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JULY 10-16, 2013 I VOLUME 38 I NUMBER 28

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JULY 10 — 16, 2013

THE ARTS ARE FLOURISHING, the housing market is on the rebound, the Seahawks are in ascent, and big Bertha is boring a gateway to the land of milk and honey beneath your feet, whether you like it or not. You can get high, marry whomever you like, and then go eat a pancake on a stick. No doubt Seattle is changing and, we like to think, things are getting better. It is, dare we say, a renaissance, and we are using this year’s guide to the Best of Seattle to toast the inventiveness of our city and celebrate the vanguard of the new (while also recognizing the fixtures that are here through thick and thin). But we can’t do it without your help, which is why we are asking you, our dear reader, to tell us what you love about this city in our annual Readers' Poll.

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We would prefer you vote online at seattleweekly.com/rebirth. But if you are fond of parchment (we know the feeling), you can mail in this physical ballot. Just write in your favorite for at least five of the categories on this page, detach from the rest of the issue, and mail it to: Best of Seattle 2013, c/o Seattle Weekly, 307 Third Ave. S., Second Floor, Seattle, WA 98104. We’ll need your name, e-mail address (which will be purged upon tallying), and ZIP code to ensure authenticity. Ballots must be postmarked or submitted online by Tuesday, July 30. The winners will be announced in our August 7 issue. In the interest of starting this new beginning off on the right foot, let’s all play fair: Only vote once.

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THE DAILY WEEKLY | Candidate McGinn

is optimistic about Seattle’s future— and the Stripper King’s legacy lives on.

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news»The Daily Weekly

For McGinn, Morning Has Broken Facing tough re-election odds, the mayor maintains his mantra: The best is yet to come.

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pack in campaign contributions, having edged between a raised $241,000 with $100,000 on hand Vietnamese hair as of June 30. salon and an McGinn says he’s not surprised or Asian gift shop upset that, smelling blood, a group of on South Jackson Street lies the formidable rivals chose to take him on. nondescript campaign headquarters “They all wanted it in 2009,” he says of of one Mike McGinn. Here, behind state Sen. Ed Murray, Bruce Hara plain wooden desk in the back room rell, Peter Steinbrueck— of this $1,000-a-month rental, sits and even Tim Seattle’s 53-year-old mayor. His Burgess, who quit face flushed from his bike the race in May. ride from City Hall and “It’s no secret I thinned from ridding his kind of jumped diet of potatoes, pasta, the line.” and other white carbs, With a McGinn shows no mischievous signs of wear or worry smile, he adds, on this sunswept “These guys afternoon. He thinks are all running there’s a wind at his Mea culpas aside, McGinn a very negative back—or, to use a has a tough row to hoe. campaign.” It’s more fitting metaclear, though, phor, a light at the that “these guys” refers specifically to Murray, for end of the tunnel. The city, he says, has turned a whom McGinn has no use. Murray, the mayor corner, and is, as he puts it, “heading in the right remembers well, seriously pondered a write-in direction.” That’s the message McGinn seeks to peddle in candidacy four years ago after then–Mayor Greg Nickels was ousted in the primary. Murray’s the few weeks leading to the August 6 primary: recent comment to Seattle Weekly still sticks in He’s made his share of mistakes and learned from them; jobs are up; crime is down; more bike McGinn’s craw: If the race boils down to him and the incumbent, as Murray predicts, it will paths and light rail-systems are on the way— be “the ugliest campaign Seattle has ever seen.” and, oh, yes, lots more bandwidth. He’s quite big On one issue in particular—Sound Transit’s on bandwidth. sub-area equity, which requires that any money McGinn’s mantra is almost Reagan-like: It’s raised in one of the Sound Transit district’s morning in Seattle. “Yeah, I’ve had setbacks,” five sub-areas must be spent in that sub-area— he begins. “The Seattle Times hasn’t been my McGinn makes it clear that he thinks he’ll friend, and the tunnel hurt.” Then comes his have the upper hand on Murray. “By opposing oft-repeated riff: “But there’s no mayor’s school, sub-area, that’s Murray’s way to blow up Sound you know. I’ve never run a place with 11,000 Transit,” he says. employees.” McGinn’s biggest challenge is to dislodge A moment later, he concedes, “I probably himself fully from the penalty box he found himshould have spent more time in meeting people, self in during the first half of his term. He had going to more [public] hearings, listening more. crusaded against the downtown tunnel during Some things, like cutting strategic advisers, were the ’09 race before suddenly dropping his opposinot well-thought-out. That was a mistake.” tion a few weeks before the election—and then Mea culpas aside, the former neighborhood bashing it again as mayor, while angering politiand Sierra Club activist has a tough row to cians far and wide when he forced a public referhoe to win a second term. His approval rating, endum on the project, which voters approved in though no longer at the Nixonian depths it a landslide. reached during his first There was also the two years in office, is MAYOR’S RACE 2013 widespread perception that still alarmingly low. This is part of a series looking his agenda was too narrow. Though his base remains at Seattle’s candidates for mayor. Headstrong and seemingly largely intact—liberals, SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM/DAILYWEEKLY anti-car, McGinn early on environmentalists, and pushed for the removal of naturally, the Cascade car lanes and on-street parking in favor of bus Bicycle Club—the latest poll put him at just and bike lanes. At the same time, he closed a $67 22 percent. More sobering for the Long Island, million budget gap by shedding 300 city workers, N.Y.–raised father of three is that nearly 30 perreducing hours at community centers, and cutcent of the electorate is undecided, and seldom ting park maintenance and library services. Later, do undecided voters break in large numbers for there was his mashup with the Department of an incumbent. In any case, McGinn has colJustice for being too adversarial in settlement lected his share of endorsements, mostly from negotiations regarding Seattle police misconduct. environmental and labor groups, and leads the

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news»The Daily Weekly No question, McGinn inherited a woeful economy, but he made things worse by alienating the business community, the city council, and even exGov. Chris Gregoire, whom he essentially called a liar regarding the tunnel. As Times columnist Danny Westneat wrote, “Bottom line: McGinn was a dead man walking, politically speaking. Or I guess dead man bicycling.” McGinn dodges most questions about his stormy tenure. He’s got a script, a positive spin, and he’s sticking to it. “Despite the recession, we’ve expanded support for education, rebuilt the rainy-day fund, while increasing funding for essential services and transit expansion,” he says in his soothing, it’s-a-lovely-day-in-the-neighborhood tone. “We’ve invested $1.68 million to expand the Youth Violence Initiative. We’re building the seawall and we’re investing in our city, in our streets, in our infrastructure.” The mayor, who relished the role of outsider four years ago, has become a developer’s darling. Paul Allen’s Vulcan real estate company, for one, was thrilled that a gung-ho McGinn championed high-density plans to build three 400-foot residential skyscrapers along Denny and two dozen 24-story towers along Fairview and Dexter in South Lake Union. To date, 19 individual Vulcan donors have shown their appreciation by giving McGinn $3,700 for his re-election efforts. McGinn says South Lake Union and similar high-density endeavors are the inevitable future. “We can’t turn back the clock in Seattle,” he says. “We’re building a world-class city.”

The Bust Seattle’s Stripper King Never Felt

Frank would have slapped himself at seeing Panico’s innovation: a drive-in strip joint! It’s Dick’s the way he would have liked it.

S E AT T L E ’ S B E S T D A M N

Police then spent more months on the case. And then just the other day, a cop was accused of crossing the line. That happened a lot when Frank ran Seattle clubs, back in the 1950s and ’60s police-payoff days. A cop walked in and Frank had a sack lunch for him, a salad of cash. Frank could then stay open. In this case, both Panico, 51, and longtime Snohomish County Sheriff ’s Sgt. Darrell O’Neill, 58, were arrested for conspiring to promote prostitution. Everett Police claim O’Neill tipped off Panico and a manager/dancer about police investigations in return for sex with the women. Investigators say O’Neill allegedly had sex inside the coffee stands while in uniform. There is video of him hugging and kissing the bikini

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baristas on duty. Police claim the coffee huts “essentially operate as drive-through strip clubs or brothels.” The investigation continues, with officials looking into possible money-laundering and organized-crime violations. Charges like that would also be right out of the Frank Colacurcio racketeering playbook. Which brings up one final point: Frank, as a strip-club mentor, could tell Panico about: going to jail. Seven felonies, one reversed. He was an expert. RICK ANDERSON E

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The owner of the alleged drive-through brothels learned from the best.

MYEVERETTNEWS.COM

Stripper King Frank Colacurcio, who died three years ago last week, resides now in the great hereafter. Wherever that is, they likely do not have newspapers. Still, you could imagine applause from above when news broke about his protégé Carmela Panico. She had danced for him at Rick’s, his nudie strip club in Lake City, going on to become one of the few female entrepreneurs in the strip-andsex business. Panico followed Frank’s model— create a small empire of joints and then battle the cops to stay alive. With one obvious difference: Panico thought small. Rather than dance halls, her clubs are the size of coffee shacks. In fact, they are espresso huts, six of them scattered around Snohomish County and one in Kent. The cops call them sexpresso stands. Besides a cuppa joe, a customer can get wiggled at and flash-danced. According to police and prosecutors, some of the grinding baristas also allowed the touching of body parts, occasionally letting it all hang out the window. Sometimes, allegedly, they offered sex for money. Frank would have slapped himself at seeing Panico’s innovation: a drive-in strip joint! It’s Dick’s the way he would have liked it. Panico, like Frank, has been fighting with the cops for years. In 2011, according to court records, a plainclothes officer said that when he drove up to one of Panico’s huts, Java Juggs, the barista asked “Are you a naughty boy?” He confessed he was. The barista told him to drive around to the other side of the stand where, through the window, he could watch her on the

stripper pole, exposing herself. A frothy cup of coffee like that cost $20. At those prices, the think-small strip clubs were revenue-large: In the past three years, Panico deposited more than $850,000 in cash into a BECU bank account, records show. It was literally cool cash—but something smelled. A search warrant on file recounts that BECU employees noticed the money always seemed to have a “foul odor.” That’s because, Panico advised her employees, she kept the money “in her freezer at home with fish.” Police spent tireless months on the case—pole dance after pole dance; oh, the humanity. Panico was subsequently charged with prostitution. She later pleaded guilty to lewd conduct and was fined $775.

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life. I was surprised by how much common fabric these stories share. 8 When I interviewed Dick Dawson, he talked about cathartically crushing cans in his parent’s garage, listening to “Shadows” by Sunny Day Real Estate. I thought back to that moment with my parents and “I’ll Believe in Anything,” and instantly understood where he was coming from. When I talked to Natalie Walker about how Sleater-Kinney very directly informed her professional career as director of the Rain City Rock Camp for Girls, I could relate. After seeing Chad VanGaalen’s video for “Molten Light,” I immediately downloaded the animation program he uses. I use that program at work all the time.  8 It’s funny how a record label can shape someone’s entire career. In the case of Brian Albright, who now works for pharmaceutical giant Pfizer, the stakes are even higher. If it weren’t for an obscure Sub Pop split single in 1992, he might never have met his wife. 8 Only a quarter-century later has it become clear what Sub Pop really is. On the surface it’s just a record label, but in reality it’s the sum of all these stories. From the first Green River EP in 1986 to this month’s release of Rose Window’s The Sun Dogs, the label’s 1,053rd record, Sub Pop has managed to put out landmark rock, folk, hip-hop, and electronica albums while simultaneously defining new genres unto themselves. But among all those records also lies a lot of humanity that isn’t listed in Sub Pop’s catalogue. 8 This collection of your stories is our addition to that » CONTINUED ON PAGE 10 catalogue. 9

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JU LY 10 — 16, 2013

hen I was 6 years old, my parents got divorced. 8 It was fine; it happens to a lot of kids. For the most part, they kept it civil and everything was totally OK. They are both wonderful parents. I would visit my dad in Seattle on the weekends and spend the rest of the time with my mom back in Maple Valley, which is two towns over from where that guy died from having sex with that horse, just so you know. 8 One morning when I was 15, I came out of the shower and found my mom and dad in a shouting match at the door. I don’t remember why it started, but I remember thinking I’d never seen my parents shout at each other like that. I watched the whole thing unfold with only a towel on from upstairs, just standing there, frozen. I felt betrayed, and naked.  8 The first thing I did was go in my room, shut the door, and put on Wolf Parade. 8 “If I could take the fire out from the wire, I’d take you where noooobody knows you, and nobody gives a damn anyway,” Spencer Krug warbled in my ears. I played that song on repeat until I felt like I actually went to that place. That place where nobody knows you and nobody gives a damn. Any place but where I was sounded really good.  8 The title of this piece may sound dramatic, but over the course of this project, I’ve found that it’s not that far from the truth. To help celebrate the 25th anniversary of Seattle’s biggest record label, we went out and collected your stories. We asked for your memories of the impact that Sub Pop songs or albums have had on your


The Washington Beer Commission Presents 2 Great Beer Events! » FROM PAGE 9 Learning to Scream

Nicki Michaels is the long-haired 17-year-old lead singer of Scinite, a rock band he formed with his high-school friends in Sammamish. Scinite just released its new EP, West Coast Strut, which the band recorded with the drummer’s dad. At the time of our interview, Michaels had recently played Teenfest at Sammamish City Hall. When he picks up the phone, he informs me he’s in the middle of drinking vodka to prepare for Scinite practice. Scinite is “more motivated” than Michaels’ now-defunct punk band, Hearabout Nancy, which he describes as being “a bitchin’ little band for a while.” He started the band when he was 15.

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My guitar teacher told me about this movie called Hype, about the early-’90s grunge scene and how Sub Pop rose to power and all that. I think the first song we ever played [in Hearabout Nancy] was “Touch Me I’m Sick” by Mudhoney. We played a ton of Mudhoney covers. We would go into our garage and we would plug a microphone into a guitar amp and we would just scream those songs. When we were warming up, we would play the entire Bleach album and [trade] off our instruments and stuff. That was so fun. We used to rock, like, “Floyd the Barber” and “Blew.” Uh, “Paper Cuts” and “Big Cheese” and “Swap Meet.” We played Mudhoney a lot too. We played shit like “Sweet Young Thing Ain’t Sweet No More” and “Hate the Police” and “Flat Out Fucked.” Oh damn, it was good stuff. [Nicki goes on to list nearly every song in the Mudhoney catalog.] Oh my God, I can’t even remember all of them. All those songs, that was our stuff. First song I ever learned to play on guitar was “Polly” by Nirvana. I learned all the early Nirvana riffs. I still to this day can play Bleach from the top to bottom, and I can play a highly butchered version of every single solo. I would sit in my room late at night, and me and my friend Mark would listen to Bleach. We’d play it for five seconds, then pause it. Then we’d sit down and play that five seconds on guitar. It was the same thing over and over until we could play the entire album. We’d take Adderall. Like, speed. A couple days of doing that, and then we came out of my room being able to play the entire album.

When we did start writing our own songs it was very Bleach-esque. Raunchy lyrics, tuneddown drop-D guitars. It was more about the aggression of it, not so much the musicality. You could just write about anything and then scream a loud chorus.

The Hell Out of Denver

David Clifford is the founder of Us/Them Group, a Los Angeles-based artist promotion company. He is also the drummer for the band Red Sparowes. It was June 1989 in Denver, Colo., when I bought Roadmouth by local heroes The Fluid. It was a fateful day in which I bought that album, Steel Pole Bathtub’s Butterfly Love (themselves a former Denver band, now making an impact nationwide), and Dinosaur Jr.’s Bug. I’d seen The Fluid live, and their MC5-infused retro-garage punk seemed nothing like what I’d heard in Mudhoney’s sludgy “Touch Me I’m Sick” single. But it wasn’t until hearing The Fluid’s second Sub Pop album paired with the noisier works of STB and Dinosaur Jr. that it all seemed to make sense in a way that things were all headed in a really exciting new direction of beautiful noise. And it meant that if The Fluid could get out of Denver and become pioneers, then I should dare to give it a try as well. Years later my own band, Pleasure Forever, signed to Sub Pop. I had a very fancy job working for a fancy record label, with expense accounts, living bicoastally between San Francisco and New York City, etc. I gave it all up just to make a record for Sub Pop. And though very little came of it, I don’t regret it in the slightest. I made some great lifelong friends at the label, toured like crazy, and had some incredible experiences, all due to that lone, crazy record label that changed my life back in 1989. 

Going Grunge

Chris Conkling, now in his 40s, grew up as a misfit in the Bavarian-themed tourist town of Leavenworth in the early ’90s. “It was kind of like a theme park,” he says. “It was pretty weird.” He now lives in Renton and runs his own independent Northwestmusic blog, donewithaplomb.wordpress.com. Leavenworth was an odd town to grow up in. You knew everyone, it was pretty secluded. This was pre-Internet, so I didn’t have access to the wider music scene. I used to drive down to Wenatchee and pick up Alternative Press or some other cool magazine like that. And I think I first heard about Mudhoney from a Sub Pop comp, The Grunge Years. There was a Mudhoney track on there, and I went out and bought their most recent record. There was nobody playing stuff like that on the radio out there, and they weren’t on the air on MTV or anything yet. When I liked a band a lot, I would write them a letter or fan mail or something. I wrote Mudhoney a letter. I knew they were a pretty shocking band, so I tried to write them a pretty


Interacting with a b was a big deal. It ga and back then, pre-Internet, who I was and what ve me more confidence in I wanted to do, and do today . what I

Journey to the Center of the Universe

Brian Albright has the dubious, self-proclaimed honor of being the first guy to launch Viagra into the Seattle market. Before doing marketing and PR at Pfizer, one of the country’s largest pharmaceutical companies, he was the manager of his college radio station at the University of Connecticut from 1987–92. Signing up for the Sub Pop singles club at the radio station, it was the coolest. They started off sending out singles with their sort of signature Seattle grunge sound, but quickly they started doing all sorts of other stuff. They were highlighting

bands they liked that were not on the label. Nobody was doing that at the time. They were pioneers. What I like in music is really this fuzzy, crunchy, indie-pop sound. They were really good at that, but it was so varied. Reverend Horton Heat, Billy Childish, Thee Headcoats, which has sort of a cult following in London, but I’d never heard of it before that Sub Pop single. The thing that kind of sealed it for me, though, was in 1992. It was one of the last singles they released before I moved to Seattle: Tsunami and Velocity Girl. At the time, Velocity Girl was my all-time favorite band. It was like, “OK. These guys [Sub Pop] are the coolest people on the planet.” It, just, I, it was . . . [Brian stammers for a moment in excitement.] It was like Seattle was the center of the universe. It was unbelievable. You know, at the radio station when Nevermind came out, it really was like the perfect record. But these singles, they were the icing. And then Seattle, the cake, was there waiting for me to come and take a bite out of it. Having been in radio before, I had some contacts here. I landed this gig as music director of this company. Any department store in the country, whether it was Macy’s, Nordstrom, JCPenney, Sears, all the way to Toys “R” Us—anywhere in the country you would go and see music videos playing on TVs, from ’92 to ’93, that was me. That was me picking and making all those shows throughout the country. We literally had the contract for every single department store. It was great, but, as you can imagine, after days and days, you start to get kind of numb. I got fired for showing this silhouette of Gloria Estefan laying on her side . . . you couldn’t see anything, but you could tell that she was naked. The manager at the Toys “R” Us is looking up at the monitor at that exact split second [laughs]. Oh, man. That was the end of that career.

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shocking, out-there letter to grab their attention. They actually wrote me back and thanked me for being a fan. I don’t even remember what I wrote the letter about . . . some crazy thing. I was just trying to be cool to the rock stars. Interacting with a band back then, pre-Internet, was a big deal. It gave me more confidence in who I was and what I wanted to do, and what I do today. They also sent me a sticker . . . it was an orange sticker that said the band name on it, so I slapped it on the bumper of my car. I was driving a ’67 Ford Falcon; it was awesome. I’d be driving around this small town. I’m a pretty quiet kid, everyone knew who I was, and all of a sudden I’ve got this Mudhoney sticker on my car and I’m blaring Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge. That album meant a lot to me. I got a lot of strange looks, and some ribbing from my family at my attempts to “go grunge.” That band was exactly what I needed at that time in my life. They will always be my favorite band of the era.

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» FROM PAGE 11 It was a good time to lose that job. It brought me to a new job working at Orpheum Records on Broadway up on Capitol Hill. That was not far from where Cobain was living at the time. Every rock star would at least stop through, but Cobain was a regular. He would come up and be like, “What’s new, man? What can you show me?” At the time, that was like absolute, utter heaven. I was like, “You’re asking me?” We would talk about all these obscure things. Cobain had really expansive taste in music, he

So then Seaweed starts to play, or what I think is Seaweed starts to play, and at the time, Jeremy Enigk and Aaron Stauffer, the lead singers, had similar builds and haircuts. So Sunny Day Real Estate starts playing, and I think it’s Seaweed. I start rocking out, and then Seaweed comes on after, and I was like, “Oh.” Right after, we went to Silver Platters, and I bought Sunny Day Real Estate’s new record. It’s been my favorite record ever since. That was a really interesting way of coming upon them. In “Shadows,” there’s this part near the end of it where they do this different kind of break and he does this neat fuzzy guitar. I could sing it for you, but I’m not sure that’s going to be helpful. [Dawson begins enthusiastically making guitar wail sounds.] Like that. Oh, right, and then he starts saying something about “Leaves falling short . . . ” uh . . . “dream’s over.” The first time I heard that song, I was crushing cans in my parent’s garage. They just would drink soda pop like crazy. There were always those black Glad bags just filled with aluminum cans, and I would take that CD down there with me. That was the soundtrack to a number of stomping sessions. It was the second CD I ever bought for myself with my own money. That must’ve been ’94, so I was what, 15? [I ask Dick if he ever resented having to stomp his parent’s soda cans at that age.] Oh, yeah. We never got any soda. It was a menial task; I was a kid who didn’t really like doing chores. The first time I heard “Shadows,” I must’ve backed it up and played that one part like 15 or 20 times. There was something about that guitar tone—just that part of the song really got to me, it really spoke to me. It felt like a palpable sense of release. There’s

wanted obscure stuff. I remember we were having a hard time tracking down the Pontiac Brothers, which is like, you know . . . “Who?” We would talk Guided by Voices. He was really into all that stuff. How crazy is that? I feel pretty blessed that for years I sort of lived my dream. That was what I wanted to do. I wanted to come here, I wanted to be immersed in the whole scene. And you know, coming out here I did meet my wife.

Crush and Release

Dick Dawson was raised in Duvall. As a young man, he fancied himself a budding guitar hero. Dawson played in bands around the community, including a couple of shows at the Redmond Fire House and one memorable set opening for some of the guys in Mudhoney. His parents were “educated hippie types,” and took him to lots of rock shows growing up. He still plays guitar. In the early ’90s, I was really into Seaweed, who were a Sub Pop band at the time. I’d seen them a number of times, like at the Pearl Jam Drop in the Park show. I found out that they were playing at the Mural Amphitheatre for the Pain in the Grass series. When I got there, there were all these signs around that said “Sunny Day Real Estate.” I was clueless at the time, and kept asking my dad if they were planning on selling the Mural Amphitheatre.

I heard e m i t t s r i The f s,” I must’ve “Shadow up and played backed it part like 15 or that one . 20 times

»

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just a change of mood in that song. When that part comes on, it sounded triumphant, but yearning at the same time. I think it was just that I was 15, I was a guitar nerd. I was just starting to teach myself guitar, really starting to find my voice. That song, that record—there was something in the way everything was phrased. When I listened to Sunny Day Real Estate, I felt like I’d found a kindred spirit. Growing up in Duvall made it a little bit more difficult for me. I was perhaps a bit more progressive than some of the people who grew up with me. I wore my hair long. They used to call me names. I was skinny. I can’t tell you how many times I got called a fag. To be honest, I was a bit of a provocateur. Some days I’d wear fucking barrettes in my hair. I knew that it was going to piss off those people. But it didn’t matter. There’s just something so cathartic about being able to listen to a song and having it exorcise whatever feelings, or support whatever feelings, you might be brooding over. Sunny Day Real Estate did that for me.

Where the Strings Come In

Jacob McMurray is the curator of the Experience Music Project at Seattle Center. He recently put together an exhibit called “Nirvana: Taking Punk to the Masses,” which found him in the attic of bass player Krist Novoselic, looking through old boxes.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JULY 10 — 16, 2013

I’ve never been a Sunny Day Real Estate fan, so when Return of the Frog King [the solo debut of lead singer Jeremy Enigk] first came out, in ’96, I sort of dismissed it. But there was this big article in The Rocket sometime around when that record came out that was about Jeremy Enigk and his conversion to Christianity with that record. I think in a way it was weird that there was so much press dedicated to his religious beliefs, but I don’t know. That article described the record and all the orchestration and everything, and I remember picking it up.

I was 24, living in the U District, going to the University of Washington working on an archaeology degree. I think what was really interesting was that all the stuff I loved at the time right specifically then was, like, Built to Spill, Modest Mouse, Violent Green—you know, a lot of pretty full-on mid-to-late-’90s indie rock—and this was so different than that. I think that’s why it made such an impact on me, and why people either loved it or hated it, because it was pretty atypical for what was going on at the time. I still think I’m sifting through that record today; it’s a phenomenal record. It’s about a half an hour long, and you know, it’s just him with an acoustic guitar and a 21-piece orchestra or something like that. What I loved about it, and what I still love about it, is that it still pushes the same buttons in me as Wizard-era King Crimson or the first Roxy Music record. It kinda has this sort of baroque, almost medieval sensibility to it. I don’t know—he has such a beautiful but rough voice. It’s really moving.

Letter Bomb

Scotto Moore is a 41-year-old recovering music blogger from Seattle. He spoke to us at the Sasquatch! Music Festival the day that The Postal Service was playing, 10 years after the release of the group’s only record, Give Up. I was a music blogger for six or seven years, and I heard Give Up when it first came out. And I knew it was going to blow up when I posted two or three tracks on my blog and my servers basically almost crashed. People were so excited about it and pounded my servers. So later, when they released “Against All Odds,” I actually had to rename it—and tell the people who were reading my blog “This is Barry Manilow”—so my servers wouldn’t be pounded by anyone other than my regular fans. As someone who was really paying attention to music at the time, it seems a little cliché, but they certainly invented this entire style. And for years, you would hear bands that would come along and be near-misses—trying to capture that magic

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MONTHLY of the digital side and the acoustic side. Because if you listen really closely, it’s not just “bleepybloopy,” which is the electric part of it. But it had the vocal richness, and you could hear the guitar in there, and I think a lot of people overlook how dense the sound is. And it’s not just computerized. “District Sleeps Tonight”—there’s a remix of it that when I DJ just totally kills. And I’m absolutely in love with how that works.

The Laws of Thermal Energy

Witt Wisebram is the very tall 29-year-old guitarist and lead singer of The Wild, an Atlanta-based folk-punk band. He hasn’t shaved in a while, and covers his long mop of hair with a beanie. Witt plays in the band with his fiancée, who is the co-singer, and bangs two tambourines together so hard, they look like they might shatter. I caught Witt after his set at Victory Lounge out on the deck, where he sat down for a cigarette. His bandmates mentioned to me earlier that he has tripped the South American psychedelic plant ayahuasca a number of times. I ask if it’s OK if we talk about it, and he emphatically insists that we do. “More people need to hear about this stuff,” he says, “it’s really important.”

The first time I went, you go and everyone is in a circle. The shaman takes ayahuasca with you, and he’s learned these songs that he was given by the plants. Over the course of his life he’s developed this repertoire of songs that sometimes aren’t in any decipherable language. They’re just melodies and words that come to him. His power and his status grows with the more songs he has. The whole six hours he’s singing songs that kind of guide the energy of the trip. If it gets really dark and he knows everyone in the group is feeling that energy, he knows the right song to get the energy back up. It’s very musical. I was raised Jewish. At a certain point the shaman’s songs all start sounding like very ancient Jewish Hebrew songs to me. To me it’s the most quintessentially religious experience anyone can have in the modern world. We’re not, like, a psychedelic band, but our last

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album was almost entirely written from psychedelic experience. I had a friend that passed away last year, and psychedelics were really important to me in understanding the space that he moved on to. You’re having an after-death experience with this stuff—you are forced to kill your ego and have an objective sense of yourself, which is impossible normally. It made me think a lot about “Where does melody come from? Where do these lyrics come from?” I do think there’s some kind of energy-channeling that’s happening. Even at punk shows, man, it’s 30 minutes where people get out their anxieties, what they have to do tomorrow, their regrets. It’s 30 minutes of being in the moment; it’s almost transcendental. I think when you are feeling an energy exchange, you are experiencing the real idea of the gestalt in its physical manifestation. There’s a sense of sincerity or authenticity when you watch bands. Even if they’re technically good, you just know if this is something they’re trying to do. You sense that ego. I love the Thermals. I think the Thermals are one of the most authentic, sincere bands. That’s why I respect them so much. Good songs . . . there’s this idea that you are channeling them from somewhere else, you are like a conduit. The Thermals do that. Fuckin A to me, just as a whole album, is the pinnacle of what they do. Fuckin A is the album, man. As a cohesive unit, it’s amazing. They made that album as a cohesive thought. I think they are intentional about the flow of the album, the sequencing. I don’t think it’s a technical thing they’ve got going on. It’s just when you see them live, they’re locked in. They’re one of the few bands that do that. They channel that energy. They’re a band that goes for energy over technicality. I think that’s really important. When we record, we record live. We go for the take. It may be a take with a missed note or a missed hit, but when you finish, you just know that this one is it. There’s this ephemeral energy to it. Like, let’s keep that one. Everybody kinda finishes, and everybody wants to be quiet for a few seconds so nothing bleeds into the recording. But in those seconds, if it’s the one, you kinda feel it, and everyone looks around and it’s like, “Yeah. Mm-hm.” [Laughs.] There’s this balance that bands should have between not sounding like shit live, but also being able to present this certain amount of energy. A lot of bands will get really sloppy when they get energetic. The Thermals have that balance;

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Sleater-Kinney

there’s this full sound and they’re playing really well, but there’s this . . . they are just giving away this energy. When you watch them, you are, like, “These guys are working hard. I want to be a part of that.” That’s what’s really important. I truly believe that. It’s all about exchanging that energy.

Speakers Blown

Natalie Walker is the director of the Seattle-based Rain City Rock Camp for Girls, “a nonprofit organization dedicated to building positive self-esteem in girls and encouraging creative expression through music.” Over the course of a week, girls at the camp choose an instrument, form a band, and write a song together which they later perform at a real rock venue in town. Walker herself plays bass in an all-female rock band called Another Perfect Crime. While interning for music journalist Everett True in 2005, she got her hands on an advance copy of Sleater-Kinney’s last album, The Woods. Everett had just gotten done interviewing Sleater-Kinney for, I think it was Plan B magazine? They had just gotten done mastering The Woods in January or February of that year, but they weren’t releasing it until May. So anyways, we are driving around in the car, and he goes, “I JUST GOT A COPY OF THE NEW SLEATER-KINNEY ALBUM, IT’S RIGHT HERE,” and I just went “WHAAAAAT? I CAN’T BELIEVE YOU HAVE IT. I AM THE BIGGEST FAN.” So he puts the CD in the CD player in my car, and the first track comes on, “The Fox.” It’s just, like, kind of growling at us, and we both look at each other and go, “Wait. Did they give you the right CD?” We did not think it was them [laughs]. But then of course Corin Tucker comes in with her crazy wail growl, and we were like, “Oh, OK, this is obviously them, but is there something wrong with the CD?” I mean, it was amazing and awesome, but it sounded really off in some places. Like, “Are my speakers blown?” Like, “It sounds like there’s bass. Did they get a bassist?” I remember Everett looking at me and going, “Wow, they went to Sub Pop and now all of a sudden they sound grunge” [laughs]. That was a really cool moment for me. I’m a huge super-fan, and I’m listening to the record before it is released, and it’s everything I love about the Seattle sound and the Sub Pop sound, and my

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 18


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Tale of Two Cities

Annie Holden is originally from Phoenix, Ariz. She recently graduated from the University of Washington. Holden has worked on marketing and communications for Seattle’s all-ages venue, The Vera Project, for a little over a year now. I knew I was coming to Seattle for college. I really liked all of the local music coming from Seattle; I loved Fleet Foxes. So I go to the local record store in Phoenix, like one of the coolest places, and I say to the guy working there, “Hey, so I’m moving to Seattle soon. Do you have any recommendations of local bands? Here’s a list of bands I like, would you have anything else?” And he goes, “Oh yeahhhhh. Seattle. For sure.” He walks me over and gives me Blitzen Trapper’s Furr. I hop in my car on the way home, and I really like it. It’s become one of my favorite albums of all time— BUT . . . I was telling my friend about this awesome band from Seattle, Blitzen Trapper, and they’re like, “Uh, no. They’re from Portland, not Seattle. Portland and Seattle are very different.” That’s when I started learning about the weird music rivalry between the two. I mean it makes sense that the record-store guy would do that

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favorite band is now kind of embracing that too. The track on that record, “Modern Girl,” is one of my favorite tracks ever. Ever since I heard it I’ve been trying to write a song like that. I haven’t quite gotten there. It’s like, you know, this really bleak kind of thing, and then toward the end when the band comes in, your speakers get blown. I guess it’s just the contrast. It’s the really pretty guitar line, the simple beginning, and the lyrics, going from really happy to “I’m really pissed of ” by the end . . . it’s just the perfect song. One hundred percent, Sleater-Kinney informs what I do at Rain City Rock Camp now. It was seeing them live that encouraged me to start playing music, you know, in a rock band. It took having a same-sex role model doing that to get me onstage. Knowing that informed the creation of this rock camp, where we’re basically saying “Hey! Here’s a bunch of role models.” We’re just going to put that in your face. They’re going to be your teachers. They’re going to be your lunchtime performers. They’re going to be your role models, and we’re not going to make it hard for you to find them because they’re all here at camp. It really directly influenced that.

to me, because, you know, Sub Pop and Seattle, but . . . I don’t know. I just always feel mad about it. Like, he lied to me, you know? I was just, like, “I wanted Seattle music, not Portland music. That’s so different.” But I mean, it’s all the Pacific Northwest. That album gave me so many preconceived notions about the Pacific Northwest before I got here. I’d only been here once before. I guess I really thought I’d be going into the wilderness a lot and . . . morphing into a wolf or something. Maybe one day, but not yet. Blitzen Trapper let me down, even though it’s a great album, and I love it.

Blitzen Trapper

Call of the Evergreens

Joseph McGeehee is a prolific artist and a recipient of the Sub Pop Scholarship, a program started by the label that doles out money to help young “losers” pay for college based on their weird talents and freaky interests. I was lucky enough to have won a scholarship in 2009; McGeehee received his in 2012. His work features melty, surreal forms and landscapes that are often either dripping or levitating. A student at the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, McGeehee recently held his first gallery show, Metamorphic Forms, and released the first issue of his comic series The Impossible Future, about a dog and a boy and their botched attempt to make home brew. His work can be viewed at artistflu.tumblr.com. I have a really strong memory of being on the 550 bus, the express bus from Bellevue to downtown Seattle, and we were going across the I-90 bridge. It was a beautiful, sunny day, and I was listening to “Grown Ocean” off of Helplessness Blues. I was so overwhelmed by the beauty of the Pacific Northwest, just with how much I love it here. That song always brings up the strongest sense of loving the place where you live. I think it really vibes with the feel of this region. It definitely feels like somehow the song is a part of the region itself. That was my senior year of high school, and I guess that’s another part of it. That was in the midst of my big decision time: “Am I going to

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 21


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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JULY 10 — 16, 2013


heard in hip-hop . . . or ever. When I first heard “Queens,” it blew my mind. From that mellow, sexy intro directing us to leave our BS at the door and let loose to the infectious “Don’t funk with my groove” hook, this definitely has always meant cool female empowerment to me. Like, “This is how it’s gonna go down, sister. So there.” It’s just one of those hooks you wish you wrote. So after spending a few weeks obsessed with the song, I was moved to write my own, with that mellow, strong, sexy vibe as inspiration. This song still makes me want to be as cool as Cat and Stas. E Additional reporting by Mark Baumgarten and Keegan Prosser.

» FROM PAGE 18 leave the Pacific Northwest to go to college?” I was really looking at the Art Center College of Design down in Pasadena. I don’t know. I visited the school. I liked it. But I couldn’t see myself living in L.A. at all. It was a really hard decision. On that bus ride, that song just really intensified this strong connection I feel to this region of the country. It intensified my appreciation for everything that is the Pacific Northwest. I also just love the laid-back energy here. In Portland it’s really encouraging to be strange, and outwardly so, which I think is really conducive to art practice. You don’t get that kind of encouragement most places. Every time I listen to Helplessness Blues, it’s just all about thinking about your life, and the scope of your life, in relation to this larger thing. You know, where you live. I think maybe it’s an aesthetic attraction for me—like, maybe instinctively I want to call evergreen trees and sweaters paradise, because they resonate so deeply for me. I just feel like I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else when I listen to that album.

its lebrates th a e c p o P Sub sary wi uly 13, r e v i n n 25th a ilee on Sat., J hub wn neig o t Silver J e g r o e le’s G ill in Seatt he free event w any m .T borhood rformances by e feature p l’s artists. be of the la lineup, go to ll For a fu .subpop.com. ilee silverjub

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Mellow Strong Sexy

Michelle O’Connor works with Natalie Walker at Rain City Rock Camp for Girls as an instructor. When I think of my fave Sub Pop songs, I immediately think of “Queens” by THEESatisfaction from AwE NaturalE. First of all, we all were so excited about this album being released on Sub Pop. It was like one of our own was getting the recognition they deserved. And the album itself is incredible. Unique, smart, and unlike anything I had ever

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the»weekly»wire Theater Group has presented this youth dance showcase. But instead of a smackdown, the finale is always a collaboration, where Bollywood meets flamenco and performs a Chinese Lion Dance. The professional portions of this year’s program will include excerpts from the Broadway production of Evita; the hip-hop troupe 8 Flavahs (seen on America’s Best Dance Crew); and returning favorite Jamel Gaines, now a choreographer for Brooklyn’s Creative Outlet Dance Theater. As always, the young local dancers boast a wild mix of skills and styles: tap, ballroom, traditional Korean and Irish dance, and more. And at the end, when they all dance together, it will make you cry. The Para-

thurs/7/11 FIRST THURSDAY

903-6220, jamesharrisgallery.com. Free. 6–8 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

mount, 911 Pine St., 877-784-4849, stgpresents. org. $10–$18. 7:30 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ FILM

The Two Stooges

Lost and in love: Hayward and Gilman in Moonrise Kingdom.

FILM

Summer Jewels

One would be hard put to actually describe the legendary Lubitsch Touch—it’s as much attitude as style. But one only need watch Ernst Lubitsch’s 1932 masterpiece Trouble in Paradise to see the smooth elegance, Continental wit, and winking innuendo that defines it. One of the greatest American films of the ’30s, and quite possibly the sexiest and most sparkling romantic comedy ever made, it stars Herbert Marshall and Miriam Hopkins as smooth jewel thieves bilking the wealthy rubes of Europe’s hot spots. (Kay Francis plays a flighty heiress who tempts Marshall.) Lubitsch is never so coarse as to show it, but with a little shadow, a little wordplay, and graceful editing, he can suggest anyone into bed. The film begins SAM’s American Comedy Classics series, which is indeed stocked with some all-time greats: Frank Capra’s It Happened One Night, with Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert ( July 18); Howard Hawks’ rapid-fire Twentieth Century, the ur-screwball comedy with John Barrymore and Carole Lombard ( July 25); and Leo McCarey’s delightful STEVE DAVIS The Awful Truth, with Cary Grant and Irene Dunne as a divorced couple that can’t stay separated (Aug. 1). The series runs Thursday nights through August 15. Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $42–$45 series, $8 individual. 7:30 p.m. SEAN AXMAKER FILM

Little Fugitives

Thoroughly summery, Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom is an excellent choice to begin the PEMCO Outdoor Movies at Magnuson Park

series, since it involves all sorts of open-air activities Two 12-year-olds (Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward) elope through the woods, pursued by Bill Murray, Bruce Willis, Frances McDormand, Edward Norton, and an overzealous scout troop. Along the way, there are electrical storms, campfires, hot dogs and orange Tang, first kisses, scissor stabbings, and dancing on the beach to vintage French pop. The youngsters are dead-set on serious romance (though imperfectly understood), while their concerned elders are reminded of lost youth. It’s a meticulous, tender storybook tale set on the not-quite-enchanted island of New Penzance, circa 1965. Moonrise Kingdom (2012) is the best and most satisfying work of Anderson’s career. He wants to keep summertime innocence and youth going just a little bit longer, before the ’60s begin in earnest. Even if his young lovers—and we use the term in a presexual way—yearn for grown-up romance, his film savors the bygone textures and flavors of late childhood. Since Anderson was born in 1969, he’s not remembering but recreating this vintage world, something like a ship in a bottle. But the movie is full of genuine feeling. (Eight more films run on Thursday nights through August 29, including Singin’ in the Rain, Skyfall, and Singles.) Magnuson Park, 7400 Sand Point Way N.E., moviesatmagnuson.com. $5. Gates open at 7 p.m. Movie at dusk. BRIAN MILLER

sat/7/13 DANCE

Youth Is Served

Dance This sounds like the traditional challenge

that tap dancers lay down to one another, as they try to dazzle their rivals—and steal their steps. And it’s true that all kinds of dance styles have been featured during the 15 years that Seattle

Fremont Outdoor Movies aren’t meant to be your dry repertory classics. Since there are bands, comedy, food (and sometimes beer), and contests before each screening, the mood is more carnival than cinémathèque. For that reason, the Farrelly brothers’ 1994 Dumb & Dumber nicely sets the tone for the series. Its anarchic, infantile humor proved a huge, welcome hit during the doldrums of the Clinton era. And while playing abject morons, Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels have a genuine moronic chemistry on their road trip to Aspen. Like their creators, Lloyd and Henry are not snobs. Yet they live in a world of affectation and elitism, surrounded by false idols and pretences they unwittingly topple. They’re levelers who bring the hoi polloi down a peg (or three) with their diarrhea jokes and wanton destruction, and there’s a kind of imbecilic sweetness to their vulgar behavior. Unlike, say, The Three Stooges, there’s no aggression or anger to their antics. And those who are offended deserve to be offended. (Saturday-night screenings continue through August 24 with Anchorman, Superbad, and other titles.) 3501 Phinney Ave. N., fremontoutdoor movies.com. $5. Activities begin at 7:30 p.m. Movie at dusk. BRIAN MILLER DANCE

Swan Song

Alas—the saddest, maddest couple say they are breaking up. Cherdonna and Lou (aka Jody Kuehner and Ricki Mason) launched their character-dance duo in 2009, and watching them navigate through popular culture has been like watching a soap opera performed in a language you really don’t understand. The landmarks are familiar, but you’re not too sure how you got there. From Cherdonna’s loopy hostess, unable to finish a sentence, to Lou’s odd combination of Hugh Hefner and Charlie Chaplin, their characters have been orbiting a strange star, but that is scheduled to change: My Obviously Unsuccessful Lifestyle is going to be their swan song. Or at least they say so—we can only hope it isn’t true.

Velocity Dance Center, 1621 12th Ave., 351-3238, velocitydancecenter.org. $12–$20. 8 & 10 p.m. (Repeats Sun.) SANDRA KURTZ

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JU LY 10 — 16, 2013

Surprise! The First Thursday artwalk actually falls on the second Thursday this month, because of last week’s FOJ holiday. (Why there were no cheese cubes and white wine behind those locked gallery doors? Now you know.) Many Pioneer Square galleries are mid-show this month, like James Harris, where Olympia photographer Steve Davis is offering large color portraits of that city’s neo-hippie denizens in Back to the Garden. Two years ago at the same gallery, Davis chronicled his old hometown in rural Idaho, where the land and sky—and lack of economic prospects—pressed down on the young people there. The figures were small against a mostly agrarian landscape. Here, rather like Richard Avedon’s In the American West, Davis uses a white backdrop to focus our eyes squarely on the oversized individual. He chose to portray “a group that is a joke to many, and an anachronism to even more . . . more than 45 years after the Summer of Love.” With their tatts and piercings and dreadlocks, most would look at home at Hempfest or the Rainbow Gathering (or begging for change), but Davis gives them their dignity. This is a life they’ve chosen, however atavistic. Theirs are faces you might Paul, a 22-year-old see at an student. Occupy Wall Street protest (remember?), and their occupations speak to the chasm of income inequality between the 1 percent and the serviceeconomy strugglers: fry cook, barista, student, mycologist, tattoo artist, etc. Like the subjects of Avedon’s lens (or Dorothea Lange’s, for that matter), there’s a quality of stoic endurance to these young folk. They’re stubborn survivors, not the last of their tribe. (Through Aug. 3.) James Harris Gallery, 604 Second Ave.,

NIKO TAVERNISE/FOCUS FEATURES

Members of the Tribe

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arts»Pop Culture

NIGHTS AT THE

Super Mecha Manga Robot Monster Love!

Why the geek community is so excited about Guillermo del Toro’s Pacific Rim. BY MARK RAHNER

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EST. 1921 NE 45TH & BROOKLYN AVE

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The mechas march out to save mankind.

I

n a summer of tentpole fantasy flicks that range from disappointing to polarizing, the no-pedigree Pacific Rim is the film generating the hardest nerdmahogany. (It opens Friday at the Cinerama and other theaters.) Seriously: Star Trek Into Darkness so disrespected its source material that it seemed more like riffing on Star Trek. Man of Steel earned enough to green-light a sequel, but small details—having Superman kill; super-punch fights that dwarf 9-11 in destruction—alienated fans. The scariest thing about World War Z was Brad Pitt’s behind-the-ears bobbed hairdo. And as of this writing, The Lone Ranger scores a wretched 23 percent on Rotten Tomatoes. The unifying factor: Audiences went more berserk for the Pacif ic Rim trailer than anything in the above movies. What’s it about? Giant, 250-foot robots fighting giant Godzilla-like monsters. What’s the big deal? If there were a geek Louis Armstrong, he’d

He’s the poster child for geek ascendancy, and he’s got the genre-lovers’ good will. say, “If you have to ask what it is, you’ll never know. And no spoilers, dude.” No major stars. Not derived from a comic book or video game. Not a sequel. It’s giant fucking robots fighting huge fucking monsters. Using a ship as a bludgeon to whack

one of them, no less. In fact, that was probably the entirety of director Guillermo del Toro’s pitch meeting. Another reason for the widely held high hopes is that del Toro is no Zack Snyder. Snyder didn’t just perpetrate a Man of Steel that donkey-punched the most fundamental traits of the world’s best-known superhero. Enduring his geek-culture movies is like meeting a beautiful woman, then finding out she doesn’t read and has her TiVo programmed for FOX News. Snyder’s Dawn of the Dead remake was slick and well-acted, but empty calories compared to George A. Romero’s transgressive, commentary-laden masterpiece. The mention of Snyder’s Watchmen adaptation makes comic people’s forehead veins pulse. Sucker Punch was just embarrassingly creepy. And 300 hasn’t aged well, but it works fine for Pride Weekend kitsch value. In contrast, Del Toro is the genuine article. His geek-genre resume vibes depth and smarts. You never hear arguments about whether or not he’s a hack. When it comes to material that we basement-dwelling freaks know and love, he’s One of Us . . . One of Us . . . The right nerd for the job. Del Toro’s impressive credits include Cronos (it’s in the Criterion Collection, for Godsakes), Mimic, The Devil’s Backbone, the underrated Blade II, a fun couple of Hellboy s, and Pan’s Labyrinth (which even people who’ve never owned an action figure consider beautifully macabre). He’s not a mainstream director slumming. Or even a Romero or Carpenter struggling to get financing. He’s the poster child for geek ascendancy, and he’s got the genre-lovers’ good


THIS WEEK S HOW

ALL S

will that Snyder—or J.J. Abrams—will never have, no matter how much dough they bring in. But let me digress. For a different subspe-

cies of fanboy, it’s a crushing disappointment that, to make Pacif ic Rim, del Toro dropped a planned adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness—reportedly because he wanted an R rating and the studio didn’t. And after suffering through the pathetic offcamera biting of the PG-13 World War Z, I’m starting to think del Toro had a point. Adding to the Mountains disappointment is the fact that there’s never been a satisfying, serious big-studio adaptation of Lovecraft’s work, and del Toro would have killed it. Stuart Gordon cranked out some admittedly fun Lovecraft titles, including Re-Animator and Dagon, but he could just never play ’em straight. They’re wacky, campy, full of Dutch angles and winks. But instead, it seems del Toro abandoned Lovecraft in order to do for giant robots fighting giant monsters what Spielberg and Lucas did with movie serials and sci-fi and what Tarantino did with ’60s and ’ 70s cult trash: make a big-budget (reportedly $180 million), beautiful, and wish-fulfilling amalgam of the old, cheap stuff that he loved as a kid. In live-

0 12-1:3 PM

2013

mecha Giant robot, especially with a human pilot. Common in manga and anime. See: Neon Genesis Evangelion, Voltron, Transformers. They’re called “Jaegers” (German for “hunter”) in Pacif ic Rim. Ahead of the screening, I cannot confirm that their pilots are called Jaegermeisters. Note: Mechagodzilla is a sort of massive transgender, both kaiju and mecha.

Wed. July 10 DELHI 2 DUBLIN United Nations of Rock ‘n’ Roll Westlake Park

Fri. July 12 PEARL DJANGO Gypsy Jazz Columbia Center

NEXT WEEK Wed. July 17 MYCLE WASTMAN Soulful Sounds from “The Voice” Two Union Square

A little history. Live-action mecha fans have

especially suffered privations as special effects (and budgets) have evolved. One of Pacific Rim’s most notorious progenitors is Robot Jox, a 1990 howler by Gordon (the wacky Lovecraft guy). Made for a reported $6.5 million, it features giant-robot fighting in stop-motion, plenty of hacky green-screen, hilariously cheap sets, and acting just slightly above what you might call Ed Woodian. (As of this writing, you can still see the whole thing on YouTube. Unless I just ruined that for everyone.) And even though Pacif ic Rim is about giant fucking robots fighting huge fucking monsters, it doesn’t appear to be overly childish or dumb. One plot point involves the Jaegers’ two co-pilots having to share all their intimate memories. (Insert your own awkward Vulcan mind-meld joke here.)

Fri. July 19 AYRON JONES AND THE WAY

TTLE N SEA

NTOW DOW

Raw, Soulful, Blues Guitarist Occidental Square

S RIDAY YS & F A D S E WEDN 12-1:30PM

JULY

LET’S JAM!

0

1

PT 2 0 - SE

COMING UP

Wed. July 24 ZOE MUTH AND THE LOST HIGH ROLLERS Cosmic Americana Bank of America Fifth Avenue Plaza

YES! ! FREE

Fri. July 26 DAN HICKS AND THE HOT LICKS

AT: MMER .COM Swing, Jazz, OUR SU PLAN Y NSEATTLE

TOW

Folk and Country Occidental Square

DOWN

Del Toro has geek cred.

Urban styles merge with cultural traditions. Hip Hop, Tap, Irish, Contemporary, Bollywood, Ballroom, Korean, Tango

STG Celebrates the 15th ANNUAL

DANCE This DANCE�This

July 13 I 7:30 PM I THE PARAMOUNT

What if you don’t speak geek? Here’s a tax-

onomy of where Pacif ic Rim comes from: kaiju A giant monster, often previously played by a Japanese guy in a rubber suit with a visible zipper in the back, stomping on model cities. Literally means “strange beast.” See: Godzilla, Gamera, Rodan, King Kong.

Hey, it may tank or have a surprise Will Smith cameo. But Pacif ic Rim already has enough word-of-mouth to generate a straightto-DVD knockoff called Atlantic Rim. And I guarantee—in a Men’s Wearhouse George Zimmer voice—that there’ll be a porn version: Pacif ic . . . eh, you know. E Mark Rahner is a journalist, comic-book writer, and podcaster. His weekly “Special Ops” episode of BJ Shea’s Geek Nation is each Thursday. Visit markrahner.com.

film@seattleweekly.com

15 15 years! years!

STG Thanks our supporters for investing in meaningful experiences for our community and future generations of performing artists.

Advance Tickets: Adult $18 I Student $10

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action, with special effects that finally look realistic and don’t involve dudes in rubber suits stomping model cities. (Which are still perfectly legit for cosplay at furry conventions.)

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arts»Performance B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

BALAGAN’S NEW WORKS SUMMER SERIES

Readings of new shows—this week, the Prohibitionset musical The Roaring 21st. Balagan Theatre, 1117 E. Pike St., 800-838-3006, balagantheatre.org/new works.html. Donation. 8 p.m. Mon., July 15. BOBBY D AND PEGGY LEE: TOGETHER AGAIN! Bob De Dea and Lindsey Larson star as Bobby Darin and Peggy Lee in this hit-filled revue. Meydenbauer Center, 11100 N.E. Sixth St., Bellevue, 425-235-5087, bellevue civic.org. $30. Opens July 12. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends July 20. THE CLOCKWORK PROFESSOR The Pork Filled Players premiere Maggie Lee’s “action-packed adventure of fantastical science fiction with a steampunk twist.” Theater Off Jackson, 409 Seventh Ave. S., 800838-3006, porkfilled.com. $12–$15. Opens July 12. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Aug. 3. DOUBT Theatre 9/12 presents John Patrick Shanley’s Catholic-school-set drama. Trinity Episcopal Church, 609 Eighth Ave., 332-7908, theatre912.com. Pay what you can. Opens July 12. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Aug. 4. ECTA’S SUMMER STUDENT SHOW See the aerial stars of tomorrow. Emerald City Trapeze Arts, 2702 Sixth Ave. S., 906-9442, emeraldcitytrapeze.com. Donation. 7 p.m. Fri., July 12. EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL A theatrical riff on Sam Raimi’s horror trilogy. Choose your seats from the nonsplatter zone, the splatter zone, or the X-Treme splatter Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

zone. Balagan Theatre, 1117 E. Pike St., evildeadtour. com. $24–$34. Opens July 11. 8:30 p.m. Thurs., 7 & 10:15 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends July 20. FAMILY AFFAIR Jennifer Jasper hosts this monthly performance-art cabaret on the theme of family. JewelBox/ Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., 441-5823, jewelbox theater.com. $10. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 17. Ends Aug. 21. GODSPELL Stephen Schwartz’s 1971 uplifter. Youth Theatre Northwest, 8805 S.E. 40th St., Mercer Island, 232-4145 x109, youththeatre.org. $13–$15. Opens July 12. 7 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends July 21. GREENSTAGE A Midsummer Night’s Dream and King Lear, plus Twelfth Night and The Merry Wives of Windsor in scaled-down “Backyard Bard” productions, in various outdoor venues, all free. Runs Thurs.–Sun., July 12–Aug. 18; see greenstage.org for complete date and venue info. ILLYRIA Peter Mills and Cara Reichel’s musical reworking of Twelfth Night. Taproot Theatre, 204 N. 85th St., 7819707, taproottheatre.org. $20–$40. Previews July 10–11, opens July 12. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Ends Aug. 10. RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN Gina Gionfriddo’s comedy explores family vs. career and other postfeminist topics. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $41 and up. Previews begin July 12, opens July 18. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends Aug. 11. SEATTLE OUTDOOR THEATER FESTIVAL 15 performances (mostly Shakespeare) in two venues; see greenstage.org/sotf for exact lineup. Volunteer Park, 1247 15th Ave. E. Free. Noon, 2, 5, & 7 p.m. Sat., July 13; 11 a.m., 2, 5, & 7 p.m. Sun., July 14. 7 DEADLY BIRTHDAYS Copious Love’s comedy about growing up Catholic and struggling with sin. Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave., 800-838-3006. $12–$15. Opens July 12. Runs Thurs.–Sun.; see copiouslove.org for exact schedule. Ends Aug. 3. SKID ROAD Denny, Mercer, Yesler: the hallowed names of Seattle’s founders. Until this revisionist improv show gets through with them. Unexpected Productions Market Theater, 1428 Post Alley, 800-838-3006, unexpectedproductions.org. Opens July 12. 8:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Aug. 10.

TOPIA A new collaborative show from the student-actors

Paper Walls Theater Company. Bainbridge Performing Arts, 200 Madison Ave. N., Bainbridge Island, 842-8569, bainbridgeperformingarts.org. Donation. 7:30 p.m. Fri., July 12–Sat., July 13. TWELFTH NIGHT My, this play is popular this summer. Here’s SPT’s Youth Program’s version. Seattle Public Theater at the Bathhouse, 7312 W. Green Lake Ave. N., 524-1300. Donation. Opens July 12. Runs Fri.–Sun.; see seattlepublictheater.org for exact schedule. Ends July 20. THE ULTRAVIOLETS The Seattle debut of this blacklight burlesque troupe from Maui, who say “Silly is the new sexy.” Can Can, 94 Pike St., 652-0832, ultraviolets burlesque.com. $12–$15. 10 p.m. Thurs., July 11. THE WAY OUT The Acrobatic Conundrum’s new aerial/ acrobatic drama. Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, 4408 Delridge Way S.W., facebook.com/acrobatic. conundrum. $20–$25. Opens July 11. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends July 27. WEDDING HORROR STORIES Seattle Experimental Theater makes improv theater out of your nuptial nightmares. Wing-It Productions, 5510 University Way N.E., 800-838-3006, seattleexperimentaltheater.com. $12. Opens July 11. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Fri. Ends July 19. WOODEN O The Seattle Shakespeare Company presents Henry V and The Tempest in various parks all over greater Seattle, all free. Runs Wed.–Sun., July 11–Aug. 11; see seattleshakespeare.org for complete date and venue info.

CURRENT RUNS

• CHICAGO If you were casting a Carol Burnett biopic,

it’s unlikely you could do better than Desiree Davar, who looks a lot like her and belts tunes in that same dusky alto. Not so much the CBS Saturday-night Burnett, that is, but the late-career, been-around-theblock Sondheim-interpreter Burnett—which makes Davar excellent in the role of Velma Kelly, one of the two bombshells in Kander and Ebb’s Chicago. She leads Village Theatre’s fine cast: As Roxie Hart, Taryn Darr balances trashy and adorable as adroitly as she handles Kristin Holland’s razzmatazz choreography; Timothy McCuen Piggee has plenty of serpentine

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JULY 10 — 16, 2013

A Talk by Valerie Steele, Director of The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology

26

Friday, July 19, 7–8 pm Valerie Steele—Director and Chief Curator of The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York—discusses the Japanese “fashion revolution” of the 1980s, when avant-garde designers Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons introduced a radically new conception of fashion to the world. Image: Rei Kawakubo for Comme des Garçons, stretch nylon and polyurethane plain-weave top and skirt with down pads, Spring/Summer 1997, Collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute. Photo: Yasushi Ichikawa.

Seattle Art Museum Downtown 1st Avenue & Union Street Tickets may be purchased online, by phone (206.654.3210) or at the Ticketing Desk at any of SAM’s three sites. SAM members: $5 Adults: $10 Students: $8 Seniors: $8

moves to match his portrayal of snake-in-the-grass lawyer Billy Flynn; and Shaunyce Omar brings a dazzling vocal versatility to Mama Morton, from pumain-heat growls to a full-on Jennifer Hudson. Still startlingly cynical after all these years (and an Oscarsweeping movie), Chicago believes in nothing—not motherhood, patriotism, or religion—except showbiz, so appropriately this production seems to have poured the most money into Karen Ann Ledger’s lavish, scrumptious costumes. GAVIN BORCHERT Everett Performing Arts Center, 2710 Wetmore Ave., Everett, 425-257-8600. $24–$63. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see village theatre.org for exact schedule. Ends July 28. HOMEBODY Usually performed as the two-act Homebody/Kabul, Tony Kushner’s play is an hour-long monologue whose putative subject is Afghan history, as told by an unnamed and very confiding London housewife. History is the text, and her unfulfilled personal life is the subtext constantly seeping in. Homebody (Mary Ewald) has just returned from a shopping trip, and she wants to tell us all about it. Pausing for sips of tea, referring periodically to what she knows is an obsolete history text, she attempts to summarize 3,000 years of invasion, war, and religious conflict. A few familiar names pop out (the Taliban, Tony Blair, etc.), but we’re soon immersed in her very subjective, stream-of-consciousness history chat. Homebody is off her meds, she admits, and she’s also popping her husband’s pills. Her tale is scattered and digressive, with one red-lit hallucination that even sends her to Kabul. Directed by John Kazanjian in NCT’s kitchen-sized space, Ewald is fully in command of the text. In her affecting performance, she makes this loony autodidact lonely and sad, though not quite pathetic. Her tale is a challenge to our compassion, but it’s never a chore to watch. BRIAN MILLER New City Theater, 1404 18th Ave., 800-838-3006, newcitytheater@comcast.net. $15–$20. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends July 20. INTIMAN THEATRE FESTIVAL Four shows in repertory, including Stu for Silverton, a new musical about a small Oregon town’s transgender mayor. Intiman Theatre, Seattle Center. $70–$250. See intiman.org for full lineup and schedule details. Ends Sept. 15.


A R T I N T H E G R E AT N O R T H L E F T

THE MAGIC PUDDING Norman Lindsey’s tale of Bunyip

Bluegum the koala, Bill Barnacle the sailor, Sam Sawnoff the penguin, and their magic pudding, Albert. Volunteer Park, schmeater.org. Free. 5 p.m. Sat.–Sun. Ends July 28. PICNIC William Inge’s play about a drifter and the small town he upsets. There will be abs. Richard Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave., 800-838-3006, reacttheatre.org. $12–$16. 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat., plus 8 p.m. Mon., July 22. Ends Aug. 3. TEATRO ZINZANNI: LUCKY IN LOVE The spiegeltent becomes Casino ZinZanni in their new Vegas-themed show. Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015. $106 and up. Runs Thurs–Sat.; see dreams.zinzanni.org for exact schedule. Ends Sept. 8. THE TOTALLY TRUE AND ALMOST ACCURATE ADVENTURES OF PINOCCHIO A theater troupe

wants to stage the classic, but runs into problems. Runs Sat.–Sun; see balagantheatre.org for schedule and venues. Ends Aug. 4.

Dance

YELLOW FISH Alice Gosti’s “Epic Durational

Performance Festival” includes work by Vanessa DeWolf, Devin McDermott, the Satori Group, and many more. She writes, “What [would it] do to this artistic community to experience . . . performances, actions, or re-actions that last for a minimum of an hour and a maximum of 48 hours, which do not necessarily require the constant attention of an audience and may not require an audience at all?” Hedreen Gallery, 901 12th Ave., 323-9405, facebook.com/TheHedreenGallery. Through July 15. DANCE THIS SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 23.

• MY OBVIOUSLY UNSUCCESSFUL LIFESTYLE •  SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 23.

Classical, Etc. METROPOLITAN OPERA AT THE MOVIES A summer

series of encores of favorite broadcasts from past seasons continues July 10, with Renee Fleming as Rossini’s Armida. On July 17, Natalie Dessay sings La traviata’s heroine Violetta. See metopera.org for participating theaters. 6:30 p.m. SEATTLE CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY July 10 7 p.m. recital: Ginastera’s Piano Sonata. 8 p.m. concert: Tchaikovsky, Beethoven, and a string quartet by Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel. July 12 Recital: Bach from pianist Anton Nel. Concert: Music by the Schumanns, Clara and Robert, and piano trios by Smetana and Dvorak. July 15 Recital: a performance by this year’s Monika Meyer Clowes Award winner. Concert: Britten’s marvelously ascetic Cello Sonata, plus Beethoven and Brahms. July 17 At 7 p.m., a free all-Dvorak concert in Volunteer Park. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 283-8710, seattlechambermusic.org. Single tickets $15–$45. Ends July 26. THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE The 5th’s production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s swashbuckler. 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave., 625-1900. $29 and up. Previews begin July 11; opens July 18. Runs Tues.–Sun; see 5thavenue.org for exact schedule. NORTHWEST MAHLER FESTIVAL Each summer, area musicians gather to read through Mahler’s symphonies and similar late-romantic blockbusters. On July 11, Mahler’s exuberant First; July 16 & 18, the Second, subtly subtitled “Resurrection.” 7 p.m each night. See nwmahlerfestival.org to register. Saint Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, 1245 Tenth Ave. E. $25. EL GRUPO ARRASTRE Sonic explorer Jeph Jerman’s new work for seven players, inspired by Tibetan singing bowls, promises “a dense, shimmering wall of singing metal.” Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., chapelspace.blogspot.com. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Fri., July 12. SEATTLE GILBERT & SULLIVAN SOCIETY Their summer show is The Gondoliers, in which one of the two title brothers seems to be the heir to a throne. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 800-8383006. $16–$40. Opens July 12. Runs Fri.–Sun.; see pattersong.org for exact schedule. Ends July 27. SEATTLE SYMPHONY “Cirque de la Symphonie” combines aerialists, jugglers, and more with Bartok, Beethoven, and associates. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $19–$112. 8 p.m. Fri., July 12–Sat., July 13. OLYMPIC MUSIC FESTIVAL Chamber music in a rustic repurposed barn, each Saturday and Sunday through Sept. 1. This weekend, an all-Mozart afternoon, including the Clarinet Quintet. Olympic Music Festival, Center Road, Quilcene, 360-732-4800, olympicmusic festival.org. $18–$33. 2 p.m. Sat., July 13–Sun., July 14.

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arts»Visual Arts B Y G W E N D O LY N E L L I O T T

Openings & Events • ACCLIMATIZED: HEAVEN AND EARTH The

Center on Contemporary Art mounts its fifth exhibition of temporary artwork in Carkeek Park. Artists will install their work in the park created to withstand the elements, intense public scrutiny, and potential vandalism—as was the case last year, when several pieces were burned or destroyed. Go early, before any mishaps can occur. Carkeek Park, 950 N.W. Carkeek Park Road, cocaseattle.org. Opens July 13. On view during park hours through Oct. 20. ARTY HOUR Sip wine and snack on nibbles during this art-making social. 21 years and up. Advance registration required. Schack Art Center, 2921 Hoyt Ave. (Everett), 425-257-8380, schack.org, $45-$50, Wed., July 10, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Tue., July 23, 6-9 p.m.; Wed., Aug. 7, 6-9 p.m.; Thu., Aug. 29, 6-9 p.m. BELLTOWN ART WALK Neighborhood galleries (including Northwest Woodworkers Gallery, Form/ Space Atelier, A/NT Terminal Gallery, and others) and non-galleries (Cyclops, Black Bottle, Bedlam Coffee, etc.) extend their hours so you can check out work by local artists. See belltownartwalk.com for details. Second Friday of every month, 6 p.m. BEST DRESSED/UNDRESSED This group show explores the notion of adornment in a range of media. With Jessica Craig-Martin, Jules Frazier, Carmen Lozar, Stephen O’Donnell, Mielle Riggie, and Margeaux Walker. Opening celebration 6-8 p.m. Weds., July 10. Winston Wachter Fine Art, 203 Dexter Ave. N., 652-5855, winstonwachter.com, Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Sept. 4. BLITZ! CAPITOL HILL ART WALK Check out

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Send events to visualarts@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

the participating galleries and stores on Pike and Pine Streets, including Vermillion, Ltd. Gallery, True Love Art Gallery, and Photo Center NW, Fetherston Gallery, and Rosebud, which will extend their hours to feature art, music, and more. See blitzcapitolhill. com. Second Thursday of every month, 5-8 p.m. CENTRAL DISTRICT ART WALK Local artists with studios along E. Cherry St. (between 23rd and 24th Aves.) invite you to come in and see what’s brewing. Venues include Autumn Thing, Doubt Us Artwork, Miss Cline Press, Outside In Studio, and Coyote Central. See centraldistrictartwalk.com. Second Saturday of every month, 1-5 p.m. DEPARTURE Mandy Blouin, Jay Mason, Darren Orange, John Osgood, and Angelina Villalobos show their painting, photography, and graphic design in a benefit show for Art With Heart. Featuring food from Local 360, a rooftop party, and more. No cover, donations encouraged. Lawrence Lofts, 1818 E. Madison St., 860-6818, lawrence-lofts.com, Sat., July 13, 5-10 p.m. WARREN DYKEMAN Text, texture, color, and jangled, abstract forms create balance and disarray in I might exaggerate.., his collection of mixed-media and collage paintings. Reception 6-8 p.m. Thurs., July 11. Davidson Galleries, 313 Occidental Ave. S., 624-1324, davidsongalleries.com, Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.5:30 p.m. Through July 27. JENI FALLDINE From 10 a.m.-4 p.m. this week, she will build and hang her site-specific string installation Ties in Occidental Park. The construction is inspired by concepts that tie people together and what “weaves our community into what it is.” The piece remains on view through Aug. 19, with an opening reception Aug. 1. Occidental Park, Occidental Ave. S. & S. Main St. GEORGETOWN ART ATTACK This month, the Georgetown Art Walk collides with the Sub Pop Silver Jubilee, so expect a bigger—and rowdier—crowd than usual. On the theme of music in Seattle are multiple exhibits including Charles Peterson’s black and white concert photography

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at All City Coffee and Justin Hampton’s rock show posters at Calamity Jane’s. Elsewhere, there’s sculpture at Krab Jab, Sub Pop arts and artifacts at Fantagraphics, a Georgetown Trailer Park Mall vending all kinds of goods, and more. Stick around until 11 p.m. for all the great music and the label’s to-beannounced “special guest.” See georgetownartattack.com. Second Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. KAREN HACKENBERG In Watershed, her recent photo-realistic paintings are also bound and published as a book. Opening reception 5-7 p.m., Thurs., July 11. Paper Hammer, 1400 Second Ave., 6823820, paper-hammer.com, Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Through July 29. HOT RODS AND HONEYS Various artists present work featuring hot cars and hotter gals. Encore celebration 6-10 p.m. Weds., July 10. Tasty, 7513 Greenwood Ave. N., 706-3020, shoptastyart.com, Weds.-Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun., 12-5 p.m. Through Aug. 4. DAVID C. KANE He shows geometric and abstract figurative portraits. Reception 5-8 p.m. Thurs., July 11. Room 104, 306 S. Washington St. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 953-8104, room104gallery.com, Weds.-Sat., 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Through July 27. KIRKLAND ART WALK Howard/Mandville, the Kirkland Arts Center, and other downtown galleries are represented at this free monthly event. Second Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. RANA ROCHAT Her abstract work explores order, chaos, and movement through organic shapes and natural forms. Opening celebration 6-8 p.m. Weds., July 10. Winston Wachter Fine Art. Through Sept. 4. ROCK ON Fourteen artists show jewelry and work in precious metals incorporating rocks and gemstones. Opening lecture 4-5 p.m. Weds., July 10 (RSVP required), followed by reception. Facere Jewelry Art Gallery, 1420 Fifth Ave., 624-6768, facerejewelryart.com, Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun., 12-5 p.m. Through July 31. STRETCHABLE MOMENT David Beckley’s ghostly digital portraits, Nancy Coleman’s nature-inspired,

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prepared images, and Cass Walker’s stuffed-animal domestic series come together in this group photo show. Reception 6-8 p.m. Thurs., July 11. Artist reception 5-8 p.m. Sat., July 13. Gallery 110, 110 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 624-9336, gallery110.com, Weds.-Sat., 12-5 p.m. Through July 27.

SCULPTURE PARK SUMMER KICK• OLYMPIC Art, environment, and community come OFF

together in this festive celebration at the OSP. Watch bands Tubaluba and Comfort Food perform, enjoy art activities, sample local wines, and check out Heather Hart’s temporary roof-like installation The Western Oracle: We Will Tear the Roof Off the Mother (which remains on view through October). Olympic Sculpture Park, 2901 Western Ave., 6543100, seattleartmuseum.org, Free. Thu., July 11, 6 p.m. THREE WAY Ben Beres, Zac Culler, and John Sutton show bronze sculpture that reimagine the usefulness and intrinsic artfulness of everyday objects like switch-plates and security cameras. Opening reception 6-8 p.m. Thurs., July 11. Artist talk at noon, Sat., July 13. Greg Kucera Gallery, 212 Third Ave. S., 624-0770, gregkucera.com, Tues.-Sat., 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Through Aug. 17. LUKE TORNATZKY Beneath Summer Skies collects his recent oil works and landscapes. Reception 6-8 p.m. Thurs., July 11. Patricia Rovzar Gallery, 1225 Second Ave., 223-0273, rovzargallery.com, Mon.Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Through July 29. WEST SEATTLE ART WALK Several venues showcase local art, including Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, ArtsWest, Alki Arts, and more. Details: westseattleartwalk.blogspot.com. Second Thursday of every month, 6-9 p.m. WHITE CENTER ART WALK Al Brewing, Company Bar, Full Tilt Ice Cream, Luso Food and Wine and other merchants open their doors for this walking tour featuring art, special events, music, and more. Downtown White Center, Second Thursday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

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OLYMPIC SCULPTURE PARK

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JULY 10 — 16, 2013

july 11–august 29

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Thursdays atthePark 6 pm-8 pm

Thursday, July 11: Join us for the kick off of summer season at the Olympic Sculpture Park with a ribbon cutting at 6 pm! Enjoy the New Orleans-style brass band Tubaluba and the fusion of electric Miles Davis and Fela Kutistyle Afrobeats with the band Comfort Food. Create your own fabulous wearable pins, tour the art in the park, down-dog-it in a yoga session with 8 Limbs Yoga, and savor local wines and food truck fun with TASTE Café, BUNS, Grilled Cheese Experience and Here & There Grill.

Additional Support: Amgen, Maryanne Tagney-Jones and David Jones

seattleartmuseum.org/getout


GIMME GOOD BOOKSTORES A Reader’s Guide CULTURE! ARTS DIRECTORY SPOTLIGHT ON

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GreenStage presents King Lear, A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Backyard Bard versions of Twelfth Night and The Merry Wives of Windsor in Seattle-area parks this summer. Check our website for details. Go see a play! 206.748.1551. FREE! http://greenstage.org/

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Volunteer Park, Seattle July 13-14, 2013

One park, two days, eight theatre companies, 15 FREE performances! Enjoy the Seattle Outdoor Theater Festival, the unofficial kickoff of the outdoor theater season! 206.748.1551. FREE http://greenstage.org/sotf

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DANCE THIS The Paramount Theatre Saturday July 13 at 7:30pm Seattle Theatre Group's 15th Annual DANCE This brings together teen performers from diverse communities for collaboration and to share their culture through the art of dance. The performance features young local dancers in collaboration with professional artists performing dances from across culturesóboth traditionally rooted and contemporary in form. This year's performance celebrates 15 years of bringing dance to the community and includes groups and dancers from the past as well as new partnerships. 1.877.784.4849. $10 - $18 www.stgpresents.org GIMMECULTURE@SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

The Underwater Welder by Jeff Lemire A World Without Time by Palle Yourgrau Saga by Brian K Vaughan and Fiona K Staples Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg The Professor and The Madman by Simon Winchester

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Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion Seattle Art Museum June 27 - Sept. 8, 2013

The upcoming exhibition Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion at SAM Downtown (1st Ave and Union) features more than 100 garments that highlight the tremendous innovation of Japanese designers who revolutionized the way we think of fashion today. The show celebrates original designers such as Issey Miyake, Kenzo Takada, Rei Kawakubo, and Yohji Yamamoto, as well as younger designers influenced by popular culture and the dynamic street life of Tokyo. 206.654.3210. $11 - $17 www.seattleartmuseum.org

Seth Shulman treads where myth meets history to unravel the complicated wires dipping into the electric past of the telephone. The driving question of The Telephone Gambit: Did Alexander Graham Bell, inspired by passion and pressured by cutthroat businessmen, steal the key design element of the first commercialized telephone?

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Go to www.Gofobo.com/RSVP Rotate, collage and size s and enter the code SwEEKZT4b to download your free pass. THIS FILM IS RATED PG-13. PARENTS STRONGLY CAUTIONED. Some Material May Be Inappropriate For Children Under 13. Please note: Passes are limited and will be distributed on a first come, first served basis while supplies last. No phone calls, please. Limit two passes per person. Each pass admits one. Seating is not guaranteed. Arrive early. Theater is not responsible for overbooking. This screening will be monitored for unauthorized recording. By attending, you agree not to bring any audio or video recording device into the theater (audio recording devices for credentialed press excepted) and consent to a physical search of your belongings and person. Any attempted use of recording devices will result in immediate removal from the theater, forfeiture, and may subject you to criminal and civil liability. Please allow additional time for heightened security. You can assist us by leaving all nonessential bags at home or in your vehicle.

In Theaters Everywhere July 19th www.red-themovie.com


film»This Week’s Attractions The Attack

pulsing music (by the French musician known as Rob) are decorative without drawing any actual blood, and the device of aligning the audience with the viewpoint of a killer just sits there. What’s left is a kind of second-hand ugliness, without even the creepy energy of a horror original. That’s a description of an especially dispiriting movie. ROBERT HORTON

OPENS FRI., JULY 12 AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS. RATED R. 102 MINUTES.

PMore Than Honey OPENS FRI., JULY 12 AT VARSITY. NOT RATED. 96 MINUTES.

KINO LORBER

The stereotype of the suicide bomber, as we all know, is Muslim, male, and mad about religion or Israel (which usually amounts to the same thing). For that reason, a Tel Aviv surgeon is confounded by the torso of a bombing victim in the morgue (one of 18). She’s female. She’s Christian. She’s the suspect, say the police. And she’s his wife. Compounding matters even further, Dr. Jaafari (Ali Suliman) is a Palestinian-born Israeli citizen, a secular scotch drinker, and someone who wants desperately to believe in peaceful assimilation. In flashbacks and ghostly visitations, his wife Sihem (Reymoud Amsalem) doesn’t wear a veil, doesn’t talk politics, so Jaafari is stunned by the cops’ allegations. Based on a 2005 novel by a retired Algerian military officer who once battled fundamentalists, The Attack tries hard to avoid the usual binary Palestinian/Israeli opposing worldviews. Director Ziad Doueiri is, like his protagonist, something of a hybrid: born in Lebanon, a veteran Hollywood cameraman (for Quentin Tarantino and others) who made an auspicious debut a dozen years ago with West Beirut. Divided city, divided nations, divided hero— these cruelly delineated states of being can make impartial judgments impossible. (One man’s freedom fighter is another man’s terrorist . . . it’s like stepping through the looking-glass.) Yet after a brutal police interrogation, Jaafari decides to launch his own forensic investigation, going back to visit his family in Nablus, where fiery imams spew hatred, his wife is featured in celebratory martyrdom posters, and no one will give him a direct answer. Surgery is one thing, detective work is another. Jaafari is indignant in the ER, tending to the mangled bodies of children—this before his wife is implicated—and asking of the per-

The bees! Not the bees!

which opinions will never be settled. Jaafari is less political than his wife, or perhaps more of an amnesiac about recent history. He’s a successful, practical man who doesn’t want to think about his own humble roots or his wife’s deeper motives. If The Attack ends on a frustratingly indecisive note, where notions of blame and balance fall away, it speaks to Jaafari’s awkward position. Sihem stepped through the lookingglass, but he’s forever caught on the threshold. BRIAN MILLER

The History of Future Folk RUNS FRI., JULY 12–THURS., JULY 18 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 86 MINUTES.

MAIDA VALE/VARIANCE FILMS

Maniac RUNS FRI., JULY 12–THURS., JULY 18 AT GRAND ILLUSION. NOT RATED. 90 MINUTES.

The 1980 Maniac is one of those periodic exploitation concepts that pay off handsomely: low budget, killer title, horrified reviews that can be used to drum up interest, and good timing (the malaise era was at its death-gasp nadir). The thing made a huge profit. A remake can’t capture that nervy, subversive vibe—there’s no surprise left. That’s partly why the recent reboots of Halloween and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre felt misjudged; the budgets were too high, the acting too competent, the properties already too enshrined in pop culture. This Maniac remake is grungier than those efforts, so I suppose it has that going for it. But without the original barrel-scraping atmosphere, even beachcombers of bucket-of-blood horror might be tested by its single-note idea and approach. Like the original film, this one relies heavily on shots from the killer’s point of view. So we don’t see much of Elijah Wood, the Lord of the Rings star, unless he passes in front of a mirror or has a flashback to his miserable childhood with a mother who exposed him to various unpleasant realities. He plays Frank, a keeper of mannequins. Frank’s big problem is needing wigs for his models, which he takes from women unfortunate enough to have come under his gaze. We see this habit play out in scenes that spare no anatomical detail. Wood’s game for the challenge, although his voice is not strong or distinctive enough to carry the long sections of POV footage. The photographer who tests Frank’s murderous obsession is played by Nora Arnezeder (Safe House), who shares some of his fascination with mannequins and almost inspires him to do more than slaughter the women in his life. There is no reason a horror picture couldn’t put these pieces together into something interesting, but director Franck Khalfoun is not sharp enough for the job. The homages and synth-

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JU LY 10 — 16, 2013

Some aspects of Brooklyn hipster culture are insufferable, like fixies and ironic facial hair. But folk musicians from outer space? Who wear red plastic buckets on their heads and play banjo ballads? Future Folk is a real musical duo with a 10-year history performing on New York stages, and they’re an entirely serious yet winningly silly combo. Their musical style could be described as bluegrass—in space! From left, Klaitz and d’Aulaire are Nils d’Aulaire plays actual space-folk musicians in Bill (his alias on Earth), New York. who, back on his home planet of Hondo, is actually General Trius. Assigned to scout out our planet for invasion, Bill has meanwhile married and is raising a cute daughter—and his bedtime stories to her sound suspiciously like the tale we’re watching. Belief in them is optional. The other half of petrators, “What is wrong with these people?” Future Folk, Jay Klaitz, plays the inept HonHe genuinely doesn’t understand. His journey dorian assassin Kevin, charged with killing Gen. to Nablus thus also becomes a process of selfTrius and getting the whole we-must-conquerdiscovery, a reclaiming of Palestinian identity, Earth mission back on track. Naturally he also and this is where The Attack becomes somewhat develops an affection for this seed colony, takes muddled. Both we and Jaafari suspect that up guitar, and develops a crush on a Latina cop Islamic radicals somehow “brainwashed my wife” (April Hernandez). Destroying all life on our and made Sihem the unwitting agent of their planet soon takes a backseat to crooning folk scheme. Instead his search leads to a different— songs to the ever-larger throngs at Larry’s bar and to my mind implausible—faction. (’80s metal icon Dee Snider). There’s always a fresh grievance in the Middle Directed by Jeremy Kipp Walker and J. East, and Sihem, in posthumous testimony on Anderson Mitchell, this is a shaggy, enjoyable, VHS (!), cites 2002’s “Jenin Massacre,” about homebrewed sci-fi tale where the costumes and

plot resemble one of those lo-fi “sweded” remakes in Be Kind Rewind. Kevin and Bill are the galaxy’s worst alien invaders, meaning they just don’t have the heart to exterminate us. Inevitably they shift allegiances when Hondo sends a lethal virus our way. “We don’t have three Earth weeks!” to save the planet, says Bill. How scary is this potential Armageddon? Well, remember this is a bedtime story. BRIAN MILLER

Instead of making the underperforming White House Down, perhaps director Roland Emmerich—the master of disaster behind 2012 and The Day After Tomorrow—should’ve stuck with his usual instinct for large-scale destruction. He should’ve made a movie about bees. More Than Honey demonstrates why the subject is ripe for apocalyptic treatment. Banish all thoughts of The Swarm, the ’70s Michael Caine flop about killer bees taking over; the real threat is not that bees will attack us, but abandon us. Albert Einstein has been quoted as saying that if bees were to disappear from the Earth, humankind would die off after four years—and while the attribution might be apocryphal, the observation points out how the agricultural grid is dependent on those tiny, buzzing ministers of fertility. You may have heard about some of this already, since docs Colony and Queen of the Sun have recently played Seattle. Colony collapse disorder (or CCD) is a widespread phenomenon in the world of beekeeping, and the millions of bees that prop up annual harvests are disappearing in vast numbers. More Than Honey is more than information, however. The info’s there if you want it, but mostly it plays like a humming, honey-dripped dream; director Markus Imhoof is besotted with bees, and he makes them the captivating heroes of his movie. In his extreme close-ups of bees, they take on the grandeur they deserve. The movie ranges around—we visit China to witness the depressing effects of a major bee die-off, for instance. But Imhoof arranges his film around two bee-men half a world apart: Fred Jaggi, a wizened Swiss apiarist whose grandfather established the family’s beekeeping business, and John Miller, a proud U.S. capitalist who deals in bees by the zillions, trucking them around the country to pollinate huge swaths of fruit and nut trees. Jaggi looks like he just popped his wrinkled head out of a cuckoo clock; Miller beams with the confidence of a shark. The contrast between Old World traditionalist and go-go 21st-century tycoon is perhaps a bit overstated, but both men are bewildered by CCD. Imhoof trains his camera on Miller’s reaction as crates of bees are opened after being transported—thousands of dead bees visible on delivery—and the sight dismays even the can-do American. A lovely movie—but please, let’s get back to The Swarm. If the accidental release of killer bees gave rise to that horror movie, the irony is that aggressive African bees might prove crucial in saving the planet. Imhoof tracks a group of scientists creating hybrid bee colonies and testing them on an island. The place is so remote that the bees can’t escape to dominate the world. But maybe they should. ROBERT HORTON

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 32 31


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The rare sequel that learns from its predecessor’s mistakes and improves on it in every way.” – Abhimanyu Das, Slant

THE ONLY HORROR FRANCHISE THAT MATTERS.” “

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GRAND RE-OPENING JULY 19TH

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JULY 10 — 16, 2013

» FROM PAGE 31

CZECH THAT FILM FESTIVAL

The Way, Way Back OPENS FRI., JULY 12 AT GUILD 45TH AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG-13. 102 MINUTES.

PThe Unspeakable Act RUNS FRI., JULY 12–THURS., JULY 18 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 91 MINUTES.

It doesn’t take long for The Unspeakable Act to go there. We’ve barely been ushered into the Kimball family unit, a normal-looking Brooklyn clan, FROM THE DIRECTORS OF THE RAID, HOBO WITH A SHOTGUN, when teenage daughter Jackie (Tallie Medel) FOR SHOWTIMES AND REMODEL NEWS VISIT: YOU’RE NEXT & THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT casually introduces the subject that she elsewhere describes as “the I-word.” Jackie is troubled— PARDON OUR DUST AS WE TRANSFORM distraught, actually—that her brother Matthew (Sky Hirschkron) has his first steady girlfriend WHO’S TRACKING YOU? and is leaving for Princeton soon. In the plainest NO ONE UNDER 17 ADMITTED MAGNETRELEASING.COM/VHS2 way possible, she tells us about how difficult is it Grand Illusion PARKING $2.00 AFTER 5PM LATE SHOWS ON SEATTLE to be in love with a member of one’s own family. Cinema (206) 523-3935 FRIDAY, JULY 12 & SATURDAY, JULY 13 FRI & SAT: 11:00 PM PAY & VALIDATE AT OUR BOX OFFICE That’s right. The I-word is incest, but the idea that this taboo subject can be treated only sensationalistically is quickly dispelled by writer/ director Dan Sallitt’s approach. This quiet micro206.324.9996 budget film sails along as smoothly and easily as siff.net Jackie’s bicycle glides through Brooklyn in the SEATTLE WEEKLY opening shots. NOW PLAYING: This isn’t a story of sexual malfunction: Jackie WED: July 07/10 Fri July 12–Thur 18 and Matthew have never consummated anyAt the Uptown 1 COL. (2.33”) X 4” thing. Now he’s AM/RT beginning to grow beyond their One Week Only! unusual emotional closeness, and she’s not at all ALL.VHS.0710.SW Charming teen comedy interested in moving on. Jackie’s spacy mother and sister exchange glances when Jackie—who THE KINGS OF doesn’t hide things well—acts out. This is a film SUMMER of small looks and expressive body language: Final shows The way Jackie’s mother stirs the coffee in the SOMM French drip is a definitive index of her distracted character. A filmmaker who can capture those THIS IS THE END moments does not need reams of dialogue. July 12 & 13 Nevertheless, the dialogue sounds authentic SEATTLE and is frequently funny. Some who watch The RETRO GAMING Unspeakable Act may find the acting flat or rough MOVIE NIGHTS! around the edges. That might be true, although Ecstasy of Order: The Tetris Masters Sallitt appears to be deliberately cultivating that The Space Invaders: In Search of informal style. the Lost Time Medel, however, is a genuine original. Barely July 17 five feet tall with a watchful gaze and quick One show only! delivery, she’s not a traditional leading lady, and Iconic Sub Pop iconic band LOW in she doesn’t waste time trying to project the LOW MOVIE energy of an adorable indie it-girl. She is just (HOW TO QUIT stubbornly herself—sometimes collected, someSMOKING) times a mess, always exact. Jackie eventually gets into therapy (Caroline Save the Date! Luft is dead-on as the poker-faced psychologist), July 12–14 | SIFF Cinema Uptown July 29–August 1 but at no time does Sallitt settle for a standard Explore the variety of new films from Czech cinema. THE HITCHCOCK 9 coming-of-age scenario—although that scenario Newly restored Silent Films from Friday Opening Night with a pre-film reception presented by Staropramen. Cinema’s Master of Suspense is actually in the movie’s DNA. Instead, The Unspeakable Act carefully hews its path, shirking melodrama and homing in on something very FREE VALIDATED SIFF Cinema Uptown SIFF Film Center 511 Queen Anne Avenue North PARKING human. It’s a weirdly calm treatment of an anxSeattle Center | Northwest Rooms from 6pm weekdays / 10am weekends | Parking passes available at box offi ce ious topic. ROBERT HORTON

www.sundancecinemas.com

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Rockwell as water-park mentor.

@weeklyevents CLAIRE FOLGER/FOX SEARCHLIGHT

Best Movies - No TV Commercials

With its promo push “from the studio that brought you Little Miss Sunshine and Juno” (Fox Searchlight), the potential charm of this summertime coming-of-ager gets shrink-wrapped by the packaging. What ought to be indie feels more like stale product left in the deli case too long. 14-year-old Duncan (Liam James) and his divorced mother Pam (Toni Colette) are dragged to a Massachusetts beach rental by her overbearing new bf Trent (Steve Carell). Trent. There is no way we are going to like a guy named that (and a car salesman, of course), and Duncan emphatically dislikes Trent, who takes every opportunity to belittle the shy, passive teen. In the movie’s very first scene, with Trent’s teen daughter and Pam asleep in the car, Trent says Duncan rates only a 3 on a scale of 1 to 10. Trent is an asshole, and the movie will do nothing to complicate that assessment. Nor does it provide anything remotely surprising or original over the next 102 minutes. Codirectors/writers Nat Faxon and Jim Rash are journeymen Hollywood comics who got lucky enough to have their names attached to a draft of The Descendants (Alexander Payne politely minimized their contribution). Oscars in hand, they pitched this awfully broad and familiar tale, in which unhappy Duncan finds a sympathetic mentor in Owen (Sam Rockwell), the flippant king of the local water park where Duncan lands a summer job. Owen is the anti-Trent: goofy and fun-loving, spitting out nicknames and bald lies, treating his staff with affectionate sarcasm, and harboring a not-so-secret thing for his boss (Maya Rudolph). While the drunken adults enjoy “spring break for adults” (per Duncan’s glum crush object, played by AnnaSophia Robb), Duncan finds new pals and self-confidence. We’ve seen this story a thousand times. But what are its incidental pleasures? Rockwell, Rockwell, and Rockwell. Faxon and Rash— who also act in the film—give him long, nonsensical dialogues that feel ad-libbed and loose. He’s got happy feet and a motormouth. “I know about 46 ways to kill a clown,” he boasts. (Unfortunately, this is not Seven Psychopaths, so there’s no way to test his prowess.) Owen’s quotations of ’80s cheese-rock lyrics suggests how The Way, Way Back might better have been a period-set raunch-com, with more misbehavior for both the adults and teens. Instead, Faxon and Rash create a mood of unearned nostalgia that wafts like a car air-freshener called That One Special Summer That Changed Everything. For Duncan maybe, but not us. BRIAN MILLER E

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Local & Repertory • AMERICAN COMEDY CLASSICS SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 23.

BENNY & JOON From 1993, this gentle family tale of

mental illness was shot in around Spokane. Mary Stuart Masterson plays the troubled Juniper, Aidan Quinn is her protective brother, and Johnny Depp makes like he’s Buster Keaton. (PG) Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684, central-cinema.com, $6-$8, July 12-16, 7 p.m. BOOGIE NIGHTS Paul Thomas Anderson’s Boogie Nights (1997) begins in 1978, when the new sexuality has hardened and been commodified in the porn industry. The film follows the fortunes of Eddie (Mark Wahlberg), a dishwasher with “something wonderful in his pants.” Anderson masterfully handles Eddie’s journey through the age of entitlement, capturing the recklessness and invincibility of the coke-tinged times. But once Dirk Diggler—as Eddie is renamed—finds his new family, he must leave them behind. In a culture that has a hard time dealing with sexual freedom, Anderson has made a film that takes an unflinching look at the business of sexuality. And what’s more, he neither punishes nor rewards his character for their experiments in liberation. (R) CLAIRE DEDERER Central Cinema, $6-$8, July 12-17, 9:30 p.m. CARLITO’S WAY Local film-appreciation society The 20/20 Awards presents the 1993 Brian De Palma gangster flick, starring Al Pacino as the ex-con trying to go straight. Sean Penn sports a memorable hairdo as his crooked lawyer. (R) Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 523-3935, grandillusioncinema.org, $5-$8, Thu., July 11, 6:30 p.m. CZECH THAT FILM This seven-film sampler of contemporary Czech cinema includes at least one solid pick, seen at SIFF ‘12: Jan Hrebejk’s Innocence (2 p.m. Sat.), which takes a sneaky, indirect approach to the lurid allegations of child sexual abuse. The accused party, Tomás (Ondrej Vetchý), is a respected orthopedic surgeon with a complicated family life. In his household are an elderly parent, a teen daughter, his wife, her mentally disabled son from a prior marriage, and a sister-in-law. And his wife’s ex is a cop who investigates sex crimes. Tomás, handsome and prosperous, has it all; the cop, an old friend whose wife Tomás stole, has nothing but his miserable case files. Of course he’s assigned to investigate when 14-year-old patient Olinka (Anna Linhartová) says she had consensual sex with her doctor (the Czech age of consent is 15). Innocence is a wrong-man thriller, and it’s very good at that level. But where it’s truly superior is in the slow dissection of Dr. Kotva’s household—like a detective story written by Chekhov. See siff.net for full schedule and details. (NR) BRIAN MILLER SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, $5-$10, July 12-14. DAZED & CONFUSED It’s 1976 all over again in Richard Linklater’s 1993 pot-hazed high-school confidential. Yet beneath the cannabis clouds there’s surprising insight into the inner lives of slackers, stoners, and jocks. Throughout, Linklater’s laid-back observational style reveals all the longing, languor, and halfunderstood notions of self that define what it means to be 18. And you can’t beat Aerosmith’s “Sweet Emotion.” Keep your (red) eyes peeled for Parker Posey, Ben Affleck, and Matthew McConaughey, whose muscle-car Romeo memorably declares, “That’s what I like about these high school girls: I keep getting older; they stay the same age.” Somehow Linklater almost makes that seem poignant. (R) BRIAN MILLER Harvard Exit, 807 E. Roy St., 323-0587, landmarktheatres.com, $10, Tue., July 16, 7 p.m. FREMONT OUTDOOR MOVIES SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 23.

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BrACiNglY FreSh ANd FuNNY . ” i loved everY miNuTe oF iT. -Peter Travers,

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JULY 10 — 16, 2013

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STeve CArell ToNi ColleTTe AlliSoN JANNeY ANNASoPhiA roBB SAm roCKWell mAYA rudolPh ANd liAm JAmeS

e xCluSive e NgAgeme NT S

STArT FridAY, JulY 12

Bellevue Lincoln Square Cinemas 16 & IMAX (425) 454-7400

• 

•  • IN THE LOOP/THE MAN WHO WASN’T THERE

Seattle Landmark’s Guild 45th Theatre (206) 547-2127

Seattle regal Meridian 16 (800) FANDANGO #808

SIFF is honoring the recently deceased James Gandolfini with a double-feature. First is the Coen brothers’ rather chilly 2001 noir exercise The Man Who Wasn’t There. Second is 2009’s In the Loop, made by the creative team behind the BBC’s political satire The Thick of It, with a few Yanks added to the cast (Gandolfini plays the Colin Powell role). Thus, the lead-up to the Iraq War—though Iraq is never named—becomes a hyperbolic transatlantic political farce. As directed by Armando Iannucci, government process becomes madness. The movie is talk talk talk,

Send events to film@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended


interrupted by a little sex and drinking, then back to the talking, which soon becomes shouting, screaming, and cursing. The Brits are led by Peter Capaldi, who plays a foul-mouthed and thoroughly frightening Scotsman at a British ministry. We’ve all heard of the Boss From Hell, but Capaldi’s Malcolm Tucker is the boss to whom all the underling Bosses From Hell report. Around him swirl doctored intelligence reports, leaks, blunders, and neocon ideologues. The latter fly especially thick when In the Loop jets over to Cheneyland, aka Washington, D.C., where the younger Brit bureaucrats meet their American counterparts. (Look! There’s Anna Chlumsky, the girl from My Girl way back when.) Steve Coogan has a small supporting role, but the movie is Capaldi’s. “Walk the fucking line!” he barks at a polite, weak, idealistic MP (Tom Hollander), who later asks himself, “Is the really brave thing doing what you don’t believe?” In politics, we learn, you can convince yourself of anything. (R) BRIAN MILLER SIFF Cinema Uptown, $5-$10, Thu., July 11, 7 & 9:15 p.m. MOVIE MONDAYS Fluid, open-ended documentaries that demand more of an audience than foregone assent or fleeting bouts of passive outrage are rare these days, which is what makes Malik Bendjelloul’s Oscar-winning Searching for Sugar Man such a gift. In telling the tale of Sixto Rodriguez, a Mexican-American balladeer from Detroit who cut a couple of tepidly received LPs in the late ‘60s, vanished amid hazy rumors of onstage suicide, and subsequently became an Elvis-sized rock god in South Africa, the Swedish filmmaker sidesteps arthritic VH1-style “where are they now” antics in favor of a more equivocal interrogation of celebrity culture. Bendjelloul interviews pertinent Rodriguez-saga parties in standard rock-doc style, including the hilariously combative former Motown bigwig and Sussex Records (Rodriguez’s label) founder Clarence Avant, as well as the singer-songwriter’s charming, touchingly loyal grown daughters. It’s no huge surprise when Rodriguez himself turns up, still living the same modest existence as before his brush with micro-fame, but it does dispel the impression that Bendjelloul has been punking us. Better still, Rodriguez’s casual disinterest in PR-blitzing his resurrection and apparent contentment with an ordinary working life lets Searching for Sugar Man hold up a mirror to what we’ve come to expect—and cynically refuse to accept—from artists in an age of pervasive, entitled notoriety. Ticket price is your drink price. (R) MARK HOLCOMB The Triple Door, 216 Union St., 8384333, thetripledoor.net, $3, Mondays, 8 p.m. Through Aug. 19. MOVIES AT MAGNUSON PARK SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 23. MUSIC CRAFT: AL GREEN The legendary R&B singer performs an hour-long set in a 1968 studio performance originally broadcast on WNYET’s Soul! series. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 829-7863, nwfilmforum.org, $6-$10, Thu., July 11, 7 p.m. RETRO GAMING MOVIE NIGHTS Geeks will converge to enjoy—or snicker at—Ecstasy of Order: The Tetris Masters (Fri.) and Space Invaders: In Search of Lost Time. (NR) SIFF Cinema Uptown, $5-$10, Fri., July 12, 9 p.m.; Sat., July 13, 9 p.m. V/H/S/2 What, you missed the first horror anthology film? Fear not, there’s a new sequel. Among the half-dozen directors is Gareth Evans, who did a pretty good job with The Raid: Redemption. (NR) Grand Illusion, $5-$8, Fri., July 12, 11 p.m.; Sat., July 13, 11 p.m.

GRAND OPENING JULY 19TH! WE WANT TO BE YOUR NEW FAVORITE MOVIE THEATRE

We Feature

• 

• 

• BEFORE MIDNIGHT Before-ophiles already know

that Celine (Julie Delpy) and Jesse (Ethan Hawke) are now a couple and the parents of twin girls. On vacation in Greece, the Paris-based family is contemplating a move to the U.S., where novelist Jesse’s teen son lives. But Celine has a career back in Paris, and she naturally takes his suggestion as an affront. From the first 10-minute take in the car ride back from the airport, kids snoozing in the rear seats, Before Midnight becomes their on-again/off-again argument about who has to sacrifice what for a relationship, what sexual spark keeps it burning, and how shared romantic history becomes both a burden and a bond. Your tolerance or enthusiasm for the third chapter of Celine and Jesse’s intermittent romance will depend on your feelings about Richard Linklater’s last two talkathons featuring the same duo: 1995’s Before Sunrise and 2004’s Before Sunset. That’s really all the guidance you need: If you cherish the first two movies, as I do, the third installment feels necessary—a midlife tonic for all those foolish old romantic yearnings, a trilogy driven by fallible, relatable characters rather than franchise economics. (R) BRIAN MILLER Sundance Cinemas

SUNDANCE HOSTS 4 NIGHTS OF PRE-OPENING CELEBRATIONS* for Seattle non-profits.

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food&drink»Feature

The Coconut Couple

How a natural disaster birthed a successful Seattle ice-cream business.

BY BETH MAXEY

S

“Durian, especially, is a risk. Some people love it, and some people really hate it,” Pink says. “In Thailand, durian is very valued. People—not rich people—will pay the equivalent of $300 for a whole durian during the season.” But here durian is often stigmatized by its reputation as a smelly fruit. “So I was terrified that someone who doesn’t like durian would only taste one flavor and think, ‘Eeew, Pink makes stinky ice cream.’ ” She smiles. Pink and Dibble decided to put a disclaimer on the label: “Warning: Extremely Pungent. Not for Durian Virgins.” Pink is passionate but practical about trying new flavors. “New flavors require an investment. The cost of time and testing and ingredients and pint cups, getting new labels printed, bar codes made, and nutrition facts done,” Dibble says, “is significant. And we have to look at

“Guests would say, ‘Oh, my God, this is the best coconut ice cream I’ve ever had. Where can I get this?’ And I’d say, ‘From me.’ ”

JOSHUA HUSTON

sourcing, and back up sourcing. When you add all the pennies up, a new flavor can cost as much as $2,000 to develop and secure.”

their International District warehouse. All this time Pink was still working her three waiter jobs, often serving her own ice cream. “Guests would say, ‘Oh, my God, this is the best coconut ice cream I’ve ever had. Where can I get this?’ ” Pink says. “And I’d say, ‘From me.’ ” One morning Pink and Dibble were having coffee at Herkimer in Greenwood, trying to figure out what to do next. On a whim they stopped by nearby Ken’s Market and 2:17 PM approached the manager. He said to bring some samples. By summer, Pink’s Ice Cream

Pink and Dibble test new flavors at local farmers markets.

was available at Ken’s Market and the Fremont Sunday Farmers Market. “Every week we tested new flavors and worked on our packaging and accounting,” Dibble says. By the end of the summer, Pink dropped her traditional “American” ice-cream flavors, like rum raisin, coffee, and chocolate, and focused on the lighter texture and Asian flavors she remembered getting in Thailand as a kid—not just coconut, but mango, toasted black sesame, Thai tea, taro, red bean, and durian, always from whole, fresh fruits.

Supply-chain problems created a business opportunity for Pink, but Pink and Dibble don’t want their business to suffer because they can’t get ingredients, so they source their dairy locally. Some ingredients are trickier, though. ”Once our mangos had an issue with customs, so we had to scramble to find another source.” The couple is currently scoping out more “transparent” sources; specifically, they want to ensure that they’re getting fruits that aren’t GMOs—genetically modified organisms— which is increasingly important to customers. Pink now sells her ice cream at Uwajimaya in Seattle, Renton, and Bellevue; Central Co-op on Capitol Hill; Ken’s Market and HT Oaktree Market in Greenwood; and Viet Wah in Renton and South Beacon Hill. You can also find her at the U District Farmers Market on Saturdays and the Fremont Farmers Market on Sunday, where she tries to test new flavors every two weeks. New this season is Black Sesame. “Way better,” Pink says, “than peanut butter and chocolate.” And based on a Twitter follower’s request, they’re working on a kale ice cream (hmmm . . . ) that Dibble says may include a hint of ginger. E

CMY

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JU LY 10 — 16, 2013

asatorn Ponguranakit was working three different shifts at Thai restaurants in and around Seattle when she noticed a problem: Her restaurants were running out of coconut ice cream. The source of the problem was half a world away. The 2011 monsoon season in Thailand had caused flooding unlike the world had ever seen. According to the World Bank, the 2011 Thai floods were the fourth costliest world disaster in history, after the 2011 and 2005 Japanese earthquakes and Hurricane Katrina. These floods damaged factories and halted the import of Thai coconut ice cream here in Seattle for about seven months. It was during that time that Ponguranakit, who goes by Pink “because it is easier to pronounce,” bought a one-quart Cuisinart home ice-cream maker and began to experiment after work. Pretty soon she had a great product. “The restaurants where I worked started serving my ice cream,” Pink says, “and then word got out in the Thai community.” By January 2012, Pink and her husband Brady Dibble had a business license and were supplying Pink’s Coconut Ice Cream to many Thai restaurants in town. As business picked up, Pink and Dibble rented a commissary kitchen in Ballard. Yet even with the extra freezer space, they quickly realized that they needed some specific equipment: a commercial ice-cream maker that didn’t take 40 minutes per quart, as Pink’s food processor did, and a hardening cabinet, a superfreezer that reaches -30 degrees and hardens the ice cream right after you make it. “The smallest commercial ice-cream maker is six quarts,” Dibble says, “and it costs $10,000.” The couple wasn’t sure six quarts would be enough, though. “But the next biggest model,” Dibble says, “costs $30,000.” They decided six quarts would have to be enough. But shortly after the equipment arrived, they hit a wall. The Thai restaurants Pink was supplying cancelled their orders. Even though the restaurants admitted that Pink’s coconut ice cream was better and even cheaper, King’s Oriental, Seattle’s dominant distributor of Thai food, started carrying coconut ice cream again. It was simpler, Pink’s clients said, to receive all their supplies from one distributor. Suddenly Pink’s Ice Cream had no buyers. “So I thought,” says Dibble, “if the restaurants want to deal with one distributor, then we’ll develop a relationship with the distributor and sell Pink’s Ice Cream that way.” Dibble approached King’s Oriental. They told him to come back in a year, when they’d had a chance BOD_WKLY_Gin_6-4-13.pdf to sell off the entire shipping container1 of 6/4/13 imported coconut ice cream they had sitting in

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food@seattleweekly.com


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As summer sweat descends, Seattle’s ice-cream options mount.

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bistro | wine bar

BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

N

o matter how urbane your lifestyle, with Graham cracker, compressed cherry, and chances are you have a fond, rustic cacao nibs. childhood memory of a family Serious Pie & Biscuit in South Lake Union: ice-cream outing, or of the tell-tale root-beer float. jingle of the ice-cream truck as it drove down Luc in Madison Valley: Bing-cherry crumble your block. In the small rural town I grew up in, with kirsch ice cream, or their staple vanilla ice we’d drive 20 minutes to a tiny shop called Snycream with chocolate sauce. der’s, where we ate our homemade ice cream atop Joule in Wallingford: rhubarb-ginger tart sugar cones at a picnic table in the still-heavy with grains-of-paradise ice cream (grains of evening humidity. There were three flavors— paradise is a West African peppery spice with chocolate, strawberry, vanilla—and a fourth only flavors of cinnamon and cardamom). in summer: peach, Bastille in Ballard: my favorite. I loved pistachio-brittle icealternating between cream-filled pastry licking the smooth with warm chocolate ice cream and bitsauce. ing into the sweet Seattleites are also, chunks of fruit. Ice of course, particularly cream in the sumlucky when it comes mer just feels primal; to handcrafted, Washwhen I watch my ington-made micro5-year-old daughter creamery options at blissfully licking her local groceries and scoop, chocolate farmers markets— ringed around her Blue Bird, Whidbey mouth, I can barely Island, and Half Pint wipe the smile off to name just a few—in my own sticky face. summer-inflected flaJuly is National vors that are anything Ice Cream Month, but vanilla, including and just off the blackberry lavender first summer heat and marionberry. wave, Seattleites are Alternately, invite lining up (despite friends over for a long waits in the make-your-ownevenings) at local sundae party. TimeFront: cherry frozen yogurt, Graham cracker, scoop shops. There honored staples like compressed cherry, cacao nib at Tilth. are plenty of places bananas, peanuts, Background: chocolate hazelnut sorbet with to indulge with new, and chocolate sauce Theo dark chocolate, rhubarb, lavender mint. summer-friendly are crowd-pleasers, flavors—and deals to but if you’re lookboot. ing to elevate the At Molly Moon’s, seasonal favorites like traditional and impress your guests, try some of these toppings: cherry chunk are back; lemon dill sorbet highlights flavor pairings; and cucumber sorbet Hazelnuts from Whatcom County arrived just this week. Fainting Goat Gelato (yes, Holmquist Hazelnut Orchards are available in local farmers markets now. it counts as ice cream) debuted mango habanero this month, as well as Key lime pie. Proprietors Diced dried fruits, like apricots and donut are also excited about their spring-and-summerpeaches, are available at local farmers markets now. only goat’s-milk gelato flavored with mastic, a Chopped cookies, like snickerdoodles from Mediterranean relative of the pistachio. And at Cow Chip Cookies. Cupcake Royale, you can get two scoops for $2 Minced fresh herbs like mint and lemon throughout July. verbena. You don’t have to stand in line to get your fix: Orange or lemon zest; if you don’t have a Now even trendy restaurants are obliging our zester, use the fine side of a Parmesan cheese ice-cream cravings with offerings both simple grinder. and sublime. Check out these six: Crystallized ginger, available at specialty markets like Penzey’s Spices, 117 Pine St. (near Pike Delancey in Ballard: blondie with roastedPlace Market). banana ice cream, roasted peanuts, and Admiral Fresh, seasonal fruit toppings are great, but Tea black salt. (Next week, we’ve been told, they’ll be offering one of two floats: blueberry ice poached fruits pair nicely with ice cream too. cream with ginger beer or buttermilk ice cream Before cherry season winds down, poach some with homemade cherry soda.) Bing, Rainier, or Summit varieties. E Tilth in Wallingford: cherry frozen yogurt nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com


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39


Reverb»Profiles

After the Burn

Shelby Earl is getting used to being a full-time songwriter, and we get to hear about it.

mainstage

dinner & show

BY MARK BAUMGARTEN

WED/JULY 10 & THU/JULY 11 • 7:30PM

the fixx w/ goodbye heart FRI/JULY 12 • 8PM

ian mclagan commander cody SUN/JULY 14 • 8PM - CD RELEASE

kirby krackle w/ the doubleclicks MON/JULY 15 • 8PM

movie mondays: searching for sugar man TUE/JULY 16 • 7:30PM

emily asher’s garden party WED/JULY 17 • 8PM

sister sparrow & the dirty birds

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JULY 10 — 16, 2013

w/ jelly bread

40

next • 7/18 bodeans w/ clarence bucaro • 7/19 debo band w/ gabriel teodros • 7/20 melissa ferrick • 7/21 michael kaeshammer • 7/22 movie mondays: sound city • 7/23 raul midon w/ adam miller • 7/24 fanfare ciocarlia w/ orkestar zirkonium • 7/25 - 27 buckaroos • 7/28 the brian nova all star big band• 7/29 movie mondays almost famous • 7/30 shye ben tzur and the radjasthan gypsies • 7/31 les nubians • 8/1 the songs of neko case • 8/2 heart by heart • 8/5 movie mondays - this is spinal tap • 8/8 cahalen and eli w/ pharis & jason romero • 8/10 jr cadillac • 8/12 movie mondays - the blues brothers • 8/13 david ryan harris • 8/14 jc brooks & the uptown sound • 8/15 patrick foster and the locomotive • 8/16 dudley manlove quartet • 8/17 the big gig...gle

happy hour every day • 7/10 jed skenandore / the warren g. hardings • 7/11 the bayous / matt jorgensen & chamber 3 • 7/12 brownchicken stringband / vunt foom • 7/13 we killed vegas / milk drive • 7/14 vaudeville etiquette • 7/15 monday night jazz w/ the lee redfield quartet • 7/16 singer-songwriter showcase w/ josh hoke, michael shoup and susy sun • 7/17 the littlest birds / run boy run TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE · PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1.5 HOURS PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW · ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

thetripledoor.net

216 UNION STREET, SEATTLE · 206.838.4333

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

SAT/JULY 13 • 8PM

S

helby Earl loves metaphor. And she does not abandon a metaphor easily. More than two years after releasing her debut full-length album, Burn the Boats, the Seattle singer/songwriter continues to reference its title when talking about Swift Arrows, her second release since she decided to strand herself on the shores of full-time musicianhood. In press releases and in person she gestures to the scorched hulls of her escape vessels, reminding us all that this is not a fluke. That she is a songwriter, not a hobbyist with a nice voice and a day job. “I was really in the trenches after putting out Burn the Boats,” she told me recently, sitting in the cool basement of her cozy Eastlake apartment. “Now I’m living this life full-time, but feeling totally alive; never been more broke, never been happier.” Ebullient in person and in concert, Earl admits to being a tad overserious with her songs, acoustic-guitar-based ballads adorned with dramatic instrumental flourishes that drive home the emotion. Again invoking a titular metaphor, she regards the 11 songs in Swift Arrows as poison-tipped messages in the songwriter’s quiver—a powerful means of communication when, as she sings in the title track that opens the album, “Words are not enough.” Earl has a lot to say, even if she is covering some elementary topical ground. Songs about personal transformation reminiscent of her boat-burning metaphor still dominate. “If ever there was a revolutionized heart, it’s mine,” she sings on the emphatic strummer “This Is Me Now.” On “Grown-Up Things,” she questions the serious demeanor demanded by the adult world by embodying that too-heavy demeanor. And in standout “Sea of Glass,” she sings of a tortuous journey, imploring “Let it hurt, just make it last” as an infectious doo-wop sound swings away behind her.

While the lyrical content at times feels stuck in the same mode as her past work, the instrumental arrangements on Swift Arrows prove Earl’s growth as an artist. This was achieved, the artist says, by abandoning the rash approach of her debut and developing a plan before recording. “I chose my team this time first,” Earl says. “The players, the producer, the engineer, the place—I figured all of that out before I put a single note on tape. Last time, I just hurled myself into it. I quit my job and two weeks later I started tracking with just friends and whoever would help.” Burn the Boats was buoyed by Earl’s rich voice and knack for an impactful lyric, as well as by good fortune and the support of some Seattle music heavyweights. Earl began recording alone, but soon earned help, first from Long Winters leader (and Seattle Weekly contributor) John Roderick, who came on as a producer, then from former Visqueen leader Rachel Flotard, whose record label released the album. That was a happy time, one that provided the young songwriter with lots of publicity and a few very strong ballads—in particular “At the Start,” her duet with Roderick. But it was also, Earl says, a pained, drawn-out experience. For Swift Arrows, Earl aimed for creative efficiency, assembling an all-star cast that could quickly build her spare guitar-based ballads into dynamic orchestrations. She invited guitarist Eric Howk (The Lashes), drummer Faustine Hudson (The Maldives), guitarist Ragan Crowe (Shim), and multi-instrumentalist Barry Uhl (David Bazan) to play. As producer, Earl chose fellow singer/songwriter Damien Jurado, whose well-documented experience in the studio with producer Richard Swift endowed him with great confidence in the studio. Jurado transferred that confidence to Earl, who was guilty of overworking the material on her debut, by teaching her to move on. The entire album was completed after one week at Columbia City Theater, each song recorded live, in only a couple takes, with little room to correct mistakes. “There’s still stuff that I can’t stand,” Earl says of some of the flubs, imperceptible to my ears. “Damien had to say ‘Trust me,’ and I was like, ‘OK.’ His reasoning was usually ‘It feels good, it feels the best, and so just trust me.’ ” Overall, Swift Arrows does feel good. Trusting her talents, Earl is growing into a songwriter who, on “The Seer,” for instance, proves capable of complex surrealistic poetry filled with metaphors that are not so simply decoded. More impressive is her ability to go simple, as on “We Will Die,” a song that derives its power from a clear message that happens to contain no metaphor at all. E

mbaumgarten@seattleweekly.com


tractor

Reverb»Reviews

Times listed are show times. Doors open 30-60 minutes before

EVERY LOCAL RELEASE*

Fri, July 12 • 9:30pm ~ $15 brainy synth-pop

Hausu, Total (out now, Hardly Art, hausu.bandcamp.com): “Our band was born between March 1991 and July 1992.” Taken literally, this line from Hausu’s bio is a nod to its members’ youth, but it also describes their sound, an adept and studious recontextualizing of American alternative rock from the late ’80s and early ’90s. On the quartet’s debut record, you can hear traces of Dinosaur Jr.’s fuzzed-out guitar fireworks, Pavement’s jangly slackerisms, and even a bit of Slint’s proto-math rock, all united in a way that doesn’t feel derivative. What you largely won’t hear are hooks, but even if Total’s songs don’t stick, its ragged, fervent urgency will. (Sat., July 13, Sub Pop Jubilee) ANDREW GOSPE

EDITOR’S PICK

Wed, July 17 • 9pm ~ $10 modern acoustic & newgrass

HEAD FOR THE HILLS TBA

Sat, July 20 • 9:30pm ~ $20 one of New Orleans’ most prestigious modern funk ensembles

IVAN NEVILLE’S DUMPSTAPHUNK TBA

Up & coming

Hausu’s Total is out now. The band plays Sub Pop’s Silver Jubilee July 13.

Spyn Reset, Serendipity EP ( July 16, 23 Sounds Records, spynreset.com): This quartet plays instrumental electronica with a heavy dose of jazz. On “Synesthesia,” the band does away with a majority of jazz grooves, and kicks the beat into high gear, creating an electro-dance-rock track with a stellar guitar riff. AP

Eric Apoe and They, Funny World (out now, Soundtrack Boulevard Music, ericapoe.com): There is nothing tight at all about Funny World, which is quite a breath of fresh air. Each song sounds as if it’s on the verge of falling apart, but somehow just manages to stay on course. The track “Creeps” is reminiscent of Leonard Cohen’s moodiest works, while “The Blind Mohel” is charmingly self-effacing. CORBIN REIFF

Sweet Water, Dance Floor Kills (out now, Fin Records, sweetwaterrocks.com): Back with its second release since its 2009 reformation, this grunge band’s EP has more in common stylistically with the music of bands like the Killers or the Strokes than with that of their early-’90s cohorts. Songs like “Birds on a Wire” and “Hey Living” are well-oiled, pop-driven tracks with just the appropriate bit of angst. (Sat., July 13, Ballard Seafood Fest) CR

KELTON SEARS

Wet City Rockers, On My Way ( July 11, selfreleased, wetcityrockers.com): For its second full-length release, the soulful reggae collective offers a collection of feel-good rasta-inspired cuts chock full of vocal harmonies, dreamy guitar, and bluesy melodies. It’s soulful and sunny, and, unexpectedly, homegrown. (Thurs., July 11, Barboza)

• 7/10 The Tractor, Square Peg concerts & Take Warning present THE DAVID MAYFIELD PARADE, KITE REPAIR ep release show, WITHEROW • 7/11 Square Peg concerts presents JOSH ABBOTT BAND, WILLIAM cLARK gREEN • 7/18 ROADKILL gHOST cHOIR, gHOSTS I’VE MET • 7/19 IMAgINE THE gIANT, TOMMY SIMMONS, THE gOOD HURT • 7/22 MONDAY SQUARE DANcE with THE TALLBOYS

5213 BALLARD AVE. NW www.tractortavern.com

ROCKIN’ PIANO SHOW

You name it, We’ll celebrate it! Anniversary Birthday Corporate Event Divorce Engagement Foreclosure Graduation Happy Hour Independence Day Just Because Kicking Back Looking for Fun Marriage Night On the Town

Out of Town guests Parent’s Night Out Quittin’ Time Reunion St. Patrick’s Day Tired of the Usual Scene Valentine’s Day Why Not? Naughty X-Rated party! (Just kidding!) Don’t Wanna Miss Out Zany Fiends

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FRIDAY JUL 19 • SHOWBOX AT THE MARKET

with

KEEGAN PROSSER

Yevtushenko, Patients Zero (out now, selfreleased, yevtushenko.bandcamp.com/album/ patients-zero): Though the members of Yevtushenko have yet to celebrate their first anniversary, they’ve already developed a genre-crossing sound of their own. Amber Shine’s Shirley Manson– esque vocals paired with fuzzy electronics and alt-rock melodies make this, the band’s second release, a great soundtrack for those rowdy latenight hangouts. (Tues., July 16, Tractor) AP

*Yeah, every release

It is our intention to review every release issued by Seattle bands and local labels. We try to run reviews as close to release dates as possible. If your LP, EP, single, or mixtape has slipped through the cracks—or you wish to alert us to an upcoming release—please e-mail reverbreviews@seattleweekly.com.

SHOWBOX AT THE MARKET 1426 1ST AVE | SHOWBOXPRESENTS.COM

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JU LY 10 — 16, 2013

Blackheart Honeymoon, Nothing and Everything Else (out now, self-released, blackhearthoneymoon.bandcamp.com): Members of Lowmen Markos join vocalist/guitarist Ian Prebo and upright bassist Wes Amundsen to create a handful of smooth country songs with a bit of indie rock mixed in. Things end on a touching note as Prebo softly sings over a friend’s voice mail in “Last Song.” (Fri., July 12, West Seattle Summer Fest) AZARIA PODPLESKY

released, kiterepair.bandcamp.com): This is rainy-day folk music at its finest. None of the four tracks are rushed, and occasionally, lead singer Michelle Fellows’ haunting voice takes its sweet time getting from one charming lyric to the next. Just press play and pour yourself another cup of coffee; you’ve got time to spare. (Wed., July 10, Tractor) AP

FEAT. MEMBERS OF THE MAgNETIc FIELDS

LUXURY LINERS

Animals in Cars, Tourist (out now, self-released, animalsincars.bandcamp.com): Kudos to this band for opening its single “Tyco” with a phaser. I wish this record sounded more like the trippy album cover instead of, like, every ’90s band in the world, though. (Fri., July 12, Central Saloon)

Kite Repair, Barometrics EP (out now, self-

FUTURE BIBLE HEROES

41


Reverb»The Short List 1303 NE 45TH ST

Rancid THURSDAY, JUNE 11

Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 652-0444, showboxonline.com. 7:30 p.m. $25 adv./$27.50 DOS. All ages. DAVE LAKE

The Crying Spell

BRIAN KASNYIK

Since Rancid hasn’t released a record since 2009’s Let the Dominoes Fall, it almost seems as if the California punks are hitting the road just so that singer Tim Armstrong can play songs from his new Transplants record in front of bigger crowds, since that band, which also features Travis Barker from Blink-182, is supporting. Rancid does, however, promise a new full-length in late 2013, so tonight you’re likely to hear a handful of new songs scattered among the band’s catalog of gravel-throated two-minute punk blasts, like ’90s radio hits “Ruby Soho” and “Time Bomb” as well as classic material like “Journey to the Center of the East Bay” and our capital’s unofficial anthem, “Olympia WA.” The band also plays Friday night, but that show is sold out. With Noi!se. Eddie Spaghetti

FRIDAY, JULY 12

Formed in 2008 by vocalist Len Hotrum, this five-piece has been generating buzz since releasing its debut album, Through Heaven to Hell, that year. The band has since toured the world, sharing its guitar-heavy alternative-rock sound with fans hungry for ’90s riffs with a pop sensibility. With a history that intersects that of Seattle greats Alice in Chains and Mad Season, as well as extensive road experience, it’s no wonder this group knows how to put on an elaborate live show. Now touring in support of its sophomore release, Disgraceland, The Crying Spell can be expected to pull out all the stops for this hometown show. Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave.,

441-4618. 8 p.m. $10 advance. KEEGAN PROSSER

Deafheaven

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JULY 10 — 16, 2013

FRIDAY, JULY 12

42

With Deafheaven’s latest release, Sunbather, the group has managed to do something pretty monumental: make a black-metal record that’s actually uplifting. The lyrics are still oblique and dark, but, as the record’s unusual pinkish-orange cover suggests, the music sounds like an ascent into the clouds rather than the genre’s typical icy, frostbitten pummeling, as pioneered by legendary Norwegian group Mayhem. Although the album came out only a month ago, reviewers have already started using the phrase “post-Sunbather” in writing about other bands. Ridiculous? Yes. But indicative nonetheless of the impact Deaf-

*

heaven’s unique take on the genre is already having on the community. In a world that has torn bands apart for not being “kvlt” enough, the members of Deafheaven, refreshingly, give zero damns about their metal pedigree. The band members are as up-front about their love of the Smiths as they are about their more classic metal influences. Thus they’re able to craft sounds not beholden to any preconceived notions of genre, instead blazing their own exciting path. With Marriages, Heiress, Nostalgist. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 381-3094. All ages. 7:30 p.m. $10 adv/$12 DOS. KELTON SEARS

Eddie Spaghetti SATURDAY, JULY 13

Eddie Spaghetti likes black T-shirts, cowboy hats, and songs about getting fucked up. When it comes to pulling them off, the Supersuckers frontman has pretty much mastered all of the above in his 25-year career. This month, however, Spaghetti will do something he’s never done before—drop a full-length solo record of alloriginal country-punk tunes, The Value of Nothing. Will the record, and the celebratory show at Chop Suey that trumpets it, stray far from the tongue-in-cheek shtick and beer songs on which Spaghetti has built his name? The chances are slim. And, in truth, who would want anything to change? Spaghetti is what Spaghetti does, and after a quarter-century, he does it pretty damn

Kingdom of the Holy Sun

EDITOR’S PICK

WEDNESDAY, JULY 10

“Psych rock” is enjoying a bit of a moment in town, from Rose Windows’ ascension to the Sub Pop roster to Lesbian’s ever-present psychotropic onslaught (which stretches to include the band members’ other scathing projects, Fungal Abyss and Golgothan Sunrise), Midday Veil’s cerebral synths, and MTNS’ trippy large-scale fuzz. Beneath this more visible cloud of heavy bands, though, are several lower-key outfits like Cabana and Kingdom of the Holy Sun, who trade the earth-shattering progressions of their counterparts for a strangely inviting slow-paced psych seduction. The project of singer/musician Guido Anselmi, KOTHS’s gently writhing rhythms and hushed vocals mirror the band’s sexual imagery, paying heavy sonic tribute to the Doors’ most relaxed moments and Jim Morrison’s bacchic leanings. Although the band’s songwriting has become an intriguing creature all its own (see last year’s Pharmacokinetics), it still provides environments to get lost in rather than songs to sing along to, and a live setting offers an even better opportunity to do just that. With the Triple Sixes, Fire Friend, Warning:Danger!. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005. 8 p.m. $6 adv./$8 DOS. 21 and over. TODD HAMM

well. Prepare your devil horns. With Jason Dod-

son, Dead Man. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison Ave., 324-8005. $10 adv./$12 DOS. 8 p.m. 21 and over. MATT DRISCOLL

Passenger SATURDAY, JULY 13

After folk-rock band Passenger broke up in 2009, the group’s singer/songwriter, Mike Rosenberg, kept the moniker and took to the streets as a solo artist, busking in his native UK, his adopted home of Australia, and everywhere in between, perfecting his casual and intimate performing style. Between, and sometimes during, songs, Rosenberg is quick with jokes and observations about the city where he’s performing. Always encouraging concertgoers to clap and sing along, he breaks down the audience/ performer barrier, making those in attendance feel as if they’re watching a friend perform at a backyard gathering, not a stranger onstage. It’s not an easy feat, but when you’ve performed as often as Rosenberg has, it’s almost secondnature. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave.,

441-4618, thecrocodile.com. SOLD OUT. 8 p.m. All ages. AZARIA PODPLESKY

Weedeater SUNDAY, JULY 14

Good metal punches you in the gut. North Carolina’s Weedeater just kind of skips your gut entirely, though. The band members tune their instruments so low that the riffage jumps down and rumbles your ass. The Southern boys on Southern Lord records are the real deal. Case in point: Bass player/lead vocalist “Dixie” Dave accidentally blew off his big toe while cleaning his favorite shotgun in 2010. The accident pushed back the release of Jason . . . the Dragon, and the following tour was referred to as The Nine-Toe Tour. Dixie’s missing toe luckily didn’t affect the album’s quality. Full of sludgy doom dirges, Jason . . . the Dragon sounds like a mythological beast taking the gnarliest bong rip—probably exactly what Weedeater intended. Tonight’s show will likely occur through a thick green haze. When you go, just please be careful not to get your toe blown off. With ASG, Stone-

burner, Serial Hawk, Crop. The Highline, 210 Broadway E., 328-7837. 8 p.m. $13 adv./$15 DOS. KELTON SEARS


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FRIDAY, JULY 12

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JULY 10 — 16, 2013

DEAFHEAVEN with Marriages (feat. Members of Red

44

Sparowes), Heiress, and Nostalgist Doors at 7:30 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS KGRG Presents:

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KIMBERLY BUTLER

JUKEHOUSE HOUNDS

Future Bible Heroes

Wednesday, July 10

ful for three guys in their 40s. May’s Desperation is the band’s second album since its 2010 reunion. With the Fucking Eagles, Dude York. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $15.

• DARK FEATURES keeps, perhaps intentionally, a low

online profile, the most telling component of which is an Instagram account of abstract images. However, the group does have a full-length album, The Control, of shadowy, post-punk-influenced synth-pop. With RKP, Cra-Z Meta4z, 4n Soundz. Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., 441-5823, jewelboxtheater.com. 9 p.m. FUTUREBIRDS hail from Athens, Ga., a town with a well-documented indie-rock pedigree. On its second album, Baba Yaga, the band’s ramshackle, countrified psych-rock lives up to its city’s reputation. With Diarrhea Planet, Neighbors. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, thebarboza.com. 8 p.m. $10 adv. MASTA X-KID This MC is influenced by old-school hiphop but is also musically voracious; when not rapping, he plays bass in a rock band and fronts a funk ensemble. With Tre Angle, ThriveAlike, Tony Ozier & the Doo Doo Funk All Stars, Elefaders, Landon Wordswell & Tim Hoke. Nectar Lounge, 412 N. 36th St., 632-2020, nectar lounge.com. 7 p.m. $7 adv./$10 DOS.

Thursday, July 11

JOSH ABBOTT BAND Abbott and his Texas-based

five-piece seem primed for mainstream/country crossover; their songs are polished, with big choruses and Abbott’s radio-ready voice. With William Clark Green. Tractor Tavern, 5231 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. 8:30 p.m. $16.50 adv./$20 DOS. ROWE Ashley Rowe’s vocals are unquestionably the centerpiece of this indie-rock four-piece, which sparingly borrows from soul and R&B. With Rachel Gavaletz. Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-7416, thecrocodile. com. 8 p.m. $5 DOS. All ages. VIBE WARRIOR Denver transplant Samuel Glover’s self-produced electro-soul bears few of the hallmarks that “bedroom R&B” typically connotes: It’s smart, cleanly produced, and unabashedly poppy. With Whiting Tennis, Susie Phillipsen. Columbia City Theater, 4918 Rainier Ave. S., 723-0088, columbiacitytheater. com. 8 p.m. $6 adv./$8 DOS.

Friday, July 12

• FUTURE BIBLE HEROES The Magnetic Fields’

Stephin Merritt fronts this group, whose music is far more electronic-leaning than his solo material. The group is touring behind its first album since 2002, Partygoing, as well as remastered versions of its first two albums. With Luxury Liners. Tractor Tavern. 9:30 p.m. $15. MICKEY AVALON With his drawling, stoner-ish flow and laid-back, guitar-heavy beats, it’s not too surprising that Avalon once opened (disastrously, as it happened) for Red Hot Chili Peppers. LOADED, his latest, was released on Kottonmouth Kings–founded label Suburban Noize. Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxonline.com. 7:30 p.m. $17.50 adv./$20 DOS. All ages. OBLIVIANS This Memphis garage-punk trio’s music has a stripped-down urgency that sounds downright youthSend events to music@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended, NC = no charge, AA = all ages.

Saturday, July 13

AUTOPSY Reunited since 2009, this death-metal progeni-

tor is touring and releasing music as brutal as that of its heyday. With Black Breath, Scolex, Bone Sickness. Neumos. 8 p.m. $18 adv. All ages. ECLECTIC APPROACH “Eclectic” is a misnomer for this five-piece, unless you consider Matchbox 20’s discography a bastion of music diversity. The group will release Break the Floor at this show. With Hot Bodies in Motion, Ben Union, James Redfern. Showbox at the Market. 7:30 p.m. $12.50 adv./$15 DOS. All ages. KATCHAFIRE Apparently roots reggae is a bigger deal in New Zealand than in the States: This eight-piece’s recent single, “Sensitive to a Smile,” reached #2 on the charts in its native country. With J. Boog, Hot Rain, Unified Culture. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 652-0444, showboxonline.com. 8:30 p.m. $30 adv./ $35 DOS. All ages.

Sunday, July 14

CESCHI This rapper and guitarist is a co-founder of

hip-hop label Fake Four, home to Seattle artists Onry Ozzborn, Sadistik, and Blue Sky Black Death. With Graves 33, Onry Ozzborn. Nectar Lounge. 8 p.m. $7. LOGAN LYNN is a Portland electro-pop artist whose current tour benefits LGBTQ mental-health services and suicide prevention. With Conquistador, Big Dipper. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, chopsuey. com. 7 p.m. $15. SEAN NELSON AND SHENANDOAH DAVIS This free show from these skilled local songwriters is part of BeatWalk, a Columbia City live-music series now in its 19th year. Columbia City Theater. 7:30 p.m.

Monday, July 15

INFINITE FLUX Stoner metal out of Tacoma, requisitely

droning, sludgy, and heavy. With Mad Mardigan, Special Guests. Comet Tavern, 922 E. Pike St., 322-9272, comettavern.com. 9 p.m. $5. JIMMY EAT WORLD When it charted in 2002, Jimmy Eat World’s “The Middle”—an upbeat rock song with a guitar solo and a craftily catchy chorus—stood out, as little else did, from the morass of nu-grunge that dominated rock radio. The band never quite recaptured that popularity, but it also hasn’t stopped churning out solid power-pop records. With X Ambassadors. Showbox SoDo. 7 p.m. $25 adv./$28 DOS. All ages.

Tuesday, July 16

CALIFORNIA WIVES These Chicagoans are touring

behind September’s Art History, a collection of melodic guitar-rock songs. With My Gold Mask. Barboza. 8 p.m. $10 adv. SHUGO TOKUMARU crafts elaborate, multifaceted songs that draw from both Western and Japanese pop traditions, and, in the vein of Sufjan Stevens, plays all the myriad instruments heard on his records. With Tara Jane O’Neil. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880, sunsettavern.com. 8 p.m. $12.


column»Toke Signals

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here are at least two schools of thought when it comes to naming a medical-marijuana dispensary. The first is to name it something bland, respectable, and medicinal-sounding; the second is to name it something everyone will remember. The shop I visited this week, Oh My Kush, is definitely in the second category. Oh My Kush occupies the location in Lake City formerly used by Green Diamond Depot, which closed around six months ago. I never got to visit Green Diamond, but I liked Oh My Kush, thanks in large part to knowledgeable budtender Leah, who guided me through a menu of $12 top-shelf, $10 medium-shelf, and $7 and $5 bargain-shelf strains. The strain selection isn’t huge at Oh My Kush. In fact, they had only around 10 strains available the day I visited, even counting the bargain shake (that’s where the $5- and $7-a-gram prices come in). But Leah gave me the lowdown on practically everything on the shelves, and mentioned her personal favorites. I selected a $12 indica, Melon Gum; a $10 sativa-dominant hybrid, Blue Dream; and, since I can’t resist a bargain, the $5 Qrazy Train bottom-of-the-jar shake. The Qrazy Train was about what you’d expect jar-bottoms to be: finely crumbled bits of sugar leaves and flowers, reasonably potent, a little harsher smoking than pure buds, and producing a serviceable buzz. That means it’s worth $5 a gram, but if I had paid $10 I wouldn’t have been satisfied.

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The Blue Dream was a solid but unspectacular expression of that strain, whose popularity is based on the fact that it’s an 80 percent sativa that offers effective pain relief like an indica strain, but without the debilitating couch-lock or sleepiness associated with many indicas. The rather loose trim had left on plenty of sugar leaves, which doesn’t particularly bother me, but does seem to be an issue for some patients (I personally think we get a more medicinal mix of cannabinoids from a looser trim). And then there was the topshelf Melon Gum, a pleasantly fruity, enjoyably loopy indica that was the only one of the three strains with a pronounced “Heeey, that’s some good stuff !” factor, about four tokes in. Effective pain and nausea relief coupled with stress reduction and a softly comforting, pillowy high make Melon Gum worth $12 a gram—and I speak as a guy who normally doesn’t like to pay more than $10. Parking can be a challenge in the area just off Lake City Way where Oh My Kush is located; street construction was greatly complicating matters on the day I visited. The check-in process is quick, efficient, and painless, and new patients get a free gram of flowers of their choice. Oh My Kush, in addition to cannabis flowers, also has a small selection of concentrates (hash and oil), medibles, and sodas. They even have a couple of brands of rolling papers, which just may save you a stop at the Mini-Mart on the way home. E Steve Elliott edits Toke Signals, tokesignals.com, an irreverent, independent blog of cannabis news, views, and information.

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EVENT S

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REASON #53

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47


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Who is Eligible f

Men and women, ages 20-45, non-smokers

f

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f

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f Take study capsules f Blood draws, stool and urine

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Seattle Weekly, July 10, 2013  

July 10, 2013 edition of the Seattle Weekly