Page 1

BORDER PATROL EXPLORERS

MUSIC IN THE PARK

GRADUATE

Ruby Rust to perform at Tonasket’s History Park, Friday at 6 p.m. See page A7.

See Page A9

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Oroville adopts changes to Critical Areas ordinance

RODEO BY DAY, FIREWORKS BY NIGHT

BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – After several public hearings and nearly two years of interim ordinances, the Oroville City Council adopted the changes to the Critical Areas Ordinance at their Tuesday, July 2 meeting. “At the last council meeting I proposed changes to lessen the impact of the prohibitions in the floodplain as long as they have at least 5000 square feet to include in upland property or to designate as open space,” said Chris Branch, director of community development. Councilman Jon Neal expressed concern about 100 foot setbacks in the riparian areas and said it looked like there was an additional buffer of 25 feet on top of that. “Did I read that right?” asked Neal. Branch said that 25 feet of riparian area was required, but not 100 feet from the ordinary high water mark, only 50 feet. Following these few questions about setbacks in the riparian area Councilman Ed Naillon made the motion to adopt a

resolution making the changes, including making a change to reflect a lesser setback requirement. The motion was seconded by Councilman Tony Koepke and passed unanimously. Rod Noel, superintendent of Public Works, updated the council on mosquito spraying for this year. “I received a call from the Public Works director of Omak last Friday afternoon and he said they are not going to spray as they neglected to get a spray permit for the Tribal side of the river. That pretty well prices us out of the market. We wouldn’t be able to get the acres required to get the copter guys at a price we could afford.” Police Chief Clay Warnstaff asked the council if they had seen that the school district had cut down the trees along the elementary school. “Those trees were city heirlooms,” said Warnstaff, asking if that was city or school property. “Part of the sidewalk ordinance says that all trees within the city right of way are property of the city, like the

SEE OROVILLE | PG A4

Agreement resolves Buckhorn Mine water quality penalties

The northern reaches of the county were hopping on July 4, with the Chesaw Rodeo filling up most of the daylight hours while Fireworks lit up Lake Osoyoos later that night. Above, Kaylee Bobadilla successfully roped a calf to win the Junior Calf Roping. For more photos, see page A3. Right, the Grand Finale of the Oroville Community Fireworks Show lights up the night at Deep Bay Park.

OHA still intends to sue, Crown vows to defend itself “vigorously” BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

YAKIMA – Crown Resources Corp. has entered into an agreement with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) to settle a penalty issued last year for water quality violations at the Buckhorn gold mine near Chesaw. On July 16, 2012, Ecology assessed a $395,000 penalty to Crown when the operation’s water treatment systems failed to adequately capture and treat mine water during the 2011 and 2012 spring seasons, resulting in permit violations. Also in 2011, Ecology determined that discharges of treated mine water created slope instability and triggered a

Photos by Brent Baker and Gary DeVon

landslide that impacted a small stream below the mine. As part of the settlement, Crown will pay $80,000, a portion of the penalty and will undertake environmental projects worth $180,000 in the local area of the mine. The projects will be approved by Ecology and completed within the next three years. Crown agreed to the process and schedule for issuing a new wastewater discharge permit that will contain more stringent limits for groundwater and treated wastewater discharged from the mine. A schedule of compliance and interim limits will allow Crown to bring the Buckhorn Site into compliance with the new limits in a timely manner. The new permit is scheduled to be issued on Nov. 1, 2013. Crown also agreed to reimburse Ecology for the costs of dedicating one full-time and one part-time employee

SEE MINE | PG A2

Jack was here Black and family kick back in valley, highlands BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Jack Black’s Tonasket-area connections are not a secret. Nor was his vacation here last week as the well known actor/ musician and his family didn’t exactly hunker down and hide during his visit. Black, his wife Tanya and young sons Sammy and Tommy, while visiting dad and stepmom Tom and Linda Black, took in plenty of the area, from buying fireworks at the stand in the TVBRC parking lot, fishing, causing a bit of a stir while grocery shopping at Grant’s and consuming a pizza with his

family (and a reporter) at the Tonasket Pizza Company. “I’ve been here quite a few times,” he said. “Even before my dad moved back here, we had lots of family here. My grandma, Gladys Black, lived here. The Fanchers are all my aunts and uncles and cousins. “This is my third time with the boys. The first time Sammy was just a baby. The second time it was just me and Tommy. But this is the first time with both my boys (at once). It’s a great town and we always have a great time when we visit here. Plus, there’s less traffic here than in L.A.” While Jack and Tom enjoyed a fishing trip on July 4, the rest of the family took in the Chesaw Rodeo, though to their regret, the boys didn’t enter the chicken chase. “When Sammy found out he could have kept a chicken he was a little upset,” his dad said. “I told him I didn’t think they’d like it on

the plane.” The boys were also treated to a tour of the inner workings of the local ambulance by the Tonasket EMS, which, as it turned out, found they were dealing with a five-year-old locked in a braineating zombie trance. “So we go on the ambulance, and they let us turn on the sirens and they took turns getting on the gurney and getting carried out of the ambulance,” Black said. “Then Tommy looked like he lost consciousness. But when he woke up he wasn’t Tommy any more, he was the Living Dead. “We all ran. He wanted to eat our brains. “It was amazing, one of the highlights of the visit.” Black himself is not working on any zombie movies. Most of his time and energy is currently feeding Tenacious D, the comedy

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

CONTACT US

Volume 109 No. 28

SEE BLACK | PG A4

Brent Baker/staff photo

Jack Black takes a stuffed crust pizza (of sorts) for a spin at the Tonasket Pizza Company. The actor/rock comedian and has family visited relatives in the area last week.

Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

INSIDE THIS EDITION Chesaw Rodeo A3 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Business Directory A7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Valley Life A9

Real Estate Cops & Courts Obituaries

A9 A10 A10


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JULY 11, 2013

Full slate of events next weekend

GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY

By Gary A. DeVon

Managing Editor

Submitted photo

Neil and Janie Helberg will celebrate their 50th Anniversary with a front porch social at 347 E. Third St. on July 20, 2013 at 1 p.m.

Trees at school got ‘axed’ for parking Planting new trees at elementary and high schools By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE – Despite the uproar, Oroville School Superintendent Steve Quick said there was a need to cut down nearly a dozen trees at Oroville Elementary – making room for parking. “One of the big reasons for their removal was complaints about lack of parking,” Quick said. “I hear there have been several comments on Facebook about the trees being cut down. I suppose that doesn’t count the earlier com-

ments on Facebook about there being not enough parking.” Several parking spaces were lost when the school instituted a pick-up and drop-off zone at the elementary, partly in response to safety concerns brought up by the Oroville PTO. Quick said the trees were also starting to lift the sidewalk in some areas and added that their removal will aid the district in snow removal. “It has been harder in the past to clear the entire area of snow,” said Quick The superintendent responded by phone while on his way to Utah for a vacation, too late to make last week’s newspaper deadline. He was unable to say whether the trees were on school property or part of the city right of way, but felt that the district, which had

always been responsible for the trees, like the adjacent sidewalks, had the right to cut them down. “We plan on replanting several trees inside the fence at the elementary, as well as several at the high school where we cut down some trees last year,” Quick said. Cut down were nine old maple trees and two locusts trees that lined the east side of the elementary school along Main Street. Most of the comments on Facebook last week concerned the beauty of the trees, many of them suspected to be over 100-years-old, as well as the shade they provided the primary end playground. “When we plant new trees and replace some of the playground equipment and bring up the play area to the new standards, it’s going to look sharp,” said the superintendent.

State budget passed but questions remain By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The state legislature, after months of negotiations, finally approved its budget at the end of June. With it comes $1 billion in new funding for education in an attempt to meet the requirements of the landmark school-funding lawsuit known as the McCleary case, which ruled that education funding must increase by $3-4 billion by 2018. How the funding increase will play out for the Tonasket School District is still in question, said superintendent Paul Turner. The funding increase is real, he said, but specifics are still few. “The analysts still need to go through it all and let us know what it all means,” he said. “(Business manager) Debbie Kitterman is waiting (for information) but will be hitting the

(Tonasket) budget hard starting Monday. But we still haven’t heard anything on the ‘pivot table,’ which is what we get that tells us how the money will roll out. “So we’re still waiting to see what it really means for us.” He said that, though it hasn’t been confirmed, that the 1.9 percent salary cut that teachers took two years ago may be eliminated. “That’s what we’re hearing,” he said. “We’re 99 percent sure, and if it’s true that would be good. Overall we’re hoping to get at least to take out some of the anxiety.” The district’s budget hearing will be at its next school board meeting on Monday, July 29, beginning at 7:00 p.m.

STEM Turner said that a team of five, including himself, attended stra-

Correction

At the North Country Car Club’s 24th Annual Car Show, Devon Sementilli’s 2001 Firebird Trans Am was the winner of the Best Upholstery Specialty Trophy. His name was misspelled in our June 20 edition.

WANT THE FACTS?

tegic planning session aimed at moving the STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) initiative forward. “We got to visit Boeing and sat with some of the people who work there in a panel discussion,” he said. “It became very obvious, both from Boeing and our own institute, that STEM fields are very, very important for kids. But just as important are the ‘soft skills’ - being able to work collaboratively, or just being able to get to work on time, things like that.” He said that there will be a similar gathering in August to do more planning. “The week was good,” he said, “and we’ll be working to move that forward.”

NORTH COUNTY – There are several events planned for the July 19-21 weekend, with Heritage Days in Oroville, a Tractor Pull in Tonasket and Sock Hop in Wauconda. Oroville Heritage Days Heritage Days starts on Friday, July 19, with a softball tournament at Bud Clark ballfields starting at 7 p.m. Later that evening The Valley Band, with Chuck Oakes, Brock Hires and more, playing at Vicki’s Backdoor Club. On Saturday, starting at 7 a.m. and going to 10 a.m. there is a breakfast served by the local Boy Scout Troop at the Oroville Senior Center. From 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. there is an escorted tour of the Similkameen Trail starting from the trailhead in Oroville on Kernan Road and going to Taber’s Vineyard at the old railroad bridge. The softball tournament continues at Bud Clark Ballfields beginning at 9 a.m. Also at 9 a.m. the Farmers’ Market will also be open at the library and the Vintage Tractor

Show will be going by Prince’s Warehouse on Ironwood St. Then there are several events taking place starting at 10 a.m. including a gold panning demonstration provided by Kinross Gold Company at Madeline Wells Park from 10 a.m. to noon. Many of the events will be taking place on the veranda at the Old Oroville Depot, these include a spinning demonstration by Betty Roberts, who handcrafts her own spinning wheels. The Oroville Garden Club will have their annual sale starting at 10 a.m. as well. Still on the veranda, and starting at 11 a.m., the Senior Citizens are serving fresh pie and the historical society is serving homemade ice cream. There is also fresh popcorn from a 1940s popcorn machine. The 1884 Customs Cabin will be open from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Then at noon, a historical walk/ talk will feature Curtis/Greg photos of the local area from the early 1916-1918. It will start at the public library.

Tonasket Tractor Pull The Fourth Annual Tonasket Comancheros Truck and Tractor

Wauconda Sock Hop “Let’s Twist Again, Like We Did Last Summer!” invite the organizers of the Wauconda Sock Hop. Re-live the fabulous ‘50s as they Rock Around the Clock at the Historic Wauconda Community Hall on Saturday, July 20. The Car Show will run from noon until 5 p.m. followed by the Sock Hop from 6 p.m. until 11 p.m. Organizers promise refeshments and prizes! Come as you are or dress for the 50’s! Bring your steady Guy or Gal. Bring the neighbors, Bring the Kids and Grandma and Grandpa too. Admission is by donation at the door. Call (509) 486-0709 for more information.

“During the course of the investigation, which began in 2011 at the La Espiga De Oro store on First Ave. in Okanogan, the Task Force purchased over $18,000 worth of cocaine from the suspects. Also during the two year period Task Force Detectives purchased or seized over two and a half pounds of cocaine and one pound of marijuana,” said Sheriff Frank Rogers Sheriff and USBP Drug K9 units were also involved in the searches. All three warrants were executed at the same time, one at the store in Okanogan, another at Trailer #13 at the M Bar J Trailer Court in Malott and at 2 S. Elm Street in Omak, the owner of the store’s residence.

“The result of those warrants included weapons, a substantial amount of cash, approximately three quarters of a pound of heroin, over a pound of cocaine and a pound and a half of methamphetamine,” said Rogers. “Several vehicles were also seized from the various locations.” The suspects were booked into the county jail, charged with crimes ranging from identity theft, delivery of a controlled substance-cocaine, possession of a controlled substance with the intent to deliver, heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine, money laundering and the delivery of a controlled substance within 1,000 of school property, according to Rogers.

On June 11, the Okanogan Highlands Alliance notified Crown Resources, a subsidiary of Kinross Gold Corporation, that it would be submitting a “Notice of Intent to Sue” letter to Crown. This letter is a prerequisite to the filing of a citizen suit under the Federal Clean Water Act. After Ecology’s recent announcement about the penalties, OHA, a watchdog group released a statement through their director, David Kliegman, saying the agency’s actions are a step in the right direction, but don’t go far enough. “Ecology’s negotiated penalty agreement provides a better way to compensate for the Buckhorn Mine’s water quality violations then straight payment to the Washington State coffers,” said Kliegman. “However, the penalties only covered a portion of the mine’s permit violations and more vigorous enforcement is needed. OHA still plans to file a citizen lawsuit for permit violations, which go beyond the water quality violations that Ecology’s penalty covered.”  After they were informed of OHA’s intent to sue in June, Crown released this statement: “We are deeply disappointed that the OHA decided to pursue this unnecessary legal action, as we continue to work extensively with the Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE)

to address water quality concerns at the Buckhorn Mine. With the WDOE’s knowledge and oversight, Crown has implemented significant on-the-ground measures aimed at ensuring ongoing permit compliance, including modifying its water treatment plant, increasing treatment capacity, adding “capture” wells, implementing a variety of source control measures, and undertaking a number of additional activities to ensure future permit compliance.” The statement continues, “Kinross is strongly committed to the ongoing protection of water quality at Buckhorn and will continue to work with the WDOE to ensure that water quality is protected in the vicinity of the Buckhorn Mine. Crown’s operations have not resulted in harm to human health or the environment and we will vigorously defend against any lawsuit filed by the Okanogan Highlands Alliance.”

Drug case leads to arrests The Gazette-Tribune

OKANOGAN – Simultaneous search warrants were served at a store in Okanogan and residences in Malott and Omak ending a two year drug investigation that led to several arrests The warrants were served by law enforcement from NCW Narcotics Task Force, the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Office, USBP and DEA. Three subjects were taken into custody: Marcelino Corrales, 47, of Omak, who is a part owner of the La Espiga De Oro Store. Also arrested were Alberto MontejanoRangel, 32, of Okanogan and Rodrigo Taizan-Rodriguez, 26, of Bridgeport.

MINE | FROM A1 to oversee the ongoing permitting and compliance efforts at the Buckhorn Mine over a three-year period. “We believe this settlement with Crown, along with a new, more stringent permit, provides us the best path to assure that the Buckhorn Mine protects surface and groundwater from contamination while the mine continues to operate,” said Charlie McKinney, Ecology’s water quality manager in Yakima, who oversees the permit. According to Mark Ioli, Vice President and General Manager of Crown Resources, the company has also agreed to implement a variety of source control measures such as the installation of liner material beneath overburden piles and the like to minimize infiltration. Other measures focused on eliminating compliance concerns will also be taken like additional wells, stormwater cutoff trenches, etc., he adds. “We are pleased that we are able to resolve the appeal and look forward to continuing to work closely with the WDOE to ensure ongoing environmental compliance at the Buckhorn mine,” said Ioli. “We are strongly committed to the protection of water quality and working with regulatory authorities to maintain the highest environmental standards at Buckhorn.”

Out On The Town

your guide to

Dining

&

Entertainment

At the

MOVIES

Oliver Theatre

Reg. Showtimes: Sun.-Mon.-Tue.Thur. 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7&9pm

NOW YOU SEE ME

Oliver, B.C.

250-498-2277

WED. - THURS - FRI. PG13 JULY 10-11-12. 7 & 9:15 PM

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY

SAT. - SUN. - MON. - TUES. - WED. - THURS. - FRI. JULY 13, 14, 15,16, 17,18,19 SHOWTIMES:7 & 9 PM

WORLD WAR Z - SAT.SUN, MON, TUES. JULY 20,21,22,23. SHOWTIMES:7 & 9 PM THIS IS THE END - WED. - THURS.FRI. JULY 24, 25,26. SHOWTIMES:7 & 9:10 NIGHTLY

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

DESPICABLE ME 2

98 min

PG

ANIMATION/COMEDY STARRING STEVE CARELL, KRISTEN WIIG, MIRANDA COSGROVE, KEN JEONG

The Okanogan County PUD No. 1 will be holding three public meetings to present the results of the 2013 Equity Management Plan and Cost of Service Study. These studies are the primary tools used to analyze the ongoing financial strength of the District and to determine appropriate rate schedules.

Fri. 6:45 & 9:30 Sat.*4:15, 6:45 & 9:30. Sun. *4:15, 6:45, 9:30. WKDAYS: 6:45 LATE SHOWS: 9:30

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB

If you are interested in learning more, meetings will be held: Monday, July 15, 2013 l 6:30 p.m. Tonasket High School Commons 35 Highway 20, Tonasket

starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Tuesday, July 16, 2013 l 6:30 p.m. Columbia Cove Community Center Meeting Room 601 W. Cliff Ave, Brewster

Steak Night

Monday, July 22, 2013 l 6:30 p.m. Okanogan County PUD No. 1 Auditorium 1331 2nd Avenue North, Okanogan

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Okanogan County PUD No. 1 “Public Power at Work” www.okanoganpud.org

Pull takes place on Saturday, July 20 at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds. And, according to the Moonlighers Pulling Team out of Spokane, on Friday, July 19 you can test pull for $20. For the actual pulling competition on Saturday there is a $25 hook up fee during the popular show which starts at 6 p.m.

(8 oz top sirloin)

Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at 509-476-3602

EVERY WEEK

THE HEAT ACTION/COMEDY/ CRIME.

R

STARRING SANDRA BULLOCK, MELISSA MCCARTHY, DEMIAN BICHIR, MARLON WAYANS 117min Fri: 6:45, 9:45 Sat: *3:45,6:45, 9:45 Sun:*3:45, 6:45, 9:45. Mon, Tues: 6:45, 9:45

THE LONE RANGER

ACTION/ADVENTURE/ WESTERN STARRING JOHNNY DEPP, ARMIE HAMMER, 149min PG13 HELENA BONHAM CARTER, WILLIAM FICHTNER Fri: 6:30, 9:45. Sat:*3:00,6:30,

9:45 Sun:*3:00, 6:30, 9:45 Wkdys: 6:30, 9:45

PACIFIC RIM STARTS FRIDAY

PG13

131min

PG

96min

ACTION/ADVENTURE/SCI-FI STARRING CHARLIE HUNNAM, RINKO KIKUCHI, RON PERLMAN, CHARLIE DAY. Fri:6:45, 9:45 Sat.: *3:30, 6:45, 9:45 Sun: 3:30, 6:45, 9:45 Wkdys: 6:45, 9:45

TURBO STARTS WED. 7/17

ANIMATION STARRING RYAN REYNOLDS, PAUL GIAMATTI, MAYA RUDOLPH, MICHELLE RODRIGUEZ. WKDAYS: 7&9:30 SAT. 3:45, 7&9:30 SUN. 3:45, 7&9:30 Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo WKDAYS 7:00 ID required. 9:30


JULY 11, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

Okanogan Valley Life CHESAW 4th OF JULY RODEO

2013 Chesaw 4th of July Rodeo Results

Above left, the Chesaw Rodeo provided plenty of thrills for cowboys young and old, including these three who look to be itching for action. Above right, Austin Olma is in hot pursuit during the Calf Roping compeition. Far right, Chase Nigg hangs on for a second place finish in Senior Cow Riding. Near right, Levi Brotherton crashes through the fence and into the crowd as his bronc had no intention of letting him go peacefully. Brotherton, who along with a spectator was injured, apologized to the crowd for his use of profanity during the incident.

Senior Roping 1st - Brad Rothrock, Tonasket 2nd - Chance Stucker, Tonasket Bareback None Saddlebronc 1st - Levi Brotherton, Brewster 2nd - Eric McKinney, Tonasket Ranch Style Saddlebronc 1st - Eric McKinney, Tonasket 2nd - Chase Nigg, Oroville Senior Cow Riding 1st - Alex McCraigie, Nespelem 2nd - Chase Nigg, Oroville 3rd - Justin Gentemann, Omak 4th (tie) - Dakota Crape, Kettle Falls 4th (tie) - Talon Kartchner, Republic 4th (tie) - Eric McKinney, Tonasket Wild Cow Milking 1st - Jake Nelson and Ryan Hanson 2nd - Stewart Leslie and Lyndsy Nelson 3rd - Cesar Bobadilla and T.J. Symonds 4th - Doc Walker and Bronson Peterson Open Barrels 1st - Brittany Jewett, Chesaw, 14.58 2nd - Darci Zolman, Chewelah, 15.54 3rd - Oly Burnett, Chewelah, 15.69 4th - Bailey Burnett, Chewelah, 15.70 Senior All-Around Tie - Eric McKinney and Chase Nigg Junior Calf Roping 1st - Kaylee Bobadilla, Tonasket Junior Barrels 1st (tie) - Sammie Walimaki, Chesaw, 15.44 1st (tie) - Jodi Nelson, Chesaw, 15.44 3rd - Joy Abrahamson, Omak, 16.85 4th - Emily Sulgrove, Valley, 17.76 Junior Cow Riding 1st - Dustin Nigg, Oroville 2nd - Wyatt Pershing, Tonasket Junior All-Around Joy Abrahamson Pee Wee Barrels 1st - Hannah Beeman, Moses Lake, 15.93 2nd - Brier Selvidge, Malott, 17.18 3rd - Stanten Pearce, Monse, 23.79

Join our aerospace community!

Clockwise from above: The Stars and Stripes fly during the national anthem; Grand Marshal Dean Brazle waves to the crowd as he rides into the arena; Calf Roping and the Chicken Chase provided plenty of opportunity for younger competitors to get a rough-and-tumble taste of the 71st annual Chesaw 4th of July Rodeo.

There are openings in the Aircraft Maintenance Technology Program at Big Bend Community College in Moses Lake. Dorms are available. Classes lead to FAA certifications. Job opportunities are right down the ramp. Classes start Sept. 23 For information: Phone: 509-793-2376 • E-mail: rebeccam@bigbend.edu

Big Bend

Photos by Gary DeVon and Brent Baker

312 S. Whitcomb

COMMUNITY COLLEGE

509-486-0615

BRIGHT, SPARKLY, TWINKLY

RHINESTONES! From Rings to Tiaras Something for Everybody!

AUGUST 2, 3 & 4 GREYHOUND PARK EVENT CENTER

IDAHO I-90 Exit 2 - WASHINGTON/IDAHO STATE LINE

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTER VISIT

w w w. n w t r u ck s h ow. c o m SPONSORED BY:

July 27 & 28, 10AM-5PM

Festival Events Include: Falconing Display ♦ Chalk Art Competition ♦ Local Farmers Face Painting ♦ 4H & Equestrian Arena ♦ Fabulous Music Lineup ♦ Handmade Arts & Crafts ♦ Wood Carvers ♦ Local Artisan Food & Farm Products Pie Eating Contests ♦ Farm & Garden Tours ♦ Children’s Activities Antique Cars ♦ Farm Trucks ♦ Wine & Beer Garden

www.greenbankfarm.com


Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JULY 11, 2013

Ellen Roberts celebrates 103 years By Joyce Emry

Correspondent

It has been three years since a great celebration, honoring Ellen Roberts on her 100th birthday, was held at the Oroville United Methodist Church, where Ellen is a member and, attended regularly, since 1935, until the closure of the Assisted Living complex, Tonasket. The new residence she lives in is farther away and church begins at an earlier hour, all of which make it impossible for her to attend, which she thoroughly misses. On July 8th she reached the 103rd anniversary of her birth, which occurred in Nebraska. Ellen and her husband, Lester Roberts, came to Washington State as newlyweds, during the depression and “dust bowl” of Nebraska, as it was thought the apple industry, which was getting started, might be a better means of making a living. The young couple traveled with the Lloyd Emry’s (Lester’s sister was Merna Emry) and they settled in the Oroville area, where Lester worked in the orchards and eventually bought his own, which he successfully operated and was tragically killed in an accident on the farm, leaving Ellen, a widow, with their three children, Gene, Gary and Dorothy. Since she had been a teacher in Nebraska she went to Eastern University, got her credentials updated and taught fifth grade, until she reached retirement age, teaching many who are still in the area, including our daughter Vicki Haney and another niece, Luanne (Emry) Billings. They had a difficult time remember-

Submitted photo

Ellen Roberts celebrated her 103rd birthday on Monday, July 8. ing to call her Mrs. Roberts, as she had always been Aunt Ellen to them. Ellen was and is, an avid reader, but dimming eyesight has made her cut back somewhat, but if the print is large enough she still enjoys a good book. And she has a great vocabulary, and keeps her hands busy with crossword puzzles. Ellen had the opportunity to do extensive traveling with fellow teachers, after retirement, which she thoroughly enjoyed. She gracefully moved into assisted living, after giving up her apartment and it was with sadness she had to make yet another move, with the closure of her “home” in Tonasket, to a family owned and operated facility, “The Golden Years,” located at 48 Hubbard Road, Riverside, WA

98849. She enjoys company, but it was her idea to not do the “party thing” but invites you to stop by, as you come or go from Omak. I have known Ellen for over 65 years and learned so much from her, in so many areas. She was and is a joy to be around. Her pleasant attitude, her faith, her knowledge, her friendliness, make her a lady to pattern your life after. She is my husband’s only aunt, but I claim her too. We love her a lot, and just love the way she points her index finger at you when she wants to make a point. We call it the “schoolteacher point.” We think she is an exceptional lady and wish her a Happy 103rd Birthday and good days to follow.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Work has begun to bury water pipe to connect Champerty Shores with the Oroville water system. The homes will eventually connect to the Eastlake Sewer system as well.

OROVILLE | FROM A1 sidewalk. The adjacent property owner is responsible for taking care of them, like pruning. I’m not sure that would include chopping them down,” said Branch. “Those were healthy maple trees,” added Noel. Warnstaff suggested that the city inventory other trees within the right of way and look at ways to preserve them. The council was also informed of the final copy of an easement from the state Department of Natural Resources that will allow a water line connection between the city water system and Champerty Shores. The new connections will serve over a dozen homes on the east side of Lake Osoyoos, just south of the Canadian border.

k n i h T ! n e e Gr

Brent Baker/staff photo

Jack Black and the family enjoyed some vacation time in the Okanogan Valley last week. Pictured are (front, l-r) Sammy, Tommy (back) Linda, Tanya, Jack and Tom Black.

BLACK | FROM A1 rock duo featuring himself and Kyle Gass. “I can’t tell you too much about it because I don’t want to give away too many secrets,” Black said. “But me and Kyle have... a series of internet short films we’ve been working on. It’s not zombies, but it’ll take place in a post-apocalyptic landscape. “There might be some toxic creatures involved.” Black said in the current economy, Tenacious D is a more surefire bet than filmmaking. “When we book a tour, we know it’s going to happen,” he said. This fall and winter, Tenacious D will be playing in Germany, England and other European countries, as well as a music comedy festival in Santa Monica, Calif. “That one’s called the Festival Supreme,” he said. “Check it out: festivalsupreme.com.” Black said he has a couple of movies that he is trying to develop: one based on a book called “The Financial Lives of Poets,” by Spokane author Jess Walter, and another with Mike White, who wrote Jack Black fan-favorite “School of Rock.” “Nowadays, things have slowed down,” he said. “So I don’t believe any of them are going to happen until they actually start filming, or until someone gives you $5 million or however much it costs

to make them.” While Black said he isn’t trying to push his boys toward replicating his career, he and Tanya (a cellist and vocalist) have naturally exposed them to the arts. “We’ll just see what their interests pull them towards,” he said. “Try to limit the iPad time. I’m not sure what kind of career there is in the iPad field. We already encourage the music, dance and theatrics. They like it and we do it with them. It’s what we know. “They’ll probably rebel and go into engineering or God knows what. But I hope they go into the arts so we have something to talk about, because I don’t know anything else.” Black, of course, is known to the Tonasket schools for his generosity in donating Disneyland passes to the entire Tonasket High School band in 2011 when it traveled there to perform and take part in a music clinic. But one of his long-term commitments has been to the United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation. “I got involved because we thought we had a family member who had mitochondrial disease,” Black said. “It turned out that person did not, but I’d already become involved. I couldn’t bail out on a good cause and the good people involved, you know? So whenever they call up and ask if I

could so something, I do my best to oblige. “I was just at a big convention for that, met a lot of the doctors. There’s a lot of support building for that organization. They say that it’s connected to a lot of other diseases. If they ever figure it out, it will have a huge domino effect to other related things, wide-ranging from autism to all kinds of things, though I’m not smart enough to talk about what they all are.” As the Black family was headed back to Los Angeles, they hoped to swing by Quill Hyde’s “A Cavallo” mobile carousel, as it is a truly unique piece of Tonasket art. “Were really impressed with the arts community here in Tonasket,” Black said. “There’s a whole subculture of stuff going on. I met Quill and he couldn’t have been less interested in me or my famousness. So I was immediately intrigued. I found out he was a really cool artist and found out he went every year to Burning Man (the art event/ community that appears annually in the Nevada desert, for which A Cavallo was originally built). “That’s another movie I’m trying to develop, one about Burning Man,” Black added. “I’ve never been to that. So now when I meet someone who’s been there, I’m interested.”

By Gary A. DeVon

Sheriff ’s Office after locating him. Herriman went missing in the river on on June 23 near Dunckel Trailer Courts off Omak Riverside Eastside Rd., approximately seven miles north of where his body was discovered. According to the Sheriff, it appeared that Herriman, 25 and Jeremiah V. Tachell, 22, of Omak went into the river near the trailer court. “Tachell was pulled to a log jam and was able to pull himself up onto the logs but Herriman was last seen swimming south

down the river,” Rogers said. “Search and Rescue was called to the area and searched until dark with searchers and divers but were unable to locate any sign of Herriman.”The search of the river continued the next morning, but the river was running high, very muddy and cold and faster than normal. “Divers (could not) see anything underwater, everything was being done by feel,” said Rogers, who added that the Colville Tribe assisted in the search of the river with their boats.

Drowning victim found Managing Editor

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Several residences just south of the Canadian border and on the east side of Lake Osoyoos will be connected to the city water system following the approval of an easement from the state Department of Natural Resources for the pipe to cross DNR land.

OKANOGAN – The body of an Omak man missing nearly two weeks and believed drowned in the Okanogan River, was discovered about a quarter mile from the Legion Park in Okanogan. The discovery of Roy G. Herriman, 25, was made on Saturday, July 7 around 3 p.m. by attorney Rodney Reinbold who was out on a small island with his dog, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. Reinbold notified the

Did you know?

e Community Fireworks.. l l i v o r . O

We use... Soy Ink

Recycled Paper Excess paper recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

U.S. armed Forces Legacy Park Book may be purchased from Terry Mills, $7060 for 46 high quality pages of dedication ceremony, ground breaking and work in progress at the Legacy Park. Photos taken by Terry Mills and Brent Baker Call 509-486-2359

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Would like to thank the following people for their help putting on our final fireworks display. Greg James, Topic Entertainment, Chris Palmer, Gary DeVon, members of the Oroville Fire Department, Police and Ambulance Crews and the Sheriff and Fish & Wildlife boats. Brian and Rebecca Sawyer without your help there wouldn’t have been an annual display at Deep Bay. To all the businesses and individuals that have donated funds in the past or present and to our friends and family that have helped in so many ways - THANK YOU! - Dane & Joyce Forrester


JULY 11, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Jack Black: Like Bigfoot I missed seeing him again

Jack Black is kind of like my Bigfoot. I hear he’s spotted everywhere – Tonasket of course, but even at the Molson Midsummer Festival a few years back. Everyone asks me if I saw him, but like the mythical giant footed creature I guess I just missed him. This week our intrepid Tonasket reporter Brent Baker has a front page article on the actor/musician. When I told a friend from Seattle Black was going to be featured this week, he asked why I wasn’t doing the interview. I just said well, that’s what I’ve got Brent for – he’s our Mr. Tonasket. But, said Geoff, you could have told him about the Tumbleweed International Film Festival. I should have known better. Geoff and friend Mo are the folks that bring the Tumbleweed to Oroville every year and are gearing up for the Out of fourth annual festival the first Thursday, Friday My Mind and Saturday of August. Maybe next year Black Gary A. DeVon could enter one of the short online movies he mentioned to Brent in his article. I guess I could have told Geoff that Black, whose dad Tom belongs to the same fly fishing club as I (that is if I ever catch up on my dues), was as elusive to me as the famous Bigfoot of the Northwest. Or maybe Ogopogo would have been a better answer. As kids, whenever my younger brothers and I would travel to Penticton and points north with our folks, dad would tell us to keep a lookout for Ogopogo in Lake Okanagan – never saw him/her either. And a trip to Scotland and Loch Ness at age 15 didn’t reveal Nessie to me either. Unfortunately, or fortunately, I’ve been compared to both Bigfoot and Ogopogo. Canadian friends at college likened me to the sea monster because of my swimming style (or lack thereof) and my motorcycle club, made up of mostly Canadians, nicknamed me Bigfoot when I rode my motorcycle with a walking cast on my size 14 foot after surgery. I see a pattern developing here – is it me or just the Canadian sense of humor (or is that humour)? Going back to a theme from last week’s editorial when we talked about all the excitement being generated on Facebook over Oroville School District cutting down the trees on the east side of the elementary – that’s nothing compared to the comments and likes we’ve gotten on Facebook since Brent posted a photo of Black hamming it up at the Tonasket Pizza Company. Most of the comments are positive, but there were a few “Where’s Tonaskets” as well as a few “What’s he doing in Tonaskets.” If Black’s stepmom Linda, the volunteer coordinator at the Tonasket visitor information center, has anything to do with it no one will be asking “Where’s Tonasket.” Maybe having Black on our Facebook page and in this week’s issue will also go a long way towards getting the word out about what a great community Tonasket is. As for me, I guess I’ll have to settle for seeing Black in movies, or in our newspaper, because I certainly keep missing him when he visits. Like Bigfoot and Ogopogo I know he exists; people keeping telling me so. Remember to read us on the web at www.gazette-tribune.com and to “Like” us on our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/ GazetteTribune.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Solutions for today’s high energy costs OPINION BY DOC HASTINGS U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Remember when gas prices were under $2 a gallon? It wasn’t that long ago. In fact, the price for a gallon of gas was just $1.89 when President Obama took office in January 2009. Today, gas prices near $4 a gallon are beginning to feel like the new normal. However, it doesn’t have to be this way and the American people shouldn’t have to accept Rep. Doc Hastings skyrocketing gas prices as simply a way of life. Without a doubt, high energy prices are one of the biggest drains on our economy and the impacts are felt every day. Especially in rural areas like Central Washington where residents must often travel miles for the most basic of necessities, these high gas prices are forcing families to make tough choices in their budgets, causing schools to run fewer buses, and driving up the costs of business for our nation’s job creators. As Chairman of the Natural Resources Committee with jurisdiction over energy production on our federal lands and waters, I continue to pursue an all-of-the-above energy approach that harnesses the natural resources we have here at home. Last week the U.S. House of Representatives approved, with bipartisan support, a bill to expand access and open new offshore areas to energy production. The Offshore Energy and Jobs Act, which I authored, requires the Obama Administration to implement a new oil and natural gas leasing program that includes areas with the greatest known energy resources. This is not a “drill anywhere and everywhere” bill, COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

75 YEARS AGO: 1938: I was unable to find the issues for the rest of 1938 so this section will not be available for the balance of 2013.

50 YEARS AGO:

July 4th - July 11th 1963: Alaska Bound El Dorado Caravan stopped in Oroville to spend the weekend to take in the various activities the Chamber had lined out for them. Ten of the 11 campers were parked at the Civic League while their drivers and passengers were officially welcomed to our community. Although the rains came, 22 persons took advantage of the guided tour planned for them Saturday. The group was transported in the Dwinnell Bros. bus with Everett Easley, local real estate agent, as guide and narrator. They were taken to Nighthawk and down to Loomis where they dismounted at Sully’s General Store for a photo op. Burglars got away with over $300 in cash and tools from the Oroville Gold Club last weekend. Police Chief Buck Gates said the burglars probably entered the clubhouse west of Orovllle some time early Saturday morning. Entry was gained by breaking a window. A cash register was looted, some items taken and a nearby tool shed was broken into. About $100 worth of tools are missing. A gas tank at the clubhouse was completely drained. Tourists are on the move through Oroville, according to Mrs. Ernie Thornton, caretaker at the local information booth. Mrs. Thornton’s records show that during the month of June, 364 cars holding 1,033 people stopped and asked information at the booth. Last year, for the same period, 349 cars with 1087 people. So far it has been about 50 percent Canadian and 50 percent from the states. However, there was one car each from England and Mexico. Weather wise: June 26th, maximum of 77 degrees and a low of 55 degrees; June 27th, 73 and 48; 28 th, 76 and 56; June 29th, 73 and 53; June 30th, 73 and 51; July 1st, 82 and 50; 2nd, 90 and 62. A total of .97 inches of precipitation. The General Service Administration opened the bids

but rather a targeted approach that would open new areas in the Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast and Alaska. It also implements critical reforms to strengthen the safety and accountability of our offshore energy agencies. The need for this bill is a direct response to President Obama’s actions that have locked up America’s abundant energy resources. When President Obama took office, nearly all of our offshore areas were open to energy production, thanks to the efforts of Congress and President Bush agreeing to lift the decades-long drilling moratorium. Instead of seizing this opportunity to increase our energy security, President Obama discarded this plan, canceled lease sales and imposed a

restrictive leasing plan that keeps 85 percent of offshore areas off-limits to energy production and offers no new jobs. According to a recent Rasmussen Poll, 68 percent of Americans believe we need to develop new sources of energy; and there’s no reason why that shouldn’t include our offshore resources. This bill would create over a million new American jobs and generate $1.5 billion in new revenue. We owe it to the American people to remove the barriers that block access to our resources and to take the steps necessary to help put us on a path towards greater energy security.

ITEMS FROM THE PAST

weather was warm and a recent rain kept the dust down. The crowds sat comfortably in newly constructed bleachers and watched cow, saddle bronc and bareback riding. A large quarter page ad by all Sprouse Reitz stores for the GRAND OPENING of the Omak Omache Shopping Center on July 14. Ciment Quebec, the Canadian cement firm is not closing the book on locating a plant north of Ellisforde, but is looking into options elsewhere. One of the many limitations is a state that at present does not have a policy that is geared to attract new business and industry. Another drawback came from environmental agencies. Although all the agencies involved were in agreement on the plant’s ability to be operated in such a manner as to not harm the environment, the approximate two year timeline for approval was unsatisfactory for the company which wished to start construction by September 1988. This project would have required a workforce of 250 jobs. Elaine Zieroth, former wildlife biologist on the San Juan National Forest in Colorado has started work as the Tonasket District Ranger. Wildlife has been Zieroth’s emphasis in the Forest Service, but she has gathered broader experience, including time as acting ranger on a Colorado Ranger District. Real Estate bargains: Large corner lot in Oroville, very nice 2 bdrm., 1 bath home, fenced large garden spot, electric and wood heat, new carpeting, $25,000; Lovely 3 bdrm., 1 bath home, fireplace insert, 1 car garage, nice lot with backyard fenced, located in Tonasket near the schools $47,000.00. A statement appearing in This & That‚ “A small town is usually a place this is divided by a railroad, a main street, two churches and a lot of opinions.” There are some recent additions to the decor at the Burgerhaus Restaurant in Oroville. These additions are the wooden model trains crafted by local restaurateur, Bill Ecklor. Ecklor started crafting his trains from drawing and pictures he found in books his wife purchased for a son whose hobby was electric trains. The wooden models are designed, roughed out, assembled and finished in Ecklor’s shop, which is the back of his restaurant. The change of decor has also prompted a change of name for the Burgerhaus. The restaurant will now be called “The Whistle Stop.”

for the remodeling of the U. S. Customs office at Oroville on June 26th. The bid was awarded to Jack Fast, Seattle, in the amount of $37,948. The bid covers extending the building about 15 feet to the east, taking in the first lane of the three-lane checking area. New rest rooms will be installed for public use and a remodeling of the present office is called for. Last Thursday evening, the Little League All-Stars were chosen by the coaches of the teams. The team will represent Oroville in the coming Little League Invitational Tournament. The players are: Tommy Siegrist, Donny Farmer, Nicki Rainsberry, Gene Harnasch, Steve Springer, Steve Chamberlin, Duwayne Edwards, Kenny Barry and Billy Rairdan. The coaches are Art Henderson, Norman Dull, Rodney Leavell, Rich Robinson and Rex Harden. Vic Didra, of Tonasket, was the All-Around Cowboy at the 21st annual Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo last week. Didra took home the silvermounted spurs, donated by Mike Lynch of Mike’s Saddle Shop. Didra placed first in bareback riding and cow riding and second in calf roping. Charlie Eder, Grover Leslie and Walter Turner and Sons provided the cattle for the show. Grocery items: Cucumbers, $.10 each; 10 # bag of flour, $.89; Beef Cube Steaks, 10 2-oz. steaks, $.99; MJB coffee, $.46 per #. 6 8-ounce tubes Biscuits, $.59; Chuck roast $.59 per #; 3 roasting ears, $.19, peaches, 3 No. 2 1/2 cans. #.89.

25 Years Ago: July 7th - July 14th, 1988: The 1988 Chesaw 4th of July Rodeo was officially named and dedicated to Marjorie Leslie. Mrs. Leslie was among the founders of the annual affair in 1942 and served as Grand Marshall one year. The Chesaw Rodeo held each year was once again a big success as witnessed by the crowd’s cheers and applause. The town of Chesaw swelled from 15 or so population to several hundred overnight. The


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JULY 11, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Time to enjoy the sun and water So, the 4th of July is behind us. Now what shall we do? If the lake is ever going to be warm, this is about time for that. I used to love being in the water, but was never a very good swimmer, but many fun times were had at rivers and lakes in my younger days. Being in the water always seemed to bring on hunger, so maybe that is why I liked those outings. Fried chicken, potato salad and even homemade ice cream. All day having fun…and nary a cell phone, iPod, Kindle or any other battery operated “thing.” So, now the rain stops. After the dam-

age is done! What a shame for the great losses. So goes the life of a farmer. Baby quail all over the place, in our neighborhood. It takes an excessive amount in order to keep ahead of the cats. Have you visited the local museum? Should stop in and see the great displays. It will bring back some thoughts of the “old days” as you view displays from the early days of the Peerless, Princes, Zosel’s, and others. Even have some pieces from an eating establishment in Molson. Those volunteers come up with some most interesting displays.

My very most favorite person had her Ginger (Cody) Miller has knee prob103rd birthday last Monday. Aunt Ellen lems, again. Perhaps surgery? Hope she Roberts opted to stay in out of the heat and recovers easily and quickly. quietly let the day go by, enjoying some callers. Former Chronicle newspaper owner/ Did you know they play publisher, Merilynn Wilson, Bingo at the Molson Grange passed away in her sleep, in Hall on Friday nights? To put a Pt. Townsend, Wash. the end new roof on that big ole’ buildof June, at the age of 90. She ing takes a lot of fundraising. was the wife of the late Bruce You are invited to join in the Wilson and they were promifun while helping the cause. nent folks in Omak, for many I knew Lady Gaga was years. Her son Scott has the “something else” but to have newspaper in Port Townsend her mutilate the National and we’d often see them on Anthem’s words show she is our visits to Port Townsend. the worst, or so it seems to me. THIS & THAT She was a delightful lady, So, the queen of the cooking Joyce Emry full of laughter, jokes, music shows, Paula Deen, is being and strangers soon became royally punished for using a racial word. friends. The only “quaint” thing about Much worse is and has been said by her (in my opinion) is that she’d always many.…but perhaps there is more to it order snails for lunch, when there were than we hear about. so many other good things on the menu.

EAGLES FLOCK

OROVILLE SENIORS

SUBMITTED by Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

The Independence Day celebrations are over for this year. We certainly enjoyed the fireworks but hope that some additional means of financing this display can be arranged for next and ensuing years. We are looking ahead to Heritage Days on the 19th and

20th of July. Our pie project is progressing well and should have a wide variety and even enough to sell by the whole pie. Potluck at the Center is still on going on the second Sunday of the month. On Thursday, July 18, Jessica

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

Submitted photo

Highlands Correspondent

Well, the 4th of July has come and gone for another year. At this time last week Chesaw was buzzing with all of the things that had to be done in preparation of the “BIG” day. The stands were repaired, the new speakers hung, the grass mowed and the rocks picked in the arena. The Drill Team was practicing some days and evenings to perfect their routine for your enjoyment. The day before many of the Vendors and Concessions were busy getting ready for the crowds to arrive. While the Family Sports were going on, the Parade was lining up just north of town. This years Grand Marshal was Dean Brazle. I can’t tell you how excited he was to represent Chesaw and tell of his life on our Hilltop. All week long

NCW still here and serving Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck President, NCW Blue Star Mothers

“Mom, I’m joining the Army (Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard, National Guard).” ... You fill in the blank. These few words can stir up a huge range of emotions; fear, pride, anxiety, and always lots of questions. Eight years ago my son joined the Air Force. He and his family are currently stationed in California with one deployment under his belt. My son-in-law was also an Airman taking my daughter with him to Georgia for four years and then was deployed twice. With no history of military service in my family I had war movie/9-11 romanticism about the military. Following rules, regulations, procedures, relocations, and deployments and having my own children not always allowed to answer questions to my satisfaction was unnerving. Being a military mom isn’t always as easy as some can make it look. I glommed on to any war seasoned military moms I could find once the deployments started. Their stories told to me, sometimes with damp eyes and low tones, that they knew exactly what I was going through. Contact with them gave me comfort and encouragement. Next, I joined a military mom service group called the Blue Star Mothers of America forming a chapter in

were represented. It was then time for the rodeo to start with the Highlands Color Guard and Mike Stansbury singing the National Anthems of the U.S. and Canada. Harry Leslie and his daughter Kathryn entered the arena with a Riderless Horse for Laddie Hirst. He was a long time horseman and helped many a young child to learn. Rosa (McCoy) Snider is running for Position #1 for Hospital Commissioner. She is a local business owner and a fifth generation in North County. Roller Skating has started on Friday nights (7 p.m.-9 p.m.) in the Molson Grange Hall. Cost: 50 cents for each member of your family. Pop, water, candy and popcorn are also available. On July 20th the Okanogan Highlands Alliance of Educational History of Stream Process (Meyers Creek). This event is free, but donations are welcome. There were lots of people, dogs and children to enjoy our 71st Rodeo. Until next week.

he called to make sure he would be there on time. He arrived very early. He did not want to miss out on any of the activities. The Parade had more than 20 entries this year, including some local Royalty from Oroville, Okanogan, Ferry County, and Tonasket. Other entries included the Highlands Mounted Drill Team, Robin Stice and her Eden Valley Guest Ranch Truck, Vic Bunn’s friends and family with his ‘39 Farmall, Gordon Jones, a Bag Piper from Midway, B.C. graced us with his presents again for the fifth time. Gordon is also a member of the Grand Forks Pipes and Drums. Another entry was Cora Diehl and Trixie her Pony, One of our Rodeo Sponsors (the Pastime Bar & Grill) had a truck with signs and lots of kids, the Similkameen Adventures of Palmer Lake horse camp had six riders and escorts, and of course the Sheriff and the Molson/Chesaw Fire Department

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

WATERFRONT

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

We meet on the third Wednesday of every month. The Business part of the meeting is always at 5:30pm followed by the Support Meeting at 6:30pm. The meetings rotate between Oroville, Tonasket, and Omak with this North Central Washington. June 2010 we began a news- monthís meeting will be held in paper and radio campaign Oroville at The Plaza Restaurant. to locate other military moms Bring your old cell phones to and here we are today support- the meeting or drop them off ing moms, soldiers, and families at the KOMW tower in Omak, through the end of Operation Discount Vacuum and Sewing in Iraqi Freedom, the duration of Okanogan, Oroville Pharmacy, or Operation Enduring Freedom in the Tonasket Legacy Memorial Afghanistan, various unnamed office. Not every soldier leaves chiloperations since. Blue Star Mothers is a non- dren or spouses at home. But profit, non-political organization all of them have mothers... Join without religious affiliation. The us. Contact us at 485-2906 or Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the military represents all aspects of www.facebook.com/ncw.blue. time ofsoyear you help save for a child’s college star.mothers America and doesthat our chapter.

Give a Holiday Gift That Doesn’t End When the aBatteries Give Holiday Run Gift Out. That Doesn’t End When the Batteries Run Out. education.

Give a Holiday Gift You can’t control That Doesn’t End When the market, but you the Out. can Batteries control yourRun decisions.

Edward Jones can work with you to www.edwardjones.com develop a strategy save foracollege. One option is a Make 529 college Whytonot start new holiday tradition? this thesavings where giftsave can for have tax benefits for you, timeplan, of year thattoday’s you help a child’s college family members and the child.* education. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in

certainJones states forcan thosework residents. Edward with you to develop a strategy to save for college. One option is a 529 college savings Why nottoday’s start a new holiday tradition? Make plan, where gift can have tax benefits for you, To make your college savings gift in time Sometimes the of market reacts poorly tohelp changes in the this the time year that you save for a family the child.*tradition? Make this the Whymembers not start and a new holiday

world. But just because theor market reacts doesn’t mean for the holidays, call visit today. child’s college education. Edward Jones can work with you to develop a strategy to save for education. Sandra uncertainOne about yourRasmussen finances, should schedule a college. option is a you 529 college savings complimentary portfolio review. That way, you can help Financial Advisor today’s gift have Edward Jones can worksavings with can you gift to develop abenefits strategy Toplan, makewhere your college intotax time you’re where you want go and for you, family members thecollege child.* toensure save for college. One is a 529 savings 32inNcontrol Main Stofoption Suite Aand

TONASKET

OKANOGAN

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

(509) 826-6191

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

(509) 826-6191

Toll Free

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health

www.wvmedical.com

BLUE STAR MOTHERS

FAMILY DENTISTRY

Your Complete Eyecare Centre

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Submitted by Marianne Knight

HILLTOP COMMENTS

Russell will be with us to share her adventure in opening her shop on Main Street next to the Espresso Building. She sells organic as well as regular produce and other items as well. Pinochle Scores for July 6: The door prize was won by Wilma; Coratie Vansant had the most pinochles and was also high scoring woman. Willma won the door prize and Leonard Paulsen was the high scoring man.

Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

Oroville Eagles 3865 would like to thank State Madam President Sheila Wilson, State Worthy President Ken Schnorr, Deana Reyes, Boby S., D. Lance, Tom and Donna Toust and Shirley Schaub for coming on July 3 for their state visit. We learned a lot from their visit. Oroville Eagles put on a great BBQ feed and we all had a great time with friends and Eagle sisters and brothers.

Recapping the ‘big day’

Death is not a period but a comma in the story of life! Sometimes mysterious things happen at our house. Like where is our battery charger for the autos? And where are the millions of ants coming from that just appear out of nowhere and attack a crumb that is lying on the floor? A drive to the Highlands found even more wildflowers than were blooming the weekend of the Summerfest celebration. Profuse beauty! An artist could have a “field day” painting the landscape, at this time of the year. Friend Mary Ann Chamberlain has gone to her higher rewards, after being in Extended Care, Tonasket, for a lengthy time. I knew her mostly from bowling with her. She could throw a ball halfway down the alley, with ease. She was a hair dresser, by trade, and a former boss said she was a “darned good cook.”

 Anti

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

 Behavioral

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion  Walk

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 MASSAGE

Su Ianniello

Licensed Massage Practitioner

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

OPTICAL

Advertise In The

*Contributions to a 529that plan may behelp eligiblesave for a state tax deductioncollege or credit in time of year you child’s should. if current eventsfor areamaking you feel certainyou states for thoseStill, residents.

.

for the holidays, callforor today. how you can potentially there. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible aget statevisit tax deduction or credit in certain states for those residents. Omak, WA 98841 plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, 509-826-1638 family members and the child.* Sandra Rasmussen Take control. Schedule your free portfolio review today. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in

Financial Advisor

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

certain states. for those residents.

32 N Main St Suite A 98841 To makeOmak, yourWAcollege savings gift in time 509-826-1638 Sandra today. Rasmussen for the holidays, call or visit Financial Advisor .

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

32 N Main St Suite A

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Call Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 Ext 3050

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


JULY 11, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life Ruby Rust to perform at MIP Community Bulletin Board Submitted by Janet Culp

Oroville Youth Soccer Fall Registration

CCC of Tonasket

TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket presents Music in the Park on Friday, July 12 from 6-9 p.m. featuring the Ruby Rust Band. Ruby Rust plays Americana/ folk and classic rock blended with original music. With two lead singers who support each other with harmonies, they provide both a rocking and songwriters’ mix of music which has been very well received at local venues. The band has played for several CCC events and just recently played at the Conscious Culture Festival. They also have played at some Wenatchee venues and many local farmers markets and winery shows. The band fea-

July’s Events Submitted by Aurora Jones ccc of Tonasket

• July 11-12, 1-4 p.m. - Adult Cooking Classes: Thursday July 11 there will be a Fresh (Raw) Foods Class and Friday July 12t here will be a Gourmet Cooking Class from 1-4 pm. There are openings in both classes. Cost is $25 per class with a $5 food fee. Call 486-1328 to sign up. • July 12, 6-9 p.m. - Music in the Park featuring Ruby Rust: Event at Tonasket’s History Park.

Ruby Rust will perform at Tonasket’s History Park on July 12. tures Denny Richardson (guitar/ vocals), Mike Bowling (guitar/ vocals), Steve Bell (drums) and Steve Pollard (bass). Everyone is welcome to come to this free event. La Ultima Mexicatessen will be offering Tamales and other good foods

for purchase. The CCC will have a table full of drinks and goodies for a donation to the CCC. A tip jar will be passed in the crowd for the performers, who have donated their time and talents. Bring a lawn chair or blanket, and enjoy the show.

CCC THIS MONTH

chase. Event is free though there will be a donation jar set up for the band. • July 28, 1:00-3:30 p.m. -- Free Community Dinner: Sunday dinner provided by the CCC and others. Free for those who need it, by donation for others. Call Janet at 486-2061 for more info. • August 2, 6-9 p.m. - Music in the Park featuring SparrOw: Event at Tonasket’s History Park. Refreshments available for purchase from the CCC and La Ultima Mexicatessan will be there with dinner for purchase. Event is free though there will be a donation jar set up for the band.

Refreshments available for purchase from the CCC and La Ultima Mexicatessan will be there with dinner for purchase. Event is free though there will be a donation jar set up for the band. • July 26, 6-9 p.m. - Music in the Park featuring The Hyde Family: Event at Tonasket’s History Park. Refreshments available for purchase from the CCC and La Ultima Mexicatessan will be there with dinner for pur-

OROVILLE - Registration for fall season is now open, with early registration closing Wednesday, July 31. Oroville Youth Soccer is a recreational soccer club open to all kids living in the Oroville and surrounding areas, and between the ages of 4 - 15. To register online go to www.ncwsoccer.com and follow the links under Oroville Youth Soccer. For more information go to Oroville (WA) Youth Soccer Club on Facebook, or contact Karrie Scott at 560-9037

British Soccer & TetraBrazil Soccer Camp Registration

OROVILLE – Oroville Youth Soccer is hosting two different styles of soccer camp this summer, August 12 – 16.British Soccer Camp returns for the fourth year with programs for players ages 3 – 12. Registration is now open for TetraBrazil Camp which returns for the third year to offer a more skill intensive camp for player 11 – 18. Register online at www.challengersports. com.For more information go to Oroville (WA) Youth Soccer Club on Facebook, or contact Karrie Scott at (509) 560-9037.

NCRL Books on Stage

OROVILLE - As part of the Summer Reading Program at the Oroville Public Library various programs are put on. The North Central Regional Library Books on Stage is one these free programs and will perform Thursday, July 11 at at 10 a.m. at the library located at 1276 Main St. For more information call the library at (509) 486-2366.

Oroville Chamber of Commerce

ROYAL NEIGHBORS

meeting

Submitted by Joanne Morris Oroville Royal Neighbors Of America

Raffle chairperson Vivian Iverson assisted Laara Peters as she draws the winner of the “Summer Fun Plus Raffle” at the Farmer’s Market. The winner was...Jan Garner from Oroville. It was very exciting for Vivian and Dolly Englebretson to deliver the “bounty of prizes” to the Garner household as Jan and husband Dick are great supporters of the many organizations in our community. Congratulations Jan! We would also like to thank all

State President visited July 2 Submitted by Lyle Anderson Tonasket Eagles #3002

Well the Fourth has come and gone and we hope you all had a good holiday weekend with friends and family. The weather has been great this week so get out there and enjoy it. A special thanks to all that volunteered and attended our State President’s visit on the 2nd, and

Submitted photo

Laara Peters draws the Summer Fun Plus Raffle winner. those that participated by buying one, two, or more tickets. Each

ticket sale plays an important part in making this event a success.

TONASKET EAGLES

Linda. On July 20th at 9 p.m. we will be having the band Bad Habbits back in our club and playing. Our scores from past Sundays pinochle are as follows. Jo Porter took first place and Lyle Anderson snagged second place. Low score was hauled in by Cindy Jones. The last pinochle of the day was by Jo Porter and Penny Smith. We wish those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

made it a fantastic visit. Bingo is back this Friday at 7 p.m. so get those daubers back out and come try your luck. The kitchen will be open at 5:30 p.m. for some of those delicious hamburgers. Don’t forget to come in on Sundays at 1 p.m. and test your skill in or weekly pinochle tournament. There will be karaoke this Saturday at 9 p.m. by

OROVILLE - Oroville as a Unique Travel Destination presented by Sandy Lorentzen will be the topic of the Oroville Chamber Meeting on Thursday, July 11 at 1 p.m. at the The Plaza Restaurant. Lorentzen has been involved in tourism development in various capacities over the years including helping to build international audiences for the Pacific Northwest Wagner Festival in Seattle and the Brighton Festival in England. Currently she is the website content editor for a South and Central American tour operator. She has spoken to many travel associations and written about making communities unique as travel destinations. She has recently helped to market the new Pastime Bar & Grill and has personally fallen in love with Oroville. If you plan on eating, you may want to come a few minutes early (no more than 10 minutes early) to get your food ordered and on the way. Lorentzen will begin presenting very soon after 1 p.m.

Tonasket Farmers’ Market

Tonasket Farmers Market is held on Thursdays, from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. The next market is Thursday, July 11. Come join us for some of the best in local produce, crafts, personal care products, homegrown music and farmstead cheeses. Whether you make a quick spin to pick up supper ingredients or hang out for hours, you’re sure to get what you want. For more info call (509) 486-1199

Jazz at Esther Bricques

OROVILLE –Sam Howell and Mark

Kubiak will be presenting an evening of Latin, swing and traditional jazz at Esther Bricques Winery’s tasting room Thursday evening, July 11, 2013. Doors open at 6 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE - The Oroville Farmers’ Market is Saturday, July 13, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Oroville Community Library located at 1276 Main St. Purchase art, crafts, plant starts, fresh baked goods and tamales plus the best produce on the planet. The Oroville Farmers’ Market continues each Saturday through October 26 and new vendors are welcome. Call (509) 476-2662 for more information.

Music at the Market

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will host “Music at the Market” each Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. during the Farmers’ Market season. Musicians who would like to showcase (volunteer) their acoustic talents are invited to call the Oroville Public Library to book a date. The next Music at the Market is Saturday, July 13. For more information call Barbara at (509) 476-2662.

Oroville Cruise-In

OROVILLE - Oroville’s Cruise-In will be Saturday, July 13 and coincides with “National Collector Car Appreciation Day. All cars will meet at 5:30 p.m at Gold Digger Park on Main Street next to Okanogan Estate & Vineyards Wine & Gift Shop (1203 Main St.). The “Cruise” will begin at 6 p.m. and cars will return to the Gold Digger Park for public viewing.

Slow Food Okanogan at Winery

OROVILLE - Slow Food Okanogan will host an evening of wine and cheese and Slow Food information at Esther Bricques Winery on Sunday, July 14 from 5-8 p.m. Music will be provided by Sam Howell and Mark Kubiak, cheeses by Larkhaven Farms, and wine by Esther Bricques. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

NCRL Books on Stage

TONASKET - As part of the Summer Reading Program at the Tonasket Public Library various programs are put on. The North Central Regional Library Books on Stage is one these free programs and will perform Thursday, July 18 at at 1 p.m. at the library located at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. For more information call the library at (509) 486-2366.

Metal and E-Cycle Collection

TONASKET - Green Okanogan will hold a metal and e-Cycle collection on Thursday, July 18 and the third Thursday of each month from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Corner of N. Western Ave. and Division St. in Tonasket. We will accept all metals and the following e-Cycle materials: TVs, computers, monitors, towers and laptops. For more information contact clanigan2@gmail.com or call (509) 556-2250

OHA Presents

Okanogan Highlands Alliance presents, “Watershed Functioning,

Plant Ecology & Stream Processes: Tying it All Together,” Saturday, July 20, 10:00 a.m. at the Chesaw Community Center. Gina McCoy, Stream Morphologist, will discuss how watershed functioning leads to characteristic patterns of streamflow and sediment delivery, creating the watershed “signature.” Tom McCoy, Plant Ecologist, will discuss how disturbance ecology shapes the upland and riparian plant communities, contributing significantly to the characteristic watershed “signature” and fluvial processes. This is a twopart event. Everyone is welcome to attend the indoor presentation in Chesaw. For the field trip following the presentation, space is limited, so pre-registration is required. Priority registration for the field trip is offered to OHA members, and remaining space will be available on a first come, first serve basis to the public. For more info visit http:// okanoganhighlands.org/education/ hw online, or contact Julie Ashmore at julie@okanoganhighlands.org, or (509)-433-7893.

NCRL Puppet Show

TONASKET - As part of the Summer Reading Program at the Tonasket Public Library various programs are put on. The North Central Regional Library Puppet Show is one these free programs and will perform on Thursday, July 25 at 1 p.m. at the library located at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. For more information call the library at (509) 486-2366.

Quilt Show in Molson

MOLSON - The Second Annual Quilt Show in Molson will take place on Saturday, Aug. 31 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Quilters will be displaying patriotic quilts and military memorabilia from all branches of service. Many of the quilts were created from the proceeds of last years quilt show. Those that would like to like to donate a quilt should contact Vicky Didenhover. Quilts will be on display for peoples’ viewing pleasure, but there will also be a selection of quilts and other sewing related items for sale. Those with sewing related items that would like to have a table to sell items and/or would would like to display a quilt at the show contact Didenhover at (509) 485-3020.

Food Banks

TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480. OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386. Editor’s Note: Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www. gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844. G.A.D.

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

- 24 Hour Service Licensed & Bonded

509-486-2692 P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

Pumps

Got Water? — Fred Cook —

Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

Midway Building Supply

RYAN W. GUNN

All of your Automotive & Upholstery needs

Civil Criminal

Busted Knuckle

Attorney at Law

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Auto & Upholstery

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

Seats  Headliners  Door Panels Convertible tops / Vinyl roof covers — Auto & Small Engine Service — We Do Tire Repair & Balance! 124 Chesaw Rd, Oroville 509-476-2611

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Excavation and Septic Service

Thank you for your continued support!  Septic

Pumping  Septic Installation  Portable Toilets

509-422-3621 Cell: (509) 322-4777 MORGASE983JS

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Insulation

OSOYOOS READI-MIX

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Installed Insulation

Oroville Building Supply 33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

HOURS: Mon. - Sat., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Septic Service

Concrete

Building Supplies Quality Supplies Since 1957

Over 25 Years experience! Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Auto / Upholstery

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

&

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

250-495-6688 1-866-495-6688

Business: Toll Free:

We Work Saturdays! 11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Garage Doors  Installed

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

Storage

Storage

Well Drilling

Lakeside

OROVILLE

“The Water Professionals”

STORAGE Boat, RV & More! Weatherization with lease Rent unit for project  Contractors store tools / product  Additional Business space available  

Located at: 124 Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-421-7168 lakesidestoreit@gmail.com

Mini Storage & U-Haul

Units 5x10 to 10x30 Power Fenced Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored n n n n

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

Water Well Drilling  Free Water Analysis Pump Systems  Zimmatic Pivots Water Treatment  Hydrofracturing  Full Service Store  Geothermal Heat Loop  Free On-Site Estimates Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

www.foglepump.com

www.orovilleministorage.com

  

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4


Page 8 A8

Okanogan JULY11, 11,2013 2013 OKANOGAN Valley VALLEYGazette-Tribune GAZETTE-TRIBUNE|• July

$MBTTJĂ FE %FBEMJOF  /PPO 5VFTEBZ r $BMM  UP QMBDF ZPVS BE

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

Announcements Indian Taco Feed, Benefit for Cary Dean. Oroville Eagles, July 13th 5:00 PM. Following is a 20 item auction starting at 6:00 PM. $6 per plate.

NAC Licensed NAC needed to provide in-home care to patient in Riverside/Tonasket area. Experience preferred but not required. Duties include heavy patient care. Must have NAC license from WA State 1-800-637-9998 inquire@availhome.com EOE

WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

30. Bar bill

12. “C’___ la vie!�

32. Hawaiian dish 33. Artwork that clarifies

13. Line in a play that elicits a big laugh

37. Exchange (2 wds)

14. Sort

40. Otalgia

19. Song and dance, e.g.

41. Recommended food plan (2 wds)

23. “Beowulf,� e.g.

43. Branch

25. ___ function

9

6

5

6 2

9

1

5

1 7 6 4

6 2 3 4 8

3 5 9

7 2

7 8

1 5 6

2 3 4 1 9

8

6

1

9

7

6 2 3

4

8

4

4

6

9

7

2

8 1 7

9

5

3

5 4 7

3 6 2

7 3 5 2 6 4 8 9 1

4 7 8

5 2 9 6

1

5

2 6

2

9

2

1 3

6 1 9

3 4 7 2

5 8

3

5 2 6 1 8

4 7 9

5 6 3 9

8 1 7 2 4

2 4

3

8 9 7

7 3 6

9

4

8 5

5 2

1 3 6

Puzzle 31 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.37)

3 9

1 8

6 9

2

Easy, difficulty rating 0.35

7

3 2

Sponsored by

1 8 4 9

509-476-3602

5 6

4

5 8 9 6 7

1 2 3

1 9 6 2 3 5 8 4 7

5

2

4 7 1 8 6 3 9

6

7

9 4 2 3

5 8 1

3

8 1 5 9

9

4 7

6 5 2

6

1

7

2 4

3 8

2

1

3 8 7

9 4 6 5

8

6 5 3 4

1 7 9 2

Puzzle 28 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.35)

7

6 8

2 5

8 4

3 1

9

6

7 2

1 9

5

7

3 1 4 2 8

4

5 4 9

2

8 1

2 9

3 7

3

1 6

3 7 5

5

5

8

7

4

7

1 6

4

6

2 8 9

5 7

2

3

9

1

6

5

3 8

4

7

1

6 9 2

Puzzle 35 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.33)

1 5

8 7 4 2

6 9 3

3 9 2 5

6 1 8

7 4

8

6

1

5 6

4 2

7 4

6 7 5 9

9

3

7

8 4

9 8 3 1

4 3

7 5

1 2 8 9

6 5 9

3

2 5

6

4

1

2

7

8

2 3

1

2 8

1 3 7 6 4

5 9

Puzzle 32 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.37)

1 8

6 2 5

7

7

2

4 6

5 9 3

3

9 8 1 4

3 9

8 7

4 5

9 6

5 3 6 1

9

4

5 8 1 2

7 6

1 2 4

5 6 3 9

3

2

9 6 8 7 2

1

1 3 7

4 8 5

7 2 4

8

5 3

1 6

9 3

8 2

5 1

7 4

2 9

6 5

2 1

9 8 5 4 3

6 7

3 8

7

9 7

8 3

1

5

8

6

5

9

4

1

2

7

2

8 3

1

7

2

4 9 6

3 8

9

1

4 6

5

9 4

7 6

3 5 8

2

1

1

5

6 8 4

2 7

9 3

7 1 2 5

9

4 3 8

6

8 3

4

1 6 7

2

5 9

6

9 5 2 8

3

1 7 4

Puzzle 36 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

9

3 4 2 1

5 7 8 6

7 3

2

5

4

1

8

9

6

6 9 1

8 2 4

3 7

5 1

8 4 2 3

6 9

7 5

9 5

7 2

3 8

4 1

6

6

8

1 7

5 4 2

9

3

3

2

4 9 1

6 7

5 8

4

6

3 5

2

7 9 8

1

8

7

9

1 6 3

5

4 2

5 1

2

4 8

9

6 3 7

Puzzle 33 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.38)

7

4 8 6 9

3 1 5 2

Puzzle 29 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

4

2

7

8

1

8 9

ANSWERS

1 4

1

6

5

Puzzle 34 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

2

9

3

8

5

3

9

8

8

4

9

1

6

62. Bolivian export

4

8

61. “China Beach� setting, shortened

60. ___ Khan

1

9

59. “Do ___ others as...�

3

4

58. Face-off

7

1

56. Cottontail’s tail

57. “___ I care!� (2 wds)

3

2

2

54. Make waves

4

52. Mouth, in slang

8

5

4 5

3 7

9 6

2

8

8 7

6 9

3

1

9

2

1

4

6

5

5

1 4

1

2

4

5 2 3

8 7

11. P.I., e.g.

50. Crosswise threads (pl.)

3

2

3

7

8 6

9

2 9

6

8

1 2

8 4

7

3 1

7 4

9 7

6

3

9

5

8 6 5

5

9 1

6

3

2

8

5

1

4

7

4

7

4

3 2

5

3

2

6

1

9 8

Puzzle 30 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

4

7

8 2

4 7

1 6

26. Becomes tiresome

49. Express

6

4

10. Absorbed, as a cost

47. Most recent

46. “Evangeline� setting

8

9

6

9. Spoonful, say

42. Downer

4

7

5

3

8. Really need to bathe

39. “___ for the poor�

5

3

1

4

7. Dermatologist’s concern

38. Pink, as a steak

AUCTION NOTICE THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 509-476-3948 JULY 18, 2013 Viewing time:

7

8

22. Retains possession of

5

21. “... ___ he drove out of sight�

7

20. “A pox on you!�

6. Not given medical care

9

18. Guardian (2 wds)

5. Litigant

6

17. Divide into three equal parts

4. Balcony section

1

16. ___ The Cat, appeared in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s�

4

15. Writes in symbols

8

3. Advanced

3

2. Desk item

13. Proved right (2 wds)

2

1. Doughnut-shaped surface

6. Northern New York

9

1. Blabs

67. Drink with a straw

3

6

5

3 9

7

8

9 3

5 4

2

1

ANSWERS

66. Pardon granted by a government

36. Makes lace

37. Alpine transport (hyphenated)

64. Profitable 65. Exaggerated saintliness

2

63. In pieces

35. Length x width, for a rectangle

6

60. City NE of Oakland, CA

34. Supernatural

5

55. Advanced study after college

31. Genius

Public Notices

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 28 (Easy, rating 0.35) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

7

53. Ceiling

DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Sudoku

1

51. Backstabber

29. It’s a piece of cake

28. Hidden valley

LEGAL SERVICES

Looking for 1950 to 1960 Volkswagon Van / Bus. Rusty OK. Please call Kevin, 403690-7646

3

48. Scatter seeds again

DRIVERS -- Looking for Job Security? Haney Truck Line, seeks CDL-A, hazmat/doubles required. Paid Dock bump/Benefits, Bonus program, Paid Vacation! Call Now 1-888-414-4467, www.gohaney.com

Automobiles

1

45. Twangy, as a voice

DRIVERS -- Inexperienced/Experienced. Unbeatable career Opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 www.centraldrivingjobs.com

2003 Wellcraft Coastal 270 Tournament Edition Approximately 80 hours on new Volvo Penta 375 horse 8.1, crate motor, approximately 20 hours on new Volvo Penta outdrive, 9.9 high thrust new in 2008 with remote control steering, beam is 9 feet 9 inches, 5kw kohler gen set, air conditioning and heat, microwave, fridge, single burner electric or alcohol stove, vacu flush head, GPS fish finder. Located on Orcas Island, $49,000. Call 360-317-7237.

24. “Fiddlesticks!� 27. “O patria mia� singer

HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS

Boats & Trailers

9

44. Ring bearer, maybe

Down

LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com

WANTED TO RENT: Ski Boat, at a Reasonable Price. July 29th and 30th. Responsible, Experienced Boaters. Skis and PFDs Required. Call 403-813-3086

www.go2worksource.com

Across

FINANCIAL

SATURDAY ONLY, 8am, 705 4th Ave. Jenn-Air wall oven, women’s clothing, Livingston boat, trailer & more!

Updated list of employment at

Crosswords

ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 6343838 for more details.

HUGE PRE MOVING Yard Sale. 9am-?, Friday and Saturday, July 12th & 13th. 30 years of stuff! At 3 First Street, Loomis. Watch for bright Orange signs!

5

Equal Housing Opportunity

Visit us at www.wvmedical.com for more info and to apply.

EVENTS-FESTIVALS

Garage & Yard Sale

7

– Family & Singles –

509-476-4057

needed for a full-time, day shift position in Omak Clinic’s Walk In Clinic. Must be able to work independently. Spanish speaking a plus but not necessary.

126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

“PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

email: stcharles@gdicom.net

Certified Medical Assistant

6

LOW INCOME HOUSING

GET YOUR Career on Track! 6 Month Railroad Training Program. See our website for information on FREE Seminars near you. www.nwri.com 800-868-1816. Space is Limited

Buying Silver, Gold Coins, Collections, Jewelry, Sterling, Flatware, Guns. Paying fair Prices. Call Spence (509) 429-4722

WorkSource Okanogan County

ATTENTION:

EDUCATION

OROVILLE

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

207 Main St., Oroville, WA

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

Wanted

Oroville: 2 bedroom, 2 bath apartment. W/D hookup. Good parking. No pets. No smoking. $525/ mo + $400 dep. 509-223-3064 509-8992046.

4

St. Charles Place Apartments

Wanted

2

TTY 425-562-4002

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

1

509-476-2808

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

8

Call for information and application

This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

Lost

5

Now Accepting Applications for 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts Subsidized for Income Qualified Households * Great Oroville Location * Picnic Areas * Spacious Floor Plans * On-Site Laundry * Park-Like Setting

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Food Service Clerk, two hour position, Monday through Friday. Position closes July 17, 2013. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. LOST DOG: 5 month old Phone 486-2126. Golden Retriever X. Veranda Beach Resort area. Answers An Equal Opportunity Employer to “Mia�. Reward offered. Call Tricia Pink, (250)864-9405 or Verand Beach office, 509476-4000 066 STIHL CHAINSAW with out bar. Runs good. Help $250/obo or trade. Call Wanted (509)476-2472

7

1105 Appleway, Oroville

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF JULY 8, 2013

2

American Legion Housing

Call Sun Lakes Realty (509)476-2121

Food Service Clerk

9

3 BD, 1 BA, Appliances, nice landscaping, covered patio, garage, close to schools, in town, quiet neighborhood $850/month. (509)840-5664

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Statewides

8

For Rent

3 BR Home $795; 3 BR/2 BA w/2XGarage by River $1100; 2 BR on River $720; 2 BR/2BA $875; 3 BR/2 BA Waterfront APT $575; 1 BR Apt $475; 1 BR Condo $695.

Help Wanted

3

3 BD, 1 BA, Appliances, newer heat pump & furnace. Nice landscaping with sprinkler system, covered patio, garage, close to schools, in town, quiet neighborhood $136,500. (509)840-5664

Found

6

Houses For Sale

For Rent

4

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Public Notices 10:00 AM Auction: 11:00 AM 1973 EZLOADER BOAT TRAILER LIC # WA FF7906 1995 CHEV CAVCP LIC # WA 671SGJ 1999 PONTIAC GRAND AM LIC # WA 159VKU Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 4, 2013. #495433 AUCTION NOTICE THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 509-476-3948 JULY 18, 2013 Viewing time: 10:00 AM Auction: 11:00 AM 1986 ISUZU PU LIC # WA B33562W Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 11, 2013. #495433 City of Tonasket Public Forum The City Council of the City of Tonasket will be holding a public forum on the changes made to the Land Use Designation Map for the Comprehensive Plan, as requested by the Tonasket City Council. The forum will be held during the regular Council meeting on Tuesday, July 23, 2013. This meeting begins at 7:00 pm. The location is the Tonasket City Council Room, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, WA. For additional information please contact Alice Attwood, 509-486-2132. Anyone is invited to attend the meeting and those with special language, hearing or access needs should contact city hall, 509-486-2132, 24 hours prior to the meeting. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 11, 18, 2013. #495648 City of Tonasket Water Use Efficiency Goals Public Forum The City Council of the City of Tonasket will be holding a public forum to set goals for the City’s water system. The forum will be held during the regular Council meeting on Tuesday, July 23, 2013. This meeting begins at 7:00 pm. The location is the Tonasket City Council Room, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, WA. This meeting is also considered as an informational meeting for water system consumers. For additional information regarding the proposed goals please contact Alice Attwood, 509486-2132. Anyone is invited to attend the meeting and those with special language, hearing or access needs should contact city hall, 509486-2132, 24 hours prior to the meeting. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 11, 18, 2013. #495652 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In Re the Adoption of: G.T. S., a person under the age of eighteen. No. 13-5-00028-1 SUMMONS TO APPEAR FOR HEARING (AMENDED) TO: EDWARD W. ARBUCKLE A Petition for Termination of ParentiChild Relationship has been filed in the above-referenced cause of action, a copy of which is served upon you with this summons. You are hereby summoned to appear on the 5th day of August, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. and respond to the petition. If you fail to appear and respond, an Order of Termination will be entered. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly. DATED this 21st day of June, 2013 CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC /s/ Robert R. Colbert Robert R. Colbert; WSBA #45494 Attorney for Petitioners Keith R. Corine and Kimberle A. Cornie. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 4, 11, 18, 2013. #494012 NOTICE The Tonasket School District will be holding the Budget Hearing on Monday, July 29, at 7:00 p.m. in the district office board room. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 11, 18, 2013 #495025 Public Hearing Six Year Transportation Improvement Program City of Tonasket The Tonasket City Council will hold a public hearing during the regular Council meeting on Tuesday, July 23, 2013 in the City Hall, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. Tonasket, WA. The

continued on next page


JULY 11, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A9

Okanogan Valley Life

Border Patrol Explorer Post graduates fourteen Eighth graduating class stationed at Oroville Submitted by Clayton Poynter

Gina and Tom McCoy at Myers Creek

OHA to host waterways program in Chesaw

AFOS - SPW/ORV

OROVILLE - Oroville Border Patrol Explorer Post #0023 held its eighth annual Border Patrol Explorer Academy from June 23-28 and graduated 18 scouts. The six day academy, held at Lost Lake in the Okanogan National Forest, is a condensed version of the Border Patrol Academy course. Explorer cadets participated in classroom instruction combined with “hands on” experience in arrest techniques, defensive tactics, survival swimming, First Aid/CPR and physical training. In addition, cadets learned basic immigration and criminal law, crime scene investigation and vehicle stop techniques. Graduation was held June 28, 2013 at the Oroville Border Patrol Station. Fourteen cadets earned the title of Border Patrol Explorer, 11 from the Oroville Border Patrol Explorer Post and three from the Marion County Oregon Sheriff’s Office Explorer Post. Marion County Cadet Bailey Moeller was awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award during the graduation ceremony. Upon receiving her award Miss Moeller said, “The Academy pushed me beyond my limits and back. I feel prepared for anything.” The 2013 Explorer Academy graduates are: Jaxon Blackler, Ryan Marcolin, David Breeden, Bailey Moeller, David Curtis, Narya Naillon, Jaden Deckard, Blake Rise, Lena Fuchs, Bonnie Roley, Ben Hickman, William Shearer, Nathan Hugus and Pie Todd, Law Enforcement Exploring is a program for young men and women ages 14-21 that provides training on the purpose, mission and objectives of law enforcement. Exploring provides leadership opportunities for youth, and performs service in the community. For more information on Border Patrol Explorers, contact John Tafolla at (509) 476-3622. July 11, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Watershed Functioning, Plant Ecology and Stream Processes Submitted by Julie Ashmore OHA Conservation Coordinator

U.S. Border Patrol photos

CHESAW - Okanogan Highlands Alliance introduces a unique opportunity to learn about our highland waterways with two highly qualified stream experts. On Saturday, July 20 at 10:00 a.m., everyone is welcome to attend an indoor presentation at the Chesaw Community Center about our local streams. Directly afterward, a field trip will be offered (preregistration required), providing on the ground examples of the concepts discussed during the presentation. Gina McCoy, Stream Morphologist, will discuss how watershed functioning leads to characteristic patterns of streamflow and sediment delivery, creating the watershed ësignatureí. She will also explain how the resulting interactions among energy, water, sediment and structural elements in streams create the morphology we can see. Tom McCoy, Plant Ecologist, will discuss how disturbance ecology shapes the upland and riparian plant communities, contributing significantly to the characteristic watershed ‘signature’ and fluvial processes. Gina describes the connections between the big picture and the close-up view: “Dialing down from the landscape to the site scale, watershed functioning is driven by interactions between nonliving and living elements,” she says. “Stream processes are driven by watershed functioning and stream channels respond dynamically to both local influences and the integration of processes occurring across the watershed.”

Tom adds his perspective on the role of plant life: “Riparian vegetation is a highly diagnostic attribute of the landscape,” he says. “It can often be read like a book that describes the infinitely variable interaction between soil, climate, vegetation, channel characteristics, and past and present disturbance and land use patterns.” Walking streamside, the event leaders will provide an opportunity to observe up-close and in-person the components of stream processes that affect channel degradation and recovery, channel incision and widening, and equilibrium within the stream. Channel stability will also be discussed, in terms of both energy dissipation within the stream and plant life near the stream. Myers Creek will be observed in the reach south of the Canadian border, and factors will be discussed that have contributed to its current state onsite, as well as what can be done to promote restoration. Tom McCoy is Manager of the Methow Wildlife Area, and Gina McCoy is a Habitat Engineer with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Priority registration for the field trip is offered to OHA members, and remaining space will be available on a first come, first serve basis to the public. Those who plan to attend the field trip will get the most out of the experience if they also attend the indoor presentation.†Both are offered free of charge to the community, and donations are welcome. Field trip details will be provided upon registration. Okanogan Highlands Alliance is a nonprofit that works to educate the public on watershed issues. Please visit okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw for more specific information or contact julie@ okanoganhighlands.org.

9

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

continued from previous page

Steve Quick - Superintendent of Schools Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 11, 18, 2013. #496305

this Notice to you as provided in RCW 11.40.020(3), or Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the Creditor’s Claim is not presented within the foregoing time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: July 4, 2013 Signed: TONI L. ORAVEZ, Personal Representative Address for Mailing of Service: C / O Joshua F. Grant, P.S. Attorney at Law P.O. Box 619 Wilbur, WA 99185 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 4, 11, 18, 2013. #492667

IS flkla MARY JEAN COVEY; and ALSO ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE REAL ESTATE DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN; Defendants. NO. 132003360 CIVIL SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE FOLLOWING PERSONS AND PARTIES: 1. PONTIAC RIDGE SPORTSMEN, a JoInt Venture 2. ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS of the members of Pontiac Ridge Sportsmen, a Joint Venture; 3. DALE E.COVEY; 4. MARY JEAN LEWIS f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY; and 5. ALSO ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE REAL ESTATE DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN. YOU AND EACH OF YOU are hereby summoned to appear within sixty calendar days after the date of first publication of this “Civil Summons by Publication”, to wit, within sixty days after the 27th day ofJune, 2013, and defend the above-entitled action in the above-entitled Court by (1) filing your “Answer” to the Plaintiffs “Com-

plaint for Quiet Title” with the County Clerk of Okanogan County and (2). serving a copy of your Answer upon the Plaintiffs undersigned attorneys at their office location provided below. If you fail to properly file and serve your Answer by the above deadline,ajudgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of Plaintiffs Complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of the above-entitled court. The “Complaint for Quiet Title” in the above-entitled action seeks to quiet title in favor the above Plaintiff, GUY T. DREW, with respect to the following real property: Legal Description: The Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 13, Township 39 North, Range 30 East, W.M. Situate in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington. Current Assessor’s. Parcel Number: 3930134002 Additionally, the Complaint seeks to recognize the satisfaction and fulfillment of (1) the Real Estate Contract between Defendant PONTIAC RIDGE SPORTSMEN, A JOINT VENTURE and Defendants DALE E. COVEY and MARY JEAN LEWIS (f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY), recorded on or around June 27, 1978. under Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 646427, and (2) the Real Estate Contract between Defendants DALE E. COVEY and MARY JEAN LEWIS

(f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY) and Plaintiff, recorded on or around December 24, 1980 under Okanogan County Auditor’s FileNo. 674503. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter,you should do so promptly to avoid any impairment of your legal rights. This “Civil Summons by Publication” is issued pursuant to CR 4 and RCW 4.28.110. LARSONBERG &PERKlNS PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiffs /s/ Jon W. Scott Jon W. Scott (WSBA#45290) for: Paul M. Larson (WSBA#06010) File your written Answer with: Okanogan County Clerk’s Office 149 N.3rd Ave. P.O. Box 72 Okanogan,WA98840 Phone: (509) 422-7275 Serve a copy of your Answer upon: Paul M. Larson Larson Berg & Perkins;PLLC 105 North Third Street Yakima, WA.98901 Phone: (509)457-1515 Published in the Oakanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 25, August 1, 8, 2013 #491451

regular meeting commences at 7:00 pm. The purpose of the hearing is to review and possibly adopt the Six Year Transportation Improvement Program for the years 2014 - 2019. Interested persons are invited to attend. Persons with special language, hearing or access needs should contact City Hall at 509-486-2132, 24 hours prior to the hearing. Alice J. Attwood City Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 11, 18, 2013. #495654 SCHOOL DISTRICT BUDGET HEARING Notice is hereby given that the Board of Directors of Oroville School District No. 410 will hold a public hearing on July 29, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. to adopt the 20132014 school year budgets. The hearing will be held in the boardroom at 816 Juniper Street. The public is invited to attend, and comments will be heard for or against any part of the budget.

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR LINCOLN COUNTY Estate of STANLEY H. SPEILER., Deceased. NO. 13-4 00036-7 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed me Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against Decedent must present the claim: Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: By filing with the foregoing Court the original of the signed Creditor’s Claim, and By serving upon or mailing by first class mail to us at the address provided below a copy of the signed Creditor’s Claim. The Creditor’s Claim must be presented by the later to occur of: Thirty (30) days after we served or mailed

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY GUY T. DREW, an individual, Plaintiff, vs. PONTIAC RIDGE SPORTSMEN, a Joint Venture; ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS of the members of Pontiac Ridge Sportsmen,a·Joint Venture; DALE E.COVEY; MARY JEAN LEW-

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties!

Find The Right

HOME

If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you.

1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA SUN 509-476-2121 LAKES Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool REALTY

Lake Osoyoos Beach. Spacious 3 Bdm/2.5 Baths, Private Garages Right on The Beach, Clubhouse & Pool in Gated Community on 18 Acres. Competitive Pricing. PICK YOUR INTERIOR! $549,000 & $639,000. One 2280 SF Home Available for $325,000.

OKANOGAN VALLEY

1422 Main St., Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602  888-838-3000

RANCH HAVILLAH/CHESAW area.

633 Acres m/l. Has been used for livestock for several years. Some acreage was farmed at one time. Small ponds for water. Seasonal Creek on South side. Borders State and National Forest on South side. Small single wide home. Old farm buildings. Excellent access. 22 miles to Tonasket. 22 miles to Oroville. Good domestic and livestock water well. Beautiful Building Sites w/Views. Excellent hunting area. Owner moving to town. - $791,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com l 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

PLAY LIKE YOU MEAN IT In Sandalia Beach Homes. Hi-Quality New Construction Directly on

Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

h i l lt o p r e a lt y

BEST VALUE ON LAKE OSOYOOS!

Beautiful smaller home just steps from the waterfront, 500 Ft. of Sandy Beach in Oro Beach Resort. Dock, Boat Moorage, Launch & includes 2nd Lot for Garage/RV. Heat Pump, Upgrades $225,900

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Lake View Home with an inviting pool! Just a hop skip and a jump to Lake Osoyoos! Built with pride this 1,869 sq ft home has 3bd/3ba. The kitchen has granite counters, a breakfast bar, stainless appliances and custom cabinetry. Great room takes full advantage of its lake views with large picture windows, and has a high efficiency fireplace. Hardwood tile and carpet throughout the home. Heated tile flooring in the master bath. All nicely landscaped, with a fabulous in ground pool and deck! MLS®509814 - $389,000.

www.windermere.com

509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

616-4th Avenue S, Oroville – 2 bed, 1 bath: The remodel is nearly completed and is cute, cute, cute! This 2bedroom/1bath home is just a short walk from town, school & other amenities. Nicely fenced lot and one car detached garage. Great location on a corner lot. A real must see. Sold “AS IS”. NWML#497829 $91,000


Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JULY 11, 2013

COPS & COURTS Compiled by Zachery Van Brunt

Superior Court Criminal

Weyline E. Waleczak, 46, Tonasket, pleaded guilty July 2 to criminal trespassing, second-degree DWLS and third-degree attempted theft. Waleczak was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 214 days suspended for the first count, 90 days in jail for the second, and 364 days in jail with 214 suspended for the third. He also had a count of third-degree malicious mischief dismissed, and ordered to pay $1,110.50 in fines. LeAysha Lamariah Louis, 19, Omak, pleaded guilty July 2 to two counts of theft of a motor vehicle, three counts of seconddegree vehicle prowling, first-degree trafficking stolen property and third-degree theft. The crimes occurred April 8 and 15. Louis was sentenced to 90 days in jail each for three counts, and 364 days in jail with 274 days suspended for each of the remaining counts. The court also ordered $500 in fines to be paid. Malcolm David Carson, 33, Omak, pleaded guilty July 2 to thirddegree assault and third-degree theft. The crimes occurred May 14. Carson was sentenced to 14 months in prison for the first count and 364 days in jail with 274 days suspended for the second. He was also ordered to pay $1,110.50 in fines. The court found probable cause to charge Robert Esteve Salazar, 19, Tonasket, with three counts of second-degree rape of a child. The court found probable cause to charge Angelina Marie Jones, 26, Okanogan, with theft of a firearm, possession of a stolen firearm and carrying a concealed weapon. The court found probable cause to charge Patrick Lee Day, 43, Okanogan, with possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). The court found probable cause to charge Nathaniel Marcus Hamilton, 26, Seattle, with seconddegree assault (DV). The crime allegedly occurred in Omak on June 25. The court found probable cause to charge Geoffrey Christopher Mazalin, 40, with possession of a controlled substance (marijuana) with intent to deliver, and two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred June 26 in Oroville. The court found probable cause to charge Marcelino Corrales, no middle name listed, 47, Omak, with 14 counts of delivery of a controlled substance (cocaine) within 1,000 feet of a school zone, 17 counts of delivery of a controlled substance (cocaine), identity theft, money laundering and possession of a controlled substance (cocaine) with intent to deliver. The court found probable cause to charge Alberto Montejano-Rangel, 32, Okanogan, with delivery of a controlled substance (cocaine), and three counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). The court found probable cause to charge Rodrigo Taizan-Rodriguez, 26, Bridgeport, with two counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine), delivery of a controlled substance (cocaine), two counts of violations committed in or on certain public places or facilities, and possession of a controlled substance (cocaine) with intent to deliver. The court found probable cause to charge Annie Louise Scroggins, 41, Okanogan, with seven counts of distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine), and second-degree trafficking of stolen property.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, July 1, 2013 Burglary on Sand Dust Rd. in Omak. Harassment on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Missing property on Blackler Rd. near Oroville. Paddleboat reported missing. DWLS on Crumbacher Rd. near Tonasket. Illegal fireworks on Westlake Rd.

School Safety Officer still on call By Chief R. Clay Warnstaff Oroville Police Department

Greetings. As I stated at a council meeting several weeks back, I have received more and more requests from the school district to provide more of a law enforcement presence at the school if no more than making contact within the schools to build relationships with students and faculty alike. During an FBI conference I came up with the idea of basing an officer from within the school as kind of an “Asset Sharing Program” (Ms. Harvey’s words). I met with Mr. Quick, the school Superintendent, along with Mayor Chuck Spieth to include the Police Committee members Mr. Tony Koepke and Mr. John Neal. Everyone agreed that the program would be beneficial

near Oroville. Automobile theft on South Old Riverside Hwy. in Omak. Fraud on North Elm Hwy. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on Riverside Drive in Omak. Illegal fireworks on Golden Hwy. in Oroville. DWLS at Main Hwy. and 16th Ave. in Oroville. Jorge Antonio Portillo, 31, booked for felony harassment and a Border Patrol hold. Bruce Leroy Wisner Jr., 49, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. William Roy Snook, 67, booked for felony harassment (threats to kill) (DV). Tuesday, July 2, 2013 Found property on South First Hwy. in Okanogan. Handgun magazine reported found. One-vehicle wreck on Blue Lake Rd. near Oroville. No injuries reported. Weapons offense at Ironwood Hwy. and Apple Way in Oroville. DWLS on South Western Ave. in Tonasket. Malicious mischief on West Fourth Ave. in Omak. Vehicle reported keyed. Assault on West Central Ave. in Omak. Child abuse on Hwy. 97 in Oroville. Child left in vehicle. Theft on South Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Salvador Garcia-Sanchez, 26, booked for third-degree DWLS and a Border Patrol hold. Raymond James Tannehill, 22, booked for second-degree assault, second-degree malicious mischief (DV), and interfering with a report (DV). Ceclia Betty Barton, 57, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for reckless driving and two Tonasket Police Department FTA warrants: obstruction and resisting arrest. Alfonso Cardenas, no middle name listed, 55, booked for violation of protection order (DV). Robert Esteve Salazar, 19, booked for three counts of seconddegree rape of a child. Ethan Correll Green, 23, booked on two OCSO FTC warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Gerardo Guzman-Gutierrez, 33, booked for alien in possession of a firearm and a USBP hold. Wednesday, July 3, 2013 Theft on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Inboard motor boat reported missing, and later found on the eastern shore of Lake Osoyoos. No-contact order violation on Jasmine Hwy. in Omak. Theft on Bonaparte Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Cooler reported missing. Theft on Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. Warrant arrest on Main Hwy. in Oroville. DWLS at Dogwood Hwy. and Central Ave. in Oroville. Theft on South Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Suitcase reported missing. Automobile theft on West Third Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Main Hwy. in Oroville. Theft on West Jonathan in Tonasket. Two-vehicle wreck on South Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. David Wayne Zacherle, 48, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Ryan Matthew Heim, 27, booked for DUI. David Allen Stewart, 59, booked for first-degree criminal trespassing and possession of a legend drug without a prescription. Alan Forbes Price, 40, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Miguel Angel Pedraza Preciado, 31, booked on a Border Patrol hold. Juan Carlos Acevedo-Mendoza, 27, booked on a Border Patrol hold. Robert Jay Mercer, 56, committed by the Okanogan County Superior Court for felony possession of a controlled substance and use of drug paraphernalia. Thursday, July 4, 2013 Weapons offense on Engh Rd. in Omak. Alcohol offense on Chesaw Rd. in Chesaw. Tavern allegedly serving liquor after 2 a.m. DUI on Engh Rd. in Omak. Possible house fire on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Omache Drive in Omak. Assault on South Ash Hwy. in Omak.

FROM THE CHIEF’S DESK to the community as a whole and costs would be negligible. I was given the green light from the City Council and am glad to report that the School Safety Officer project is moving ahead as planned. I would like to clarify the purpose of the School Safety Officer, and that would be to respond to calls as usual from an office

Illegal fireworks on Appleway Hwy. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Main Hwy. in Oroville. Public intoxication at South Antwine Ave. and East Seventh in Tonasket. Xavier Lewis Smith, 22, booked on three FTA warrants: seconddegree burglary, residential burglary, and second-degree theft. Miguel Franco-Escobar, 30, booked on a Border Patrol hold. Enrique Garcia-Huerta, 35, booked on a Border Patrol hold. Shawn Robert Clark, 30, booked for DUI. Nichole Alice Boyce, 18, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and thirddegree malicious mischief (DV). Friday, July 5, 2013 Underage drinking on Eastside Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Okoma Drive in Omak. One-vehicle wreck on Conconully Rd. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Assault on Jasmine Hwy. in Omak. Assault on Oak Hwy. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Threats on South Birch Hwy. in Omak. Dustin David Blackburn, 35, booked for failure to register as a sex offender and a Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Joseph Kevin LaCourse, 38, booked for violation of a no-contact order and fourth-degree assault (DV). Adam Charles Luntsford, 39, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV), felony violation of protection order, and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Charles Marques Johnson, 38, booked on a Department of Corrections warrant. Saturday, July 6, 2013 Weapons offense on West Third Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Omak Ave. in Omak. One-vehicle wreck on Blue Lake Rd. near Oroville. Injuries reported. Wallet found on Sawtells Rd. near Oroville. Malicious mischief on North Second Ave. in Okanogan. Illegal fireworks on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Assault on North Juniper Hwy. in Omak. DWLS on West Central Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Alcohol offense at Veteran’s Memorial Park in Oroville. Illegal fireworks at Deep Bay Park in Oroville. Public indecency on East Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Theft at North Whitcomb Ave. and Havillah Rd. in Tonasket. House keys and vehicle keys reported missing. Robert Joe Storm, 32, booked for third-degree DWLS and a Department of Corrections warrant. Sunday, July 7, 2013 DUI on South Second Ave. in Okanogan. DUI on Golden Rd. near Oroville. Malicious mischief on Homestead Trailer Court Rd. in Tonasket. Hit-and-run wreck at South Third Ave. and Rose Hwy. in Okanogan. Motorcycle wreck on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Injuries reported. Illegal fireworks on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on South Second Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on South Ash Hwy. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Riverside Drive in Omak. DUI on Golden Rd. in Oroville. Theft on Kay Hwy. in Oroville. License plates reported missing. Theft on Fourth Ave. in Oroville. License plates reported missing. Jerry Ray Mears Jr., 25, booked for second-degree assault. Donovan Rae Nysti, 20, booked on a Department of Corrections warrant. Garrett Marlatt, no middle name listed, 22, booked for DUI and third-degree DWLS. Julio Madrigal, no middle name listed, 44, booked for DUI and on a Border Patrol hold. Jesus Guzman-Larios, 30, booked for third-degree assault. Thomas Lynn Brand, 70, booked for residential burglary and thirddegree malicious mischief.

from within the school, and to assist students and staff on law enforcement related issues as well as being a positive influence to the learning atmosphere. I have been advised by school staff that they will be able to provide a computer for the officer to conduct routine case work and investigations. As it looks now, the Oroville Police Department should be ready to operate out of the old athletic director’s office by the third week in July. That does it for this week, thanks, and have a great week!

Obituary

Susan Marie Whiteaker

Susan Marie Whiteaker

Susan Marie Whiteaker, 66, of Spokane died Monday July 1,

2013 at her home. She was born January 5, 1947 in River Falls, Wisconsin to her parents Daniel and Clara Mae DeMulling. After Sue’s first year of college, she met Jim Whiteaker on New Years Eve 1966. Three months later on March 18, 1967 they were married. Sue loved bingo, The Price is Right, The Mariners and Seahawks, traveling and her grandchildren. She was proceeded in death by her Mother, Clara Mae DeMulling. She is survived by her husband Jim; father Daniel F DeMulling, sister Patti Rottinghaus, brother Dan DeMulling and sister-inlaw Sandi Demulling, son Jim and daughter-in-law Christie, daughter Debi and son-in-law Martin Rosales. Grandchildren:

Jessica Rosales, Victoria Rosales, Samantha Rosales, Jason Whiteaker, Martin Rosales II, Katie Whiteaker, Armond Rosales and Alyx Whiteaker. Memorial service will be held Saturday July 20th at 11 a.m. at Jim and Sue’s home in Spokane.

Subscribe to the... Okanogan Valley

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church? OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Interim Visiting Pastors Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 11, 2013  

July 11, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 11, 2013  

July 11, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune