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CONSCIOUS CULTURE FESTIVAL See Page A4

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

LEGEND OF CAT BALLOU

Western musical at the CCC of Tonasket, June 28 and 29 at 7:00 p.m.

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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Oroville holds Critical Areas Workshop BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – A workshop was held prior to the regular Oroville Council meeting to discuss the various aspects of the city’s Critical Areas ordinance. Part of the Comprehensive Plan Amendments, the city has been operating under an interim ordinance for several years, renewing with public hearings every six months. Over the past two months Oroville has held public hearings to try and gain final approval for the Critical Areas aspects of the comprehensive plan, a requirement

of the state Growth Management Act. However, there has been little to no public participation regarding the ordinance so a workshop was requested by Chris Branch, director of Community Development. Branch gave an overview and addressed the Wetlands, Fish and Wildlife Habitat Conservation areas and Frequently Flooded Areas aspects of the Critical Areas changes. “It kind of sounds like the negotiable item is going to be ascertaining habitat values,” said Councilman Ed Naillon, regarding the ordinance. “We’ve had these rules in place with

TSD admins lauded at WSLA

more stringent buffers since 2007, we really haven’t had much development in these areas,” said Branch, who adds that the state has defined much of what is considered to be wildlife habitat. He added that about 90 percent of the wetlands that fall within the urban growth area of Oroville are associated with rivers and streams – the Okanogan and Similkameen rivers and Tonasket and Nine Mile creeks in particular. Branch said there is concern for things like eagles and especially for anadromous (ocean-going) fish species, like salmon and steelhead. “That’s were the focus really is, but

we also have whitetail deer habitat that extends down to Veranda Beech where a lobe of that habitat reaches down to the lake. The rest of the habitat is above Eders,” he said. About the anadromous fish species, Branch said that there are concerns about lower Tonasket Creek because the Colville Confederated Tribes have found salmon in there. There is a 50 foot setback along the riparian area already in place along the creeks, he said. “They’ve added a piece that we hadn’t added before and that’s the ‘Frequently Flooded Area,’” said Branch. “But we

haven’t really added it because it is basically a collection of stories related to past flooding.” He said that while there is a dike on each side of the creek, until you can pull that dike back a reasonable distance to allow for flooding along the creek, it doesn’t make much of a difference in controlling where the flooding takes place. “When you’re building a city, and that’s what we’re doing, you’ve got to keep these things in mind. It is going to take a coordinated effort, we can’t just move

SEE WORKSHOP | PG A3

Bids exceed estimate

RAIN, RAIN GO AWAY

ATV club asks Oroville to open up its roads

State delays payment again

BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket School District’s efforts to understand and develop strategies to improve the education of children coming from impoverished backgrounds received high praise after its administrators’ presentation at last week’s Washington State Leadership Academy in Spokane. The administrators had run through their presentation at the Monday, June 17, school board meeting and reported on the results of the conference on Monday, June 24. The district last year received a two-year regional improvement grant through the ESD. “We wrote the grant to say, ‘these are the things we are doing,” said special education director Liz Stucker, who coordinated the team’s efforts. “You had to be far enough down the road that their help would boost your progress.

It’s not just the touristS that want the rain to go away. Cherry growers throughout the state are suffering from an overabundance of rain, which can lead to splitting of the fruit. Growers have enlisted a squadron of helicopters in the north county to try and dry the fruit from above, while the fans of sprayers are put to duty drying from below. Greg Moser, general manager of Gold Digger Apples said that there’s already been damage from the persistent rain. “There’s good fruit, but there’s also damage in some of the early varieties which have splits. We may not be picking some of the early blocks at all,” Moser said. The GM added it’s a statewide problem with the rain, however prices are pretty good right now. “I hope prices hold or strengthen a little bit,” he said.

“The Tonasket WSLA team was superlative. Other superintendents and principals learned from them how to be better administrators. ” Jeanine Butler, Washington State Leadership Academy coach, in a letter to the Tonasket School Board.

If you were on ground zero and had nothing in place, then they wouldn’t accept you. If you just had a few gaps, then you were approved and they could help you pull all the pieces together. We did so well because we had so many pieces in place.” Still, she said during the meeting, the accolades that came Tonasket’s way were somewhat of a surprise. “I was thinking it was our first year,” she said. “We’d struggled with some things and done some good things. I just figured in Year 1 we’d be bottom of the ladder. But districts two years into the process were in awe of what we’ve done. It really speaks well of our leadership team and the work they’ve done.”

SEE ADMINS | PG A3

Gary DeVon/staff photos

OROVILLE – The preliminary results of the bid to construct a new water reservoir north of Oroville has come in higher than what the city’s engineers, Varella and Associates, had estimated. “The bids for the north end water reservoir have come in a lot higher than the engineer’s estimate of $425 to $450 thousand,” said City Clerk Kathy Jones. “ “The low bid was $562,000 and with a funding for $519, which includes a reserve and $82,000 for the engineers, it won’t cover what we wanted to do.” The city is planning on building a water reservoir to serve the north end water system (north of the city limits). The move was to ensure water in the system, especially now the new U.S. Border Patrol Station has become part of the system and has fire suppression sprinklers that could result in a rapid drawdown of water. The federal government is paying for the construction of the reservoir. “The bids go from a high of $704,500 to a low of $557,300. The engineer really underestimated the costs of the reservoir,” Jones said. “They’re off by over 20 percent. It makes it tough on the city. We had a contingency fund in the original estimates, but there is no contingency at this level.” The city rejected the bids and

SEE OROVILLE | PG A2

Dean Brazle is Chesaw 4th of July Grand Marshal ‘Ranch’ bronc riding added this year BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

CHESAW – Dean Brazle, he’s a ‘Real live nephew of his Uncle Sam, Born on the Fourth of July” and he’s also Grand Marshal for this year’s 71st Annual Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo. The members of the Chesaw Rodeo Club said they take great pleasure in naming Brazle as this year’s Grand Marshal. This Yankee Doodle Dandy, as the George Cohan song goes, will

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 26

celebrate his 87th Birthday on Thursday, July 4 as he serves as Grand Marshal. Brazle grew up in the Loomis area and when he was in seventh grade the family packed up and moved to the ranch on Knob Hill near Chesaw. He graduated from Molson School in 1944 and in March, before his graduation, he joined the Navy. He served his “boot camp” time at Farragut Naval Training Base on Lake Pend Oreille in Idaho. During his 27 months of service to the nation, Brazle spent 19 months on Tinian Island in the 18th Naval Seabees. This his where they constructed and

maintained airstrips for the refueling of bombers that were being used against Japan. Brazle told the rodeo club that one of the highlights of his life was being chosen to participate in an Honor Flight with Inland Northwest Honor Flights to view all the war memorials in Washington, DC. After returning to the Okanogan, he worked for 27 years for the Zosel Lumber Company. He met and married Gay Miller and they later bought back the original family farm on Knob Hill, where Brazle still resides. He and his wife loved the outdoors –

SEE CHESAW | PG A2

Submitted photo

Dean Brazle is the Grand Marshal for the 71st Annual Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Valley Life Letters/Opinion Community

A4 A5 A6

Calendar A7 Real Estate A7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9

Cops & Courts Obituaries

A10 A10


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JUNE 27, 2013

CHESAW | FROM A1 fishing, hunting and gardening, along with the farming of grain and raising pigs and cows. They had one son, Alvin. His son and wife have both passed on, leaving him with two grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. “Thank you Dean, for your service to our country, we are very proud of you,” said the Rodeo Club membership in making their selection, adding, “Happy birthday Dean.” This year’s Fourth of July Rodeo events take place on Thursday and start at 10 a.m. with the small sports. The parade

is at 12:30 p.m. and the rodeo follows at 1 p.m. The rodeo features two forms of saddle bronc riding this year. Along with the regular saddle broncs, the rodeo has added ranch saddle broncs. Modern day rodeo traces its roots back to bronco riding and busting horses to the saddle. While similar to professional bronc riding, the difference between that and ranch bronc riding is that the cowboys ride using their everyday work saddle, rigged like they were going to go to work on the ranch that morning.

The rodeo also features bareback and cow riding, as well as barrel racing and the Men’s Wild Cow milking. For the kids there’s the Kid’s Calf Scramble. The night before the rodeo, on Wednesday, July 3, there will be the Country Western Dance with music by Powder River. The dance is for families and people of all ages and starts at 9 p.m. and goes to 1 a.m. For more information on the dance or the rodeo call (509) 4852204, (509) 485-3941 or (509) 485-3041. Pre registration for the parade can be done by calling (509) 485-2103.

OROVILLE | FROM A1 Gary DeVon/staff photo

Two from Oroville were injured and transported to Mid-Valley Hospital after a semi-truck and trailer collided with their car while passing on Hwy. 97 north of Ellisforde last Thursday.

Oroville woman dies in fatal crash near Omak Semi collides with car near Ellisforde By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OMAK – An three vehicle accident on Sunday, June 23 claimed the life of an Oroville woman and sent four others to the hospital. According to the Washington State Patrol, Ma B Silva, 62, was driving a 1999 Gold Chevrolet CavAlier southbound on SR97 near the Riverside turnoff when she crossed into the northbound lane and struck an oncoming 2005 Ford F-150 pickup driven by Laura E. Mayer, 44, Ephrata. The third vehicle, a Chevrolet K3500

pulling a horse trailer driven by Robert P. Mayer, 67, Ephrata, swerved to miss the collision and was struck by Silva and ended up in the northbound ditch. Silva was pronounced diseased at the scene, according to WSP Trooper N. Lull. Her car was totalled. Laura Mayer was not injured and her pickup was driven from the scene. Robert Mayer was transported to MidValley Hospital. Three passengers from his pickup were injured., including Karen E. Mayer, 67, who was airlifted to Sacred Heart Hospital in Spokane. Angela S. Mayer, 41, was transported to Mid-Valley Hospital, as was Wyatt W. Stevenson, 4. Trooper Lull lists the cause of the accident as “crossing the cen-

ter line.” In an unrelated accident on Thursday, June 20, a semi-truck and trailer collided with a passenger car when the truck tried to pass about seven miles south of Oroville. According to Trooper J. Eifert, James B. McGuire, 70, Chase, BC, was driving southbound on SR97 in a 2004 International behind Reyna Acuna Median, 41, Oroville, in a 1999 Pontiac Grand Am. McGuire attempted to pass and Acuna Median attempted a left hand turn and the two vehicles collided. The crash caused extensive damage to the car and Acuna Median was injured and transported to Mid-Valley Hospital, as was a passenger, Cristal Reyes Diaz, 22, Oroville.

A FOND FAREWELL

will look at ways it might lower cost of construction, as well as approach the federal government about additional funding. “We need additional dollars or we will have to pare back. There is little money in the North End System... and certainly not this much,” said Jones. “That wouldn’t be a good use of the North End funds anyway,” said Councilman Keopke.

Oroville ORVS? Members of the North Central ATV Club approached the council with a presentation and a request that the city designate Oroville as an ATV friendly community. “We are here to ask you to consider opening up the streets of Oroville for ATV and ORV use,” said Spencer King, president of the group. King said the club partners with the DNR, US Forest Service and Okanogan County to establish travel routes. “Our motto is, “Leave no tracks,” he said. King said their club promotes safe and responsible motorized recreation trhough education of other ORV (Off Road Vehicle) riders. They also police areas that are open to ORV Riding. He cited several other towns in the county that have opened some of their streets to ORV use. These are Okanogan, including Hwy. 215 within the city limits; Tonasket, including Hwy. 97 within the city limits; Loomis, Riverside, Conconully and Mallot. In Tonasket the frontage road is open connecting Tonasket with areas like McLaughlin Canyon. While state law does not require liability insurance for ORVs, the county does. ORV rid-

ers are also required to wear helmets, have lights and mirrors and to follow other state and county regulations. In the ORV areas, outside of the city limits, the state does not require a driver’s license, however, children must be accompanied by an adult. “By opening up some of Oroville’s streets that will open up access to the Molson/Chesaw area. Cities with less than 3,000 people can open up the part of the highway in town to ORV use,” said King. “This will help us with destination loop routes and has the potential for economic gains for businesses,” said King. Ed Surrette, who is also with the club, said that he goes to Idaho quite often and that there are many areas that allow ORVs on the street. “We go to Wallace, Idaho, and people probably spend $600 to $1000 a day per family,” Surrette said. “We use the roads to access other riding areas... most people don’t want to ride on the pavement.” Koepke said he had recently been to Chewelah, Wash. where ORVs are allowed on some of the streets and said he enjoyed being able to ride his there. “I’d like to be able to take off from here and ride to Conconully and spend the night and then take off and spend the night in Twisp,” said Koepke. The club says that reports from Stevens County indicate that enforcement has become easier since the streets were opened up to ORVs. They also say that Sheriff Frank Rogers said that since Okanogan opened up its roads in 2009 there have been no tickets written and no reportable incidents involving ORVs. The county recently increased the

speed limit on county highways were ORVs are allowed from 35 mph to the posted limit. The council had questions about the noise from these vehicles. “You’ll find the newer ATVs have stricter requirements than on a lot of modern vehicles... you’ll see they’re a lot quieter,” said King. “Give us some time to do some research and we will get back to you with the council’s decision,” said Mayor Chuck Speith.

Other Business The council approved the mayor signing an interlocal agreement with Eastside Fire and Rescue of Issaquah, Wash. to use their bid to purchase a 2013 Braun Ambulance with Stryker Power tools in the amount of $195,324 plus sales tax of 8.1 percent for a total of $211,145. The council also authorized the mayor signing a water supply agreement with the Champerty Shores Owners Association, with an attached latecomers agreement. The estimate for Plateau Archeological Investigations of $20,000 to conduct a Cultural Resource Investigation at the campground at Lake Osoyoos Veterans Park has been lowered considerably. The investigation is required prior to installing additional electrical hook-ups to the camp sites. “This particular estimate does not go too far outside the areas we are improving right now,” said Rod Noel, Superintendent of Public Works and head of the parks department. “It is less than one-third of what they had estimated, but we were looking ahead at improving the irrigation system and that piece is no longer covered.”

Oroville wants to spray for mosquitos By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

The Oroville and Tonasket Catholic Churches got together to celebrate Mass at Oroville’s Deep Bay Park on Sunday morning. After Mass, presided over by Fr. David Kuttner (left), a potluck was held to honor his service to the churches as he is moving on to a new parish. As a going-away gift he received a portable “Mass set.”

Gary DeVon/staff photos

OROVILLE – It looks like Oroville will be spraying for mosquitos after all, if they can just get some of the logistics worked out and keep the price down. At their Tuesday, June 18 council meeting, Rod Noel, Superintendent of Public Works, updated the council on whether the city will be doing mosquito spraying this year. Several things need to be determined, but the city council authorized the spraying to proceed if

the price is not too much higher than was budgeted. “Okanogan decided not to do aerial spaying when Omak had pulled out due to budget worries... they are going to try a fogger like Conconully does,” said Noel. “Riverside still wants to do aerial spraying and it looks like Omak may want to do so as well because they had quite an uprising at their last council meeting with people demanding they spray. Looks like Omak is doing a budget amendment.” Noel said he feels the city can have the spraying done at a price

Out On The Town

within a few hundred dollars of what was budgeted if they combine with Riverside and Omak (which has the permit). “It has definitely been the topic of discussion downtown,” said Councilman Walt Hart. Mayor Chuck Spieth suggested it might be time for a mosquito district to be formed. Noel said that the Public Works heads from all the towns involved in spraying should get together earlier in the year to work on the issue, rather than to try and figure something out just before mosquito season.

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SMALL SPORTS 10:00 A.M. PARADE 12:30 P.M. RODEO 1:00 P.M.

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JUNE 27, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

WORKSHOP | FROM A1 part of it (the dike) because that would affect others. Eventually we’d like to pull it all back to 50 feet on each side of the stream to make a big corridor to go through,” said Branch. He that this would give the water places to hold when it overflows its banks, rather than sending it downstream and making it someone else’s problem. While much of the area along the creek goes through agriculture prop-

erty, the property owner is not required to make any changes like pulling the dike back, unless they change the use and want to develop the land. “The frequently flooded areas piece might get your attention. It says we don’t allow development in the floodplain anymore,” Branch said. “That’s because the more development we have in the floodplain the fewer places we have for flood waters to go.

However, if you already have a lot created there is a reasonable use exemption and we have to make it so you can use your lot.” After Branch addressed questions from the council, staff and public, there seemed to be a consensus that there was a better understanding of how the ordinance will work. Final approval is expected soon following a public hearing at a future council meeting.

went through as a board, and that’s where we adopted this sort of thinking (of being one system, not a just a group of schools),” said board member Lloyd Caton. “I commend Liz for reminding them that we’re a school system and not a system of schools, and that’s a huge difference... I’m really happy and glad to see the way you represented the district that they could see how we think that way. It was a revelation to me (at the time).” “It is amazing to watch the team work,” said board chair Jerry Asmussen, who added he’d seen the administrators work with Butler before. “Jeanine is a very dynamic leader.” “This is awesome,” said board member Ty Olson. “It’s very, very, very nice to see this kind of recognition.” “We look forward to seeing amazing things from your team,” said board member Catherine Stangland.

board Stangland, Kitterman said the district would “be on its own” if it didn’t have enough fund balance to meet its obligations. Stangland said it was a reminder how critical it was to revisit the discussion on what level of fund balance was necessary as a hedge against insolvency. “This is the second year in a row they’ve done this,” Kitterman said. “The first email (issued by the state) was incorrect, and not everyone received it (including Tonasket). So I just got it this morning. Here we are five days away and that’s all the warning we (and many other districts) got.” “Last year we had enough in reserve and we had no worries,” Caton said. “This year it’s going to be tighter... Last year some districts had to hold their teachers’ pay (until after the first of the month).” Asmussen pointed out that state superintendent Randy Dorn recently released a list of 115 school districts that could be “tipped over” if the state didn’t pay its apportionments. Tonasket was one of six Okanogan County districts on the list (the others being Oroville, Pateros, Okanogan, Methow Valley and Grand Coulee Dam). “That would be if they didn’t pay any apportionment,” Kitterman said, reiterating that her information was for a 30 percent hold-back. She added that, while there was not time in this instance to take out a short-term loan, she was going to contact local banks to see what would be required to cover similar situations in the future. “I do not see a problem (this year) unless at the last minute they (hold back) 50 percent,” Kitterman said. “The first recourse would be to hold the Accounts Payable checks ‘til the last day of the month and then mail them.” “It’s not a fun place to be,” Asmussen said. The school board next meets Monday, July 29, at 7:00 p.m. for its a budget hearing, followed by its regular one-monthly meeting as per its summer schedule.

ADMINS | FROM A1

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Workers are expected to finish the $1.2 million new roof project on Oroville Elementary School by as soon as next week. The project replaces most of the flat roof with pitched roof and should prevent the issues with leaks the school has had since the building was remodeled in 1981.

Oroville School Board tours elementary school District hires new boys hoops coach By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE – As part of their regular meeting last Monday, the Oroville School Board toured the elementary building, paying particular attention to the work being done on the new roof. The tour followed reports from the superintendent and two of the spring coaches. There were no principal’s reports, because both the high school and elementary school principals were away at training. “Well we graduated everyone, with the exception of two who didn’t quite make it. I think they’re going to complete what they need to over the summer,” said Steve Quick in his Superintendent’s report. “The senior trip was fun... the kids were mostly well behaved.” Quick said the district has a new physical education teacher coming, who will also serve as the boys high school basketball coach. His name is Jay Thacker and he comes to Oroville from Goldendale, Wash., according to Quick. The superintendent said there were a few teachers who were looking elsewhere at employment and had not found a new district. He wanted to remind them that July 1 is the cutoff to be released from their contract. “The roof project is really progressing along. Oversight from the project manager has saved us thousands of dollars so far,” said Quick, adding, “The wells for the energy project at the high school are being drilled.” Quick said he and the two principals had attended evaluation training last week and that both principals are in training to do teacher evaluations. “The whole evaluation system makes me a little nervous, but overall I think it will turn out to be a positive,” Quick said. Golf coach DeHaven Hill started out by thanking Dolly Sneve and the Oroville Golf Course for their help during the golf season. “We are very fortunate and have gotten spoiled because they do not charge us to use the course. They even are letting the players play for free during the summer,” he said. Three Oroville golfers qualified for state and the team also took an alternate. “Connor Hughes, a senior, set goals and he accomplished them at state,” said Hill. “Our two eighth graders – Jordyn Smith had a great experience and Bryce Glover is just a golf junky.” Hill added, “It was also the first time all the parents all went over and that was great support. It was a great season and I’m looking forward to next season.” Harold Jensen, the Oroville track coach, brought visual aids, including several sports and sports photo pages from the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune he had laminated. “I want to thank the G-T and

Brent (Baker); he took some great photos,” said Jensen. Jensen said that the track team had taken 10 to state this year. “In addition, the girls won two trophies this year – the Colville Invitational and the sub districts up here,” Jensen said, adding the track program is working on a website with all past results. The board then travelled over to the elementary school, looking at the condition of the kitchen and cafeteria first. Steve Thompson, head of the maintenance department, said he had replaced several tiles and two holes, one in the cooler wall, that were required by the health department. “If there is one part of the building we ever want to get rid of, I would suggest it be this center section,” said Thompson. The tour then went to look over the bathrooms at both ends of the buildings. The toilets on the primary end flush automatically with a system where water is constantly running, according to Thompson. He said this was a pretty dramatic waste. While there he pointed out the two enclosed drains that cross the hallway in this section. These have pipes that empty water that is gathered through the inverted pitched room above this section. He said the new roofing and repairs to the gaskets should prevent further leaking into the hall. He added that overflow drains at the two foot level were being added (a state requirement) that will prevent the up to six feet of standing water that had been overpowering the drains ability to handle above average sustained rain and melting snow. “Normally the drains can handle it, but when we get a lot of water it is just too much for the drain system as the old gaskets leak,” he said. The group also looked at the bathrooms on the south end of the building. Thompson showed where he had to bring in a new pipe to carry hot water to the sinks. He said the old pipe, which runs underground had disintegrated with age and could not be easily repaired. Next the tour went to one of the classrooms and asked questions about the tile and windows. They also were told that they had been painted two years ago. Then it was outside to look at the now pitched roof and the board members looked at the thickness of the new composite shingles. They are guaranteed for 15 years for material and labor, according to Thompson. The materials themselves are guaranteed for 50 years. The board travelled back to the district office and resumed the meeting, passing a large consent agenda that included setting the upcoming school year’s meeting dates and keeping the meeting time at 6:30 p.m. Other consent agenda items included approving the resignation of Jacqueline Marshall and Stacy Hinze (as volleyball coach), hiring Jay Ottman as middle school math teacher; Jaime Santana as a bus driver and Thacker as PE teacher and

basketball coach. The board approved using eighth grade students for certain sports next year as per WIAA guidelines. “I’m probably the only one that still doesn’t like it, but the parents and everyone seem to think it has been a positive,” said Quick. “We did have two eighth grade kids go to state in golf,” said School Director Rocky DeVon. “All those parents I have talked to said it’s their and their kids decision.” The coaches are still required to put a written policy together regarding the use of eighth graders in high school sports teams. Director Todd Hill said if approval was contingent on that policy being done right away he would bet it would get done faster. “I just don’t want an issue with parents later with a senior versus an eighth grader wanting to play in the same position problem,” said Hill. Four of the agenda items, which were donations, were pulled out by Director Amy Wise for special recognition. They included a $1192 donation from the PTO for the YoYo Assembly; a $200 donation from the Seventh Day Adventist Church of Republic for the Kindergarten classes and a $1370 donation from the Oroville Booster Club for Cheer Camp and $107 for FBLA registration for Nationals. The board will next meet on Monday, July 29 at 6:30 p.m. in the board room at the district office located at 816 Juniper St.

The presentation, featuring pieces delivered by Stucker, high school principal Jeff Hardesty, middle school principal Jay Tyus, elementary school prinicipal Jeremy Clark and high school assistant principal/athletic director Kevin Terris, focused on the effects of poverty on students’ ability to learn, the meaning of data gleaned from comparing students’ learning ability to their economic status, and strategies they were developing to narrow the achievement gap between students of different economic backgrounds. Jeanine Butler, WSLA Leadership Academy coach who mentored the Tonasket group as well as a number of other districts, sent a letter to the Tonasket School Board within days of the June 20 presentation. “I need to let you know what an amazing job they did at (the) statewide end of year presentation in Spokane,” she wrote. “As a first year WSLA team they had outstanding presentations that impressed all the other districts they met with, including the second-year districts.” She commended superintendent Paul Turner for his initiative in getting his administrators plugged into the WSKA opportunity, as well as Stucker (who led the admin team) as a “tireless worker ... pushing us to remember that there are not three individual schools but one system. Her commitment to each and every student learning regardless of background or scenario is tenacious and helps us all.” She also lauded, with individual highlights, the work of Hardesty, Tyus, Clark and Terris. “The Tonasket WSLA team was superlative,” Butler wrote. “Many other superintendents and principals learned from them how to be better administrators. And this is all because they have been so incredibly committed to improving student achievement this past year and have thought deeply and worked diligently.” Needless to say, school board members were pleased with the feedback. “Three or four years ago Paul (Turner) got the book that we

State to delay payment again As it did last year, the state has apparently decided to withhold part of its apportionment payments to school districts by one day to satisfy budgetary requirements. While that delay may not sound like much, it can create chaos at the district level, particularly those districts without much margin for error. “They say (they are withholding) only 30 percent but I’m planning on 40,” said business manager Deb Kitterman. “We have enough in our ending balance to cover payroll and if we do get the (70 percent), we can pay our accounts payable as well.” Kitterman said that if the district were going to fall short, asking Okanogan County for interest-bearing warrants to cover the expenses for a few days was no longer an option. “It’s not yet their policy, but I was told there were too many entities (in warrants),” Kitterman said, noting that even if it were an option the rest of the state payment would likely arrive before money from warrants would have been available. Responding to question from

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Big R Big Rock Sports Beyers Market Bob Feil Boats & Motors Eagle Claw Harvest Foods Oroville Havillah Shake Company

Jerry Utt’s Apiary Kinross Kettle River Buckhorn Lee Franks Mercantile Midway Building Supply Morgan & Son Nancy Inlow - Avon Okanogan County Sheriff Okanogan Valley Bass Club Oroville American Legion Post 84 Oroville Sportsmen Club Plano Molding Prince’s Department Store Pure Fishing

Rocky Mt. Elk Foundation Royal Neighbors of America, Oroville Scholz Sporting Goods Son of American Legion Tonasket American Legion US Army Corps of Engineers US Forest Service - Tonasket R.D. Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife Wauconda Hall Association Wright & McGill Co

ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY AT 7:30PM. WED-THURS.-FRI.SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES. JULY 3-4-5-6-7-8-9 Summer Showtimes 7&9pm nightly - Starting July 3

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 27, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Conscious Culture Festival

Photos by Gary DeVon

Above: The crowd is reflected in her shades last Saturday afternoon at the Conscious Culture Festival. The three day event had a variety of music and art. Right: Dee Lawnmower demonstrates glass blowing with Funky Budda and Peace of Mind from Spokane.

Cowgirl or angel? From the look on her face it’s not easy to Hula Hoop when your wearing a hat and wings.

A couple dancers get their groove on to the beat of a drum circle near the Yoga tent.

Give a Holiday Gift That Doesn’t End When Several bands performed a variety of music over the three-day festival on the Main Stage, on the Solar Stage and the Batteries Run under the dome. Give a Holiday Gift Out. That Doesn’t End When Music. Food. Fun. Something for everyone! the Batteries Run Out. Do You PrepareGift Do You 2 days of FREE music in downtown Give a Prepare Holiday EPHRATA Washington More for MoreDoesn’t forFamily Family That End When Vacations Than Vacations Than July 19 & 20, 2013 the Batteries Run Out. Music on the cool, green lawns of the historic Grant County Courthouse Why not startfor a new holiday tradition? Make You Do College? You Do for College? To the make your savings gift in timefor a this time of college year that you help save Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the time of year that you help save for a child’s college education.

Rob Smith of Oroville offers free samples of his pickled garlic at his Pop’s Garlic booth near the main stage at the Conscious Culture Festival. There were many vendors at the three-day event selling food and other items.

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JUNE 27, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Oroville School Board Directors Rocky DeVon, Todd Hill and Amy Wise, touring the elementary school with Maintenance Director Steve Thompson and Superintendent Steve Quick.

School tour revealing

I wonder how many people who don’t have kids in school ever get passed the gym or the commons to get a good look at how our school facilities are holding up? The Oroville School Board invited the public to take a closer look at the elementary school during their board meeting last Monday. Although my kids are grown I have the kind of job that takes me to both school buildings and I think I am pretty familiar with the classrooms. However, having Maintenance Director Steve Thompson along to point out what has been fixed, what needs fixing and just why the old roof leaked was an education in itself. While Steve, School Director Rocky DeVon and I have the advantage of remembering what it was like to in the elementary school from a student’s perspective, it was interesting to know just how long some of the facilities have lasted. Out of It’s not surprising that some parts are reaching My Mind or reached their usefulness a long time ago. Gary A. DeVon Inverted pitched roofs with drain pipes that cross the hallway ceilings on the primary end and bathroom hot water pipes that disintegrated under the floor of the south end go a long way to reminding us just how old parts of the elementary building are. Yes, it’s hard to imagine using those oh-so-low to the floor water fountains nowadays, but they mostly serve as a reminder of how much of the old school still looks the same as it did when it was originally built. One thing my mom, a retired Oroville Elementary School teacher, questioned since the early 1980’s was how come they didn’t replace the old flat roof with a pitched one. Since the old roof started leaking about the same time as the 1981 remodel, that was a good question. Well, the community answered this year by approving a $1.2 million capital improvement levy. Most of the roof is finally being replaced by one that is pitched and fingers-crossed, will eliminate the problem. Oroville’s buildings aren’t as shiny and new as some districts, but the community has always been forthcoming in trying to offer quality spaces for our kids to learn. There’s still a lot to be done at the elementary, but taking care of the roof is a good first step. Replacing restrooms, cafeteria, kitchen are probably high on the list for the next step. I know that when asked the community will step up, but for now were sure the students and staff are grateful for the new roof and a dry place to go to school.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Grateful for help in time of need Dear Gary, I’d like to thank everyone for assisting me during my time of need. Thanks for the cards and letters and phone calls. I am especially grateful to the ones that bullied me into the ambulance, my children and the ones that made it possible to stay in my own home. Thanks to Boots and Clayton for the yard work they have done and for Bobbie and Midge for calling and checking up on me. Beverly Holden Oroville

Tyranny of world government Dear Gary, After reading the front page article “City sets Critical Areas Workshop,” I wonder why the public didn’t provide any comments on the updates to Oroville’s Critical Areas/ Comprehensive Plan Amendments. Has the public become tired of going to meetings and workshops that inform them of the “new” rules that govern the use of lands that have been deemed “critical areas” by people who don’t live here? Where do these rules and ordi-

nances come from? What constitutes a Frequently Flooded area anyway? Will those who impose these “new” rules compromise with the City of Oroville if the city council says no to the Comp Plan, Shoreline Master Program and Critical Areas designations? Do the people of this nation think it is a good thing to adopt rules that come from a foreign power, when it comes to our land? As a suggestion to the council maybe they should get the book by Rene’ Holaday entitled “The Perils of Sustainable

Development” and see how critical areas, Comp. plans and shoreline master plans fit nicely into the Agenda 21 plan by the United Nations for the united States? The time for saying NO to this sewage that comes to us in the form of these foreign rules is long past. We are spoon feed this stuff like it is supposed to be good for us. How do the Comp. Plan and private property rights work together? Does our constitutional right to private property trump the Marxist Comp. Plan in des-

ignated areas? Is the State the real mastermind of the Shoreline Master Program? And the statement “will likely see additional changes after the city adopts the program” is a bit of an understatement, “additional changes” is one of the defining attributes of government. Should we continue to give up private property rights for the “greater good” of the environment and the tyranny of world government? Steve Lorz Tonasket

Never met a tax they didn’t like “The only difference between death and taxes is death doesn’t get worse every time Congress meets.” - Will Rogers. OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

It certainly seems that Democrat legislators in both Washingtons have never met any working Americans who weren’t earning too much money for their own good. In Olympia, legislative Republicans and two constitutionally salvageable rogue Democrats may have been able to hold the line on Democrats’ ever more ravenous addiction to other people’s money by virtue of a windfall from existing taxes. Still, as their remarks to the Seattle Times suggest, Democrat legislators are drooling in delirious tremens for want of new taxes. Oh what to do?   So much targetable working people’s money out there to be confiscated, so little time to take it. There is an inescapable dilemma with they who presume to decide what someone else’s “fair share” of taxes should be. Once such a figure is determined, it is but a nanosecond before the revelation strikes Democrat congresspersons that if taxing the workers this much is fair, then ...   zounds! ... taxing them more must be even fairer!

And so the situation devolves to an entire political party of legislators who have such uberarrogant contempt for taxpaying Washingtonians as to actually sue for the ‘right’ to pillage the worker yet more easily with less accountability. These Democrat legislators actually stick their middle finger in the voting public’s eye and squat all over the latter’s clear initiative-expressed, heavy majority mandate that taxes only be increased with a two-thirds vote. “A simple majority should rule,” these taxation obsessed Democrats piously pontificate, blithely ignoring that a simple and huge majority of voters has already ruled by initiative for the two-thirds restriction. Yes of course taxes are unavoidable, even desirable on anything approaching a reasonable scale. America needs infrastructure, security, and the opportunity to earn one’s way up the prosperity ladder in a business friendly nation. But there are four acidic problems with our current taxation: First, the taxpaying worker has lost all control over government’s power to extort his income. That famed 1% are blessed with so much money they can live well no matter how high taxes get. But those average workers crawling from check to check, writing those carnivorous due dates on bill envelopes, doing without, stretching each cent to the max, they live in constant fear that

taxaholic legislators will choke the life out of their families. Recently revealed, rampant partisan corruption in our Democrat-puppet IRS speaks ominously for itself. Second, the working taxpayer has no control over how his money is spent. Millions for weapons to Syrians who danced on 911, annual billions for wars that just succeed in getting our young volunteers killed, federal funding for the mass Gosnellation of live human fetal infants, ad infinitum. It doesn’t matter your political party here. We all shake our heads daily at unimaginable extremes of tax dollars squandered on waste and schemes so egregious we agree across party lines that it’s lunacy. The third problem is that abysmally too few citizens and corporations pay any income taxes at all. They criminally ride free on the worker. The fourth toxic problem is the worst, for it prohibits any solution to the first three. Once enacted simply to pay national bills, taxation has become a social engineering cattle prod for government to stick us with, to forcibly herd us into behaviors they decide for us that we must adhere to. ‘Sin’ taxes, incentive tax breaks, carbon taxes, energy taxes, electric car tax rebates, etc. The list is endless and growing daily. Are we a free people, or are those of us who pay taxes merely slaves on

the hoof to be herded and milked to serve the powerati? If not, why the prod taxes? Government tax guzzlers forget or, worse, don’t care that somebody had to work hard and long for every dime of those billions extorted from workers. Most workers desperately need that money. But government ... just ... keeps ... mega-spending it on too many insane projects and too much negligent waste. As of election 2012 working taxpayers have become the new persecuted minority in America. It’s time for some affirmative action to save him and her, for it is the sands of their lives through the hourglass spent earning the money so carelessly bled away by reckless taxation. What’s called for here is a shift of some of that famed American compassion from such insanity as spending billions supporting foreigners who hate us to helping American workers who must surrender the bulk of their finite breaths dearly earning the money exacted in taxes with barely maybe - enough left over to feed their families. These working, taxpaying Americans have profoundly earned some sadly overdue compassion from government and its avaricious taxation fetishists. William Slusher is a writer with a horse ranch on the Okanogan near Riverside.   He may be complained to at williamslusher@live .com.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JUNE 27, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Get ready to celebrate America’s birthday A week from today the sparkle system is becoming. Or is it the and bang of fireworks will be insurance companies? Let’s just the order of the day and the try and stay well. Fourth of July Rodeo in Chesaw, Last weekend I saw Leona celebrating the birthday of the Forthun and it is so good to report USA. Most years the weather is that she has made such excellent hot and dry but I’ve heard “old progress. She has worked dilitimers” say they remember days gently and it has paid off. She and when more than just a few flakes Bud have three great sons and of snow came. In they were all home the valley we’ve had helping their dad cellotsa rainy times. ebrate Father’s Day. Having the small Another good communities of the report is from Ed Highlands, Molson Naillon. He has perand Chesaw come severed and told me together and make at this time he is in large celebrations, are remission from the really unique happencancer that has been ings. There are a lot a part of his life for a of dedicated people THIS & THAT lot of years. He has who work very hard a good philosophy of to keep these tradi- Joyce Emry life. Hopefully he has tions alive. many “well years” The one thing that ahead of him. He we can usually count on and that deserves them! is that rain will come when the An illness is like a TV comcherries start to turn red. And it mercial…even a short one is too has happened again. long. Remember to take time to And speaking of those comsmell the roses…and there are mercials…won’t you be glad some beautiful ones in bloom when Terry Bradshaw’s contract now. And of course the wild ones on weight loss runs out. are here and there and they do The very pretty classic El have a nice fragrance. Camino vehicle that has filled What a mess our health care a space in our garage for a lot

of years has gone to the home of another man, who can enjoy it. Now, we’ll find something small just for driving to the grocery, senior center, post office and other errands about town. You know a little car, to be driven slowly, by a little old lady to church on Sunday. Driving is a lot like baseball – it’s the number of times you get home safely that counts. Leon Alden was honored last Sunday afternoon, at his church in Tonasket, with the occasion being that he has been a pastor for 50 years. His talents are shared between The Community Church, Tonasket and The Oroville United Methodist. A large following from both churches were on hand to show their appreciation for his serving both. Leon is a caring man, with a very supportive and talented wife at his side and together they are pillars of the communities. A suggested prayer for all preachers: “O Lord, fill my heart with worthwhile stuff and nudge me when I’ve said enough”. It seems the new color trend this spring is bright yellow/ orange. The laundromat is having a facelift using that color and the Camaray recently used that color.

America’s Family Grill has the new signing up, so now people know it is open and ready to serve you. Last Saturday a mini class reunion for the classes of 1942,’43,’44,‘46 and one from ’48, was held at the Red Lion Inn, Wenatchee. That place was chosen so Dale Parker could come but unfortunately he wasn’t up to travel the distance, that day. Present were Al and Mary Alice Robinson, Fred Owyen and wife, Virgil and Donna Forney, Richard Henneman and friend Ruth, Everett Green, and Clayton and “Boots” Emry. I think it was unanimous that Bob Drummond and Effie Coulton would be prosecuted today if they used the same disciplinary tactics they did in those “good ole days” on the high school hill. Some of our schools have gone modern. The kids who once cleaned the erasers now dust the computers. What a tragic accident happened in our community last week when a small child drowned in a swimming pool... that was virtually empty, with just a bit of water and some sludge in the

bottom, but enough to cause a tragedy. Condolences go out to the family. Nancy (Greene) Zimmerman, sister of Bill Greene and Barbara Shaw, made her yearly visit and had requested home made ice cream. I’m glad she did as Shaw’s fulfilled her request and included Gordon and Nancy Roberts, neighbor Myrtle Wood and friend husband and I, last Sunday afternoon. Nancy lives in Olympia and has worked at the capitol building as hostess and party planner and she and her husband were so helpful to me when Clayton had health issues in that area, a couple of years ago. I can never repay them enough! Cousins are great things to have! Memorial Day has come and gone for 2013. Since one of our American Legion members thinks that my “This and That” column is widely read he has asked me to add this information. In case you aren’t aware, it is the Legion Post #84 that places the little white crosses and American flags on the graves of those that have served in the different branches of the military,

EYECARE

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No more classes until fall quarter. Our final spring quarter class is Friday and then there’s a summer respite. Many, many thanks to our instructors, our students, and to the many businesses that willingly display or distribute class catalogs throughout the year. There is no program with-

Pies, whole or by slice on Heritage Day Submitted by Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

Senior Citizens will be serving pies, by the slice or by the whole pie, at Heritage Days on July 20. You will find us next to Bob Seaman’s homemade ice cream stand. Do stop by as we will have a variety of pies. Our pie event is scheduled on the Museum veranda. We will be raffling off a huge basket on the Fourth of July. But wee need many more items to fill it. Jim Fry is out of the hospital after having a new pacemaker installed. Cal Porter is in

Fundraiser for Zeus the police dog, June 29 Submitted by Lyle Anderson Tonasket Eagles #3002

If you have put those umbrellas up, you may wish to keep them out a bit longer. Next week is the Fourth of July, so make sure to get out there and enjoy the fireworks and the company of friends to celebrate our Independence Day. We would like to thank the volunteers that helped put on the fish fry this last Saturday. A special thanks to Roger Sawyer,

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THE LEARNING TREE out all of you. Over the summer watch for a ‘traveling’ and very colorful three-sided presentation board in Oroville and another in Tonasket. We hope to change its location every week so you’re bound to find it somewhere – the visitors’ center, the library, and businesses around town. You will see great

OROVILLE SENIORS Wenatchee Central Washington Hospital for multiple surgeries. Kay Tracy is at the Critical Care Center in Tonasket. Do drop in to see her. Walt Hart’s Scout Troop #26 will be providing breakfast here at the Center on July 20. Serving time: 7 a.m. until 10 a.m. We wish to thank Cenah Whiteaker and her mother Judy, of Blossom and Briar, for demonstrating flower arranging in a pretty colored vase.They provided the flowers and the vases. Everyone attending said we need to have more classes. HMMM!

TONASKET EAGLES Servando Garcia, Fred Bevier, and Bev Montanye. Our beginning of the month meetings will be next week on July 3rd. The Joint meeting will be at 6pm, and the Aerie meeting to follow at 7pm. There will be no Auxiliary meeting due to the holiday on the Fourth of July. On Saturday, June 29 there will be a steak dinner and auction to help our local police dog Zeus, so come and help support our community. The dinner will be $10

photos from some of the classes NVCS has offered and information about the program that may be new to you. There are so many people with so much talent in this area! Are you one of them with something educational, recreational or cultural to offer? Don’t be shy. Please let us know. We are available several ways. You can call Ellen Barttels at (509) 4762011; email her at community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu or visit our website at northvalleycommunityschools.com. Enjoy your summer! We’ll be in touch. Pinochle scores for June 15: Barbara Cline won the door prize; Ed Craig had the most pinochles and was also high scoring man for the week; High scoring women were Boots Emry and Wilma Colburn. Pinochle scores for June 22 Judy Ripley won the door prize and also was high scoring for the women; Ken Ripley was high scorer for the men and most pinochles winner was Beverly Storm. P. S. Jim and Cal are both home now and improving daily. Pinochle scores for June 15: The door prize went to Barbara Cline; Ed Craig had the most pinochles and was also the high scoring man for the evening. Boots Emry and Wilma Colburn were high scorers for the women. and there will be karaoke following it all at 9 p.m. There will be no bingo or kitchen on Friday, July 6 due to the holiday. Our annual visit from the state presidents will be on Tuesday, July 2 and there will be a dinner to follow that meeting. This past Sunday’s pinochle scores are as follows: Liz Moody took first place and Nellie Paulsen grabbed second place. Low score was Lyle Anderson and the last pinochle was JoAnn Michels and Liz Moody. We wish those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

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HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health (509) 826-5600

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Submitted by Jackie Valiquette

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

HOSTS ( Help One Student to Succeed) at the Oroville Elementary school was fortunate to receive two bikes, from the Oroville Masons. HOSTS students, with their mentors, read books for the opportunity to earn a bicycle. David HernandezDelgado and Skyler Noel were this years bike recipients. “A huge thank you to the Masons for these gifts. Their participation in the HOSTS program, with their generous donation, encourages students to ‘bee’ the best they can ‘bee,’” said Marlene Barker, the coordinator for Oroville’s HOSTS program.

School’s out for the summer

and are buried in Riverview cemetery. This year 349 American graves, four Canadian and one British grave had the cross and flag placed on the grave. Unfortunately, one of the lists has been misplaced and they feel there are others that should have had flags. If someone in your family (or anyone you know of) didn’t have a cross and doesn’t have a military marker and would like information, please contact Louie Wilson. As of last weekend Bud Gerken was still in the hospital in Spokane, being taken there after having had more strokes. I’m told his eyesight has been affected as well as his memory. Word came to me that he was being transferred to Tonasket hospital. Hopefully, he will be able to do that in the near future. Monday it rained again, and the helicopters were buzzing around trying to dry cherries. I know that installing the covering that some of the orchards have, is a most expensive item, but I believe it is almost a necessary thing, as it does seem to rain, at the most critical time, far too often.

 Anti

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

 Behavioral

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion  Walk

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916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 MASSAGE

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JUNE 27, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life Foundation awards OROVILLE $6,900 to students SCHOLARSHIP Submitted by Glenna Hauenstein The last meeting for 2012-13 was held recently by the Oroville Scholarship Foundation to review the fundraising events and the scholarships awarded to Oroville High School graduates. Proceeds from an enjoyable variety show / silent auction, which was held in march, will be used for the continuing education scholarships presented yearly in late December. The money is also shared with the high school music department for their help with the event. Also one of the elementary school employees donates to this fund by a payroll deduction. The $3,200 available for 2012-13 scholarships was divided among the nine applicants. Two of the awards were possible because of donations from Kinross Gold Corporation.

Preparing for Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

With the Mid Summer Festival over for this year most of our attention is now on the 4th of July.  The Rodeo Club is working hard to get things ready for the “Big Day.” The Community Dance will start the festivities on Wednesday, July 3rd at 9 p.m. with music provided by Powder River. Admission is $5. Books opened Tuesday, June 25th. Entries accepted 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. only. Books close when events are filled. Fees must be paid by 2 p.m., July 1st. Call Mary Ellen Field at (509) 485 3223. Junior Events - No Entry Fee - Cow Riding - Calf Roping & Barrels. Kids Events- No Entry Fee 12 and Under - Calf Scramble. Chicken Chase Open Barrel Racing - $10 Entry Fee. Wild Cow Milking - $ 20 Entry Fee -Per Team Senior Events - $20 Entry Fee - Cow Riding - Calf Roping Regular Saddle Bronc Bareback and new this year – Ranch Style Saddle Bronc. On the 4th of July the day will start with Breakfast by the Sitzmark Crew then lunch, with

FOUNDATION

With interest rates so low now on the invested funds, the donations received this year were especially appreciated. The Steiner Foundation again made money available for a generous scholarship. Dr. Steiner grew up in Okanogan and has a dental practice in Gig Harbor. Several members of the King family have donated throughout the year to the Ed King funds. Three students were helped by the King scholarships. Also for the second year, $300 was received by the ICC (North Central Washington Chapter of the International Code Council). This group includes the Building Code officials, Plans Examiners and Building Inspectors for Adams, Grant,

HILLTOP COMMENTS burgers and fries. The Knob Hill Club will have their Walkin’ Taco’s, Corn Dogs and Sno Cones, Pop Corn and Cotton Candy, at the Community Building. Family Games start at 10 a.m. in the Rodeo Grounds and the Annual Fourth of July PARADE will begin at 12:30 p.m. Sign up now for your spot in the line up. All are welcome to join in. It makes it run smoother if you sign up now. Call Marianne at (509) 485 2103. Meanwhile over in Molson on Friday Nights starting at 7 p.m. and the Grange Building is open to Family Roller Skating. The cost is 50 cents for two hours of fun for the whole family. On the third Friday of the Month in Molson is Family BINGO at 6 p.m. cost is $10 for 10 Games. Vacation Bible School will be in Chesaw on July 8 and 9 from 9 a.m. to noon. For more information call Carol Mills at (509) 485 2083. Winners of the different Molson Midsummer Events and drawings, include: Run Walk, Shuffle - First Place overall: Chance Llewellyn from Mountain Home, Idaho 1st place 3 miles: Hadley Blasey, Oroville, 10 years and under; Chance Llewellyn, Mountain Home, Idaho, 11-18 years; Dewey Edwards, Republic,

Kittitas and Okanogan Counties. With the help of all those mentioned as well as the generous support from local businesses and individuals, the 13 senior class applicants shared a total of $6,900 in scholarships. We are proud of all of our OHS graduates and send our best wishes with them as they enter a new phase in their lives. We also want to thank the Class of 1963 members who donated at their May Day reunion. Several other classes are planning reunions for this summer. We would like to encourage having one of the OSF donation jars at your event. We are very much interested in eventually being able to award a yearly alumni scholarship. We need volunteers to help us get names and addresses to make this happen. For more information please contact president Teresa Kitterman (509) 476-2127) or secretary Terri Barker at (509) 476-3145. 19-30 years; Jason Llewelllyn, Chesaw, 31- 49 years; Bob Thornton, Oroville, 50 years and up; 1st place for 1 mile: Nakia VanHoven, Moses Lake, 10 years and under; Conner Forthun, Oroville, 11-18 years; Allison Ryum, 19-30 years; and Jeff Forthun, Oroville, 31-49 years; Tie: Ken Cockle, Sr., Puyallup and Chuck Thompson, Nine Mile Ranch, 50 years and up Doubles Horseshoes: David Shaw and Lisa Sooter Car Show: People’s Choice First Place Tim Roberts, Molson, Blue 1966 Chevy Chevelle; Second Place (tie) Bill Douglas, Omak, Blue 1930 Ford Pickup and Ted Hilstad, Molson, Black 1936 Ford Pickup. The second place tie-breaker settled with a coin flip with Douglas winning the coin toss. Scavenger Hunt: First Place Hannah Eger and Isaac Lotze; Second Place Debbie Nesper Frisbee Golf: First Place, Len Firpo, three under par for 34; Second Place, Scott Forthun, four over par for 41 and Third Place, Kathryn Cleman, five over par for 42 The general door prize winners were Everett Turner, Joan Case, Florence Rise, Hunter Forthun, Elise Peterson, Leona Forthun, Mary Louise Loe and Karen Cockle. Bracelets were won by Florence Rise and Beverly Nelson. The Candy Jar prize was won by Jeol Nesper and Alex Curtis. Diana Nielson won the quilt and Elise Peterson won the painting.

Tonasket Elementary year-end awards Battle of the Books (A reading incentive program designed to encourage students to read quality literature and answer questions about literature in a game show style setting, for grades 3-5.) Third Grade 1st Place - Reading Angels (Sara Alexander, Madison Prock, Skylar Hardesty, Treshelle Caddy). 2nd Place - Burning Flames (Alex Owsley, Conner Hardesty, Trace Scott, Juan Tafolla). 3rd Place - The Survivors (Stella Crutcher, Leslie Ortiz, Anthony Sanchez, Myah Hirst). Honorable Mention Battleships of the Deep (Quaid McCormick, Tait Olson, Cody Stirek, Waylon Thomas); Magic Judy Moody Girls (Madi Wirth, Erica Breashears, Brielle Wahl, Jennifer Paluck); Galloping Through Time (Savannah Bones, Alexus Alvarado, Chrystal Rivera, Rebecka Allen); Bone Shredders (Jesus Najera, Ryden Zabreznik, Chloe Combs, Carson Sasse, Isaiah Ayscue). Fourth Grade 1st Place - Superstars (Malia

Find The Right

Whitemore, Ariana Perez, Colin Silverthorn). 2nd Place - Angry Books (Carter Alberts, Josh Bello, John Kennedy, Waylon Wilson). 3rd Place - Bandits From Heaven (Araceli Torres, Becca Rollins, Katie Keane). Honorable Mention - Cubs (Myra Webber, Emily Nissan, Yahir Calderon). Fifth Grade 1st Place - Bouncy Books (Emma Alexander, Christina Torres, Angelina Wilson). 2nd Place - Reading Stars (Grace Cory, Rubi Capote, Maria Garcia, Makala Ramsey). 3rd Place - Bookworms (Alexis Swanson, Yayra Ortega, Erica Good, Raegan Timm). Honorable Mention Bookateers (Jennifer Cosino, Cheyenne Stirek, Lynzi Scott); Cowgirls (Jamie Wilson, Kyndall Rollins, Kaitlynn Curtis, Marsie Brazil); Nitro Readers (Chance Watson, Gene Woolbert, Seth Thompson).

Cattlewomen Award Students wrote about why their dads deserve a steak dinner.

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1422 Main St. Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 888-838-3000

Students Katy Keane and Alex Wisdom received t-shirts for their entries while their fathers each won a box of beef steaks from Double S Meats.

STAR Reader Awards Students were recognized for the most growth in reading. The top two students received bikes donated by the Oroville Masons. Winners were Jade Ramon and Kaylee Fox. Moby Math Awards Chase Pilkinton, Paola Silva, Drake Duncan, Neida MartinezGiron. Silverwood Readers Students were give a calendar to read 10 hours in 20 days. Upon completion of the challenge they received a pass to Silverwood Park. 144 students participated. Teachers were awarded a ticket for the most students that participated. Jay Aitcheson (13), Fay Aitcheson (13), Steve Robeck (12), Amy Cheeseman (11), Lissa Mensik (11), Donna Weitman (9), Jollie Evans (7), Megan Huckaby (7), Cheri Wahl (7).

A MATTER OF DEGREE Tonasket sisters Camille (Glanzer) Wahl and Katie Glanzer were recently awarded with advanced degrees from the University of Washington. Camille earned her Doctorate of Dental Surgery on June 8 and Katie earned her Masters of Early Childhood Special Education on June 15. They are the daughters of Tyrone and Janet Glanzer of Tonasket.

Community Bulletin Board Stroke Support Group OROVILLE - This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. We will meet at Oroville’s Lake Osoyoos Veterans Park on Thursday, June 27 at 10:30 a.m. Discussion from those who have recovered will be very welcome. We will meet at the small pavilion by the lake.

Oroville Neighborhood Band OROVILLE – The Oroville Neighborhood Band will perform Thursday evening, June 27 at Esther Bricques Winery’s Tasting Room, featuring musical highlights by Ray Dispenza, Steve Pollard, Steve Bell, and Pati Bell. Doors open at 6 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Acrylic Painting Class at NVCS TONASKET – With a change of dates, North Valley Community School’sÍÍZ Acrylic Painting class will now take place on Thursday and Friday, June 27 and 28 from 3-5:00 p.m. Everyone will paint the same piece, but each will have its personal twist. This isn’t just a class, it’s going to be a party! The paints are permanent, so dress for the mess. This class will be in Tonasket at “Hidden Talents.” Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 4762011, community.schools@ oroville.wednet.edu or go to our new website at www. northvalleycommunityschools. com to register.

OHA Presents “Forest for the Trees” TONASKET - OHA presents the summer’s first event in the Highland Wonders series with a unique perspective on Okanogan Highlands ecology. “Seeing the Forest Among the Trees,” features a Friday evening presentation (June 28, 6:30 p.m. at the Tonasket High School Commons) with a Saturday outdoor field trip the following day. Renowned forest ecologist Herb Hammond will share his unique perspective on forest ecosystems. Priority registration for the field trip is offered to OHA members, and

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon LAKE AND COUNTRY Very cute, fully remodeled home right in town!

New laminate flooring, new vinyl windows and fully finished basement. Located 1/2 block from tennis courts. Features 2 car detached garage, underground sprinkler system, 3bd, 1.75 bath and 1,584 sqft of living space! MLS#453753 $140,000

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

SUN LAKES REALTY

IT’S A BEAUTIFUL GARDEN ON THE LAKE - 300 ft of Premium Waterfront on Almost 3 Fenced Acres w/Delightful 1-level Home, Double Garage & Giant 3 Bay Barn for RV, Toys, Shop+ has Huge Office. - $299,000

LAKE OSOYOOS MINI LODGE- Nestle into Your Private Retreat, Sunny Eastside, loads of beachfront w/3 bedroom Daylight Basement, Carport & Separate Garage. Won’t Last Long - Call Today. $379,950

remaining space will be available on a first come, first serve basis to the public. Both are offered free of charge to the community, and donations are welcome. For information or to register, email julie@okanoganhighlands.org or call (509) 433-7893.

Author Laurie Rogers to Speak TONASKET - Author Laurie Rogers from Spokane will speak on “What is Common Core? How will it effect my students?” on Friday, June 28, 2013 from 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. at Whistlers Restaurant in Tonasket. Rogers is the author of “Betrayed: How the Education Establishment has Betrayed America and What You Can Do” will tell us more about state common core standards and what they mean for our children’s education. According to Laurie “The Common Core initiatives are unproved….”

Farmers’ Market Flea Market OROVILLE - Do you need a great place to sell your yard sale or flea market goods? The Oroville Public Library Farmers’ Market will host a giant Flea Market and Yard Sale Saturday, June 29 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Space is available and your booth fee will benefit the Oroville Public Library on Main Street in Oroville. Call (509) 4762662 for more information.

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The Oroville Farmers’ Market is Saturday, June 29, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Oroville Community Library located at 1276 Main St. Purchase art, crafts, plant starts, fresh baked goods and tamales plus the best produce on the planet. The Oroville Farmers’ Market continues each Saturday through October 26 and new vendors are welcome. Call (509) 476-2662 for more information.

Music at the Market OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will host “Music at the Market” each Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. during the Farmers’ Market season. Musicians who would like to showcase (volunteer) their acoustic talents are invited to call the Oroville Public Library to book a date. The next Music

at the Market is Saturday, June 22. For more information call Barbara at (509) 476-2662.

The Legend of Cat Ballou The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket will be presenting “The Legend of Cat Ballou,” a classic western musical comedy. The play will next be presented on Friday, June 28 and Saturday, June 29, each starting at 7 p.m. Admission is $8 with tickets available at Tonasket Natural Foods, Oroville Pharmacy, Roy’s Pharmacy, Main Street Market in Omak and at the door. These shows sometimes sell out, so buying tickets in advance is suggested.

Free Nursing Assistant Training North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class. Deadline to get your application in is Monday, July 1. The class begins on July 8 and will be completed in August. Applications may be picked up at North Valley Hospital’s Human Resource office or online at www.nvhospital.org. This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative and technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. For information call the Extended Care at (509) 4863110 or Marcia Naillon (509) 486-3155.

Quilt Show in Molson MOLSON - The Second Annual Quilt Show in Molson will take place on Saturday, Aug. 31 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Quilters will be displaying patriotic quilts and military memorabilia from all branches of service. Many of the quilts were created from the proceeds of last years quilt show. Those that would like to like to donate a quilt should contact Vicky Didenhover. Quilts will be on display for peoples’ viewing pleasure, but there will also be a selection of quilts and other sewing related items for sale. Those with sewing related items that would like to have a table to sell items and/ or would would like to display a quilt at the show contact Didenhover at (509) 485-3020.

h i l lt o p r e a lt y NEW LISTING - 80 Acres w/Home & Outbuildings

9 miles to Tonasket. County Road. School Bus. Unique Home. 2-bdrm, 1-bath. Could easily be built onto. Passive Solar Features. Built 1992. Sauna/Steam House. 2 Shops. 2 3-bay equip sheds. Garage. Easy Care Yard. Good Water. Some Equipment will stay including 2 Tractors. Nature Conservancy borders on 3 sides. Unique Property with Views and Privacy. $380,000.00. Possible Owner Contract with 1/2 Down. Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com l 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

www.windermere.com

509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

3 Blue Star Lane, Tonasket – 3 bed, 2 bath: Country living at it’s best! 74+ acres just off Hwy 20 (acrages on both sides of Hwy 20) This 3 bedroom/2bath MH is currently being rented ($650 rent). Half of the acreage is wooded, half is pasture which is fenced & cross fenced with 2 winding streams. The well is 50GPM and drilled. Call for appointment to view. NWML# 500218 $195,000


Page 8 A8

Okanogan June27, 27,2013 2013 OKANOGAN Valley VALLEYGazette-Tribune GAZETTE-TRIBUNE |• June

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale Tonasket 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, heat pump, single car garage with shop and storage shed. RV parking with dump site and AC power. Covered patio. $98,000. Bill: (509)486-1952

www.gazette-tribune.com

For Rent 3 BR Home, $785 Darling 1 BR Furn. Cottage on Eastlake, $535 3 BR, 2 BA, w/2xGarage, $875 & By River for $1100 3 BR, 2 BA Wtrfrnt Apt, $725 1 BR Apt, $450. **Call Sun Lakes Realty** (509)476-2121

Subscribe to the...

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

St. Charles Place Apartments 207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION:

LOW INCOME HOUSING “PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

– Family & Singles –

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

509-476-4057

email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

American Legion Housing 1105 Appleway, Oroville

Now Accepting Applications for 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts Subsidized for Income Qualified Households * Great Oroville Location * Picnic Areas * Spacious Floor Plans * On-Site Laundry * Park-Like Setting Call for information and application

509-476-2808 TTY 425-562-4002

Announcements We would like to thank everyone for the cards, flowers, prayers and donations made to the Eagles Scholarship fund and the US Armed Forces Legacy in honor of Jack. A special thanks to the ladies Axillary for the luncheon and the American Legion for the Military Service. We are so over whelmed by all the love and support. We received from the community. Jack loved you all. From the family of Jack Rawley

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

Found

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

House for rent, July 1st 1 Bed 1 Bath, washer & dryer included. Big yard, close to schools. $500/m, $500 security deposit. No Smokers (509)476-3059

Help Wanted

Announcements I want to thank my wife, Nancy, for the OLD AGE birthday party on June 8th. I’ll admit that if I knew I would live so long, I would have taken better care of myself. Thank you all for taking the time out to attend Saturday. Special thanks to Marilyn, Mary Lou, Dennis and Dal. The music from the Wilder Band was fantastic. Thanks to Vicky’s son Kevin who graciuosly helped with the pary. The cake made by Harvest Foods showed a lot of ingenuity. Unfortunatley it was factual as I did not her the big buck. Most of all, thank you all for attending OLD AGE PARTY. Thanks, Gordon.

The Oroville & Tonasket Office’s of North Valley Family Medicine are seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented applicant. Must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Crosswords

Oncall CMA or LPN

Certified Medical Assistant needed for a full-time, day shift position in Omak Clinic’s Walk In Clinic. Must be able to work independently. Spanish speaking a plus but not necessary. Visit us at www.wvmedical.com for more info and to apply.

25. Decide to leave, with “out�

4. Derby prize

26. “___ we having fun yet?�

5. Came down

27. Risk

6. Bug

28. European language

7. Lesser quality substitutes

29. Cut

8. Falling star

31. Electric dart shooter

9. Presidential assassin

32. “O, gie me the ___ that has acres o’ charms�: Burns

10. “It’s no ___!�

33. Freudian topics

12. Within a building

35. Calculator, at times

13. Overshadow

38. Speak incoherently when angry

14. Come in again

43. Vocation 45. Biochemistry abbr. 46. Churchill’s “so few�: Abbr. 47. Abreast (of) 48. Stallion, once 49. ___ cheese 51. Knowledge gained through anecdote 52. Issue

ANSWERS

53. One who leads a Spartan lifestyle 55. Feed

1. Change places

57. Instruct again

8. More drab color

58. Accord

15. Divided into small spaces

59. Heavy, filling foods

16. Core

60. Most rancid

17. Dishes the dirt

11. Lentil, e.g.

21. A way 24. ___ souci 27. Try, as a case 28. “___ of Eden� 30. Coaster 31. ___ de force 33. Androgynous 34. Delight 35. Unpaid overdue debt 36. Fixed (2 wds) 37. Actual 38. Antares, for one 39. White, crystalline, poisonous alkaloid

2 Dachshund Puppies. 8 weeks. Female; cream, black tail. Male; cream, black back. $200. 509-485-2149.

CMA position

The Oroville & Tonasket Office’s of North Valley Family Medicine are seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented CMA. Applicant must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Mon. - Fri. (approx. 40 hours). Medical/Dental/401K. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online Head HS Girls Basketball Coach The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Head HS Girls Basketball Coach. Position is open until filled. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 486-2126. An Equal Opportunity Employer

Now hiring for the position of Activities Coordinator/ General Store Clerk. Must be 21 or over to sell alcohol. Apply today at Veranda Beach Front Desk 509-476-4000

19. Atlas enlargement

Down

20. Length x width, for a rectangle

1. Enchanting

22. “Whatcha ___?�

2. Magnetite, e.g. (2 wds)

23. Whispers sweet nothings

3. Plaster of Paris painting surfaces

Radio Controlled Airplane. Brand New! Never Flown! Beginners to Intermediate. Everything You Need. Model “Switch� by Flyzone. Paid $260. Asking $160. 509-4763944

Wanted Buying Silver, Gold Coins, Collections, Jewelry, Sterling, Flatware, Guns. Paying fair Prices. Call Spence (509) 429-4722

Livestock & Poultry EXCELLENT CLUB Lambs Available. $100 each. These are the best lambs we have had. Our lambs place well every year. Call Holly or Jim Barnes, 509-223-4303 or 509-846-3440

Garage & Yard Sale GIANT YARD SALE & flea market at the Oroville Public Library Farmers Market, Saturday June 29th, 9-1pm. Main Street, Oroville Moving Sale. Living Room Set, Pool Table, Coffee Tables, End Tables, Bookcases, Tools, Kids Toys, Lots More! Saturday, June 29th thru July 3rd. 4 Salam Lane, Oroville. 509-560-0890 call for info.

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF JUNE 24, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make goodâ€?, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPT -- WARM, FUN Professional Couple Eager To Provide Your Child With Love and Happiness Forever. Expenses Paid. Ann and Peter. Call 1-800-593-1730 ADOPT: ACTOR/DIRECTOR & Executive long for 1st baby; Sports, Playful pup, Home Cooking awaits! Expenses paid. 1-800-989-8921 EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com FINANCIAL – NOTE BUYERS BAJILLIONS Still Available for good R.E. Contracts, Notes and Annuities. Are you Receiving Payments?....Get the Best Pricing seen in 25 years‌.. Skip Foss 800-637-3677. FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS FREE 10â€? Internet tablet when your order DISH installed free. Free HBO. Offer ends Soon Call for details. 1-866-845-7776. Restrictions apply with approved credit. HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS DRIVERS -- Tired of Being Gone? We get you Home! Call Haney Truck Line one of best NW heavy haul car-

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310 Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

40. Joins the military 41. Notched wheel and pawl 43. Bad feeling 44. Ages 48. Apple gizmo

18. Lure with music

24. Backless seat

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Miscellaneous

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— CALENDAR —

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Public Notices AUCTION NOTICE THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 509-476-3948 JULY 3, 2013 Viewing time: 10:00 AM Auction: 11:00 AM 2007 Subaru Impreza Lic# WA 361WGM Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 27, 2013. #490849 Basic Service Annual Ad Skyline Telecom is a quality telecommunications services provider that provides basic and enhanced services at reasonable rates within its service territory. Basic services are offered at the following rates: Single Party Residence Service, Monthly Service Charge, $19.50; Single Party Business Service, $25.00; Federal Subscriber Line Charge – Single Line, $6.50: Access Recovery Charge-Single Line $.50. Touch Tone Service: Touch Tone service is provided as a part of local service rate. Toll Blocking: Available at no charge; Emergency 911 Services: Surcharges for 911 services are assessed according to government policy. Low-income individuals may be eligible for Federal and State Lifeline telephone assistance programs that include discounts from the above basic and local service charges. Basic services are offered to all consumers in the Skyline Telecom service territory at the rates, terms and conditions specified in the Company’s tariffs. If you have any questions regarding the Company’s services, please call us at (888) 7824680. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 27, 2013. #492601 City of Oroville Clerk’s Office, P.O. Box 2200, Oroville, Washington, 98844, (509) 476-2926 Fax (509) 476 9067 CALL FOR BIDS Sealed Bids will be received by the office of the Clerk-Treasurer, City Hall, Oroville, Washington, until 4:00 p.m. local time, June 28, 2013 for furnishing the following equipment: One used rubber track, zero tail swing, compact mini excavator. Unit shall have an operating weight of 5600 pounds and have a engine horsepower of no less than 20 H.P. The machine shall have a manufacture date of 2006 to present. Bids will be publicly opened and read during the July 2, 2013 7:00 p.m. regular meeting of the City Council. All bids shall be firm bids and shall clearly state the date of delivery. The City of Oroville reserves the right to wave any minor informalities and to reject any and all bids. Bid specifications and bid forms may be obtained by contacting City Hall, P.O. Box 2200, Oroville, WA 98844 or by calling (509) 476-2926. ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones Clerk/Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 20, 27, 2013. #490740 Notice of Meeting Cancellation The Oroville Planning Commission has cancelled their Wednesday, July 3, 2013 meeting. Regular meetings are held the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at 4:30 pm in the City Council Chambers. If you have any questions, please call JoAnn Denney at 4762926 ext 13. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 27, 2013. #491060

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: WALTER C. LEONARD, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00048-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the ad-

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June 27, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune June 27, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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LEGAL NOTICE NEGOTIATION OF STATE LEASES WITH EXISTING LESSEES BETWEEN AUGUST 2013 AND OCTOBER 2013 EXPIRES: DECEMBER 2013. 10-075044-GRAZING-W1/2, W1/2E1/2, SE1/4SE1/4, Section 16; NE1/4NE1/4, SE1/4NE1/4, NW1/4NE1/4, E1/2NW1/4, NW1/4SW1/4, Section 21; all in Township 40 North, Range 32 East, W.M. Written request to lease must be received by July 31, 2013, at Department of Natural Resources, 225 S Silke Rd, Colville, Washington 99114-9369. Each request to lease must include the lease number, the name, address and phone number of applicant, and must contain a certified check or money order payable to the Department of Natural Resources for the amount of any bonus bid plus a $100.00 deposit. The envelope must be marked “Sealed Bid” and give lease number, expiration date of lease applied for and give applicant’s name. The applicant must be prepared to purchase improvements that belong to the current lessee. Persons wishing to bid to lease any of these properties can obtain more details, bid packet, and qualification requirements by contacting the Colville office or calling (509) 684-7474. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 27, 2013 #489644

to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-9410, or call (800) 795-3272 (voice), or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). “USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender”. The Equal Employment Opportunity Coordinator is responsible for coordinating this organization’s nondiscrimination compliance efforts and may be contacted at Skyline Telecom PO Box 609, Mount Vernon, OR 97865, (541) 932-4411. Any individual, or specific class of individuals, who feel that this organization has subjected them to discrimination may obtain further information about the statutes and regulations listed above from and/or file a written complaint with this organization; or the Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington DC 20250; or the Administrator, Rural Electrification Administration, Washington , DC 20250. Complaints may be filed within 180 days after the alleged discrimination. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 27, 2013. #492602

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY IN PROBATE Estate of FRANCIS WILLIAM JOHNSON, Deceased. NO. 13-4-08869-7 SEA PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 13, 2013 Personal Representative: H e l e n Elizabeth Johnson Attorney for Personal Representative: Barbara C. Sherland WSBA #15032 Address for Mailing or Service: Stoel Rives LLP 600 University Street, Suite 3600 Seattle, WA 98101-4109 Court of Probate Proceedings Cause No.: King County Superior Court Cause No. 13-4-08869-7 SEA Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 13, 20, 27, 2013. #487684

LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE REAL ESTATE DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN. YOU AND EACH OF YOU are hereby summoned to appear within sixty calendar days after the date of first publication of this “Civil Summons by Publication”, to wit, within sixty days after the 27th day ofJune, 2013, and defend the above-entitled action in the above-entitled Court by (1) filing your “Answer” to the Plaintiffs “Complaint for Quiet Title” with the County Clerk of Okanogan County and (2). serving a copy of your Answer upon the Plaintiffs undersigned attorneys at their office location provided below. If you fail to properly file and serve your Answer by the above deadline,ajudgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of Plaintiffs Complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of the above-entitled court. The “Complaint for Quiet Title” in the above-entitled action seeks to quiet title in favor the above Plaintiff, GUY T. DREW, with respect to the following real property: Legal Description: The Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 13, Township 39 North, Range 30 East, W.M. Situate in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington. Current Assessor’s. Parcel Number: 3930134002 Additionally, the Complaint seeks to recognize the satisfaction and fulfillment of (1) the Real Estate Contract between Defendant PONTIAC RIDGE SPORTSMEN, A JOINT VENTURE and Defendants DALE E. COVEY and MARY JEAN LEWIS

(f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY), recorded on or around June 27, 1978. under Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 646427, and (2) the Real Estate Contract between Defendants DALE E. COVEY and MARY JEAN LEWIS (f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY) and Plaintiff, recorded on or around December 24, 1980 under Okanogan County Auditor’s FileNo. 674503. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter,you should do so promptly to avoid any impairment of your legal rights. This “Civil Summons by Publication” is issued pursuant to CR 4 and RCW 4.28.110. LARSONBERG &PERKlNS PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiffs /s/ John W. Scott John W. Scott (WSBA#45290) for: Paul M. Larson (WSBA#06010) File your written Answer with: Okanogan County Clerk’s Office 149 N.3rd Ave. P.O. Box 72 Okanogan,WA98840 Phone: (509) 422-7275 Serve a copy of your Answer upon: Paul M. Larson Larson Berg & Perkins;PLLC 105 North Third Street Yakima, WA.98901 Phone: (509)457-1515 Published in the Oakanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 25, August 1, 2013 #491451

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY GUY T. DREW, an individual, Plaintiff, vs. PONTIAC RIDGE SPORTSMEN, a Joint Venture; ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS of the members of Pontiac Ridge Sportsmen,a·Joint Venture; DALE E.COVEY; MARY JEAN LEWIS flkla MARY JEAN COVEY; and ALSO ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE REAL ESTATE DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN; Defendants. NO. CIVIL SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE FOLLOWING PERSONS AND PARTIES: 1. PONTIAC RIDGE SPORTSMEN, a JoInt Venture 2. ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS of the members of Pontiac Ridge Sportsmen, a Joint Venture; 3. DALE E.COVEY; 4. MARY JEAN LEWIS f/k/a MARY JEAN COVEY; and 5. ALSO ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE,

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Statement of Nondiscrimination Skyline Telecom is the recipient of Federal financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The USDA prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR LINCOLN COUNTY Estate of ROBERT E. RILEY, Deceased. NO. 13-4 00031-6 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed me Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against Decedent must present the claim: Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: By filing with the foregoing Court the original of the signed Creditor’s Claim, and By serving upon or mailing by first class mail to me at the address provided below a copy of the signed Creditor’s Claim. The Creditor’s Claim must be presented by the later to occur of: Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice to you as provided in RCW 11.40.020(3), or Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the Creditor’s Claim is not presented within the foregoing time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: June 13, 2013 Signed: Donna J. Riley, Personal Representative Address for Mailing of Service: c / o Joshua F. Grant, P.S. Attorney at Law P.O. Box 619 Wilbur, WA 99185 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 13, 20, 27, 2013 #488123

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Notice of Public Hearings City of Oroville The Oroville City Council will hold a public hearing at its regularly scheduled meeting on Tuesday, July 2, 2013 in the City Council Chambers beginning at 7:00 pm to take public input for the final adoption of the draft Critical Areas Ordinance by the City Council. The Oroville Community Development Department has been working with its Planning Commission to address initial state agency comments directed at the interim ordinance, and to incorporate Department of Ecology’s recent and more flexible buffer recommendations for small communities. The Planning Commission held a hearing on the proposal on March 21, 2012. Designation, classification and protection of Critical Areas utilizing the Best Available Science are requirements of the Growth Management Act for all counties and cities in the state of Washington. The proposed revised ordinance, and related documentation is available for viewing on the City’s website at www.orovillewa.com under the “Public Documents” section. Additional information for this hearing is available from Chris Branch, Community Development Director, at 509-560-3535. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 27, 2013. #491075

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In Re the Estate of JAMES A. HOADLEY, Deceased Probate No. 13-4-00036-8 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 20, 2013 Personal Representative: Kathaline C. Copple Attorney for Personal Representative: W. Scott DeTro Address for Mailing or Service: 700-A Okoma Drive, Omak, WA 98841 Court of Probate Proceedings and Cause No: Okanogan County Superior Court Cause No. 13-4-00036-8 CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC W. Scott DeTro, WSBA #19601 Attorney for Estate Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 20, 27, July 4, 2013. #489657

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dress stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: June 10, 2013 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: June 20, 2013 ELLEN K. VASQUEZ Personal Representative Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Leonard Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 20, 27, July 4, 2013 #489053

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JUNE 27, 2013

Cops & Courts Compiled by Zachery Van Brunt

Superior Court Criminal

The court found probable cause to charge Stephen Dale Moses, 52, Omak, with felony harassment (threats to kill). The court found probable cause to charge Delores Nancy Love, 53, Oroville, with second-degree trafficking of stolen property and second-degree possession of stolen property. The court found probable cause to charge Jermaine Thomas, no middle name or hometown given, 32, with second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm, harassment (threats to kill), making false or misleading statements to a public servant, and third-degree possession of stolen property.

Juvenile

A 13-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty to fourth-degree assault. He was sentenced to 10 days in detention with credit for nine served. He was also ordered to pay $100. A 17-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty to theft of a firearm. He was sentenced to 20 days in jail and ordered to pay $100.

District Court

Stuart Sim, 45, Surrey, B.C., had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Jimme A. Smith, 20, Okanogan, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Jeremiah Van Tachell, 21, Omak, pleaded guilty to one count of reckless driving. He was sentenced to 180 days with 170 suspended and ordered to pay $1,058 in fines. Jacki Rae Tasker, 55, Omak, pleaded guilty to DUI. Tasker was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 suspended, and ordered to pay $1,936 in fines. Ian Ray Tatshama, 43, Omak, pleaded guilty to DUI. Tatshama was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 suspended, and ordered to pay $1,936 in fines. Joseph Edward Whittington, 41, Tonasket, pleaded guilty to a trip permit violation. Whittington was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 180 suspended and ordered to pay $518 in fines. Teanna Marie Wilson, 24, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Leroy Joseph Zacherle, 43, Omak, pleaded guilty to a no-contact/ protection order violation. He was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 324 suspended, and ordered to pay $1,240 in fines. Zacherle also had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, June 17, 2013 Non-injury collision on LoomisOroville Rd. outside Oroville. Custodial interference on Webber Rd. in Tonasket. Roll-over wreck on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket Pedestrian struck on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Violation of no-contact order on Oak St. in Omak. Burglary on Fig Ave. in Omak. More than $4,200 in cash, money orders and silver reported missing. Vehicle prowls reported on Ironwood St., Hillcrest Circle Drive, Shumway Rd. and Engh Rd., all in Omak. Theft at Engh Rd. in Omak. Wayne Morris McGhee, 63, booked for fourth-degree assault. Kevin Bert Priest, 47, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: DUI and DWLS. Melissa Irene Senger, 31, booked and released for first-degree accomplice to escape and second-degree rendering criminal assistance. Dustin Thomas Hayes, 25, booked on six FTA warrants for thirddegree DWLS. Deanna Jean Davis, 30, booked for second-degree vehicle prowl

and second-degree theft. Reinaldo Anejandro Beltran, 19, booked for a District Court commitment for second-degree criminal trespassing. Brian Kristopher Boyd, 23, booked for fourth-degree assault. Tuesday, June 18, 2013 Theft on East Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Solar lights reported missing. Warrant arrest on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Assault on South Main St. in Omak. Theft on Riverside Drive in Omak. Alcohol was reported stolen. Malicious mischief on South Cedar St. in Omak. Structure fire on Peacock Lane in Omak. Three people reported injured. Theft on Rodeo Trail in Okanogan. Twenty gallons of gasoline reported missing. Fraud on Nigg Rd. near Oroville. Automobile theft on Woods Rd. in Omak. Automobile theft on Rodeo Trail in Okanogan. Charles Henry Hess Jr., 32, book on four Omak Police Department warrants: two FTA for thirddegree DWLS and two FTA for reckless driving. William Travis Applebee, 31, booked for a court commitment for DUI. Steven Lynn Barr, 53, booked on a State Patrol warrant for failure to comply DUI. Wednesday, June 19, 2013 Non-injury wreck at Hwy. 20 and Mock Rd. near Okanogan. Possible missing person on LoomisOroville road near Oroville. Warrant arrest on West Oak St. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on West Third Ave. in Omak. Ishna Rayman Mason, 33, booked for first-degree trafficking stolen property, second-degree vehicle prowl, third-degree theft and first-degree criminal trespassing. Lamberto H. Valdovinos, 24, booked for attempting to elude, felony possession of a firearm, violation of the Uniform Controlled Substance Act, reckless endangerment, and a Superior Court warrant for FTA for possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver. Auston R. Strieck, 20, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Alfonso Cardenas Jr., no middle name listed, booked for violation of no-contact order and resisting arrest. John Andrew Hilderbrand, 19, booked for two Department of Corrections holds. Shyanna Kristine Lanni, 25, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Lisa Diane Wolff, 32, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. J.W. Fox II, 38, booked for thirddegree DWLS. Lindsey Ann Pakootas, 36, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Thursday, June 20, 2013 Theft on North Third Ave. in Okanogan. Pistol, medication and keys reported missing. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. in Omak. Lost property on West First Ave. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Theft on Omache Drive in Omak. Purse reported missing. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Cherry St. in Oroville. Wreck at Hwy. 97 and Dwinnell Cutoff Rd. near Oroville. Injuries reported. Wreck on West Fourth St. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Kacee Robert Webb, 23, booked on a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife FTA warrant for driving with no valid operators’ license. Kevin Michael Clark, 32, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Friday, June 21, 2013 Hit-and-run wreck on Simons Rd. near Okanogan. Damage to a gate and fence were reported. Warrant arrest on Wannacut Lake

Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing at Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS at Harley St. and North Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Flatiron Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Omak River Rd. in Omak. Burglary on Maple St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Quince St. in Omak. Tent reported missing. Assault in East Side Park in Omak. Jason Alber Boyd, 25, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for delivery of drug paraphernalia. Francisco Nicolas-Perez, 28, booked for DUI, hit and run attended and a USBP detainer. Brenda Kay Moore, 41, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. David J. L. Condon-Soderberg, 19, booked for possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, possession of drug paraphernalia, and third-degree DWLS. Michelle L. Carden, 25, booked on five Okanogan County Prosecutor’s Office warrants: three for forgery and two for thirddegree theft. Walter Douglas Moore, 40, booked for DUI. Brandon S. Chapman, 31, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing and disorderly conduct. Saturday, June 22, 2013 Domestic dispute on East Second St. in Tonasket. Motorcycle struck a deer on Conconully Rd. in Okanogan. Injuries reported. Theft on Omache Drive in Omak. Non-injury wreck at Dayton St. and East Third Ave. in Omak. Lisa Louise Best, 43, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree malicious mischief. Sarah Marie Ohmer, 40, booked for first-degree trespassing (DV) and fourth-degree assault (DV). Alicia Sue Saulmon, 44, booked for first-degree criminal trespassing. Angelina Marie Jones, 26, booked for theft of a firearm, possession of a stolen firearm, and carrying firearms. Michael Paul Demers, 63, booked for DUI. Sunday, June 23, 2013 Assault on Appleway Rd. in Okanogan. Three male subjects were allegedly assaulting a fourth. DWLS at Kermal Grade and Hendrick Loop Rd.. Three-vehicle fatality wreck on Hwy. 97 and Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. An Oroville woman died and three Ephrata residents were reported injured. Malicious mischief on North Second Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle sprayed with BBQ sauce and tire punctured. Domestic dispute on Riverside Drive in Omak. Trespassing on O’Neil Rd. near Tonasket. Hit-and-run wreck on South Whitcomb Ave.. Marcos Buenaventura-Moran, 20, booked for second-degree DWLS and an Omak Police Department warrant for minor intoxication in a public place. Kevin Lee Dixon, 24, booked for third-degree DWLS. Ian Ray Tatshama, 43, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for DUI. Key: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Obituary Susie Rider. Lew was raised in the North Okanogan County and attended school in the Chewiliken Valley until the sixth grade. He then began to work, packing supplies into sheep camps. Over the years Lew worked in the area primarily in the timber industry. He drove logging truck for many years, retiring while driving for Duke Reihart. In August of 1944 he married Virginia Hedrick in Kamloops, B.C. Over his course of his many years, Lew enjoyed the outdoors, especially hunting and fishing.

Lewis ‘Lew’ Rider

Lewis ‘Lew’ Rider Lewis “Lew” Rider, 102, of Tonasket died June 20, 2013 at North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket. He was born May 21, 1911 in Tonasket to Sam and

Lew was a longtime member of the Oroville Eagles. Lew is survived by some nieces and many old friends. He was preceded in death by his wife Virginia in 1979 and his brother Jim. Funeral services will be held Tuesday, July 2, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. at the Bergh Chapel in Oroville with Pastor Rod Brown officiating. Interment will follow at the Oroville Riverview Cemetery. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Deep Bay Park Mass and Farewell Potluck for Fr. David OROVILLE - The Catholic Churches of Tonasket and Oroville are celebrating Mass at Oroville’s Deep Bay Park on Sunday, June 23 starting at 11 a.m. Following the service will be a barbecue and potluck to bid farewell to Father David Kuttner who is moving on to Walla Walla Parish. Those who know Fr. David and wish to say goodbye are invited to the gathering. Please bring your favorite dish and a lawnchair if you are able to.

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church?

OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Interim Visiting Pastors Information: 509-223-3542

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CHESAW

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Did you know? We use... Soy Ink  Recycled Paper Excess paper recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, June 27, 2013  

June 27, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, June 27, 2013  

June 27, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune