Page 1

Covering Arlington for 124 years and Marysville for 121 years.


2

June 12, 2013

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe


June 12, 2013

Mel Sheldon Jr.

Jon Nehring ■

Marysville Mayor

Dear friends and visitors, As Mayor, I welcome you, your family and friends to the city of Marysville, proud home of the Marysville Strawberry Festival and Twilight Grand Parade. This year’s “Fiesta” theme is fitting, since Marysville is a welcoming community that celebrates diversity among its many cultures, as well as its rich agricultural heritage that largely stems from Marysville’s most famous fruit — the strawberry. The Strawberry Festival pays tribute to the annual berry harvest, and the role that strawberries have played as a part of Marysville’s colorful history. This year’s festival organizers are adding a dash of Southwestern flavor to the festival’s traditional Pacific Northwest festival fun, so look for a fiesta atmosphere filled with plenty of excitement and pageantry. The Marysville Strawberry Festival is one of the longest ongoing festivals in Washington state, and ranks among the most recognized strawberry festivals across the nation. We invite you to join the thousands of families from around the Pacific Northwest and parts beyond who come to enjoy the full spectacle of summertime fun, food and events spread over several days. The Strawberry Festival is about bringing people together as a community, and extending that sense of belonging to all visitors. In that spirit of inclusiveness, we proudly welcome you to our great city. Experience Marysville — live, work, play!

Tulalip Tribal Chair

O

n behalf of the Tulalip Tribes, welcome to “Fiesta,” our 82nd Annual Marysville Strawberry Festival. This year’s multi-cultural theme is also a reflection of the broad diversity of our region. The Tulalip Tribes share a strong partnership with Marysville, Everett and Snohomish County. As the region’s first ambassadors, we thrived on and along the waterways of Puget Sound and the Pacific thousands of years before the Point Elliot Treaty of 1855 brought the Snohomish, Snoqualmie, Skykomish and other tribes and bands together on the Tulalip Reservation. Together, as friends, neighbors and partners in economic development, we hope this festival offers a peek at the entertainment, culture, history and other opportunities our area offers. During the festivities, we invite you to visit our Hibulb Cultural Center, a quarter mile down Marine Drive on the left as you enter the Reservation. And please also consider visiting our nationally acclaimed Tulalip Resort Casino, Seattle Premium outlet mall, our amphitheater and restaurants all on the west side of I-5. Your vital business and support funds education, environmental restoration, social services, healthcare, law enforcement and art/culture for both Tribal membership and the surrounding region.

Welcome Letters ...............3-4 Entertainment Schedule........5 Map & Events ........................6 Senior Royalty...............5, 8-9 Junior Royalty..................... 10 President’s Marshall .......... 12 Grand Marshall ................... 13 Kids Party in the Park ........ 13 Festival History..14-15 & 25 Talent Show ........................ 16 Fashion Show ..................... 17 Carnival ............................... 17 Market at Asbery Field ...... 18 Berry Run ............................ 19 Rose Planting...................... 19

JUNE 16, 1932

Kiddies Parade ................... 20

I

n spite of overcast skies and rather threatening weather, Marysville’s first Strawberry Festival attracted thousands of visitors to the town Wednesday. Local business men, as a rule, appeared surprised that so many people could be assembled here. There were 1,261 adult visitors registered, and many hundreds of others did not push through the crowds to the registration booths. It is estimated that three thousand persons were assembled at one time in the city park to see the sports, witness Indian dances, hear band music and “Red” West, and to share in the Strawberry Shortcake, provided by the Marysville Commercial Club. It is estimated by the luncheon committee, that 850 gallons — 3,100 cups of coffee were served during the meal. More than 2,700 helpings of strawberry shortcake were served.

Grand Parade ..................... 21 Senior Royalty...22, 23 & 24 Festival Float ...................... 26

Apollo Plumbing * * * * * *

Serving ALL of Snohimish County

786634

786596

Water Heaters Leaky Pipes Drain Cleaning New Installtion Remodels Trench-less Water Lines * ALL Plumbing Repairs

3


4

June 12, 2013

Strawberry Festival Guide Publisher Paul Brown

Editor Scott Frank

Reporters Kirk Boxleitner Lauren Salcedo

Ad Sales Melody Renae Faust (Inside) Terrie McClay (Arlington) Louis DeRosa (Marysville)

Graphic Design Sound Publishing Creative Design Team

Published by Marysville Globe © 2013 Sound Publishing

Madison Doty

Jeri Welch ■

Maryfest President

T

his year, we’re not just having a festival, we are having a Fiesta! Growing up in the Southwest in a large Hispanic family, I have always loved my family and friends gathering together for celebrations. The food, the music and the fun would last for days, and the memories will last me a lifetime. The Marysville community is like one large family, and I can’t wait to celebrate the 82nd Annual Strawberry Festival with you! Since moving to Marysville, I have always loved the Strawberry Festival. What a great way to bring everyone together for some fun. Bring the kids down to spend the day with family-friendly favorites at the Kids’ Party in the Park. Race your friends in the Berry Run, or walk with the kids for the Kiddies’ Parade. Earn bragging rights at the Strawberry Shortcake Eating Contest, find a great gift at the Market, and go for a spin on the rides at the Carnival. And don’t forget to grab your spot for the Grand Parade, where our regional bands, clubs, associations and visiting festivals delight the crowd with lights, music and performances. Make sure to catch the grand finale with the fireworks show. We could not have our celebration without all of our great festival sponsors and volunteers! The time and assistance we receive is priceless, and we appreciate everyone for their support. We are fortunate to have so many people who care about our community, to graciously give their hours and money to make it successful. Please take time to recognize their efforts by thanking our volunteers and visiting our local sponsors. And welcome to all the visitors coming to our wonderful city that we call home! I look forward to sharing our Fiesta celebration with everyone, as we blend some Southwestern influences into our Pacific Northwest festival fun!

Strawberry Festival Queen

A

s the 2013 Strawberry Festival Queen, and on behalf of my royal court, I welcome you to our Marysville Strawberry Festival Fiesta! When I think of Fiesta, it is all about the party. There is music, dancing, good food and, of course, friends and family. Our fiesta is an event filled with this fun! We have Kids’ Day, the Market in the Park, the Kiddies Parade and the Carnival, to name a few. Don’t forget our Grand Parade and firework show as well. These events are full of surprises that will always be remembered. For us to enjoy this spectacular Fiesta, I would like to extend a special thank you to our volunteers who spend countless hours putting our festival together. Thank you also to our community businesses and individuals who contribute their time and money to make the festival what it is today. I am thrilled to represent my hometown of Marysville this year. I am the fourth generation of my family to be involved with the festival, and I am proud to continue this tradition. I have enjoyed traveling to parades in other cities, but of course our own festival is and will be the best. The Strawberry Festival is about bringing our community together and spreading the spirit that characterizes our town to visiting people. So on that note, I hope to see you all during the festivities this year. Get ready for this extravagant Fiesta.

Now With 2 Locations to Serve You! Marine Drive Chevron

6326 ~ 33rd Ave NE • 360-716-3222

ATM on Site!

Tulalip I-5 Exit 202

2332 ~ 116th St. NE • 360-716-3241

786000_TulalipChevronStrawFest0612.indd 1

5/15/13 10:27 AM

786007

24/7 Credit-Debit • 6:30 am - 9 pm Cash Kiosk OPEN 7 Days a Week - 365 Days a Year

786000

Check Out Our Rewards Program!


June 12, 2013

Queen Madison Doty connects to her own community and others

Q

ueen Madison Doty credits her time as a member of the Strawberry Festival Royalty with helping her learn how to meet new people and develop leadership skills. “You have to figure out how to work with your team before you start out for the day,” said Doty, a 17-year-old junior at Marysville-Pilchuck High School, who’s enrolled in Running Start at Everett Community College. Doty has been fascinated to study firsthand the differences between each of the communities in Washington state and Canada that she’s visited, especially in how they celebrate their own respective festivals. “I can’t wait to wave to the folks in my own community who know me,” said Doty, who confessed that she also looks forward to the Strawberry Shortcake-Eating Contest. “It’s great to be able to encourage the younger kids especially.” Doty remains undecided as to her college major, although she’s currently leaning toward education and away from medicine. “I’m a people-person who enjoys working with kids,” Doty said. “I’ve volunteered at Pinewood Elementary, to see if that’s what I might want to do, and my mom is a teacher, and she’s my role model.” Doty’s remarks during this year’s crowning ceremony for the Strawberry Festival Royalty reflected on what she learned from attending the actual fiesta of her friend’s quinceañera.

“For a while, I stayed seated instead of participating,” said Doty, who did eventually get up to dance during her friend’s 15th birthday celebration. “The choice to join the dance is a metaphor for life. You can taste the new, or let life pass you by.” In the meantime, Doty plans to smile and have fun interacting with others as this year’s Strawberry Festival Queen. “There are so many opportunities that you’ll miss if you don’t have a positive attitude,” Doty said.

2013

Entertainment Schedule FRIDAY, JUNE 14 Clover The Balloon Fairy 2-9 p.m. Lavender Lucy 2-3 p.m. Pennies for Puppies and Ponies Benefit Concert Featuring Magazine 4:30-8:30 p.m.

SATURDAY, JUNE 15 Clover The Balloon Fairy 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Voices of the VIllage Noon to 1 p.m.

Smokey Point Family Dentistry

SATURDAY, JUNE 15 Continued...

The Marlin James Band 3-5 p.m. Uptown Lowdown Jazz Band 5:30-7:30 p.m.

SUNDAY, JUNE 16

Jed Skenandore 10-11 a.m.

Queen Madison Doty has been fascinated to study firsthand the differences between each of the communities in Washington state and Canada that she’s visited.

5

Carly Calbero 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Clover The Balloon Fairy 10 a.m to 5 p.m. Marysville City Band 10 a.m. to Noon Tarnished Brass 12:30-1:30 p.m. Scott Lindenmuth Group 2:30-4:30 p.m.

TM

Gentle Concerned Dentistry for the Entire Family.

Dr. Hanssen & Family

• Utmost Attention To Your Comfort • Emergency & Walk-in Patients Welcome • Latest in Cosmetic Dentistry & Teeth Whitening • Nitrous Oxide Gas Available • Complimentary Consultations • Payment Plans Available • Most Insurance Plans Accepted & Filed

360-658-3000 Outside Area: 1-888-223-5507 3533 172nd St. NE, Bldg. B. • Arlington

PPO Provider:

WDS, Premera Blue Cross, Regence, Met Life and United Concordia

Offering EVENING and SATURDAY Appointments 785995_SmokeyPtDentalStrawFest0612.indd 1

5/15/13 9:28 AM

791542

(Across from Safeway Center)

785995

Jennifer K. Tran, D.D.S. Donald Kim, D.D.S Sara M Lundgaard, D.D.S. Patrick C. McGrath D.D.S. Carol M Baldwin D.D.S. Otto J. Hanssen, D.D.S.


6

June 12, 2013

Event Map

SATURDAY, JUNE 15

MARYSVILLE

To Smokey Point Plant Farm

1

13

2

SATURDAY, JUNE 8

Berry Run 8:30-10 a.m. Smokey Point Plant Farm

Kids Party in the Park 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Asbery Field

Rose Planting Ceremony 10-11 a.m. Totem Middle School

TUESDAY, JUNE 11

Market in the Park 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Asbery Field

Fashion Show Noon to 1:30 p.m. Leifer Manor

THURSDAY, JUNE 13 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Funtastic Carnival 4-10 p.m. Marysville Middle School

Fashion Show Talent Show Funtastic Carnival Kiwanis Beer Garden Kids Party in the Park Strawberry Shortcake Eating Contest Entertainment Stage Market in the Park Rose Planting Ceremony Kiddies Parade Grand Parade Fireworks Finale Berry Run/Walk

Kiwanis Beer Garden 5-10 p.m. Seventh Street by Asbery Field Talent Show 6:30-10 p.m. Marysville-Pilchuck High School Auditorium

Funtastic Carnival 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Marysville Middle School Kiwanis Beer Garden Noon to 6:30 p.m. Seventh Street by Asbery Field Strawberry Shortcake Eating contest Noon to 3 p.m. Asbery Field

FRIDAY, JUNE 14 Market in the Park 2-9 p.m. Asbery Field

11

3

9 4

10

6 12

5

Funtastic Carnival 4-10 p.m. Marysville Middle School Kiwanis Beer Garden 4-10 p.m. Seventh Street by Asbery field

7 8

Kiddies Parade Check-in at 4 p.m. Judging at 5 p.m. Parade 6-7 p.m. State Avenue and Seventh Street Grand Parade 7:45 p.m.-10 p.m. State Avenue Fireworks 10-10:30 p.m. Public Works

SUNDAY, JUNE 16 Market in the Park 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Asbery Field Funtastic Carnival 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Marysville Middle School

Finally, Gourmet Pizza Delivered! 50% OFF

www.jetcitypizza.com

BUY ANY PIZZA

At Regular Price & Get Each Additional Pizza 50% OFF (Most Expensive Pizza Will Be Charged Reg. Price) Minimum $12 for delivery. Delivery charges may apply. Not valid with other offers. Expires 6/30/12

Online Code: FLIGHT50

View our entire menu online Marysville

360-653-5858

Mon-Thur 3pm to 10pm, Fri-Sun 11am to 10pm 792396

Delivery & Carry Out


The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

June 12, 2013

7

768790


8

June 12, 2013

Prince Derek Groves stays focused on schedule, but seizes the day

P

rince Derek Groves has honed his scheduling skills as a direct result of being a member of the Strawberry Festival Royalty. “We’re giving up every Saturday for this, but it’s worth it,” said Groves, an 18-year-old senior at the Marysville Getchell School for the Entrepreneur. “Still, there’s a lot of prioritization of your time that’s required.” Groves has enjoyed touring through different parts of Washington state and witnessing the effect that the parades and other festivities have on members of those communities, even as he’s felt himself moved emotionally by those events. “I’ve grown up with our local events every year, but you see them all in a brand new light when you’re part of the Royalty,” Groves said, before laughing, “I’m hoping for sunshine for our festival.” Following this summer’s festivities, Groves expects to major in business at Western Washington University, in keeping with his studies at the School for the Entrepreneur and his participation in the Future Business Leaders of America.

“FBLA has helped me become a better speaker and make personal connections,” Groves said. Like many of his fellow candidates at this year’s Royalty crowning ceremony, Groves drew a common thread between the Strawberry Festival and its theme of “Fiesta” by describing both as opportunities to bond with loved ones in the midst of joyous occasions. “What’s the point of life if you’re not having a good time?” Groves asked. “Are you going to want to remember doing homework and studying for tests, or birthdays and other parties? Those are the glorious moments that will stay with you for the rest of your life.” As much as Groves emphasized the importance of “keeping track of yourself” as a member of the Strawberry Festival Royalty, he voiced a similarly carpe diem attitude toward experimenting and trying new things. “Don’t be afraid to go outside of your comfort zone,” Groves said.

Prince Derek Groves enjoyed touring through different parts of Washington state and witnessing the effect that the parades and other festivities have on members of those communities.

Prince Israel Lopez confident, committed to representing Marysville well

P

rince Israel Lopez believes his time as a member of the Strawberry Festival Royalty has made him more responsible. “I have to wake up extra-early and not forget what I need to wear,” said Lopez, an 18-year-old senior at Marysville-Pilchuck High School who’s enrolled in Running Start at Everett Community College. Lopez takes seriously the responsibilities of representing Marysville, not only to the members of the Strawberry Festival Junior Royalty, but also to the representatives of other festivals and communities throughout the region. “It’s been great being welcomed by other royalty to their festivals, and I look forward to welcoming them to our festival,” Lopez said. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience.” Looking to the future, Lopez expects to be able to enter his first quarter at Seattle University as a junior, and ultimately plans on becoming a doctor. Strawberry Festival Prince Israel Lopez takes seri“I want to help the world in general,” Lopez said. ously the responsibilities of representing Marysville.

Marysville

Celebrating 103 Years! 1910-2013

CALL FOR INFORMATION

BIKE Shop

DUE’S BERRY FARM (Just North of Marysville)

And New Due’s Produce Barn Under new management 4th Generation Wayne & Becky Due

Farm Yard Stand location on 152nd Street, N.E. 5 miles north of Marysville off Smokey Point Blvd., by the soccer field.

360-659-3875

ALL STANDS OPEN by 10 AM & CLOSED WHEN THEY ARE SOLD OUT CALL BEFORE COMING

789102

Call First to See if Berries are Ripe:

360-548-3311 1511 Grove St. Marysville

791574

at

Lopez elicited cheers during this year’s crowning ceremony for the Strawberry Festival Royalty, first by wearing mariachi band attire to fit the Royalty candidates’ speech theme of “Fiesta,” then by doffing layers of an athletic ensemble intended to serve as a metaphor for the layers of his personality, which concluded with him ripping off breakaway pants to reveal white jeans underneath. “The Strawberry Festival began to celebrate our virtues and values as a community,” Lopez said. “Our light is meant to shine, because our presence liberates others.” Just as he shrugged off any suggestions that he had anything to be nervous about as the Strawberry Festival approaches, so too is Lopez confident of his ability to “head in any direction” in the future. “I achieve by trying my best,” Lopez said. “Nobody has ever had success without failure. I’m thankful for this opportunity to grow as a person. It’s impacted all of our lives.”


June 12, 2013

9

Princess Franqui Rojas: ‘Interacting with other people is my game’ New York City to major in business administration, although she's already been accepted into the Seattle University Business Institute for this summer. "Interacting with other people is my game," Rojas said. "I also love advertising, because it allows you to be creative." During this year's crowning ceremony for the Strawberry Festival Royalty, Rojas described herself as grateful simply to be alive, because her parents had been told that their daughter might not even manage to be born. "It's the difficult moments that we learn from," Rojas said. "Like photographs, we develop from negatives." For now, Rojas expects to remain very busy for quite a while, so it's her goal to make the most of it. "I'll only get to do this once, so I'm going to have the best time that I can," said Rojas, who also extended her thanks to all of the Strawberry Festival's supporters, as well as all the people who have supported the Royalty personally over the course of their lives. "Without you, we wouldn't be here, and we wouldn't be who we are."

“It’s the difficult moments that we learn from. Like photographs, we develop from negatives.”

Princess Franqui Rojas has utilized her role in the Strawberry Festival as a networking opportunity, by getting to know new people and resolving to keep in contact with them in the future.

785999

P

rincess Franqui Rojas cited communication as a skill that's essential for members of the Strawberry Festival Royalty, as she's gleaned from experience. "Whether you're calling or texting or emailing, you have to find out the latest on what's going on so that you don't mess up the schedule," said Rojas, a 17-year-old junior at the Marysville Getchell School for the Entrepreneur. Among the other benefits of her role, Rojas has utilized it as a networking opportunity, by getting to know new people and resolving to keep in contact with them in the future. At the same time, she expressed enthusiasm for continuing to take part in what she regards as a family tradition, albeit on a different level than before. "Every year, I shop for arts and crafts at the Market at Asbery Field," Rojas said. "It'll be good to come back home, after going to all the other festivals, and to have the people we know in the community see us in a different light." Beyond this year's Strawberry Festival, Rojas is still weighing her options between attending college in the Pacific Northwest or heading to


June 12, 2013

Strawberry Festival Junior Royalty Princesses Criscia “CC” Rinaldi, Erika Krause and Cassandra “Cassie” Kunselman are grateful to have made friendships that they hope will last a lifetime.

Strawberry Festival full of surprises for Junior Royalty

T

785986

10

he Strawberry Festival Junior Royalty have already seen their share of surprises, challenges, rewards and lessons from their experiences. While Princess Erika Krause of Totem Middle School wasn’t expecting the number of parades and other activities that they’ve already gone through, fellow Princess Cassandra “Cassie” Kunselman of the 10th Street Middle School was impressed when she saw the Strawberry Festival float for the first time. “It’s so beautiful,” Kunselman said. “I love the ‘Fiesta’ theme.” As for Princess Criscia “CC” Rinaldi of Cedarcrest Middle School, she remarked upon being able to meet “so many fascinating people,” including one of the earliest Strawberry Festival Queens at the Marysville Historical Society’s annual Spring Tea and Vintage Fashion Show. “It amazes me that we’re doing what she did a long time ago,” Rinaldi said. Rinaldi and Krause agreed that their busy schedules have been an adjustment, with Krause noting that she’s balancing her obligations as Royalty with piano lessons and commitments to her church’s youth group, while Kunselman continues to cope with a leg injury that put her in a cast. Still, all three girls agreed that they’re grateful to have had the opportunity to make friendships with their fellow Royalty and others that they hope will last a lifetime.

“It’s so beautiful,” Kunselman said. “I love the ‘Fiesta’ theme.” “It isn’t always fun and games, though,” Krause said. “There are times when you have to be professional and proper.” While Kunselman credits her successful fulfillment of these responsibilities with instilling in her a greater sense of self-confidence, Rinaldi has honed social skills such as how to greet new people, how to deliver a speech and how to pick out “the perfect dress.” All three girls are looking forward to appearing in the Strawberry Festival Grand Parade. Rinaldi can’t wait to dance on the float, while Krause is more eager to have her friends and family see her than to dance — “Because I’m a really bad dancer” — and to go on as many carnival rides as she can. “I also love meeting all the little kids who are excited to see us,” Kunselman said. “I’ve dreamed about this since I was three years old.” “I’m very excited to represent Marysville all around the state,” Krause said. “I’m very proud to call Marysville my home.” “This is such an amazing experience and I am having so much fun,” Rinaldi said.


June 12, 2013

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

FOOD & BEVERAGE: Jackpot Teriyaki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360-651-4977 Taco Del Mar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360-654-2960 Port o Subs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360-654-2950 Quil Ceda Liquor & Cigar bar . . . . 360-716-2940 BEAUTY & SHOPPING Hoity Toity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360-716-2982 Salon de Porres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360-716-2929 Tulalip Nails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360-657-3750 Reset Games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360-653-8580

11

SERVICES Tulalip Clinical Pharmacy . . . . . . . 360-716-2660 The UPS Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360-657-5500 Quil Ceda Family Dental . . . . . . . . 360-659-1149 Marysville Tulalip Chamber & Visitor Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360-659-7700 8825 34TH AVE. NE, TULALIP Quil Ceda Village is conveniently located on the I-5 corridor. Use exits 200 and 202 and turn west.

For more information call 360-716-5010.

QuilCedaVillage.com

790410


12

June 12, 2013

Stage Atkins is named President’s Marshal

S

tage Atkins was diagnosed with a mitochondrial disease as an infant — a diagnosis that meant dealing with vision, speech and mobility impairment as well as frequent seizures. Stage, 6, has been named the Strawberry Festival President’s Marshal, after he and his family overcame the often devastating obstacles involved with having a disability — and learned to embrace the good things in life. “In the beginning, we didn’t realize he was having seizures. We didn’t even know what it was,” said Jeff Atkins, Stage’s father. “Our first introduction to him having seizures was when Jessie took him to the doctor and they recognized it as a seizure. And then it all happened at once.” Jessie Atkins, Stage’s mother, recalls her initial reaction to the epilepsy that Stage was experiencing as a baby and his ultimate diagnosis. “The biggest thing at first was thinking, ‘Oh my God, he has epilepsy. He’s not going to be able to swim by himself, he’s not going to be able to drive!’ And then, slowly, the doctors are saying things like, ‘Ok wait, he might not ever walk. Or talk.’ That was really the beginning point of grieving.” Although he is nonverbal and requires a wheelchair, Stage and his family — including his siblings Acashia, 10, and newborn Chance — have an immense family bond and are thankful for the good that they see every day, especially in the Marysville community. Jessie described a routine grocery shopping trip with

The Atkins family, from left, Acashia, Jeff, Stage and Jessie. Stage Atkins was nominated to be the Strawberry Festival President’s Marshal.

Stage that turned into a moment of surprising compassion. “I was at Grocery Outlet, and my son hates grocery shopping — he just screams the whole time,” she explained. “So, I’m pushing his wheelchair and dragging a cart and I know that other people are thinking, ‘Where’s all that screaming coming from?’” She was standing in line to pay and began to sing the Itsy Bitsy Spider, one of Stage’s favorite tunes. “I’ve learned to get over my fear of singing in public

because it’s the only thing that calms him down,” she said. “I was surprised when the cashier started singing along with me. And then the lady behind me in line started singing, then the lady behind her.” There they were, all strangers, bound by nothing more than the impulse to embrace another person’s challenges and do what they could to help. Stage stopped crying to listen. “It was just amazing,” said Jessie. “It’s little things like that. They really make a difference.”

Furniture World Celebration!!! Marysville 360-653-5312 1031 State Ave. Marysville Lynnwood 425-744-6694 19215 Hwy 99 Lynnwood

688

$

599

No Credit C hec Needed Fin k ancing

Or

2 Piece Living Room Set

Sofa and Love Seat Available in 5 Colors.

4 Piece Bedroom Set

Includes queen bed, night stand, dresser and mirror. Queen Sleigh Bed Only $237

24 Months N Interest Fin o ancing OAC

www.furnitureworldnw.com Lynden 360-778-3036 303 Front St., Lynden

Oak Harbor 360-682-2431 988 Ault Field Rd., Oak Harbor

791639

$


June 12, 2013

13

Herman Williams Sr. is Grand Marshal

H

erman Williams Sr. is a former Tulalip Tribal Chair, Marysville School Board Director, Marysville High School ASB President and football quarterback. He is an artist, painter, musician, fisherman and storyteller. And now, he is adding one more title to his list of influence in the Marysville and Tulalip areas — Strawberry Festival Grand Marshal. “Herman has been influential in Tulalip and Marysville for many years,” said Carol Kapua, of the Strawberry Festival. “Being one of the leaders of the Tribes, he has been instrumental in getting the Tribes to where they are today, especially in the business world.” His academic success at Marysville High School and Saint Martin’s University garnered attention from tribal leaders. “I was surprised to get on the council as young as I was. They got me elected and named me chairman,

can you believe it? I was 22,” he said. “I held that for a long time. They kind of looked at my success at school and thought maybe something good may come from me.” And it did. Williams spent 40 years on the Tulalip Board of Directors, working with elders to help foster business on the reservation. Since retiring in 1980, Williams has kept his passion for art, and uses paintings, stories and songs to honor the history of the Tribes. “What I’m doing is trying to go back and depict the life of my ancestors,” said Williams. “I want to really show the life they had, and how they went through the trauma of people telling them they couldn’t sing their songs or tell their stories.” Willams will be in the Strawberry Festival Grand Parade on Saturday, June 15, and jokes that he will have to perfect his waving skills.

“What I’m doing is trying to go back

and depict the life of my ancestors,” said Williams.

Herman Williams Sr. was selected to be the Strawberry Festival Grand Marshal.

Kids Party in the Park brings family fun

STORYTELLING June 2, 2013 Sunday, 1:00 PM - 1:30 PM Lois Langrebe - Language Teacher, Artist

POETRY SERIES June 6, 2013 Thursday, 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM Renee Roman Nose, Cheyenne - Actress, Poet Open Mic to follow Renee’s poetry. CULTURE SERIES June 15, 2013 Saturday, 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Mary Williams - Artist Demonstrating - Beading

Children gather around a tortoise presented by the Reptile Man at the 2012 Strawberry Festival Kids Party in the Park.

T

he Kids Party in the Park is an annual family celebration, where children of all ages come together at Asbery Field and enjoy a number of fun activities. This year, the party is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on June 8, one week before the Strawberry Festival Market and Parade. “We will have three new bouncy houses, the Reptile Man, the Balloon Fairy, Kung Fu 4 Kids, Radio Disney and more,” said Bobbi Easley, event organizer. Previous years’ activities have included face painting, local sports team mascots including Webbly from

the Everett Aquasox, and arts and craft tents. “We will have the Taco Time traveler coming in to give away free tacos, but there will also be a good number of different food vendors,” said Easley. Kung Fu 4 Kids plans to host demonstrations, while Radio Disney will bring games and activities to the kids. “We are pretty excited about the new bouncy houses this year,” said Easley. “It’s really big and it’s brand new. They just got it in.” Children of all ages are encouraged to attend the Party in the Park. Asbery Field is located at 1605 7th St. For more information visit http://marysfest.org.

WORKSHOPS June 22, 2013 Saturday, 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM Monique Moses Demonstrating - Friendship Bracelets $10.00 Kit Fee to Artist

FILM SERIES June 27, 2013 Thursday, 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM Michael Taylor

Screening - Massacre

NEW EXHIBIT OPENS AUGUST 10TH!

Skateboard Culture in Native America June is the last month the Veterans exhibit will be up in its entirety, in July it will be relocated.

(360) 716-2600 Facebook.com/Hibulb 6410 23rd Avenue NE, Tulalip, WA 98271

HibulbCulturalCenter.org

794478


14 June 12, 2013

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

June 12, 2013 15

SHOP • THINK • DINE • EMPLOY • SERVE •SUPPORT • BUY LOCAL

360-653-6447

Strawberry Festival has long history

Purchase 2 Dinners with Drinks and recieve

This year the 82nd Marysville Strawberry Festival is celebrating with the theme Fiesta.

Olympic Ave. Also Visit Us At... 329 N.Arlington

206 E. Stanley St. Granite Falls

793474

9611 State Ave. Marysville

O

WHO’S ON FIRST? SPORTS CARDS Baseball • Football • Basketball • Hockey Buy • Sell • Trade

Open: Mon. - Fri. 11-7 / Sat. 10-6 Manager

401 State Avenue Marysville, WA 98270

DEVEN BELLINGAR (360) 653.9014

789219

MARYSVILLE AWARDS & GIFTS Great Ideas for Father’s Day & Graduation Gifts

10 years ago - 2003 ◆◆◆ Fair weather and friendly crowds marked the first-ever televised Marysville Strawberry Festival Grand Parade June 21. “Most of the reports that we have gotten back have been very positive,” said Carol Kapua of the Maryfest Board of Directors. “I know

3 6 0 - 6 5 3 - 4 8 11 1826 4th St. Marysville

791589

www.marysvilleawards.net

s ’ r r a C

HARDWARE AN OLD FASHIONED HARDWARE STORE

Serving the Community in the Same Location Since 1924

360-659-2292

1514 3rd St. Downtown Marysville

791586

Pharmacy • Gifts • Gourmet

.

• Trophies • Plaques • Ribbons • Engravable Gifts • Frames • Fun & Unique Jewelry • Wind Chimes • Boy Scout Trading Post

793856

riginally begun in 1932, the Marysville Strawberry Festival is one of the oldest continuing festivals in the state of Washington. With the exception of the years during World War II (1942-45), the Marysville Strawberry Festival has been continuous. The Strawberry Festival was started to promote the local strawberry crop. The Marysville Strawberry Festival, the idea of then Marysville Globe Editor Leon Stock, was first promoted by the Commercial Club (a forerunner of the Marysville Chamber of Commerce), as a way to publicize and promote the local strawberry crop and to attract visitors to town. Although the first Strawberry Festival was in 1932, the festival did not crown its first Queen until 1933, giving that honor to Bonita Davis (Parrish). The first festivals were sponsored by the Commercial Club, and in 1946 by the Veterans Club. From 1947 until 1959, the festival was sponsored by the Marysville Chamber of Commerce. In 1959, a group named Greater Marysville took over as sponsor. Since 1974, Maryfest Inc., an organization comprised of local business people, community leaders and volunteers, has been the sponsoring organization for the Marysville Strawberry Festival. In 1949 there was a serious polio outbreak in the area which prompted organizers to cancel the festival. In 1950, the Strawberry Festival returned, with not one, but two Strawberry Festival Queens. Jeanette Burns, Queen from 1949, shared duties with 1950 Queen Betty Greger. In 1997 severe thunderstorms canceled the Marysville Strawberry Festival Parade for the first time in history. Festival officials canceled that year’s edition after a volunteer was knocked down after the light post he was standing next to was struck. Unlike the parade, he escaped unharmed. Since its humble beginnings in 1932 as a one-day event to promote the local strawberry crop, the festival has grown in size, duration and popularity over the past eight The front pa ge decades. Now it attracts visitors from near and far, and includes the Berry Run, Beer preparations of The Marysville Glo be, publishe being made d on to ready Mar Garden, Talent and Fashion shows, Kids Party in the Park, the Funtastic Carnival, Market at ysville for its June 6, 1932, details the first Strawbe Asbery Field, Rose Planting, Kiddies Parade, Grand Parade and fireworks. rry Festival that there were a ton of audience members. It was packed all the way down the parade route.” Kapua added that the crowd was not only large, but also enthusiastic. “I know we had a very gracious and generous crowd this year,” she said. “Participants commented on how they were all well received.” The 2003 Marysville Strawberry Festival Ambassadors includes Royal Ambassador Christina Patchen and

Ambassadors Rena Wigdahl and Allissa Butner.

25 years ago - 1988 ◆◆◆ Strawberry Festival moves into high gear during the next week. Events ranging from a ping-pong tournament to the

Grand Parade will take place in the next 11 days as Marysville celebrates one of its most precious treasures, the strawberry. One event, the Festival Holein-One contest at the Marysville Golf Center, began Sunday and runs through June 19. Events start Saturday with the Best Auto and Bike Show sponsored by the Downtown Merchants Association _________________ See HISTORY Page 25

791578

$10 Off

Valid at all 3 locations. One coupon per table. Dine-in only. Not to be combined with any other offer. Expires 7/31/13.

fax: 360-651-7556 hilton_pharm@msn.com

360-659-3222

Gift Certifcates Available

220 State Avenue Marysville, WA 98270

The Vintage Violet ...an absolutely charming store

786005

Marysville, WA

25 %Off

Marysville • 1521 2nd St.

360-653-3538

Hours: Mon-Sat 11-5

791552

204 State Street

Saurkraut Band Live Saturday 2pm-6pm • Saturday Evening Come See the Seafair Pirates!

792386

Mon ~ Wed: 8 am till Midnight Thursday: 7 am till Midnight Friday : 7 am till 2 am Saturday: 8 am till 2 am Sunday: 10 am till Midnight

Specializing in decor and accessories in a variety of styles... Shabby Chic • Romantic Cottage • Elegant Vintage

Any One I Exclu t item des c em s. O on

www.facebook.com/thevintageviolets 786005_MarysvilleYMCAStrawFest0515.indd 1

5/10/13 10:52 AM

ne co signm e Expir upon p nt & s a e es 6 /30/1 r custo le 3. mer. 792407


14 June 12, 2013

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

June 12, 2013 15

SHOP • THINK • DINE • EMPLOY • SERVE •SUPPORT • BUY LOCAL

360-653-6447

Strawberry Festival has long history

Purchase 2 Dinners with Drinks and recieve

This year the 82nd Marysville Strawberry Festival is celebrating with the theme Fiesta.

Olympic Ave. Also Visit Us At... 329 N.Arlington

206 E. Stanley St. Granite Falls

793474

9611 State Ave. Marysville

O

WHO’S ON FIRST? SPORTS CARDS Baseball • Football • Basketball • Hockey Buy • Sell • Trade

Open: Mon. - Fri. 11-7 / Sat. 10-6 Manager

401 State Avenue Marysville, WA 98270

DEVEN BELLINGAR (360) 653.9014

789219

MARYSVILLE AWARDS & GIFTS Great Ideas for Father’s Day & Graduation Gifts

10 years ago - 2003 ◆◆◆ Fair weather and friendly crowds marked the first-ever televised Marysville Strawberry Festival Grand Parade June 21. “Most of the reports that we have gotten back have been very positive,” said Carol Kapua of the Maryfest Board of Directors. “I know

3 6 0 - 6 5 3 - 4 8 11 1826 4th St. Marysville

791589

www.marysvilleawards.net

s ’ r r a C

HARDWARE AN OLD FASHIONED HARDWARE STORE

Serving the Community in the Same Location Since 1924

360-659-2292

1514 3rd St. Downtown Marysville

791586

Pharmacy • Gifts • Gourmet

.

• Trophies • Plaques • Ribbons • Engravable Gifts • Frames • Fun & Unique Jewelry • Wind Chimes • Boy Scout Trading Post

793856

riginally begun in 1932, the Marysville Strawberry Festival is one of the oldest continuing festivals in the state of Washington. With the exception of the years during World War II (1942-45), the Marysville Strawberry Festival has been continuous. The Strawberry Festival was started to promote the local strawberry crop. The Marysville Strawberry Festival, the idea of then Marysville Globe Editor Leon Stock, was first promoted by the Commercial Club (a forerunner of the Marysville Chamber of Commerce), as a way to publicize and promote the local strawberry crop and to attract visitors to town. Although the first Strawberry Festival was in 1932, the festival did not crown its first Queen until 1933, giving that honor to Bonita Davis (Parrish). The first festivals were sponsored by the Commercial Club, and in 1946 by the Veterans Club. From 1947 until 1959, the festival was sponsored by the Marysville Chamber of Commerce. In 1959, a group named Greater Marysville took over as sponsor. Since 1974, Maryfest Inc., an organization comprised of local business people, community leaders and volunteers, has been the sponsoring organization for the Marysville Strawberry Festival. In 1949 there was a serious polio outbreak in the area which prompted organizers to cancel the festival. In 1950, the Strawberry Festival returned, with not one, but two Strawberry Festival Queens. Jeanette Burns, Queen from 1949, shared duties with 1950 Queen Betty Greger. In 1997 severe thunderstorms canceled the Marysville Strawberry Festival Parade for the first time in history. Festival officials canceled that year’s edition after a volunteer was knocked down after the light post he was standing next to was struck. Unlike the parade, he escaped unharmed. Since its humble beginnings in 1932 as a one-day event to promote the local strawberry crop, the festival has grown in size, duration and popularity over the past eight The front pa ge decades. Now it attracts visitors from near and far, and includes the Berry Run, Beer preparations of The Marysville Glo be, publishe being made d on to ready Mar Garden, Talent and Fashion shows, Kids Party in the Park, the Funtastic Carnival, Market at ysville for its June 6, 1932, details the first Strawbe Asbery Field, Rose Planting, Kiddies Parade, Grand Parade and fireworks. rry Festival that there were a ton of audience members. It was packed all the way down the parade route.” Kapua added that the crowd was not only large, but also enthusiastic. “I know we had a very gracious and generous crowd this year,” she said. “Participants commented on how they were all well received.” The 2003 Marysville Strawberry Festival Ambassadors includes Royal Ambassador Christina Patchen and

Ambassadors Rena Wigdahl and Allissa Butner.

25 years ago - 1988 ◆◆◆ Strawberry Festival moves into high gear during the next week. Events ranging from a ping-pong tournament to the

Grand Parade will take place in the next 11 days as Marysville celebrates one of its most precious treasures, the strawberry. One event, the Festival Holein-One contest at the Marysville Golf Center, began Sunday and runs through June 19. Events start Saturday with the Best Auto and Bike Show sponsored by the Downtown Merchants Association _________________ See HISTORY Page 25

791578

$10 Off

Valid at all 3 locations. One coupon per table. Dine-in only. Not to be combined with any other offer. Expires 7/31/13.

fax: 360-651-7556 hilton_pharm@msn.com

360-659-3222

Gift Certifcates Available

220 State Avenue Marysville, WA 98270

The Vintage Violet ...an absolutely charming store

786005

Marysville, WA

25 %Off

Marysville • 1521 2nd St.

360-653-3538

Hours: Mon-Sat 11-5

791552

204 State Street

Saurkraut Band Live Saturday 2pm-6pm • Saturday Evening Come See the Seafair Pirates!

792386

Mon ~ Wed: 8 am till Midnight Thursday: 7 am till Midnight Friday : 7 am till 2 am Saturday: 8 am till 2 am Sunday: 10 am till Midnight

Specializing in decor and accessories in a variety of styles... Shabby Chic • Romantic Cottage • Elegant Vintage

Any One I Exclu t item des c em s. O on

www.facebook.com/thevintageviolets 786005_MarysvilleYMCAStrawFest0515.indd 1

5/10/13 10:52 AM

ne co signm e Expir upon p nt & s a e es 6 /30/1 r custo le 3. mer. 792407


June 12, 2013

Talent Show draws diverse crew of performers to M-PHS stage The Marysville Strawberry Festival Talent Show will return to the stage of the MarysvillePilchuck High School auditorium at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 13, this year. Talent Show Director Marcy Giesler explained that the judges for the Talent Show will all be different from the judges who sat in on the auditions on May 8 and 9, to avoid any potential biases. The event is designed to showcase the skills of vocalists, dancers, instrumentalists and other performers, from 4-year-olds on up to all ages of adults, and will give awards to the first, second and third-place winners in each category. The categories are divided up by age groups and talents. Last year’s Talent Show fit 30 competitors into the M-PHS auditorium to show the packed house audience what they could do. Performers in previous years have included pianists, violinists, guitar players, belly dancers, aspiring stand-up comedians, and both a jug band and a harpist, the latter of whom was named the overall winner of the 2010 Talent Show. Giesler noted that it’s not uncommon to see first-time participants in the Talent Show sharing the stage with returning performers. “The talent that’s out there just gets better and better every year,” Giesler said. The M-PHS auditorium is located at 5611

JUNE 9, 1949

I

108th St. NE in Marysville, and doors open at 5:30 p.m. before the Talent Show starts. Tickets are being pre-sold for $4 and will go for $5 at the door, and children under 7 years old will be admitted for free. Call Giesler at 360-653-6584 for more information.

Marvin Fritze has been a recurring contestant in the Talent Show for at least a decade.

t was officially announced by Elmer Schaefer and R. Burdette Leff, speaking for the Strawberry Festival committee, that the festival, scheduled for Friday and Saturday of this week, has been canceled. In the interest of the health and welfare of the Marysville community and the entire county, Dr. H.L. McMartin, county health officer, advised dropping of plans to carry on the festival this year. One new case of polio was reported Tuesday forenoon when a fifteen-year-old boy was admitted to an Everett hospital. The lad is seriously ill but not paralyzed, though a difficulty in swallowing is being carefully watched, according to the health officer. The Festival committee made the decision to call off the festival for this year in the belief that one child is worth safeguarding, though others might be disappointed or inconvenienced by the change of plans. It is emphasized, however, that canceling of the festival is not an indication that any spread of polio is anticipated. The move is made to prevent such a possibility.

REDEEM for One

FREE

Soft Serve Cone

786020

Stanwood 10204 Stanwood 26710 72nd Ave. NW 360-629-6022

Snohomish 10612 Snohomish 1426 Bickford St 360-568-7855

Marysville 3126 Marysville 1315 4th St NE 360-651-5475

Pioneer 11098 Lake Stevens 715 91st Ave NE 425-334-2353

Silver Lake 10767 Everett 9803 19th Ave SE 425-316-8395

Arlington 12332 Arlington 20318 77th Ave NE 360-403-7131

Broadway 4626 Everett 2424 N. Broadway 425-258-2868

Lakewood 17089 Marysville 17301 27th Ave NE 360-654-0745

786588

16


June 12, 2013

Fashion Show has Fiesta flair

17

Strawberry Festival Funtastic Carnival runs from June 13-16

M

odels of all ages, shapes and sizes will don clothing from area merchants for the annual Strawberry Festival Fashion Show on June 11 from noon to 1:30 p.m. at Leifer Manor. Organizer Sue Stevenson confirmed that Parks and Recreation Director Jim Ballew will once again be the emcee for the event, while the food, decorations and clothing will follow the Strawberry Festival theme of “Fiesta.” Tickets for the luncheon are set at $20 per person, while tables of six or eight guests receive a 10 percent discount. In addition to local political and educational leaders acting as models, the Fashion Fiesta will include a Mexican buffet for guests, as well as a raffle for a number of prizes. In previous years, fashion vendors have including JC Penney, Cabela’s, Trusty Threads and other local clothing stores. For more information visit http://maryfest.org.

F

untastic Shows has been delivering the “world’s finest carnival” since 1985 and it will visit the Marysville Strawberry Festival once again this year, from June 13-16. The Marysville Middle School play field will be the venue, as usual, and the carnival hours will run from 4-10 p.m. on Thursday, June 13, and Friday, June 14, as well as until 11 p.m. on Saturday, June 15, and until 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 16. Opening times for June 15 and 16 will depend on the weather. Attendees can expect rides on the Ferris wheel, merry-goround, scrambler and octopus,

and will also be able to take part in carnival games and other attractions. The Strawberry Festival Royalty are slated to make an appearance or two at the carnival, but dates and times have not yet been determined.

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring and Wendy Volosin model fashions at the 2012 Strawberry Festival Fashion Show.

JUNE 14, 1962

S

andra Staben of Marysville was crowned Queen of the 1962 Strawberry Festival June 13 in the Marysville High School Cafetorium. Art Duborko had the honor of placing the crown (a gift to the Queen this year) on her royal highness’ head at ceremonies during the annual Coronation Ball. Princesses of her court, runners-up in the campaign just concluded, are Barbara Wenz, Donna Jensen and Carol Hatley. In addition to ruling over festivities this weekend, the winners will all receive cash prizes, a free day at Century 21 and participate in various parades in the Pacific Northwest. All candidates selling over 500 tickets are being awarded a trip to Victoria by plane. Assisting with the ceremonies were Art Nelson, Mrs. John Crowley and young Pamalea Carpenter, crown bearer.

And Sound Power Equipment

WE’RE BACK!

Pilchuck Rentals

Powered by

399

$

Berg’s Bookkeeping & Tax Service

& Sound Power Equipment Sales

999

$

515 Cedar Ave. • Marysville

We have a large range of equipment for “ALL” types of jobs:

360-659-6676 www.bergsbookkeeping.com

• Power EZ • Pressure Washers • Earth Moving Equipment • Lifting Equipment and Much More

“Accredited Tax Preparer” & “Certified Bookkeeper” with 32 Years of Experience ~

360-659-5557 or 360-322-7760 www.pilchuckrents.com

791583

9114 State Ave., Marysville

Personal & Business Taxes with FREE Electronic Filing Full-Service Accounting including Payroll Specializing in “Homeowners Associations”

789983

huck Rentals Pilc

Funtastic Shows is set to put on their carnival again at this year’s Strawberry Festival at Marysville Middle School. Kids of all ages can test their skills on the games at this year’s carnival courtesy of Funtastic Shows.


18

June 12, 2013

Market at Asbery Field brings crafts, food to Strawberry Festival

D

arren Doty, Barbara McNair, Bobbi Easley and John Hawks have stepped in as the directors of this year’s Market at Asbery Field, and they’ve promised event attendees that plenty of familiar favorites and new features alike will be on site through the weekend of June 14, 15 and 16. “We’ve got lots of returning vendors, plus a few more activities,” Easley said. “Of course, the bouncy trampoline, the rock-climbing wall, the go-karts and the train rides will all be back. We’ve even got pony rides and putt-putt golf again.” As in previous years, the Market seeks to showcase artistic talent as well, in the form of not only live musical performances, but also a host of area crafters, whose handmade products have ranged from wood puzzles to housewares, such as kitchen towels and pot-holders, over the years. “We’ve been contacting returning crafters and searching for new vendors from other festivals,” said Easley, who added that more than 130 tent vendors and as many as 10 field vendors have already signed up for the event, with the 20 food vendors that have booked their spaces putting the Market at capacity in that area already. “That’s roughly in line with last year’s totals, although this year’s food vendors are set to include not only the regular fare, from bratwurst to frozen treats, but also shrimp and fish and chips.” While the Strawberry Shortcake-Eating Contest also tantalizes attendees’ tastebuds, local merchants and regional businesses will be present as well, to provide information on subjects as diverse as home improvements and fundraising campaigns on behalf of community organizations. “We’re not doubling up in any fields, by having three chiropractors or anything like that,” Easley said. “Just like the entertainment lineup, there’s a wide variety of everything this year.” The Market will run from 2-9 p.m. on Friday, June 14, from 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Saturday,

June 15, and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 16, at Asbery Field. The Marysville Kiwanis Club will likewise be represented at this year’s Market, through their beer garden from 5-10 p.m. on Thursday, June 13, from 4-10 p.m. that Friday, and from noon to 6:30 p.m. that Saturday, on Seventh Street between Asbery Field and Totem Middle School. Right: Putt-putt golf, a familiar favorite for attendees of all ages to the Market at Asbery Field, will be making its return this year. Below: Younger festival-goers can again look forward to the pony rides at this year’s Market at Asbery Field.

JUNE 15, 1983

T

he Marysville Strawberry Festival is off and running. Several events have already begun and a few have come and gone. The activities began Saturday with the second annual golf tournament and the beginning soccer games. The first-ever fishing derby brought many fishermen out for a relaxing day of fishing Monday and close to 200 women filled the Moose Lodge for the annual fashion show sponsored by Soroptimist International of Marysville. Royalty this year included Queen Betsy Rossie and Princesses Laurie MacDonald and Laurie Clark.

Chinese Food & American Cuisine Cocktails • Banquet Facilities Local Delivery Karaoke ~ Wed - Sat In the LOUNGE

360-659-0879 625859

9611 State Ave., Marysville K-Mart Plaza


June 12, 2013

Berry Run set for June 15

H

undreds of runners and walkers crowd the entrance to the Smokey Point Plant Farm every year to compete in the annual Berry Run. Although it was held a week prior to the festival weekend in previous years, the 2013 Berry Run is set to begin at

9 a.m. on Saturday, June 15, kicking off festival activities. The Plant Farm has hosted the fun run for years, but a fall installment of the 156th Street overcrossing has prompted a rearranging of the usual route. “We were hoping to run down the parade route this year, but instead we will run at the Plant Farm again, just with a different route,” said Jeff Sowards, event organizer. The Berry Run offers both a 1-mile run/walk and a 5-kilometer race for people of all ages, on a pavement

19

course with a very short gravel section. “We’ve added more divisions this year, and so the prices are cheaper for younger kids,” said Sowards. Participants should arrive at least 60 minutes prior to the race start time. To register in advance, log onto http:// marysvillewa.gov and click on the green “ePlay: Parks and Rec Registration” button. The cost of registration is $25 per participant and includes a commemorative Berry Run T-shirt. The Plant Farm is located at 15022 Twin Lakes Ave. in Smokey Point.

Participants in the 2012 Strawberry Festival Berry Run take off to complete the 5-kilometer race.

Rose Planting Ceremony returns to Totem rose garden

Royal Rosarians will plant roses in honor of individuals in the community. This free event is open to all ages, and light refreshments will be offered afterward. The ceremony began in 2001. It had previously taken place at the “Red Caboose,” which was located at the corner of Cedar Avenue and Fourth Street, but a fire in the summer of 2009 caused organizers to move the event to the middle school, where a rose garden was planted for the event.

JUNE 25, 1997

S

Unique Interiors

evere thunderstorms canceled the Marysville Strawberry Festival Parade for the first time in history. Festival officials canceled this year’s edition after a volunteer was knocked down after the light post he was standing next to was struck. Unlike the parade, he escaped unharmed. Festival-goers persevered through what some called the most rain in recent memory this time of year. “Considering everything from January to the Strawberry storm, we were successful,” said Managing Director Cheryl Deckard. The rest of the week’s events went off without a hitch. Golfers were able to finish Friday evening’s golf tournament despite a deluge. The Market in the Park at Comeford Park withstood the challenges, and festival-goers shopped and ate trough Sunday afternoon, Deckard said.

Hours: M-F 9-5 Sat. 10-4

Carpet Vinyl Tile Granite Hardwood Laminate Window Coverings

785989

T

his year’s Marysville Strawberry Festival Rose Planting ceremony continues on in the venue it gained in 2010. The annual ceremony — a tradition to commemorate the friendship between the Strawberry Festival and the Northwest Festival Hosting Association — will take place at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 15, at Totem Middle School, located at 1605 Seventh St. in Marysville. During the ceremony, which is slated to take about an hour, representatives from the Portland

This year’s Strawberry Festival Rose Planting ceremony will again take place at Totem Middle School in Marysville.

220 E. 2nd Street. Arlington 785989_UniqueInteriorsStrawFest0612.indd 1

5/8/13 5:30 PM


20

June 12, 2013

Kiddies Parade lets kids be creative

E

ach year, the Strawberry Festival Grand Parade draws thousands to downtown Marysville. But before the floats can start down the line, the Kiddies Parade brings childlike wonder to the decades-old parade tradition. “I think the public likes to have the kids doing their own parade,” said Amanda Peterson, the event organizer. “We had about 80 kids last year, but we are hoping to have even more.” Peterson took over coordination of the parade from Bobbi Easley, who was the one urging her to volunteer in previous years. “We have five categories for judging — costumes, wheels, pets, groups and floats,” said Children display their costumes and floats during Peterson. “This year we are hoping to have more the 2012 Strawberry Festival Kiddies Parade. floats because we only had a couple last year.” A float is restricted from having motors, but kids who are using bicycles, wagons or other wheeled see some fiesta-inspired costumes,” she said. Each of the five categories of entrants will have objects can still sign up for the wheels category. “It was so much fun to be a part of it last year,” its own staging area at the start of the Kiddies said Peterson. “The kids have a great time and I Parade route, at Totem Middle School on Seventh love seeing how creative they can be. We had a Street. The parade will then head south on State costume entry last year where the kids dressed up Avenue until it reaches Fifth Street, at which as Alice in Wonderland with a complete tea set on point awards will be given to the participants in their wagon. It was so cool, definitely one of my Comeford Park. Registration begins at 4 p.m. on Saturday, June 15, which is followed by a judging favorites.” Strawberry Festival organizer Carol Kapua period until 6 p.m. The grand prize winner of the Kiddies Parade explained that the Kiddies Parade is the perfect opportunity for local children to be involved with will get to appear in the Grand Parade later that same day. Entry forms for the Kiddies Parade can the festival and be creative with their costumes. “Since this year’s theme is Fiesta, we’ll probably be found online at http://maryfest.org.

JULY 11, 1957 JUNE 22, 1972 Marysville’s Annual Strawberry Festival continues through its week of activities climaxed by the grand parade Saturday morning down the length of State Avenue. Last Saturday saw the kickoff of the full week of events with the first Jaycee Kid’s Fishing Derby. Tasting the wares to be found at the 1972 Strawberry Shortcake Feed were Princess Karen Hoffman, Queen Janelle Moberg, and Princess Janet Brown. They enjoyed strawberries from Marysville complete with whipped cream and cake after the parade. Marysville is known for its strawberries and its Strawberry Festival.

1957 Marysville Strawberry Festival Queen Lynn Walker and her court of princesses will reign over the big celebration this weekend, July 13 and 14. Queen Lynn was declared winner of the contest at the queen’s selection ball held Saturday night at the IOOF Hall which was attended by a large crowd. The court includes Queen Lynn Walker, Marysville, and Princesses Ruth Bond, Granite Falls; Patsy Wells, Marysville; Marilu Barclay, Lake Stevens; Mary Lou Nicoli, Everett; Josie Whisenant, Anacortes; Paula Eisenman, Marysville; Ruth Kaess, Marysville; Sally White, Darrington; Sharon DeVos, Lynnwood; and Corrine Wicker, Everett. Coronation will be held at the high school Friday evening following the talent show. Queen Lynn, with her court and four chaperons, went by airplane to Victoria, B.C., Tuesday and visited Seattle on Wednesday.

AMERICAN DISTRIBUTING Making Warm Friends Since 1924

360-653-8200

Best Propane Prices in Town!

Bring This Ad In and Receive

Open to the Public / RV Friendly

360-658-3751 ~ 425-252-2126 13618 45th Ave NE • Marysville ~ Corner of Navy Support Complex

www.americandistributing.com

25% OFF

The Ring of Her Dreams

Any Diamond Ring*

50% Off Any Mens Bands

When Purchasing Any Wedding Ring*

9611 E. State Ave. #E • Marysville *Can not be used in conjunction with any other special offer.

We Buy Gold Come In for An Appraisal

791539

Not Good With any Other Special. Expires 8/31/13

7 790061

BBQ Tank Refill $


June 12, 2013

21

Grand Parade showcases local talent

T

he Strawberry Festival Grand Parade on Saturday, June 15, will not only host visiting floats, dancers, drill teams and marching bands — it will also include a robot built by Arts & Technology High School students. “They have built a robot that spits out frisbees and they are going to have someone standing in front to catch them,” said Carol Kapua, Strawberry Festival organizer. “We are very excited to have them in the parade and be able to acknowledge the students who built this in only six weeks.” The Grand Parade officially starts at 7:45 p.m. on 76th Street, to ensure that entrants are rolling southbound on State Avenue in front of the TV cameras by 8 p.m. The parade is set to wrap up on Third Street and Alder Avenue by 10 p.m., just in time for the halfhour fireworks show. As is the tradition, the parade will feature this year’s Grand Marshal, Herman Williams Sr., and Stage Atkins, this year’s President’s Marshal, will also make an appearance. In addition to the Strawberry

Festival’s Fiesta-themed float, the parade is set to feature popular performers from around the Pacific Northwest. “We will have the Seattle Seafair Pirates back again this year, and the Seattle Cossacks Motorcycle stunt and drill team,” said Kapua. “We are excited to have a lot of different bands signed up this year as well.” The tradition of having both Marysville-Pilchuck and the Marysville Getchell marching bands perform throughout the parade will carry on for the second year as well. “We are excited to have floats from all across Washington and Canada, and they have some really great designs,” said Kapua. “The Seafair Marshals will be there to assist us — they are always a great help.” Call 360-659-7664 for more information.

The 2012 Strawberry Festival “Just Imagine!” float withstands clouds and rain during the annual Grand Parade on State Ave.

Save 40% to 70% off prices you’d pay elsewhere. Shop us First. Get more. 9620 State Ave. • Marysville, WA 360-659-9909 Mon. - Sat. 8am - 8pm Sun 9am - 7pm

$ off

Valid at Marysville Grocery Outlet only. One coupon per person. No cash value. Not valid with any other offer. Duplicated coupons will not be accepted. Coupon must be surrendered at time of purchase. Expires 7/16/13.

786011

5

a $50 minimum purchase (excludes alcohol)


June 12, 2013

Madeleine Villa names Rowley, Thomas as Royalty

J

ames Rowley has been married 37 years, but not to Velva Thomas, and yet the duo have developed a playfully bickering rapport as the Strawberry Festival King and Queen for the Madeleine Villa Health Care Center. “I went in for a lobotomy,” Rowley joked about his most recent medical procedure. “At least they were able to tell me I wasn’t pregnant.” “Be serious,” chided Thomas, who prides herself on having been “a single gal” all her life. “They’re going to put what you say in the paper.” While Thomas rolls her eyes and chuckles at Rowley’s habitual wisecracks, they agree on how well they’ve been cared for at Madeleine Villa and how much they’re looking forward to the Strawberry Festival. “There are very caring people here,” said Rowley, a retired Western Union installer of communication equipment. “I’ll enjoy having some fresh strawberries.” “I like it here,” said Thomas, a

published poet who leads a choir at Madeleine Villa every Friday night. “God gave me a singing voice, so I choose to use it. I wouldn’t mind entering the strawberry shortcake eating contest this year.” Rowley has also remained active socially, and goes out on regular dates with his wife, occasionally joined by her daughter. “I still thinks she looks beautiful,” said Rowley, whose tone made it clear that he wasn’t kidding for once. “I wouldn’t trade her for all the girls in the world.” As for Thomas, who used to be a babysitter, she still manages to see her adoptive grand-baby every once in a while, and in the meantime, she focuses on living a peaceful life. “I’ve receiving good care and I’m doing okay,” Thomas said. “I’ve learned to get along with everybody. I watched the Strawberry Festival parade last year, and I think this will be a good opportunity for me.”

Merrill Gardens Royalty Hinz and Morris settled down in Marysville after lifetimes of travel

B

ob Hinz and Nickie Morris, this year’s Strawberry Festival Royalty for Merrill Gardens, share in common some well-traveled pasts, King Bob because of his job, and Queen Nickie because of her hobby. Hinz was born in Nebraska in 1925 and stayed in the state to play football for two different colleges before being drafted into the Army for the Korean War, which was ironic because the military had turned him down when he’d tried to enlist just a few years prior. “I’ve really been lucky all my life,” said Hinz, whose stint at the Cornhusker Ordinance Plant in Nebraska from 195055 saw him promoted to production foreman in short order, before he moved to Washington state to work for Shell Oil and eventually joined the ranks of pipefitters. “I’ve actually had a lot of pretty good jobs.” A transfer to Shell Chemical in Louisiana saw him retire from that job in 1977, before he returned to Washington and worked on barges until he finally retired for good in 1986. When asked to sum up his reaction to being chosen as Strawberry Festival Royalty, Hinz simply shouted, “Wahoo!” Although he’s enjoyed the past year that he’s lived in Merrill Gardens, and he and his wife lived in Sedro-Woolley for years, he paid to have her buried in Nebraska, as per her wishes. After Morris’ first husband passed away in 1985, she got hooked on geology thanks to her second husband, to whom she was married 23 years before his passing in 2009. The decor outside her door at Merrill Gardens includes polished gemstones and two pieces of a huge geode that the couple discovered on the border

King James Rowley and Queen Velva Thomas are the Strawberry Festival Royalty for the Madeleine Villa Health Care Center.

Queen Nickie Morris and King Bob Hinz have settled down as the Strawberry Festival Royalty for Merrill Gardens after their lifetimes of travel.

of Mexico and New Mexico. “He took a 10-pound sledgehammer to it and cracked it open,” said Morris, who also traveled throughout Oregon, California, Nevada and Texas with her husband as part of their “rockhound” pursuits. “I cried when I saw what was inside. It was beyond anything.” Although Morris is still capable of living on her own, she had always planned on moving into a senior residential care center in her later years, due to her mother’s positive experiences in such housing, as well as her own desire for company. “I like the idea of living with a group,” Morris said. “I get to have my own apartment but still be around other people, and I love not having to cook anymore. The staff here is wonderful, and they do everything they can to make sure I’m satisfied.”

Classic Garage Door Service, llc. LIC# VANDAFC261LP

Locally Family Owned & Operated

Area Rugs + Carpet + Hardwood + Tile/Stone + Laminate + Resilient/Vinyl + Window Covering

Serving Snohomish County for over 14 Years

“We Service All Your Garage Door Needs”!

790377

360 435-8710 MyBigDoor.com

Don Culbertson, owner, shows off his truck that has helped him service Snohomish County for years.

791550

22


June 12, 2013

Tulalip Tribal Royalty Pete and Carolyn Henry recall history of region

King Pete Henry and his sister, Queen Carolyn Henry McKay, are this year’s Strawberry Festival Royalty for the Tulalip Tribes.

B

rother and sister Pete Henry and Carolyn Henry McKay are this year’s Strawberry Festival Royalty for the Tulalip Tribes, and they both remember when the Marysville and Tulalip communities were a very different place. “Marysville was only two blocks long in the 1940s,” said Pete Henry, 72. “There’s been a big boom in Marysville over the course of the past 30 years. Tulalip has big casinos now. All we had before was a little cigarette shop. Our young people back then had to leave the Reservation to get any kind of work, but we were basically imprisoned on the Reservation until 1952. Logging off the Reservation was about the only income we had.” “I started going to the parades in 1954,” said Carolyn Henry McKay, 70. “Where we lived was quite a way back into the woods back then. I’m so excited about this year. It’s just such a wonderful privilege.” “I was tricked into doing this,” Pete quipped.

While Carolyn was a stay-at-home mom who worked as a Walmart greeter for a while after her children had left home, Pete’s careers included stints at Boeing and Associated Sand & Gravel, before serving 10 years in various capacities with the Tulalip Tribes. “It’s great for us to be able to represent our people here, and for the young people to see their elders,” Pete Henry said. “When we were kids, we went to the parades all the time. It’s changed a lot since I was a kid, but I remember it being pretty good fun. My own kids always went on the carnival rides.” In spite of his outward gruffness, Pete agreed with Carolyn that they’d make sure to sport their best parade waves. “I’ll try and give great smiles,” Carolyn Henry McKay said. “I don’t have enough teeth to smile,” Pete Henry chuckled. “I’ll enjoy doing this with my sister, though. I think our mom would have been really proud of us.”

23

Windsor Square Royalty Brooks and Parker look back on Marysville’s history

J

oAnn Parker moved to Marysville 33 years after Earl Brooks, but they’ve both lived more than enough decades in town to qualify as longtime residents. “I came here in 1929 with my folks,” said Brooks, 93, the Strawberry Festival King for Windsor Square. “I went to the 10th Street School and the old junior high and high school. Of course, they tore the old high school down.” “I came to town in 1962,” said Parker, 89, the Strawberry Festival Queen for Windsor Square. “My kids all picked strawberries in the fields every summer, from the time they were 12 years old.” Brooks can recall when traffic was even worse at the corner of State Avenue and Fourth Street — “It would jam up every afternoon on the weekends” — but he remembers both the Hilton Pharmacy and Carr’s Hardware on Third Street “always having been there.” Parker likewise proudly touted the fact that all of her children graduated from

the local high school. “This was the last thing I thought would happen,” Brooks said of his selection as Strawberry Festival Royalty. He echoed Parker’s gratitude simply to have been considered for the role, as well as her fondness for Windsor Square. “I’m not as fortunate as I used to be in my health, but I’ve found people here who are very nice,” said Brooks, whose employers have included McMaster’s of Marysville, the Eclipse mill in Everett, Hogland Transfer, Humphreys Trucking and Renton Trucking. “Everyone is very jovial and friendly here. I’ve been gardening a plot of flowers right beside my window. We’re both pretty fortunate, I think.” “In six years, I’ve never regretted coming here,” said Parker, a former labor delivery nurse who still keeps herself busy with painting. “This is a nice place to live. It’s a privilege to grow old, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy.”

Queen JoAnn Parker and King Earl Brooks, the Strawberry Festival Royalty for Windsor Square, have lived in Marysville for decades.

JUNE 13, 1940

T

he weather man was kind Wednesday in honor of Marysville’s Ninth Annual Strawberry Festival, sunshine pouring down on the thousands who gathered to enjoy the day’s festivities. The holiday crowd lined several blocks to view the splendid parade containing many beautiful decorated floats, marching groups and bands. The Queen selection dance last Friday night revealed that Phyllis Johnson of Marysville was to be Queen for the Strawberry Festival. The coronation of the Queen and the introduction of her court took place Tuesday evening at the city park. Princesses included Doris Carlson, Stanwood; Ruby Wick, Edgewood; Bernadine Hallock, Arlington; Betty Parent, Monroe; Dorothy Wilkinson, Snohomish; Shirley Langlois, Alderwood Manor; Mira Archibald, Sunnyside Boulevard; Martha Erickson, Granite Falls; and Thelma Williams, Lake Stevens.

✧ Carpet ✧ Hardwood ✧ Ceramic Tile ✧ Laminate Flooring ✧ Natural Stone ✧ Window Coverings ✧ Vinyl Lic. #BUNDYC1945DA

Berry Good Buys on In-stock Carpet Huge Festival Savings throughout the Store!

615 State Ave. ✧ 360-659-0663 Monday ~ Friday 9-5:30 ✧ Saturday 9-3 www.BundyCarpets.com

792411


24

June 12, 2013

Marysville Care Center names Holt and Hayden its King and Queen

K

ing Shayne Holt and Queen Ann Hayden are this year’s Strawberry Festival Royalty for the Marysville Care Center. Holt, a developmentally disabled 57-yearold, has been a resident at the Marysville Care Center since February of this year. He enjoys his crown so much that he’s taken to wearing it all over the facility, and he’s excited to ride in the Strawberry Festival Grand Parade. While Holt misses caring for his cat Chelsea at the Marysville Care Center, he’s developed quite a rapport with Patches, the resident cat at the facility. What Holt looks forward to most about the Strawberry Festival, though, is taking part in the Strawberry Shortcake-Eating Contest. “I like it with whipped cream the best,” said Holt, who added, “Ann is a good queen.” Hayden, who turned 100 years old at the Marysville Care Center on April 25, was a resident of Iowa until the age of 43, but her jobs as a seamstress and in the government

took her across the country and connected her with some high-profile celebrities. “I was working in sensitive security areas in the Air Force at the same time that my mom was working for the government, so I had to go through combination-locked doors to get to my office,” said Lewis Fisher, Hayden’s son, before laughing, “I got mad because my mom went through more combination locks to get to her office than I did.” Among the multitude of occupations that she’s held, Hayden put her seamstress talents to work for the Dunes Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas for a number of years, and made fur coats for Liberace and a bedspread for Mike Tyson during that time, until her job ended with a literal bang. “They blew up the Dunes,” Hayden laughed, referring to the 1993 implosion of the Dunes Hotel and Casino, to make way for the Bellagio resort. “That’s the only way they could get rid of me.” In addition to her son, Hayden has two grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and nine great-great-grandchildren.

King Shayne Holt and Queen Ann Hayden of the Marysville Care Center are backed up by their fellow Strawberry Festival Royalty.

Grandview Village Royalty Richard and Amy Cox still active

R

ichard and Amy Cox have been married for 27 years, so it only seems fitting that the couple, who are both in their 90s, should reign together as the Strawberry Festival King and Queen for Grandview Village. Amy had been widowed several years before, and met Richard through his brother, who asked her to join them for dinner whenever Richard visited to his mother in Marysville. “After a few weeks, he told me, ‘I think we’re old enough to go out on our own,’” Amy Cox laughed. “After a few months, we knew we had something good going on.” Amy has a daughter in Stanwood and a son who’s taught schools in Marysville from her previous marriage, while Richard has a son, a daughter in Ellensburg and another daughter who’s an ordained minister in Puyallup. Richard grew up in Marysville, but joined the Navy shortly before the United States entered World War II, which took him overseas for two years, and was living in Lake Chelan when he first met Amy. “I liked her looks,” Richard Cox said. “We both enjoy the water,” Amy Cox said. “He had a boat, and we were both active on the water.” Another area where Richard is still active is in driving, since he passed his latest driving test “with flying colors,” albeit with three doctors certifying the results due to his advanced age. Although Richard and Amy met up when their respective families were already raised, and they themselves were old enough to indulge their mutual love of travel,

King Richard Cox and his Queen Amy, the Strawberry Festival Royalty for Grandview Village, have been married for 27 years.

Richard is feeling his Marysville roots as the Strawberry Festival approaches. “I was born and raised here, and I used to pick strawberries here,” said Richard Cox, who noted that all of his children attended Marysville schools when they were growing up. “The morning of the festival, I used to pick the best strawberries. The festival was the only thing to do in the summer back then. Marysville was nowhere near what it is now.” “He’s come full circle, in a way,” Amy Cox said of her husband. “For me, this is all a new experience, especially riding in a parade rather than watching it from the sidewalk, but I’ll try it and see,” she laughed.

Come In and Taste the Difference

“Transmissions, It’s What We Do”

European • Japanese • Domestic One Day Service/Rebuilds in Stock • 36 mo. Unlimited Mileage. Warranty Available

3943 116th Street NE Suite 113 (Next to WinCo) • 360-572-0184 www.DJsBarbecue.com

facebook@djsbarbecue

HOURS: 11 am ~ 8 pm Mon. thru Sat.

617452

Must Present Coupon. Expires 6/30/12

www.edstransmissions.com 624553

Buy Any Sandwich - Get a Free Bottomless Fountain Drink

Free Local Towing w/Major Repair


June 12, 2013

History

25

From Page 15

and the Port Gardner Vintage Auto Club. The ping-pong tournament also opens at the YMCA. Monday, the Soroptimists will have their annual “Touch of Class” fashion show. June 15 marks the beginning of one of the wildest events in the festival: the adult trike races. The children take center stage on June 16 as the Kiddies Parade rolls through the downtown area. The same evening, Funtastic Shows opens its annual festival carnival. Friday the festival really gets active as the carnival continues, arts and crafts booths begin to spring up in Comeford Park, the softball tournament begins and the teen dance takes place. Saturday at 11 a.m., the day kicks off with the Strawberry Festival Grand Parade. Following the parade at about 1 p.m., the annual Jaycee Bed Race will take place. The festival will wrap up June 19 with the conclusion of the softball tournament, Funtastic Shows, the arts and crafts and the ping-pong tournament. The 1988 Strawberry Festival Court includes 2nd Princess Stacy Strickland, 1st Princess Paula Eldridge and Queen Jeanette Hinchen.

50 years ago - 1963 ◆◆◆ Thousands of spectators, hundreds of participants and over 3,000 servings of strawberry shortcake helped make Marysville’s 1963 Strawberry Festival a big success, according to Dr. Robert Beaman, general chairman of the event. The Strawberry Festival Grand Parade, directed by the Marysville Lions Club, got underway at the B&M parking lot

for its march down State Street and Third Street to Alder. Parade Marshal Sant Asbery and Master of Ceremonies Floyd Turner viewed the event from the reviewing stand at Fifth and State. The 1963 Strawberry Festival Court includes Queen Judi Lindborg and Princesses Patti Marsh and Sandy Staats.

80 years ago - 1933 ◆◆◆ Marysville’s Second Annual Strawberry Festival goes into history as much more successful than that of 1932, judging from the attendance and activities of the day. It is estimated that 5,000 to 6,000 people visited the town during the day, and about 3,500 were served with strawberries, cream and coffee. The shortcake was served to 2,745, with plates of berries and cream satisfying several hundred more. The parade was the highlight of the day’s entertainment, with pets, children, floats and miscellaneous features led by the Eagles’ Band from Everett and the Queen’s car, with attendants and Lieutenant Governor Victor A. Myers. Miss Bonita Davis, Queen of the festival, was accompanied by Dorothy Holcom and Sadie Morney, who were runners-up in the recent contest. The feature of the day was the serving of Marysville’s pride, strawberries. Approximately one ton of berries left the crowd with a good taste in their mouths although hundreds of visitors became discouraged upon seeing the lines waiting for service. Coffee, served free, took 75 pounds of Maxwell House in the making. Thirty-two gallons of cream were used during the day. ■

JUNE 19, 1952

M

arysville was host to a greater crowd than ever has attended a previous Strawberry Festival, it was averred by many who helped stage the affair. To this appreciative audience, a fine, spectacular celebration was presented, starting off with the official 1952 parade. The 1952 Marysville Strawberry Festival Queen was Kay Larson of Marysville. ___________________________________________________________

JULY 17, 1992

M

aryfest President Leah Crombie presented a plaque to the city of Marysville Saturday in memory of several community members who were active in organizing the Strawberry Festival. The plaque honored the contributions of Jack Harrington, Larry Johnson, Lynn Helgeson St. Onge, Robert Klepper, Duke Demiglio and Audrie Black. Black and Demiglio will also be honored during this year’s Strawberry Festival Grand Parade on Saturday. The 1992 Strawberry Festival Court includes Queens Jessica Gibson, and Princesses Amber Norman and Michell Butts. 785998


26

June 12, 2013

Strawberry Festival royalty waves atop the 2013 Fiesta-themed float.

T

2013 Marysville Strawberry Festival Float has Latin-themed flair

he 2013 Strawberry Festival float has followed the tradition of being inspired by the annual theme — Fiesta! “This year’s theme is Fiesta and the float really captures that look,” said Strawberry Festival organizer Carol Kapua. “It has a lot of cactus and floral designs. There is a large strawberry in motion with a big sombrero on and it’s shaking maracas.” The float contains rockery, complete with iguanas scaling the sides, and animal-shaped piñatas along the edges. There are sugar skulls in the style of Dia de los Muertos celebrations and even a roadrunner to evoke a southwestern landscape.

JUNE 25, 2008

North Puget Sound’s Only Mattress Factory For Over 50 Years Open Directly to the Public.

Home • RV • Marine

Any Size - Any Shape! Mattresses • Upholstery Work Cut to size foam

T

here is no official count, but Marysville Strawberry Festival organizers are thinking there was a pretty healthy sized crowd lining State Avenue for the 2008 Grand Parade. Saying she is lousy at guessing at crowd numbers, festival board member Jodi Hiatt put the number of parade watchers at around 30,000. Fellow festival board member Carol Kapua guessed the crowd came closer to 50,000. In any case, whatever the actual tally, both agreed the crowd probably was the largest ever to watch the parade. All told, the parade featured nearly 140 entries ranging from the Seattle Seafair Pirate to, of course, the official Strawberry Festival float. Naturally, the latter featured the reigning Marysville Royalty, Queen Danielle Wilcoxson and Princesses Che Renouard and Lila Hart.

50 Off

$

RV Upholstery & Mattresses

Slumber Ease Products Only. Must be present at time of sale. Expires 7/31/13

Slumber Ease Mattress Factory

Showroom 4th & Cedar, Marysville • Factory 1327 8th St., Marysville 360-659-8458 • 800-548-0960

www.slumberease.com BBB Rated A+

“This float was made by all the festival organizers this year,” said Kapua. “It took about four months to complete, we started in January. Everything has to be both weather-proof and fire-proof.” Stormy weather at the Daffodil Festival proved that the float, which travels regularly across Washington and British Columbia, Canada, for festival appearances, can stand a little precipitation. “It really stood the test of time at the Daffodil Festival. It was pouring rain, with wind and sleet. If it holds up through that, it will be good for the rest of the season,” said Kapua.

791598


June 12, 2013

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

Winnebago Itasca Travelers Club ALL Winnebago Owners! Come Join Us

JUNE 16th

For A Barbecue at the RV Lot.

Cruze, Silverado 1500 and Spark

360-659-6236

www.RoyRobinson.com/www.RoyRobinsonRV.com

I-5 Exit 199 In Marysville

786152

6616 35th Ave. N.E. Marysville/Tulalip 98271

27


June 5, 2013

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

GO-GO’S & B-52’S

J U LY 6

& KENNY WAY

J U LY 21

MELISSA ETHERIDGE

A U G U S T 18

SAMMY HAGAR

N PETER FRNEASHMEPPTO RD HE

GRETCHEN WILSON

FOREIGNER

A U G U S T 25

A U G U S T 15

J U LY 28

S DOOBIE BROTHER & AMERICA

SEPTEMBER 7

TICKETS & PACKAGES

ON SALE NOW! COM TULALIPCASINO.

ALL SHOWS AGES 21 AND OLDER.

768786

28

Strawberry Festival - Strawberry Festival 2013  

i20130619151833613.pdf

Strawberry Festival - Strawberry Festival 2013  

i20130619151833613.pdf