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Quilts Displayed at

RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE

Molson Grange.

Thursday, Sept. 5, at Tonasket Community Church Noon - 5 p.m.

See Page A12

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Warrants drop past $1 million

MUD BATH

North Valley Hospital wary of proposed rule change that could jeopardize Critical Access Hospital certification BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The North Valley Hospital District hit a long-awaited milestone on Thursday, Aug. 26, as its warrant debt to Okanogan County dropped to below $1 million for the first time in recent memory. Hours before that evening’s meeting of the NVH Board of Commissioners, the hospital received its 2012 cost report settlement of $278,000, dropping the warrant level to $953,000. Warrants have dropped precipitously in the last couple of months as stalled Medicare and Medicaid payments have begun coming in and the sale of the Oroville clinic building was completed. The warrants spiked at nearly $3 million almost exactly a year ago, precipitating layoffs, the closure of the Tonasket and Oroville clinics and, most contentiously, the closure of the North Valley Assisted Living facility. “That’s a real positive thing to celebrate,” said board chair Helen Casey. “And we still have that ‘meaningful use’ money (for conversion to the federally mandated electronic records system) out there.”

HHS RULE PROPOSAL CEO Linda Michel reported on a rule change proposed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that would have a dire effect on rural hospitals - including North Valley Hospital - if

SEE HOSPITAL | PG A4

Fatal shooting near Chesaw

Death of grouse hunter investigated as homicide BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

CHESAW – The Okanogan County Sheriff ’s office is investigating the fatal shooting of a grouse hunter on Pontiac Ridge near Chesaw Monday evening as a homicide. According to Sheriff Frank Rogers, deputies responded to a report of a shooting on Cow Camp Road at around 7:15 p.m. When they arrived they found one subject who had been shot and was pronounced dead at the scene. “What we do know is that two subjects were in the area grouse hunting, neither subject is from this area but living on the west side of the state. Apparently the one subject got out of the vehicle to shoot at a grouse. The passenger in the vehicle said he then heard a shot and saw his partner with blood on him and then saw him fall to the ground,” said Sheriff Rogers. The other hunter then drove from the scene to another residence in the area where he was able to call law enforce-

SEE SHOOTING | PG A4

Brent Baker/staff photo

It was hard to tell what was the bigger attraction during the tug o’ war at Saturday’s Tonasket Comancheros Demolition Derby: the competition, or the mud. In the end the mud won out as the many of the participants willingly doused themselves. But first came the chance to hang on for dear life as a lineup of kids were defeated by the Tonasket Comancheros team. For coverage and more pictures from the Demo Derby, see page A10.

TSD approves MOU on evaluation system

State-required TPEP framework could be effective, but is big unfunded mandate BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board approved a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Monday, Aug. 26, that was drafted by a committee of administrators and teachers that charts the district’s course through the statemandated Teacher/Principal Evaluation Project requirements. Teachers will be evaluated on a yearly basis using the system, although the depth of evaluation differs from year to year based upon a number of factors. Teachers will be evaluated both upon a standard set of eight criteria (based upon what is known as the Marzano Evaluation Model) and student achievement. The achievement portion is based upon student growth, not simply raw test scores. “Our teachers are becoming confident about this process being about growth and improvement,” said middle school principal Jay Tyus, who coordinated the TPEP committee. “It’s not about some kind of mongering evil.” The four-tiered system places teachers into four categories, both in each of the eight standard criteria and as an overall evaluation: Distinguished (exceeds standards), Proficient (consistently meets standards), Basic (occasionally meets standards) and Unsatisfactory (does not meet standards). Student growth is measured on three tiers. “You cannot be ‘Distinguished’ without at least average student growth,” Tyus said. He also stressed that great lengths were taken to be certain that student

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 36

Brent Baker/staff photo

The first day of school brought bus loads of students in for the new year. It also promises to be a big year of adjustment for teachers and administrators alike as they fully implement the state-mandated Teacher/Principal Evaluation Project. growth will be evaluated for what is pertinent to what is being taught. For example, he said, in a shop class, students’ language arts proficiency won’t be what a teacher is accountable for. “In shop class, I want to see from start to finish how many kids can do vertical welds,” Tyus said. “How many kids can weld around a pipe, if that’s something that’s a standard you need to pass on the industry tests. “This whole thing is where the rubber meets the road. I know where kids were,

I know where they are (now), I did something about it.” Teachers that show two months of below-average student growth, or who fall into the Basic category, will be placed on action plans to remedy whatever issues have arisen. “This is regardless of whether a teacher is Distinguished or not,” Tyus said. “The following school year: we have to examine student growth along with other evidence. We have to examine extenuating circumstances; we have to

SEE TPEP | PG A3

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

schedule monthly conferences focused on improving student growth. “So this could be the greatest teacher you ever had in your life in your whole building, and you’re going to end up having monthly accountability meetings around student growth. Also if you have a teacher struggling around the rubric (the Marzano standard), (administrators) will be accountable to them to have these conversations. It’s about improve-

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7 Calendar A7

Classifieds/Legals A8 Real Estate A9 Cops & Courts A9

Sports Outdoors Valley Life

A10-11 A11 A12


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

SCARY STORM

Submitted by OBHS

A DeGrubb/Peerless Hotel photo by Curtis. Note the two modes of transportation in 1917.

Locals Night at the Museum Submitted by Kay Sibley

Director – Okanogan Borderlands Historical Society

Pamela Knowlton from Oroville was leaving Wal-Mart in Omak when she, like many who were in mid-county last Thursday, Aug. 29, was caught up in a fierce storm that threw rain, hail, dust, thunder, lightning and wind about in what looked to her like a tornado brewing. She said it was like nothing she had ever seen before in her 42 years. Knowlton caught several photos of the storm on her camera phone, as well as a short video (see it on our facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/ GazetteTribune). She said she filmed the storm as it moved north and east toward Home Depot. Curious, Knowlton contacted the National Weather Service about whether it was indeed a tornado and they asked her to send copies of her photos and the video. They later got back to her and said it wasn’t a tornado based on the photos from her and others. Pamela Knowlton/submitted photos

OROVILLE - Can you answer these questions: the largest live steer in the world was on display where in Oroville? How big was the animal? or are there ghosts in the Peerless? The Borderlands Historical Society is having a Locals Event Sunday, Sept. 8, your last opportunity to see this year’s exhibit before our closing on Sept. 15.

We will be open to the general public from 5 pm to 7 pm. Our special ice cream will be available as well added refreshments. Come investigate: the story of the Peerless Hotels, a video of early days at Zosel’s Mill and the narrative of three generations of the Prince family retail businesses. Perhaps you have not seen or run the model train depicting the local area from Zosel Mill up past Enloe dam. The exhibit was created by Jerry Ecklor and Gale Noel. Next years display will clev-

erly disguise the train and will not be available for viewing. The new ramp and stairs for the depot makes access easy thanks to the at cost work of Lawrence Construction Services owned by Robert Lawrence. Randall Opal of Extreme Concrete Designs was instrumental in having just the precise mix and precision for the concrete work to finish the job. The large stairs in the middle of the deck will soon be removed and a smaller set of stairs will be added toward the north end of the deck.

a 2001 Ford Focus, was traveling on the Sinlahekin Road approximately a mile south of Fish Lake Road when the driver came around a corner and went over the edge of the embankment and rolled approximately two times. There is nothing at the scene to indicate speed was a factor,” Rogers said. Carissa L. Amundson, 22, Omak, was ejected from the vehicle and pronounced dead at the scene. Garrett T. Peterson, 19, who was also in the vehicle was still at the scene when deputies and medical personal arrived. Peterson had several injuries, including a head injury. He was transported to Mid-Valley

Hospital and then later transported to Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee. The third person in the vehicle, Sophia J. Best, 19, Omak, was able to get out of the vehicle after the accident. “She then climbed up the hill to the road and walked approximately two miles down to the campground at Fish Lake where she was able to get help. Best was also transported to Mid-Valley Hospital with injuries. “At this time we believe that Amundson was the driver at the time of the accident. It is not known if alcohol or drugs were involved,” said Rogers. Amundson’s family members have been notified.

Fatal accident near Fish Lake The Gazette-Tribune

CONCONULLY – Deputies and detectives are investigating a one-vehicle fatality accident near Fish Lake and Sinlahekin roads that occurred last Monday morning. At around 6:30 a.m. on Sept. 2 Okanogan County Deputies and detectives responded to the accident scene, approximately five miles north of Conconully, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. The accident is still under investigation, but Rogers said at this time it is known that three people were in the vehicle at the time of the accident. “It appears that the vehicle,

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Kinross contributions promote area health, safety and quality of life The Kinross Kettle River – Buckhorn operation purchase an electrical equipment interface for is proud to be able to support local community ef- the generator to connect to the local Republic forts that focus on improvSchool District electriing the health, safety and cal system, the facilgeneral quality of life for ity chosen through the the people living in the area. APELL program to be Recently, we have collabothe central location rated with local organizawhere people would tions to complete some gather in case of emerinteresting and beneficial gency. The interface projects for the region. was donated to the In 2008, Kinross and the Ferry County Public local governments initiated Utility District and was the APELL program, or the installed at the school Awareness and Preparedin August. This will alness for Emergencies at low for the generator the Local Level. As part to be easily connected of this process, it was imand ready for use in the portant to identify gaps in Kinross built and donated a dunk tank to the City event of an emergency. key resources to properly of Republic for use by area groups in their fundSince 2010, Kinross raising efforts. manage and support emerhas also been assistgency situations. One essential resource that ing with infrastructure improvements to the Ferhad been missing from the Republic area was the ry County Fair Barn, an iconic structure located lack of a generator to ensure power supply at a on the fairgrounds that is often used as a venue central location that could shelter victims of major for an assortment of events throughout the year. incidents, such as high duration snowstorms and These projects have included making improvewildfires. In 2008, Kinross purchased a 500kw, ments related to heating, wiring, insulation, win480volt emergency generator that could be used dow and door replacement, foyer construction by the local community in the event of such an and landing improvements. This year, Kinross incident. In 2012, the project was expanded to matched the county with a grant to patch and re-

paint the exterior of the structure to its original barn red. By patching and painting the building, the fair barn will continue to be a steadfast feature of the Ferry County Fairgrounds, able to be used by the community for many years to come. Finally, Kinross recently donated the legendary “Dunk Tank” to the City of Republic. Echo Bay The repainted barn on the Ferry Minerals, a County Fairgrounds. subsidiary of Kinross Gold Corporation, built the dunk tank approximately 15 years ago and it has been used at various community events. We decided it was time to make the tank more accessible to the general public, and asked the City of Republic if they would like to own and manage the tank. The Kinross maintenance team made some minor repairs to the dunk tank and trailer, and it was donated to the city this summer. Local groups can now contact the city hall for more information on borrowing the tank for their fundraiser. We would like to thank all of these community organizations that have been working with us to make improvements to our local area.


SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

TPEP | FROM A1 ment, not replacement.” Despite measured optimism about the system itself, there was concern about the effects of what amounts to a massive unfunded state mandate to get the job done. “Is the state going to help us pay for this?” asked board member Lloyd Caton of the administrators. “Are you still going to be able to the rest of your job? Your sole job isn’t to evaluate teachers. That’s going to eat up a lot of your time.” “If we do it right, it will change the face of work as we know it,” said high school principal Jeff Hardesty. “We’ve had lengthy conversations where we’ll come the full circle. First we’ll freak out - at least I will - then eventually we’ll say wait, it’s manageable. We’re all a little apprehensive about it. “I just ask that you ask that question in a year. The reality is that we’ll probably have to have a conversation about restructuring our resources to do it right.” “If there’s a way, track the cost of this,” Caton said. “Because when I go to legislative meetings and we’re looking for more funding, I want to be able to tell them TPEP is costing us this much money ... Their hours are worth dollars. If they are putting dollars into (TPEP), and over here (something else) doesn’t happen... “Maybe the relief we get is

more money and more assistant principals or something to help get this work done. We’ll have to have our ducks in a row, and a sheet of numbers that says, you did this to us and it cost us $1.5 million or whatever it is.” “That’s a lot of work,” said board member Ty Olson. “”I can’t even imagine it. I appreciate your attitudes toward it.” “Be sure to express that to every teacher you see,” Tyus said. “We (administrators) have a lot of work we have to do in terms of documentation. But the teachers have to actually change their practice. And for some that means changing who they are as a person.” Turner and Tyus both expressed the significance of the collaborative nature of formulating the MOU. “That’s how we’ve been trying to move this evaluation project forward ...,” Turner said. “It’s not going to behoove us to be onesided on this.” “I think we were able to come to the conclusion that we were all in it together,” Tyus said. “We needed to solve the problem. It’s all about student success. That’s all it’s about. Student success is tied to teachers’ success, which is tied to Paul’s success. There’s not any one group that wins more than any other, except maybe the kids.”

Tonasket PTO, businesses to join forces for character traits campaign great program. “We’re going to have a monthly awards assembly that will be new TONASKET - Local busi- for the building, and we’ll try to nesses will be joining forces with have some kind of connection Tonasket Elementary School in into that. It’s a way to recognize an effort to teach kids about char- the kids.” Alexander said that the acter. The program, called “Tiger program will start by reinTraits,” involves participating forcing the character traits businesses displaying a “word already receiving focus in the e l e m e nt ar y ’s of the month,” REACH proand when gram. Those children enter “It’s a great opportui n c l u d e the business nity to build important R e s p e c t f u l they can be n d questioned on character traits through a R e sp ons ibl e ; what the word the school system,” he Eager learnmeans. If they Awesome can describe or said. “I think it’s going er, Attitude, display the trait to be a great program.” Caring and in question, the C o op erative, student would Jeremy Clark, and Honest. receive a small Tonasket Elementary School Principal “ W e ’ r e token (such as reinforcing a pen or sticker) from the business, or even just these each day with a morning announcement,” Clark said. “The verbal recognition. Kari Alexander presented kids will participate in that mesdetails of the program on behalf sage, sharing a definition and of the Tonasket Elementary what that looks like in the school PTO last week and immediate- and in the community. It would be cool to have a Tiger ly received commitments from four businesses to participate Traits banner somewhere in the (Tonasket Interiors, Lee Frank school, like the cafeteria. There’s opportunity for growth / Ace Hardware, attorney Dale within the building, and for the Crandall and dentist Rob Nau). “Kathy Duchow (a recently- community to take hold and retired teacher) went to a ‘how to invest in it as well. We’ll start with get the community involved’ con- the four (businesses) and see how ference a few years back and the many others are interested.” A partial list of other traits idea came from there,” Alexander said. “She never knew how to get included kindness, adaptability, it started, but thought with my diligence, faithfulness, forgivecommunity ties I probably could. ness, humility, optimism, perse“I don’t want the businesses verance, appreciation, committo spend a lot of money on this. ment, confidence, compassion, Even just a thank you for being cooperation, determination and respectful or being responsible modesty. Alexander said the she hopes could go a long way.” Elementary principal Jeremy to get the program launched by Clark said it was very similar to mid-September. Businesses can the national Character Counts choose to participate at any time. Those who wish to take part can program. “It’s a great opportunity to contact Alexander at (509) 429build important character traits 3493 or Chamber of Commerce through the school system,” he president Julie Alley at (509) 486said. “I think it’s going to be a 1096. By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Page A3

Is mandatory community service a self-defeating requirement? Tonasket school board grapples with question

erty.”

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Members of the Tonasket School Board all agreed that community service was something they hoped students embrace and want to involve themselves with. Whether or not to set community service guidelines as a graduation requirement was another question and led to a lengthy discussion at the board’s Monday, Aug. 26 meeting. The board did pass a community service policy at the end of the discussion, but with the caveat that it would bring the policy back into play at a future board meeting to gauge the community’s feelings on the matter. The latter part of the policy, which came directly from the Washington State School Director’s Association, gives the district plenty of leeway in whether or not to implement an actual graduation requirement: “The board will implement an incentive program to recognize students for achievement in community service and may, in its discretion, include community service in the district’s high school graduation/diploma requirements.” “When we tune into (that), it says ‘and may’” noted Superintendent Paul Turner. “And then it refers to the graduation requirements. That’s all this policy is doing.” “It’s still discretionary,” said board chairman Jerry Asmussen. Board member Catherine Stangland said that she felt that such a requirement was part of the school’s responsibility in producing educated citizens. “As part of being a public school ...we are creating citizens,” she said. “For me it’s the idea that kids are understanding that serving their community is an important value.” “I agree with that part,” Asmussen said. “But you tell a teenager to do anything the odds of them doing it again when they’re 30 is never.” “I don’t think that’s necessarily true,” Stangland said. “I think for some kids it’s just the opposite.” “I’m all for encouraging the kids to do community service,” said board member Lloyd Caton. “If you start forcing kids to do community service, it’s something they may not like the taste of and spit it out.” “You may hear the same argument that kids don’t want to learn,” Stangland said. Board member Ty Olson said that while he agreed that it was something to be encouraged, doing so was a value that needed to be taught at home first. “I don’t think we’re in the business of raising kids,” Olson said. “We’re in the business of educating them. Intellectually it’s fun to talk about this, but where the rubber really meets the road... I promise you, when I was 15-years-old and someone made me do something I didn’t want to do... my dad made me change sprinklers and to this day I don’t change sprinklers. It’s the same principle. It may not be the same task or the same job, but when people are made to do things they don’t want to do they seldom do them again.” School administrators, though not as in sharp disagreement, provided a mix of viewpoints. High school principal Jeff Hardesty said that no matter what the board decided, it was setting a

North Valley Hospital and Extended Care is proud to welcome Jeff Massart, Physical Therapist, and Aloe Otte, Occupational Therapist.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket students of all ages disembark from their bus on the first day of school, Wednesday, Aug. 28. value statement. He said that with the school’s advisory program, that a vehicle was in place to get the job done if the board decided to move in that direction, but that to be done right it would take time to implement. “If you say head this direction, I’ll say we can get there in two years,” Hardesty said. “You don’t have to pass a policy saying that this is what’s going to happen (immediately).” He said there initiatives in place, such as implementing STEM education, the Teacher/ Principal Evaluation process and an emphasis on coping with the effects of poverty, that were considered high-priority. “If you lay out a value statement ... then I will figure out how to work it into this very complex thing we call high school, and we’ll get there,” Hardesty said. Middle school principal Jay Tyus said he felt that community service was an effective way to combat some of the issues associated with poverty among the student population that would be participating in service. “If we’re going to be servant leaders, we need to teach it,” Tyus said. “That’s not raising someone else’s kid. That’s just an opportunity to say thank you. Look for needs, and solve them. We need to start to find ways around helplessness. One of our major issues in our school, was, we did not see ways around problems... Community service is a vehicle where students become empowered to see solutions to many problems. (Research shows) it’s one of the suggested activities to get rid of helplessness.” “Community service gives us a vehicle to share opportunities with kids so that they can develop learning experiences,” said special education director Liz Stucker. “They can have exposures that they may not (get at) home.” Elementary principal Jeremy Clark said his concern was about equal access of opportunities to all students. “Can we build into our system the supports needed for these kids that are on top of Mt. Hull or whatever, that don’t have gas money?” he asked. “How will they get into town?” Caton and Asmussen thought

that an incentive program, rather than a graduation requirement, might produce a better result. The board eventually passed the policy unanimously (board member Ernesto Cerillo was absent), acknowledging that as worded it didn’t require an actual requirement to be put in place. The motion included a provision to revisit the issue at the school board’s next meeting.

Addressing Effects of Poverty With nearly 70 percent of Tonasket School District students qualifying for free or reducedprice lunch, finding ways to cope with the effects of poverty has become a district priority. A number of district personnel attended a workshop this summer by Eric Jensen, author of “Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids’ Brains and What Schools Can Do about It.” “For myself it was probably one of the best professional development opportunities I’ve had, not only as an administrator but as a teacher,” Clark said. “It was really the message of hope. That’s something we’ve taken on as a motto for the school this year... empowering students to overcome the stress that they may live in in their daily lives and obstacles they may face.” Clark said that the challenge will be to let go of preconceived notions about students’ backgrounds. “It is a monumental task we face as educators,” he said. “We need to be really in tune with the students’ backgrounds, the types of students and families we serve and putting things in their paths to set them up for success.” Stangland has referenced Jensen’s book at several board meetings, including during the community service discussion. Turner said that Jensen’s research was something that he intends to use to shape the district’s direction this year. “Wow,” he said of the conference. “The information he threw out there and the takeaways made you really re-think things. It was really good stuff. It fit right along with our ‘problem of practice’ that we addressed the board with (earlier this year regarding) pov-

Clark Discussses State Report Card Clark discussed a letter that he sent to elementary school parents that described the school’s status as an “Emerging Priority” school and action steps that are being taken to improve the school’s standing. Schools are rated relative to one another in categories that include “Reward,” “Focus,” “Priority,” and an “Emerging” category that adds onto the Focus and Priority designations. Though the actual definitions of the categories are much more complex (and can be found at http://w w w.k12.wa.us/esea/ publicnotice.aspx), in short the Reward schools are the top 10 percent of schools in reading and math for the past three years (all of the measurements are for three-year averages for Title I eligible schools). The next chunk of schools do not receive any designation. Emerging schools (of which there were more than 150) are those that are not on the Priority or Focus schools (lowest achieving) lists, but are taken from a list of schools deemed to be at risk of falling into either of those categories. “It was tough to send (the letter) out,” Clark said. “I wanted you (the board members) to be aware that it’s out there so you’re able to address questions from anyone in the community.” Clark said that he has seen significant improvement already, but that because the scores are based on a three-year average it will be at least another year before Tonasket can be removed from the “Emerging” list. “We don’t have our new AMO statistics, which is what placed us into the Emerging Priority status,” he said. “The state ... went back to 2009-10, and based on the average of those three years. They looked at our Level 1 and Level 2 (the lowest of five levels) students. We had too many in those populations.” Clark said he was looking forward to the new scores being released. “By my number crunching, I do believe, at least in the categories for all students in both math and reading, it appears we met our AMO (targets) in the school year. Unfortunately with the three year average we can’t step out of (Emerging Priority) this year, but I have very high hopes and expectations with the staff that by next year we’ll be able to overcome that. Hopefully we’ll soon be seeing the accolades Jeff Hardesty has seen in the high school.” Staffing The school board also approved (as part of the consent agenda) the hiring of Stephanie Schertenleib as the head high school girls basketball coach; Jay Aitcheson as seventh grade football coach; Lesa Sevin Smith as part time elementary outreach teacher and certificated substitute Kelsey Smith. They also approved the resignations of special education parapro Ben Blaney and transportation / maintenance custodian Pat Stevens. Earlier at the July 29 meeting, the board also approved the hiring of middle school teacher Michele Fancher; birth-age 3/grade 1-5 ECE teacher Kari Tommervick; middle school math teacher Carissa Haug; middle school food service clerk Dawn Garton; and nine migrant / bilingual summer school staff. The Tonasket School Board next meets on Monday, Sept. 9, at 7:30 p.m.

Notice of Public Meeting International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control The International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control is holding its annual public meeting regarding the regulation of Osoyoos Lake water levels and the related operation of Zosel Dam by the State of Washington under the International Joint Commission’s Orders of Approval. The Board will provide an overview of 2013 lake levels to date and invite comments, concerns and questions from the public.

Please plan to attend

North Valley Health & Rehab-Oroville

Monday-Thursday 8:00AM to 4:00PM 1417 N. Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-4050

North Valley Health & Rehab-Tonasket

Monday-Friday 8:00AM to 4:00PM 203 S. Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855 509-486-2784

Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 7:00 PM Walnut Beach Resort (Vista Room) 4200 Lakeshore Drive, Osoyoos, BC

International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control Bruno Tassone Chair, Canadian Section For further information, please contact: in Canada: Gwyn Graham (604) 664-4052 or visit http://www.ijc.org/

Cynthia Barton, Ph.D. Chair, United States Section in United States: Marijke van Heeswijk (253) 552-1625


Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

HOSPITAL | FROM A1 put into effect. The rule would eliminate Critical Access Hospital designation for about 70 percent of the nation’s hospitals. That would include NVH, Mid-Valley Hospital of Omak, Brewster and Chelan. “Critical Access Hospitals were established in 1977 because rural hospitals were closing everywhere because they could not make it in the ‘prospective payment system,’” Michel said. “So they came up with the CAHs, that let us get reimbursed in a cost-based system so rural communities could be served.” Because NVH has another medical facility within 35 miles of it, it (as well as the other hospitals) would be stripped of its CAH designation. Of the 39 CAH hospitals in the state, only 13 would retain their status. “They have no consideration for how far you have to travel,” Michel said. “They won’t close us - but if they decertify us we can’t survive.” Commissioner Lael Duncan said that the issue would require phone and email campaigns to legislators to prevent such a rule from taking effect. “I think part of this is political maneuvering as well,” she said. “Their first offer (may be) to take away everything and then get back to a middle ground. But it’s still frightening.” “It would be huge,” said board chair Helen Casey. It’s really a travesty. Just devastating.”

Boiler Update Kelly Cariker, who has been overseeing the replacement of the hospitals’ aged boiler system, said that McKinstry representatives had visited that day, this time with engineers on hand. “They were looking at more of the nuts and bolts of what actually has to take place during deconstruction of the boiler and construction of Phase I,” Cariker said. “We looked at moving water

lines and how things would work without losing services at the hospital.” He said that IRS Environmental (a toxic substance remediation outfit, not the federal tax agency) provided a plan should any asbestos be encountered while removing the old boiler, which dates to the 1950s. “They wanted to get an idea, if as we decommission the boiler, if we run into any asbestos inside the boiler, they would be able to take care it,” Cariker said. “They’ve abated the room in the past, so there is nothing on the exterior. The only thing we need to worry about inside; without knowing what’s in there, they’re being cautious about that. They were really down and detail-oriented.”

‘Obamacare’ Patient Financial Services director Jana Symonds reported that a speaker from the Washington State Insurance Exchange Commission had been invited to speak to both hospital staff and the public about the new Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) insurance exchanges. “It’s outlining how the program works and who qualifies,” Symonds said, saying a tentative date was Sept. 12. “When it’s confirmed that they’ll be here then, we’ll get the information out as best we can. Business Development Coordinator Terri Orford added that she has begun putting together a presentation to take to community groups to help educate the public as to how the exchanges will function as well. “Jana and I will be meeting to talk about the role her department will play and I will play in connecting to the community,” Orford said. The NVH Board of Commissioners next meets for a special meeting on Monday, Sept. 9, at 7 p.m., in lieu of its regular board meeting on Sept. 12.

Tonasket council to resume reviewing city code, sets meeting By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The Tonasket City Council, in an effort to return to its long-standing attempts to update city codes, set a date for a meeting specifically dedicated to that activity during its Tuesday, Aug. 27, session. Continuing discussion about the city’s noise ordinance, which at different times has been described as too vague to be effective but also specific enough to be used as a “weapon” in a dispute between neighbors, was front and center of in that discussion. Council members Jean Ramsey and Claire Jeffko had met with Police Chief Rob Burks since the council’s early August meeting and requested he find other cities’ noise ordinances to use as a tool for revising the Tonasket code. They had not yet had time to fully review those or discuss them with Burks. “We want to pick out the good, the bad and the ugly from what other cities have,” Ramsey said. Jeffko said she questioned whether or not the ordinance, which as currently written only requires a complaint from one individual to get a neighbor written up for a ticket, could be used as a way for one neighbor to

harass another. “That’s kind of what’s gone on and why I’m concerned,” said Mayor Patrick Plumb. “There’s a couple of things that needed to be addressed so they could deal with loud stereos and loud mufflers. Nothing is determined yet…. “There’s two lines of thought. Do we want it quiet all day in town? Or only during certain hours?” At the heart of the matter was the issue of officer discretion, which council member Jill Vugteveen noted was discussed regarding a different situation with the noise ordinance over a year ago. “We punted it to (city attorney) Mick Howe because we need to figure out how we can word it so we can get what Rob wants with officer discretion,” Vugteveen said. “That’s where it ended, in Mick’s hands. We wanted to be able to address things that are issues in the city limits, like the mufflers and stereos.” “She’s right,” Plumb said. “But now what happened was I brought it back to council because of some questions about what I conversed with Mick about: can one person file a complaint repeatedly and expect at the end that someone else is going to get a ticket? Can it

be used as a harassment tool? The response back, was, ‘Yes.’” Plumb asked Ramsey and Jeffko to meet with Burks again after they had had a chance to review the other cities’ ordinances. “It’s an old, old, old problem that’s been going on for 30 years,” Jeffko said. “Every time it crops up we’ll need to deal with it.” That and other city code will be discussed at a special city council meeting dedicated to that purpose on Saturday, Sept. 21, at 1 p.m. at the Kuhler Bar and Grill. Also, a special town hall meeting to discuss the proposed sidewalk ordinance was scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 18, at 5:30 p.m. in the council chambers. The ordinance, if enacted, would set parameters for sidewalk access in the downtown business core.

Transportation Ballot Plumb, who serves as the city’s representative on the Okanogan County Transportation Authority board, said that the board’s plan to put a 0.4 percent sales tax hike for public transportation enhancements could be in jeopardy due to a lack of funds. He said that, because it would be on the ballot for the entire county it could cost as much as $10,000 that could be difficult to

raise in a limited amount of time. “It’s quite expensive,” he said. “There is a meeting in early September to hear the latest and greatest on that.”

Other Items The council approved an ordinance to amend existing code to set the speed limits on roads included in the Bonaparte Creek/ Mill Drive annexation completed last winter. Bonaparte Avenue and Bretz road will now have posted speed limits of 15 miles per hour. “The (kids) darting that is going on because (vehicles are) parking length wise and not parallel; they have a lot of running speed to get out in the road,” Plumb said, adding that at least one of the residents in that area was pleased with the new speed limit. The council also set its 2014 budget dates. Various steps of the budget will be on the agenda for each of the regular meetings of the city council through the end of November, with a special budget workshop meeting also scheduled for Oct. 9. If all goes according to schedule the 2014 budget will be adopted Nov. 26. The Tonasket City Council next meets on Tuesday, Sept. 13, in the council chambers.

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HOSPITAL | FROM A1 ment. The shooting occurred near a residence and deputies have interviewed people in the area including the two subjects living at the residence, which was approximately 100 yards away. “We are treating this as a murder investigation but no arrests have been made at this time. We do have people of interest and detectives are still on scene,” said

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Rogers. The Washington State Patrol Crime Lab has also been called to assist in processing the scene. “As more information comes in additional information will be released. This is the fifth murder in Okanogan County this year,” said the sheriff. The name of the victim is being withheld at this time pending the notification of family members.

Lightening-caused fire doused By Shannon O’Brien

Washington State Department of Natural Resources and Forest Service firefighters continue to work together to respond to fires as are reported. Another Wethey have the PLAN! reconnaissance flight was scheduled for Saturday afternoon. To report a forest fire, please call 911.

Liar’s Cove Report lower Conconully Reservoir. This year has been the best fishing and Liar’s Cove Resort the largest fish we have seen in CONCONULLY - FishING has the last five years. Most everystill been pretty good even though body is still fishing over by the it is pretty warm. Kelly Pritchard dam. We have two young ladies from Olympia, Wash., caught this Monica and her mother Leanne 18-inch rainbow using a 3-foot Delosh who fish almost everyday kiddy pole. Kelly was using orange and catch their limit of rainbows. Power Eggs with a worm. She was Monica has caught 3 rainbows 18 fishing over by the dam on the inches or over 3 days in a row. OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 29, 2013 Submitted by Gene Bussell

TONAKSET - Firefighters responded to a fire southeast of Lyman Lake on Friday, Aug. 30. The Lost Fire was less than an acre, burning in grass and timber about 30 miles southeast of Tonasket. It was caused by Thursday’s lightning storm and found during a reconnaissance flight Friday afternoon. Crews are mopping up Saturday. It is common for lightning caused fires to take several days to show up following a storm.

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Throughout the day – Penelope the Clown 8:00 am – 12:00 pm Horse Gaming in both Arenas 8:30 am Livestock Judging CDE; Agronomy Judging CDE to follow 9:00 Fairgrounds open to public 9:00 am – 4:00 pm Scavenger Hunt in Photography Barn TBA Frozen T-Shirt Contest – Rabbit Barn 10:00 am Paul Isaak – Main Stage 10:30 am Round Robin Fitting & Showing Contests 10:30 am Mutton Bustin’ 11:00 am Best Dressed Rabbit contest 11:15 am Stoddard & Cole – Main Stage 12:30 pm Berrinzhe Norteno Mexican Band – Main Stage 1:00 pm Okanogan Roping Club Team Roping & Women’s Barrels – Rodeo Arena 1:00 pm Dancing Horses - Grandstands 1:00 pm On the Track: Horse Races, Junior and Senior Pony Express, Women’s Pony Express of two horses 1:00 pm Low Rider Racing – during Horse Races 1:30 pm Paul Isaak – Main Stage 2:45 pm Stoddard & Cole – Main Stage 3:00 pm Market Livestock Sale – Berg Pavillion 3:00 pm Rabbit Tattooing 3:00 pm Davis Shows Northwest Carnival 4:00 pm Rabbit Breed ID Quiz 4:30 pm Mutton Bustin’ 5:00 pm Paul Isaak – Main Stage 5:00 pm Truck & Tractor Pull – Grandstands 6:00 pm Scout/Cub night (former & present scout gathering) – Cub Scout Barn – back of Commercial Bldg. 6:30 pm Stoddard & Cole – Main Stage 7:00 pm Rabbit Agility 7:00 pm Rodeo - Grandstands Intermission during Rodeo - Dancing Horses 9:00pm – 11:00pm Band on Main Stage 11:00 pm Fairgrounds closed to public

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Penelope the Clown Fairgrounds open to public Market Swine Judging Rabbit Judging (Horse classes) Intermediate and Adult Horse Fitting & Showing – North Arena, Adult Riding and Halter classes – North Arena, Intermediate Riding classes – North Arena, Senior and Junior Fitting & Showing – South Arena, Youth Halter classes – South Arena, Senior and Junior Riding classes – South Arena Produce Judging Contest-south of Arts & Crafts Building Rowdy Refs – Main Stage PUD Demonstration FFA Tractor Driving CDE Competition-Infield Rabbit fitting and showing demonstration Paul Isaak – Main Stage Davis Shows Northwest Carnival opens Rabbit toenail trimming demonstration Rowdy Refs – Main Stage Rabbit agility course demonstration Paul Isaak – Main Stage Youth Horsemanship Class sponsored by Sam & Raci McKee Royalty Pageant - Main Stage After Pageant – Project 3:16 Band – Main Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013: Throughout the day 9:00 am 9:00 am 9:00 am – 3:00 pm: 10:00 am 11:00 am 11:15 am 11:30 am 12:00 pm 1:15 pm 2:30 pm 3:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:15 pm 5:30 pm 5:30 pm 6:00 pm 6:30 pm 7:00 pm 8:00 pm 10:00 pm

Penelope the Clown Fairgrounds open to public Livestock, Poultry & Rabbit Fitting & Showing (Horse classes), Horse Trail classes (all ages) – North Arena Youth Western classes – South Arena, English classes – South Arena, Driving classes – South Arena Rowdy Refs – Main Stage PUD Demonstration Stoddard & Cole – Main Stage Mutton Bustin’ Paul Isaac – Main Stage Rowdy Refs – Main Stage Stoddard & Cole – Main Stage Davis Shows Northwest Carnival Paul Isaak – Main Stage Mutton Bustin’ Stoddard & Cole – Main Stage Dancing Horses – Guillermo Hernandez from Rock Island – Large Arena Horse Racing Registration – Horse Office Truck & Tractor Pull – Grandstands Olivia de la Cruz – Main Stage unconfirmed as of 8-23-13 Scott Krippayne – Main Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

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A “ONE PAY” GATE GETS YOU IN TO SEE ALL EXHIBITS, RODEO, ENTERTAINMENT, HORSE RACING, AND ENTRANCE TO THE CARNIVAL. (does not include carnival rides)

ALL PRICES PER PERSON EXCEPT FOR 1-DAY FAMILY PASS. DAILY THURSDAY THRU  SATURDAY .........................................................................................................$8.00 SUNDAY ......................................................................................................................................................$5.00 PER PERSON- SEASON PASS (4 DAYS) .....................................................................................................$20.00 1-DAY PASS PER FAMILY (2 ADULTS, 3 KIDS) ...........................................................................................$25.00 KIDS 5 AND UNDER.................................................................................................................................... FREE

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013: Throughout the day – Penelope the Clown 8:00 am Awards in Rabbit Barn 9:00 am Fairgrounds open to public 9:30 am Cowboy Church – Main Stage 10:00 am Parade of Champions 10:00 am Davis Shows Northwest Carnival 10:30 pm Paul Isaak – Main Stage 12:00 pm Horse Races 12:00 pm Sign-ups for Mutton Bustin’ Finals (55 lb weight limit) 12:30 am Mutton Bustin’ (Belt Buckle Finals!) 1:00 pm Team Roping and Women’s Barrels 1:00 pm Paul Isaak – Main Stage 1:00 pm Fur & Feather Auction – Berg Pavillion 2:00 pm Royalty Coronation – Main Stage 3:00 pm Fairgrounds closed to public

To contact Okanogan County Fairgrounds: fair@co.okanogan.wa.us Phone: (509) 422-1621 Fax: (509) 422-1203 Cell Phone: (509) 322-1621 PO Box 467 175 Rodeo Trail Rd. Okanogan, WA  98840

www.okfair.org

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SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

‘Community Service’ debate a good thing

Just as our national leaders are going to debate what we should do in response to the use of chemical weapons in Syria, having the debate over requiring community service in our schools is a good thing. There seems to be a growing number of vocal people, especially living within the Tonasket School District, that think requiring volunteer community service is not something their district should be doing. Required Volunteerism is definitely an oxymoron and maybe it would be a good start to eliminate any notion of the “V” word from consideration. The district could still require community service as a graduation requirement, if that’s what is decided on a local basis – but Out of volunteering it ain’t. No more than being My Mind pressed into a chain gang or being ordered by Gary A. DeVon the court to do community service is volunteering. However, if community service in our schools is not used as a punishment, but as a learning opportunity, then it will continue to have value. Value to students and value to the community alike. The idea of making our graduates get a taste of serving their community as a graduation requirement seems to have been a positive for students in Tonasket, an early adopter of the community service program, and of Oroville too. Many good things have come from the program. New benches, fixed bleachers, help for civic organizations and much much more. The students will take from it what they want – either they’ll find they like working with and for the community or they won’t – just like many things involved in education. Not everyone sees the value in learning algebra either. We’ve all had to take classes that we know, or think we know, will never be used later in our career path. In some cases if we’d been paying better attention maybe they would have helped us and now we have to do things the hard way. And like these unliked classes, after our students graduate they can go on to further their education, get jobs and perhaps never give back to their communities other then by becoming good citizens and paying their taxes. That’s alright too, but we think most, if not all will look back on what they did for their community with pride. The biggest problem once we get past the “V” word is probably the difference in what each student takes on as his or her task. Some students definitely do the minimum, while others tackle much larger projects. Sometimes that might be a matter of funding – some students have access to more financial means than others. The program should probably be judged more on the students’ ability to meet the minimum requirements – it’s hard to compete when you have to raise the money for your projects all by yourself – especially when 50 of your fellow classmates are trying to do the same. These are the kind of details the Tonasket and Oroville School Boards, school boards all across the state, will have to wrestle with – especially if one day the state makes community service a statewide graduation requirement. It would be a sad thing if this program disappeared over the appearance that kids are being forced to “volunteer” rather than making community service a class or program requirement just like reading, math or writing. However, having a Jesuit post-high school education, maybe the idea we should be helping our students be more rounded through education, not just teach the basics and graduate them along, has permanently colored my thinking.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Hasting doesn’t have to care Dear Editor, “Hastings drops by” read the headline in the Gazette-Tribune. I think I would have titled it, “Hastings slips into town and out again.” Had I known he was coming I would have gone and asked him some questions, but like most politicians I’m sure he doesn’t like unscripted stuff. In the interview Doc dwelled a bit on how Medicaid and Medicare payments were often delayed to struggling hospitals like ours. His ire was raised: “The federal government should be like everyone else; they need to pay their bills on time.” (I love the use of the pronoun, “they”-that darned government - it’s certainly not anything Doc’s a part of!) “We never really get a good answer (about reimbursement delays).” Why not? You gotta wonder what Doc actually does in Washington D.C. Why doesn’t he focus on this instead of voting on bill after bill repealing Obamacare?

Why doesn’t Hastings ever acknowledge that Obamacare will help tens of thousand of hard working Americans in his district? Instead he blames his not doing anything about delayed payments to our hospital on Obamacare. You gotta wonder why Hastings doesn’t care about people who don’t have health insurance. I think it is because he and his family have the best of government paid healthcare, and he doesn’t have to care about other people. Rob Thompson Tonasket

Tree Board a good first step Dear Gary, It is encouraging that Oroville now has a Tree Board. Hopefully it will be able to prevent the type of wanton destruction that occurred with the school’s trees and has also been noted elsewhere around town – for example that once stately stand of old cottonwoods south of town that suffered a butcher job and are now dead. It certainly sends a message to those entering Oroville. We hope the Board will not confine their efforts not only to street trees, but will also

be able to protect and enhance the rest of the town’s tree population. Many towns have done tree surveys in order to identify those of particular value and interest and have worked with landowners to protect these “Legacy” trees as well as encourage new plantings that will become the legacy trees of the future. We also hope the Board will turn their attention to the many valuable shade trees in the Veteran’s Park. Many of these appear stressed or even dying, perhaps due to lack of adequate water? It would be a shame to lose these trees just because someone forgot to turn on a hose. Henry Thoreau, the famed naturalist, said it well: “What are the natural features that make a town handsome? A river, with its waterfalls and meadows, a lake, a hill, a cliff or individual rocks, a forest and ancient trees standing singly. If the inhabitants of a town were wise, they would seek to preserve these things.…It would be worth the while if in each town there were a committee appointed to see that the beauty of the town received no deterrent.” Something to think about! Jessica McNamara Tonasket

Is public records law abused? OPINION BY JERRY CORNFIELD JCORNFIELD@HERALDNET.COM

Those looking for a more transparent government are increasingly relying on public records to make it happen. They hope the more documents they obtain the clearer their view of what’s really going on behind closed doors in school districts, city halls and county buildings. But there are those throughout the public sector convinced some of these Washingtonians are abusing the Public Records Act. An alliance of government forces — whose members often are the targets of the records — tried unsuccessfully earlier this year to rewrite the act to make it easier to repel requesters whose motives they question. With the help of Republican and Democratic lawmakers, they pushed a bill to make it easier for public agencies to block requests and to limit the time spent compiling records. Though the bill died in the legislative process, the matter reappeared in the state budget in the form of a provision to spend $25,000 contemplating ways to help governments deal with records requests they consider harassing. Lawmakers tapped the Ruckelshaus Center, a joint venture of the University of Washington and Washington State University, to facilitate a conversation between those in the alliance and those who viewed the failed bill as an unprecedented attack on citizens’ right to petition their government. By Dec.

15, the center is supposed to put forth recommendations. The effort is just getting off the ground and folks at the center are tamping down expectations what will emerge. Michael Kern, the center director, said this week the time frame is too tight to pull the parties together for fruitful face-to-face sessions presuming everybody on all sides is interested in doing so. The game plan is to speak with 20 to 30 people who’ve been visible and vocal in the legislative conflict then prepare an assessment of the situation based on what center staff hears in the interviews. “We’ll report what the diverse interests say,” he said. “It will not include our opinions because we don’t have opinions. We are a neutral third party.” That’s not quite what Democratic Rep. Dean Takko of Longview envisioned when he helped persuade leaders of his party to put the proviso in the budget. Takko, who sponsored the failed bill, hoped the skilled forces at the center could blaze a trail lawmakers could not. “Myself and quite a number of other people think there’s something we need to address,” said Takko, a former Cowlitz County assessor and Cathlamet City Council member. “I don’t think anybody wants to hide public records. What we’re trying to do is stop frivolous requests.” Now, he’ll take whatever they provide this

winter as a possible starting point for legislation in 2014. “In all honesty, we probably will not be a whole lot further than when the session ended,” he said. “It’s a big enough issue that we have to take some baby steps forward.” Another person interested in talking with Kern’s team is Jason Mercier, an analyst with the Washington Policy Center and member of the Washington Coalition for Open Government. The coalition strongly opposed Takko’s bill. He sees no reason to change the Public Records Act. The problem isn’t the law, he said, but officials understanding of it. Many do not realize what tools are already available to them when someone submits one of those so-called burdensome requests. He suggested lawmakers asked the wrong question with the budget proviso. Leaders in local governments say hefty requests can chew up staff time and taxpayer dollars but there’s no data on how much time and money is wasted to back up their claims, he said. Getting the answer would really inform the discussion, he said. Sounds like something a public records request, or two, could clear up. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www.heraldnet.com. Contact him at (360) 352-8623 or jcornfield@heraldnet.com.

Back to school: Restoring local control to our communities It’s that time of year again. The fun-filled days of summer vacation are drawing to a close and teachers and students across Central Washington are heading back into the classroom for a new school year. Throughout the year, I often meet with local teachers, administrators, parents, and students on ways we can improve our educational system and better serve our students. The resounding message that I hear is the need for more local control and less interference Rep. Doc from the federal govHastings ernment. A decade has passed WA-4th Dist. since Congress first passed the bipartisan No Child Left Behind Act. While there is no doubt this law is far

from perfect, it established a level of accountability for the first time by insisting on results for the billions of federal dollars spent on education. However, many improvements can and must be made. It is clear that a one-size-fits-all approach to education is not in the best interest of our students. Education programs that work well for students in Seattle may not be the best fit for those in Yakima or Moses Lake. In my view, students in Central Washington and all across the country are best served when decisions about education are made by local school districts and parents – not the federal government. Recently, the House of Representatives passed, with my support, the Student Success Act. This important legislation helps restore flexibility and local control of public education programs by putting decisions about student’s education back where it should be – in the hands of parents and local school districts. This bill restores power to states by elimi-

nating an existing federal one-size-fits-all student progress requirement and replacing it with state determined accountability systems. The Student Success Act also saves hardworking taxpayer dollars by eliminating more than 70 duplicative and unnecessary federal education programs that further create bureaucratic red tape for local schools. I urge the Senate to act swiftly and pass the Student Success Act to ensure that American students have access to the quality of education they deserve. I will continue working to restore local control and decision-making, and ensure hardworking taxpayer dollars are spent wisely. I wish all the teachers, students, and parents in Central Washington a safe and successful 2013-2014 school year. Hastings, Congressman from Washington State’s Fourth U.S. Congressional District, is Chairman of the House Committee on Natural Resources.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Ready for September? Are we ready for September? The summer, hot as it was, some days, is pretty much behind us. School has started, it’s getting dark earlier, some of the pears have been picked, folks are finding themselves with more tomatoes and zucchini’s than they know what to do with, and soon apple harvest will be upon us. When someone offers a zucchini, take it, grind it up, and be half way there to making a warm bread to share with someone and a cup of tea or coffee or eat while it’s hot with butter dripping off it, all by yourself, or make the bread and give to a shut-in, or neighbor, just to be nice. I have tomatoes coming from all directions, (and I love’em all). I get “funny looks” from my companion, when I have toast with sliced tomatoes on it for my breakfast. I tell him if I had to eat boring oatmeal in the winter and grape nuts in the summer, I’d just skip the whole thing. Oh! well! To each his own! I heard on the news that Seattle has now surpassed the California cities for having the most pot smokers, having open gatherings on the streets celebrating the passage of the recent bill for allowing marijuana to be used in public. The pictures that were shown were disgusting (or so it seemed to me). What a thing to celebrate. The many random shootings that the young folks are guilty of couldn’t be a result of such, now could they? I was told by someone, who seemed to be in “the know,” that the Peerless furnishings were being moved to Chelan. How about that? It was reported to us at the Senior Center that Dal Wilder was flown to the hospital in Seattle with heart issues, and is doing well.

2014 Hometown Soldier Calendar submissions open Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck NCW Blue Star Mothers

It’s time to gather photos for this year’s Hometown Soldier Calender and we want your son or daughter to be a part of it! Send us 1-3 photos of your Soldier, Airman, Sailor, Marine, Guard, or Patrol in uniform: formal, at work, or working out! The higher the resolution the better keeping them above 640x480 pixels in size (the bigger, the

NVCS classes begin this month Submitted by Jackie Valquette

Bill Greene is home and released to drive to the orchards, and obseerve that things are moving along. He looks real good, but will need a lengthy time of recuperation. A family member tells me Bud Gerken is doing well and beginning to get out and about a bit. It seems crowds were not a good thing for him as he recovered from a series of strokes, but he is beginning to adjust. John Wayne says: Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway! Condolences to the family of Bruce Cool. His death has taken a friendly, funny guy from the community, of which he had been a member for a lengthy time. A young boy wrote on his exam that “A natural death is where you die by yourself without a doctor’s help” I think Bruce would have smiled at that! Do no regret growing old. It is a privilege denied to many! For a quickie supper….heat up a can of chili in the microwave, in a shallow dish. Put a cup or two of hot cooked rice on top of the chili. Spread grated cheese on top and return to the microwave ‘til the cheese melts. Top with sliced green onions or chopped onion. Serve with a green salad (or sliced tomatoes and cucumbers) this time of the year, garlic toast and there you have it! Easy, quick and good. Or make a Rueben sandwich…they’re good too. Butterflies taste with their feet…that is a fact! I’m glad human’s don’t. It would be very messy and most difficult, don’t you think? So much money is spent on foolish things in this wonderful country of ours. Like the mating habits of poly- wogs, or

BLUE STAR MOTHERS better). We’d love to see one with Mom in the photo, too! Who’s eligible to be in the calendar? The only requirements are that the mother’s or serviceperson’s hometown is in North Central Washington and the serviceperson is currently serving in a branch of the U.S. Military or Boarder Patrol. Please extend this invitation to others who are eligible. You do not have to be a member of the NCW Blue Star Mothers to submit a photo but

THE LEARNING TREE

North Valley Community Schools

We’re back! And, there are more than 40 classes from which to choose during September through December! We have several new classes as well as

those that are popular every time they’re offered. Just a few coming up in September are Art of Welding, Is Your Dog Training You, and Three Cheese

September events at the CCC

COMMUNITY CULTURAL CENTER

Submitted by Aurora Jones CCC of Tonasket

Wednesday, Sept. 18 - A Priceless Legacy: Honoring Frank S. Matsura Photographer, 18731913 presented by the Okanogan county Historical Society. Al Camp will present “Looking Through the Lens” starting at 7 p.m. This presentation is free. Saturday, Sept. 21 - 4th Annual International Peace Day Celebration featuring the film “Roadmap to Apartheid” ñ begins at 5:30 pm with dinner followed by the film and a presentation by

Annual dues deadline Submitted by Jan Hansen Oroville Eagles

The deadline for annual dues is fast approaching. If you haven’t paid for this year you have until Sunday, Sept. 15 before being dropped. If you have paid but have not picked up your current card, please stop by, say HI!, and pick it up. There will be a memorial steak dinner for Marian Dahlin on Saturday, Sept. 14 with an auction

Bill Dienst M.D. For more info contact Rick Gillespie. Sunday, Sept. 29 - Free Community Dinner - Sunday dinner provided by the CCC and others. Dinner served from 2-4 pm. Free for those who need it, by donation for others. Call Janet at 486-2061 for more info. Friday and Saturday October 4-5 - CCC Rummage Sale 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Donations of good saleable items can be brought to the center on Tuesdays and

EAGLEDOM AT WORK to follow. Dinner from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Donations are appreciated. Starting this month we will be sending, via e-mail, updates, current and future events to our members with current e-mail addresses. If you want to be included let us know and we will add you to our list. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesdays of the month

Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

how far it is to mars and many other far reply, “Oh, I know where that is, we fetched things that money is wasted on. went through there, once, on our way How about using that money to fight into Canada.” We even met a man in the importing and growing of drugs Japan, during the World’s Fair, a lot of and do something construcyears ago, and he asked if tive? You can’t tell me if we we knew Dick Forrester, as can go to the moon, mulhe was a carpet salesman and tiple times, and many of the came to Oroville and played other projects that take milgolf on our beautiful course. lions and billions of dollars, It is a much smaller world, that the drug problem in the than it used to be, that is for U. S. couldn’t be brought sure. under control, and until it is, Mentioning Forrester’s… there is going to continue to Richard had surgery last be all the killings, suicides, week and reports are that he accidental deaths, and other is doing well. forms of mayhem that people THIS & THAT Growing older brings on do when they are “high” on Joyce Emry new problems, and as it is the results from using “dope” said, “getting old ain’t for of one kind of another. It sissies.” gets no better. They just keep coming Clayton and I took a “drive about up with new forms of junk that often town” last Saturday visiting River Oaks kills from the use. There is too much Park, which is located southwest of Main money being made from drug sales and Street on the river, and found that it was too many who don’t want the problem almost full to capacity and the majority solved, or so it seems to me. We need of the camp trailers had Canadian license to stop drugs, not legalize them. I hope plates. Then we toured the Veteran’s City the Seattle folks are happy with passage Park and about the same held true there, of that law. and of course the same holds true at We can’t keep things in order here on Veranda Beach. Lots of those folks like earth so why are the “powers that be” the U.S. and they buy lots of butter and so gung-ho on discovering new planets. cheese, too! When we get our own house in order, Also some property sales have been and have time and money on our hands, made. Barb and Monty Drummond have then perhaps new places could be looked sold their lake home. Joan and Bruce for. I’ll get off my soap box now. I Cool sold some while back and you know there are many who don’t agree wanna guess who bought those properwith me and I don’t expect you too, but, ties…yeah, Canadians. so far I can speak my mind, sometimes. I was sorry to hear that the former Every new day is another chance to Blackler & Evans holdings had been change your life!! sold. They were pioneers of the valley Gary’s recent editorial about trying and among the first to set out orchards. to explain where Oroville was located As a young gal I worked for Mrs. reminded me of the many times I’ve Evans, mostly just sitting with her aged tried doing that. When I start by saying, mother, and she told me how her son, “Oh! it’s a small place you probably Arthur, would bring apple trees on the never heard of” and how often they’ll train, from Chicago coming down the

room is limited and priority will go to those who choose to stand as members. For membership information, contact Georgie Berry at 429-2662. Be sure to include the following five pieces of information: The serviceman’s/woman’s formal military title (i.e. 1st Lt Bob Smith), their job title (i.e. Battalion Chemical Officer), where they are stationed (i.e. Fort Bliss, TX), their hometown, the serviceperson’s birth date (we would like to send a birthday card!) Deadline is Sept. 30, 2013. Send submissions or questions to ncw.bluestars@yahoo.com or call Daralyn at (509) 485-2906 for further instructions.

Chili Rellenos. They all start on Monday, Sept. 16. Pick up a catalog in stores around Oroville and Tonasket. It’s more user-friendly this time, at least we think so! To register for a class call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email her at community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu, or sign up on our website at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com. It’s time to get back to school.

Thursdays and left on the back stage by the door. All proceeds will go towards CCC operations. For more info call the center at (509) 486-1328. Save the Date! The annual CCC Fundraising Auction is scheduled for Saturday November 2 this year. We are seeking donations for our live and silent auctions. Please call Janet Culp at 486-2061 for more info. Also, the Children’s Play Group held in the CCC’s back room starts up again on Tuesday, Sept. 10. This play group is for kids age 0-5 and their caregivers and is open from 9:30 - 11:30 a.m. every Tuesday morning. Contact Aldona at (509) 485-2477 for more info. and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day and Seahawks games are always Happy Hour. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Taco Night (until Steak Night comes back) and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what’s happening at your club and join in. As always, We Are People Helping People.

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Hot August Night Car Show winners By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

OK! We are going to try this again this week. I had quite a time trying to get it through to the Gazette-Tribune. Sometimes when the fingers do the typing they miss one or two or add a couple where they are not needed, or send it into cyberspace. Aug. 24 was our Hot August Nights Car Show in Chesaw. I am going to give you the registration numbers of the cars entered and the placement they ended up in. If you know the registration number you can tell who is who. For some reason the winners list turned up missing. No fault blamed.

HILLTOP COMMENTS Here is the partial list of winners for the Hot August Nights Car show in Chesaw last weekend. We did not get a complete list. So, here is what I got: 1940 & Under - First Place, #3; Second Place, #16 and Third Place, #29; 1941-59 - First Place, #28; Second Place, #17 and Third Place, # 2 1960 & Up -First Place, #30; Second Place, #32 and Third Place, #13 Tractor Division, #10 Best of Show, #14, from Moses Lake The Eden Valley Guest Ranch hosted special guests this week that provide services for Veterans with vision problems.

Enjoy the last days of summer Submitted by the Lyle Anderson Tonasket Eagles #3002

rails through Molson and planted the orchards. Mrs. Gladys Evans was a sister of Art Blackler. They became very successful orchardists but also had some ups and downs, then after the elders passed on, son Perry (and other family members) have had the holdings and now it is out of the family, as I would guess no one in the family wished to purchase it. It is such a lovely, old home. It has dozens and dozens of small windows and when I worked there, each of them had frilly, ruffled white curtains and that was before wash and wear fabrics and I was the designated ironer. Maybe that is why I have become the “shaker and smoother” with my own ironing. And no, Canadians didn’t buy it. The Gadberry family had a mini reunion this past week. How pleased we were to have a visit from Marion and Jan. They split their time between a home in Arizona and Ocean Shores, Wash. Pretty “cushie” living but when you work hard and manage things properly, that’s the reward you get. Was also good to see Nancy (Gadberry) Peterson, and she shared with us a copy of the memory book, compiled by her and others of the class the ‘63.... What a terrific book!! I believe I am correct to say she will return to Oroville, after full retirement of she and her husband, since she has the house her parents lived in until their passing. And brother Gene joined them for part of their stay. (while Gene was in high school he worked at the Gazette, back in the old days when we folded the papers by hand, usually very late at night) This week end is the Okanogan County Fair. Conflicting interest will keep us from going this year (shoot, I’ll miss the funnel cake). Temperatures as low as 38 degrees have been reported from Chesaw. It’s too soon for that, in my opinion.

TONASKET EAGLES warm clothing that you may no longer need. Friday there will be bingo at 7 p.m. and it is always a fun enjoyable time. Don’t forget that bingo is open to the public so invite some friends that may not be members and have them come share in a great evening. The kitchen will be open at 5:30 p.m. for those great hamburgers and fries. Make sure and try some of those golden onion rings while you are at it. Saturday at 9 p.m. there will be karaoke by Linda. Come to the Eagles that night and show off those new moves you might have learned. Our weekly pinochle tournament will be at 1 p.m. on Sunday. If you enjoy some good friendly competition and great company come in and show off those pinochle skills. Pinochle scores from last

September has come and fall will be here before we know it. We hope that all are enjoying the last of the summer days. Football season starts this weekend, so it is time to get in that closet and get out your Seahawk gear. The Sunday game will be on our televisions here and is a great place to relax and see the game. Membership renewal has been going very well and I would like to thank all the members that have reenrolled for the coming year. If you haven’t paid your dues there is still time to stop on by and pay. Bonnie Jean from Free Warm Wear will be here again this Thursday from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m., so swing in and donate some Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the

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Kelly Golden, Specialist for the Department of Veterans Affairs asked Eden Valley to share this information with veterans and their families in the Okanogan Highlands. She goes to their home at no cost to them. Any veteran or their assistant may call Kelly at (509) 434 7214 or 1 888 325 7940 at her Spokane Office. Eden Valley Trail Rides have been busy and will continue doing rides in the mornings for the next few weeks. It is really dark in the early mornings now so they start at 9:30 a.m. or 10 a.m. and usually go out for a couple of hours. Most of their riders are beginners. One lady, age 64, last week had never ridden a horse even as a child. The views are beautiful on our mountain trails and the riders usually see some type of wildlife. Happy Trails to Robin and her crew (509) 485 4002. Until next week Sunday are as follows: Leonard Paulsen ran off with first place and Neil Fifer was a close second. Low Score was swept up by Sue Wisener and the last pinochle of the day went to Leonard Paulsen and Neil Fifer. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

OLIVER THEATRE

Sat. Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

Enjoy your evening out, taking in a movie at the Oliver Theatre!

September, 2013 Programme Visit our website

Phon

Sat. - Sun. Show

OLIVER THEATRE

www.olivertheatre.ca

Sat. Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY AT 7:30 P.M.

Thurs. - Fri. Sat. Sept. 5 - 6 - 7 Enjoy your evening out,- taking in a movie at the on OliverSat. Theatre! Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

At the

MOVIES

September, 2013 Programme

Phon

Sat. - Sun. Showt

Visit our website

www.olivertheatre.ca

ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY AT 7:30 P.M.

Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. Sept. 5 - 6 - 7 Showtimes on Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

Oliver Theatre OLIVER THEATRE

*

Sat. Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

Oliver, B.C.

Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

Enjoy your evening out, taking in a movie at the Oliver Theatre!

September, 2013 Programme

250-498-2277 www.olivertheatre.ca Visit our website

ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY AT 7:30 P.M. coarse language. Violence,

R

Sun.-M Fri.-Sa

(

Phone 250-498

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tu Showtimes on Sa

CLOSED SUN. - MON. - TUES.-THURS. SEPT. 8 - 9 - 10, 12Closed (RE-OPENS SEPT. 13) Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. Sept. 5 - 6 - 7

Sun. - Mon. - Tues., Thurs. 8 - p.m. 9 - 10, 12 Showtimes on Sat. atSept. 7:00 & 9:10

Violence, coar

(re-opens Sept. 13)

2 GUNS THURS.-FRI.-SAT.

Thu

Fri. - Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues.

Violence, coarse language.

Sun. -Sept. Mon. -13 Tues., - 14 Thurs. - 15 - 16Sept. - 17 8 - 9 - 10, 12

Closed Showtimes on Fri. & Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

Violence, coars

(re-opens Sept. 13)

SEPT 5-6-7 7:30 THURS. 7&9:00PM NIGHTLY.

Thu

Fri. - Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Sept. 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 - 17 Showtimes on Fri. & Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

WE’RE THE MILLERS

Violence, coarse language.

FRI.-SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES. SEPT. 13-14-15-16-17 SHOWTIMES FRI&SAT. 7&9:10PM

Sun. - Mon. - Tues., Thurs.

Sept. 8 - 9 - 10, 12

Closed

Violence, coarse language.

(re-opens Sept. 13)

Fri. - Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Sept. 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 - 17 Showtimes on Fri. & Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

Thurs. - Fri. - S

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS

T

Violence.

Sun. - M

Coarse and sexual language.

Violence.

Thurs. - Fri. Sept. 19 - 20

T

Sun. - M

Coarse and sexual language.

Thurs. - Fri. Sept. 19 - 20 Violence.

There will also be a at 2:00 p.m. All

Sun. - Mon. - Tues Coarse and sexual language.

Thurs. - Fri. Sept. 19 - 20

THURS.- FRI. SEPT 19-20. 7&9

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL Violence.

Violence.

Coarse langua

Programme subject to unavoidable change Coarsewithout langua Coarse language.

Violence.

Programme subject to unavoidable change without notice

Programme subject to unavoidable change without

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

THE BUTLER Starts Friday. Biography, Drama. Starring Forest Whittaker, Oprah, John Cusack 132 min Fri. 6:45, 9:45 PG13 Sat.*3:45,6:45, 9:45 Sun.*3:45,6:45 Wkdays. 7:00

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

RIDDICK Starts Friday 119min

R

Action/Sci-Fi/Thriller, Starring Vin Diesel, Karl Urban, Katee Sackoff. Fri.6:45 & 9:45 Sat. *3:45,6:45, 9:45. Sun.*3:45,6:45. OLIVER THEATRE Wkdys 6:45. September, 2013 Programme

Sat. Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

Enjoy your evening out, taking in a movie at the Oliver Theatre!

Elysium

ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY AT 7:30 P.M.

*

Regular Showtimes

109min

www.olivertheatre.ca R

*

Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M. (Unless otherwise stated)

Phone 250-498-2277

Visit our website

Oliver, B.C.

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Sept. 21 - 22 - 23 - 24 Showtimes on Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. Sept. 5 - 6 - 7 Showtimes on Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

Starts Friday. Action/Drama. Sci-Fi Starring Matt Damon, Jodie Foster, Sharlto Copley Fri.6:45, 9:30. Sat. *4:00,6:45, 9:30. Sun. *4:00,6:45. WkdysClosed 6:45. Violence, coarse language.

Sun. - Mon. - Tues., Thurs.

Sept. 8 - 9 - 10, 12

Violence, coarse language.

Percy Jackson Sea of Monsters (re-opens Sept. 13)

Fri. - Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Sept. 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 - 17 Showtimes on Fri. & Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m.

Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. Sept. 26 - 27 - 28

Adventure/Family.Fantasy Starring 106min PG Logan Lerman, Alexandra Daddario. Douglas Smith. Fri: 7:00 & 9:30. Sat. *4:00,7:00, 9:30 Violence.

Sun. *4:00,7:00. Wkdys: 7:00

There will also be a matinee of this show on the Sat. at 2:00 p.m. All seats $6.00 for the matinee.

Sun. - Mon. - Tues.

Sept. 29 - 30, Oct. 1

Coarse and sexual language.

Thurs. - Fri. Sept. 19 - 20

Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required. Violence.

Coarse language.

Programme subject to unavoidable change without notice


SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life BRIAN TIMMERMAN & ANNA LATHUM

JENNIFER HUANG & JESSE TOFTE

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Latham and Mr. and Mrs. Mark Timmerman are happy to announce the engagement their children, Anna Lee Latham and Brian Mark Timmerman. Anna Latham is a 2007 Burlington-Edison High School and also a graduate of Western Washington University. She is an industrial engineer at Boeing. Brian Timmerman is a 2006 graduate of Tonasket High School and is employed by Vecca as an electrician in the Burlington area. Their wedding date is set for Sept. 21, 2013.

Jennifer Huang married Jesse Tofte in a ceremony that took place in Seattle on Aug. 10, 2013.Huang is the daughter of Wen Guan and Han Huang of Seatte. Tofte is a 1998 graduate of Oroville High School and is the son of Peggy Tofte and Mike Jones of Oroville. Maids of Honor were the groom’s sister, Erin Tofte, a Tonasket High graduate and the bride’s sister, Amy Huang. Ruben Gonzalez, an Oroville High School graduate and friend Robert Vargas were Best Men. The bride’s daughter Aryanna and her niece Evelynn were flower girls.Local musicians Sun Dog Lanigan and Reed Engel performed at the ceremony which was officiated by the groom’s uncle, Rev. David Mullen, of Antelope, Calif.

Tonasket Farmers’ Market TONASKET - Tonasket Farmers Market is held on Thursdays, from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. The next market is Thursday, Sept. 5. Come join us for some of the best in local produce, crafts, personal care products, homegrown music and farmstead cheeses. Whether you make a quick spin to pick up supper ingredients or hang out for hours, you’re sure to get what you want. For more info call (509) 486-1199.

EMR Class OROVILLE Oroville Ambulance is looking for more people to expand our EMS crew. They will be holding an EMR (Emergency Medical Responder) class that will be starting the end of September. Those holding the class say it is a very exciting and rewarding way to volunteer for your community, and on top of that they offer monetary compensation for your time. For those who may be interested, there will be three informational meetings they are on Thursday, Sept. 5 and Monday, Sept. 9. Call (509) 4764320 for further details. Leave a message and someone will get back to you.

Blood Drive at Tonasket TONASKET - The next Red Cross Blood Drive is coming up on Thursday, Sept 5, 12 - 5 p.m. at the Community Church/ United Church of Christ, 24 E. Fourth Street, Tonasket. Walk-ins are welcome or you can schedule an appointment by calling 1-800RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

Genealogical Society Meeting OKANOGAN - Okanogan County Genealogical Society will hold its next meeting on Sept. 5 at 2 p.m. at the Wilson Research Center in Okanogan. The featured speaker will be Bob Tonseth who will present a program on the Early History of the Town of Methow and surrounding area. He will be providing information on the part the Bolinger family made in this settlement. People have had questions about the “rock house” in Methow and Tonseth will be able to answer questions about its origin. Everyone is welcome to attend this program. Plan to take in the Fair after the meeting. For further information contact Maggie at (509) 422-3944.

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The Oroville Farmers’ Market is Saturday, Sept. 7, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Oroville Community Library located at 1276 Main St. Purchase art, crafts, plant starts, fresh baked goods and tamales plus the best produce on the planet. The Oroville Farmers’ Market continues each Saturday through October 26 and new vendors are welcome. Call (509) 476-2662 for more information.

Old Time Revival MOLSON - Morning Sun

Yellow Pony in Molson at the Molson Grange on Thursday, Sept 5 at 6 p.m., Friday, Sept. 6 at 6 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 7 at 10 a.m. People are invited to come hear what God has done in Morning Suns life. For more information contact (509) 4853183 or (509) 485-2006.

Music at the Market OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will host “Music at the Market” each Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. during the Farmers’ Market season. The next Music at the Market is Saturday, Sept. 7 featuring an Chris Williamson. If you would like to volunteer to showcase your acoustic talents, please call Barbara Pollard at (509) 476-2662.

Classes To Start OROVILLE – North Valley Community Schools is back! Classes begin on the Monday, Sept. 16 and that includes Three Cheese Chili Rellenos. The time it takes to make these is worth it. Our instructor knows what she’s doing and you’ll love these rellenos with ranchero sauce, made with all fresh ingredients. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 4762011 for information and to register for this yummy cooking class.

Photographer to talk on Matsura TONASKET - The Okanogan County Historical Society’s A Priceless Legacy: Honoring Frank Matsura lecture series will continue when photographer Al Camp presents “Looking Through the Lens.” The lecture will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18, at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center, 411 S. Western Ave. It is free and open to the public. His lecture will include what it might have been like for Frank S. Matsura to photograph our county and the people living here from 1903 to 1913. What technology and techniques he might have used to obtain the results we see in his photos? The fifth in a series of six lectures, lecture will give some insights into how Matsura saw the region through his camera’s lens.

Oroville Booster Club Dinner Auction OROVILLE - The Oroville Booster Club Dinner Auction will be held Saturday, Sept. 21 at Veranda Beach Resort. Happy Hour and Silent Auction begin at 4 p.m., dinner by the Breadline at the Beach will be at 5 p.m. and the Live Auction at 6 p.m. Tickets are available in Oroville at Veranda Beach Resort and Oroville Pharmacy and North Cascades Broadcasting in Omak. The auction at the American Legion will be on Saturday, Nov. 2.

Poet Laureate at TMS Benefit TONASKET - Children’s Poet Laureate and author Kenn Nesbitt will visit Tonasket as part of a Tonasket Middle School fundraiser on Friday, Sept. 27. Nesbitt will give a presentation during a dinner

theater hosted by Tonasket Middle School students, a fundraiser for the middle school students who are planning to visit Washington D.C. next summer. The evening event will be held at Tonasket High School with the meal being served at 5:15 p.m. Mr. Nesbitt will take the stage for one hour beginning at 6 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend whether or not they purchase meal tickets. Tickets for the meal will be available at U.S. Bank, North Valley Hospital, Shannon’s Cafe & Deli, and the Tonasket Elementary School Library until Sept. 20.

Gold Stars at Legacy Park TONASKET - Saturday, Sept.28 at 11 a.m. the NCW Blue Star Mothers will be placing gold stars in honor of those mothers who lost children in the service of our country on the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy plaques in Tonasket designated K.I.A. and M.I.A. We will also be hoisting the Blue Star Flag which will fly until Veteran’s Day.

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

Your Complete Eyecare Centre

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

WATERFRONT

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

Food Banks TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480. OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386. Editor’s Note: Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844. G.A.D.

eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

TONASKET

OKANOGAN

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

Hometown Soldier Calendar Military Mothers and Families send 1-3 photos of your soldier, airman, sailor, or guard to the North Central Washington Blue Star Mothers group to be published in next year’s Hometown Soldier Calendar. Contact Blue Star Mothers at (509) 485-2906 or email them at ncw.bluestars@ yahoo.com. Deadline is Monday, Sept. 30. While you’re at it, drop off your old or broken cell phones at Discount Sewing and Vacuum in Okanogan, the KOMW Radio Station in Omak, the Tonasket Legacy Memorial office, and at the Oroville Pharmacy. Proceeds go to supporting our local military families.

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

(509) 826-6191

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

(509) 826-6191

Toll Free

www.wvmedical.com

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health (509) 826-5600

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

 Anti

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

 Behavioral

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion  Walk

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 MASSAGE

Su Ianniello

Licensed Massage Practitioner

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

OPTICAL

Advertise In The

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Call Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 Ext 3050

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


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Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 OOkanogan KANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • September 05, 2013

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

Oroville. 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath home in Large yard with big trees. All appliances includes F/S/W/D. Rent $500/ month with 1 year lease. Call 509-476-3708 evenings available October 1st. Oroville: 2 bedroom, 2 bath apartment. Walk in closet, ground floor, nice yard with patio, W/D hookup. Good parking. No pets. No smoking. $525/ mo + $400 dep. 509-223-3064 509-560-9043 OROVILLE LAKE FRONT HOME 3 BR, 2 BA. 5 appliances. Pets? References $875, first, last. 509476-2438. TONASKET - 1 bedroom house, yard & shed. Close to town, quiet. $550/ month. 509-486-1682 or 429-0873.

Commercial Rentals Business/Office space for lease 100+ sq.ft. Prime spot Main St. Oriville. $650/month. (509)486-1682 or 429-0873. Business/Office space for lease 900 sq.ft. Prime spot downtown Tonasket. $650/month. (509)486-1682 or 429-0873.

Announcements A BIG THANKS to all the good friends for prayers and good wishes for my recovery during my stay at Virginia Mason Hospital. Dal Wilder. Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Sudoku

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each Puzzle 36 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44) column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION: “PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

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– Family & Singles – 2

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Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home� 9

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email: stcharles@gdicom.net

Puzzle 34 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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Equal Housing Opportunity

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Sponsored by

LOW INCOME HOUSING 9

Easy, difficulty rating 0.38

ANSWERS

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This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy

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Beautiful nice rooster free to good home. (509)486-1682 or 429-0873

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Rebate Sale on all Pacific Energy pellet and woodburning stoves, fireplace inserts and fireplaces. See at www.pacificenergy.net Now through Sept 30. ALJU Stove & Fireplace, Omak 509-826-2736.

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF SEPT. 2, 2013

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CMA, LPN or RN (certified or in training) Seeking part-time clinic manager and medical assistant at small, private Natural Health Clinic in Okanogan. Minimum 2 year commitment. Wages depend on experience. Call Jana at (509) 422-3700 for more information

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Now Hiring Clinic Manager and Medical Assistant

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OROVILLE 1 Bedroom house with bonus room. In town, close to restaurants and shopping. $525/month, water & garbage paid. Call 509-990-4406 or 509-990-4402

Health General

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515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

For more information contact Desirae Coe at desirae.coe@wsu.edu

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Hillside Park Senior Apartments

WSU Upward Bound is hiring tutors for high school level math and science (preferred), and reading & composition, or Spanish language. Provide up to 12 hours of individual instruction and/or tutoring to students from Oroville and/or Tonasket. May work during school, evening or weekend hours. WSU Upward Bound is funded by a grant through the U. S. Department of Education. Washington State University is an equal opportunity employer. $12 - $15/hr. DOE To apply send cover letter, resume, and contact information and three references to WSU College Bound, PO Box 1689, Omak, WA 98841, Attn: North County. Positions open until filled. Minimum Requirements: • Two years of college • Demonstrated ability to tutor effectively in subject area • Must pass a criminal background check

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3 BR Home - $795 2 BR on River - $720 2 BR, 2 BA - $875 2 BR, 1 BA - $700 1 BR Apt - $510 ** Call Sun Lakes Realty ** (509) 476-2121

P/T Tutor Temporary Position

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For Rent

wverner@orovilleremanandreload.com

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TONASKET 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH Home located in the town of Tonasket. Low maintenance house has thermal pane windows, R38 insulation in the ceiling and heat pump. Single car garage and shop, attached storage shed and covered patio. RV parking with AC power and dump site. Seller will negotiate paying closing costs. Must be pre-approved buyer. FSBO: $98,000. Bill 509-486-1952.

wverner@ orovillereman andreload.com

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Houses For Sale

Experience/ education with payroll and payables (QuickBooks). Growing company 80+ employees. To apply email

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www.gazette-tribune.com

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Help Wanted Office Administrator

For Rent

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Statewides submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make goodâ€?, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. HELP WANTED AMERICAN GREETINGS is hiring Retail Merchandisers across Washington! For a full listing of available locations and detailed job information, please visit us at WorkatAG.com FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS NEED CLASS A CDL Training? Start a Career in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Classâ€? training.• New Academy Classes Weekly • No Money Down or Credit Check • Certified Mentors Ready and Available • Paid (While Training With Mentor) • Regional and Dedicated Opportunities • Great Career Path • Excellent Benefits Package Please Call: (602) 730-7709 GORDON TRUCKING, Inc. A better Carrier. A better Career. CDL-A Drivers Needed! Up to $1500 sign-on bonus! Dedicated Fleet Option. Home weekly available in some areas. EOE. Call 7 days/week! Call: 866-725-9669 DRIVERS -- Get on the road fast! Immediate Openings! Top Pay, Full Benefits, CDL-A, Doubles Required! Haney Truck Line, Call Now. 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com DRIVERS -- Whether you have experience or need training, we offer unbeatable career opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877-369-7105 centraldrivingjobs.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices City of Tonasket FALL CLEAN UP Deliver Your Own Trash-No Fee For City Residents & Businesses When: Saturday, September 14th, 2013 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM Where: Tonasket City Shop 500 Railroad Avenue (next to Chief Tonasket Park) Items NOT Accepted: No wet paint No Oil No tires No car batteries No hazardous materials No Appliances will be accepted. The City crew WILL NOT be picking up any items. For elderly and disabled assistance and for information call 509-486-2132. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 5, 12, 2013. #510469

Public Notices

Public Notices

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: JOHN E. KEENER, Deceased. NO. 09-4-00040-8 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: August 14, 2013 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: August 22, 2013 /s/ WILLIAM KEENER WILLIAM KEENER Personal Representative /s/ Anthony Castelda Anthony Castelda, WSBA#28937 Attorney for Keener Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on August 22, 29, September 5, 2013 #506397

nance adopted by the Oroville City Council during the August 20, 2013 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 5, 2013 #509327

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 Date of Auction: September 13th, 2013 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1999 FORD EXPLORER LIC# 4EWD569 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 5, 2013. #510065 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 Date of Auction: September 9th, 2013 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1978 FORD VAN LIC# WA 649-KPB Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 5, 2013. #507853 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 Date of Auction: September 9th, 2013 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1995 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO LIC#: WA 190-YKD Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 5, 2013. #508444

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF KING In re the Estate of: LARRY KURTIS WOLTER, Deceased. NO. 13-4-10424-2 KNT NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorneys at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the Notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate assets and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: September 5, 2013. PR: MARYLENE STATHAM RUTH A. ROTI WSBA #19495 Of MOGREN, GLESSNER & ROTI P.S. Attorneys for Persanal Representative 100 Evergreen Bldg.; P. O. Box 90 Renton, WA 98057-0090 (425) 255-4542 King County Superior Court Cause No. 13-4-10424-2 KNT Published in the Okanogan ValleyGazette on September 5, 12, 19, 2013. #509711

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PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 828 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington vacating an alley in Block 25, plat of Oroville, subject to conditions and setting an effective date. The above summary is of an ordinance adopted by the Oroville City Council during the August 20, 2013 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 829 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington amending section 12.18.020 of the Oroville Municipal Code to allow additional tree board members, designating City Officials as Ex Officio Members and setting an effective date. The above summary is of an ordi-

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310 Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 www.gazette-tribune.com

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SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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Cops & Courts Superior Court Criminal

Melissa Marie Holcomb, 24, Oroville, pleaded guilty Aug. 27 to seconddegree criminal trespass and third-degree theft. Holcomb was sentenced to a total of 364 days in jail with 317 suspended and credit for 47 days served. She was also fined $1,010.50. The crimes occurred July 11. Wayne Bert Symmonds, 50, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Aug. 28 to communication with a minor for immoral purposes, second-degree criminal trespass and two counts of violation of a no-contact order. Symmonds was sentenced to a total of 60 months in prison, 36 months community custody, and fined $1,110.50. The crimes occurred July 12-13. Tabitha Marie Hall, 22, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 29 to taking a motor vehicle without permission. Hall was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $1,100.50. A restitution hearing is set for October. The crime occurred June 11. The court found probable cause to charge Melissa Delone Starzyk, 34, Omak, with delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine).

Juvenile

A 17-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Aug. 28 to second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm and making false or misleading statements to a public servant. She was sentenced to 10 days in detention on the second count and 15-36 weeks in state detention on the first, with credit for 18 days served. She was also fined $100. The crimes were committed June 18. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Aug. 28 to MIP/C. He was sentenced to 17 days in detention, six months community supervision, and fined $100. The crime occurred Aug. 12.

Civil

Camaray Motels, Inc., of Surrey, B.C., was ordered to pay $9,474.41 to the Washington State Department of Revenue for taxes, increases and penalties. Linda S. Darrow and David R. Darrow, owners of Linda’s Bakery in Oroville, were ordered to pay $4,254.33 to the Washington State Department of Revenue for taxes, increases and penalties. Meggin E. Lindsey of Loomis was ordered to pay $809.84 to the Washington State Department of Employment Security for an overpayment of unemployment benefits. Amy E. Ergenbright of Omak was ordered to pay $1,809.60 to the Washington State Department of Employment Security for an overpayment of unemployment benefits. Juan S. Lopez of Oroville was ordered to pay $710.70 to the Washington State Department of Employment Security for an overpayment of unemployment benefits.

District Court Martin Antonio Aguilar, 24, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree theft. Aguilar was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended and fined

$808. Betty B. Alexander, 32, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Alexander received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. Aaron Thomas Allen, 30, Omak, guilty of DUI and third-degree DWLS. Allen was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 356 days suspended and fined a total of $2,436. Jorge Alberto Alvarez Urapo, 23, Tonasket, guilty of disorderly conduct. Alvarez Urapo was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 76 days suspended and fined $608. Cassie Nicole Louise Andrew, 24, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Andrew received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. Eric Mathew Anguiano, 21, Oroville, guilty on two counts of violating a no-contact order. Anguiano was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 350 days suspended and fined a total of $1,766. Zachary James Arthur, 24, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Arthur was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended and fined $118. Kayla Geri Barker, 20, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: possession of a controlled substance (marijuana) (less than 40 grams). She was fined $400. Shalena Bree Bent, 18, Omak, had a thirddegree DWLS charge dismissed. Andrea Beth Calico, 34, Oroville, hard a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Kyle Albert Cantlon, 20, Okanogan, had a charge dismissed: possession of a controlled substance (marijuana) (less than 40 grams). He was fined $400. Jose Eduardo Cocino, 20, Tonasket, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Thomas Lee Cohen Jr., 42, Omak, guilty to first-degree DWLS. Cohen was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended and fined $1,058. Lucas D. Cook, 28, Omak, guilty of no valid operator’s license without identification. Cook was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended and fined $858. Christopher Michael Cornett, 18, Okanogan, guilty on two counts of fourth-degree assault and one count resisting arrest. Cornett was sentenced to a total of 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended and fined $1,308. He also had two charges dismissed: MIP/C and possession of a controlled substance (marijuana) (less than 40 grams). Esmundo Cosino, no middle name listed, 25, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Duane Lee Gilge, 49, Okanogan, had two charges dismissed: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Margarita Gonzalez Ochoa, 44, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: failure to transfer title within 45 days.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, Aug. 26, 2013 Threats on North Second Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Theft on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Keys and pellet gun reported missing. Sex offense on Boundary Point Rd. near Oroville.

Violation of no-contact order on Cartwright Dr. near Tonasket. Vehicle crash on North Second Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Violation of no-contact order on South Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Rocky River HUD Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Mailbox reported damaged. Threats on Hwy. 20 near Wauconda. DUI on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Injuries reported. Theft on West Fifth Ave. in Omak. Fuel reported missing. Theft on South Columbia St. in Omak. Harassment on North Fir St. in Omak. Trespassing on West Fourth Ave. in Omak. Weapons offense on East Jonathan Ave. in Omak. Juvenile problem on South Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. A shoe was reported missing. Theft on Fir St. in Oroville. Julio Celio Fernandez-Hernandez, 37, booked for three counts of second-degree unlawful hunting of big game. Gelasio Mercado-Murillo, 21, booked for DUI and a Border Patrol hold. Matthew Bruce Mathwick, 39, booked for third-degree malicious mischief and disorderly conduct. Rogelio Ortega Arevalo, 19, booked for DUI. Joe Ballesteros Lopez, 19, booked on four State Patrol FTA warrants: possession of a controlled substance (marijuana) (less than 40 grams), possession of drug paraphernalia, no valid operator’s license without identification, and third-degree theft. Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013 Assault on Engh Rd. near Omak. Fraud on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Fraud on Heidi Ct. near Tonasket. Burglary on South First Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on South Main St. in Omak. Theft on Third St. in Riverside. Jewelry reported missing. Burglary on Armory Junction Rd. in Okanogan. Bicycles reported missing. Illegal burning on Lakeview Loop Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on West Apple Rd. in Omak. Theft on North Main St. in Omak. Jewelry reported missing. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Weapons offense on Clarkson Mill Rd. in Tonasket. Romerio De Asis Regis, 19, booked for DUI, hit and run (unattended property) and a Border Patrol hold. Eustequio Hernandez-Sanchez, 31, booked for DUI and a Border Patrol hold. Joseph Blaze Parnisi, 32, booked for harassment and displaying a weapon. Joseph Clinton Cox III, 40, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Wayne Morris McGhee, 63, booked for second-degree DWLS. Robin Gayle Blaylock, 38, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013 DWLS on South Second Ave. in Okanogan. Public intoxication on Hwy. 7 near Oroville.

Malicious mischief on Veranda Dr. near Oroville. Theft on South Second Ave. in Okanogan. Laptop reported missing. Two-vehicle crash on Danker Cutoff Rd. near Okanogan. Fraud on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. Trespassing on South Teal Lake Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Hagood Cutoff Rd. near Tonasket. Drugs on North Third Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Bicycle reported missing. Littering on South Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on South Ash St. in Omak. Burglary on South Douglas St. in Omak. Bicycle and chainsaw reported missing. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. Automobile theft on Quassia St. in Omak. Trespassing on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on South Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Franklin John Raschka, 34, booked for third-degree DWLS, an OCSO FTC warrant for DUI and a Department of Corrections warrant. Destanie Talethia Daniel, 30, booked on a Department of Corrections warrant. Cheryl Lavette Dick, 43, booked on an OCSO warrant for first-degree DWLS and refusing to cooperate with an officer. Charles Rodriguez, no middle name listed, 46, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Michelle Ann Hernandez, 23, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Robert E. Haydon, 26, court commitment for third-degree DWLS. Dominique Gonzalez, no middle name listed, 21, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Tommy Eugene Moore, 47, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 Fraud on Old Riverside Hwy. near Omak. Theft on West Fork Rd. near Okanogan. Wood reported missing. Wildland fire on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Burglary on Crystal Butte Rd. near Oroville. Generator and ladder reported missing. Trespassing on Orchard St. near Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Malicious mischief on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. Vehicle damage reported. Weapons offense on Elmway in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Badger Rd. near Tonasket. Fraud on North Ash St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Quassia St. in Omak. DUI on South Birch St. in Omak. Harassment on North Western Ave. in Tonasket. Suzanna Marie Marchand, 31, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for

second-degree DWLS and two Omak Police Department FTA warrants for first-degree DWLS. Bill Dewayne Hall, 59, booked for DUI. Aja Seymour, no middle name listed, 30, booked on two OCSO FTC warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Karalyn Ann Cline, 23, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for use or delivery of drug paraphernalia.

Friday, Aug. 30, 2013 Assault on Jackson St. in Omak. Fraud on West Lost Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on South Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on South First Ave. in Okanogan. Wood reported missing. Drugs on North Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. Jewelry reported missing. Burglary on West Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on West Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Littering on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Threats on South Ash St. in Omak. Custodial interference on West Third Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on South Ash St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Hanford St. in Omak. Trespassing on Hanford St. in Omak. Violation of no-contact order on Main St. in Oroville. Jack Allen Webster, 65, booked for DUI. Ethan Correll Green, 23, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Brian Jon Edwards, 25, booked for third-degree malicious mischief, a Tribal FTA warrant for DWLS, a Cowlitz County FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS, and two Grant County FTA warrants: third-degree DWLS and hit-and-run (unattended property). Antonio Allen LaGrou, 25, booked for possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: first-degree negligent driving and third-degree DWLS. Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013 Malicious mischief on Pine St. in Okanogan. Harassment on Hagood Cutoff Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on South Second Ave. in Okanogan. Gaming console reported missing. Theft on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Automobile theft on Eighme Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Heidi Ct. near Tonasket. Illegal burning near Blue Lake. Illegal burning on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. Illegal burning on Lakeview Loop Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on South Birch St. in Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Theft at East Side Park in Omak. Found property on Omache Dr. in Omak. Bicycle recovered. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Shoes reported missing.

Public intoxication on Pine St. in Omak. Burglary on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Violation on no-contact order on Panvista Dr. in Omak. Robbery on Omache Dr. in Omak. Fraud on Edmonds St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Juniper St. in Oroville. Burglary on Dogwood St. in Oroville. Gaming console reported missing. DWLS on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Found property on North Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Handgun recovered. Trespassing on East Division St. in Tonasket. Renee Natasha West, 19, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Jose Luis Morales Martinez, 53, booked for DUI. Lisa Dianne Wolff, 33, booked on two Prosecutor’s FTA bench warrants: possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. Thomas Lee Cohen Jr., 42, court commitment for first-degree DWLS. Lorenzo Gutierrez, no middle name listed, 49, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for harassment and a Border Patrol hold. Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013 Alcohol offense on Omak Ave. in Omak. Three MIP’s reported. Assault on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Burglary on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Dwinnell Cutoff Rd. near Oroville. ATV roll-over crash on Lone Pine HUD Rd. near Omak. Injuries and fatality reported. Malicious mischief on Stampede Dr. in Omak. DUI on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. One-vehicle crash near Blue Lake. Injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Threats on Haley Creek Rd. near Omak. Theft on North Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Inlow Loop Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Flatiron Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Stereo reported missing. Theft on East Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Drill bits reported missing. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Found property on West First Ave. in Omak. Bicycle recovered. Public intoxication on North Main St. in Omak. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. DUI on South Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket.

Key:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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DAVID HANNA - BROKER, DUANE WILSON ASSOC. BROKER, GLEN GROVE & STEVE CLARK AGENT Where good deals are not extinct! 509-486-4528 or 509-429-8322 This is a very nice well maintained home on a quiet dead end street. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, kitchen, dining and living room on main floor. The full basement has 2 finished rooms, a 3/4 bath and a utility room. The basement has inside and outside entrances. $118,900 MLS #466102 PICTURES - www.hannarealty.com email: dave@hannarealty.com 306 Hwy. 7 S., Tonasket Toll Free 1-877-593-7238

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

SPORTS

Caveness, Montanye big winners at Demo Derby By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - There weren’t as many cars as in past years at Sunday’s Demolition Derby in Tonasket, but that didn’t dampen spirits much on a sun-drenched last-summer Sunday afternoon. There were only nine cars that participated, but thanks to the ingenuity of the various pit crews, most were able to survive multiple heats of the eighth annual edition of the event put on by the Tonasket Comancheros. The #303 car had plenty of success on the day as Robert Hallam won the first heat in it, with Jimmy Caveness winning the second and third heats to claim the overall trophy. “I came to win it, but also to have fun,” said Caveness, of Okanogan. “It’s taken me eight years to get first up here in Tonasket.” He also won this year’s demo derby in Omak. “I just try to stay calm, drive smart,” Caveness said. Jordan Montanye and his #69 won the Main Heat despite blowing his transmission early on, relegating him to running in reverse. “That’s a brand new tranny I just had rebuilt this year, and it’s toast,” Montanye said. “I hoped to eliminate this problem. But it worked out; it’s my first time winning the Main.” Montanye, of Tonasket, said he was 16 when he first started working on cars for the derby when he was 16, but chafed at being too young to race them. “I used to help my brother and those guys all the time,” he said. “I could always build ‘em and watch ‘em, but I could never play with ‘em. “I like to go out there to put a show on for the crowd and have fun. I don’t really care about nothing else. But I was excited. It’s a lot of fun and I enjoy it.” Melissa Stafford and co-pilot Ashley Cline won the Powder Puff heat. Jake Taylor’s crew won the Mechanic’s heat as well as the Most Wrecked trophy; Montanye claimed the Best Appearing trophy and Ray Becker of Gold Bar won the trophy for having traveled the farthest. Other highlights included Parker Kenyon’s electric guitar rendition of the National Anthem; Brock Hires’ live country music between heats; and the kid’s tug o’ war (and mud bath) before the final heat.

2013 Tonasket Comancheros Demolition Derby results 1st Heat - Trophy sponsor: The Junction 1. #303 Robert Hallam 2. #71 Jake Taylor 3. #64 David Brown 4. #36c Darryl Ortuno 2nd Heat - Trophy sponsor: George Frank 1. #303 Jimmy Caveness 2. #64 David Brown 3. #4400 Brandon Weller 4. #71 Jake Taylor 3rd Heat - Trophy sponsor: Parker’s Orchard 1. #303 Jimmy Caveness 2. #101 Karl Isenberg 3. #71 Jake Taylor 4. #36c Darryl Ortuno

Clockwise from top, Jimmy Caveness (black car) collides with Karl Isenberg’s vehicle during a heat of Sunday’s Tonasket Comancheros Demolition Derby. Caveness won the overall trophy. Above, Jake Taylor’s (right) crew of Steve Picking and Randy Taylor pose with Tonasket Rodeo Queen Karlie Henneman after winning the Mechanics’ heat. Below left, Melissa Stafford, Henneman and Ashley Cline pose after Stafford and Cline’s Powderpuff victory. Above left, the Comancheros vs. Kids Tug-o-war was followed by quick, cold hose-downs for dozens of kids.

Main Heat - Trophy Sponsor: Montanye Logging 1. #69 Jordan Montanye 2. #101 Karl Isenberg 3. #36c Darryl Ortuno 4. #64 David Brown Powder Puff - Trophy sponsor: Stampede Awards 1. #69 Melissa Stafford and Ashley Cline

Photos by Brent Baker

Mechanic’s - Trophy sponsor: Kuhler’s Bar & Grill 1. #71 Jake Taylor’s crew

B O N N E V I L L E

Overall Winner - Trophy sponsor: Montanye Logging 1. #303 Jimmy Caveness Best Appearing - Trophy sponsor: Jim’s Repair 1. #69 Jordan Montanye Farthest Traveled - Trophy sponsor: OK Chevrolet 1. #777 Ray Becker (Gold Bar)

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Most Wrecked - Trophy sponsor: NAPA Allen’s Auto Parts 1. #71 Jake Taylor General Sponsors Les Schwab Oroville, Whitney’s Garage, David Hannah Transportation, Tonasket Diesel Repair, Odom Corp., Montanye Logging, Webberís Dirt Works, Timís Country Saw Shop. Miscellaneous Sponsors Rancho Chico, Shannonís Cafe, Lee Frank Mercantile, Tonasket Subway, Kuhler’s Bar & Grill (Judges’ shirts) Equipment Steve Lorz, McMillan Construction, Tom Bretz, Jim Attwood Special Thanks - to Bob McDaniel for the new logs; - to Weller Trucking for hauling the logs; - to Parker Kenyon for his rendition of the National Anthem on electric guitar; - to Brock Hires for his music, and running the sound system.

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Conservation land acquisitions will protect Washington fish and wildlife habitat The Bonneville Power Administration intends to fund the purchase of two properties in Okanogan County, Wash. They include the 40-acre Salmon Creek Meadow and the 154-acre Salmon Creek Pond properties. When the purchases are complete, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation will own and manage the property for fish and wildlife conservation purposes and BPA will receive a conservation easement to ensure that the habitat values on the property are always protected. The funding will be provided as part of BPA’s ongoing efforts to protect, restore and enhance habitat for Upper Columbia steelhead as mitigation for the construction and operation of the dams in the Columbia River Basin, and would satisfy some of BPA’s requirements identified in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2008 Biological Opinion that guides the protection of salmon and steelhead listed under the federal Endangered Species Act. The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation will develop management plans for the properties and will provide the public an opportunity to review and comment on them. BPA must approve the plans before new actions can occur on the properties. Letters describing the proposed purchase, maps and information describing environmental review requirements under the National Environmental Policy Act are available at www.efw.bpa.gov. For more information contact BPA project manager Sandra Fife at 503-230-3678 or safife@bpa. gov. You can also call toll free 800-622-4519.


SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A11

SPORTS & OUTDOORS PNT hikers find ultimate adventure

Hutchinson takes over as Oroville AD

Rookie backpackers hit midpoint of 1,200 mile trail

OROVILLE - Oroville Middle and High School’s new athletic director is not exactly a new face on campus. Longtime football coach Tam Hutchinson took over the position this month after Brett Fancher stepped down as A.D., citing growing demands in his classroom teaching job. “It was kind of a last-minute deal,” Hutchinson said. “(High school principal) Kristin Sarmiento asked me if I would do it, and it was endorsed. I was a little surprised.” Hutchinson, whose teaching responsibilities also changed this year (moving from middle school to high school social studies, American history and credit recovery), has had to dive right into reams of paperwork that were enhanced by a high participation rate. “We have 60 percent of the kids in our building doing sports this fall,” he said. “Plus we need to find some assistant coaches for volleyball (which had nearly 30 girls turn out). “There’s a lot to get done.”

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Taking on a marathon backcountry trip like the Pacific Northwest Trail is not necessarily recommended for novices. But that hasn’t slowed down Brian Magelssen, Matt Marquardt and Austin Wagoner, who decided to tackle the 1,200-mile trail this summer. The trio spent a day or so in Oroville last week, stopping for laundry and some fresh food as they made their way from Glacier National Park in Montana to Cape Alava on the northwest corner of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. Oroville is at about the midway point. The three started their expedition on July 20 and plan to finish by the end of September. All in their early 20s, the three attended Western Washington University and decided that a trip such as this one needed to happen now, or wait until retirement. “We all quit our jobs to do this,” Marquardt said. “None of us had career-type jobs yet,” Magelssen said. “So we figured now was the time.” Marquardt, in fact, had never taken a backpack trip before. Ever. “It’s been eye-opening,” he said. “The first few weeks were pretty arduous. Even going 10-12 miles in a day was absurd. It took about a week and a half to get into the groove. Getting the day-to-day down was tough.” But, he said, the learning curve had been worth it. “We’re loving it - getting away from the city,” he said. “I grew up in Seattle, so seeing the other side of the state, seeing Montana, has been awesome.” As they’ve rounded into better hiking shape, they’ve gotten up to about 20-25 miles in a typical day, occasionally hitting 30. “Out of the three of us I’d done the most,” Magelssen said. “That being about 100 miles total. I did hike the Wonderland Trail around Mt. Rainier and did a lot of camping growing up, but this is the first time doing something like this.” Wagoner, who missed out on the interview while doing laundry, and Magelssen did the initial planning and packing for the trip, with Marquardt hopping on board near the departure date. But the inexperience showed, Magelssen said, in their pre-trip food preparation. “We’d been planning the food - couscous, powdered sweet potatoes, that kind of thing,” he said. “We were so stressed out, planning 400 meals, 60 days, two meals each per day. We ended up throwing together this crap that was totally inedible. The lunch meat turned into jerky. We were trying to save money by mailing

SPORTS SCHEDULES Sept. 5-14 Friday, Sept. 6 FB (Var) - Tonasket at Bridgeport, 7 pm FB (Var) - Oroville at Brewster, 7 pm Saturday, Sept. 7 XC - Tonasket Invite (w/Oroville), 10 am GSoc - Tonasket at Okan. Jamboree, 10 am Submitted photo

Inexperience hasn’t slowed Pacific Northwest Trail backpackers (l-r) Matt Marquardt, Brian Magelssen and Austin Wagoner, who made their way westward through Oroville from Glacier National Park on their way to the Olympic Peninsula last week. boxes out to towns along the trail, but we ended up pouring money down the drain. “So we’ve ended up buying food in town along with some other essentials. But if we were to do it again, that’s something I’d do a lot differently.” Meanwhile, the group has had to cope with the inevitable pitfalls of a long trip, including weather and equipment failure. “Three to four days of rain in Montana was our first real test,” Marquardt said. “Plus, we got a bit lost. And Austin bought a bunch of expensive high-performance gear but beat the crap out of it. We got stuff we needed that’s not great but that we’ll be able to use again. “But Austin’s been impressive. One day he was having issues with his back-

pack while we were bushwhacking out of the Selkirks to Priest Lake. He was near the breaking point, but he was ready to go the next day.” Meanwhile they have managed to take in sights and experiences they wouldn’t have gotten anywhere else. “Glacier was crazy beautiful,” Magelssen said. “None of us had ever been there. We saw moose, bears.” “The Kettle Range was a great surprise,” Marquardt said. “From Northport to Oroville, the lower Selkirks, Whitefish. The Kettle Crest Trail was beautiful. “We came upon this cabin and even though we’d only gone eight miles that day we decided to stay, just because it was so amazing. The following day, though,

was pretty challenging because we ended up going 26 really tough miles.” “Austin was so tired and hurting but he ended up running the last part” Magelssen added. “It was like he had some kind of blood lust.” As the hikers prepared to head into the Pasayten Wilderness and the second half of their trip, they seemed undaunted by the challenge and were already talking about planning a future adventure. “It’d be cool to mountain bike the Pacific Crest Trail,” Marquardt said. “I love the adventure,” said Magelssen. “We could sail to Alaska or something like that. As long as we have crappy jobs, we’ll probably keep doing this kind of thing.”

Monday, Sept. 9 FB (JV) - Oroville at Omak, 5:30 pm Tuesday, Sept. 10 Vball (JV/Var) - Oroville at Tonasket, 5/6:30 pm Thursday, Sept. 12 GSoc - Tonasket at Liberty Bell, 5 pm Vball (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Liberty Bell, 5/6:30 pm Vball (JV/Var) - Oroville at Republic, 5/6:30 pm Friday, Sept. 13 FB (JV) - Kettle Falls at Tonasket, 4 pm FB (Var) - Kettle Falls at Tonasket, 7 pm FB (Var) - Mary Walker at Oroville, 7 pm Saturday, Sept. 14 XC - Tonasket and Oroville at Moses Lake Invite, 10:30 am

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Civil Criminal

Busted Knuckle

Attorney at Law

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Auto & Upholstery

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

Seats  Headliners  Door Panels Convertible tops / Vinyl roof covers — Auto & Small Engine Service — We Do Tire Repair & Balance! 124 Chesaw Rd, Oroville 509-476-2611

Pumps

Septic Service

Excavation and Septic Service

Over 25 Years experience! Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

Midway Building Supply

RYAN W. GUNN

P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

— Fred Cook —

Building Supplies Quality Supplies Since 1957

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Got Water?

Auto / Upholstery

Thank you for your continued support!  Septic Pumping

 Septic Installation  Portable Toilets

509-422-3621 Cell: (509) 322-4777 MORGASE983JS

HOURS: Mon. - Sat., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Concrete

Insulation

OSOYOOS READI-MIX

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Installed Insulation

Oroville Building Supply 33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

&

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 We Work Saturdays! 11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Garage Doors  Installed

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

Storage

Subscribe

Well Drilling

Lakeside

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN VALLEY

“The Water Professionals”

STORAGE Boat, RV & More! Weatherization with lease Rent unit for project  Contractors store tools / product  Additional Business space available  

Located at: 124 Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-421-7168 lakesidestoreit@gmail.com

www.gazette-tribune.com

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington... 509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

 Water

Well Drilling

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

 Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store  Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Zimmatic Pivots  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com


Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Dazzling aray of designs at Molson Quilt Show

Farmers full of virtues

TONASKET MARKET REPORT

By Suzanne Dailey Howard Tonasket Farmers’ Market

Faith, hope and love; the three theological virtues. Perhaps no one possesses them in more abundance than a farmer. The farmer plants seed in spring, waits in the hope that it will produce good fruit, and tends the crop with great love and care. Once again, the virtuous farmers have been rewarded with bountiful crops, and in turn visitors to Tonasket Farmers’ Market are rewarded each Thursday afternoon with a bountiful choice of fresh produce. First time market vendor, Jennifer Bluhm, brought a fine

variety of vegetables to sell last week. Her Tonasket grown, all organic collection included green beans, tomatoes, purple and green peppers, cucumbers and sun sugar cherry tomatoes. Thanks for sharing your abundance with us, Jennifer. Sutton’s “Gently grown” potatoes are back! Many of us wait with hope of enjoying the late summer offering of unusual potato varieties, this year, over 20 kinds. Irene Kuhlman staffed the booth and showed off tender, bite sized young potatoes. She is particularly proud of Purple Viking,

which features white flesh inside purple skin. Bags of mixed white, red and purple make for a colorful potato salad. Bakers, too, are a virtuous lot. Part art, part chemistry, and a generous helping of faith, hope and love go into the baking process. Melanie Thornton has a perfect recipe, and each loaf is baked with love and care. We sampled a loaf of golden raisin walnut this week, which makes superb toast. We also succumbed to temptation and enjoyed her homemade oatmeal chocolate chip cookies. Along with faith, hope an love, gratitude comes to mind. I am about to sit down to a bowl of potato soup; garden fresh potatoes, onions, carrots and garlic, for which I am thankful. Hope to see you at the market this week!

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Gary DeVon/staff photos

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 5:30 p.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

There was a really good crowd for the 2nd Annual Molson Quilt Show, according to organizers. “We had a lot of quilters come down from Canada that our group is associated with. We also sold a lot of stuff,” said Vicky Didenhover. Above, Vivian Emry of Molson and veteran Vern Scriven of Moses Lake, check out the 35 veteranthemed quilts that were fashioned with the proceeds from last year’s quilt show. They will be donated to aid veterans, according to Didenhover. A photo Emry’s late husband, the late Cleland Emry, a veteran of World War II and former publisher of the GazetteTribune, was among the military memorabilia included in the colorful display. Below, along with the quilts on display there were also quilts for sale, as well as a number of sewing related items. Below, Roberta Cole displays some of her quilts and various items she had for sale at the quilt show. She said that there was a rush of people that came to the show earlier in the day, mostly arriving before noon.

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

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Seventh-Day Adventist

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

www.gazette-tribune.com

Oroville Free Methodist

509-476-3602 888-838-3000

312 S. Whitcomb

Mfg.

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

JUST IN FROM SEATTLE

GIFT SHOW Sterling Rings by Wheeler Mfg.

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Interim Visiting Pastors Information: 509-223-3542

Morning Sun Yellow Pony Coming to Molson Sept. 5th, 6th and 7th

For information call 485-3183

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, September 05, 2013  

September 05, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, September 05, 2013  

September 05, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune