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TUMBLEWEED FILM FESTIVAL

BULLS & BARRELS

ROLLING INTO OROVILLE

Tonasket Rodeo Grounds August 2 at 6:30 p.m.

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More water must spill over Enloe, falls PUD, Dept. of Ecology contimplate next move BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – The ink was barely dry on Okanogan County PUD’s new federal license to operate Enloe Dam when the state Pollution Control Hearing Board said streamflow over the dam and Similkameen Falls must be considered and directed the Department of Ecology to do do an aesthetic study. “We are still processing what this means to our project,” said John Grubich, general manager of the public utility “Obviously this involves litigation and we are limited at this time to any comments we could make. It is also up to Ecology’s legal team to decide how they will proceed.” On July 23, 2013, the Washington State Pollution Control Hearings Board (PCHB) issued an order directing the

Ecology to do an aesthetic flow study if Okanogan PUD decides to build Enloe Dam project. The PCHB ruled that the water quality permit (called a “401 Certification”) does not protect the scenic and associated recreational values of the Similkameen Falls. A coalition of local, state and national river advocacy groups had challenged the permit for what they claim was a failure of the state agency to comply with federal and state Clean Water Act requirements that protect scenic values of rivers. A  trial  was held at the PCHB offices in Tumwater, Wash. on April 16-19 and May 15-16. “The Board’s decision could not be more clear: the Board held that the coalition proved that Ecology had simply failed to study and protect the proposed project’s impact on the scenic values of Similkameen Falls, and instead improperly chose flows based upon the  Enloe  Project’s economics,” said Suzanne Skinner of the Center for Environmental Law and Policy in arecent press release. The Board found that

Ecology’s “401 certification is deficient” to protect the Similkameen River “without further conditions” on aesthetics. The Board criticized Ecology’s afterthe-fact evaluation of the minimum flow regime, which reduces natural flows by more than 90 percent to 30 cfs during summer months, and 10 cfs from October through March each year.  The Board stated that “selection of a minimum flow in this manner results in Ecology considering the impact of aesthetic flows on the operation of the (Enloe Dam) Project, rather than considering the Project’s impact on the aesthetic values of the flows. This is not the proper standard.” The PCHB noted that Similkameen Falls, although remote, is attracting an increasing number of viewers due to development of local and regional trail systems. The falls’ value as a scenic stop on the Similkameen River Trail is a factor to be considered in protection of flows over the dam as well as at the falls, according to the groups who appealed

the issuance of a 401 Certification. In making their ruling the PCHB said Ecology never considered flows greater than the minimum, reasoning that the aesthetic requirements only applied to populated areas such as around Spokane and Snoqualmie Falls. “The Similkameen River is a valuable resource to the community for recreation, scenic values, and fish and wildlife. This decision affirms that the Similkameen remains a multi-use river and is not for the sole use of power generation,” said Jere Gillespie, Columbia River Bioregional Education Project. The groups claim that the PCHB’s decision comes at a time of growing uncertainty about the PUD’s ability to finance the  dam project given electrical rate increases to customers for the next several years. They say there is growing opposition by ratepayers to pursue  Enloe  Dam given its outdated cost and revenue projections. “Okanogan PUD customers are already feeling a big pinch with pro-

posed 30 percent rate increases,” said Rich Bowers of the Hydropower Reform Coalition.   “Enloe  Dam will take a big bite out of ratepayers’ pocketbooks.  The PUD has failed to assess the economics of the project since 2007 despite an independent economic analysis showing the Project will be a big money-loser.  The PUD spent nearly a million dollars in the last year, fielding attorneys and consultants in this appeal, all of which has resulted in an adverse decision for the PUD and the ratepayers who are footing the bill.” Joseph Enzensperger of Oroville, was among those who testified at the hearing. “I just let them know what a priceless place it is and what the price will be if we allow this project to impact the amount of water that flows over Similkameen Falls. It will have an incredible impact on the landscape,” Enzensperger said after hearing of the PCHB’s decision last week. The parties, including Ecology and and the PUD, have 30 days to appeal the PCHB’s decision.

Tonasket applies for sidewalk grants Infrastructure discussions dominate meeting

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - In an effort to better connect the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Park to downtown Tonasket, the Tonasket City Council authorized planner Kurt Danison to apply for a Transportation Alternative Project grant. The action took place at the Tuesday, July 23, city council meeting. The grant, if approved, would bring in about $92,000 to put in a sidewalk along Whitcomb Ave. (US-97) from Sixth St. to just short of the Bonaparte Creek bridge next to Shannon’s. That would set the stage for a second project that Legacy Park leaders have been planning: a foot bridge across the creek that would keep pedestrians from having to cross to the park on the highway bridge. “What we would get is 370 feet of sidewalk,” Danison said. “It involves replacing all of the curb, existing concrete and asphalt, and replacing it from the southwest corner of Sixth, and it would run down to the northern entrance of

Shannon’s parking lot. Any more than that you’d have to tear it out because when they do the pedestrian bridge it will have to be excavated. “I think the funding is in the ballpark and we have a reasonably good chance at it.” Council member Scott Olson said that it was important to keep the businesses that would be affected by the project Shannon’s, Whistler’s and the Chevron station - fully in the loop as things progressed. “We’ll write them a letter to let them know the city is applying for a grant,” said Mayor Patrick Plumb. “It may or may not happen, no guarantees. But if we can send a picture with the letter and let them know if they want to discuss any of it, they can come here (to a council meeting) or contact City Hall.” Originally Danison had been asked by the Legacy Park leadership team to apply for a grant for the pedestrian bridge itself. But at the July 9 council meeting, he said that with a deadline of July 24 for

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Gary DeVon/staff photo

New trees have been planted at Oroville Elementary School, keeping the district’s promise of planting more trees after it cut down nearly a dozen to make room for more parking. The trees are inside the fence now, instead of outside. They were looking a bit dry on Monday as the district was experiencing irrigation system problems and staff had to resort to hand watering.

Local teen recovering from horrific crash BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Brent Baker/file photo

Amanda Johnson, playing for the Tonasket Tiger’s Girls Soccer Team.

TONASKET - Amanda Johnson has touched quite a few people in her life. If she and her family ever doubted that, the outpouring of support she and her family have received since Amanda was involved in a serious car accident July 19 would put any such thoughts to rest. Amanda, about to begin her senior year at Tonasket High School, was scheduled to be transferred to St Luke’s Rehab Center in Spokane after a series of surgeries at Sacred Heart Hospital to repair the damage done after her one-car rollover accident near Riverside, in which she was ejected from her vehicle. Her injuries included fractured vertebrae in her neck and back, a fractured left foot; multiple fractures in her right hand (one of which required her middle finger to be amputated); a severe laceration to her head; and “road rash” over much of her body. “She’s doing remarkably well, all things considered,” said her mom, Tiffany Johnson. “Actually, she’s been pretty

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 31

amazing. Even at the scene (of the crash), Meanwhile, social media filled with she’d lost consciousness but woke up and expressions of prayers and support for was able to give (first responders) my Amanda and her family. name and number “We’ve had quite to call.” a few visitors,” R e m a r k a b l y, Tiffany said. “That Fund set up for teen’s Tifffany said, has really helped. Medical Expenses Amanda never “Amanda is the lost movement in kind of person An account has been set up at her legs and arms that touches everyChase Bank for medical expensdespite the injuries one she’s ever met es. The “Amanda Jo Johnson to her back and somehow.” Benefit Trust,” for anyone wishing neck. One of those “She doesn’t visitors was close to make a donation to Amanda remember what friend Elizabeth and her family to help offset happened, which Jackson, a socexpenses. Donations can be sent is probably just cer and basketball to c/o Danna Grooms, P.O. Box as well,” she said. teammate. The two B, Omak, WA 98841 or dropped “She can’t rememjoined forces for off at Baines Title Company in ber if she swerved their senior projOkanogan to Kelly Townsend. to avoid a deer, fell ect to raise $3,800 asleep, or what.” to install an elecAmanda was tric scoreboard at kept under sedathe Tonasket High tion for four days she underwent mul- School soccer field, as well as rebuild tiple surgeries, largely because it was the team benches and repair some of the deemed to risky to remove and reinsert worn areas of grass on the field. the tube that was breathing for her. A car wash they had scheduled for

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CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Saturday, July 27, went on as scheduled, with Elizabeth getting help from Amanda’s sisters Ariana and Alex Perez, Michelle, Bo and Sarah Silverthorn, Lexi Gavin, Tyra Bell, Kjeld Williams and Elizabeth’s parents and brother Tim. “It’s been a bit stressful doing this without her,” Jackson said. “Mainly I’m just concerned about Amanda and her getting better. I had a lot of volunteers come to help, so I’m very thankful.” Amanda and Elizabeth had raised more than $1,100 prior to Saturday’s car wash. Tiffany Johnson said it’s still unclear how much of Amanda’s medical expenses will be covered by insurance. “We hope it covers a lot of it but we really don’t know at this point,” she said. “My aunt, Danna Grooms, set up an account at Chase Bank to help with medical expenses. “We’re very grateful for the support of everyone - family, friends, and my co-workers at Mid-Valley Hospital,” she added. “They’ve really done a lot for me. A lot of people have done so much for us, it’s been amazing.”

News A2-4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6

Upcoming Events A7 Classifieds/Legals A8 Real Estate A9

Art/Entertainment A10 Cops & Courts A11 Obituaries A12


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | AUGUST 1, 2013

Tonasket police running short on vehicles

Department could be down to just two cars if problem not resolved By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Joaquin Bustamante/submitted photo

Little remains of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation Headquarters in Nespelem after an early morning fire destroyed the building in the early morning hours of Monday, July 29. The cause of the fire is still under investigation according to Tribal officials.

Fire claims the Tribal headquarters building Cause of fire under investigation The Gazette-Tribune

NESPELEM - Fire claimed the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation’s Headquarters located at the Colville Indian Agency early Monday morning, Colville Tribal Chairman Michael O. Finley said Monday morning. “For the first time in our government’s recent history, our legislative body and Administration is without a Headquarters. We are shocked and saddened at this development. Many irreplaceable Tribal and personal items were lost today. Fortunately, no one was hurt. The Tribal Governmental community, and the community at large, is pulling together beautifully around this event so that the Tribes can continue to operate in as seamless a manner as possible,” said Finley in a CCT press release on Monday, July 29. “The fire was reported at about 1:15 a.m. Officers arrived on the

scene at approximately 1:20 a.m., and reported that the building was fully engulfed about five minutes later. Crews from the Bureau of Reclamation, Grand Coulee

“We are working to establisth temporary office space... will continue operations with minimul disruptions” Francis Somday, Executive Director, Colville Tribes

and Coulee Dam all assisted the Colville Tribal Emergency Services fire crews. “We are very thankful for the assistance we received in fighting this fire,” added Finley. The headquarters, built in 1975, housed the Colville Business Council and was the site of their meetings. The Tribes’ Executive Director, Land and Property manager, Information Technology and Elections offices were also located in the building.

Approximately 40 Tribal employees were displaced by the fire. “Our priority is always to provide governmental services to the Tribal membership. We are working to establish temporary office space and supplies and will continue operations with minimal disruption. The new Tribal Government Center, which has been a priority for quite some time now, will be fast-tracked in order to meet the needs of the Tribal membership and government as quickly as possible,” Francis Somday, Executive Director of the Tribes said Monday morning. “Due to the age and construction materials of the building we lost, we were already concerned about the building and have been planning for new construction. This tragedy highlights the basis for our concerns and our need for a new center,” continued Somday. Michael O. Finley added, “We are very thankful that the building was not occupied, and that nobody was hurt.” The cause of the fire is being investigated and work is being done to restore phone and email service to the Tribes.

TONASKET - The Tonasket Police Department’s fleet of vehicles, beset by age and use, is rapidly approaching critical levels, leaving Police Chief Rob Burks concerned that there is no margin for error for providing the city with adequate police coverage. Burks and the Tonasket City Council discussed the issue at length at the July 9 City Council meeting. Burks noted that each of the vehicles has 100-200 thousand miles on it. While most were bought on the cheap - the most recent purchases were a pair of cars bought from Republic for $1,200 apiece -- the cost of repairs has negated whatever savings there were from buying inexpensive cars. “At the time I’d heard concerns about buying cars so cheap,” Burks said. “Yet I’m constantly being reminded about how tight the budget is, to watch my budget... I totally understand. But a couple of years ago I asked for $8,000 for a car and was told, ‘No.’ “Of the six police cars we have two are either ‘done’ or we can’t afford to fix them at this time. Of the remaining four, mine has 169,000 miles on it and has transmission issues. Darren (Curtis’s) had 95,000 on it and recently had its front end redone. Audra (Fuller) is using a reserve car with 112,000 miles on it.... “At any given time we could be down to two cars or worse just because of the condition of the cars. I’m at the point of, what are we going to do? I’m totally open, but I’m afraid to ask for money (because of recurring budget discussions).” Mayor Patrick Plumb noted that one car had had $6,300 of repairs done on it and another $6,200. “What I want to hear from you,” Plumb said, “is if one more

car goes down, what are you going to do?” “I’m prepared at any given moment that three of us will be sharing two police cars, or even one,” Burks said, noting that they had discussed cannibalizing parts from multiple vehicles, including a transmission and engine, to cobble together one that would remain functional. “It’s tough that there are grants (to apply for) for swimming pools

“I would like for you to put out feelers,” Plumb said to Burks. “We have another officer coming in (to replace the retired Jim Rice) and we can’t put him in a $100 car. I need for you to go out and see what we can find in the $4000-7000 range. We’ve got to find something... (even though) it’s going to be really tight.” “In three years, we’ve paid more in repairs than it would have cost to lease a brand new car,” Burks

“Of the six police cars we have two are either ‘done’ or we can’t afford to fix them at this time.... At any given time we could be down to two cars or worse just because of the condition of the cars.” Chief Robert Burks, Tonasket Police Depatment

but there aren’t for the police or for cars,” Burks said. “I understand the money situation, but it’s frustrating that it seems we can’t do anything about it.” Plumb said that he wanted to see the issue addressed with a car that might cost more initially but not require nearly as much in maintenance and repairs. “We’ve spent more than 50 percent of our budget for repair and maintenance (for the year),” said council member Jean Ramsey. “And we have two cars sitting there that you can’t use and haven’t been fixed yet.”

said. “If we’re paying that money, there must be some there someplace…. Just in 2010, repairs on my Explorer were enough to lease a brand new car. It’s crazy.” Plumb asked for Burks to give him three options: a new or leased vehicle; a “nice” used vehicle and a well-worn used vehicle. “You know what ‘free’ means.” Plumb said. “We spent over six grand in each of three years.... “Get us actual figures, read the fine print, give us real numbers. My suggestion is if you need to finance them, we can talk about it as a council.”

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Kinross, neighbors work together to preserve quality of life The Buckhorn Community Advisory Association (BCAA) is a diverse group of community members who came together prior to the opening of the Buckhorn Mine. The group began meeting early on as citizens who were interested in issues associated with the mine, such as job creation and retention, potential environmental impacts, improved tax base,haul route, increased school enrollment, quarry noise, law enforcement, and other social, environmental, and economic issues. The BCAA consists of three subgroups, each with a vital role that ensures the group as a whole remains fair and focused on the overall intent of the organization. The Social Subgroup addresses community issues such as impact on schools, law enforcement, traffic, and other services. The Environmental Subgroup focuses on potential environmental issues and manages the Citizen’s Water Monitoring Program. The Economic Subgroup addresses issues such as housing, local employment, and economic impacts related to the mine. The BCAA meets quarterly, or more frequently if needed, at the Eagle Cliff Grange. The meetings are open public meetings, and everyone is encouraged to attend. More information on the group can be found on the BCAA’s website at www. buckhorncaa.org. The structure of the BCAA includes a process to be followed if there is ever a specific issue that the community would like addressed. The process is as follows: when a community member has a concern, he/she takes it to a BCAA member or brings it up at one of their meetings. The BCAA, which consists of an 18 member board, reviews the concern, discusses ideas to alleviate the concern, and comes to a consensus about the best recommendation to bring forth to Kinross. The benefit to utilizing this process is that the recommendations are generated and agreed upon by the community-based BCAA, so when the recommendation is brought to Kinross, we know the community has already fully reviewed and discussed the issue and is in support of the recommendation. This makes it quicker and easier for Kinross company repre-

sentatives to review the issue and recommendation, and respond to the BCAA with a workable solution.

Fish Hatchery Road is unsuitable for carrying mill traffic, so Kinross maintains signage directing suppliers to use the better-developed Old Kettle Falls Road.

Recently, this process was very successfully implemented. Last November, Kinross invited residents of Fish Hatchery Road to a meeting at the Ferry County Fairgrounds to provide an update on the Buckhorn mining operation and discuss issues associated with Fish Hatchery Road. After that meeting, Suzie Sage, as a member of the Social Subcommittee of the BCAA, decided to bring the issue up to the BCAA. She came to the next BCAA meeting prepared with a plan to form a subcommittee that would research the issues and possible solutions to resolve concerns that residents voiced. The results of the subcommittee indicated that the primary concerns of residents along Fish Hatchery Road were speed, dust and safety. Mea-

sures that Kinross already had in place to address these concerns include: • Annually funding of one additional Sheriff’s deputy • Conducting random radar checks • Regular Kinross security patrols • Vendor/Supplier/Contractor communications, including providing maps indicating no access on Fish Hatchery Road and providing regular reminders • Regularly requesting employees to avoid Fish Hatchery Road, if possible • Requiring company vehicles to use alternate route (exceptions may include environmental sampling, security patrols, employees living along route, corporate responsibility, and other occasional circumstances that may dictate use of the route) However, the BCAA subcommittee recognized that despite the measures that Kinross had already taken, some vendors and suppliers still occasionally used the route, primarily because GPS instructions direct drivers to go that route and the existing signage was unclear. As a result, the BCAA subcommittee recommended that Kinross purchase and install two signs along State Highway 21N and one additional sign at the junction of Fish Hatchery Road and Jack Mays Pride Road. Kinross is currently working with the State Department of Transportation and the Ferry County Public Works Department this summer to fabricate and install these signs. The Kinross Kettle River – Buckhorn operation would like to thank the committee that was selected to examine the concerns of Fish Hatchery Road residents. It took a tremendous amount of time and effort to identify and review concerns, travel the route, talk to residents, identify possible solutions and gather details from local and state agencies. The hard work and dedication the group demonstrated on this issue is a fine example of one of the responsibilities of the Buckhorn Community Advisory Board.


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AUGUST 1, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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All roads truly lead to Tonasket In 1913 the Tonasket Times ran a promotional map under the headline ‘All Roads Lead to Tonasket’ that illustrated how the town was truly the busy hub and focal point of many roads. People come to Tonasket for commerce, school and entertainment – for community. Whether it be roads to the west from Loomis and the many lakes recreation area and the Senlehikin Wildlife area, to the north from Oroville and Canada beyond, to the northeast from Havillah, Sitzmark and the Okanogan Highlands, to the south and Riverside, Omak and Okanogan or to the east and Wauconda, Republic and beyond – all roads truly seem to lead to Tonasket. That 1913 illustration was why the late Henry Colbert and Elva Helm decided to use the All Roads Lead to Tonasket theme for their historical compilation of the same title. Their book commemorated Tonasket’s 75th anniversary, which took place in 1985.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 1, 2013

GRANTS | FROM A1 the grant application, there wasn’t enough time to get the various requirements for the more complex project together. Danison also thought that getting the sidewalk in place first would improve the likelihood of securing grant funding for the bridge. “(The sidewalk) would be perfect,” Danison said at that time. “This is our project, but this is all we’re asking for now They need to see it’s part of a bigger effort.”

Speaking of construction... Infrastructure projects have a way digging up the sins of the past, and the Third/Fifth/Sixth Street repaving project has been no exception. While the project itself is less expensive and complex than other projects the city has taken on (such as the various water/ sewer upgrades), the streets project has brought a few issues to light, especially in terms of how the roads were laid down half a

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE century ago. Bill Burman, construction engineer for city engineering firm Varela and Associates, was on hand to discuss the difficulties that have arisen. Issues the construction crews have encountered included extremely thin pavement in some areas; places where the street had been widened while laying down pavement without little or no gravel base; and some areas where mushy, wet clay under the pavement will require additional preparation before the road could be repaved. The bad news was that the council would need to approve additional expenditures in able to complete the project. The good news was that the Transportation Improvement Board, which supplied 95 percent of the funding to complete the project, will also fund 95 percent of those unanticipated costs. “This project has had the interesting surprises of all the ones we’ve done,” Plumb said. “The other ones came in under (budget), but we’ve been over twice on

this one already. I’m not criticizing - but the cheapest project of all has been the most surprising.” “Are we going to find these problems on other streets?” asked council member Scott Olson. “From what I’ve seen, this is unusual,” Burman said. “I don’t believe this is widespread. Even on Locust we had a lot of sand.” “Is someone responseible for that?” Olson asked “We paid someone to put in asphalt, right?” “Probably 50 years ago,” Plumb said. “Those are just layer upon layer. It’s not just one project.” The cost to the city for the additional repairs (five percent of the total) amounts to about $1,800, which the council approved. The other alternative was to scale back the partially completed project. “This sounds like a bargain to me,” Olson said. “For $1,800 we get to fix it long term.” Additionally, the council discussed the fact that ADA access on the east side of Whitcomb was non-existent in some areas and that construction had further complicated access for those who needed it, especially on Third.

“That is part of the US-97 project (which hasn’t started yet),” Plumb said. “The next project will tie that in,” Burman said. “But that doesn’t solve this immediate problem.” City Clerk Alice Attwood pointed out that grant restrictions on the TIB money prohibit work on the corner of US-97. Any kind of temporary solution would have to be fully brought up to state standards - in other words, be a permanent fix. “The 97 project was supposed to be done by the end of this year,” Plumb said. “And last year, too.” “(Overall) I think these sidewalks are excellent,” Olson said.

“People I talked to don’t know why we’re doing it. They just want to know why the street’s not fixed. We need to get the message out that we’re getting sidewalks in.” On another front, George Hill requested help paying a bill to fill in a 40-inch by 60-foot gap along Sixth Street after he fronted $1,200 to fill in an area that has been a danger to pedestrians. The entire section was on city rightof-way near one of the building’s he owns. “(Construction crews) were just going to leave what was there before (dirt and gravel),” Hill said. “Every now and then I’d go down and try to smooth it out. It’s a

hazard ... people trip, I’ve tripped on it.” Hill said the contractor agreed to fill in the area with concrete. “It was a no-brainer for me to get it done for $1200,” he said. “But I was hoping the city would help to pay for part of it.” The council said it would consider Hill’s request after reviewing the legalities of his request. “Something like this would need to be worded by (city attorney Mick Howe) in a way that indicates why this is different from other situations,” Olson said. “If we do this, we need it so it doesn’t come back to bite us.”

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LOCAL HEALTH CARE. LOCAL HEALTH PLAN. INTRODUCING AN EXCITING NEW PARTNERSHIP! The physicians of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center are now partners with Health Alliance to bring you health care and health coverage. We have a lot in common—intense focus on quality and service, led by doctors and here to stay.

Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Health Alliance

• #1 Private HMO/POS Health Plan in Illinois • Washington State 2011 Corporation for and Iowa* Communities recognition for making community • #1 Medicare Advantage PPO Plan in Illinois** involvement a priority. • 4.5 out of 5 stars from the Centers for Medicare & • Inpatient rehab center’s CARF distinction, Medicaid Services for HMO and PPO plans*** representing the highest standard of clinical quality. • Commission on Cancer accreditation, to ensure a high-quality, comprehensive cancer treatment program.

WE HAVE PEOPLE FOR THAT Want to Know More?

Give us a call at 1-509-662-0736 or stop by for a visit and a cup of coffee. Our home is your home at 316 Fifth St., just down Chelan Avenue from Wenatchee Valley Medical Center.

HAheretostay.org * Based on NCQA’s Private Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2012-2013. Health Alliance Medical Plans ranks 35th nationally for HMO/POS. ** Based on NCQA’s Medicare Advantage Plan Rankings, 2012-2013. Health Alliance Medicare ranks 32nd nationally for PPO. *** Medicare evaluates plans based on a 5-star rating system. Star Ratings are calculated each year and may change from one year to the next.


AUGUST 1, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Disappointed in recent actions of ATV Club

Support a truly unique event Like it’s namesake, the Tumbleweed Film Festival has rolled back into town. And with two free and two paid events, there’s really no excuse not to venture out and give the promoters your support by attending one of the venues. It really is time we get behind Seattle filmmakers and TwFF founders Mo Fine and Geoff Klein and show them that their efforts are appreciated. They aren’t making lots of money off the festival by any means, but their love of the area and desire to give something to the community, keeps them coming back. It’s not that the TwFF doesn’t have some die-hard fans, some have been coming back year after year. Wouldn’t it be great if Oroville, Tonasket and Osoyoos became at least a miniMecca for those who enjoy great short films from around the world? Like Sandy Lorentzen Out of said to the Oroville Chamber oof Commerce a My Mind couple weeks back, these are the kind of events Gary A. DeVon that start small and with a little work from a few dedicated organizers they can lead to really big things. This year is unique in that there is a free family night at Veranda Beach Resort on Thursday. Bring the kids and for those old enough to remember, recapture what it was like to go to the local drive-in theaters, the Pow Wow in Oroville or the Silver Sage in Osoyoos. For the 21-and-over crowd, the Pastime Bar and Grill will also have a free movie night on Thursday featuring some of “Best of Fest” offerings from the three previous festivals held in Oroville. Now’s your chance to get a taste of what you’ve been missing. These events are free and brought to you through the sponsorship of Veranda Beech and the Pastime. And of course, the venues at Bart’s Alpine Brewing and Steve and Linda’s Esther Bricques Winery, Friday and Saturday, respectively, have proven to be most popular. You’ll have to buy a ticket (and the brewery is 21-and-over only), but going by festivals past you’re guaranteed to have a good time. So why not try to take in several short movies on one or two nights? All too often we hear there’s nothing going on. The festival has something for every taste – the shorts will make you think and they’ll make you laugh. Let’s support our unique film festival and the businesses who sponsore it, like this newspaper, so it can continue to grow into something we can all benefit from.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Dear Editor, I write to express disappointment in the recent actions of the North Central ATV Club and the Okanogan County Commissioners. As staff for Trout Unlimited, I’ve worked hard the last few years with a group of folks among both environmental and ATV recreation interests to pass 1632, a sensible bill to both expand ATV routes and improve accountability among users to reduce conflicts and protect the environment. The bill would have passed early this year except for concerns in Olympia with how it would be implemented in Okanogan County. The concern was high enough that one legislator tried to exempt the Methow Valley entirely. This led Representative Kretz to make this (paraphrased) statement on the House floor: “The Methow is an incredible area; beautiful country. It is worth taking care of. There’s a wide range of recreational opportunities there. Some mix better and some aren’t really well suited with each other. My hope is that we’ll be able to determine routes that will keep conflicts to a minimum. I have talked with the Okanogan County Commissioners about this and have their commitment that we will work together. I look forward to working with them and the other interests in the Methow. I hope we can do a really inclusive process in Okanogan County. I would urge folks that are concerned about this to work the public process on a local basis and we can hopefully meet the needs of all the different interests.” But before the ink was dry, the ATV club ignored the opportunity for quality process and compromise and petitioned the commission to not only open all qualifying roads throughout the county but to also open a long list of roads that are illegal and unsafe for ATV use. This undermines that spirit of the new law and the collaboration that got it passed, and threatens to unravel the momentum we’d developed for sensible resolution of recreation conflicts on our roads and trails. By responding to an olive branch with a sword, the North Central ATV Club and Okanogan Board of Commissions have reinforced distrust that keeps us locked in conflict. Gregg Bafundo Tacoma, Washington

SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602

Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Looking for justice for ‘sweet and gentle’ Ben Dear Editor, Ben was gunned down for no apparent reason by a man some neighbors refer to as the “crazy neighbor.” He didn’t chase livestock; in fact, he could only plod along and sniff, due to spinal injuries from a prior accident. He was sweet and gentle and didn’t deserve to die. My brother spent the past four days searching everywhere and talking to everyone in the vicinity of his place near Tonasket,WA. He even asked the alleged shooter if he had seen Ben and was told “no.” Even though I

spent the past week and a half with John and Lu and gentle Ben, I had to return home. So when I got the news, I started utilizing social media and soon my community of dog agility people were sharing Ben’s lost dog story all around the country! We were all hopeful that this story would have a positive outcome.... Alas, it was not that way at all. Another neighbor called John in response to a lost dog flyer said he had heard a shot and saw a black lab stumble a few steps and collapse into the ditch. John had the presence of mind to call law enforcement, before charging out there to find his beloved lab. I don’t know that I would have been that way; even though my husband is in law enforcement. At this point, there is is no resolution and no justice for poor Ben; the “crazy neighbor” who has a history of shooting other people’s dogs, just happens to be a retired okanogan sherriff’s deputy. No wonder they said they knew him & that he was known to be an animal lover! Ben’s lifeless body with it’s soft,shiny black coat has mysteriously disappeared. And as anybody who watches tv knows, without a body, it’s very hard to prove a crime.... So it certainly appears that instead of adhering to a higher standard (like my husband and most responsible law enforcement officers do) this agency prefers to protect its own and allow for a double standard. WA state code RCW 16.52.205 animal cruelty, first degree: Cruelty to an animal causing death a) to inflict substantial pain b) causes physical injury c) kills an animal by means causing undue suffering Check. Check. and Check. Myriad studies have shown a link between those who commit acts of cruelty towards animals and their eventual escalation to acts of violence towards humans. This may be one of those instances where we can stop the chain of events before they become even more tragic. It’s already tragic for Ben. And for my brother, who loved him and for my sister-inlaw, to whom Ben was completely devoted. Just look into his adoring eyes... he was looking at Luann. And what did he do to deserve a senseless and horrific death? Not one thing. Just think if it were your companion animal that was gunned down. And help sweet Ben by pointing the light of truth and justice where it should be shining. Gailanne Molver Modesto, California

Hope thde coffee shop rumors aren’t true Dear Gary, Hey, this is the old coffee drinker but I don’t drink coffee. I now have an amazing drink called Spark. Dan Dixon says that I now can be called “Sparky.” Thanks, Dan, I really like the new name. With a Spark in one hand, I got to thinking about ‘rumors.’ As of late, though thankfully it’s quieted down, we’ve heard many rumors about our hospital. Some, but certainly not all, may be true; but, like the old telephone game that many of us have played where one person whispers something to another and that person passes it on and after it goes in each ear and leaves each mouth it soon grows to where the original person no longer recognizes it. Facts get distorted and inferences run rampant. Like Will Rogers used to say “All I know is what I read in the papers and then I only believe half of that”. Well, here is another rumor and with every fiber in my body, I hope it isn’t true. The rumor is that the Drip Line may be closing. I hope that this is a rumor that isn’t true. I’ve heard that it isn’t making money or even paying for itself. But, so what? Even if it doesn’t turn a profit, or even pay for itself, it is still a necessary service and an added convenience It is a service to anxiously waiting families of a patient in surgery. It is a service to families who come to support patients, and it is service to the many employees of our hospital. The food served is incredibly good. The sandwiches are excellent with ample contents. The soups or salads and other condiments are scrumptious and the attitude of those who prepare and provide the service are very relaxed and friendly. This service is right next to where friends and relatives of patients, anxious to hear the news and results of the medical services being provided, can quietly support each other. I hope that this is just an unfounded and wild rumor but even if it is true that it doesn’t pay for itself is no justifiable reason not to provide the service. If turning a profit is what justifies existence then many people have no reason to exist because of their debt. Gee, come to think about it, our government certainly has no reason to exist because of our large debt and lack of profit.. Anyway, give this some thought and if you think as I do, let your voice be heard. Sparky, the ex coffee drinker, Randy Middleton Tonasket

It’s time to get to work OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

I hated working for a bank as a skip tracer. It was in my trucking phase during the Carter recession when the firm I drove for went down along with my job. I was gone from my young family for days at a time, living out of motels, tracking down people who’d run with cars, house trailers, bulldozers, backhoes, tractors, boats, motorhomes, trailer trucks, even art works, all of whom had fallen terminally behind on the loans those items were collateral for. I was the worst news unemployed folks or bad money handlers could see pulling into their driveway for I was the bank guy come to take their loved possession, the stock of their trade, their only means of transportation, the roof over their head. News of my car flashed up Tennessee hollows by phone. Men ran with their trucks, women gathered their kids and hid out back of the trailer. Women wept, baffled children cried, broken men railed and threatened. I carried a gun and needed it twice. It was a horrid, ugly job but it put rice in my family’s bowl in hard times and my people didn’t do welfare. I reminded myself that if it weren’t me the bank would just send another, and I tried to hurt the least and leave the most dignity intact. Still, I loathed it so much I took another job eight months later that required me to commute 500 miles one-way for a week at a time offshore Gulf of Mexico. In this current recession (Oh yeah, it’s not over - ask the legions of unemployed. SNAP (food stamp recipients have tripled since 2008) two of my sons and my daughter -

two of them parents - were laid off or their employer sank. All obtained solid jobs within six weeks. One was laid off a second time, but found yet another job in two weeks. So I look askance at accounts by people living - apparently adequately - on unemployment and SNAP who lament they’ve been out of work for two years because they “just can’t find a job.” I wonder if a taxpayer funded skew of definition might not at least occasionally be at play. A Tonasket friend tells of being behind a man dressed like an Abercrombie & Fitch model who bought groceries with a SNAP card and toted it all out to a nice car. She told him her company needed workers bad and would hire him immediately, but he whined about his shoulder, the one he was carrying heavy... free... groceries with. This same company has tried to hire Americans only to be told by some workers that they “couldn’t” accept the job offer until their unemployment and SNAP ran out. So I can’t help but feel that one cannot claim to be unable to find a job just because none is nearby, advertising prime work at prime pay. Nope, sorry, that’s not “can’t find a job.” Depending somewhat on age, disability, education, experience and kids in tow, you can’t claim that you can’t find work as long as there’s an open job doing... anything... anywhere. Not while working people are using up their lives earning money taken from them to feed and shelter you. Cold? Let me tell you about cold. When the government approved construction of Hoover Dam in the Great Depression ads were run in

national newspapers imploring the hordes of unemployed not to come to Las Vegas, for the infrastructure to hire dam workers would not be in place for a year. They came anyway by the thousands. They hitched, rode the rails, walked, or drove rolling wrecks with their kids and everything they still owned. They lived months on garbage in squalid tent cities for just the chance of a dangerous job outdoors in 120 degree heat. That’s... cold. That’s... “can’t find a job.” It gets colder. The reality is that for many presently unemployed the old job is never coming back. A robot is now doing it, or some Bangladeshi is doing it for five bucks a day. The time for comfy entitlement illusions in America has passed. It’s time to rethink your value to the job market because no one is going to do that for you. It’s time to work whatever you can get better than anyone else so you can use it as a step up to something higher. It’s time to work for chump change as an entry-level assistant learning an employable trade. If you can afford school or training, it’s time to research where American jobs are going to be and go back to class. It’s time to... compete... Americans, hard, for only the competitive will be keeping their roofs and rides when America becomes Greece-west and the unemployment and free food doles run dry. William Slusher is a writer with a horse ranch on the Okanogan near Riverside. He may be complained to at williamslusher@ live.com.


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | AUGUST 1, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Time stands still for no one A new month and soon another school year will begin, with apple harvest on the horizon. Time surely does not stand still for anyone! The seasonal cherry workers have been laid off, and so it goes. Those who do home canning will be busy with all the fruits of the season. Count me out on that. I never did get great enjoyment from that and age has not altered my feelings. I did it because it was the economical thing to do, not because I enjoyed doing it. And, I’m not a jam and jelly eater so I get out of that chore, too. Apricots are ready and waiting for preserving, now. Soon the peaches and nectarines will be ready. Busy, busy! This month our youngest granddaugh-

ter will be married in Issaquah. We’ll have more to say about that later. The setting sounds interesting to say the least. In September Grace Zou, daughter of pastor Jin Ming Ma and “Sho Sho” will be married in Everett, and we hope to attend that. Condolences are indeed in THIS & THAT order for Barbie Friemuth, due to Joyce Emry the death of her

husband, Irv, a victim of cancer. I have not been to see Barbie, as I’ve had this wretched cold and surely didn’t want to expose her. I was housebound all last week and probably missed out on lots of “stuff.” Evelyn Frazier is once again having chemotherapy, in Spokane, and seemingly receiving benefit from it. Hopefully, she’ll be able to return to her home shortly. I hadn’t seen Jean (Harden) Jacobs for a lengthy time, so we blocked the isle, at the grocery, and got caught up a bit. We used to have such great times bowling and wondered if we could even lift a ball now, much less throw it down the alley. At 91 she’s “lookin’ good.”

As you slow down, when driving on Main Street take a moment to look up and admire the beautiful hanging baskets. They made it through the extremely hot days, very nicely. The thermometer readings are not nearly as extreme as they were earlier in the month and that is good. Just when Bob Hirst was making some positive strides, he has taken a couple of falls, due to dizziness and losing his balance. Adjustments are being made in dosages of medication and hopefully he will receive some benefit from those measures. Falling down is a part of life! Getting back up is living! Have watched some real good baseball games and just when I’m about ready to give up on the Mariners, they get with it, and win a few. Soon the almighty football games will start. Did you know that when the University of Nebraska Cornhuskers play football at

Many visitors at rodeo time

Making Music in the Park At CCc

Submitted by Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

As many of you know over the week before and after the Fourth of July we have a lot of visitors come in and out to visit us and attend the rodeo. Most are grand kids or great grand kids. We throw in an adult or two for drivers of cars or trucks to the beach or over to Molson to the museums. Whoever said that there is nothing to do in Chesaw and surrounding area. Each year I have asked the kids to write me a story about their time in Chesaw. The following is

home, the stadium becomes the state’s third largest city? You didn’t know that and most likely didn’t care. We had 28 at Senior’s playing pinochle last Saturday night. Largest number for quite a while, but we got room for more, so come on out. Good snacks, too! For this household, the month of July has been much better than last year, when we were “living” in North Central Washington hospital. The man of the house has even played a few rounds of golf. Saw Jim Prince and “Buffy” (youngest daughter) at the grocery. Jim has not gotten totally used to not being at the store, but is working at it. Buffy had her children here enjoying the lake, with boating, water skiing and living the life she lived when she was growing up. Jim reported that the health of brother Ben was “not good” and of course we discussed Gonzaga and the upcoming basketball season.

HILLTOP COMMENTS one of the results. “The week In Chesas” by Alivia Merritt age 7 Day 1 It was fun seeing my cousins, papa, grandma and Aunt Jackie. We ate a yummy Dinner together. Day 2 Today in went swimming with my cousins and Mark. we got ice cream. Day 3 I went to the Dance with Mark, My cousins and my grandpa Jeff I danced with my grandpa The rodeo was fun and I ohmost cat a Chickin. Swimming was fun I plaed with Dasey the Dog. And throo the ball for Lasey Dasie. I am hoping that the other kids

will now write to me and tell me of their fun. From Sandy Vaughn -- Fiona “There will be a yard sale and swap meet in the yard at Fiona Gallery in Chesaw on Saturday and Sunday, August 10 and 11, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Everything from garden plants to household items, tools to curiosities. Several vendors lined up, more welcome! (509) 485 2281. Saturday, Aug. 24 will be here soon for the Hot August Nights. to enter as a Participant or vendor call Pauline at (509) 485 2255. Lots of categories available, Car and Tractor show, Decorated ATVs, Lawnmowers and Golf Carts and Lots more. Aug. 31st is the Molson Quilt Show. Call Vicky Didenhover (509) 4853020 for more information.

submitted photo

Sparrow will be playing at Music in the Park at Tonasket’ Community Cultural Center on Aug. 2.

Sparrow to perform Aug. 2 Submitted by Janet Culp

CCC of Tonasket

On Aug. 2, the Community Cultural Center in Tonasket will be the venue for a group of four musicians, “Sparrow,” featuring, Mariliz Romano, Doug Wilson,

Enjoy ‘South of the Border’ flavors Submitted By Suzanne Dailey Howard

Tim Alley, and Steve Sher. These musicians play an eclectic mix of jazz, rock, and folk music - something for everyone. The event runs from 6-9 p.m. La Ultima Mexicatessen will provide delicious food for purchase. The Community Cultural Center

will have drinks and snacks by donation. Come with a lawn chair or blanket and enjoy this wonderful group of talented people. Our last MIP of the season is on August 9 featuring the Randy Battle Bluz Band & Lota Duarte.

TONASKET MARKET REPORT

of other preserved treats. Jams and jellies include blueberry, nectarine, peach, blackberry, Italian plum, raspberry, and jalapeno. The jalapeno is good with cheese and crackers. We tried the peach this week, and give it two thumbs up. If you want to do your own cooking with genuine south of the border ingredients, you can’t miss the Capote family’s booth. Fernando and Alma, assisted by daughter Rubi sell traditional fresh herbs, jalapenos and tomatillos. They grow a vast array of fruits and vegetables such as onions, pickling cukes, Swiss chard, carrots, peppers and cherries. In addition they sell fresh flower bouquets. I used their Inferno banana peppers to create a favorite appetizer this week. Gracias, mi amigos! Add a little salsa to your step and spice to your life. Shop local and try new flavors. Adios, see you at the market!

Tonasket Farmers Market

North Okanogan County may be near the Canadian border, but we enjoy many “south of the border” flavors. Never is this truer than at the Tonasket Farmers’ Market. Our Hispanic community makes up a big part of the market family of vendors, and this week I’d like to shine the spotlight on just three of them, all located in the southwest corner of Triangle Park on Thursday afternoons. Crave cool treats on a hot day? Stop by Godina confections, where Felipe and Alicia serve fresh fruit cups and sno-cones. Try their refreshing fruit waters, which come in tamarind, pine-

Annual picnic this Saturday at Bonaparte Resort Submitted by Lyle Anderson Tonasket Eagles #3002

The gardens are growing and the weather has been beautiful. We hope that all have been enjoying this fine summer so far. A special thank you to all that have been renewing their memberships, and helping to make this Eagles one of the finest around. There will be no bingo or kitchen this Friday due to the annual picnic this Saturday. We will have bingo up and running again next week and all of you that love bingo make sure to let all know that our bingo is still going strong. To those in Omak come on up and enjoy our Friday night and it is open to the public. For those wishing to play pinoch-

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apple, strawberry, hibiscus and coconut. They offer fresh green beans and promise corn on the cob is on its way. While you are enjoying your refreshment, check out the bright scarves and hair accessories that Alicia crochets during the winter. Next stop is Leonor’s Tamales, especially if you want a hot, delicious dinner without heating up your kitchen. Leonor Eggerton offers tasty tamales with your choice of pork, chicken, or vegetarian filling. Top them with her homemade salsa and have a picnic at the market, or take them to go. If you love the salsa, Leonor has it in jars, along with lots

TONASKET EAGLES le this Sunday the weekly tournament will be at at the Tonasket American Legion at 1 p.m. This Saturday is our annual picnic up at Bonaparte Lake Resort. So make sure to come on up and enjoy the company of your fellow members. Make your favorite dish and bring it up for the potluck meal that will be held. The club will be cooking up hot dogs and hamburgers also. The day will be filled with good company and plenty of games to keep all entertained. Karaoke later that day will be provid-

312 S. Whitcomb

ed by Mery and donations for him are more than welcome. So come early and stay late and help make our annual get together one to remember. The club will be closed Aug. 3rd and 4th. Our pinochle scores from last Sunday’s tournament are as follows. Julie Hovland and Lyle Anderson ran off with first place and also the last pinochle of the day. Second place went to Ken Cook and Ted Zachman. Low Score was snatched up by Duane and Bev Wilson. A great big thank you to all that came in and played. We wish those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

509-486-0615

Sometimes you feel like a nut... A Tagua Nut

OKANOGAN VALLEY

10K, 14K, Tagua Nut & Diamond Ring.

1-888-838-3000

Made by Keith – $300!

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Brent Baker/staff photo

TVBRC arts curator Lauralee Carey chats with Oroville author Arnie Marchand during last Friday’s artist/author meet-and-greet. Marchand hosted a book signing.

Heritage Day pie event was a success by Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

We were sorry to learn of the death of Iry Freimuth last week. He and Barbie were long time members of the Oroville Senior Center.They were also faithful Bingo members and rarely missed an opportunity of play. His favorite number was 39, probably the year of his birth. Her favorite number was 22. Our Heritage Days Pie Event

Oroville Senior News was a success. Thank you to all who participated. Brent Baker made his rounds taking pictures for the GazetteTribune. Barbara Workman and David Karaffa had the first shift and Evelyn Dull was the pie cutter all day. Larry Thompson and Marilyn Perry also served, as well as Roberta Cole and Marge Finlay. The carpets in the Pool Room

will be cleaned in the next week. Guest speaker for Aug. 6 will be a seminar sponsored by Aging and Adult Care presented by Beth Widby, RN. Her topic is Health, Happiness and fall prevention. Pinochle scores for July 27: The door prize was won by Ken Ripley. Most pinochles was won by Nellie; she was surprised when her son Ted brought birthday cake and ice cream for us. High scorer for the women was Sally Eder, who had just returned from a vacation touring Alaska with husband Junior. High scoring man was Leonard Paulsen, again. More next time

Tips for Setting - and Pursuing - Financial Goals FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

You can get lucky by finding a parking meter with time left on it. You can “luck out” by having nice weather on your vacation. You can even be lucky at love. But when it comes to financial matters, you’re better off not counting on Lady Luck — and focusing instead on setting and pursuing goals. Here are some suggestions for establishing and pursuing your financial objectives: Be specific. You probably have a lot of ideas about what you want to do, but if you’re going to turn these wishes into reality, you need to get specific. So, for example, instead of telling yourself that you want to retire early, set a goal of retiring at, say, 62. You can then use this target number to help guide your overall investment strategy. To illustrate: You can determine that you need to invest a certain amount of money each

year, and earn a certain rate of return, to be able to retire at 62. You can also estimate about how much money you can afford to withdraw from your investment accounts each year to sustain a retirement that begins at 62.

Prioritize your goals. Of course, you want to achieve all your financial goals —and you can have a better chance of doing so if you rank these goals in terms of both importance and timing. For example, you may want to send your kids to college, purchase a vacation home and still be able to retire at age 62. How should you allocate your resources to each of these goals? Should you invest more at any given time for a specific goal? What types of investments are best for each of these goals? Prioritizing your goals can help you answer these and other questions — and help direct your overall investment strategy. Be prepared to change your goals. Over time, your family and financial circumstances can change considerably — which means you shouldn’t be surprised, or alarmed, if you have to change your goals accordingly. And you’ll find it easier to maintain this flexibility if you’ve worked diligently to create an investment portfolio with sufficient resources to allow you to change direction, as needed.

Review your progress regularly. If you’re going to eventually achieve your goals, you absolutely need to measure your progress along the way. Are your investments performing the way you had anticipated? Are your goals becoming more expensive than you had initially envisioned? To achieve these goals, are you taking on too much — or too little — risk? To answer these types of questions, it’s a good idea to review your overall progress at least once a year and then make whatever adjustments may be necessary. As you can see, it will take considerable effort to set, review and (hopefully) achieve your goals. And it can be somewhat complex, too, so you may want to work with a financial professional — someone who takes time to talk with you about your goals, understands your risk tolerance and family situation, and has the training and experience necessary to help you work toward your objectives. But in any case, think hard about your goals and how you might accomplish them. And don’t delay in taking action — because goals are generally easier to attain if you have time on your side. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.


AUGUST 1, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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Community Bulletin Board Crafts Day at Tonasket Library TONASKET - A Crafts Day will be held at the Tonasket Library on Aug. 1 starting at 1 p.m. as part of their Dig Into Summer summer reading program. The library is located at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. For more information call (509) 486-2366.

Tonasket Farmers’ Market TONASKET - Tonasket Farmers Market is held on Thursdays, from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. The next market is Thursday, Aug. 1. Come join us for some of the best in local produce, crafts, personal care products, homegrown music and farmstead cheeses. Whether you make a quick spin to pick up supper ingredients or hang out for hours, you’re sure to get what you want. For more info call (509) 486-1199

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The Oroville Farmers’ Market is Saturday, Aug. 3, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Oroville Community Library located at 1276 Main St. Purchase art, crafts, plant starts, fresh baked goods and tamales plus the best produce on the planet. The Oroville Farmers’ Market continues each Saturday through October 26 and new vendors are welcome. Call (509) 476-2662 for more information.

Music at the Market OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will host “Music at the Market” each Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. during the Farmers’ Market season. The next Music at the Market is Saturday, Aug. 3, featuring an open stage. For more info call Barbara at (509) 476-2662.

OHS Class of 1953 Reunion OROVILLE - The Oroville Class of 1953 will be hosting their 60th reunion on Saturday, Aug. 3. The get together will take place at Hometown Pizza beginning at 12 p.m. to about 4 p.m. Lunch of your choice from the menu. See you then. For more information call (509) 476-2488.

Youth Football Registraiton OROVILLE – Registration for the North Central Washington Youth Football “Oroville Killer Bees Team” will be Saturday, Aug. 3 at the Oroville Grade School cafeteria from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. NCWYF is a competitive/recreational football league open to all second through sixth graders living in Oroville and the surrounding area between the ages of eight and 13 years of age. Oroville is looking to field both a bantam and junior team in 2013. For more information contact

Kolo Moser at (509) 429-8677.

OHS CLASS OF 1973 REUNION

Winery has Engel and Swanson

OROVILLE - A 40 year class reunion for the 1973 OHS alumni will he held this Saturday, Aug. 3 on Kathy (Minyard) Noel’s and Susan (Valentine) Christensen’s adjoining lawns at 1714 and 1718 Deerpath. The 4 p.m. casual potluck picnic will feature Rod Noel (Class of ‘72) on the BBQ and Gary Bull (Class of ‘73) manning the pulled pork sandwiches. Teachers, staff, neighbors, friends, and especially those from ‘70 through ‘75 are all invited to come see, visit and eat. Contact Salley Bull (509) 560-3624.

OROVILLE – Reed Engel and Harvey Swanson will combine their talents Thursday evening, Aug. 1 at Esther Bricques Winery’s Tasting Room. Doors open at 6 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Clothing Exchange OROVILLE - The LDS Church, located at 22420 Hwy. 97 north of Oroville, will be having a clothing exchange on Saturday, Aug. 3 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.ml. This means that the “exchange” will be from us to you. No need to bring any clothes with you. We will have everything from infant to pre-school to adult and everything in between. Some school clothes as well. Hope to see you there.

‘Sack of Hammers’ Opens for TWFF OROVILLE – Steve Kinzie and his group from the Seattle area, Sack of Hammers, will provide music from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., opening the Tumbleweed Film Festival held at Esther Bricques Winery, Saturday, Aug. 3. Music will begin at 5 p.m, with light refreshments available for purchase. The film festival itself begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are available for the films for $10 by calling the winery. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call (509) 476-2861.

Vacation Bible School LOOMIS - Vacation Bible School is set for Monday-Friday, Aug.5-9, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Loomis Community Church, on Main Street in Loomis. Ages are 3-12. The theme for VBS is, “Gone Fishing.” Stories, games,crafts and music will be included in the program. For information or rides call (509) 223 3902. All kids are welcome, and it’s free!

Community HU Song TONASKET - All are invited to a Community HU Song on Wednesday, Aug. 7 at the little shop of Yoga located at 306 S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Also called a HU Chant, it is a gathering to sing this ancient love song to God. The experience of a 20-minute group HU Song can be one of the most uplifting events in the life of an individual, further strengthening and deepening the bond of love we each have with the divine. It’s simply for the spiritual upliftment of those who come and is not directed to any other purpose. A short

celebrate the end of the Summer Reading Program. Come and have fun with us as we play games and win prizes. The library is located at 1276 Main Street. It’s a party, so there will be cake. For more information call (509) 476-2662.

silent contemplation will follow. Listen to the HU Song at www. eckankar.org. For more information contact Julie Greenwood at julieandscott@bossig.com or call (509) 486-1045.

Sandy Vaughn to Perform at Winery Geology of the OROVILLE –Sandy Vaughn Highlands will bring her guitar and vocals,

OKANOGAN HIGHLANDS - Geology of the Okanogan Highlands, Part III -- a field trip through the highlands will take place on Saturday, Aug. 17. Preregister with julie@okanoganhighlands.org or by calling (509) 433-7893. More information is available at http://okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw.

and perhaps some other performers to Esther Bricques Winery’s Tasting Room Thursday evening, Aug. 8. Doors open at 6 p.m. Light refreshments are available. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more info call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Western and Native art show

Quilt Show in Molson

OMAK - The Courtyard in Omak will be hosting the Western and Native Art Show, ThursdaySaturday, Aug. 8-10 from 10 a.m-7 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 11 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. There also will be a reception on Saturday from 2-5 p.m. and a live auction at 3 p.m.

MOLSON - The Second Annual Quilt Show in Molson will take place on Saturday, Aug. 31 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Quilters

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TONASKET - “One Way” Vacation Bible School will be held Monday through Friday, August 12-16, 2013 from 9:3012:30. Three Tonasket city churches are teaming together to bring this summer’s bible school. Children will be participating in crafts, music, games, snacks, Bible presentations and Scripture memorization. Tonasket Bible Church (Hwy. 97 & SR-20) will host 4-5 year olds, Tonasket Free Methodist (1 Stanton Loop Road) will host Grades 1-7 and Tonasket Four Square Church is providing workers. Registrations will be taken at both church sites each day. Please contact the Tonasket Free Methodist Church for more information at (509) 486-2194 or on Facebook.

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509-476-3602

Editor’s Note: Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune. com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage.

Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

At the

MOVIES * OLIVER THEATRE * Valley Christian Fellowship Summer Showtimes 7:00 & 9:00 P.M. Nightly (Unless otherwise stated)

August, 2013 Programme

Phone 250-498-2277

We're Airconditioned

OLIVER THEATRE Oliver Theatre www.olivertheatre.ca Visit our website

We're Airconditioned

Summer Showtimes 7:00 & 9:00 P.M. Nightly

Visit our website

THE HEAT

Wed. - Thurs. - Fri. Aug. 21 - 22 - 23 Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m. Nightly

Wed. - Thurs. - Fri. Aug. 7 - 8 - 9 ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY AT 7:30 P.M.

There will also be a matinee of this show on the Sat. at 2:00 p.m. All seats $6.00 for the matinee.

coarse language, violence. Aug. 8 - 9 - 10Frequent - 11

Wed. - Thurs. - Fri. Aug. 7 - 8 - 9 ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY AT 7:30 P.M.

Aug. 8 - 9 - 10 - 11 Wed.-Thurs.-Fri. Aug.7-8-9. 1 Showing Nightly at 7:30PM

Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m. Nightly

Frightening scenes.

PACIFIC RIM Sat.-Sun.-Mon.-Tues, Violence.

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Aug. 10 - 11 - 12 - 13 Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Nightly

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL Violence, coarse language, frightening scenes.

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues.

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Aug. 10 - 11 - 12 - 13 Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Nightly

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

Action/Adventure/Fantasy Starring Hugh Jackman Rila Fukushima, Will Yun Fri. 6:45, 9:45 Sat.*3:45,6:45, 9:45. Sun. *3:45,6:45,9:45, PG13 Wkdays. 6:45,9:45 129 min

Aug. 31, Sept. 1 - 2 - 3

There will also be a matinee of this show on the Sat. at 2:00 p.m. All seats $6.00 for the matinee.

Violence.

Programme subject to unavoidable change without notice

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Aug. 31, Sept. 1 - 2 - 3 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. Violence.

Violence, coarse language, frightening scenes.

Wed. - Thurs. - Fri. Aug. 14 - 15 - 16

The

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. - Wed. - Thurs. - Fri. Healing Service: 1st Sunday Aug. 24 - 25 - 26 - 27 - 28 - 29 - 30 Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:25 p.m. Nightly The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022 Frightening scenes.

Violence.

Wed. - Thurs. - Fri. Aug. 14 - 15 - 16

THE WOLVERINE

Trinity Episcopal

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. - Wed. - Thurs. - Fri. Aug. 24 - 25 - 26 - 27 - 28 - 29 - 30 Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:25 p.m. Nightly

Aug.10-11-12-13. Showtimes 7&9:30pm Nightly Violence.

Oliver, B.C.

Aug. 17 - 18 - 19 - 20

There will also be a matinee of this show on the Sat. at 2:00 p.m. All seats $6.00 for the matinee.

Frequent coarse language, violence.

THE LONE RANGER

Aug. 17 - 18 - 19 - 20

(Unless otherwise stated)

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues.

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Aug. 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Nightly

Oliver, B.C.

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • -Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m. Wed. - Thurs. - Fri. Aug. 21 22 - 23

*Sat. - Sun. - Mon.* - Tues.

Oliver, B.C. Reg. Showtimes: Sun.-Mon.-Tue.- August, Phone 250-498-2277 2013 Programme Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues. Aug. 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 Thur. 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7&9pm 250-498-2277 Showtimes at 7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Nightly www.olivertheatre.ca Enjoy your evening out, taking in a movie at the Oliver Theatre!

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues.

ContaCt Your LoCaL WnPa MeMber neWsPaPer to Learn More.

TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480. OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship

OROVILLE Digger’s Delight Party at the Oroville Public Library on Wednesday, Aug. 14 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. The Digger’s Delight party is to

Sat. - Sun. - Mon. - Tues.

LOW COST • ONE CALL • ONE BILL 509-476-3602

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

TURBO Animation. Starring Ryan Reynolds, Violence.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266 There will also be a matinee of this show on the Sat. at 2:00 p.m. All seats $6.00 for the matinee.

Programme subject to unavoidable change without notice

Paul Giamatti, Maya Rudolph, Michelle Rodriguez.

AUGUST 2, 3 & 4 GREYHOUND PARK EVENT CENTER

IDAHO I-90 Exit 2 - WASHINGTON/IDAHO STATE LINE

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTER VISIT

w w w. n w t r u ck s h ow. c o m SPONSORED BY:

Matsura images subject of new book by Marilyn Ross Okanogan County Historical Society

Food Banks

OROVILLE

Digger’s Delight Party

Sat.-Sun.-Mon.-Tues. Aug. 3-4-5-6. Showtimes: 7&9:15 pm nightly

YOU NEED HELP – They need work. over•2 million readers•with manyBILL LOWReach COST ONE CALL ONE

Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune. com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844. G.A.D.

This year marks the centennial of the death of locally famous, world-renowned Japanese photographer Frank S Matsura. Matusra lived with and photographed the people and events of frontier Okanogan County from 1903 until his untimely death from tuberculosis in 1913. Thanks to him we have an incredible visual record of the early development of the area. Among the collections of the Okanogan County Historical Society is a set of over 1,200 of Matsura’s negatives, about half of them glass plates. To honor the man and his legacy the Historical Society, among other projects, is publishing a hand-crafted, limited edition book using images from the collection. These are photos taken of Native Americans who lived in the area at the time, and whose descendants live here today. Individually framed prints of these images will be on display in the Rockwall Cellar’s tasting room during the time of the 2013 Omak Stampede celebrations.

Tonasket VBS

Enjoy your evening out, taking in a movie at the Oliver Theatre!

going once… going twice…

will be displaying patriotic quilts and military memorabilia from all branches of service. Many of the quilts were created from the proceeds of last years quilt show. Those that would like to like to donate a quilt should contact Vicky Didenhover. Quilts will be on display for peoples’ viewing pleasure, but there will also be a selection of quilts and other sewing related items for sale. Those with sewing related items that would like to have a table to sell items and/or would like to display a quilt at the show contact Didenhover at (509) 485-3020.

Fri: 7:00 & 9:30. Sat. *3:45, 7:00, 9:30. Sun: *3:45, 7:00 & 9:30. 96min PG Weekdays: 7:00 & 9:30

2 Guns Action/Comedy

Crime. Starring Denzel Washington, Mark Wahlberg, Paula Patton, Bill Paxton. Fri: 6:45, 9:30. Sat: *4:00, 6:45, 9:30. Sun:*4:00, 6:45, 9:30. Wkdys: 6:45, 9:30 109min R

SMURFS 2 Animation/Comedy/Family

PG

Starring Neil Patrick Harris, Katy Perry, 105min Christina Ricci, Jayma Mays. Fri. 7:00, 9:30. Sat. *3:45, 7:00, 9:30. Sun. *3:45, 7:00, 9:30. Weekdays. 7:00, 9:30 Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Interim Visiting Pastors Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | AUGUST 1, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • August 01, 2013

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

For Rent

Announcements

3 BR Home $795; 3 BR/2 BA w/2XGarage by River $1100; 2 BR on River $720; 2 BR/2BA $875; 3 BR/2 BA Waterfront APT $575; 1 BR Apt $475; 1 BR Condo $695.

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com

WorkSource Okanogan County

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32. Beloved of Aphrodite

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42. Give off, as light

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44. Blunted end

26. Sit in the sun

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57. Octaves

38. Civil War side

ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details.

Buying Silver, Gold Coins, Collections, Jewelry, Sterling, Flatware, Guns. Paying fair Prices. Call Spence (509) 429-4722

19. Idle fancy

2

55. Prayer

WARM, FUN Professional couple eager to provide your child love and happiness forever. Expenses paid. Ann and Peter. Call 1-800-593-1730. annpeter102@gmail.com or go to www.annandpeter.info

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 31 (Easy, rating 0.37) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

6

Across

5. Adjust

24. Browning’s Ben Ezra, e.g.

5

7

4

3

9

5

2

6

1

8

7

ANSWERS

23. “___ we having fun yet?�

7

Crosswords

If interested call Michael at Thompson Bees in Oroville at 509.476.3948

1

WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

ADOPTION

Wanted

3

www.go2worksource.com

This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

EVENTS-FESTIVALS

Needed

20-30 hours per week. Work includes answering phone, customer service, ordering and restocking.

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF JULY 29, 2013

is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented applicant. Must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online

Office Help/Secretary

Updated list of employment at

LEGAL SERVICES

Statewides

call

CMA

7

126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

14-21 days out. $3,500 gross weekly. Weekly settlements. Class-A CDL & 1 yr. experience. Discount plans for major medical & more. Fleet Owners Welcome. Call Matt 866-458-2595. DriveForGreatwide.com

DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com SCHOOLS/INSTRUCTION

The Oroville and the Tonasket Offices

1

Equal Housing Opportunity

On-

9

509-476-4057

email: stcharles@gdicom.net

Vacation Rentals

5

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

Homeschool Outreach Oroville. Large, Nice 1 bedProgram Part-Time Teacher room apartment. upstairs. No pets or smoking $400 + The Tonasket School District Utilities. 509-476-3145 is now accepting applications for an ES teacher for the homeschool Outreach Program one day per week for 2013/14 only. Must have Washington state certification with elementary endorsement. Position will remain 2 bedroom condo, Kala Point, open until filled. To apply, apPort Townsend WA. Week of plicants must complete an 9/13/13 - 9/20/13. $450 plus on-line application and sub$55 cleaning fee. Call mit materials through the on(509)476-3353 or 509-360- line system. We will not ac0222 cept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu www.gazette-tribune.com Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed.

7

– Family & Singles –

Help Wanted

6

“PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

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ATTENTION:

LOW INCOME HOUSING

Oroville: 2 bedroom, 2 bath apartment. W/D hookup. Good parking. No pets. No smoking. $525/ mo + $400 dep. 509-223-3064 509-8992046.

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TTY 425-562-4002

LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com

Haney Truck Line, Call Now. 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com

Vehicles Wanted

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St. Charles Place Apartments

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FINANCIAL

ESTATE SALE at the home of CT & Jo Taber. Thursday August 1st through Sunday DRIVERS -- Get on the road fast! August 4th. 9am-7pm. Last Immediate Openings! Top Pay, Full Benefits, CDL-A, Doubles Required! house on Rose St. in Orville

NAC

8

www.gazette-tribune.com

Call for information and application

Estate Sales

Looking for 1950 to 1960 Volkswagon Van / Bus. Rusty OK. Please call Kevin, 403690-7646

5

Tonasket Three bedroom, two bath, 1248 sq. ft, vacant, all new carpet and fresh paint, convenient location in Old Orchard Estates subdivision, ½ mile North of Tonasket. Only $145,000. Will consider contract sale or possible long term lease, $1,000 per month. Call: 509-322-4732

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

7

Houses For Sale

Found

is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented applicant. Must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online

2

www.gazette-tribune.com

Now Accepting Applications for 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts Subsidized for Income Qualified Households * Great Oroville Location * Picnic Areas * Spacious Floor Plans * On-Site Laundry * Park-Like Setting No Screening Fee!! Short Wait List!!

mension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N

GIANT YARD SALE & flea market at the Oroville Public Library Farmers Market, Sat- HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS urday August 3rd, 9-1pm. OWNER/OPERATORS -- Flex Fleet, Main Street, Oroville

Oroville of Offices of North Confluence Health

9

1105 Appleway, Oroville

Time

CMA

8

American Legion Housing

Full-

3

www.gazette-tribune.com

Statewides

ESTATE SALE: August 2nd & 3rd at 967 Hwy 7 North Tonasket. 9am-4pm. Household, Antiques, Collectibles, Native American... Lots of Stuff!

6

Call Sun Lakes Realty (509)476-2121

Garage & Yard Sale

Health General

4

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

HIGH SCHOOL Diploma From Home. 6-8 weeks. Accredited. Get a Diploma. Get a Job! No Computer Needed. Free Brochure 1-800-8330. Benjamin Franklin HS www.diplomafromhome.com

Public Notices CITY OF OROVILLE PUBLIC NOTICE SIX YEAR TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Notice is hereby given that the Oroville City Council will hold a public hearing for the purpose of reviewing and adopting the Six Year Transportation Program for the years 20142019, at 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013 in the City Council Chambers. ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on July 25, August 1, 2013. #496008 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of SCOTT FRANCIS WICKLUND, Deceased. Cause No.: 13-4-013646SEA NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative (hereinafter, “PRâ€?) named below has been appointed as PR of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to PR or the PR’s attorney of record at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the PR served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.051; or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in Section 11 of this act and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of Filing: March 20, 2013 Date of First Publication in King County: March 21, 2013 Date of First Publication in Okanogan County: August 1, 2013 PR: Donald G. Wicklund Attorney: AndrĂŠe R. Chicha WSBA No. 17853 Attorneys for PR Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on August 1, 8, 15, 2013. #501364 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY GUY T. DREW, an individual, Plaintiff, vs. PONTIAC RIDGE SPORTSMEN, a Joint Venture; ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS of the members of Pontiac Ridge Sportsmen,a¡Joint Venture; DALE E.COVEY; MARY JEAN LEWIS flkla MARY JEAN COVEY; and ALSO ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE REAL ESTATE DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN; Defendants. NO. 132003360 CIVIL SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE FOLLOWING PERSONS AND PARTIES: 1. PONTIAC RIDGE SPORTSMEN, a JoInt Venture

continued on next page


AUGUST 1, 2013 August 01, 2013| •Okanogan OKANOGANValley VALLEYGazette-Tribune GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Public Notices continued from previous page 2. ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS of the members of Pontiac Ridge Sportsmen, a Joint Venture; 3. DALE E.COVEY; 4. MARY JEAN LEWIS f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY; and 5. ALSO ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE REAL ESTATE DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN. YOU AND EACH OF YOU are hereby summoned to appear within sixty calendar days after the date of first publication of this “Civil Summons by Publication”, to wit, within sixty days after the 27th day ofJune, 2013, and defend the above-entitled action in the above-entitled Court by (1) filing your “Answer” to the Plaintiffs “Complaint for Quiet Title” with the County

Page A9 9

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Clerk of Okanogan County and (2). serving a copy of your Answer upon the Plaintiffs undersigned attorneys at their office location provided below. If you fail to properly file and serve your Answer by the above deadline,ajudgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of Plaintiffs Complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of the above-entitled court. The “Complaint for Quiet Title” in the above-entitled action seeks to quiet title in favor the above Plaintiff, GUY T. DREW, with respect to the following real property: Legal Description: The Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 13, Township 39 North, Range 30 East, W.M. Situate in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington. Current Assessor’s. Parcel Number: 3930134002 Additionally, the Complaint seeks to recognize the satisfaction and fulfillment of (1) the Real Estate Contract

between Defendant PONTIAC RIDGE SPORTSMEN, A JOINT VENTURE and Defendants DALE E. COVEY and MARY JEAN LEWIS (f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY), recorded on or around June 27, 1978. under Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 646427, and (2) the Real Estate Contract between Defendants DALE E. COVEY and MARY JEAN LEWIS (f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY) and Plaintiff, recorded on or around December 24, 1980 under Okanogan County Auditor’s FileNo. 674503. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter,you should do so promptly to avoid any impairment of your legal rights. This “Civil Summons by Publication” is issued pursuant to CR 4 and RCW 4.28.110. LARSONBERG &PERKlNS PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiffs /s/ Jon W. Scott Jon W. Scott (WSBA#45290) for: Paul M. Larson (WSBA#06010) File your written Answer with:

Okanogan County Clerk’s Office 149 N.3rd Ave. P.O. Box 72 Okanogan,WA98840 Phone: (509) 422-7275 Serve a copy of your Answer upon: Paul M. Larson Larson Berg & Perkins;PLLC 105 North Third Street Yakima, WA.98901 Phone: (509)457-1515 Published in the Oakanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 25, August 1, 8, 2013 #491451

Think Green!

Did you know?

We use...  Soy Ink  Recycled Paper

 Excess paper recycled for

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE Find The Right

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If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you.

Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St. Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 888-838-3000

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9 Miles Tonasket. County Road. School Bus. 2-bdrm, 1-bth Home could be added on to. Sauna/Steam House. 2 Shops. 2 3-bay Equipment Sheds. Garage. Nice Yard. Some Equipment will stay including 2 Tractors. Nature Conservancy borders 3 sides. Views & Privacy. $380,000.00. Possible Owner Contract with 1/2 Down. Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com l 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | AUGUST 1, 2013

Arts & entertainment

Latest TVBRC art display offered strands of color, texture ‘Hard arts’ on display mid-August By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The idea of a city visitor center as art gallery has been a hit in Tonasket for artists and patrons alike. For some, it’s even given them a taste of some commercial success. Laurlee Carey, the Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center arts curator, has overseen the growth of the rotating series of exhibits the past two years. The latest permutation of the month-long fiber arts showing featured 23 artists and included more than $1,000 of sales. Each of the shows has also featured a “meet-and-greet” afternoon featuring as many of the

artist that wanted to talk about their art, as well as a tasty selection of finger foods. “People are discovering that these shows are places where they can come and find art created by local people,” Carey said. “It’s reasonably priced, so it’s become very popular that way. “Every one of the shows we’ve sold in the $1000-$1500 range. Not necessarily any one artist, so it’s not necessarily a lot. Last year we generated about $5000 and this year we’re about on track to match that. It’s not a lot of money, but when you think about people wandering in off the street to see something, it’s exciting to me that people are coming in here to shop.” This month’s exhibit featured works by Patti Middleton, Linda Topping, Tom Deebach, River Jones, Spurlin, Betty Roberts, Tedi Fletcher, Sandra Walters,

Sandra Sweetman, Nola Casady, Angello Levan, April Levan, Pam Metcalf, Tiffany Reynolds, Ben Heizer, Debbie Turner ,Cindy Butler, Patty Crane, Teri Perkins, Molly Avey, Amanda Shaub, Rebecca Shaub, and Lindy Weber. Oroville author Arnie Marchand, who recently published his book, “The Way I Heard It,” was also on hand to sell signed editions of his book and chat about this history and lore of the Okanogan. Beginning mid-August, the fiber arts will move out and hard arts (metal, stone and glass) will move, with a Meet and Greet tentatively scheduled the first Friday in September. “We’ll have last year’s artists, but I also keep having people ask me about this artist or that artist I hadn’t heard of,” Carey said. “So, I keep adding more artists.”

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tonasket Visistor and Business Resource Center has been decked out with fiber art creations by local artists for most of the past month.

– Tumbleweed Film Festival Aug. 1st, 2nd and 3rd –

‘Bigger and Better’ Tumbleweed Film Festival rolls back to town Local resort, restaurant, brewery and winery serve as venues

The Gazette-Tribune Washington’s most unique film festival takes place right in Oroville. The fourth annual Tumbleweed Film Festival (TwFF) is back in town this Thursday, Aug. 1 through Saturday, Aug. 3. This year’s film fest offers three nights of completely different films at four venues. A total of 40 American and international short films will be presented during the festival’s three nights. What makes Tumbleweed so unique, and sets this film fest apart from other film festivals is how they turn wineries, bars, restaurants or resorts into theaters for a night. Attendees will also enjoy a film experience very different from that of a typical movie theater. At most of Tumbleweed’s venues filmgoers may sample local wines, beers and cuisine while they watch entertaining short films from around the world. Filmgoers will even have an opportunity to meet up with some of the festival’s filmmakers. Venues for this year’s festival are Esther Bricques Winery, Veranda Beach Resort, Alpine Brewing Company and the Pastime Bar & Grill. Each evening will feature different films, and the festival line-up is always comprised of a mix of comedies, dramas, documentaries and animation. This year’s offerings include an Academy Award-nominated short as well as films from the US, Spain, England, South Korea, Russia, Australia, Egypt, Latvia, Ireland and Canada. The British short, “Walking the Dogs,” stars British actress Emma Thompson.

“Each night’s films are as different as are the venues,” says Geoff Klein, Tumbleweed co-founder. “The films are great, but watching the films at each of the venues really makes for a completely fun experience. “And each venue offers a great assortment of both humorous and thought-provoking films,” adds co-founder Mo Fine. “People may check out the films we’ll show each night on our website.” Two free events kick off this year’s festival on Thursday, Aug. 1. For families, Veranda Beach Resort offers the closest film experience to a drive-in theater, when it hosts an outdoor evening of family films, shown under the stars. Spread your blankets and lawn chairs on the grass in front of Veranda Beach’s 16-foot outdoor screen, and enjoy the evening in the great outdoors. Food is available for purchase at the resort’s diner. Films begin at dusk. The other free event takes place at the Pastime Bar & Grill, which offers “A Blast of the Past” special screening of favorite entries from Tumbleweed’s previous past three years. This event begins at 9:15 p.m. and is intended for audiences age 21 and over. A special three-course festival menu will be served at 7:30 p.m. by reservation. There will also be flavored popcorns available during intermission. Friday evening’s venue is the Alpine Brewing Comapny’s “Beers, Brats and Short Films,” where attendees may sample hand-crafted German style beers or taste wines from four local wineries. Filmmakers from two of the films will be in attendance that night. “We’re looking forward to another fun event with Tumbleweed this year,” says Bart Traubeck, Alpine Brewing Co. owner. “We really seem to have a nice combination of film festival and party here.” Bananas mock-u-mentary and Canadian filmmaker Sharon Roberts and actor Fraser Corbett will be on hand to answer questions about their film, “Shakey’s Coffee.”

Tumbleweed Film Festival was founded in 2010 by Mo Fine and Geoff Klein, two Seattle area film makers, who combined their love of making short films with their love of the Okanogan and Okanagan areas.

A barbecue featuring Uli’s “Wurst of the Fest” may be purchased beforehand. Doors open at 5 p.m. and films start at 7:00 p.m. Attendees must be 21 or older. Tickets are $10 and may be purchased at the door or on Tumbleweed’s website www. tumbleweedfilmfest.com. Saturday night is “Movies in the Vineyard” at the Esther Bricques Winery, which includes many award-winning shorts from other film festivals. Once again, Esther Bricques has transformed their winery production area into a cool, dark movie theater. The evening begins at 5 p.m. with live music by Steve Kinzie and his group of Seattle musicians called “Sack of Hammers.” Besides tastings in the winery’s tasting room, light appetizers and wines by the glass or bottle are available for purchase. “We’re excited once again to host Tumbleweed and expect our attendees to be as pleased with this year’s selection of films that Mo and Geoff programmed for our winery as they have the past three years,” says Linda Colvin of Esther Bricques Winery. “The arts are indeed alive in the Okanogan! We hope that each year more people in the

Aug. 2nd at Alpine Brewing Doors Open at 5pm Films start at 7pm Visit our Brewery and try our freshly brewed German Beers! Call For Tours! 509-476-9662 • 821 14th Avenue, Oroville, WA

sales@alpine-brewing.com

www.alpine-brewing.com

area will take the opportunity to a part of this magical evening and that this year’s fest is the best ever, “ adds Colvin. Films start at 7 p.m. Attendees under age 21 are welcome. Tickets are $10 and may be purchased at the door or online at

Tumbleweed’s website, www. tumbleweedfilmfest.com. Tumbleweed Film Festival is a Washington-based non-profit organization committed to bringing the art of storytelling through filmmaking to communities in Washington and Brit-

Music provided by Steve Kinzie and The Sack of Hammers 5 pm. Films start at 7 pm. Contact the Winery at 476-2861 or estherbricques@nvinet.com for Tickets ($10).

ish Columbia. For more details about the annual festival including trailers and venues as well as TwFF’s on-going “Best of Fest” events, visit www.tumbleweedfilmfest.com or the Facebook page, www.facebook.com/TumbleweedFilmFestival.


AUGUST 1, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

The court found probable cause to charge Garret Victor James Elsberg, 24, Omak, with two counts of second-degree possession of stolen property. The court found probable cause to charge Kimberly Ann M. Marrero, 25, Omak, with two counts of vehicular homicide. The court found probable cause to charge Candace Suzanne Daniels, 43, Riverside, with four counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). The court found probable cause to charge Jason Craig Hale, 36, Okanogan, with failure to register as a sex offender. David J. Donovan, 56, pleaded guilty July 26 to two counts of seconddegree felony possession of a firearm. Donovan was sentenced to three months in jail for each count to be served concurrently, and was fined $1,110.50. David James Lavin, 53, no hometown listed, pleaded guilty July 25 to third-degree theft. Lavin was sentenced to 364 days in jail, with 315 days suspended and credit for 49 days served. Lavin was fined $1,010.50 plus $43.41 in restitution.

CIVIL MATTERS

Wayne David Lawson, Okanogan, doing business as Wayne David Lawson D.C., was ordered to pay $1,743.26 in taxes and fines.

DISTRICT COURT

Raymond Joseph Oreiro, 22, Omak, had two charges dismissed: possession of a controlled substance (marijuana) and use of drug paraphernalia. Ernesto Ramirez Palomares, 44, Omak, pleaded guilty to seconddegree criminal trespass and third-degree theft. Palomares was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 30 days suspended for the first count, 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended on the second, and fined $1,416. Joseph Glenn Payne, 47, Riverside, had a hit-and-run charge dismissed. Richard D.A. Poitras, 32, Okanogan, pleaded guilty to making a false statement to a public servant and third-degree DWLS. Poitras was sentenced to 180 days in jail for the first count, 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended for the second, and fined $1,298. Darcey Lee Quintasket, 44, Omak, pleaded guilty to violating a protection order. Quintasket was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 170 days suspended, and fined $1,033. Crispin Emanuel Ramirez, 22, Tonasket, had a DUI charge dismissed. Richard Alan Reed, 52, Oroville, had multiple nine charges of seconddegree animal cruelty (unnecessary suffering) dismissed. Michelle Lee Reynolds, 22, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Zachary Tyler Roach, 36, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Billy Joe Rosenkilde, 34, Oroville, pleaded guilty to third-degree theft and second-degree criminal trespass. Rosenkilde was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 150 days suspended for the first count, 90 days in jail with 75 suspended on the second, and fined $1,058. Rodolfo Silva Jr., no middle name listed, 39, Omak, pleaded guilty to third-degree DWLS. Silva was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 suspended and fined $658. Shannon Tawny Simpson, 28, Conconully, had three charges dismissed: two third-degree DWLS and a hit-and-run charge. Mehar Singh, 28, Omak, had a supplying liquor to minors charge dismissed. Jacob Donald Smith, 21, Omak, had a charge dismissed: operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Genna Swan, no middle name listed, 63, Tonasket, had a DUI charge dismissed. Swan was fined $1,125. Kacee Robert Webb, 22, Oroville, pleaded guilty to no valid operator’s license without identification. Webb was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended and fined $500. Donald Wayne Whittington Jr., 45, Tonasket, had a second-degree DWLS charge dismissed.

COPS & COURTS

MONDAY, JULY 22, 2013

DUI on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Fraud on Engh Rd. in Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Harassment on Hagood Cutoff Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on East Grape Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on East Central Ave. in Omak. Theft on North Juniper St. in Omak. Theft on Oak St. in Omak. Illegal burning on West Third Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Cherry St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. Kevin James Brock, 30, booked for hunting without a license and felony possession of a firearm. Candace Suzanne Daniels, 42, booked for three counts of delivery of a controlled substance. Jason Craig Hale, 36, booked for failing to register as a sex offender and on a Benton County FTA warrant for second-degree theft. Pete Shane Swimptkin, 48, court commitment for second-degree DWLS. Dakotah Dupree Condon, 21, booked for violating protection order and three Omak Police Department FTA warrants: second-degree burglary, third-degree theft and first-degree trafficking.

TUESDAY, JULY 23, 2013

Assault on Eisen Lane near Oroville. Harassment on Hagood Cutoff Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on North Fir St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on West Oak St. in Okanogan. Threats on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Alcohol offense in Eastside Park in Omak. Harassment on North Douglas St. in Omak. Custodial interference on Engh Rd. in Omak. Harassment on East Seventh St. in Tonasket. Malicious mischief on South Joseph Ave. in Tonasket. David Allen Stewart, 59, booked for second-degree criminal trespass. Marcos Florentino Rosas, 27, booked on a WSP FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS and a Depart of Corrections detainer. Clint Thomas Black, 32, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Casey Peone, no middle name listed, 19, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer, third-degree theft, second-degree vehicle prowl and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for second-degree DWLS. David Lee Fitzgerald, 55, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: thirddegree malicious mischief and fourth-degree assault (DV). Melvin Robin Augg-Dworsack, 21, booked for violating an antiharassment order and a protection order. Michael Todd Walls, 44, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Todd Anthony Perez, 39, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for fourthdegree assault (DV). Rodolfo Valdovinos, no middle name lasted, 23, booked for felony eluding, second-degree theft, seconddegree possession of stolen property, attempted vehicular assault, first-degree criminal trespass, resisting arrest and a Department of Corrections detainer. Cynthia Aron Buchholz, 21, booked on two Superior Court bench warrants: third-degree assault and obstruction. Danielle M. Flett, 32, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Bruce Leroy Wisner Jr., 49, booked on a Department of Corrections warrant. Shauna Lee Rollins, 44, court commitment for possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Tabitha Marie Hall, 22, booked for first-degree criminal trespass.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 2013

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS

Automobile theft on Bonaparte Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Structure fire on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Vacant building. Illegal burning on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Wildland fire on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Theft on Sandflat Rd. near Omak. Theft on Mountain View Dr. near Oroville. Burglary on North County Vue Rd. near Omak. Burglary on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Automobile theft on South Main St. in Omak. Assault on South Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on North Second Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Illegal burning on Southwest State St. near Tonasket. Jorge Sauseco-Ayala, 28, booked for first-degree criminal trespass. Juan Cruz, no middle name listed, 32, booked for third-degree malicious mischief (DV), a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft and a Border Patrol hold. Cameron Dean Craig, 53, booked for FTA for fourth-degree assault (DV) and fourth-degree malicious mischief (DV). Guilibaldo Saucedo Garcia, 40, court commitment for DUI. Michael Aaron Cornella, 23, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

THURSDAY, JULY 25, 2013

Harassment on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. DUI on South First Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on East Eighth Ave. in Omak. DWLS on North Second Ave. in Okanogan. Weapons offense on Jasmine St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Juniper St. in Omak. Fraud on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Harassment on Appleway Ave. in Oroville. Assault in Veterans Memorial Park in Oroville. Two-vehicle crash on South Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Christopher Michael Cornett, 18, booked for two counts of fourthdegree assault, MIP, possession of a controlled substance (marijuana) and resisting arrest. Anthony Kalani Freeze, 28, booked for second-degree possession of stolen property, second-degree malicious mischief and obstructing. John Barton Woodward, 55, booked on a Department of Corrections hold. Van Thomas Medcalf, 57, booked on DUI.

FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Trespassing on Appleway St. in Oroville. Theft on Ross Canyon Rd. near Omak. Fuel tank reported missing. Violation of protection order on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Drug paraphernalia found on North Main St. in Omak. Theft on North Main St. in Omak. Theft on Koala Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Bramble Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on North Elm St. in Omak. DUI on Central Ave. in Oroville. DWLS on West Fourth St. in Tonasket. Jennifer Ilene Stone, 36, booked on a Washington State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Erik Gonzalez Castillo, 22, booked for DUI. Donald Richard Sampson, 35, booked for violation of no-contact order (DV). Daniel James Marsden, 23, booked for a drug court violation.

SATURDAY, JULY 27, 2013

Illegal burning on Greenacres Rd. near Omak.

The Oroville Housing Authority Located at 617 Hwy 97, Oroville WA 98844

is now providing access to a computer station for anyone to research, apply for, or manage DSHS benefits. This terminal will be available on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays unless there is a holiday between the hours of 10:00 AM and 11:30 AM.

RETAIN

Theft at Veteran’s Memorial Park in Oroville. Trespassing on Cherry St. in Oroville. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Harassment on South Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Kayla Geri Barker, 20, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for possession of a controlled substance. Jovanny Alvarez Urapo, 20, booked for second-degree DWLS/R. Jose Alfredo Sepulveda, 41, booked for third-degree DWLS. Angelo Javier Lopez, 31, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Brian Keith Ferrens, 42, booked on

SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013

DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on South Columbia St. in Omak. Trespassing on Cherry St. in Oroville. Structure fire on Columbia St. in Omak. Assault on Monroe St. in Okanogan. Assault on Barnholt Loop Rd. near Okanogan. Harassment on South Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Assault on Webber Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on West Third Ave. in Omak. Illegal burning on West Third Ave. in Omak. Theft on South Douglas St. in Omak. Custodial interference on West Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Burglary on South Ash St. in Omak.

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four counts of reckless endangerment. Deanna Jean Davis, 30, booked for possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine), second-degree introduction, and two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: second-degree vehicle prowl and third-degree theft. Tia Lenee Meshelle, 24, booked for possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine), second-degree introduction and an FTA warrant out of Texas for forgery. Cassie Marie Sanders, 29, booked on fourth-degree assault (DV).

From the Chief’s Desk:

Beware of phone and internet scams BY CHIEF R. CLAY WARNSTAFF OROVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT

Hello again, I wanted to pass along some information pertaining to internet and telephone scams. We have been getting some inquiries from the elderly lately concerning offers through the internet and telephone calls dealing with winning money, wanting information, or asking that you cash a cashier check or money order and you keep a little bit of the money for yourself “for your trouble” of course, or the one about you have a relative in some county jail and the cop says that he will let your relative go with out charges if you will send bail money. Yes we have actually had that happen a few times. The old adage that “if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is” goes a long way when dealing with anyone over the phone or on the internet. So please do not engage with anyone that is trying to get you to do something that requires you to give personal information, or asks you to pay money for anything that you have not initiated yourself. The best thing to do is hang up and not answer that call again. I tell people to tell the person on the other end of line that, “you have contacted your local police and that you don’t want to be bothered” and that usually takes care of it. We can always rely on our common sense as well. So if you think that you may have a scam on your hands come tell us and tell your friends as well. Until next time

OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

John

DIST 7

Assault on North Main St. in Omak. Violation of protection order on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Public intoxication on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Omak. Theft on West Cherry Ave. in Omak. Automobile theft on West Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Violation of protection order on West Cherry Ave. in Omak. Assault on North Main St. in Omak. Threats on South Columbia St. in Omak. Trespassing on East Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Assault on North Elm St. in Omak. DWLS on West Fourth St. in Omak. Theft on Emery Rd. in Oroville. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash at Central Ave. and Ironwood St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Kernan Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Cherry St. in Oroville. Bulmaro Santos-Santos, 28, booked for DUI and a Border Patrol hold. Jose Luis Ruiz-Negrete, 42, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Lita Diane Avelino, 52, booked for possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and possession of drug paraphernalia. Joshua Vernon Aldridge, 40, booked for fourth-degree assault. Johnny Thomas Snell, 39, booked for violation of protection order.

Church of Christ

Senator

STATE SENATE

PAGE A11

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Interim Visiting Pastors Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


PAGE A12

GEORGE ALBERT WICKSTROM

George Albert Wickstrom died peacefully on July 18, 2013 at North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket. He was born February 23, 1921 in Douglas, Ariz. to Albert Wi c k s t r o m and Ellen Nordstrom Wickstrom. Capt. Wickstrom George grew up in Douglas, and then attended the University of Arizona. He excelled both in academics and sports, particularly football, and received the Freeman Medal in George Wickstrom 1942, an award given each year to the outstanding member of the Senior Class. He received a Bachelor’s Degree in Agricultural Chemistry Upon graduation, through ROTC, he also received a commission in the US Army. He served as a Captain in the Armored Cavalry during WW II, and saw combat in France and Germany including the Battle of the Bulge. He was in charge of the Honor Guard for the funeral of General George Patton. In 1942, he married Bonnie Meredith, his high school sweetheart. They had one son Greig. George returned to the University of Arizona after the end of the war and received a Master’s degree in Agricultural Chemistry. He worked for the American Potash Institute, both in the Midwest and in the Pacific Northwest. In 1965 George lost his vision completely. He surmounted this loss through diligent effort, and besides developing and running his own business selling plant and soil testing kits, he regularly accomplished tasks difficult for even a fully sighted individual. He loved fishing, and continued to pursue that hobby until very late in life. Once, when a clerk offered to sell him the disabled Hunting and Fishing license for the same price as Fishing only, George remarked “Oh, don’t bother, cause I just can’t seem to get anyone to go hunting with me.” In 1981, his first wife Bonnie died of lung cancer. Later that

year, George married Mary Henze. The Wickstrom and Henze families had been friends since 1952, and Mary had lost her husband several years earlier. It was a wonderful marriage that endured for 25 years until Mary’s death. Together Mary and George traveled the United States and the world. In 2000, they moved to Tonasket to be near Mary’s son Walter and his family. It was a very happy period in their lives. In 2004, George and Mary moved to North Valley Assisted Living. In 2009 George moved to North Valley Extended Care (NVEC). After his death, the NVEC staff was uniform in their assessment: “George was such a gentleman.” He was an inspiring father and grandfather, had a fine sense of humor, and was a great raconteur. His memory faded during his last several years, as did his hearing, and he was confined to a wheelchair. But despite these limitations, he was always up for lunch at The Kuhler with a beer and onion rings. George was a member of Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity, the Arizona Bobcats, a member of the congregation of Trinity Episcopal Church in Oroville and a staunch Republican. George is survived by his son Dr. Walter Henze (Sarah Kaiser) of Tonasket, his daughter Dr. Catherine Henze (Chris Larson) of Green Bay, Wisc., three grandchildren, Talia Tittelfitz of Seattle, Washington, Dr. Daven Henze of Boulder, Colo. and Jamie Speegle of Orlando, Flor., one great grandchild, River Speegle also of Orlando, and one niece, Cicely Overman of Los Angeles, Calif. He was preceded in death by his parents, his wife Mary, one sister Ruth Overman of San Diego, CA, and his son Greig. George will be interred at Arlington National Cemetery where there will be a graveside service. Memorials may be sent to North Valley Extended Care, 22 West First Street, Tonasket, WA, 98855 Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket is in care of arrangements.

LOLA BURTON

Lola Burton passed away on July 22, 2013 at her home in Tonasket, Washington. She was born in Port Gamble, Wash. on October 17th, Lola Burton

OBITUARIES

1943 to Lowell and Mae Hill. Lola grew up in Poulsbo and as a child had fond memories of playing with the chicks on her great grandparents farm. She would often share stories about her grandparent’s slaughterhouse and talk of making traditional lutefisk and lefsa. She attended school in the North Kitsap School District and graduated from North Kitsap High School in 1962. In 1962 Lola married Patrick Burton, an Army veteran. The couple initially lived in Poulsbo before moving to Suquamish to raise their family. Lola worked at Suquamish hardware store and as a custodian for the Kitsap School District. Once Pat retired they moved to their home in Tonasket where she lived for the last 19 years. Pat is in long term care with the Tonasket Nursing Home. Lola had a generous heart and would never let someone in need or a stray animal go without care. She was a devoted community volunteer assuming leadership roles in the Garden Club, Wauconda Women’s Country Club and the Hospital Guild. She organized projects for the community such as Sock Hops, quilt drives, food drives, clothing drives and volunteered at local festivals and holiday booths. She also spent time volunteering at assisted living home playing cards and would always lend a helping hand to lighten the load for families and friends. When she wasn’t volunteering Lola filled her time quilting, gardening, painting and was always in the middle of some type of crafty endeavor. Being the adventurous type, Lola loved traveling, kayaking, bungee jumping, fishing, snowmobiling, fishing, camping and snorkeling. Lola was treasured for her fun loving attitude that would fill a room and make everyone present feel like family. She could find a way to make light of most any situation and often joked that burned food was just ‘Ranch Cooking.’ She is survived by her husband Patrick Burton, daughters Pamela Maier Burton and Mona Burton; grandchildren Jessica Maier, Robert Powell and Brett Burton and her beloved pets. She was preceded in death by her parents. As per Lola’s request, no memorial services will be held. Condolences may be made via the Lola Burton Memorial group on Facebook. Memorials may be made to the Garden Club, Wauconda Women’s Country club or a charity of your choice. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

WILLIAM E. GARNETT

Bill Garnett passed away peacefully at St. Anthony’s Hospital in Gig Harbor, Washington on July 20, 2013, surrounded by his family. William Ernest Garnett was born on Dec. 21, 1946 in Tacoma. Bill spent his childhood in Rosedale, playing in the bay with his brother Greg, his cousins, and his dog Yogi. After William Garnett graduating from Peninsula High School in 1965, he attended the University of Washington, where he studied history. Prior to completing his studies, he enlisted in the Marine Corps, obtaining the rank of Sergeant and completing a tour of duty in Vietnam. While stat i o n e d at Camp Pendleton in San Diego, he met his first wife Linda McEneany. The two married on May 20, 1972 and moved to Seattle, where they had their first son, Nathan. Bill finished his undergraduate studies at the University of Washington and then earned a J.D. at the University of Puget Sound School of Law.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 1, 2013

In 1977, Bill opened up a law practice in Oroville, Wash., where Bill and Linda soon welcomed a daughter, Jenny, and another son, Derek. In addition to his law practice, Bill enjoyed the outdoors and was an active member of the community in Oroville - some of his many activities included coaching youth soccer, reading cowboy poetry at community events, and membership at Trinity Episcopal Church. In 1998 Bill moved to Bend, Ore. to begin a new career in the technology industry. He married Barbara McPeak on Dec. 21, 1998 in Tulsa, Okla. The couple eventually returned to Bill’s hometown of Gig Harbor, where Bill and Barbara enjoyed a life of companionship, friends and family. Bill particularly enjoyed being a grandfather, a role he was born to play, after the births of his grandsons Willie, Pete, and

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OROVILLE

Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

Bull Riders: Open $75, Junior $55, Steers $25 Team Roping: $50 Per Team Classic Bull Competition: $100 per bull For 3-4 Year Old Bulls July 31st entry deadline Contact Trampas @ 509-486-1012 Barrel Racers: Open $55, Junior $25, Pee-Wee $20 Contact Rhonda @ 509-476-3503

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908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

North Cascades Broadcasting, Inc 509 826-0100 or 800 725-5669

Tickets/Information: 800-933-6625 Online Ticket Sales: www.omakstampede.org

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Charlie. Bill was a voracious reader and a great storyteller. Throughout his life, Bill entertained family and friends with his stories, with each tale perfectly crafted and laced with his signature humor. Bill was preceded in death by his parents, William and Margaret, and is survived by his wife Barbara, brother Greg (Karen), children Nathan (Sarah), Jenny, and Derek, and grandsons William, Peter and Charles. Donations in his honor may be made to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. A casual memorial party will be held in Bill’s honor on the afternoon of Aug. 10, beginning at noon, at Esther Bricques Winery, 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville, The family looks forward to joining his friends in remembering Bill.

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Interim Visiting Pastors Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse -

Assembly of God 102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 01, 2013  

August 01, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 01, 2013  

August 01, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune