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SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, JULY 4, 2013 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Planner seeks to solidify pool vision

CHERRIES: FIRST THE RAIN, NOW THE HEAT

Some local growers are letting cherries go unpicked

Tonasket City Council votes to put criminal justice tax on ballot BY BRENT BAKER

BY GARY A. DEVON

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket City Planner Kurt Danison of Highland Associates reported at the Tuesday, June 25, city council meeting that he has been consulting with Pool World of Spokane to come up with a number of concept options for a potential replacement for the condemned city swimming pool. The pool has been closed since the end of the 2011 summer season. “The next step is to develop three conceptual designs as well as a color rendering of three options, as well as the estimated cost,” Danison said. “The idea is if we go through that process the community gets to decide what option or combination of options we have, and this is what it costs.” Danison said that pool design would be about 30 percent of the total cost. The big key will be the city’s ability to apply for a matching grant (50 percent), which Danison says won’t be successful unless the city has the matching funds already available, which it currently does not. Council member Scott Olson reiterated his opinion from many earlier discussions about the pool -- he feels the city can not take on the project by itself. “The city cannot subsidize a pool for the larger community,” he said. “We need to keep other people actively involved and not take this on ourselves.”

Major damage to crop

MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Cherry grower David Taber Jr. said rain has caused more damage with this season’s cherry crop than any he’s seen in two decades.

“We had all that rain and now we’re fighting a heat wave.”

Brent Baker/staff photo

Claire Jeffko (right) is sworn in by City Clerk Alice Attwood as the Tonasket City Council’s newest member. “I think the key to that will be actually having something tangible,” Danison said. “There will be ample opportunity for the community to step up. Best case is, we’ll get a 50 percent matching grant. And the only way we’re getting that is if we walk in with the money... (Even with one family pledging to donate a substantial sum) there will be a gap, maybe in the $3-400,000 range.” “I have no problem with us getting the pool,” council member Jean Ramsey said. “My concern is maintaining it.” “That’s why you have someone like Pool World involved,” Danison said. “They understand that and the different types of options and how much they will cost for the city to run it.” Danison also explained where

SEE COUNCIL | PG A3

Greg Moser Manager, Gold Digger Apples

Despite the sharp rise in temperatures this week, last week Taber and his crew were trying to thin off the splits caused by the rain and selectively pick the rest. That isn’t so easy he said, with some areas suffering much more than others. “A lot depends on the soil – if it holds the water then the trees just greedily keep drinking it up and we get more splits... it’s better in areas with sandy soil,” said Taber. “The damage, especially with the early varieties, is the worst I’ve seen in 20 years.” Greg Moser, general manager of Gold Digger Apples Inc., a grower’s cooperative, agrees and said the damage varies depending on where the trees are. Gary DeVon/staff photo “We’ve seen significant damage Despite the rain, there are still lots of cherries to pack at Gold Digger Apple Inc.’s cherry facility. While only one in some blocks,” said Moser. shift is going right now, the operation expects to add additional shifts as the season progresses. Workers are utilizing the old cherry line while a new more automated line from and Australian company is being added. SEE CHERRIES | PG A2

‘Doc’ Maycumber, veteran and veterinarian Fireworks

on at Deep Bay

BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

REPUBLIC - When one refers to a “vet,” there is sometimes confusion over whether we’re referring to a military veteran or a veterinarian. Hugh “Doc” Maycumber, as it turns out, is both, having served both as a U.S. Navy hospital corpsman in World War II and as a Tonasket animal doctor for 40 years. Born and raised in Republic, Maycumber had been eager to join the Navy from the time recruiters had come through the high school. “I wanted to go, but I needed my parent’s signature,” he says now. “But they just put it off and put it off, and a lot of guys my age were being drafted. “Right after Thanksgiving I took a little trip to Seattle. I signed up over there, Dec. 13, 1942.” It turned out to be a significant date. Upon returning home, he got an unexpected reaction from his dad. “’Oh my God,’ he says, ‘That’s the same day your Uncle Guy and I went in back in 1917.’ “It was just meant to be, I guess.” The Navy didn’t make it easy, of course. He was waiting at home in Republic for his orders when he received notice he was to be in Seattle by Jan. 6. Problem was, he received that information on Jan. 5. “I went into town and looked up a truck driver I knew that hauled freight and rode with him to Wilbur,” Maycumber says. “I caught a bus and was overnight getting to Seattle.” From there he was sent to boot camp

Good News, Bad News BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

Brent Baker/staff photo

Hugh “Doc” Maycumber shows off his hospital corpsman’s manual that he received during his training in 1943. He recorded his World War II travels inside the front and back covers though, he admits, he wasn’t supposed to. in Farragut, Idaho, with snow four feet deep that kept the men from getting any liberties until it melted in the spring. “On Saturdays,” he says, “we got to exercise in the gym.” Otherwise, it was marching in the snow for most of the 12 weeks of boot camp. He stayed on in Farragut for another six weeks for hospital corps

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 27

school. One item issued to him there he still has in his possession: his hospital corps manual in which he (illegally) kept a diary of his travels over the next three years. “You’re not supposed to keep a log of where you go,” Maycumber says. “But I did.” After a few months working at a North

Seattle Navy hospital, Maycumber was sent to Treasure Island (an artificial island in the San Francisco Bay acquired by the Navy in 1942). And there he waited for nearly three months. “I could just as well have been work-

SEE MAYCUMBER | PG A10

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE – The good news: This year’s Oroville Community Fireworks Display will burst into the sky above Deep Bay Park and Lake Osoyoos at dusk on the Fourth of July. The bad news: This could be the last year if someone doesn’t take over finding donations for the annual pyrotechnics display. Dane Forrester, who has volunteered his time gathering contributions and organizing the Oroville tradition is experiencing burn out. The event also falls at the worst time of year for him as he helps his dad in their cherry orchards during the harvest. He says Brian Sawyer, who got his license to touch off the popular Independence Day blast, doesn’t have the time to do the leg work to get the money it takes to reserve the fireworks for Oroville. So, unless there is a group or individual ready to step up and take over the funding side of the event, Forrester says this may be its last year. To help, contact the Gazette-Tribune at gdevon@gazettetribune.com.

Valley Life A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Business Directory A7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Cops & Courts A9-10 Obituaries A10


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JULY 4, 2013

Stalled payments frustrate hospital

TREES AT OROVILLE ELEMENTARY GET THE ‘AX’

NVH’s progress on warrants slowed by festering Medicare, Medicaid issues By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Nearly a dozen maple trees, said to be 100 plus years old, were cut down on the east side of the Oroville Elementary School this week to make room for more parking. The school district promises to replace the trees at the grade school, as well as the high school, with even more trees. The new trees at the elementary will be within the fence and will provide some much needed shade to the playground , visible here, at the primary end of the building. The old stumps will be ground down to allow paved parking, much of which was lost when a pick-up and drop-off zone was designated earlier this year. The tree removal has generated several critical comments on the social media site Facebook, although the district office has also received several complaints about the lack of parking as well.

CHERRIES | FROM A1 “Some growers are shutting down picking because it is just isn’t worth the cost of harvesting.” He added, “We had all that rain and now we’re fighting a heat wave. We have to worry about sunburn as well as cracks.” Moser said having a lot of rain and then a lot of heat is just not good for the fruit and will reduce the size of the crop considerably. His growers are doing a lot of sorting on the tree and in the bins before they get to the warehouse to insure only the best fruit is packed. “The market is going to remain strong for quality fruit. It is up to the grower to make sure they just bring us the best fruit to make sure we keep getting the best prices,” Moser said. The growers’ co-op’s GM said that Gold Digger isn’t even in the thick of it as far as the cherry harvest goes. In addition to plans to add more shifts at their cherry facility, Gold Digger expects 39 H2A Guest Workers to come in this week to help with the harvest in the field. Like the Taber and DelRosario Orchards, Gold Digger has secured several workers under the federal program to make sure there is no shortage

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Ron McDougall, an agricultural inspector with the Washington State Department of Agriculture for 23 years, pours a combination of crushed cherries, water and brown sugar into three tubs. McDougall will look for any signs of Western Cherry Fruit Fly. “Every load that comes in from the field we have to pull a sample from. The sample cherries are crushed and mixed with the brown sugar and water. We let it sit for five minutes and then observe. The solution would make any bugs rise to the surface. If larvae appear then the cherries would not qualify for sale to California or be certifiable to exporting countries. That load would need to be fumigated or destroyed,” said McDougall, who adds that so far this season has been clear of the fruit flies. of labor. The workers are housed in the trailers at the agricultural

workers camp under and agreement with the Oroville Housing

Authority, which runs the camp, as well as the Harvest Park.

Sheriff investigating Malott murder/suicide By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

MALOTT - A Malott man is suspected of fataly shooting his landlord before taking his own life last Monday afternoon. On Monday, July 1, at around

12:20 p.m. Okanogan County Sheriff ’s deputies responded to a shots fired call at 1481 Old Hwy. 97 in Malott, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. “When Deputies arrived at the scene they found two subjects, both dead at the scene from gun-

DNR sets Fire Danger to ‘moderate’ OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced Monday the following changes in fire danger rating and burn restrictions on DNR-protected lands. Effective midnight, July 2, 2013, the following changes will be implemented: • In Okanogan and Pend Oreille counties, the fire danger will increase from ‘low’ to ‘moderate.’ Effective midnight, July 5, 2013, the following changes will be implemented: • Ferry County and Stevens County, outside of Fire Districts 1 & 2, will increase to ‘moderate.’

WANT THE FACTS?

shot wounds,” said Sheriff Rogers. The investigation shows that William T. Bordua, 65, of Okanogan, and his wife Anita Bordua, had gone to the residence in Malott, which they own, to evict the subject living there, Tony J. Halford, 47 of 1481 Old Hwy 97 Malott. Apparently while the Borduas were in the bedroom in the house with Halford an argument ensued and Halford became aggressive towards Anita Bordua. “William Bordua stepped between Halford and his wife and at that time Halford reached

Lightning ignites fires Submitted by USFS Okanogan-Wenatchee Nat’l Forest

over to the bed and pulled a semi-automatic 40 caliber pistol from beneath the pillow and shot William Bordua once in the chest, killing him,” said Rogers. “Halford then told Anita Bordua the next bullet was for her but instead, Halford walked out onto the front porch and shot himself. Both William Bordua and Halford were pronounced dead at the scene.” Anita Bordua was not hurt during the incident. “This is the fourth murder in Okanogan County this year,” Rogers said.

Out On The Town

TONASKET - If glitches in the Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement system seem like an old story, it might be because it’s a problem that seems a long time in getting solved. The North Valley Hospital Board of Commissioners received a report at the Thursday, June 27 board meeting that persistent problems with receiving payments from the hospital district’s primary funding source are pushing the warrant level upward. As of June 27, the hospital district owed Okanogan County $1.696 million. By the same token, the NVH was owed hundreds of thousands of dollars by both Medicare and Medicaid that Chief Financial Officer Helen Verhasselt in the past has said would go directly toward paying down the hospital’s warrants. The problems are actually on two fronts. The first involves incentive payments from both Medicare and Medicaid for the hospital’s conversion to an approved electronic health records system (EHR). “There’s a little bit of confusion with Medicaid and the documentation they want,” Verhasselt said. “(Chargemaster) Patrick Plumb had been working on communication with the state to see if we can get that money sent sooner. We’ve been waiting on it for about six months. That process hasn’t happened. DZA (Dingus, Zaracor and Associates’, the hospital’s contracted auditor) is trying to help us push things through with the state.” The Medicare payment, which Verhasselt said would be for a significant amount, has also been subject to numerous delays, she said. “We’ve followed up with them,” she said. “We’ve sent them the documentation, then they were out of the office and didn’t look at our stuff for a few weeks... There’s only one cycle run each month. The cutoff day is the third Thursday of each month. In our case the earliest day it could be posted would be July 18. Once we’ve posted the payment its up to the EHR contractor to make the payment. The estimated time ... is 4-8 weeks “So because they were out

TONASKET - Forest Service firefighters provided initial attack response on Saturday, June 29 on fires caused by a lightning storm that came through Okanogan County. Along with DNR resources, they worked on fires in the McFarland area and on McClure Mountain, both south of Twisp. The small, tenth of an acre fire near McFarland Creek was controlled by mid-afternoon and firefighters are working on the small fire on McClure Mountain. Firefighters also responded to a report of smoke seen from the Aeneas Lookout northeast of

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Tonasket. “The lightning storm traveled across much of central and eastern Washington,” said Shannon O’Brien, Public Affairs Specialist. “As we go into the July 4 holiday, it is important that everyone do what they can to avoid starting human caused fires.”

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doing audits for two weeks they didn’t have time to review our information, they missed a whole ‘nother month. It keeps pushing us off further and further.” Additionally, technical issues originating with Medicare administrative contractor Noridian Healthcare Solutions, have caused numerous claims to be erroneously rejected. While the Noridian website acknowledges the nationwide problem, a solution has not been forthcoming in the time period since an April 25 announcement. “So we’ve had to bill everything that was on the universal bill and withhold everything that was a Pro Fee until the glitch was resolved,” said Patient Financial Services director Jana Symonds. “They said not to appeal the claims, not to do anything different; they would let them pass through as they came. The pass-through hasn’t come yet. Anything after May 2 was supposed to be cleared.” Verhasselt said that the problem actually seems to be worsening. “They still don’t know when their system will be fixed so that those claims can be reprocessed,” she said. “I also found out from one of the billers this afternoon, if there is a corrective claim we have to send in to Medicare - a charge missing or whatever - and they’d already made a payment on the original claim that went through, Medicare is taking back the money they originally paid us, but because of their system errors, they are not reprocessing the corrected claims. “So our cash flow is going down, and our warrants are creeping back up.” “What kind of alternatives do we have?” asked commissioner Lael Duncan. “Do we have any leverage?” “This is a nationwide issue, not something unique to our facility,” Verhasselt said. Duncan suggested that contacting legislators might be useful. “It would definitely get their attention if a senator’s office called them to ask what was going on,” she said. “You don’t want to use that card too often. But ultimately, that is their boss.” The board of commissioners next meets on Thursday, July 11, at 7:00 p.m.

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JULY 4, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

COUNCIL | FROM A1 the funding for the Pool World lead work would come from. “Two years ago, when we hired the previous consultant, the council authorized $47-50,000 out of real estate excise tax money,” he said. “We only spent $25,000 of that. We’re not talking about spending the money we’ve set aside from not having a pool to maintain. We’re talking about money that is dedicated, capital improvement funds, that is totally separate, and possibly some of the memorial fund.” “I just want to make sure we’re very transparent about where the money is coming from,” Olson said, “so no one comes back later and asks what happened to it.” Danison also reported on a number of other items, including the Planning Commission’s assessment of the council’s suggestions regarding changes to the land use designation map. Some of the recommendations were accepted, others not. Danison suggested a public forum at a future council meeting to inform the public of upcoming changes to land use designations in some areas of town. “Some areas will have their land use designations changed based upon the commission’s recommendation,” he said. “One of the concerns (in making those recommendations), for example, if we change the zoning from R2 to R1, how many non-conforming lots are created?... You don’t have to have a hearing, but there are changes to the map... It gives the public one more time to have a look at it.” A public forum will be added to the July 23 city council meeting to review the changes.

Council doesn’t budge on streets After another discussion with Tonasket Avenue residents unhappy with the new ordinance that made the portion between Third and Division Streets a one-way drive, the council members agreed that it was far too early to make any changes or reverse course. “We need to make a decision and then stick with it for awhile,” Olson said. “One, to find out how it plays out and two, encourage people to stay abreast of what’s happening. Reactionary meetings get us stuck in reactionary mode and I want to avoid that.” Christina Collins, who had been at the previous council meeting to protest the changes, said during public comment that she had done some research indicating that the one-way could increase speeding and decrease property values, but said that the inconvenience was the number one factor driving her concern. Lisa Andrews, who worked with Police Chief Rob Burks and former Public Works Director Bill Pilkinton to come up with a compromise on the street’s

parking issues, felt that further changes weren’t necessary on the street, partly because, she said, the parking ordinance the council adopted last year was different than what she, Burks and Pilkinton had hammer out. Later in the meeting, the council discussed how it should handle the revisiting of publicly advertised and voted-on decisions. None of the council members looked favorably upon backtracking recently-approved ordinances that took years of discussion to bring to the table. “We can second guess every decision and change our mind half a dozen times,” Ramsey said. “When it takes us two years to make a decision, I don’t know why we need to revisit it yet again. We asked for public input, we took two years to make a choice, and the public doesn’t care until the decision is made. And then we hear about it. “There isn’t a darn thing we can do ordinance-wise that we can’t undo if it doesn’t work.” “We made the decision, and we took a lot of time to make that decision,” council member Jill Vugteveen said. “It wasn’t based just on the original ordinance we created to eliminate some of those issues from the city’s operational standpoint as well as your personal situation. We didn’t get a lot of compliance. We did get some, but it was mainly from he people who were proactive in coming to meetings and working with us. I don’t feel like (backtracking would be) fair to the ones who were involved in the process.” After some further discussion, Mayor Patrick Plumb concluded the discussion with his own remarks. “I’ve heard ‘everybody, nobody, ever, never and my,’” the mayor said. “Reality is, no one owns that street in front of that house. Not you, your neighbor, or me. There’s not a designated spot. So we need to be careful when we say ‘Everybody doesn’t like,’ or ‘Nobody doesn’t like,’ we need to just speak for ourselves... “We’ll make decisions for what we think is the best, but if it were that easy we would have done so a long time ago. We appreciate you coming in. Christina. I appreciate your being open and honest. We’re all human and we’ll keep trying.”

Transport tax panned Plumb reported on his attendance at the Okanogan County Public Transportation Board Authority meeting the previous night, sharing that the various entities from around the county that attended did not support a proposed 0.4 percent addition to the sales tax to help fund an expanded transportation system. “I expressed that the council had consensus to not support the 0.4 thing on the ballot,” he said. “I was just about to start to talk about that when Omak said they didn’t support it either.” he said. “The

divide really was between the north and the south.” Vugteveen, who was Plumb’s alternate to a previous transportation board meeting, said that issues had been presented to that board but, “I thought they’d fallen on deaf ears,” she said. “A lot of edits we asked for were not made and when we asked why at the following meeting, they made it sound like that had nothing to do with how it was written and it would be decided by the person that was appointed to manage it.” The council had, at a public meeting that no one but its members attended, agreed that it “could not support that level of increase in the sales tax without more marked benefits to the City of Tonasket,” Plumb said. “The word I took away from that meeting was ‘dogpile,’” he added, “and not in the sense of poop. But in the sense, as a large group of people in this county, we’re going to be asked for a half a percent increase in a lot of these municipalities. Omak has also approached the county about a mosquito control district... that would need sales tax to support that also.” He added that the city’s stand is not that it doesn’t support the transportation system, just not the 0.4 percent increase. “They presented three different options,” Vugteveen said. “Each had a different expectation of taxes to cover it. This is the most grandiose of the three... I feel that one of the lesser tax options might be more successful and more practical for our county’s needs.”

Criminal justice tax to ballot Voters will, however, get the chance to decide whether or not to add 0.1 percent to the sales tax for local criminal justice. “We’re putting it toward jail fees and dispatch fees, though it won’t cover those fully,” Plumb said. “It’s for putting people into custody for supposed crimes they’ve committed, public defenders, and paying the county to dispatch our officers using the radio system.” “I think it’s inevitable, our little town, with dispatch and jail fees going up, and our revenue staying stagnant, we have to start looking at a way to pay for our law enforcement,” Ramsey said, reflecting the consensus of the council, which voted unanimously to put it on the ballot this fall. “This goes a little ways. “I’d rather pay this than lose protection. This is something I can agree to pay tax money on. A bus, not so much, I’m sorry.” “It’s important that we show people that this is not for anything new,” Olson said. “This is just to cover costs that we are already incurring.” “The costs are going up, but the money we have to work with is the same,” said council member Dennis Brown. “We have to do something. It’s not what I’d prefer, but it needs to be done.”

RICE RETIRES; JEFFKO APPOINTED TO COUNCIL

TONASKET - Two familiar Tonasket faces stood front and center to lead off the Tuesday, June 25, session of the Tonasket City Council, as longtime police officer Jim Rice was honored for his years of service in his final week of active duty, and Claire Jeffko was sworn in to fill an empty seat on the council. Police Chief Rob Burks presented Rice with a plaque adorned with an old-model radar gun (above) and talked about Rice’s unrelenting enthusiasm for his work and determination to solve even the most vexing of cases. “Jim is a guy I rave about at training,” Burks said. I’ve got a guy ... who’s in his 60s, doing it forever. He probably pulled Moses over when he got his license. He’s just as excited today as when he started, and you don’t see that. “We usually burn out within five years. We either quit, get over it, turn ourselves around, or just become one of those grumpy cops. Jim never did that. He’s had grumpy moments, but he’s always been excited about being a cop.” “Tonasket has always been very good to me,” Rice said of his 23 years in Tonasket. “That’s why I’ve gone as far as I have here.” Each of the city council members had plenty to say. “I want to thank you for ... when I had a career as a bartender, knowing I never had to step outside at closing time and be alone,” said council member Jean Ramsey. “I’d look outside and there’d be Jim. I’d lock up; he’d go one way and I’d go the other. I really appreciated that all these years.” “I really like you as a police officer,” said council member Dennis Brown. “You helped me out several times. I really appreciate all you’ve done for me. But as a friend, you can’t be beat. My best friend, and it’ll always be that way.” “Knowing you on the fire department and your leadership there has been wonderful,” said council member Scott Olson. “I don’t know how Chief Burks will do without you. You’re a leader among people and a good trainer... I hope you’ll find a way to still help guide the force because you’re an important part of it. Thank you for all you’ve done.” “Obviously you’ll be missed, and Rob has a tough time filling your shoes,” said council member Jill Vugteveen. “You’re irreplaceable. I know we’ll see you again. I’m sure you’ll be helping when there is a need, because that’s just who you are. “ Mayor Patrick Plumb opened with a review of Rice’s lengthy career, which began in 1979 with the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Department. “Jim kept us safe while we slept,” Plumb said. “Jim kept us safe when we were awake. Jim has been there when you’ve said, ‘I’m down, I’m out....’ He’s been there for a lot of kids... Everyone’s got a story.” Meanwhile, Jeffko was appointed to the seat recently vacated by Lee Hale, who accepted employment out of the area. Jeffko in effect gets a head start on the council as she is running unopposed for the seat this November. When asked why she wanted a seat on the council, she said, “This town has been very good to me. I want to give back.” Council member Scott Olson requested a brief executive session, after which the council unanimously voted to appoint her to fill Hale’s unexpired term.

Sewer issues Vugteveen said a tour of aging sewer facilities that serve the Parry’s Acres/ John’s Landing area was an eye-opener. “(City manager) Hugh Jensen showed me where the issues were,” she said. “I could tell it needs attention. From what I saw, it’s functioning now but I would encourage the council to be proactive and not wait for them to fail.” The pipes themselves are not the issue

so much as the pumping stations. “If we can’t invest in the system, we should consider annexing those areas,” she said. “It will be an expensive endeavor. And if we can’t deal with it, we need to discuss giving it back to the county.” Olson agreed that it was an issue that would need to be discussed soon. The council next meets on Tuesday, July 9, at 7 p.m. in the council chambers at City Hall.

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Mine Rescue Team Finds Success at Competition The Buckhorn Mine Rescue Team brought home second and third place awards from the Central Mine Rescue Competition held recently in Kellogg, ID. Team members showed advanced skill and knowledge in first aid, a field scenario, technician skill testing, and team trainer competency against teams assembled from four states and Mexico. Bill Kellogg, Cody Brown, and Glenn Booher led the team to a third place award in the first aid competition. They proved their first aid knowledge in a scenario of an employee injured by an electrical panel explosion. The hypothetical victim needed immediate attention to steel shrapnel embedded in their neck and chest. They worked quickly to treat the injuries according to training they had received. The two panel judges watched closely for the team’s diagnosis and treatment of symptoms including bleeding, shock, airway obstruction, Eric Turner checks the ITX flash burns, and imgas instrument for any paled objects. problems. Cameron Patrick and Eric Turner also brought home a third place award at the technician skill station. They

Jason Archuleta, Glenn Booher, Tim Scriver, Cameron Patrick and Eric Turner prepare to explore the mock mine.

debugged five self-contained breathing apparatus’ (Drager BG-4) and two gas meters (ITX). Cameron and Eric explained to the judges each step as they inspected and repaired each device. The exercise required them to know how to react to alerts given by the devices. After they had assembled the equipment they and the rest of the mine rescue team were ready for the field exercise. Team Captain, Eric Turner led his team consisting of Jason Archuleta, Glenn Booher, Cameron Patrick, and Tim Scriver (co-team captain) to a second place victory in the field competition with a scenario of an evacuated mine due to a fire. They wore breathing apparatus’ while pulling a 100lb

stokes basket loaded with first aid, bulkhead, and firefighting supplies. Bill Kellogg and Cody Brown worked at a fresh air base station outside the mine tracking the team’s progress, findings, as well as the medical condition of victims found. Four judges graded the seven competing teams according to the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) Mine Rescue Manual. They received points according to their ability to seal areas traveled, track mine gasses, Patrick examines inspect ventilation Cameron the BG-4 for malfunctions. systems, note ground conditions, and render first aid. At the end of the competition, the Buckhorn Mine Rescue Team was awarded an unofficial second place overall for their skills and competency in all the events held The Central Mine Rescue Competition is held annually and is hosted by MSHA. Team members are now gearing up for the national competition against teams from all over the United States held in Reno, Nevada at the end of July. We are proud of the Mine Rescue Team’s achievements and wish them luck at nationals.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 4, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

‘CAT BALLOU’ LIGHTS UP THE STAGE

“The Legend of Cat Ballou” completed its run at the CCC of Tonasket last week, performing to nearly-full houses for each showing. The play was directed by Sarah Kaiser and supported with resources of talent and money from throughout the community. Above, Clay Boone (Matt Smith), with help from co-conspirator Cat Ballou (Aly Parigrew) surprise the Baggage Car Guy (John Oelund). Far left, the script included nods to a number of local institutions, including the Gazette-Tribune. Right, Scott Olson hams it up as fauxpreacher Uncle Jed. Photos by Brent Baker

Left, Hedda (Allene Halliday) dazzles by channeling her younger self with a dance routine. Below right, Pa Ballou (Rob Thompson) gets help from Uncle Jed and Clay Boone after a Barter Faire experience. Below, Sir Harry Percival (Nick Watts) takes Cat’s bait, hook, line and sinker.


JULY 4, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Should have had a discussion before cutting trees

If social media means anything, then Oroville’s school superintendent’s ears are probably burning. He’s getting the brunt of the criticism on Facebook since the district decided to cut down a dozen 100-plusyear-old maple trees on the east side of the elementary school. Unfortunately, he’s off on vacation this week and we weren’t able to ask him about this irreversible decision. A call to the district office got the response the trees were removed in order to make room for more parking. In fact, there was some mention about complaints on another Facebook page about the lack of parking at the grade school. It seems the district might have traded one set of complaints for another. There was also mention that the trees dripped sap on to the cars parked under them. That’s been happening for a long time. That could have Out of been fixed with proper pruning and a couple sprays a year. Or, if you’re worried about sprayMy Mind ing, then buy some ladybugs and control the Gary A. DeVon aphids using biological means – don’t cut down the trees. On the Facebook front, Crisha Warnstaff, who started the conversation, said her research shows trees in the city’s right-of-way are the city’s responsibility. She said a search of the recent minutes of the city council and the school board doesn’t mention these particular trees at all. It definitely wasn’t discussed at any of the recent meetings as the G-T was in attendance. I do know, however, that I mentioned the trees while on the building tour of the elementary at the last school board meeting - I don’t remember hearing they were going to be cut and replaced. Last Monday morning I saw what I thought was a severe pruning job early last Monday morning. What I didn’t know was how severe it would turn out to be – pruned nearly to the ground level, leaving ugly stumps behind. More parking is needed at the elementary, but rather than just cutting the trees down – acting first and begging forgiveness later – the issue should have been discussed and explained. Planting new trees at the grade school and high school, inside the fence, will be a good thing. But replacing the shade for kids on the primary end playground will take many years. Replacing the energy savings from the shade on the building will also take time. Trees provide shade, beauty, habitat, oxygen and much more. Oroville is a member of Tree City USA and has a tree board. Was the board consulted? Trees are an emotional subject with most of us. I can still remember the uproar, most coming from the Senior Citizens Center, when several trees were cut down at Henry Kniss Riverside Park. Many remember the rope swing from which we launched ourselves out into the river. Perhaps one of the most visible reminders of tree cutting gone wild was the loss of the huge maples that used to line the south side of Central Avenue. It was the only street that we had with big trees on both sides – spectacular in spring and fall. Paved parking at the elementary is needed, especially in light of the parking lost to the pick-up and drop-off zone. However, if the district administrator is going to take a step bound to raise emotions, it should have been discussed with the community first. The community at large still might not have liked it, but at least they could have known the reason behind the decision. Enjoy your vacation while you can; I see some emotion-packed board meetings when you return.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Beware fly-by-night salesmen Dear Editor, Concerning ATV’s being allowed on Tonasket city streets. I was generally opposed to allowing ATVs-the added noise, the zippiness of small rigs, the concern about liability insurance and the major traffic flow on US 97. I, being older and kind of conservative, also tend to oppose anything new . I did notice some things though that I would like to point out. There were two candidates for the vacant position who were interviewed for the open seat. One candidate was asked if she had an agenda to which she replied she did not. When Mr. Hale was interviewed he was not asked if he had an agenda, but maybe that was because everyone knew what his agenda was, i.e., getting the city to pass an ordinance allowing ATVs on city streets. When one of the interviewers stated that one had to be committed and asked if Hale was ready, he answered in the affirmative. Lee Hale stated that he was concerned about people moving into the area and trying to apply west coast ways (You mean to use democratic means to change things to how they might like them?). Maybe that was the bone that convinced Mayor Plumb to vote to appoint Lee Hale as councilman. I also noted that the draft ordinance was passed in the absence of councilman Scott Olson who had generally opposed allowing ATVs in Tonasket. You might have thought that the mayor would have wanted councilman Olson present to legitimize the vote if nothing else even though it would not have changed the outcome. After serving on the council for just over two months and attending five of six meetings including one at which he arrived one hour late, Lee Hale announced he had sold his house and was moving, necessitating his resigning from the council. Some commitment. Maybe when Hale joined the council he had no idea he would be moving, but one has to wonder. Hale joined the council on

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR February 12. He put his house up for sale on February 28. The vote for the Draft ATV Ordinance was March 12. Now I have not had any problem with ATVs on the streets, in fact, I haven’t even seen one since the ordinance passed. I do hope ATV riders will follow the established rules and will exercise extra caution during this period of automobile drivers and pedestrians getting use to their being part of the mix. I also hope that the police department will be assiduous in enforcing the ordinance. As far as people like Hale getting onto the council with a strong agenda (and then slipping away after getting what they want), it’s okay if you are for what they were for, but you should understand what it’s like if you don’t like their agenda. As far as the council filling open seats, perhaps they should try to avoid appointing people with glaring agendas. And I might add that people moving into our area to stay with their west coast ways might be better than fly-by-night salesmen like Hale. Rob Thompson Tonasket

Supporting Sen. Smith by a narrow margin Dear Editor, I attended a Farm Bureau debate (in midJune) featuring the candidates running for the Seventh district WA state senate seat. All three republicans seemed like smart, principled men of character. Mike Brunson was the older candidate by a comfortable margin, a jack of many trades retired from the Air Force, now a PI from way eastern Washington State. Brian Dansel is much younger, a (neighboring) Ferry County com-

missioner. John Smith is the Stevens County business consultant recently appointed to serve out the term of highly regarded retired state senator Bob Morton. Brunson wore a gray suit, was affable, at ease, casual. Dansel wore a navy blazer and khakis, was poised yet aggressive, smiled occasionally, took the fight to Smith on a couple of issues. Smith wore a working shirt and jeans, was intense, erudite, driven. He never smiled and seemed mildly tired, possibly because he was six hours into a nine hour drive from Olympia to his home and family. Go figure. For what it’s worth to anyone, I give the edge to incumbent Senator John Smith, by the narrowest of margins over Brian Dansel. I was quite impressed with Dansel - he’s a sharp pit bull who knows what he’s out to achieve and leaves no doubt that he intends to achieve it. Regardless, I was also impressed with John Smith, a businessman, rancher and farmer who was always up to the task tonight except for one deer-in-the-headlights, Rick Perry moment when he blanked trying to remember the name of some organization he intended to mention. (I write that off to six hours on the road after the frustrations of butting heads with the Olympia asylum. They’d be having to CPR me after that.) Mike Brunson is a good man, I’ve no doubt, but even he admitted he’d never been to Okanogan County before tonight, cementing a fear I have of him being a little too far-eastern Washington than is good for Okanogan County. It’s not the fault of the other two candidates but, while all were good, Smith has the advantage of a few months experience in the office he’s running for and it shows. I’ll be watching Brian Dansel with great interest because I think he has a future in Washington politics, but in the end I feel like the 7th district seat in the Washington senate is well filled by John Smith. Assuming John doesn’t show up on YouTube peddling his package in his underwear - and I’ll risk it - I’ll vote to reelect him. William Slusher Riverside

Torture is torture - It’s illegal and wrong OPINION BY DAVID P. GUSHEE AND WILLIAM S. SESSIONS

Twenty-five years ago, President Ronald Reagan vigorously championed U.S. ratification of the international Convention Against Torture, which he signed on April 18, 1988. Reagan acclaimed it as having marked a significant step in the development of international measures against torture and other inhuman treatment. “Ratification of the Convention by the United States,” Reagan wrote, “will clearly express United States opposition to torture, an abhorrent practice unfortunately prevalent in the world today.” Little could he have known that the United States would itself soon engage in this “abhorrent practice.” That our government authorized and permitted the torture of a number of suspected terrorists and other detainees in its custody is one of the key conclusions reached in a comprehensive report released earlier this month by The Constitution Project’s Task Force on Detainee Treatment, an independent bipartisan group charged with examining the treatment of people captured in response to the global terrorist threat during the last three administrations. Without a doubt, the terrorist attacks of September 11 were among the most heinous acts ever visited upon this nation, a clear violation of the laws of war and any kind of civilized moral code. Nevertheless, the torture of suspected terrorists, no matter how monstrous their alleged crimes or connections, is expressly proscribed by American and international law. The legal prohibition against torture is rooted in our Bill of Rights;

the explicit rejection of torture, even in the middle of national emergencies, dates back at least to Abraham Lincoln and the American Civil War. Torture is not a concept whose definition exists in the eye of the beholder. The U.S. government has historically condemned many of the same interrogation practices used by U.S. personnel against terror suspects in the wake of 9/11. Waterboarding, stress positions, extended sleep deprivation, nudity and prolonged solitary confinement have all been deplored by the U.S. State Department when practiced by other countries, by U.S. civilian courts in cases other than those dealing with terrorism, and by respected global humanitarian organizations such as the International Committee for the Red Cross. If these techniques are torture when others in engage in them, how can they be anything less when we use them ourselves? We are troubled that so many high-ranking former political and military leaders continue to suggest that there is a legal or moral justification for torture. They argue that lawyers in the Office of Legal Counsel approved the use of certain interrogation techniques because they defined them as not being torture. Those opinions, since repudiated by legal experts and the OLC itself, relied not only on a very narrow legal definition of torture but also on factual representations about how the techniques would be implemented that later proved inaccurate. Those who sincerely believe that the ends justify the means when it comes to coercive interrogations are free to try to change national and international laws. But they are not free to ignore those laws.

Much of the torture that occurred in Iraq and Afghanistan was never explicitly authorized. However, once the Bush administration declared that the Geneva Conventions, a venerable instrument for ensuring humane treatment of prisoners in time of war, did not apply to captives in Afghanistan or Guantanamo, many lower-level troops said they believed that “the gloves were off” regarding treatment of prisoners. Loosening restrictions on physical and mental cruelty dehumanizes not just detainees but also their captors. In the heat of military conflict, amidst a climate of fear and loathing of the enemy, what may be intended as carefully calibrated interrogation techniques to be used on a few “high-value” detainees can quickly devolve into the infliction of pain for the sheer fun of it. The attitude among the higher-ups that allowed the setting aside of traditional legal rules that protected captives in a few instances quickly dropped down the chain of command, and led directly to the abuses at Abu Ghraib and elsewhere. Regardless of political party, the leaders of this country should acknowledge that the authorization and practice of torture and cruelty after September 11 was a grave error and take the steps necessary to ensure that it cannot be repeated. As a nation, we must recognize that our government is not exempt from the rule of law. Only then can we reclaim a role of moral leadership in the world. Dr. David P. Gushee is Distinguished University Professor at Mercer University and Director of the Center for Theology and Public Life. William S. Sessions served three U.S. presidents as Director of the FBI.


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JULY 4, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Happy 4th of July

Summer making a comeback Submitted by Lyle Anderson Tonasket Eagles #3002

Well, summer has reared its head this week and gave us some very warm temperatures, so hoping you all have gotten those air conditioners up and running. A big thank you to all the people that came and ate and enjoyed

TONASKET EAGLES the dessert auction for our local police dog Zeus. Well, we have had our annual visit from the Aerie and Auxiliary State Presidents, and would like to thank all those that attended and helped out on the June 2nd. There will be no bingo or kitchen this Friday due to the

ISSUING A CHALLENGE

holiday. There will be karaoke this Saturday at 9 p.m. by Robin. This past Sunday’s pinochle scores are as follows. Bill Maple and Duane Wilson took 1st place and Jo Porter and Ken Cook snatched up 2nd place and the last pinochle of the day. Cathy Moore and Morrie DeBack was our low score for the day. We wish those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Chesaw Rodeo is always a lot of fun

in medication are being administered and he can be monitored to see the effects. Hopefully that will put an end to the small strokes he had been having. Sometimes too much medication can be detrimental, when less is beneficial. Kathy Godwin has recently been taken to the University Hospital for evaluation, which seems quite serious. And it was reported that Peggy (Buckmiller) Wall has an abdominal infection added to her other health issues. Farmer’s market is being held each Saturday, but my favorite things, cukes and tomatoes, are still a long ways from being ready. Have you seen some of the huge radishes? Elsa Lewis had some that looked like turnips when sliced into discs. Another “ole timer” in the community, Lew Rider, who at 102-years-of-age, passed away, last week at the Extended Care facility in Tonasket. He was a

The big day is here by Marianne Knight Highlands correspondent

The “BIG” day is here. Don’t forget your water bottle, sunscreen and wear your light colored clothing to help you keep cool.

The Rodeo Club has worked hard to get everything ready. The food venders will be ready to serve you and the craft peo-

DENTISTRY

EYECARE

submitted photo

Ernie Wisdom, Oroville Eagle Trustee, presents Kristen Sarmiento, Oroville High School Principal, with a donation of $250. The money was raised at a recent Eagle event and will help with a fund that aids students from low income families. The fund was at zero prior to the donation. The Oroville Eagles is issuing a friendly challenge to other clubs and organizations to help this fund before the coming school year.

Wave your flags! Independence Day is here! This is also the 70th anniversary of the Chesaw Rodeo. Always a lot of fun to watch the kids try to catch a chicken or ride a calf and watch the big kids try to milk a cow on the run. Heritage Days in Oroville will be the 19th and 20th of July. The Senior Center will be serving pies on the Museum veranda right next to Bob Seaman and his homemade ice cream. Many events are planned for the day including a breakfast served by Walt Hart and Troop 26. Breakfast will be served at the Senior Center from 7:00 to 10:00 A. M. Pinochle scores for June 29: Door prize won by Barbara Cline; Dolly had most pinochles; Nellie Paulson had the high score for the ladies and Ted Zachman had the high score for men. More next time.

Plan Ahead For Your Own Financial Independence Day FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

This week, we celebrate Independence Day with fireworks, sparklers, picnics and parades. Amidst the hoopla, though, it’s always important to reflect on the many freedoms we enjoy in this country. And as an individual, you may want to use the occasion to think of another type of independence you’d like to enjoy — financial independence. In some ways, we are living in a time when attaining financial freedom is more difficult than it has been for quite a while. We’re still recovering from the bursting of the housing bubble and the lingering effects of the Great Recession. Furthermore, wage stagnation is a real problem. In fact, median income for working-age households — those headed by someone under age 65 — actually slid 12.4 percent from 2000 to 2011. Taken together, these factors certainly impose

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challenges on anyone seeking to become thing, don’t become dependent on “hot financially independent and eventually enjoy tips” or other questionable financial advice about The Next Big Thing in the investment a comfortable retirement. world from so-called experts who often have Still, you need to do everything you can poor prognostication records. Even more to put yourself on the path to financial importantly, though, their advice may simply independence. For starters, make full use of be inappropriate for your needs and risk whatever resources are available to you. If tolerance. you have a 401(k) or similar retirement plan at work, try to contribute as much as you can Finally, consider these two suggestions: possibly afford — and every time you get a Maintain adequate liquidity and keep your raise in salary, increase your contributions. debt levels as low as possible. By having At the very least, put in enough to earn your enough cash reserves to cover unexpected employer’s matching contribution, if one is costs, such as a major car repair or a new airoffered. Also, within your 401(k) or similar conditioning unit, you won’t have to dip into plan, choose an investment mix that offers your long-term investments. And by keeping you the chance to achieve the growth you your debt payments down, you’ll have a will need to make progress toward the type of stronger cash flow, which means you’ll have more money available to save and invest for retirement lifestyle you’ve envisioned. your future. In addition to contributing to your 401(k), you can also take advantage of another Each one of these suggestions will require a retirement account: a traditional or Roth commitment on your part, along with a clear IRA. Like a 401(k), a traditional IRA grows focus on your goal of financial independence tax deferred, while a Roth IRA can grow tax — there just aren’t any “short cuts.” But with a free, provided you meet certain conditions. consistent effort, you can keep moving along Plus, you can fund your IRA with virtually any on your journey toward your own Financial type of investment, including stocks, bonds, Independence Day. certificates of deposit and Treasury securities. This article was written by Edward Jones for What else can you do to help yourself move use by your local Edward Jones Financial toward financial independence? For one Advisor. 312 S. Whitcomb

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ple will be all set to sell their products. There will be jewelry, T-shirts, plants and flowers, handmade items and much, much more. Family Sports start at 10 a.m., the parade starts at 12:30 p.m, with the Fourth of July Rodeo starting at 1p.m. See You In Chesaw on July 4th.

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

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very friendly sort of fellow with a lot of stories to share, especially those that pertained to the logging industry. It was good to recently see Ernie and Lavina Field and their daughter Laura. Too many years had passed and I didn’t recognize them. They have lived in Omak, several years, since moving from Oroville. It would seem that soon there will be the opening of a new gas station, at the site of the tax free smoke shop located a short distance from Oroville, south on Hwy. 97, and it is rumored that gas prices will be significantly less. That is good news to the consumer but perhaps the station owners in town aren’t very elated. Time will tell the results. There does seem to be great fluctuations in gas prices with just 30 miles distances separating towns and even more so between here and Wenatchee.

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A year ago as I write this, always placed a kiss on his July 2nd, friend husband forehead as she left the room was two days out of what (I don’t know if we paid extra was to be a simple surfor that). We’re glad to report gery. All was well and he that a year has been helpful watched fireworks from his in getting somewhat “back to hospital bed and then it was normal.” downhill after that. Three We’ve had a bunch of rain months later he was finally and now we’re being threat“outa there.” ened with HOT, extreme hot in By that time we were on some places. Not a happy time a first name basis with doc- THIS & THAT for the cherry growers, here. tors and nurses and hop- Joyce Emry There was lightening, thunder ing that we never had to and all kinds of nasty things enter Central Washington happening. Hospital again. I think he does still Cherry harvest was not good this year, remember the one little lady doctor, that

and even worse in Wenatchee. There were four fellows came from there to find jobs picking, here in Oroville. Oh! the woes of the farmer! Helicopters have been buzzing, especially after another rainstorm, blowing water off the cherries to help avoid spilling of the fruit. A costly procedure but if it helps ya’ gotta go for it. Last week we had the two pit bulls calling on us again. I am not too happy with dogs coming into our yard, (even on the deck) barking at me as if I was intruding on them, instead of the other way around. If people want to have that type of dog they should keep them home, or so it seems to me. I’m glad to report that Joe Allemandi is out of the hospital and home where he is resting and hopefully gaining strength. Bud Gerken has been transferred to Tonasket hospital, where some changes

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JULY 4, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life

Adult arts and crafts at CCC Submitted by Janet Culp

CCC of Tonasket

TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket presents the Adult Arts and Crafts Week, July 8-12. Classes are three hours long, from 9 a.m.-noon and 1-4 p.m. Cost to take each class is $25, plus materials fees if listed.

Choose from collage, knitting, crocheting, guitar lessons, rug making, various art offerings, cooking, jam/jelly making, recycle art, story-telling, and more. Please check out our Web Site for class descriptions at http://communityculturalcenter.org or by typing in “Community Cultural Center of Tonasket” in your search engine.

There is an application form to fill out with directions to either mail or drop off with your check enclosed. All proceeds go to pay our instructors and to support our operation of the Community Center. Please call the CCC at (509) 486-1328 for more info, or come in and pick up a course description booklet and application.

is an idea, a way of living and a way of eating. Although international in scope, Slow Food is entirely grassroots and works to link the pleasure of food with a commitment to community and the environment. The Slow Food vision is “Food is a common language and a universal right. Slow Food USA envisions a world in which all people can eat food that is good for them, good for the people who grow it and good for the planet.” This vision is pursued by: • Raising public awareness, improving access and encouraging the enjoyment of foods that are local, seasonal and sustainably grown; • Caring for the land and protecting biodiversity for today’s communities and future generations; • Performing educational outreach within their communities and working with children in schools and through public programs; • Identifying, promoting and protecting fruits, vegetables, grains, animal breeds, wild foods and cooking traditions at risk of disappearance; • Advocating for farmers and

artisans who grow, produce, market, prepare and serve wholesome food; • Promoting the celebration of food as a cornerstone of pleasure, culture and community. Slow Food Okanogan has been working over the last several years to promote awareness of the richness and variety of locally produced food available to Okanogan residents and to support and promote local producers. An annual feast of all-local fare has been served in locations up and down the valley. Dinner-andmovie night brought people both the delight of an all locally produced winter meal and increased awareness of local food security issues. Slow Food Okanogan supports two school garden programs and has an interest in a mobile poultry processing unit. Wine-and-Cheese events are held to further inform while providing fun with local cheese, bread, wine and music and promoting Slow Food membership. For more information on Slow Food in general, go to slowfoodusa.org. You can read more about this event and keep up with Slow Food Okanogan on Facebook.

Slow Food Okanogan to visit local winery Submitted by M. Clare Paris

submitted photo

Dale Olson, Tonasket District Ranger, and David Kliegman, OHA Executive Director, with a new full color, highpressure laminate sign that speaks of the importance of using lead-free fishing tackle to avoid wildlife poisoning.

New interpretive signs at Bonaparte and Lost lakes Joint effort of USFS, USF&W & OHA Submitted by Julie Ashmore Okanogan Highlands Alliance

The Okanogan Highlands Alliance (OHA), in cooperation with the Tonasket Ranger District (Forest Service), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ginger and Dan Poleschook and others, created and produced public information signs to help raise awareness about the issues facing local loons. The Okanogan Highlands provide some of the best loon-nesting habitat in Washington State, with rich wetlands at the lakeís edge providing ideal conditions for floating mat nests. The new loon signs explain the importance of using lead-free fishing tackle to prevent lead poisoning of loons and other wildlife, as well as providing some natural

history information about loons. The Tonasket Ranger District has installed the full color, highpressure laminate signs near the shores of Bonaparte and Lost Lakes, both in highly visible locations where passersby can read the information when fishing and utilizing the lake for recreation. The project was funded through a partnership with the US Fish and Wildlife Service, which also helped fund OHAís trailside signage and wildlifefriendly fence. The fence was installed in cooperation with local landowners and the Forest Service, protecting the Lost Lake wetland’s sensitive plant and wildlife populations from cattle trampling. These projects stem from OHA’s Lost Lake Wetland and Wildlife Preserve, initiated in 2010 to protect 40 acres of wetland and 25 acres of adjacent upland forest at the south end of Lost Lake. The Preserve includes family-friendly hiking

trails, which are open to the public and will also feature full-color interpretive signage before the end of this field season. “The shoreline loon signs are a natural extension of OHA’s Lost Lake project,” said OHA Conservation Coordinator Julie Ashmore. “The Preserve has been set aside to provide wildlife habitat as well as a place for the community to enjoy and learn about local natural history. The shoreline signs encourage people to utilize the Lost and Bonaparte lake areas in a way that supports the local wildlife” For more information about the Lost Lake Wetland and Wildlife Preserve, contact julie@ okanoganhighlands.org or 509433-7893. Okanogan Highlands Alliance is a non-profit that works to educate the public on watershed issues. More information can be found on OHAís website: www. okanoganhighlands.org/restoration/lost-lake.

Community Action seeks housing preservation grant Submitted by Lael Duncan Okanogan Co. Community Action

OKANOGAN - Okanogan County Community Action Council (OCCAC) wishes to apply for grant funding under the USDA Rural Housing Preservation Grant. It is required in accordance with 7 CFR 1944.674 (b) that our statement of activities be made available to the public for comment. This grant will allow OCCAC

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Community Bulletin Board Benefit Bake Sale

CHESAW - On Thursday, July 4th there will be a Benefit Bake Sale in Chesaw for Jen Mateo, diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Come support one of our ladies with her medical bills and make this a great donation for Jen.

Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE - The Oroville Farmers’ Market is Saturday, July 6, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Oroville Community Library located at 1276 Main St. Purchase art, crafts, plant starts, fresh baked goods and tamales plus the best produce on the planet. The Oroville Farmers’ Market continues each Saturday through October 26 and new vendors are welcome. Call (509) 476-2662 for more information.

Music at the Market

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will host “Music at the Market” each Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. during the Farmers’ Market season. Musicians who would like to showcase (volunteer) their acoustic talents are invited to call the Oroville

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OROVILLE - Slow Food Okanogan will host an evening of wine and cheese and Slow Food information at Esther Bricques Winery and Vineyard on Sunday, July 14, from 5-8 p.m. Music will be provided by Sam Howell and Mark Kubiak, a delightful mix of Latin, swing and traditional jazz performed on bass clarinet and guitar. Larkhaven Farmstead Cheeses will be served buffet style and Esther Bricques wines will be available by the glass and bottle. Frequent raffles throughout the evening will award prizes such as wedges of cheese, local produce, annual Slow Food Feast tickets and gift certificates for local products. A Slow Food information table will be set up and it will be possible to become a member of this world-wide organization and become part of the local group, as well as the opportunity to sign up for the Slow Food Okanogan email list. Slow Food Okanogan is part of a global movement, which believes everyone has the right to good, clean and fair food. It

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tunity to live in a safe and healthy, more energy efficient home. OCCAC has nearly 50 years of service in Okanogan County. We serve as the distribution center for 8 local Food Banks, Farm to Food Bank Gardens, Gleaning, Square Foot Gardens, Energy Assistance and Weatherization and more. For more information on OCCAC services and volunteer opportunities contact: Lael Duncan, Executive Director at (509) 4224041or laeld@occac.com.

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Public Library to book a date. The next Music at the Market is Saturday, July 6. For more information call Barbara at (509) 476-2662.

Movie Night at HUMUH Center

OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, July 6, at 6:30 p. m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call (509) 476-0200.

Paul the Magician

TONASKET - As part of the Summer Reading Program at the Tonasket Public Library various free programs are put on. Paul the Magician is one the programs and will perform on Thursday, July 11 at 1 p.m. at the library located at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. For more information call the library at (509) 486-2366.

Jazz at Esther Bricques

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TONASKET - As part of the Summer Reading Program at the Tonasket Public Library various programs are put on. The North Central Regional Library Books on Stage is one these free programs and will perform Thursday, July 18 at at 1 p.m. at the library located at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. For more information call the library at (509) 486-2366.

Quilt Show in Molson

MOLSON - The Second Annual Quilt Show in Molson will take place on Saturday, Aug. 31 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Quilters will be displaying patriotic quilts and military memorabilia from all branches of service. Many of the quilts were created from the proceeds of last years quilt show.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JULY 4, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • July 04, 2013

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale 3 BD, 1 BA, Appliances, newer heat pump & furnace. Nice landscaping with sprinkler system, covered patio, garage, close to schools, in town, quiet neighborhood $136,500. (509)840-5664 Tonasket 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, heat pump, single car garage with shop and storage shed. RV parking with dump site and AC power. Covered patio. $98,000. Bill: (509)486-1952

For Rent 3 BD, 1 BA, Appliances, nice landscaping, covered patio, garage, close to schools, in town, quiet neighborhood $850/month. (509)840-5664 3 BR Home, $785 Darling 1 BR Furn. Cottage on Eastlake, $535 3 BR, 2 BA, w/2xGarage, $875 & By River for $1100 3 BR, 2 BA Wtrfrnt Apt, $725 1 BR Apt, $450. **Call Sun Lakes Realty** (509)476-2121

American Legion Housing 1105 Appleway, Oroville

Now Accepting Applications for 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts Subsidized for Income Qualified Households * Great Oroville Location * Picnic Areas * Spacious Floor Plans * On-Site Laundry * Park-Like Setting Call for information and application

509-476-2808 TTY 425-562-4002

Announcements

Wanted Buying Silver, Gold Coins, Collections, Jewelry, Sterling, Flatware, Guns. Paying fair Prices. Call Spence (509) 429-4722

Help Wanted

207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION:

LOW INCOME HOUSING

– Family & Singles –

Now hiring for the position of Activities Coordinator/ General Store Clerk.

509-476-4057

Must be 21 or over to sell alcohol. Apply today at Veranda Beach Front Desk 509-476-4000

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home� email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Food Service Clerk, two hour position, Monday through Friday. Position closes July 17, 2013. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 486-2126. An Equal Opportunity Employer

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Crosswords

An Equal Opportunity Employer

LPN or MA Certified, Family Health Centers, Tonasket, WA 1 full time and several Per Diem positions at our Tonasket clinic. We’re seeking an energetic team player who has a desire to make a difference. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. Take vital signs, review history with patient, administer medications, perform EKG’s, performs, prepares for and assists with procedures in accordance with clinical protocols, coordinates and processes refill requests with Provider, documents information to EHR and other duties as assigned. WA State license/certification required. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job description & See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job description & application. Send resume to HR@myfamilyhealth.org or HR, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840. EEO. Open until filled Subscribe to the...

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

www.gazette-tribune.com

25. Indian salad

5. Christian Science founder

26. “We the Living� author

6. Freedom from danger

27. Disguise

7. Ancient assembly area

29. Arch

8. Golden Triangle country

30. British coins

9. “A jealous mistress�: Emerson

31. Stinking nightshades

10. Remote

33. Depression at the mouth of a volcano

11. Kind of fair

34. Cleaning cabinet supplies

15. Farmer, at times

35. Deep or still place in a stream

17. Short holidays?

36. Transfer data or programs 39. Saint Anthony’s fire

21. Units of length equal to .001 inch

43. Mideast V.I.P.

24. Sensationalist journalism

44. “___ Maria�

26. House agent

45. Sudden raid 46. Full house, e.g.

28. Lightweight boat propelled by a double-bladed paddle

47. Forger

30. 86 is a high one

49. Guns

32. “20,000 Leagues� harpooner ___ Land

50. “C’___ la vie!� 51. Artificially formal 53. Back muscle, familiarly 54. Held the title of monarch

ANSWERS

Across 1. Suffix with sea or moon 6. Dish served with a dressing (pl.) 12. Three equal parts 14. Mushrooms having umbrella caps with gills underneath 16. Desktop card index (trademark)

56. Football stat 58. Gestures 59. Sixpence

13. Brand, in a way

33. Minor player 35. Comely 36. Escorts 37. Introduce one stage at a time (2 wds) 38. Freckle

60. Chewy candy

39. “... there is no ___ angel but Love�: Shakespeare

61. Villain

40. Emerald Isle 41. Attacked brutally 42. Enigma

Down

44. During 47. Grave marker

18. Flirtation by touching feet

1. Duration

48. Furnace output

19. “... ___ he drove out of sight�

2. Bach piece

51. Catch

20. Complains

3. Hinged flap on an airplane wing

52. Blah

22. Casual attire 23. Bakery buy

4. Ace

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Food Service Clerk

Head HS Girls TONASKET Basketball Coach 2 Bedroom apartment with garage. Close to town. The Tonasket School District $500/mo. Call 509-322-0347 is now accepting applications for a Head HS Girls Basketor 509-476-2234 ball Coach. Position is open until filled. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: Indian Taco Feed, Benefit for www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Cary Dean. Oroville Eagles, Tonasket School District, July 13th 5:00 PM. Following 35 DO Hwy 20 E., is a 20 item auction starting Tonasket, WA 98855. at 6:00 PM. $6 per plate. Phone 486-2126.

St. Charles Place Apartments

“PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

Help Wanted

For Rent

55. African antelope 57. Chain letters?

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF JULY 1, 2013

Certified Medical Assistant needed for a full-time, day shift position in Omak Clinic’s Walk In Clinic. Must be able to work independently. Spanish speaking a plus but not necessary. Visit us at www.wvmedical.com for more info and to apply. ENROLLMENT ASSISTANCE SPECIALIST, Family Health Centers, Brewster, Okanogan & Tonasket, WA FHC is hiring (3) Enrollment Assistance Specialists for its Okanogan, Tonasket & Brewster medical clinic locations. These grant-funded positions are for a period of one year minimum. Individuals will be given training in insurance options being made available through the Affordable Care Act. This will include expanded Medicaid programs, new competitive private health insurance marketplaces & other affordable health insurance options. Attention to detail and excellent customer services skills are essential. Bilingual English/Spanish required. Resume/application to hr@myfamilyhealth.org or mail to Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840. EOE. Open until filled. Clinic Operations Manager, Family Health Centers, Brewster, WA Are you tired of sitting in traffic while your life passes you by? Do you desire wide open spaces and the beauty of nature at your door? Do you want to be part of a beautiful rural community with four true seasons? If you are an energetic team player with the desire to make a difference, we are looking for YOU! Family Health Centers is a growing, comprehensive health care system incorporating State services (WIC) with first rate medical and dental care to facilitate a healthy community. We operate three medical clinics and three dental clinics, providing ambulatory medical care with a family practice focus in a rural community. Full time salaried exempt position. Duties include day to day clinic operations, program planning & evaluations, quality improvement & regulatory compliance & supervision & development of staff. REQ’s: Knowledge & training in the healthcare field typically required through a formal Associates degree or trade school program in nursing OR high level of skill, expertise and basic clinical knowledge to manage the medical clinic; may also have been acquired in not less than five years of managing a medical clinic. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for details. Submit resume and letter to HR, Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or HR@myfamilyhealth.org. EOE

CMA position

The Oroville & Tonasket Office’s of North Valley Family Medicine are seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented CMA. Applicant must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Mon. - Fri. (approx. 40 hours). Medical/Dental/401K. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online

This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS

On-call CMA or LPN

The Oroville & Tonasket Office’s of North Valley Family Medicine are seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented applicant. Must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online

Found

ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 6343838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com FINANCIAL – NOTE BUYERS BAJILLIONS Still Available for good R.E. Contracts, Notes and Annuities. Are you Receiving Payments?....Get the Best Pricing seen in 25 years‌.. Skip Foss 800-637-3677. FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS FREE 10� Internet tablet when your order DISH installed free. Free HBO. Offer ends Soon Call for details. 1866-845-7776. Restrictions apply with approved credit. HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Pets 2 Dachshund Puppies. 8 weeks. Female; cream, black tail. Male; cream, black back. $200. 509-485-2149.

Garage & Yard Sale HUGE 5 FAMILY YARD Sale. Lots for Men & Women. Wedding Dress, Baby Clothes, Tools, Furniture. 2.5 Miles South of Oroville Hwy 97. July 5th & 6th, Friday & Saturday, 8:30 am 6:00 pm. Tonasket Multi Family Indoor Garage Sale, 8AM - 6PM, July 5th 6th. 2 blocks up Havillah Road from Hwy 97. Household, Tools, Hardware, Furniture, Audio Books, Much More!

Automobiles Looking for 1950 to 1960 Volkswagon Van / Bus. Rusty OK. Please call Kevin, 403690-7646

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310 Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

GORDON TRUCKING Inc. CDL-A Drivers Needed. Dedicated & OTR Positions Available! Consistent Miles, Benefits, 401k & EOE. Sign On Bonus! Recruiters available 7 days/wk! Call: 866-725-9669 DRIVERS -- Get on the Road Fast! Immediate Openings! Top Pay, Full Benefits, CDL-A, Hazmat, Doubles Required! Haney Truck Line, Call Now. 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices AUCTION NOTICE THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 509-476-3948 JULY 8, 2013 Viewing time: 10:00 AM Auction: 11:00 AM 1996 Plymouth Voyager Lic # WA 077TTS Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 4, 2013. #494084 AUCTION NOTICE THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 509-476-3948 JULY 8, 2013 Viewing time: 10:00 AM Auction: 11:00 AM 1992 PontiacBonneville Lic # WA 038UWA Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 4, 2013. #494080 NOTICE Oroville Rural EMS Commissioners’ meeting, regularly scheduled for the first Thursday of the month, will not be held in July. The next regularly scheduled meeting will be held on August 1st at 7:30 in the Ambulance Hall. If there are any issues that need to be addressed prior to this meeting, please contact Beth at 476.2817. Thank you. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 4, 2013. #492897

continued on next page


Public Notices

Public Notices

tion, a copy of which is served upon you with this summons. You are hereby summoned to appear on the 5th day of August, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. and respond to the petition. If you fail to appear and respond, an Order of Termination will be entered. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly. DATED this 21st day of June, 2013 CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC /s/ Robert R. Colbert Robert R. Colbert; WSBA #45494 Attorney for Petitioners Keith R. Corine and Kimberle A. Cornie. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 4, 11, 18, 2013. #494012

11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 20, 2013 Personal Representative: Kathaline C. Copple Attorney for Personal Representative: W. Scott DeTro Address for Mailing or Service: 700-A Okoma Drive, Omak, WA 98841 Court of Probate Proceedings and Cause No: Okanogan County Superior Court Cause No. 13-4-00036-8 CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC W. Scott DeTro, WSBA #19601 Attorney for Estate Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 20, 27, July 4, 2013. #489657

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY GUY T. DREW, an individual, Plaintiff, vs. PONTIAC RIDGE SPORTSMEN, a Joint Venture; ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS of the members of Pontiac Ridge Sportsmen,a·Joint Venture; DALE E.COVEY; MARY JEAN LEWIS flkla MARY JEAN COVEY; and ALSO ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE REAL ESTATE DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN; Defendants. NO. 132003360 CIVIL SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE FOLLOWING PERSONS AND PARTIES: 1. PONTIAC RIDGE SPORTSMEN, a JoInt Venture 2. ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS of the members of Pontiac Ridge Sportsmen, a Joint Venture; 3. DALE E.COVEY; 4. MARY JEAN LEWIS f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY; and 5. ALSO ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE REAL ESTATE DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN. YOU AND EACH OF YOU are hereby summoned to appear within sixty calendar days after the date of first publication of this “Civil Summons by Publication”, to wit, within sixty days after the 27th day ofJune, 2013, and defend the above-entitled action in the above-entitled Court by (1) filing your “Answer” to the Plaintiffs “Complaint for Quiet Title” with the County Clerk of Okanogan County and (2). serving a copy of your Answer upon the Plaintiffs undersigned attorneys at their office location provided below. If you fail to properly file and serve your Answer by the above deadline,ajudgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of Plaintiffs Complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of the above-entitled court. The “Complaint for Quiet Title” in the above-entitled action seeks to quiet title in favor the above Plaintiff, GUY T. DREW, with respect to the following real property: Legal Description: The Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 13, Township 39 North, Range 30 East, W.M. Situate in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington. Current Assessor’s. Parcel Number: 3930134002 Additionally, the Complaint seeks to recognize the satisfaction and fulfillment of (1) the Real Estate Contract between Defendant PONTIAC

RIDGE SPORTSMEN, A JOINT VENTURE and Defendants DALE E. COVEY and MARY JEAN LEWIS (f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY), recorded on or around June 27, 1978. under Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 646427, and (2) the Real Estate Contract between Defendants DALE E. COVEY and MARY JEAN LEWIS (f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY) and Plaintiff, recorded on or around December 24, 1980 under Okanogan County Auditor’s FileNo. 674503. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter,you should do so promptly to avoid any impairment of your legal rights. This “Civil Summons by Publication” is issued pursuant to CR 4 and RCW 4.28.110. LARSONBERG &PERKlNS PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiffs /s/ Jon W. Scott Jon W. Scott (WSBA#45290) for: Paul M. Larson (WSBA#06010)

File your written Answer with: Okanogan County Clerk’s Office 149 N.3rd Ave. P.O. Box 72 Okanogan,WA98840 Phone: (509) 422-7275 Serve a copy of your Answer upon: Paul M. Larson Larson Berg & Perkins;PLLC 105 North Third Street Yakima, WA.98901 Phone: (509)457-1515 Published in the Oakanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 25, August 1, 8, 2013 #491451

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Puzzle 27 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties!

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Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon LAKE AND COUNTRY This well groomed 5.289 acre treed parcel, is easy to access and has a level building site perfect for a home or cabin looking over Sidley Lake in Molson. The four adjacent parcels are also available. MLS#500481 $44,000

h i l lt o p r e a lt y RANCH HAVILLAH/CHESAW area.

633 Acres m/l. Has been used for livestock for several years. Some acreage was farmed at one time. Small ponds for water. Seasonal Creek on South side. Borders State and National Forest on South side. Small single wide home. Old farm buildings. Excellent access. 22 miles to Tonasket. 22 miles to Oroville. Good domestic and livestock water well. Beautiful Building Sites w/Views. Excellent hunting area. Owner moving to town. - $791,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com l 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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Monday, June 24, 2013 Missing person on Cayuse Mountain Road near Tonasket. Threats on Rawhide Road near Oroville. Burglary on Swanson Mill Road near Oroville. Found property on West Apple Avenue in Omak. A duffle bag containing a cell phone and drug paraphernalia recovered. Harassment on Omache Drive in Omak. Counterfeit bill on South Main Street in Omak. Assault on Main Street in Oroville.

Wednesday, June 26, 2013 One-vehicle wreck on Palmer Mountain Road near Oroville. Vehicle reportedly drove through a fence. Theft at Hungry Hollow Road near Oroville. Two gates reported missing. Burglary on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Trespassing on Mountvue Street in Riverside. Warrant arrest at West First Avenue and South Main Street in Omak. Vehicle prowl on West Fifth Avenue in Okanogan. Hit-and-run wreck on Engh Road in Omak. No injuries reported. Burglary on East Dewberry Avenue in Omak. Air compressor reported missing. Assault on East Jonathan Avenue in Omak. Malicious mischief on Main Street in Oroville. Public urination on Juniper Street in Oroville. Thomas Lee Adolph, 28, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV), interfer-

Thursday, June 27, 2013 Suspicious traffic at Rone and Summit Lake roads near Tonasket. One-vehicle rollover wreck on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Injuries reported. Two-vehicle wreck on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. No injuries reported. Burglary on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Wire fraud on Greenacres Road near Riverside. Trespassing on Airport Road near Oroville. Theft on Elm Street in Oroville. Threats on Juniper Street in Oroville. DWLS at Hwy. 97 and George Ehlers Road near Oroville. Assault on Juniper Street in Oroville. Wayne Bert Simmons, 50, booked for violation of no contact order (DV). Charles Burbery, no middle name listed, 59, booked on a Department of Corrections violation. Tyler Michael Clouse, 24, booked for third-degree DWLS. Alberto Montejano-Rangel, 32, booked for four counts of delivery of a controlled substance and on a Border Patrol hold. Marcelino Corrales, 47, booked on 30 counts of delivery of a controlled substance (cocaine), identity theft, money laundering, possession with

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Tuesday, June 25, 2013 Two-vehicle wreck at Main Street and 14th Avenue in Oroville. No injuries reported. Threats of custodial interference on Webber Road in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Ironwood Street in Oroville. Theft on Powers Butte Vista in Riverside. Hit-and-run wreck on Wannacut Lake Road near Oroville. Public intoxication on Main Street in Oroville. Two-vehicle wreck at Hwy. 20 and Talkire Lake Road near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Mill Drive in Tonasket. Patrick Lee Day, 44, booked for possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and possession of drug paraphernalia. David Lee Fitzgerald, 55, booked for third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Kevin Earl Devine, 41, booked on three FTA bench warrants: forgery, first-degree trafficking of stolen property, and third-degree theft. Lynn Arnhold, no middle name listed, 28, booked on a Department of Corrections warrant. Nicki Kaylin Windsor, 21, booked for

ing with reporting (DV), thirddegree DWLS and DUI. Geoffrey Christopher Mazalin, 40, booked for possession of more than 40 grams of marijuana with intent to deliver, two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia, and an Immigrations and Customs Enforcement hold. Darwin James McDonald, 25, book on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Roland Ray Wolff, 56, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer.

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A 17-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty June 26 to second-degree trafficking of stolen property and two counts of third-degree theft. He was sentenced to 10 weeks community supervision, 240 hours community service with credit for 48 hours served, and 30 days in detention with credit for six served. Remaining detention time was converted to the above community service sentence. He was also ordered to pay a $100 fine. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty June 26 to third-degree theft. He was sentenced to two days in detention with credit for two days served. He was also ordered to pay a $100 fine. A 14-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty to minor in possession of an intoxicant on June 26. He was sentenced to six months community supervision and 15 days in detention. He was also ordered to pay a $100 fine.

FTA for second-degree possession of stolen property. Michael Todd Walls, 44, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS; and one OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Nathanial Marcus Hamilton, 26, booked on second-degree assault (DV) and a Pierce County FTA warrant for possession of a controlled substance. Travis Justin Smith, 32, committed by the court for two counts of possession of a controlled substance and one count of third-degree DWLS. Cory Lee Craig, 25, booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for residential burglary. Michael Paul Utigard, 59, booked for felony possession of a firearm.

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The court found probable cause to charge Ishna Rayman Mason, 32, Omak, with first-degree trafficking stolen property, second-degree vehicle prowling, third-degree theft and first-degree criminal trespassing. The court found probable cause to charge Jermaine Thomas, no middle name or hometown listed, 32, with felony failure to register as a sex offender. The court found probable cause to charge Lamberto Hernandez Valdovinos, 23, Okanogan, with attempting to elude, second-degree unlawful possession of firearms, and possession of a controlled substance (hydrocodone). The court found probable cause to charge David J.L. Condon Soderberg, 19, Omak, with possession of a controlled substance (hydrocodone), use of drug paraphernalia, and third-degree DWLS. The court found probable cause to charge Heather Nichole Zimmerman, 23, Spokane, with possession of a stolen motor vehicle, possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine), possession of a controlled substance (heroin), use of drug paraphernalia, and firstdegree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred in Omak on June 24. Adrian James Manivong, 28, Omak, pleaded guilty June 27 to seconddegree possession of stolen property. The crime occurred May 12. Manivong was sentenced to 45 days in jail and ordered to pay $1,110.50 in fines. Marvin Keith Lezard, 47, Omak,

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Fraud on Third Avenue in Oroville. Vicious animal on North State Frontage Road near Tonasket. Malicious mischief at East Seventh and Bonaparte avenues in Tonasket. Juveniles reported writing in newly poured cement. Vicious animal on Sixth Street in Tonasket. Heather Nichole Zimmerman, 23, booked for possession of stolen vehicle, first-degree DWLS, possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamines) and possession of a controlled substance (heroin).

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pleaded guilty June 26 to two counts of third-degree theft. He was sentenced to 364 days in jail for each count, with 314 days suspended and credit for 50 days served per count. Lezard was also ordered to pay $1,010.50 in fines and $89.32 in restitution. Michael John Stensgar Jr., 27, Tonasket, pleaded guilty June 25 to second-degree assault with a deadly weapon, felony harassment (threats to kill) and second-degree felony unlawful possession of a firearm. Stensgar was sentenced to 15 months in prison on the first count, eight months on the second count and 11 months on the third. He was also ordered to pay $1,110.50 in fines. The crimes occurred April 21 and 23. Stensgar also pleaded guilty for unrelated Feb. 22 charges of second-degree felony possession of a firearm and resisting arrest. He was sentenced to 14 months in prison on the first count and 90 days in jail for the second. He was ordered to pay another $1,110.50 in fines. Benjamin Robert Bridges, 47, Omak, pleaded guilty June 20 to firstdegree murder in the October 2011 killing of Vickie Renner Harvey. Bridges was sentenced to 291 months in prison and ordered to pay $2,229.10 in fines. Lupine Littlerain, 31, Okanogan, pleaded guilty June 21 for firstdegree theft and two counts of forgery. The crimes occurred in November of 2007. Littlerain was sentenced to 60 days in jail and pay $600 in fines. Jose Ramos Rodriguez, 34, Oroville, pleaded guilty June 21 to felony harassment (threats to kill). The crime occurred May 9. Rodriguez was sentenced to 40 days in jail with credit for one day served. He

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Cops & Courts Complied by Zachery Van Brunt

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 27 (Easy, rating 0.44) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In Re the Estate of JAMES A. HOADLEY, Deceased Probate No. 13-4-00036-8 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR LINCOLN COUNTY Estate of STANLEY H. SPEILER., Deceased. NO. 13-4 00036-7 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed me Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against Decedent must present the claim: Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: By filing with the foregoing Court the original of the signed Creditor’s Claim, and By serving upon or mailing by first class mail to us at the address provided below a copy of the signed Creditor’s Claim. The Creditor’s Claim must be presented by the later to occur of: Thirty (30) days after we served or mailed this Notice to you as provided in RCW 11.40.020(3), or Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the Creditor’s Claim is not presented within the foregoing time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: July 4, 2013 Signed: TONI L. ORAVEZ, Personal Representative Address for Mailing of Service: C / O Joshua F. Grant, P.S. Attorney at Law P.O. Box 619 Wilbur, WA 99185 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 4, 11, 18, 2013. #492667

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SPECIAL MEETING OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT As authorized under RCW 42.30.080, the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District will be holding a special board meeting to go into executive session to conduct interviews for the Manager position. The meeting will be held at the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Office, 516 11th Street, Oroville, WA 98844 on July 18, 2013 at 1:30PM. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 3, 2013. #494103

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In Re the Adoption of: G.T. S., a person under the age of eighteen. No. 13-5-00028-1 SUMMONS TO APPEAR FOR HEARING (AMENDED) TO: EDWARD W. ARBUCKLE A Petition for Termination of ParentiChild Relationship has been filed in the above-referenced cause of ac-

Public Notices

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: WALTER C. LEONARD, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00048-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: June 10, 2013 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: June 20, 2013 ELLEN K. VASQUEZ Personal Representative Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Leonard Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 20, 27, July 4, 2013 #489053

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JULY 4, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune July 04, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JULY 4, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life MAYCUMBER | FROM A1 ing at the hospital,” Maycumber says. “I was just doing little duties, sweeping down, nothing as far as the hospital.” Maycumber said he’d thought he would be shipping out to Samoa. Instead, orders came to board a train to New Orleans. “We get there, we’re assigned to three ships,” he says. “They were all LSTs. We sailed out of New Orleans, arrived at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba on Sept. 13.” Though not on the front line, even getting moved from point A to point B proved hazardous. “One poor bugger, we had to climb up rope ladders,” Maycumber says. “He lost his footing and, pfft, they never did find him. Guys were shining lights all around looking for him.” That was the beginning of the lengthy cross-world voyage through the Panama Canal that didn’t end until they reached Mobile Hospital #3 at Pago Pago, Samoa on Halloween. “I was there until June 7, working at the hospital there,” Maycumber says. “About May 1 we started taking it down, took it all to pieces and loaded it down on the transport ship. Several months and stops later, Maycumber and company arrived at Pellilu, where he served from November until the following April, when he was transferred to the U.S.S. Solace. Sailing to Pellilu “was calm most of the time,” he says. “There were naked guys all over the ship. There would be troughs and you’d stand under the trough in the rain water, getting the salt off. That was a treat.” The first night at Pellilu, he says, “there were trucks that took us up to the hospital. We got our tent and set it up - four men in a six-man tent. That night a damn typhoon hit. It was bad enough to flatten our tent. So we were wet and cold, on work detail unloading supplies as they came in from the hospital.” Though he never found himself in combat, he was never far from the war zone. “One night we could hear the gunshots going off, and jeez, guys rolled off boxes everywhere,” Maycumber says. “Just get down behind anything. A few days later in daylight, they found one Japanese solder in the swamp.” That Thanksgiving, he remembers was special for the two bottles of beer that accompanied his c-rations and Spam. Not soon after, he was felled by appendicitis, a common malady among the troops. “All them c-rations, no roughage, you know,” he says. “We had a lot of appendicitis and that’s what caused it.” The island was only seven miles long, with an airstrip and no animals. “The number of guys that got killed there was awful,” he said. “I worked there at Base 20. We eventually built the hospital up from quonset huts. I worked in the ward.” While serving in the U.S.S. Solace, he made several trips to Okinawa. Though the Solace, a converted passenger liner, was

312 S. Whitcomb

MEN’S RINGS IN STAINLESS STEELE!

Friday, June 28, 2013 Warrant arrest on North Second Avenue in Okanogan. Hazardous materials at Swanson Mill and O’Neil roads near Tonasket. Vehicle theft on Harris Road near Okanogan. A motorcycle was reported missing. Public intoxication on Eastlake Road near Oroville. One-vehicle rollover wreck on Cayuse Mountain Road near Tonasket. Unknown if injuries were sustained. DWLS on Main Street in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Main Street in Oroville. Burglary on North Main Street in Omak. Cash reported missing. Malicious mischief on South Birch Street in Omak. A window reported broken. Threats on South Main Street in Omak. Car vs. bicycle wreck on Main Street in Oroville. No injuries reported. Custodial interference on Demerchant Road in Oroville. DWLS at Main and North Sixth streets in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Main Street in Oroville. Rodrigo Taizan-Rodriguez, 26, booked on two counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine), delivery of a controlled substance (cocaine), two counts of violations in certain places, possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute (cocaine), and on a Border Patrol hold. Annie Louise Scroggins, 42, booked on seven counts of distributing a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and trafficking stolen property. Lois Elaine Perez, 51, booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for second-degree burglary.

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Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Hugh Maycumber prior to completing his veterinary studies, ran for Ferry County Auditor, as shown in this 1947 poster that touted his military service. equipped to carry 430 patients, Maycumber says the number was usually 600 or more. “Some of them could walk,” he says. “They took us out of our quarters, gave them our quarters, and we had to sleep on the deck. Which was better; it was cooler, and we got fresh air.” In late June of 1945, the Solace departed for the U.S. mainland and dry-docked in Portland after stopping in San Francisco. “The other watch got to go on a 30 day leave,” Maycumber says. “And I was sitting on the ship. I had a phone call to the girlfriend in Spokane that I’d been writing to. She’d heard that my brother was home from the Army. So I went to the executive officer and said, ‘By God I’ve got to leave.’ I took a bus part of the way, and then I hitchhiked.” While Maycumber was subsequently assigned to a supply depot east of Spokane, the United States dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, bringing about the war’s end. “Someone at the top knew what was going to happen,” he says. “They knew the bomb was coming. I was home with my dad and brothers. We heard the church bells ringing in town. The war was over, Japan was suing for peace.” With the war over and 39 months of time served, Maycumber returned for civilian life for awhile. He ran for Ferry County Auditor (and won) and married Mae Lindsey of Curlew. He returned to the service for another nine months, serving as a corpsman on Bainbridge Island until leaving the Navy for good in 1953. “I’d do it again,” he says. “I might think twice about signing

up for a draft overseas. I might even look into something like flying.” He completed his veterinary school at Washington State University in June of 1956 and promptly moved to Tonasket. “Dr. Nelson, a veteraraian there, he’d left work and they needed one in Tonasket,” Maycumber says. “I’m getting old enough, I thought, so I’d better do that. Only kind of worked with him a little bit, learned a lot of the things for testing for various things. But I went right into practice.” He and Mae adopted two sons, Pete and Chuck, and ran his practice for 40 years before retiring. “I made farm calls as far south as Chelan, Leahy, Nighthawk, Danville, Keller,” ‘Doc’ Maycumber says. “And a lot of them around Republic because they didn’t have a veterinarian there at that time. “So that’s why I know so many people.” Now living in Republic, Maycumber, who hits the 90-year milestone this year, has been instrumental in the creation of the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Park in Tonasket and continues his involvement with the plaques that cover ever more of the Legacy’s walls. “Nothing compares with it,” he says. Note: This is the latest in a continuing series of profiles featuring local armed forces veterans. We are currently focusing on those who served in World War II. If you or a family member with local connections served in that war, please contact Michael Stewart through the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Park, Brent Baker at bbaker@gazette-tribune.com or (509) 476-3602.

Gregor Wallace Howard, 53, booked on an FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Thanh Van Nguyen, 38, booked for indecent exposure. Kevin Charles Rounds, 25, booked for third-degree DWLS. Saturday, June 29, 2013 Assault on Appleway Road near Okanogan. DUI at North First Avenue and Pine Street in Okanogan. Two-vehicle collision at Eastlake and Eder roads near Oroville. Unknown if injuries were sustained. Vehicle prowl on North Third Avenue in Okanogan. One-vehicle rollover wreck on Hwy. 97 north of Oroville. Driver complaining of back pain. Public intoxication at Chesaw and Balms roads near Oroville. Warrant arrest at Elm Street and 14th Avenue in Oroville. Possible missing person on Cayuse Mountain Road near Tonasket. DWLS at West Second Avenue and South Birch Street in Omak. Malicious mischief on Omak Avenue in Omak. Satellite cables reported severed. Theft on Omak Avenue in Omak. A purse reported missing. Warrant arrest at West Fourth Avenue and South Hemlock Street in Omak. Two-vehicle wreck on Ironwood Street in Oroville. No injuries reported. Vehicle prowl on 14th Avenue in Oroville. Warrant arrest at Elm Street and 14th Avenue in Oroville. Amy Elizabeth Tatshama, 29, booked for violation of no-contact order (DV). Sarah Sandoval-Polina, 36, booked for DUI. Chyna Taylor Darrow, 22, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and first-degree criminal trespassing.

Thursday, July 4th:~ Chesaw, Wa ~ – Benefit Bake Sale –

for Jen Mateo, diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Come support one of our ladies with her medical bills! *Make this a great donation for Jen! Thank you... the Highland Community!

OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

COPS & COURTS | FROM A9 intent to distribute (cocaine), and on a Border Patrol hold.

509-486-0615

David Eugene Bales, 46, booked for non-emergency use of 911. James Dale Watkins, 51, booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for forgery. Sunday, June 30, 2013 Warrant arrest on Appleway Road near Okanogan. Motorcycle wreck on Ellemeham Mountain Road near Oroville. Injuries reported. Assault on Nick Cain Road near Okanogan. Hit-and-run wreck reported at South Elm Street and West Third Avenue in Omak. No injuries reported. Juan Carlos Sandoval, 33, booked for non-emergency use of 911. Joseph Alexander Felix, 18, booked for minor in possession or consumption of intoxicants and disorderly conduct. Dale Edward McGowan, 62, booked for DUI. Angelo Javier Lopez, 30, booked on a Department of Corrections warrant for third-degree assault and for violation of a no-contact order.

Key:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Interim Visiting Pastors Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 04, 2013  

July 04, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 04, 2013  

July 04, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune