitive beats, trancey synths, and great samples seemingly plucked out of the sky—in this case, it’s Rickie Lee Jones discussing the Arizona sunsets when she was a child. Showbox at the Market. 12:15 a.m. $30/ free with Decibel pass. GE JOAN OF ARC is a band that’s never let melody or other supposed prerequisites for listenable music get in the way of a cool concept. For its latest exercise in this, this year’s Testimonium Songs, the band has produced an “interpretation” of a poet’s collage of courtroom testimony in workplace-negligence trials. Confused? That’s probably the point. With Arrington de Dionyso’s Song of Psychic Fire. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, thebarboza.com. 7 p.m. $12 adv. 21 and over. DAN PERSON

Sunday, Sept. 29

JARBOE It makes sense that when Michael Gira reunited

his post-punk group Swans a few years back, Jarboe wasn’t on board. The band’s former keyboardist and female vocalist has since the band’s dissolution in 1997 blazed her own path as a experimental vocalist, achieving new ways of bringing in her audience with her intoxicating voice and then shredding them. The plight of the siren is a lonely one. With Helen Money, Eye of Nix. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, chopsuey.com. 8 p.m. $12 adv. MB Is it just me or is Kansas City’s TECH N9NE always on tour? Seems like the quick-lipped rapper comes

Dirty Beaches

Wednesday, Sept. 25

34

he Earshot Jazz Festival kicks off its 25th year on Tuesday, but overly eager jazz enthusiasts need not wait till then to soak in one of the best jazz performances of the next month. It might just happen tonight in the dramatically lit underground confines of Barboza—the kind of place where jazz belongs, actually. There, Taiwanese-born sound artist Alex Zhang Hungtai will perform with his band Dirty Beaches for Decibel Festival, the premiere Seattle electronic multimedia festival that celebrates its 10th year this weekend. It actually isn’t that strange to align the two festivals. In their most rewarding moments, a certain segment of both electronic and jazz musicians have always shared a sensibility—maintaining the duality of theme and improvisation, anchoring the listening experience in the familiar while encouraging the artist to go far out. Hungtai and his band go far out. Hungtai started Dirty Beaches by emulating hip-hop and experimenting with sampling sounds. Then he toyed with rock ’n’ roll and created his most celebrated release, 2011’s Badlands, an LP built out of old rock-song samples. But Hungtai has moved past that accomplishment. In fact, he recently took to his blog to formally reject that work. “No songs from badlands,” he wrote about his current tour. “Over it. Done.” Instead Dirty Beaches will play from its two most recent releases, albums that embrace what has long been an undercurrent of improvisation within its music. This can be heard most clearly on the band’s

DANIEL BOUD

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

T

Hotels EP, a collection of quiet and contemplative piano interludes recorded by Hungtai on hotellobby pianos during 2011 and 2012. It’s a quietly astounding work that proves the artist’s ability to pull beauty from the ether. That experience inspired Love Is the Devil, a melancholic collection of mostly instrumental songs released earlier this year. Hungtai’s wayward, sparse piano parts, Francesco De Gallo’s sax playing, and a coy flute solo act as genre signifiers, but what really makes this album jazz is its adherence to themes, though they are less melodic and more temporal. The album spans musical multitudes while not really moving the emotional needle, as if the artist is seeking to dig directly into a particular bundle of synapses to unearth some truth. It is insistent outsider music that rewards patience. Drifters, also released earlier this year and potentially a part of tonight’s show, is less meditative and more beat-driven and features vocals, recalling at times the avant-garde work of Arthur Russell—an apt referent, since that late Brooklyn artist updated jazz for the post-disco generation and proved that jazz finds a way. With Sisu, Chasms. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, thebarboza.com. 8 p.m. $10/Free with Decibel pass. MARK BAUMGARTEN


tractor 1303 NE 45TH ST

fri, Sept 27 • 9:30pm ~ $15

Lorde

alt-hip hop from canada

Saturday, Sept. 28

L

JAMES K. LOWE

Times listed are show times. Doors open 30-60 minutes before

KELTON SEARS

through town every other month, which makes it all the more impressive that his July release Something Else (his 13th studio album) features cameos from hip-hop heavyweights like Kendrick Lamar and Wiz Khalifa. With Krizz Kaliko, Mayday, Stevie Stone, Ces Cru. Paramount, 911 Pine St., 682-1414. stgpresents.org/ paramount. 7 p.m. $35. All ages. AP Electronic DJ ZEDD (real name, Anton Zaslavski) made heads turn and bodies shake with his breakout single “Clarity” (feat. Foxes), and with performances at every major electronic concert under his belt, he’s looking to take the mainstream EDM crown from Skrillex. But what sets ZEDD apart is his classical training—something you’ll hear in the tightness of his arrangements and the soaring melodies that take you to the drop. With OLIVER, Alex Metric. Showbox SoDo. 8 p.m. SOLD OUT. KP

Monday, Sept. 30

HANSON Fifteen or so years later, all but one of the

Hanson brothers have cut their hair. Like Samson, it’s very likely the brothers’ powers lay in that hair, since Hanson’s new songs are nowhere near the soaring prepubescent glory of “MMMBop.” Instead, they skirt closer to the cheese of Bruno Mars, with music videos that also look like Target ads. I guess this is growing up. With Paul McDonald. Neumos. 8 p.m. All ages. SOLD OUT. KS

Tues, Oct 1 • 8pm ~ $15

contemporary pop singer/songwriter

LEE DEWYZE

TOMMY SIMMONS SpEcIAL VIp TIckETS INcLuDE pRE-ShOW MEET & gREET Wed, Oct 2 • 8pm ~ $20 melodic power pop

gLENN TILBROOk Of SquEEZE

JOE MIchELINI

Of RIVER cITY ExTENSION SEATED ShOW

up & coming • 9/26 SANTEE album release show, BIgfOOT WALLAcE, TALL SMOkE • 9/28 Square peg concerts presents chERRY pOppIN’ DADDIES, yogoman burning band • 9/29 Loving Alice: A Benefit for Alice Stuart with ThE fORMERLYS feat. ROgER fIShER, pOLLY O’kEARY, pATTi ALLEN, BABY gRAMpS, LEE OSkAR, kEVIN SuTTON, kIM fIELD

5213 BALLARD AVE. NW www.tractortavern.com

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 26TH

HIGHWAY 9 9PM - $3 COVER

FRIDAY & SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27TH & 28TH

MICHAEL ANTHONY PRATT 9PM - $5 COVER

SUNDAY SEPTEMEBER 29TH

MARLIN JAMES TRIO 9PM - $3 COVER 4PM OPEN MIC / ACOUSTIC JAM W/ BODACIOUS BILLY TUESDAY OCTOBER 1ST

COUNTRY DAVE & THE PICKIN’ CREW 9PM - NO COVER

MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY

KARAOKE WITH DJ FORREST GUMP 9:00PM • NO COVER

FREE COUNTRY DANCE LESSONS WITH OUR HOST MARY ANN AT 8PM; SUN, MON, TUES

HAPPY HOUR 9AM-NOON & 4-7 PM • MON-FRI

WELL DRINKS & DOMESTIC BOTTLED BEER $2 16 OZ. MICROS $3.50 DINNER: 5-10PM EVERYDAY BREAKFAST & LUNCH: SAT 8AM-2PM / SUN 9AM-2PM 7115 WOODLAWN AVENUE NE 522-1168

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

orde recently became the first woman to top the U.S. Billboard Alternative Chart since 1996. She’s more populist than pop, though— Lorde makes music for the people. “Royals” is a very unusual pop song in that way. For a tune that launched Lorde to the dizzying heights she is rapidly approaching, it’s incredibly minimal. Ninety percent of the song is just drum and vocals. A subtle synth very occasionally pops in, but that’s about it. Even without bells and whistles, the song is unrelentingly catchy—a guaranteed earworm. Its highly economical minimalism is a testament to its message. “Everybody’s like Cristal/Maybach/Diamonds on your timepiece/Jet planes/Islands/Tigers on a gold leash/We don’t care/We aren’t caught up in your love affair,” she sings. “Royals” is a clever middle finger to the limousines and diamond rings promoted by our dominating cultural narrative. “We’re fine with this/We didn’t come from money.” So who the hell is Lorde? Surprise! She’s a 16-year-old from New Zealand who also might be the smartest person in the music industry right now. Even though she was offered a music deal by Universal at age 12, she continued with her honors studies in public school, quietly honing her songwriting chops into the razor-sharp weapons of pop destruction they’ve become. While she consciously skewers the excesses of pop culture, she’s rubbed elbows with Diplo and Kanye West and turned down an opening slot on Katy Perry’s world tour. Her brilliantly named double-entendre debut LP, Pure Heroine, is out this month, and will likely wreak joyful havoc on today’s musical landscape. If I had a daughter, I hope she’d listen to Lorde. With Until the Ribbon Breaks. Showbox SoDo, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxpresents. com. 7 p.m. SOLD OUT. Free with Decibel Pass. All ages.

Buck 65

OpEN MIkE EAgLE TBA

NTw.RlittleYreMdhUenS.coIC LIVE COUww m

35


arts&culture»Music LocaLReLeases

The Only Safe Access in Mason County!

Massage Therapy $60 Auto & L&I with Prescription, not limited to MMJ Patients By appointment only.

Belfair

Your Hours: Mon-Sat 9a-8p Sun 9a-6p 23710 E. State Rt 3 360-275-1181

Shelton

Your Hours: Mon-Thurs & Sat 10a-7p Fri 10a-8p Sun 11a-5p 3811 St Rt 3 (Bayshore) 360-426-0420

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

DI N I NG

WEEK LY

MICHAEL BERRY

Cumulus,

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

MUSIC NEWSLETTER

36

even harmonies, and crisp production tones make this an excellent first offering, hinting at solid releases to come. Niedzialkowski takes her cues from the likes of Kim Deal and Tanya Donnelly, post-punk grunge goddesses who have a bit more gravel in their pipes, but nonetheless add a feminine grace note to songs that rock hard. Tracks are more understated here, but stand on strong and balanced instrumentation (that’s Lance Umble on guitar and Leah Julius on bass). There are distorted, driving guitars aplenty and riffs on every early-’90s band from The Beautiful South (whose “36D” is unmistakably channeled in the intro to “Ocean Song”) to Smashing Pumpkins, but the saccharine lyrics to “Morning Coffee” are firmly rooted in the current age’s dreamy, earnest idealism: “Last night your lips touched mine/Like a strawberry/When it gets too heavy/And touches the ground.” When the pendulum swings to the other side with the chilling words of “Wanderlust”—“Can not trust a man/Who does not know how to be alone/He will wind up from bed to bed/Until he makes your head his home”—you realize this button-cute band has it all. If grunge has taught us anything, it’s that the three-chord, dirty-rocker thing lasts only so long. (Thurs., Oct. 3, Neumos) GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

OMOTIONS EV ENT ISNever Meant It toPBeR Like This

M US IC The inside scoop on upcoming shows and the latest reviews.

FILM

DANIELLE BURTON

Meds Mari

Blue Sky Black Death, Glaciers (10/1, Fake Four Inc, twitter.com/BSBDmusic): On its Twitter feed, Blue Sky Black Death offers tips on how best to review an album. “Gotta hear it five times,” goes the feed, “your first spin impression reviews are worthless.” On that advice I listen to BSBD’s new album—the fourth solo release from production duo Kingston McGuire and Ian Taggart, aka Young God—the prescribed number of times. It comprises just that many tracks, each minimally labeled “I” through “V,” and features labelmates Child Actor (“I” and “II”) and JMSN (“IV”), as well as Seattle native Lotte Kestner (“III”). Four of the five tracks are over 10 minutes long; expansive as they are, after five spins, I would have appreciated more harmonic variety (the keyboard has black keys, too) to sustain interest over the long haul. Each track is composed of as many as 200 synth layers, yet the music never sounds cluttered. On my third pass, “III” stands out as the best track, and my fourth listen to the album had me walking through an ethereal soundscape full of wonderfully detailed sonic moments that I could almost touch. My final listen reaffirmed my belief—and the band’s—that trying to pigeonhole music like this (what they call “hip-hop through [a] kaleidoscopic perception”) does it a disservice. After all, good art rewards repeated encounters, which is why we still enjoy Shakespeare, Beethoven, and Van Gogh. While it sustains multiple listens, it’s unclear whether the layers of Glaciers will endure or recede, like its icy namesake, over the years.

H A P P Y H O UR Join us in the Trophy Room for Happy Hour: Thursday Bartender Special 8-Close Fridays: 5-8pm RESERVE THE TROPHY ROOM FOR YOUR NEXT EVENT!

COCKTAILS • TASTY HOT DOGS • LOTSA PINBALL

2222 2ND AVENUE • SEATTLE

206-441-5449

(10/1, Trans Records, cumulusband.com): Death Cab’s Chris Walla signs this Seattle twee-rock trio to his own Trans Records label; Phil Elverum (Old Time Relijun, the Microphones, Mount Eerie) produces from his own Anacortes-based studio; and out comes this 10-song gem of crunchy, grunge-indebted pop currently being lauded by Spin as “a comforting rainy-day blanket.” While Alexandra Niedzialkowski’s eternally chirpy vocals have a tendency to grate with their inexhaustible pep, the songwriting here is high-quality. Great hooks,

A R T S A ND E NT E R TAI N M E N T

Send your upcoming release to

reverbreviews@seattleweekly.com

In beautiful downtown White Center

Buy, Sell & Barter rs Records, Guita

o

& Vintage Stere

, Good selection Fun shop, Fair prices. Follow our Facebook for New Arrival Updates!

Closed Monday T-F 2-9 • Sat 11-9 • Sun 11-7 9632 16th Ave SW, White Center, WA

(206) 432-9537


toke signals»By Steve Elliott

Nature's Medical Group Medical Cannabis Evaluations The Lowest Cost Since 2010

And Then There Were Three

count, brings to three the number of storefront medical-marijuana dispensaries in Bremerton. The shop opened in August. For years a desert when it comes to safe access (save a couple of delivery services), it seems Kitsap County has finally entered the 21st century. Top Green Meds is one of the storefronts in a little shopping center. My visit got off to a good start, because I was able to park right in front of the place. Once I got inside the wellappointed waiting room, receptionist Rose gave me a friendly welcome. The medical-marijuana

The medical-marijuana children’s story If a Peacock Finds a Pot Leaf is on the counter. Pick it up—it makes for enjoyable reading.

BLOG ON » POT xTOKESIGNALS.COM

$75

Evening and Weekend Appointments Available!

Call 206.682.3015 for an appointment www.choicewellnesswa.com

ALTERNATIVE HEALING

S.A.M. COLLE S.A.M. COLLECTIVE

MEDICINE MAN MEDICINE MAN WELLNESS CENTER Walk-ins Welcome WELLNESS CENTER

Super Lemon Haze

Celebrating our New Low Prices and New Summer Clinic Hours ** Starting June 28, 2011 ** New Clinic Times: Tues 4–6 Fri 12-2 Sat **starting JULY 2ND ** 10–2

New Hours: M-F 12:00 – 7:00 Saturday 10:00 – 5:00 Sunday 12:00 – 5:00

On-Line Verification Available Celebrating our New Low Prices New Hours: M-F 12 Bring this ad for an extra 10% off and New Summer Clinic Hours Providing Authorizations in - For weekly specials, follow us onSaturday Facebook 10:00 – Bring thisJune ad and receive with RCW 69.51A** 4023 Aurora Ave. N. Seattle, WA 98103 **Accordance Starting 28, 2011 an additional $25.00 OFF www.samcollective.orgSunday 12:00 – Fri 12-2 New4021 Clinic Times: Tues 4–6 $99 includes (206) 632-4023 Aurora Ave N. Seattle, WA 98103 Bring this ad for an ex Authorization and Card A non-profi t organization in accordance with chapter RCW 69.51A 206-632-4021 • seattlealt@yahoo.com Sat **starting JULY 2ND ** 10–2 Doctors available Tuesday 2 - 6, BringThursday this ad 11 - 3,and Fridayreceive 11 - 6

Also Open Sunday 12 - OFF 4 an additional $25.00

4021 Aurora Ave N. Seattle, WA 98103 4021 Aurora Ave N. Seattle, WA 98103 206-632-4021

An impressive selection of medibles is available, and they’re reasonably priced: $4 for the larger ones, $3 for cookies. Most are fine, but avoid the crispy cereal treats; the one I bought tasted stale and mushy. E

www.medicinemanwellness.com 206-632-4021 • seattlealt@yahoo.com

tokesignals@seattleweekly.com

Steve Elliott edits Toke Signals, tokesignals.com, an irreverent, independent blog of cannabis news, views, and information.

TOP GREEN MEDS 2135 Sheridan Rd., Suite D, Bremerton, 360-479-9172. Noon–9 p.m. Mon.–Thurs., noon–10 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2–8 p.m. Sun.

For weekly specials, follow u

4023 Aurora Ave. N. Seatt www.samcollectiv

(206) 632-40

A non-profit organization in accordance wi

Now accepting all major credit/debit cards! RMMCconsulting.com (206) 395-8280

I-502 application assistance Location research and zoning by jurisdiction MMJ migration to I 502 businesses Marketing strategies Operating Plans / Business Plans / Floor Plans Seed to sale implementation Providing solutions and opportunity for business professionals and medical cannabis patients

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

children’s story If a Peacock Finds a Pot Leaf, by Kingston-based Morgan Carman, 17, and illustrated by her mother, Geneva, is on the counter. Pick it up—it makes for enjoyable reading. Another guy arrived during my verification process and got to go back to the bud room first, since this wasn’t his first visit as a patient, but it was only a few minutes later that budtender Steve escorted me there. Steve was very helpful guiding me through a smallish selection of about 10 strains, although the display cases could use brighter lighting. With Steve’s assistance, I selected the CBDrich indica-dominant strain Cannatonic, known for its pain-relieving properties, and a sativa, Super Lemon Haze. All flowers at Top Green Meds are $10 a gram across the board. The Cannatonic provided welcome relief from chronic abdominal pain (CBD is a potent anti-inflammatory). Bred from an MK Ultra mother and a G-13 Haze father, this hybrid strain also has enough THC in it (almost the vaunted 1:1 THC/CBD ratio)

to have psychoactive effects, and it definitely gives you the munchies. There are a couple of obvious reasons Super Lemon Haze is one of the most popular sativas around: taste and potency. A well-executed cross between Lemon Skunk and Super Silver Haze, it has beautiful multihued flowers and hints of sweetness in its citrusy smell. Since the effects are quite cerebral and energetic (this is definitely working weed), if you are prone to anxiety, you may want to approach with caution; but if you need nausea and pain relief but still need to get shit done, this is your strain. Top Green has reasonably priced ($20 per half-gram, $35 per gram) butane hash oil (BHO), but only one variety: a 50/50 mix of Sour Diesel and OG, according to budtender Steve. I tried the oil on my Daborizer vape pen (which, unlike the cartridge varieties, has a globe and bowl with which you can use noncartridge oil), and found it to be noticeably and immediately effective.

STEVE ELLIOTT

T

op Green Meds, according to my

NO HIDDEN FEES

37


SPAS

KING’S MASSAGE Body Shampoo Sauna Expert Massage Come and see us You won’t be disappointed

13811 HIGHWAY 99 LYNNWOOD WA 98037 425-743-6183

MASSEUSE NEEDED Vina Sauna GRAND OPENING

Open 7 Days a Week

10AM - 9PM

13985 Interurban Ave., Suite 200 Tukwila, WA 98168

(206) 243-2393

ADULT PHONE ENTERTAINMENT 100s of HOT local Singles Try it FREE!! Call NOW! 18+ 206-812-2900 425-791-2900 253-579-3000 QuestChat.com 100s of HOT Urban singles are looking to hookup NOW! 18+. Try if FREE! 206-866-2002 425-297-4444 253-590-0303 MetroVibeChatLine.com

Free FORUMS & CHATROOM 206-753-CHAT 253-203-1643 425-405-4388 Free GAY CHAT 3-9pm! 206-753-CHAT 253-203-1643 425-405-4388 WebPhone on LiveMatch.com

Gay & BI Local Chat! 1-708-613-2103 Normal LD Applies 18+

#1 Chat in Seattle! HOT LOCAL SINGLES! 18+ try it FREE! 206-812-2900 425-791-2900 253-579-3000 QuestChat.com

HOT GAY, BI, & LESBIAN LOCALS Listen to ads & Reply FREE! 206-877-0877 Use FREE code 5912, 18+

#1 SEXIEST CHAT! Join the party with local singles! FREE to try! 18+ 206-577-9966 425-953-1111 253-444-2500 NightLineChat.com Always SEXY Chat! Instant live phone connections FREE to try 18+ 206-577-9966 425-953-1111 253-444-2500 NightLineChat.com Erotic Playground! 1-888-660-4446 1-800-990-9377

Seattle

206.877.0877 Tacoma

FREE PARTY LINE! 712-432-7969 18+ Normal LD Applies

$10 Buck Phone Sex Live 1 on 1 1-877-919-EASY (3279) 18+

#1 Chat in Seattle! HOT LOCAL SINGLES! 18+ try it FREE! 206-812-2900 425-791-2900 253-579-3000 QuestChat.com

WARNING HOT GUYS!

WANT TO KNOW ABOUT UPCOMING EVENTS, CONTESTS OR LOCAL PROMOTIONS? SIGN UP FOR SEATTLE WEEKLY’S PROMOTIONS NEWSLETTER. Go to: seattleweekly.com/signup

253.882.0882

FREE to listen and reply to ads!

FREE CODE : Seattle Weekly

1-888-MegaMates

Hot live Sexy Chat!!! 1-888-404-3330 1-800-928-MEET (6338)

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 2589

Hot & Nasty Phone Sex 1-800-960-HEAT (4328) 18+ Intimate Connections 1-800-264- Date (3283) Naughty Older Women 1-800-251-4414 1-800-529-5733 Private Connections Try it free! 1-708-613-2104 Normal LD Applies 18+ Sexy Swinger’s line! 1-800-785-2833 1-800-811-4048 Tired of talking to your cat? 206-753-CHAT 253-203-1643 425-405-4388 WebPhone on LiveMatch.com Ladies free to talk w/VIPs!

facebook.com/seattleweekly

filtering the best of

THE NORTHWEST!

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

seattleweekly.com/dailyweekly

38

HALLOWEEN COSTUMES COMING SOON!

HUGE SALES! 50% off Select Toys

$3.95

enhancement supplements

4 for $8.99

male

50% Off hundreds to choose from

VIVID DVDs

Largest Selection of Adult Toys, Lingerie, Shoes, Lotion, Rush & More

OVER 30,000 DVDS FOR SALE

25% off for Dancers and Baristas Super Action Adult Theatre • OPEN 24 Hours

HOLLYWOOD EROTIC BOUTIQUE

instagram.com/

12706 LAKE CITY WAY NE, SEATTLE

206-363-0056

A TRUSTED NAME IN SEATTLE FOR 37 YEARS! ALWAYS DOING OUR BEST!

www.xxxforbidden.com


Professional Services Music Lessons GUITAR LESSONS Exp’d, Patient Teacher. BFA/MM Brian Oates (206) 434-1942

Home Services Drafting/Design

Home Services Landscape Services

Real Estate for Sale King County

Any kind of

*** BANK OWNED HOUSES *** Free List With Pictures www.SeattleBankOwned.net

YARDWORK *Bark *Weed *Trim *Prune *New Sod *Thatching

*Paving Patios *Rockery/Retaining Walls *General Cleanup

Call Steve

206-244-6043 425-214-3391 lic#stevegl953kz

HOME DESIGN and CAD DRAFTING

Announcements

DS ELECTRIC Co.

New breaker panel, electrical wiring, trouble shoot, electric heat, Fire Alarm System, Intercom and Cable, Knob & Tube Upgrade, Old Wiring Upgrade up to code... Senior Discount 15%

Lic/Bond/Insured DSELE**088OT

(206)498-1459

Free Estimate Home Services Excavations

Excavation Work Specializing in Small & Medium Jobs Demolition Trenching & Grating Brush/Stump Removal Hauling Services Top Soil/Bark/Rock

WA Misc. Rentals Rooms for Rent Greenlake/WestSeattle $400 & up Utilities included! busline, some with private bathrooms • Please call Anna between 10am & 8pm • 206-790-5342

SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeks to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of love, opportunity, and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at 206-920-1376, 877-290-0543 or AndrewCorley@ outlook.com or our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376. Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless is proposing to collocate antennas on the rooftop of a building located at 2807 3rd Avenue, Seattle, WA 98121. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30days from the date of this publication to: Paul Bean, Tetra Tech, Inc., 19803 North Creek Parkway, Bothell, WA 98011, 425-482-7811, paul.bean@tetratech.com

WA Misc. Rentals Want to Share TUKWILA $550 month. Your own private living room, bedroom, bath. Private Entrance. Sink, fridge and counter area plus free TV. View, off street parking. Own parking place. Large quality home. Employed, steady income. References and deposit required. No Smoking, No Pets. 1 Adult Only. 206241-1700 Evenings

WA Misc. Rentals Want to Rent

WISH TO Rent to own, Cabin, Cottage or Trailer with water and power. Can pay $1000 per month. 206367-0913. Deperate, please help. Auctions/ Estate Sales

*WARHOL WANTED* Lichtenstein -S. Fairey, etc. Auction price competitive offers. Complimentary valuation. zyart@pacbell.net 310-259-9188

Garage/Moving Sales King County SEATAC

WELDING / TOOLS Sale! Moving out of state, must sell! Layout table, sander, hole punch, clamps, nuts, bolts, screws, welder, gas tanks and so very much more!! Serious inquiries only. Please call 206-444-0852. billandlaurie@comcast.net

Vashon Island

GARAGE SALE. Saturday & Sunday Sept. 28th. & 29th. 10am-3pm. 9318 S.W. 171st. St. Everything must go.

Employment Computer/Technology Engineering ServiceNow, Inc. has a Software Development Engineer (Req # 2209) job opportunity available in Kirkland, WA: Design, implement, test, and deploy large scale Cloud Computing solutions as part of the Cloud Computing team. Mail resume to ServiceNow, Inc., Staffing Department, 4810 Eastgate Mall, San Diego, CA 92121. Must reference Req #2209.

TECHNOLOGY Salesforce.com, Inc. has the following position open in Seattle, WA: Member of Technical Staff, Software Engineering: Develop large scale, enterprise software systems. Database design and development of scripts. For more info & to apply, go to www.salesforce.com/ company/careers

Employment General

Automobiles Classics & Collectibles

HELP WANTED!! Make up to $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! Genuine Opportunity! No Exp. Required. Start Immediately! www.themailinghub.com

45th Annual Monroe Swap Meet, October 12th & 13th, Evergreen State Fair Grounds, Monroe Wa. Vendors $40/per stall per weekend. Car Corral, $40 per stall per weekend. Free Admission. Saturday 8am-5pm. Sunday 8am-3pm. Autos, Motorcycles, Tractors, Stationery Engines, Parts, Antiques & Collectibles. www.aarcbellingham.com

Employment Social Services VISITING ANGELS Certified Caregivers needed. Minimum 3 years experience. Weekend & live-in positions available. Call 206-439-2458 • 877-271-2601

Employment Transportation/Drivers

Employment General

DRIVERS A NEW OPPORTUNITY! Are you money-motivated, outgoing & have a positive attitude? Do you have a P/U truck and want to travel the US? Take home *$2000 to $4000/week* No investment, we train. Must have valid drivers license & insurance. CALL NOW! Call 877.235.8490

CDL Flatbed Driver

Employment Career Services

Local run, no long haul. Full benefit package, Call Barry

260.255.9688 Garage/Moving Sales Kitsap County Bremerton

Classified @ 206-623-6231, to place an ad

Call

THE OCEAN Corp. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a new career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid avail for those who qualify 1.800.321.0298

My one reason for donating plasma?

PUBLIC AUCTION King County Surplus Sat October 5th -9 am

3005 N.E. 4 th, Renton, WA.

Previews Thursday, Friday 3rd-4th

No Buyers Premium Autos, Pickups, Trucks, Vans, Machinery, Heavy Equipment,much more!! Chech web for photos & lists. Harold Mather Inc. Auctioneers 253-847-9161 WSL144

www.matherauctions.com

ESTATE SALE. Thursday, Friday, Saturday. 9am-?. 8686 Tracyton Blvd. Early 1900’s J. Bauer & Co. upright piano $500. 2 sets of early 1900’s chairs, 5 pc. full bedroom set $600, Retro kitchen range, Liv. room furniture, 1 twn bed $50. Retro, Antiques, Porcelain bird collection, Lowery Organ, Lawn mower, Crafts, Sewing supplies, Christmas decor, Books & Household.

REASON #66

BIGGER MONEY: MORE MILES = MORE MONEY

$3,500 SIGN-ON BONUS MAY APPLY FOR EXPERIENCED DRIVERS

Schneider National is Hiring Truck Drivers for Dedicated Work s %XPERIENCEDDRIVERSANDRECENTDRIVING SCHOOLGRADSSHOULDAPPLY TUITION REIMBURSEMENTAVAILABLE

To show I care about my community

s (/-%7%%+,9 s  3)'. /."/.53&/22%#%.4'2!$3 s %ARNUPTO YEARBASEDONEXP

Learn more about donating plasma at

s #ONSISTENTMILES

Grifolsplasma.com

FIND YOUR

Apply online: schneiderjobs.com/newjobs More Info: 800-44-PRIDE

7726 15th N.W., Seattle, WA In addition to meeting the donation center criteria, you must provide a valid photo I.D., proof of your current address and your Social Security or immigration card to donate. Must be 18 years of age or older to donate.

REASON TO

DRIVE

ATTENTION:

AMAZON WAREHOUSE WORKERS A Class Action Lawsuit Has Been Filed Alleging That Many Current and Former

EMPLOYEES ARE ENTITLED TO BACK PAY Under the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act.

You may be owed wages for the time that you worked.

TIME MAY BE SHORT.

Call today: 1-855-436-1832 Email: amazonclaims@johnsonbecker.com

Rebecca Roe, Esq. Adam Berger, Esq. Schroeter Goldmark & Bender 810 Third Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 (206) 622-8000

Johnson Becker 33 S. 6th St., Suite 4530 Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612) 436-1800

EARN UP TO $12.00

PER HOUR

NOW HIRING IN BELLEVUE

STAFF MANAGEMENT | SMX IS HIRING IMMEDIATE WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATES FOR THE AMAZON FULFILLMENT CENTER

JOIN OUR TEAM!

UĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?Þʍ>ĂžVÂ…iVÂŽĂƒ]ĂŠ*>ˆ`ĂŠĂŒĂ€>ˆ˜ˆ˜}ĂŠEĂŠ i˜ivÂˆĂŒĂŠÂœÂŤĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜Ăƒ UĂŠ Â?i>Â˜ĂŠEĂŠĂƒ>viĂŠĂœÂœĂ€ÂŽĂƒÂˆĂŒiÆÊĂ€i>ĂŒĂŠÂ“>˜>}i“iÂ˜ĂŒĂŠĂŒi>“ UĂŠĂ•ĂƒĂŒĂŠLiĂŠÂŁnĂŠĂži>Ă€ĂƒĂŠÂœÂ?`ÆÊ-ĂŠ`ÂˆÂŤÂ?œ“>ĂŠÂœĂ€ĂŠ ĂŠĂ€iÂľĂ•ÂˆĂ€i` UĂŠĂ•ĂƒĂŒĂŠÂŤ>ĂƒĂƒĂŠ`ÀÕ}ĂŠĂŒiĂƒĂŒĂŠEĂŠL>VÂŽ}Ă€ÂœĂ•Â˜`ĂŠVÂ…iVÂŽĂƒ UĂŠLÂ?iĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠĂœ>Â?ÂŽĂ‰ĂƒĂŒ>˜`ĂŠ`Ă•Ă€>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂœvĂŠĂƒÂ…ÂˆvĂŒ UĂŠLÂ?iĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠÂ?ˆvĂŒĂŠĂ•ÂŤĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠ{™Â?LĂƒ " ÉÉÉ É6

APPLY ONLINE

DAY & NIGHT SHIFTS, FULL-TIME POSITIONS

""7ĂŠ1-ĂŠ"

apply.smjobs.com

ĂŠ  " "  ĂŠ E ĂŠ / 7  / / ,

MEDIA CODE: W09 JOB CODE: 704S

SEATTLE WEEKLY • SEPTEM BER 25 — O CTOBER 1, 2013

206-510-3539 Licensed, Bonded & Insured

University District 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apts available for pre-leasing. 206-441-4922 9am–2pm

U-DISTRICT $425-$500 All Utilities Included! Call Peir for more info (206) 551-7472

360-386-9332 Home Services Electrical Contractors

Apartments for Rent King County

Antiques & Collectibles

EOE M/F/D/V

<<<<<<<<<<< <NORTHEND MASSAGE< < FOR YOUR HEALTH < < < < LAURIE LMP, < < < < 206-919-2180 < <<<<<<<<<<<

39


NING

DININGW W W. S E AT T L E W EWEEKLY E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

Classified

Call

@ 206-623-6231, to place an ad Are you suicidal, but resisting harming yourself? We want to hear from you! The Behavioral Research and Therapy Clinics at the UW is looking for participants for a study on suicidal thoughts, feelings and behaviors. For more information, call 206-543-2505.

Singing Lessons

FreeTheVoiceWithin.com Janet Kidder 206-781-5062

FILM

MOST CASH PAID 4 GOLD JEWELRY 20%-50% MORE 24/7 CASH 425.891.1385

WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

HAP

FILM NEWSLETTER

WWW.KIRKLANDGOLDBUYER.COM aUR@N[Q`<[YV[RP\Z

The inside scoop on upcoming films and the latest reviews.

PAKALOLO MEDICAL AUTHORIZATIONS YOUR LEGALLY DEFENSIBLE RECOMMENDATION MEDICATE WIT DAKINE

Best Meds In Town! Open From 10am to 7pm Everyday!

360-265-0236

4231 OLYMPIC DR. BREMERTON, WA 98312

80Flat Fee

$

OPEN ON SATURDAYS (1) Original Patient Watermark aka â&#x20AC;&#x153;green cardâ&#x20AC;? (1) Original Designated Provider Watermark 24 HOUR VERIFICATION WEBSITE 360-275-2004 Located AVOID STRONG OPIATES in Belfair AND BARBITUATES Alternative Therapies, for pain, all qualifying conditions a healthier means of achieving your goals.

Toke Signals with Steve Elliott

DO YOU WANT TO STOP USING ALCOHOL? The UW and the Seattle VA are looking for people ages 18 and over who use alcohol frequently, have problems with it, and want to stop using it. Non-veterans are welcome! Study is evaluating whether an investigational medication is effective at reducing alcohol craving and use. Study takes 16 weeks. Volunteers will be compensated. Call Ian at 206-277-4872.

WEEKLY

MUSIC

10338 Aurora Ave N, Seattle ¡ www.foursquare.com

DANCING BARE Âť HOT BABES & COLD DRINKS ÂŤ

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY p ½ OFF DOOR 11PM-4PM 2,4,1 TUESDAY p2 FOR THE PRICE OF 1 @ THE DOOR BOEING RECOGNITION WEDNESDAY p½ OFF DOOR* MICROSOFT RECOGNITION THURSDAY p ½ OFF DOOR* MILITARY FRIDAY p½ OFF DOOR* *I.D. Required American Liberty Adult Store

FILM

HAPPY HOUR

Select from a variety of DVDs, Mags, and Toys. Buy, Sell, Trade!!!! Ask Clerk for details about how you can save $$$ on your next purchase.

Find us on Facebook @ jerrywoodhead ¡ Follow us on Twitter @dancingbarestrp OPEN MON-SAT: 11AM - 2:30AM & SUN 2PM - 2:30AM

Your source for uncut, uncensored, no-holds-barred, non-corporate-controlled cannabis news.

>> tokesignals.com - Activism - Culture - Dispensaries - Legalization - Legislation - Medical - News - Products & More

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. M / S I GTIONS NUP PRC OOMO EVENT S

Fall Edition Win TickeTs To seaTTleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Top Fall shoWs!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT NEWSLETTER

Seattle News and Events | Free Stuff

http://www.seattleweekly.com/promo/freestuff/

Find out about upcoming performances, exhibitions, TICKETS PROVIDED BY: openings Jazz alley â&#x20AC;˘ seaTTle shakespeare â&#x20AC;˘ arTs WesT â&#x20AC;˘ seaTTle public TheaTer â&#x20AC;˘ TeaTro and special zinzanni â&#x20AC;˘ seaTTle TheaTre group â&#x20AC;˘ paciFic norThWesT balleT â&#x20AC;˘ seaTTle arT events. museum â&#x20AC;˘ uW meany â&#x20AC;˘ earshoT Jazz â&#x20AC;˘ universiTy book sTore â&#x20AC;˘ Tacoma museum

AR T S AND ENTER TAINMENT scan here To enTer:

MU

pass â&#x20AC;˘ book iT reperTory TheaTre â&#x20AC;˘ Third place books

http://kaywa.me/jLKj7

Download the Kaywa QR Code Reader (App Store &Android Market) and scan your code!

Seattle Weekly, September 25, 2013  

September 25, 2013 edition of the Seattle Weekly

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you