Page 1

th al 8 7 nu An

Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo This weekend!

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.Gazette-Tribune.com | thursday, MAY 30, 2013 | 75 Cents NEWSSTAND PRICE

Oroville property valuation completed

Founders Day weekend is here

NEVER FORGET

Rodeo, parade, “Make a Splash” theme highlight 78th edition of annual celebration By Brent Baker

Waterfront property owners will notice most increase

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OKANOGAN – The new assessment of property within the Oroville School District is complete and while most won’t notice much of an increase, those with lakefront property will see taxes rise, according to Okanogan C o u n t y Assessor Scott Scott Furman Furman. “We used to be cyclical, doing assessments every four years,” said Furman. “Now we are doing them annually and doing a physical assessment of one-sixth of the county every year, while the other five parts we compare sales value to assessment values to determine rates.” The one-sixth this year was the Oroville School District, according to Furman, who adds that the new assessments will be mailed out to about 1500 property owners on May 31. “These are for the effective taxes to paid in 2014. People have 30 days to appeal if they chose to do so, but we encourage people to contact our office at (509) 4227190 first,” the assessor said. Furman said for the most part property owners within the

See Taxes | PG A2

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Walt Hart III and Marge Finley prepare to lay a wreath on the grave of Major William Hodges, the soldier from whom Oroville Hodges Post #84 of the American Legion gets its name. Members of the American and Canadian Legion were on hand to serve as color guard and to participate in this year’s Memorial Day Ceremony at Oroville’s Riverview Cemetery. Following the ceremony at Riverview Cemetery another was held at the 12th Street bridge where a wreath was thrown into the Similkameen River in remembrance of those who served at sea.

TONASKET - Tonasket’s 78th annual Founders Day weekend will feature non-stop, end-to-end activity for those who wish to partake in the full plethora of festivities beginning Thursday, May 30, and highlighted by a full day Saturday that includes the annual parade, rodeo and more. This year’s theme is, “Make a Splash!” to highlight the work being done to build the Tonasket Water Ranch in Chief Tonasket Park. Patti Middleton was chosen by the Tonasket Chamber of Commerce’s selection committee to serve as this year’s Grand Marshal and plans to ride in a sheep cart with her husband Randy and five small grandchildren. Karlie Henneman was chosen as Miss Tonasket Rodeo last October and has since been representing Tonasket in rodeos and other public appearances throughout the Northwest this spring. It all gets underway Thursday evening at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds on Rodeo Road, just south of Tonasket, with a 5 p.m. barbecue, followed by kids’ games at 6 p.m. The all-you-can-eat barbecue costs $7. Hank Williamswannabe Bud McSpadden will provide musical entertainment. Also beginning May 30 is the annual Library Sale, which runs from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. both Thursday and Friday. The first session of the Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo is Friday, May 31, at 7 p.m. at the Rodeo Grounds. Pre-sale tickets are $12 for adults, $8 for children ages six to 12 and free for anyone five or

Brent Baker/staff photo

Karlie Henneman is serving as the Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo Queen this year. under and can be purchased at II Sisters, The Junction, Superior Auto Parts, or the Tonasket Eagles 3002 in Tonasket. At the gate, tickets will be $15 for adults and $10 for children six to 12. Gates open at 5 p.m. This year the rodeo features the Elite Professional Bullriders and World Class Bucking Horse Association. Saturday’s activities swing into action early, beginning with the Cowboy Breakfast at the Rodeo Grounds from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. The Tonasket 5K Community Fun Run will be run and/or walked at the Tonasket High School track beginning at 8:00 a.m., with registration beginning at 7:40 a.m. Proceeds will go to the Tonasket Water Ranch. An

See founders | PG A2

‘Marshal Middleton’ finally gets to ride the parade And there are a lot of her former students in the Tonasket area. Middleton retired from a long stint as the school’s TONASKET - Patti Middleton is no music teacher last year. And unlike most classroom teachers, she had a lot of those stranger to parades. But she’s never gotten to ride in one. students for many years, giving her a As the longtime music teacher in the chance to see a lot of them grow up. “The best part of teaching was the kids Tonasket School District, she’s marched in countless parades, including many I got to know,” she said. “A lot of them are editions of the Founders Day variety, my friends now that they’re adults. “That’s wonderful, and one of the always as part of the Tonasket Marching great things about teachBand. and especially about “I’ve never ridden in “What was really fun ing, music because you get a parade,” Middleton was giving the kids them year after year.” said. “I’ve walked a lot Middleton, born and of miles in them with an opportunity to raised in Tonasket, was the band, but never got showcase themselves. deeply influenced by forto ride in one.” music teacher Wally Middleton, her They really do rise to mer Moore. husband Randy and the occasion in music, “He had such a big five grandchildren on me and many, (all under the age of athletics or anything impact many other students,” five) will ensconce she said. themselves in a sheep else.” “The things that Wally wagon provided by her Patti Middleton, believed in - like work brother, Mike Buchert, Grand Marshal ethic, always doing your as she rides the parade best and trying your as this year’s Tonasket hardest - I hope, as far as musicality, that Founders Day Parade Grand Marshal. As usually happens with the grand I taught that. “What was really fun was giving the marshal, Middleton was shocked to hear her name called at the Tonasket kids an opportunity to showcase themChamber of Commerce’s annual banquet selves. They really do rise to the occasion in music, athletics or anything else. They in February. “My first hint was when (Tonasket really want that.” Since retiring she’s been busy running Mayor) Pat (Plumb) said something about rhythm,” she said. “I was like, her business, Buena Vista Quilting and Lodging, and working with Randy with ‘What the heck is he talking about?’ “But that was fun because he was one their other business, AdvoCare. “I spend a lot more time at church, and of my students.” By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune Volume 109 No. 22

Brent Baker/staff photo

Longtime Tonasket School District music teacher Patti Middleton will serve as the 2013 Tonasket Founders Day Parade Grand Marshal. I don’t feel like I’m rushed and tired,” she Middleton said she had plenty of happy the music department and people always said. “The best part is not having any memories from her teaching years. appreciated what the kids did. bells going off (as at school). “I absolutely feel blessed,” she said. “It was the hometown band, home“I miss the instructional part, and “Tonasket has many, many wonderful town choir, and a lot of people came being a part of the band. But you do people who live here. I always felt like to the concerts. It made the kids feel move onto other things.” the community was very supportive of wonderful.”

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Letters/Opinion A4 Community A5 Valley Life A8

Sports B1-3 Schools B3 Classifieds/Legals B4-5

Real Estate B6 Police Stats B6 Graduates C1-6


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MAY 30, 2013

Taxes | FROM A1

AFTER 33 YEARS ON THE JOB

Oroville School District will see tax assessments similar to those from last year. “On Osoyoos or Palmer lakefront property is more likely to have increased because people are still buying land on the water and continue to pay higher prices,” he said. “Otherwise for the most part there shouldn’t be much change.” The county is divided into neighborhoods and everyone’s assessment can go up or down depending on that neighborhood, explained Furman. “We track what property sells for and the state did a ratio study and said we were within 92.6 percent. What that tells me most is that we are assessing at what properties are selling for. So if the state said we were 80 percent, then we would need to raise the assessments… if they said it was 120 percent it tells me we need to lower assessments.” That was proved out when the assessments in the Oroville area were lowered 10 percent across the board a few years back. He reminds taxpayers that Kinross still has plans to shut down operations at the Buckhorn Mountain gold mine in 2015. “Last year was the high water mark at $175 million, this year it is about $110 million based on them starting to wrap up operations,” Furman said. “There is about $350 million in assessed valuation in the county and the

mine represents about a third of that.” The assessor said the west side of the state was starting to see the market increase for property sales. He added that he felt Okanogan County was on the verge of the market taking off, but hasn’t seen it yet. “The west side Chelan County and Douglas County are starting to see some increases as well and we’re usually right behind them,” he said. The county is just now starting the process of assessing new construction and that it is “trending up after bottoming out in 2009,” according to the assessor. Some of the new construction in the county includes the Big R Store and the FedEx shipping facility in Omak. “There’s been nothing earth shattering though… it’s more like the trend you normally see with improvements in the economy,” he said. The county is also starting to update the open space tax rate, which is a lower rate for agricultural property as defined by state law. He said the rate is based on a formula using market value as set by the five-year average of the net income, then capitalizing that income into a value. “All of this is spelled out by WAC and RCW. The state legislature created the program in 1972

to insure agriculture production. For example only -- an orchard’s market value may be $10,000 an acre, but the agriculture value is based on a formula that might put it at $1000 an acre,” said Furman. “There is a five person committee as set by WAC. Each type of crop is different… orchards, rangeland, vineyard, irrigated or not.” Furman wanted to remind taxpayers about the Senior Exemption Program. If someone is 62-yearsold or older and has a combined gross income of $35,000 or less they may qualify for the Senior Exemption Program. He said the income is calculated a little differently than what people use for their income taxes purposes and encourages those interested in the exemption to contact the assessor’s office at (509) 422-7190. Information about the program can also be found at the assessor’s website by going to www.okanogancounty. org and clicking on the assessor link. “Those unhappy with their assessment can go online and look up what the values in their area are. The website is a great resource,” he said. To appeal a tax assessment, Furman said to get in touch with the Board of Equalization by calling the clerk of the board Laleña “Lanie” Johns at (509) 422-7105. The next sixth of the county will be for property in the Tonasket School District.

FOUNDERS | FROM A1

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Oroville High School Social Studies teacher George Thornton received a plaque in recognition of his more than three decades as a teacher in the Oroville School District. Thornton, who grew up in Oroville, has no long range plans for retirement other than to do some travelling.

Social Studies teacher George Thornton retiring from Oroville Enrollment drops in last months of school year By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE – Oroville teacher George Thornton received a plaque acknowledging his 33 years of service from the school board at their Monday, May 20 meeting. “One of the first administrators from when George started teaching said in his evaluation that he was going to make an impact on his community… that’s just what he’s done,” said Superintendent Steve Quick. Social Studies teacher Thornton is a 2011 recipient of the Golden Apple Award for Excellence in Education. When he got that award, one of only 10 given in the state each year, it lauded Thornton for “overcoming Oroville’s rural isolation by using technology to connect with the rest of the world and for his work developing a system of senior projects for his students that help them give back to the community.” It continued, “His students have learned about Afghan culture by holding the first Skype conversation with an all-girls school in Afghanistan and used Google Earth to better understand the homes of their peers across the world. Senior projects emphasize community service and studyabroad programs bring the world to a remote community of less than two thousand. Thanks to his work, students at Oroville High are increasingly open to the possibilities awaiting them in the wider world.” Thornton said he had no special plans following retirement and that right now he was just looking at finishing out the year and doing US Forest Service vegetation surveys at the Tonasket Ranger District. He will also be a guest teacher at Discover Washington: Youth Heritage Project to be held July 16-19 at Ebey’s Landing on Whidbey Island. “(I’ll be doing) some traveling of course… catching up with life.

Like so many people I’ve worked constantly since my teens,” Thornton said. After the school board heard reports from administrators, the student representative to the board, staff and spring sports coaches, business manager Shay Shaw gave the financial report. Shaw said that the district was going to get $3,000 from one federal program, but due to sequestration was getting $15,000 less for Special Education.

“...catching up with life. Like so many people I’ve worked constantly since my teens.” George Thornton, OHS Social Studies Teacher

“That’s a $12,000 difference, but I’ll take that because we could have been looking at $50,000 to $60,000 less,” she said. Shaw said enrollment, which had been higher than predicted for most of the school year, had started to drop. “We took quite a hit in enrollment in April and May. We are down almost 25 kids in two months… we had been thinking 568 for the budget,” she said. Enrollment numbers are important because the state pays basic education funds based on FTEs or Full Time Equivalents, the number of students enrolled in the school district. The Oroville School Board has had a conservative policy of basing the upcoming school budget on a number lower than the district’s

best guess at what FTEs will be in the upcoming year. When asked what was the reason behind the numbers drop, high school principal Kristen Sarmiento said, “People have been moving out of the area, many are making big moves, not just to nearby towns. I think it is for work reasons.” Rocky DeVon, chairman of the school board and co-owner of a local real estate agency, said, “It’s not just blue collar workers we are also seeing a lot of professionals move.” Citing a report from fourth grade teacher Kelly King and second grade teacher Cynthia Poynter, School Director DeVon said he would like to invite a teacher from each building to address the board on a revolving basis at their meetings. “We need to know what’s going on… we need that input,” he said. He also suggested the board do a walk through of facilities as part of their meetings every six months. Supt. Quick said the plans for the new crow’s nest at the football field had been turned in to Oroville Permit Administrator Christian Johnson for approval. “We should have a new one by football season, Harold Jensen will be working on that,” said Quick. The superintendent also said each board member was given an email address that works through the district’s email system. “By going through the district’s system we won’t have to use your personal emails and that helps to keep things on the up and up,” said Quick.

Omak Stampede try-outs for singing American and Canadian National Anthems OMAK - Omak Stampede is now taking applications for American and Canadian National Anthem singers for the 2013 Rodeo performances. Registration deadline is Friday, June 7 for tryouts on Sunday, June 9 at 12 p.m. in Triangle Park, next to the Stampede Arena. Information and applications are available online at www. omakstampede.org under “arena events” or at the stampede office.

entry form with a variety of registration options can be found on page B2. For those participating in the parade, line-up begins at 9:30 a.m. with check-in located in the parking lot of the Wells Fargo Bank, 16 West 5th Street. Judging of floats will take place at 10 a.m., with the parade itself starting at 11 a.m. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tonasket Middle Schoolers will be holding a fundraiser in an attempt to jump-start funding for the Tonasket city swimming pool, which was shut down two years ago. The fundraiser will include games and dunk tank “festivities.” Following the parade, from noon to 2 p.m., will feature downtown activities.

The athletically-minded can swing back into action at 12:30 p.m. at Chief Tonasket Park, where the third annual softball tournament will be held. This year’s tournament leads off with a Home Run Derby with the tourney starting at 1:30 p.m. Cost is $10 per person for the Home Run Derby and $120 per softball team, with proceeds going to the Tonasket Junior Baseball and Softball Association. Concessions will be available. Finally, the second session of the rodeo will begin at 7 p.m.

“Budley” takes on project Bud McSpadden, retired rodeo clown and current all-around entertainer, is working on a branding display as part of the rodeo grounds beautification

Out On The Town

project. “Since I am no longer clowning I need something to keep me out of trouble,” McSpadden said. “Theythey don’t trust me in the kitchen... With Jon Wilson’s help as ‘branding boss’ we will be branding the old grandstand seats that were removed during (Karlie Henneman and Breanna Howell’s) senior project. “For $10 you can have your family’s brand along with a name displayed for eternity or until the termites eat the planks, which ever comes first?.” McSpadden said both power for “newfangled” brands or fire to heat up the old-style metal ones will both be available. All proceeds will go toward additional rodeo ground projects.

your guide to

Dining & Entertainment Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

~ LIVE MUSIC ~

Sat., June 1st

Company Band

WANT THEIR ATTENTION? Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at EVERY WEEK Phone: 509-476-3602

k n i h T ! n e e Gr

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin) Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Did you know?

We use... Soy Ink

Recycled Paper Excess paper recycled for gardens, fire starter & more! OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602


MAY 30, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

Oroville Chamber bringing C&M Circus to town

WELCOME TO THE OKANOGAN

Submitted by Terri Moss Culpepper & Merriweather Circus

Submitted photo

Kasen Richard Davisson was born on May 14th 2013 at Mid Valley Hospital. Parents are Tiffany Johnson and Shawn Davisson; sisters are Amanda, Alex and Ariana.

WEDDING BELLS Amanda Bradburn and Zachary Mieirs are getting married on August 24, at the Ellisforde Church of the Brethren. For more information, visit their website at http:// AMANDAEAndZACHARYT. ourwedding.com

Submitted photo

OROVILLE – Thanks to the sponsorship of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, the Culpepper & Merriweather Circus is coming to Oroville on Tuesday, June 11 at the City Park on Main Street with two scheduled performances at 5:00 & 7:30 p.m. Now in its 29th edition, C&M Circus, America’s Favorite Big Top Circus, has become internationally known for quality family entertainment. This authentic One-Ring, Big Top Circus has been featured on National Geographic’s Explorer TV series, Entertainment Tonight, The Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Tribune, Arizona Highways Magazine. It has also been featured on the A&E Special: Under the Big Top and most recently, On the Road with Circus Kids, a Nickelodeon special featured on the Nick News Program. C&M and the chamber are encouraging everyone to bring friends and family out circus morning to watch as a familiar place in your town is transformed into a bustling Circus City. Activity swirls around the grounds as animals are unloaded, the Big Top is erected, and rigging is prepared for performances later in the day. Enjoy the magic and tradition of the American Circus with your family and create memories that will last a lifetime. Between 9:30 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. come watch the raising of the Big Top, then stay for the free tyour. This presentation offers a unique face-toface opportunity for families, schools, and interested community members to meet and learn all about the Culpepper & Merriweather Circus family and includes a walking tour of the circus grounds. Learn interesting facts about the performers, the history of the show and the different species of animals in the C&M Circus Family. In

Submitted photo

The Culpepper & Merriweather Circus will be visiting Oroville on Tuesday, June 11 at the City Park on Main Street. Jungle Cats Solomon, Delilah and Francis, presented by Trey Key, should be a highlight of the show. this presentation they will also address topics such as hygiene, grooming and the veterinary care all of our animals receive. In recent years the Tent Raising and Morning Tour has become a popular program for families and interested community members. It is presented in a way everyone, young and old can learn many interesting facts about the Culpepper & Merriweather Circus Family and now we have a brand new tent! This is a special part of Circus Day that should not be missed. On circus day, performers bring the magic of the circus to life in each 90-minute show. This year’s lineup includes an All-Star group of performers and entertainers that include: Miss Simone and her amazing single trapeze, Miss Paulina’s proud prancing ponies, The Arlise Troupe on their wild and crazy unicycles, Natilie’s American Eskimo Escapades, The Ayalas with unforgetable foot juggling, a rediculas Rola Bola and certainly a hair raising Hair Hang! But, lets not forget our favorite performing Jungle Cats,

Soloman, Delilah & Francis, presented by Mr. Trey Key, that will certainly have you on the edge of your seats. All with original music written by the talented, Matt Margucci from Los Angeles, Calif. C&M promises their performers will be sure to amaze, delight and entertain the audience members of all ages beyond your wildest imagination. The costumes alone are certainly of Los Vegas quality. Save money by purchasing your tickets in advance. Advance tickets are available at: Prince’s Department Store, Oroville Pharmacy, Camaray Motel, Tonasket Interiors and online at www.orovillewashington.com until June 10 Prices for advance tickets are $6 for children ages two to 12, children under 2 are always free, and $10.00 for adults. On show day tickets will be $13 for adults and $7 for children. Buy your tickets early and save. For more information or to purchase tickets with a credit card call 866 BIG TOP 6. Advance tickets will be available on show day at this number until 4 p.m. Monday – Friday, Central Time (2 p.m. Pacific).

Approval of Oroville Critical Areas Ordinance delayed Oroville PD offers school presence of police officer By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE – Approval of a new Oroville Critical Areas Ordinance was put off for at least two weeks as the council reviews the ordinance in it’s current form. The Tuesday, May 21, Oroville City Council meeting was advertised as a public hearing to take relevant testimony about the ordinance which was drafted by the Oroville Planning Commission, with the help of Chris Branch, director of Community Development. Mayor Chuck Spieth asked if anyone in the audience was there to testify regarding the proposed ordinance and no one stepped forward. “As you know the interim ordinance has been extended a number of times,” said Branch. “The Oroville Planning Commission held a hearing on March 21, 2012 which they extended to Aug. 15 and no one testified. The most significant change from the previous ordinance we always used is the wetlands provision.” Branch said he found it a little troubling to go through regulations like the one proposed and not get any public input. He suggested the council review the ordinance for another two weeks before adopting it. “I hope this hearing gains attention prior to adoption,” he said. The mayor closed the hearing after again calling for testimony and Councilman Tony Koepke made a motion to postpone adoption until at least the next council meeting. The motion was seconded by Councilman Jon Neal and approved.

Moment of Silence Before the hearing Mayor Spieth said he was going to break with the normal order of things and asked those present to join with him in a moment of silence in recognition of the tornadorelated devastation going on in Oklahoma. “Sometimes we don’t realize how lucky we are to live in Okanogan County,” the mayor said after people took a moment to join in the mayor’s request. Water Transfer Under old business, Rod Noel, Superintendent of Public Works, updated the mayor and council on the issue of the water rights transfer from Puget Properties to the city. “Basically a water rights permit was issued by the Department of Ecology to Puget Properties, AKA Veranda Beach, in 1986,” said Noel, explaining that the resort had transferred that right to the city when the city agreed to supply them water. However, the city was unable to develop good enough wells on the resort property and Ecology said the water had to be drawn from that area, rather than on the other side of the lake, where the city has all its other wells. Ecology claimed they were different aquifers. Since then the city approached Ecology to see what could be done to supply water to the east side of the lake using its existing wells. “Basically we are retiring the permit from Puget Properties in order for some quantity of water we have an application for on our Well Number 4 from 1986,” said Noel. “I think it looks good. I think we have a good chance to make it work.” Noel explained that the city would be able to withdraw more water from Well Number 4 than is currently being withdrawn. However, the difference between

that amount and that asked for in the application would not be decreased as the city hopes that the Water Rights application the city made to Ecology in 1986 will be approved. “The Puget Properties water right was originally for up to 1000 gallons a minute. We will not give up the 2950 we have applied for,” said Noel. He credited much of the success in the city’s hiring of a former DOE employee now working in the private sector to help the city find its way through the red tape to get the water rights transfer. “I believe he’s done an excellent job on this... there’s no way we could have attempted this without his help,” said Mayor Spieth. Noel said that Veranda Beach Resort has been contacted and they indicated that the city should proceed keeping the resorts interest in mind.

Veterans Memorial Park The council heard that a cultural assessment may be required before the city can dig ditches to run electrical services in the camping area. “We’d already anticipated expenses for a cultural resource survey in the campground when we planned on running electrical, but the estimate is pushing $20,000,” said Branch. “That price is giving us sticker shock... something will have to be done sooner or later though.” Noel said that an area of cultural interest was located by the state when they still had the park and when they were putting in irrigation. He said the irrigation system needs to be updated whether they

add additional electrical hookups or not. “Technically if we come to the point we have to upgrade the irrigation system we will have to have an assessment then anyway,” said Noel. Arnie Marchand, a member of the Colville Confederated Tribes said that the park was not much of a gathering place prior to white settlers coming into the area because it was mostly wetlands. He said so much has been in the park prior to it becoming a park, like bleachers for the county fair and band stands. “There has been an awful lot going on there in the past 70 years,” said Marchand. Branch said other studies of the area had been done in the past that indicated Native Americans made their camp up above. “That makes more sense to camp there because the areas below were swamp. Much wasn’t used until there was fill put there,” he said. “$20,000, come on this is Oroville,” said Marchand, who suggested that representatives from Oroville meet with tribal representatives face to face.

School Safety Issue “Ever since the shootings in Connecticut we have been getting more and more requests to spend more time at the school,” said Police Chief Clay Warnstaff. “Since I attended an FBI training I’ve come up with a simple idea I think could help.’ Warnstaff suggested that the city allow one of his officers to be based out of the high school and the school has agreed to supply a lockable office, phone line and

computer work station. “During the week I have an officer with me from 11 a.m to 3 p.m.; he could be based out of the high school and still respond to calls. He would not be a school resource officer. His job would to be work for the city full time,” said Warnstaff, adding he would rotate in a new officer every three months. “I think that would be an excellent program,” said Koepke. “It sounds good; it will be good for the kids to see an officer’s

presence,” added Councilman Walt Hart. Oroville High School Principal Kristin Sarmiento said the school was excited about the plan. “In the past we had Kevin Kinman with an office in the school,” said Sarmiento, referring to a local Okanogan County Deputy. “The first level of law enforcement is an officer’s presence. I think it is a simple solution... I don’t know why I didn’t think of it sooner,” Warnstaff said.

Come See The Tent Raising Between 9:30 & 10:00 am

City Park Rain or Shine

SHOW TIMES

5:00 & 7:30 PM

ADVANCE TICKETS

Prince's Department Store Oroville Pharmacy, Camaray Motel Tonasket Interiors www.orovillewashington.com

MAY SPECIAL May 1st-31st

TICKETS

In Advance Adult.......$10 Child.........$6 (ages 2-12)

Circus Day

Adult.......$13 Child..........$7 (ages 2-12)

To purchase advance tickets with credit card call 866-BIG TOP 6 • M-F 8-4 CT

OROVILLE Tuesday • June 11

See What It’s All About! 224 West 4th St. Tonasket 509-322-2946

Sponsored by The Oroville Chamber of Commerce


PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 30, 2013

THE TOWN CRIER

Actually looking for public input

How often do you find yourself saying, “Who came up with that stupid law or regulation?” And how often do you really get the chance to give input before a government body or agency actually makes those “stupid” rules in the first place? The answer is probably more often than we think. Our local county and municipalities are always passing new or updated ordinances, but often we just let the hired staff, or in many cases, volunteer boards, do the heavy lifting. After all we’re free to complain about how “stupid” it was later. Perhaps we could do less complaining and take advantage of the opportunities afforded us by public hearings and share our ideas and concerns before these new rules are passed. A Out of prime example is Oroville’s new Critical Areas Ordinance: no one, outside the staff, came to My Mind give comment when it was going through public Gary A. DeVon hearings in front of the Planning Commission and no one came last week when a hearing to consider approval was being held at the city council meeting. We’ve seen many dozens of these public hearings over the years (which are often required before regulations are made or changed) and at very few have we seen someone come to give public testimony – that is other than “staff.” One such staff member is Chris Branch, Oroville’s director of Economic Development. He was visibly and verbally disappointed that no one had a comment about the ordinance. Whereas you might think he’d want the council to just rubber stamp the new ordinance, which feels like it’s been years in the making, he asked them to delay approval for a couple of weeks. He wanted them to review the draft ordinance and perhaps to give people one more chance to voice their comments. If someone wanted to they could look at the proposals by going to Oroville’s website oroville-wa.com and see whether they agree with the direction the city is headed. Of course, just because you might not like something in the ordinance, that doesn’t mean the council will vote it down, but it may give the city time to address your concerns. In other cases, the city’s hands might be tied and parts of the ordinance are written the way they are because of state or federal regulations. But the city often has a certain amount of leeway and your ideas for change might be incorporated into the final plan. Even though we are talking about the Critical Areas Ordinance, this is just an example. We can understand Branch’s consternation – he, like planners, boards, councils and commissioners everywhere, often get frustrated about the lack of input until the regulation has already been passed. On the other hand, while the Critical Areas Ordinance has had little outside input, many in the county felt frustration after being asked to give their input on the Comprehensive Plan Update. After dozens of meetings and gathering comments from all corners of the county, all that input was apparently put in File 13 because certain groups didn’t like where the Comprehensive Plan was going. We guess that’s okay; it’s only been nearly 50 years since the old ordinance was passed. That must mean sometimes there’s just too much input -- maybe it’s better to stay at home and let the boards, councils and staff make all the decisions for us. After all, we can always say they’re stupid later.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Honor Flights Dear Editor, (On) Thursday and Friday, May 16 and 17, I had the honor of being a guardian with Inland NW Honor Flight. This Honor Flight was special because it was the first time a chartered plane was used. This meant that 95 WWII Heroes got to travel to Washington D.C. all at once (that is the amount of 3 regular). It also meant that the trip was only two long days instead of three due to shortened direct flights, and all for the same cost overall. The weather was absolutely perfect for our Veterans to visit their memorials and be honored for their service. While on the plane I noticed a familiar face - Mr. Bob Hirst of Oroville! I was so happy to see that Mr. Hirst was able to take his Honor Flight with his son. This picture is of me and Mr. Hirst at the WWII Memorial. What an honor for me to see our heroes be thanked for their service by everyone. Please help me continue to send WWII Veterans (and soon, Korean Veterans) to D.C. to be honored before it’s too late. Contact me at jp4vets@ yahoo.com or on Facebook - Jp4vets. Sincerely, Justin Peterson Chewelah, Wash.

Drive ATVs responsibly Dear Gary, As one of the people initially concerned with the proposal to allow ATV’s in the town of Tonasket, I was cautiously optimistic when the code was changed to permit their use. Safety requirements and enforcement had been addressed at various meetings, and I was assured that the ATV community did a lot to hold riders accountable for responsible use. I was relieved when I saw the first ATV in town. The driver was following all rules of the road and was easily visible. The second time I saw two ATV’s together. As they approached the four-way stop at the corner of Fourth and Western, the first rider neither signaled a right turn nor stopped. The second rider stopped but pulled up next to another car, making five vehicles at the intersection. Then the second rider turned right also, without waiting for the other vehicles and without a signal. I am most concerned with safety for motorists and pedestrians in our town. I encourage our police force to enforce rules of the road, and I encourage the ATV community to drive responsibly and to hold each other accountable. Sincerely, Christine Olson Tonasket

Would you be guilty? Dear Gary, It’s been a while since I’ve poured a cup of the black stuff and scribbled some thoughts. I’ve been thinking lately (which some find that quality in me to be a rarity—smile) but, I’ve been thinking about some of our recent history. By recent, I mean things that have taken place within the last 100 years that was a result of a foundation of previous thought. A hundred years ago, many people thought that what took place outside the shores of North America was a problem for those “over there” but not those here. That isolationism laid the foundation for December 7th, 1941. That momentous event quickly changed the United States to realize that the event drew the world into a closer world community. It helped us realize that what took place outside the U.S. did, in fact, affect others. Today, I’m afraid that we, as a nation, have fallen into the same trap. Today, we (as a nation) are being attacked on many fronts such as religious freedom, downhill morality and a roller coaster of other events. If we as a nation, and Christians within this nation, don’t stand up with a steel rod as a backbone, I fear we, as a nation, and each of us as individuals will experience a far greater disaster than Pearl Harbor. Today, our freedom and the individual expression of that freedom is being sucked up by a monstrous vacuum cleaner. As a result, my Bible cannot be displayed in many places such as a teachers desk, a military office or a school graduation as well as many other locations. But the Koran, Bagavadegita, and Torah can. Today I can’t enter into public prayer but the Muslim can close down an intersection as they bow down and pay homage to Mecca. I could continue with many examples of inor non-equality; but, my point is to awaken all, and especially the Christian, that if we don’t stand and be counted and make an impact within our world we will become as despised by others as were the Jews in the late 30 and 40’s in Germany 60 and 70 years ago. I read, in my Bible, that I should not be ashamed of the Gospel for it is the power of God for Salvation, nor should any Christian cower in their proclamation. We are to be loving, forgiving and humble but not silent and hide in the corner like a little old man afraid of his shadow. To conclude these thoughts I remind you

that Jesus asked of His disciples who do men say that I am? The disciples began responding by saying that He was Elijah or a prophet. As they were throwing out names Jesus interrupted them as if what they were saying was inconsequential and pointedly asked them “But, who do YOU say than I am?” The same question is being asked of the Christian today. That question is, who do YOU say that Jesus is. Do and will others hear and see your proclamation of Christ? If it were illegal to be a Christian, as it is in many countries, and being convicted of being Christian were punishable by execution, would you, by a jury of your peers, be found guilty? Only you can answer that question. What is your response? Sincerely, The old coffee drinker, Randy Middleton Tonasket

Homegrown philosophy Dear Editor, Wisdom is not a religion that can be taught, it can only be observed if at a young age one has regular contact with an individual who already possesses wisdom. One must commit him or herself to a lifetime of learning, mostly in solitary circumstances. In addition, there is no end to wisdom as there are to some other religions. The wise man has the capability to see through falsehoods and errors and point us in the direction of truth, but at the same time feels no obligation to do so, for each individual must determine for themselves the virtue (if any) of the path they have chosen in life. As the decades spent learning and practicing wisdom go by we begin to focus more on the larger issues in life, what will or will not be helpful for humanity, what will or will not be helpful to the nation we live in. The most important point is that we must never give up on improving ourselves, our nation, or humanity. If we do give up because we have determined that the task ahead is too difficult, we will then have ruined many positive elements of life for future generations. Those responsible for this will be those who are alive today. And what have you thought about today? Ray Gattavara Sumner, Washington

Understanding, diaglogue make us stronger OPINION BY KELL PETERSEN

My dear American friends: I have reflected upon your often-repeated claim that your (yes, your) president should be impeached for treason. I know you to be an intelligent gentleman and I have in the past brushed off your statements about the President as gags. I hearken to Voltaire’s proviso that “I disapprove what you say but will defend your right to say it with my life. I respect you. Through our military service we have both risked our lives to defend democracy. Hence: you’re right to say your president should be impeached for treason and my right to ask you to explain why. In my own case, I would not have been alive had not the United States intervened in the Second World War. As any European, I owe much to the United States for its principal role in saving Europe and for its help after the war, via the Marshall Plan, in helping to rebuild. This gratitude on my part extends to the US role through NATO where I served in securing and stabilizing Western economic and military power in subsequent years. You may know that my research and work over many years has concerned “the allocation mechanism and its faults” in democratically governed mixed monetary economies such as the United States, Sweden, Canada, Mexico, et. al. Fault in the allocation mechanism, if unsolved, will inevitably cause varying degrees of social, economic, and ecological problems. The hodgepodge in the U.S. financial and housing sectors that precipitated the 20072008 collapse is one glaring example of such failure. The reason I bring this up is because in terms of the present discussion, presidential leadership plays a large role in such failures in a democracy. Thus President Obama was responsible in large part for this collapse. Wrong! He wasn’t even President until 2009. I think some fellow named Bush might have been in charge then. I’m also reminded that President Obama got us involved in Iraq and Afghanistan, wars that even now show all the signs of fruitless tragedy and suffering well into the future. Wrong again! Someone else was at the switch when those quagmires got started. Finally, I’m reminded of the sorry state of

health care allocation in the United States. When Obama assumed office, United States consumption of healthcare was the highest in the world; it was in fact more than $8000 per capita, roughly double that of Sweden, Germany or Canada, as ready examples. More than 45 million Americans lacked access to adequate healthcare, causing many to utilize the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA), needlessly filling the ER waiting rooms at hospitals across the country. It is important to realize that excess consumption of healthcare can only be obtained at the expense of investment in facilities that create good health, such as research, education, employment and in infrastructure and ecology. Hence excess consumption of healthcare and allied high insurance costs seriously hamper business and damage the United States’ comparative advantage in the global economy. Reducing the consumption of healthcare to the level of Switzerland’s $5200 per capita and thus providing healthcare to all would reallocate about $940 billion to more productive health care uses. To put this in perspective, defense spending is roughly $940 billion, compared with $67 billion for research and 130 billion for education. Irrespective of political beliefs I trust most will agree that $940 billion would be better allocated to areas of the economy that create good somatic and mental health research and education and infrastructure rather than to frivolous and excess consumption of healthcare, as well as to healthcare fraud. As we all know, President Bush got that all sorted out a few years ago so that the United States is well on its way toward providing health care to everyone. Wrong once again! President Obama was at the switch on this one, attempting to stitch together a system (the Affordable Care Act) which at least showed promise of resolving this problem --far from what should have been done, but a necessary start nevertheless. Something needed to be done! Social satisfaction and quality of life depend on economic production in business and employment; excess consumption of healthcare hampers both business and employment. Dear friend, I’m not trying to defend

President Obama’s stewardship of the American economy or even its foreign policy. I find many areas in which to criticize his judgment and policies, his failure to sanitize the financial sector being the most serious. However, when you suggest that somehow his activities as President are in some manner treasonous, I take great umbrage. Perhaps your loose words (if I may characterize them as such) at the café, or at other venues in which democratic expression holds free rein, are taken too literally. Also the White House is only one side of the government. What about the Congress with its apocalyptic behavior, its only goal seeming to be to maim the President at the expense of the Nation’s wellbeing? Could it be that members of the Congress never need feel the effects of their own action or inaction, being protected as they are in their own little cocoon of wonderful government benefits? Rather, they, in effect, fiddle while Rome (the economy, the environment, public well-being) burns. My world view is clearly derived from my work as an economist, but also as a citizen of the Western World, a world in which the United States has served as a beacon of democracy and strength. We would all be wise to appreciate its institutions and its inherent strength. Whatever we may think of the various occupants of the Oval Office, they have all, at least within my memory, adhered to an essential faithfulness to democratic tradition and to the supervening role of the United States in preserving it, as best as possible, for others. May I suggest that at our age (I am just a few years younger than you), we have an obligation to discuss the issues that really matter to society, such as education, investment in business and employment? --- in other words, the underlying factors that secure good social conditions and good somatic and mental health in society. We belittle ourselves when we descend to ad hominem attacks on the character of our leaders. Resentment, hatred, and polarization will not make the United States stronger and that worries me immensely. Understanding and good faith discussion will make us stronger. Best regards, your Danish/ Canadian friend, inviting discussion as always…


May 30, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A5

Okanogan Valley Life

June begins soon and brings lots to do Here we are, all out of month, again. What will June bring? Graduation, Father’s Day, weddings and soon ripe cherries and thinning apples, family reunions and hopefully some other fun things. Not that thinning apples is fun, but it makes money to then do something fun, THIS & THAT remember? E d u c a t i o n Joyce Emry is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don’t. Last week I mentioned that Jim Manuel had a stroke. He had one about five months ago, and has had some light ones,

but this one (during May Day festivities) put him in the hospital for a short time. Presently he is at home, and is recovering his speech and loss of memory which was affected, but the doctor is hopeful that he will continue to improve. This update comes from his wife. I must say the big pots of colorful flowers are more attractive and inviting looking at the front entrance of the new Pastime Bar and Grill than the “corral gates” that were there a couple of weeks ago. The Former Fat Boys is still not open… guess they had to do extensive work on the air conditioning system. Being raised in the Missouri, I know from personal experience how devastating tornados can be, however this one in Oklahoma was worse than any I ever saw. Is it just me or do we ever hear of other countries coming to the aid of “our” disasters? Bless the Salvation Army and Red Cross and of course all other orga-

nizations and churches and surrounding neighbors for coming to their aid. How sad for the loss of the lives of the little children and others too. It’s amazing that the number of lives lost wasn’t greater. Once again we can be thankful we live in the area we do. The winds we’ve had don’t help the hanging baskets of flowers on the streets (mine weren’t even hanging up yet and got blown over). We had some visitors at the Senior Center for lunch last Tuesday. Mr. Ralph Zosel and friend, Bob Anderson. Ralph has had 96 birthdays and his eyesight is such that he can’t drive, but he still enjoys a ride in his pickup and we hope he comes again. George and Willlie Penner joined us for lunch and it was good to see that George was not to “worse for wear” after his motorcycle tumble, but it was best not to make the hugs too tight, as he did receive some broken ribs. And the third visitors were Roberta Cole’s son and wife from the Philadelphia area to help Howard and Roberta celebrate their 40th wedding anniversary. The recent rains that were accompanied by high winds made my windows look lots cleaner on the outside. We have had an antique clock that was passed down through the Emry fam-

ily, but never did work, for us. We are pleased to say that it is “ticking away” bonging on the hour and half hour, and looking almost new, thanks to the clockmaker out of Tonasket, Dana Henry. If you have a clock needing repair, it can be left at the Oroville Senior Center and he will give you an estimate before doing the work. Tom and Eve Kammers have a new, cute little car, a Fiat 500, I want one of those. (editor’s note: in Italy the Fiat 500, or cinquecento, is known as topolino, little mouse. That’s also what they call Mickey Mouse). I wonder when you’re on a baseball team (Mariner’s) and lose two or three games of scores 10 and 12 to nothing, if you ever think, that just maybe you’ve chosen the wrong career, or at least the wrong team? Remember when we used to use flat irons for ironing, that were heavy and heated on a wood stove, and cold by the time you got to the ironing board? How much nicer today to have a light weight iron, heated by electricity and usually with steam. But, I still don’t especially like the job and find that I’m a pretty expert “smoother” and “shaker” taking the clothes out of the dryer, immediately.

Have you had fresh strawberries dipped in the new cool whip frosting? Yummy! I’ll bet Edna is glad to have an associate in the barber shop to help take the pressure off of her a bit. Welcome back Corinne Curtis. It’s good to have our neighbor, across the street, Myrtle Wood home, after a two week stay, warming up and relaxing in sunny Arizona, with her daughters and granddaughter. It’s also good to have our neighbor above us, Bev Holden gaining strength, doing therapy and enjoying one of her sons, who is seeing that she doesn’t overdo… now, who is going to watch over her when he leaves? She is used to doing lots of outside work… and going to yard sales and auctions and Red Hats fun and games, and pinochle and Bingo and Senior Citizens Sunday pot lucks and more pinochle and did I miss anything? Anyway she has to slow down a bit, but as we say, “It’s hard to stop a race horse from running.” Isn’t it amazing that the old fashioned yellow rose bushes are always in bloom for Memorial Holidays? The kind of season we have doesn’t seem to make a difference; it just always blooms at the proper time.

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Your Complete Eyecare Centre

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

Gary DeVon/staff photo

David Karaffa and Marge Finley did a royal job of representing the Oroville Senior Center as this year’s Senior Center King and Queen during the May Festival Grand Parade and throughout May Festival weekend.

Arnie Marchand to hold book talk, signing June 4 Submitted by Dolly Engelbretson Senior Center Correspondent

The third Tuesday of the month is the Seniors Business meeting. The fourth Tuesday, or May 28th, Alleen and Steve were scheduled to play some music for us. On June 4, Arnie Marchand will be here for a book signing and tell us something about why he is writing his book, “As I Heard it” now. Juanita Waggy is improving after a lengthy hospital stay and

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS has been moved to the Rehab Unit for therapy as a result of a fall resulting in a broken hip. Jim Fry has made a speedy recovery after a trip to the hospital a week ago. Apparently he may need a new pacemaker but more tests are being scheduled. The Indian Taco Feed on the 18th went well. It was a learning experience for us, but it was successful. We may have another during Heritage Days, July 19 and 20. Mark Anderson, a reader of

this newspaper but living elsewhere, recently had a brain aneurysm and has been hospitalized for the last several weeks. He is recovering nicely, but will remain hospitalized for the time being. Pinochle Scores: I am a little behind. May 18: Door Prize was won by Eunice Godwin; most pinochles was won by Danny Weitrick; high man for the evening was Leonard Paulsen and high scoring woman was Judy Ripley. Evelyn Dull had 1,500 trump. May 25: The door prize was won by Boots Emry who also was the high scoring woman for the evening. Most pinochles went to Larry Smith and Nellie Paulsen; and Leonard Paulsen was the high scoring man for the second week in a row.

WATERFRONT

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Submitted by Lyle Anderson Tonasket Eagles

May is coming to an end and the weather has been pretty good. It is time to get those gardens going if you haven’t. Don’t forget to get into the Eagles and get yourself some of those tickets for the scholarship raffle, to support the further education of our children and grandchildren. It is your chance to win either $400 in groceries or $400 in gas. Tickets are one for $5 or three for $10, so don’t delay and come and get a chance at winning. The drawing will be at 10 p.m on June 1, you do not have to be present to win. Our Incoming Officer Installation is this Wednesday June 29th at 6 p.m., with a potluck to follow. There will not be any Bingo this Friday due to The Founders Day rodeo going on that evening. The Kitchen will also be closed that night. This weekend is Tonasket Founders Day and Rodeo. Come on down Saturday morning to watch the parade and cheer for our float in the parade. The float is being driven by Fred Bevier in the parade. Worthy President Ron Wisener will also be in the parade with two classic

TONASKET EAGLES

Give a Holiday Gift That Doesn’t End When the aBatteries Give Holiday Run Gift Out. That Doesn’t End When the Batteries Run Out. education.

You PutaThem In a Safe Place. Give Holiday Gift

Edward Jones can work with you to develop a strategy save foracollege. One option is a Make 529 college Whytonot start new holiday tradition? this thesavings plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, time of year that you help save for a child’s college family members and the child.* education.

HEALTH CARE

(509) 826-6191

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

(509) 826-6191

Toll Free

www.wvmedical.com

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health (509) 826-5600

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Lots planned for Founders Day

OKANOGAN

OMAK

HEALTH CARE Don’t forget to come in Sunday at 1 p.m. and test your skills in our weekly pinochle game. Our pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows. Dale and Cindy Byers took first place and also cars in memory of his father Dick had the last pinochle. Second Wisener, who was an Eagle mem- place went to Gib McDougal and Betty Paul. Low Score was taken ber since 1949. Our annual steak feed for by Joanne Michels and Gladys Founders Day will be here at the Fifer. We send our well wishes to Eagles on June 1 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Price of the dinner is $10, so Jack Rawley and quick return to come enjoy a nice steak cooked home. Also we wish those that to you liking. Also that night we may be ill a speedy recovery to health. God bless all.the will beWhy having band to followholiday by good nota start a new tradition? Make this Powder River. The band will start The Biggest Little Eagles in the time of year that you help save for a child’s college up at 8 p.m. state. www.edwardjones.com

TONASKET

 Anti

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

 Behavioral

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion  Walk

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 MASSAGE

Su Ianniello

Licensed Massage Practitioner

 Emergency  VA

Clinic

 Surgical

Center

 Rehabilitation  Obstetrical  Imaging

(Oroville & Tonasket)

Services

 Full-Service

Laboratory Care  Swing Bed Program  Extended

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

www.edwardjones.com

Do You Prepare Now, Doesn’t Where Was That? That End When Advertise Are your stock, bond or other certificates in a safety deposit box, desk More for Family In The Edward can youatto develop a strategy Are your stock, bond or certificates in a drawer orJones closet ... or work are youwith notother sure the moment?Out. the Batteries Run to safety save for college.box, Onedesk option is a 529 college savings deposit drawer ortradition? closet ... orMake AWhy lostwhere or not destroyed certificate canhave mean inconvenience money Vacations Than start a new holiday plan, today’s gift can tax benefits and for lost you, To make your college savings gift in time for you and your heirs. Let Edward Jones hold them for you. You are you sure the moment? this thenot time ofat year that you help save forstill a family members and the child.* retain ownership and make all the decisions –today. while we handle all the You Do for College? Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the for thecollege holidays, call or visit child’s education. Edward Jones can YOUR AD HERE

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

OPTICAL

*Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in certain states for those residents.

paperwork. *Contributions a 529that plan may behelp eligiblesave for a state deductioncollege or credit in time of to year you fortax a child’s certain states for those residents.

A lost or destroyed certificate can mean work with you to develop a strategy to save for education. inconvenience and lost money for youpayments, and savings your Sandra Rasmussen We’ll automatically process dividend interest mergers, college. One option is aand 529 college splits, bond calls or maturities, and more. Even better, you’ll receive a Financial Advisor heirs. Let Edward Jones hold them for you. plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits Edward can worksavings with to develop a strategy To make Jones your college in consolidated account statement and a you singlegift form at time tax time. for you, family members the child.* You stillfor retain and all the savings to save college. One ismake a 529 college 32 ownership N Main St option Suite Aand for the holidays, callforor visit today. *Contributions to ayour 529 plan may beEdward eligible a Jones state tax have deduction ortax credit in certaintoday. states for thoseyou, residents. Call or visit local financial advisor Omak, WA 98841 plan, where gift can benefits for decisions – today’s while we handle all the paperwork. .

509-826-1638 family members and the child.*

Sandra Rasmussen

We’ll automatically process dividend and interest Financial Advisor payments, mergers, splits, bond calls or maturi32 N Main St Suite A ties, andOmak, more.WA Even better, you’ll receive a 98841 To make509-826-1638 your college savings and giftainsingle timeform consolidated account statement fortax thetime. holidays, call or visit today. at

*Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in certain states. for those residents. www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

Having fun with your family is important. But nothing is more vital than your child’s future. That’s why at Edward Jones, we can help you put together a strategy to save for college.

Direct Readers To Your Medical Using our education funding tool, we can estimate future or Health expenses at more than 3,000 schools and then recommend a Related Business financial strategy based on your unique needs. True, vacations are great. But graduation ceremonies are even better. Every Week

Call Charlene Helm

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

For a free, personalized college cost report, call or visit today.

509-476-3602 Ext 3050

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 30, 2013

78th TONASKET FOUNDERS DAY

RODEO

2013

TONASKET FOUNDERS DAY RODEO . . . g n i r u t fea ELITE PROFESSIONAL BULLRIDERS O

Photos by Brent Baker

& WORLD CLASS BUCKING HORSE ASSOCIATION THURSDAY MAY 30, 2013 5PM BBQ PRICE-$7 ALL YOU CAN EAT FREE KIDS GAMES AT 6:00

TONASKET S D N U O R G RODEO N E P O S E T GA AT 5:00PM

FRIDAY MAY 31, 2013 7PM SATURDAY JUNE 1, 2013 7PM

PRE-SALE TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SUPERIOR AUTO PARTS, THE JUNCTION, II SISTERS & TONASKET EAGLES ADULTS $12.00, KIDS 6-12 $8.00 & KIDS 5 AND UNDER FREE! GATE TICKETS: ADULTS $15.00, KIDS 6-12 $10.00 & KIDS 5 AND UNDER FREE!


WELCOME

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 30, 2013

Tonasket Founders Day Thursday, May 30th

9 a.m - 6 p.m. - Library Sale 5:30 p.m. - Kids Games at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds

Friday, May 31st

9 a.m - 6 p.m. - Library Sale

Queen Karlie

Photos by Brent Baker

7:00 p.m. - Tonasket Bulls & Broncs Founders Day Rodeo

Saturday, June 1st 7:30 a.m. - Tonasket Freedom 5K @ HS Track 11:00 a.m. - Parade on Main St. Softball Tournament (after parade) 12 - 2 p.m. - Downtown Activities 7:00 p.m. - Tonasket Bulls & Broncs Founders Day Rodeo www.tonasketchamber.com Tonasket Chamber of Commerce supporting local businesses

Good Times!

The Kuhler Bar & Grill Music: Company Band on Saturday, June 1st

Hughes

RODEO Fans & Participants!

Good Luck to all the Rodeo Participants!

GREENHOUSE

– Western Decor –

We grow our plants with TLC!

Lots of Designs to choose from!

 Books  Candles  Children’s Gifts  Quilts  Garden Decor  Antiques & Collectibles

 Salads  Foods to  Deli

LOCATED: ¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496

go

 Sliced Meats  Cold Drinks  More!

7 Days A Week: 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.

212 N. Hwy. 97, Tonasket  486-2183

Roy’s Pharmacy

Enjoy the RODEO!

318 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 486-2149

440 Hwy 7 S., Tonasket 486-2206

SPECIAL Folding Chairs RODEO WEEKEND Saturday, June 1

Lee Frank Mercantile and

Scholz509-486-2105 SPORTING Goods 324 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket

Let’s Rodeo

Only

8.99

$

SKU #8301087

 Bait / Tackle / Ammo  Sporting Equipment  Camping Supplies  Reloading  Hunting & Fishing Lic.  More!

Let’s Rodeo

Welcome Rodeo Fans! The ways of the good ol’ boys and cowboys has been lost and forgotten for many cities and towns, but not Tonasket! The town of Tonasket is the home to many activities from Rodeos to Demolition Derbies to Car Shows. All of which are hosted by The Tonasket Comancheros. A non-profit organization that strives to promote the Western Heritage of Tonasket. Come on down to the little town and join us for any of our events that happen all summer long. Not only can you get a good show, but you can get good food, cold brew and memories that will last a lifetime. For more information please feel free to contact the Tonasket Comancheros. You can also check out our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/tonasketrodeo or send us an email to tonasketrodeoinc@gmail.com.

24 Pack Cube

24 Pack Coors Cubes 12 oz Cans

7.99

$

G RANT’S

MARKE T

18 W. 4th, Tonasket 486-2127

Tonasket VA Clinic

We enocourage everyone to get and enjoy the Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo!

18.99

$

Enjoy the festivities of Tonasket Founders Day!

North Valley Family Medicine will be closed on June 1 (Sat. Clinic), so our staff can participate in the Founders Day Celebration. If you have an emergency, please go to NVH Emergency Room.

We will open Mon., June 3 at 8:30 a.m.

NORTH VALLEY

FAMILY MEDICINE Physician-owned and patient-centered

17 S. Western Ave., Tonasket 486-2174 1617 Main Street, Oroville 476-3631

Tonasket VA Clinic

Open 8:00AM to 4:30PM Located inside North Valley Hospital at 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket PH: 509-486-3107

North Valley Hospital District “Growing Healthcare Close to Home”

Tonasket: 203 South Western Ave. www.nvhospital.org

Ph. 509-486-2151


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 30, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Hyde family and friends performing at Music in the Park last year. The Community Cultural Center is bringing various performers to entertain throughout the summer at Tonasket’s History Park. The first group to preform will be Chanon and the No More Tears Band on Friday, June 21 starting at 6 p.m.

Full schedule of performers this summer

MUSIC IN THE PARK

SUBMITTED BY JANET CULP CCC OF TONASKET

TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket has released its summer schedule for Music in the Park. Dates and performers include: • June 21 - Chanon and No

Market season started at Triangle Park SUBMITTED BY SUZANNE DAILEY HOWARD TONASKET FARMERS’ MARKET

Cool, cloudy weather did little to dampen the spirits of Tonasket Farmers’ Market attendees this past week. As a matter of fact, it was perfect planting weather. Early market sessions are the best place to find plant starts. Using already rooted, leafy plants gives your home garden a head start over beginning from seed. Many vendors offer flowers and vegetable plants, both old favorites and ones you have never even dreamed of. We came in search of tomato and tall phlox plants, found success on both

Not playing hooky BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Where was I a couple of weeks ago when I did not get my copy to the paper? Well...I had the opportunity to attend the Induction Ceremony of the Greater Seattle Bowling Hall of Fame in Seattle at the Nile Country Club. In my “Other Life” I was associated with the Greater Seattle Women’s Bowling Association in one way or another. In about 1970 I took some Free group lesson and was hooked. I bowled in a couple of leagues and entered a

A history lesson of the NVCS SUBMITTED BY JACKIE VALIQUETTE NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

We are not an old program but we do have some history. The community schools program grew from the ideas of community members who wanted to create a multi-purpose community center that would provide youth and adults with educational, recreational and cultural opportunities. Oroville Community Schools began in 2003 with startup funding from The Center for the Future of Public Education, the Okanogan County Community Action Council and The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The program’s purpose was to increase the computer literacy and internet access of the area’s low income population. Technology classes were offered free; all other classes were offered for a modest fee, as they are today. When these startup funds were exhausted, members of the

More Tears band, 6:007:30 p.m., followed by the Ian Macferran Duo, 7:309:00 p.m. July 12 - Ruby Rust (Denny Richardson, Mike Bowling, Steve Bell and Steve Pollard), 6:00-9:00 p.m. July 26 - Hyde Family and

MARKET REPORT counts, and brought home columbines as well. Such a treasure hunt. Stopping at Leaping Sheep Farms booth, we bought a beautiful bunch of leeks, while admiring floral bouquets made on the spot by Ton Rietveldt. In the very next booth, Melanie Thornton’s crusty loaf of fivegrain bread called my name. She bakes many varieties in the European tradition, each tastier than the next. Then a beautiful head of red-leafed butter head lettuce rounded out my meal plan of braised leeks on toast and a side salad. Inspiration for fresh springtime fare abounds. The benefit of purchasing from the farmers’ market is that you get to chat with the growers and

HILLTOP COMMENTS tournament or two and in 1975 was asked if I would like to report the Village Lanes high scores and news to the local Bowling News paper. That was my start in the Bowling Industry that lasted until we moved here to our “Hilltop Paradise.” I worked at Village Lanes for some twenty years and a Sunset Bowl for three years and enjoyed just about every minute of it. At first, I returned once a month to bowl until back surgery got the

THE LEARNING TREE community schools advisory council created a 501C3 nonprofit organization. North Valley Community Schools was born in 2005 and to this day is the only program of its kind in Okanogan County. The Okanogan north valley is too impoverished to fully fund NVCS; hence, substantial support from business and individual donations, and grants, has

friends, 6:00-9:00 p.m. Aug. 2 - SparrOw (Doug Wilson, Mariliz Romano and friends), 6:00-9:00 p.m. • Aug. 9 - Randy Battle Bluz Band and friends, 5:00-8:00 p.m. La Ultima will be on site with Mexican food for sale, and the CCC will provide drinks and goodies by donation. All musicians are donating their time, so a tip jar will be passed at each event. Call Janet Culp (509-4862061) with questions. •

producers, and in turn learn where your food originated and how it was grown, baked or preserved. In asking Mariah Cornwoman about her herbs, I was able to request a chive plant, as mine died over the winter. She did not have any with her, but will bring some to the next market. Now that is personal service. New to the market are Cha Cha Candles, made by Sasha Jones. Sasha and her daughter, Sadie, drew customers to their bright multi-colored jars of yummy smelling scents. All are soybased, burning clean and long, and many feature essential oil scents. There are so many to choose from you are sure to find the perfect one for yourself or for a gift. Give yourself the gift of fresh scents, sights and tastes every Thursday afternoon, 3 p.m.-7 p.m. at Triangle Park in Tonasket. See you at the market!

best of me. Backing up a bit, in 1976 I was also asked if I would help do some calling for Village Lanes and became the League Coordinator. Three years later I was appointed as a Director to the Greater Seattle Women’s Bowling Association and -ater was elected President for a three-year term. About a month ago I received a ballot to vote for this year’s inductees. My dear friend Sandra Nelson received this prestigious award for Meritorious Service. What a grand evening it was, hob nobbing with the past and present winners. What a nice memory. Now, you know that I was just not playing “Hooky.”

always been necessary to continue the program. It has been well received with nearly 350 registrations each year. It’s eight years later and the end of spring quarter. There are eight classes to go in June; here are four of them: Cigar Box Art on June 5 and 12; Junkyard Wind Chimes on Thursday, June 6, Beginning Acrylic Painting on June 7 and 14; and Crepe Paper Flowers on June 10. Call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011, community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu, or www.northvalleycommunityschools.com to register for these creative classes.

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

–Tonasket –

The Windy City!

Windsocks, Wind Spinners, Pinwheels...

BIG SELECTION!

Cheatgrass Performing at Winery

TONASKET MIDDLE SCHOOL POOL FUNDRAISER

OROVILLE – Cheatgrass will be featured on Thursday, May 30 at Esther Bricques Winery tasting room. Cheatgrass is a popular local group that includes members of the Hyde family and Steve Pollard. Doors open at 6 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, call the winery at (509) 4762861.

TONASKET - The Tonasket Middle School will be hosting a fundraiser to raise money for the municipal pool. This event will take place in the U.S. Bank Parking Lot on Saturday, June 1 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. All proceeds will go to the City of Tonasket in hopes of getting the pool open again. The middle schoolers invite everyone to come and dunk Mr. Tyus from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Mrs. Fancher from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. and Mrs. Gliddon from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.

Home run Derby & Softball Tourney TONASKET - The third annual Founders Day Swing into Summer Softball Tournament and Homerun Derby will take place on Saturday, June 1. The Homerun Derby starts promptly at 12:30 p.m. and the softball tourney will start at 1:30 p.m. at the Tonasket Little League fields. All proceeds go to the Tonasket Jr. Baseball and Softball $10 per person for Homerun Derby and $120 per team for tournament. Concessions available. To sign up or for more info contact Shellie Barroca at (509) 322-1375 or Rich Vassar at (509) 341-4485.

Chesaw Wild Great Green Stock Exchange CHESAW - Chesaw Wild Invites everyone to the Great Green Stock Exchange on Saturday, June 1 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the garden next to FIONA, Main Street Chesaw. The even will take place rain or shine and their is no vendor fee to buy, sell or trade anything to do with gardening: Bedding plants, house plants, bulbs, baby trees and shrubs, lawn furniture, yard art, baskets, containers, veggie starts, seeds, tools, fencing and pathway materials, bird and bat houses, etc. Share ideas: Composting, greenhouses, creative watering, drying and preserving, hot and cold frames, raised beds, pest control, propagation, transplanting, etc… There will be Master Gardeners (and local masterly gardeners) on hand to share their expertise, and a display of old tools and how they were used. Coffee, tea and pastries available at FIONA More info: chesaw wild.org or call Sandy at 485-2281 Brought to you by the Meyers Creek Watershed Explorers Club.

National Trails Day Outing & Work Party OROVILLE - The National Trails Day is the first Saturday of June, June 1. The Pacific Northwest Trail Association, Back Country Horsemen and others are holding a work day at the Whistler Canyon trailhead. Tools and safety equipment will be available. It will be a great time to meet new friends and contribute to the success of the trail, say organizers. Work will start at 9 a.m. at the trail head and join in a variety of work groups that will be working at the trailhead, a new sign near Hwy. 97 and also up trail.

Cigar Box Creations OROVILLE – No-one will know that you started with a cigar box when they see your unique and clever creation. Who doesn’t like little boxes? Make

one for a child, as a gift for a friend (with something in it, of course), or for yourself. You will start with paper mache’ and then let your imagination go wild. Add gold or silver paint, old jewelry, coins or whatever you want! This will be a fun and creative class on Wednesday, June 5 and 12. Cigar boxes provided. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, community.schools@oroville.wednet.edu or www.northvalleycommunityschools.com to register.

Latin Jazz Performance at Winery OROVILLE – Sam Howell and Mark Kubiak will be performing “Latin Jazz” at Esther Bricques Winery on Thursday, June 6, 2013. Doors open at 6 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Church Yard Sale OROVILLE - A big yard sale is planned at the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Oroville on Friday, June 7 and Saturday, June 8th from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Beginning Acrylic Art TONASKET – It’s true - everyone is an artist! In this class North Valley Community School students will paint the same piece, but each will have its personal and unique twist. This isn’t just a class – it’s a party! Leave the fear behind and enjoy some creative play as you develop a piece of artwork full of bright colors and whimsical critters. The paints are permanent, so dress for the mess. Sally Howerton of “Hidden Talents” encourages you to come and have fun on Fridays, June 7 and 14. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email community.schools@oroville.wednet.edu, or www.northvalleycommunityschools.com to register.

Taking Orders for Cinnamon Roll Fundraiser’ OROVILLE - The Oroville Catholic Church is taking orders for cinnamon rolls that they will have for Tuesday, June 11 delivery as part of an annual fundraiser. The cinnamon rolls are

PRESCHOOL REGISTRATION

made by John Desjardin and are very generous in size with a caramel topping. Cost is $3 per each roll and will be sold in half and full dozen quantities. To place an order or for more information call Jane Lynch at (509) 476-2177.

Quilt Show in Molson MOLSON - The Second Annual Quilt Show in Molson will take place on Saturday, Aug. 31 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Quilters will be displaying patriotic quilts and military memorabilia from all branches of service. Many of the quilts were created from the proceeds of last years quilt show. Those that would like to like to donate a quilt should contact Vicky Didenhover. Quilts will be on display for peoples’ viewing pleasure, but there will also be a selection of quilts and other sewing related items for sale. Those with sewing related items that would like to have a table to sell items and/or would would like to display a quilt at the show contact Didenhover at (509) 485-3020.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

How to get your item in the paper and online Editor’s Note: Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. G.A.D.

At the

MoVIeS VIeS

Oliver Theatre

Oliver, B.C.

Reg. Showtimes: Sun.-Mon.-Tue.Thur. 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7&9pm

IRonMAn 3

250-498-2277

Pg

SAt. Sun, mon. tueS, thurS, Fri. mAY 30-31 7 & 9:30Pm

STAR TRek InTo DARkneSS SAt. Sun, mon. tueS, thurS, Fri. June 1-2-34,6-7 ShoWS Fri & SAt: 7&9:30Pm

gATSby

Pg

SAt, Sun, mon, tueS. June 8-9-10-11. one ShoWing nightlY At 7:30

OMAK THEATER omAK And mirAge theAterS Are noW digitAl 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

FAST & FuRIouS 6

130 min

Pg13

Action/crime/thriller StArring vin dieSel, dWAYne JohnSon, PAul WAlKer, michelle rodrigueZ. Fri. 6:45, 9:45. SAt. *3:45, 6:45, 9:45. Sun. *4:00, 7:00. WKdAYS 7Pm.

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

STAR TRek

InTo DARkneSS

Is your child ready for preschool?

Oroville Co-Op Preschool is now accepting applications for the upcoming 2013-2014 school season for both the 3 and 4 year old classes. The registration fee is $40.00, but from now until...

May 31, registration is only $30!

For more information, please contact OROVILLE CO-OP PRESCHOOL Joey Bocook at (OROVILLE COMMUNITY & YOUTH ASSOCIATION) Located at 816 Juniper Street, Oroville, WA 98844.

476-3672 or Kathy Smith at 509-322-9889

The OROVILLE CO-OP PRESCHOOL (OROVILLE COMMUNITY & YOUTH ASSOCIATION) admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

Pg13

132 min

Action/Adv/Sci-Fi StArring chriS Pine, Benedict cumBerBAtch, Zoe SeldAnA. Fri. 6:45 & 9:45 Sat.*3:45,6:45 & 9:45 Sun. *4:15, 7:15 WKdYS. 7:15

The hAngoVeR III

comedY StArring BrAdleY cooPer, ed helmS, ZAch gAliFiAnAKiS, meliSSA mccArthY Starts thurs may 23 Fri. 7 & 9:30 Sat.*4:30,7 & 9:30 Sun. *4:45 & 7:30 WKdYS: 7:30pm.

AFTeR eARTh

100 min

r

100 min Pg13

Action/Adventure/Sci Fi StArring Will Smith, JAden Smith, SoPhie oKonedo, Zoe KrAvitZ StArtS Fri: Fri. 6:45 & 9:15 Sat.*4:15,6:45 &

9:15 Sun. *4:30 & 7 WKdYS. 7:00. 27-*4pm

Adults $7.50 Kids 11-under & *Discount Matinee-kids/adults $5 ea

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


MAY 30, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS

MAKING THEIR

STATE

MENTS

Oroville’s SIERRA SPEIKER wins 3200 meter Class 2B state title to pace six local medalists

KAITLYN GRUNST 6th Place, High Jump Oroville (2B) EMILY MILLS 5th Place, 400 Meter Dash Tonasket (1A)

TANNER SMITH 8th Place, 100 Meter Dash Oroville (2B)

LUKE KINDRED 5th Place, Javelin Oroville (2B)

SIERRA SPEIKER 5th Place, 1600 Meter Run Oroville (2B)

BREANNA ERVIN 7th Place, Pole Vault Oroville (2B)

Full coverage, page 2B


Page B2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MAY 30, 2013

SPORTS Speiker’s state title leads the way for Hornets By Brent Baker

Grunst named WIAA athlete of the week

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

CHENEY - The weight of high expectations can sometimes catch a runner with more ease than any human competitor. Oroville’s Sierra Speiker, a heavy favorite to win the Class 2B state 3200-meter title, felt that weight and decided to leave nothing to chance. The Hornet junior, winner of two of the last three state cross country titles, won her first track championship Friday, May 24, at Eastern Washington University to lead five Oroville athletes that brought home six state medals. “It was a great state meet with many incredible athletes,” said Oroville coach Harold Jensen. “Many records were broken in all classifications. “I was pleased that our athletes were part of this festival. Overall we performed very well and came away with medals where we expected.” The Hornet girls finished 17th in the team scoring, which was tightly bunched after the first three spots.

Winning it all Speiker put the rest of the field behind her in the 3200, effectively knocking the remainder of her competitors out of contention before the first lap of the eight-lap race was complete. Staying ahead of those expectations, that was the challenge. “It was kind of hard,” Speiker said of being the season-long favorite. “People had really high expectations for me. It makes me nervous when someone from ‘below’ comes up. I really just wanted to get out there and go.” Battling 45-degree weather and a biting wind, Speiker took a 50-meter lead after the first lap and managed to extend it for most of the race, winning by 24 seconds of Northwest Christian (Lacey)’s Hailey Bredeson with a time of 11:31.74. Despite the chilly conditions and lack of someone close to pushing her, Speiker came within a second of setting a new personal best. It was a far better run than her sixth place finish of 2012, including a time drop of more than 30 seconds. “It was cold,” she said. “It took me awhile to warm up. “I just really didn’t want anyone to be able to catch up to me. My goal was to get out there and stay there.” Speiker also earned a fifth place finish in the 1600, finishing in 5:27 - faster than last year, but one spot off her 2012 fourth place spot. “I just wanted to get on the medal stand in that,” Speiker said. “I wanted to PR (5:20), but that didn’t happen. I was tired, but (Saturday) was a beautiful day to race.” Bredeson won in 5:20.59 in a photo finish over Anna Henry of Northwest Christian (Colbert). Speiker had also hoped to reach the medal stand in the 800, but her time of 2:32.31 left her less than a half second short of qualifying for the eight-runner final heat. She also anchored the 4x400 relay with

OROVILLE - Kaitlyn Grunst became the fourth Oroville athlete to receive WIAA Athlete of the Week honors in Class 2B for the week of May 13 following her performance at the CWL North Sub-district meet. Grunst received the award after taking first place in all four events in which she competed: the high jump, triple jump, long jump and 4x400 relay. She was the fourth Hornet to receive the award this season, following Sierra Speiker and Luke Kindred in the fall and Lily Hilderbrand in the winter.

Above, it might not be his best event, but at times Saturday it was the coolest-looking as Luke Kindred made state in the pole vault after competing in it for the first year in his high school career. Left, freshman Sammie Walimaki races through the rain in the 200-meter dash in her first state finals experience.

Brent Baker/staff photos

Brittany Jewett, Kaitlyn Grunst and Callie Barker, finishing 11th in 4:34.96. Barker had already run both the 100 and 300 hurdles prelims and Grunst had already competed in the triple jump, leaving Jewett with the only fresh pair of legs among the quartet. Speiker, who has always preferred cross country to track, will now return her focus to trail running and preparing for defending her state cross title. “I’ll take a week off, then get back into it,” she said. “I like to run the Whistler Canyon Trail and run up to the Hot Lakes above the (Oroville) golf course. “I definitely like the trails.”

Bringing home the hardware Speiker was far from the only Hornet to bring home a state medal. Also doing so were Luke Kindred in the javelin (5th place, 152-6), Kaitlyn Grunst in the high jump (6th, 5-0); Breanna Ervin in the pole vault (7th-tie, 7-0) and Tanner Smith in the 100 (8th, 12.03). Sammie Walimaki, a late addition to the field as an alternate, finished 13th in the 200-meter dash with a time of 29.18.

Barker competed in the 100 hurdles (16th, 20.36) and 300 hurdles (16th, 54.77). Kindred was less than pleased with his fifth place finish in javelin. He’d been attempting to reach the 160-foot mark all season, which in this year’s field would have made him a state title contender. “I was really disappointed,” he said. “I threw so great in warm-ups the other day. I was shooting for a lot higher, and it just didn’t happen.” Most of his throws hit in the 135-foot range, but he had things clicking on his next-to-last toss that got him his 152-6 measurement. “That one felt pretty good - I was just shooting for my PR at that point,” Kindred said. “It felt great, but it looked like it was going to be terrible (while in the air). So when I heard 152, I was pretty happy.” Strange things happen at state, he acknowledged, especially after watching friend and competitor Mikey Michael of Liberty Bell finish 15th. Michael had beaten Kindred at the regional meet last week. “That was tough,” he said. “I felt really

bad for him. So yeah, it could have been a lot worse. “I was just disappointed I didn’t perform as well as I wanted. But I’ll come back next year, hopefully to win the whole thing. It’ll be good; it’ll be fun.” Kindred also competed in the pole vault, clearing 10 feet and finishing 14th. “I pretty much accomplished what I wanted to there,” he said. “It was just my fifth meet doing pole vault, so I was just happy to find out what state is like.” Grunst, in addition to running a leg of the 4x400 relay, earned a sixth place medal in the high jump and competed in the long jump and triple jump. “I felt pretty good about the high jump,” she said, after hitting 5-0 without any misses before bowing out at 5-2. “Some of those girls were pretty amazing today. I wanted the gold, and I wanted to medal in the long jump.” She didn’t quite medal there - she hit 15-5.5 and advanced to the finals, but was passed up by a couple of girls in the final round of jumping and finished 10th. Grunst leapt 30-5.5 in the triple jump to place 11th.

The triple jump, I was pretty much happy just to be in it,” she said. “In the relay, I thought we did OK, but the competition was pretty tough.” Ervin’s seventh place finish in the pole vault was not something she’d seen coming, even if her jump of 7-0 wasn’t what she’d been shooting for. “I just wanted to try to get to 7-6,” she said. “I wasn’t happy not to get it, but the medal is great.” She actually finished in a four-way tie for seventh, earning the team three-quarters of a point. But she was so surprised at having earned a medal that when the call was made to honor medalists on the podium, she was at the top of the stands with her teammates and nearly didn’t make it in time for podium pictures. “I ran down and they wouldn’t let me on the track -- I had to run all the way around (to the furthest entrance point) to get my picture. I’m glad I made it. “I didn’t do as well as I wanted, but I’m really happy with a medal. And I almost got a full point, too.” Smith, who finished fifth in the opening heat of the 100 on Friday, was surprised just to make it to the final. His heat had been the deeper of the two, so his 11.5 was actually the fifth-fastest time heading into the final. Smith went out fast in the championship heat but faded to eighth over the final strides. Winning the race was James Thompkins of Waitsburg-Prescott, who terrorized Smith and the Hornets during their state football playoff contest last fall. “It felt good to be up there (on the medal podium),” Smith said. “I was really surprised that I got through to today. “My start felt really good. I was happy with that, but I just died in the final stretch. And Thompkins, he’s just really fast.” Smith also competed in the 200, but didn’t advance to the final heat and finished 13th overall (24.99). Kindred and Smith were both already looking forward to football season, in which a senior-laden Hornet team will have some high expectations of their own. “I’m so excited about football,” Smith said. “I can’t wait to get started.”

Mills nabs 5th, 4x400 relay team 10th at 1A state By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

CHENEY - The state 1A track and field finals proved to be a weekend to remember for the small group of Tonasket athletes that earned the right to be there. Emily Mills, Kylie Dellinger, Cassie Spear and Rose Walts went up against the state’s best on Friday and Saturday, May 24-25 at Eastern Washington University. The four of them combined for a 10th place finish in the 4x400 relay, while Mills also ran the open 400 and brought home a fifth place medal. “The relay ran a good race,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “It was the second fastest time they had run all season. It’s quite an accomplishment to be the 10th best team in the state. “Emily had a good meet (too). She ran a great race in the finals; it was her third in two days and she left it all on the track.” Mills had hoped to break into the top four and push her time under the minute mark. Neither quite happened, though she felt a great sense of relief just to get through to the finals. Despite running a personal best of 1:00.24 in the preliminary heat, that was good for only fourth in the heat as two girls broke the minute mark and a third was within hundredths of a second of it. The top three from each heat advanced the finals, as well as the top two additional times, and Mills had one of those. “I was really surprised I made it (to the finals),” Mills said. “I really wanted to get to 59 seconds, and today I was hoping for fourth place.” Neither one of those quite happened. But the seventh-seeded Mills, running in the outside lane, finished fifth in 1:00.61. She beat

Above left, Tonasket’s Rose Walts (left) takes the hand-off from Emily Mills to start the second leg of the 4x400 relay at the state finals in Cheney last weekend; below left, Cassie Spear rounds the curve on the third leg of the relay; below right, Kylie Dellinger battled shin splints while finishing off the event for the Tigers. Above, Emily Mills shows off her state medal after finishing fifth in the 400-meter run.

Brent Baker/staff photos

her seeding by two spots and also edged past one of the girls she’d lost to in the preliminary. “I think state makes you get closer to God,” she said. “It did for

me. I was praying that whole 60 seconds that He would help me keep running faster.” Mills also led off the 4x400, which at regionals had set a

school record and beaten its previous best time by 10 seconds. It would have taken another PR to get through to the finals, which didn’t quite happen. Mills, Spear,

Walts and Dellinger finished fifth in their heat and 10th overall with a time of 4:14.81. Probably costing both the Tigers (as well as some other teams)

was negotiating the congestion in the hand-off zones. The state meet, with so many teams so close together, offers much more of that than at most meets throughout the season, and several of Tonasket’s hand-offs were delayed in the tangle of fast-moving bodies. “State was something to remember,” said Dellinger, who anchored the relay despite running with shin splints. “It was unforgettable. There is so much talent there, it makes me feel good about making it. Running with the other teams gave me confidence!” As it turned out, the Tigers would have needed a new PR to have gotten to the finals as the seventh and eighth-seeded teams each ran 4:11 in the preliminaries. All of the state-qualifying Tigers are eligible to return next year, though Mills is planning on graduating early.

State 1A notes: The Caribou Trail League claimed three state titles and a solid number of medalists. State champions included Cashmere’s Angela Knishka in the 800, Karle Pittsinger of Chelan in the shot put and Kara Staggs of Okanogan in the javelin. A typical performance by Tonasket’s Ethan Bensing in the triple jump would indeed have put him on the medal stand at state - if he’d not been stuck behind three state medalists and unable to claim one of the region’s three state qualifying spots. His regional jump of 40-8.5 would have placed him seventh had he equaled that at state. If he’d matched his PR of 41-11, it would have been good for third. That, of course, is just speculation. The WIAA’s qualifying system precluded the attempt from being made at all.


MAY 30, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page B3

Tigers’ Beyers takes 5th at state

Sports / Schools

Brent Baker/staff photo

Megan Beyers, pictured at a match earlier this year, brought home a fifth place medal from the state tennis tournament last weekend. Submitted photo

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

YAKIMA - Tonasket’s Megan Beyers shook off a first-round loss in the state 1A/2B/1B tennis finals May 24-25 in Yakima to sweep her final three matches and bring home a fifth place medal. Samantha Weeks of Annie Wright defeated Beyers 6-2, 6-1 in their opening-round match. Beyers faced loser-out matches in the next two rounds, but defeated Jamie Skeie of Castle Rock 8-3 and Darby Pierce of St. George’s to advance to the medal round.

In an all-Caribou Trail League fifth place match, Beyers swept Molly Kenoyer of Cashmere 6-1,60 to claim the fifth place medal, while Kenoyer took eighth. The CTL proved its strength in girls tennis over the weekend as Shaylyn Goodall (Omak) took third and Megan Robinson (Chelan) finished fourth as the league swept up half of the available singles medals. In girls doubles, Tasha Kowatsch and Sammy O’Brien of Cashmere defeated Halley Hussinger and Katie Whitten of Cascade in an all-CTL state championship match.

Hughes finishes 13th at golf state finals By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OLYMPIA - Oroville senior Conner Hughes claimed a 13th place finish at the 1B/2B state golf finals at Oakbrook Golf Course. Hughes carded an 89 on the first day to make the cut (the top 21 survived), and improved that with an 86 on the second day for a total of 175. “(That) was better than he scored last year,” said Oroville coach DeHaven Hill. “His goal was to finish in the top 15, which he did. Good job for a three-time state participant.” Ryan Baumgart of DeSales

(which won the team title) took state medalist honors with a 143. Also competing were eighth graders Bryce Glover, who scored a 108 in his one round of play, and Jordyn Smith, who missed the cut in the girls t ou r n am e nt Hughes by two strokes with a 111. “Our eighth graders did a good job,” Hill said. “(They had) a solid round of golf for their first state tournament.”

Celebrating their finish in Math is Cool competition are fourth graders (front row, l-r) Anthony Castro, Logan Clark, (second row) Jaden Rothrock, Yahir Calderon, Clay Buchert, (third row) Diego Maldonado, John Kennedy, Parker Haug and Gersain Valdovinos. They and their teammates finished fourth out of 28 teams in their first taste of regional competition.

Math is Cool for 4th graders, too TONASKET - The Tonasket Elementary School fifth graders may have blazed the trail in Math is Cool competition with their fifth-place trophy a couple of months ago. The fourth grade Math is Cool team managed to one-up their older classmates, if just barely, by bringing home a fourth place trophy (out of 28 teams) in their first regional competition in April. Bo Silverthorn brought home a trophy of his own, finishing in a tie for seventh place out of 134 students. “This was a great way to celebrate higher level thinking skills in students,” said fourth grade teacher Scott Olson, who acted as the team’s coach. “Tonasket can be proud that our students can succeed and triumph when measured on a fair field.” Olson added that he was unsure what would transpire, considering it was the first time Tonasket had entered this particular competition. “I expected to get trounced by the schools who have been doing this for years,” he said. “Our whole team was surprised when they called our name for fourth place. It was great to celebrate academic aptitude in a powerful way.” The team included Silverthorn, Carter Alberts, Josh Bello, Lane Bolich, Clay Buchert, Yahir Calderon, Anthony Castro,

Pool funds sought By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Oroville graduate Catie Arrigoni, shown competing in a cross country meet last fall, won the conference championship in steeplechase and finished third in the 5k for Everett Community College.

Arrigoni wins NWAACC title in steeplechase SPOKANE - Catie Arrigoni (Oroville ’11) dominated the field in the 3,000 meter steeplechase on Monday, May 20, to win what has become her signature event at the Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges championship meet. She finished with a time of 11:27.16 to win by 15 seconds. Arrigoni, a sophomore who is transferring to NCAA Division I Eastern Washington University next year, has a personal best time in the event of 10:59.70 (a conference record), which she ran on April 26 in a meet at the University of Washington. If she had been running at EWU this year, that would put her in the

top 100 of about 250 athletes who have run the event at the Division I level this season. She also ran the 5,000 meter run the following day, finishing third with a time of 18:35.73.

Wirth. “Math is Cool was a great experience,” Malia Whitmore said. “You get to have fun and learn new things at the same time. You take a lot of tests but some are funner (sic) than others. At the end they give out awards. The important thing is try your best and have fun.” Olson enjoyed Tonasket’s underdog status, especially once the trophy-winners were called out. “We walked in the gym and all the other teams had matching team t-shirts,” he said. “It was intimidating. This made the joy even greater to walk up with the kids dressed every which way at the end and get our trophy.”

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Efforts to construct a new swimming pool in Tonasket haven’t yet borne much fruit. Nonetheless, a group of Tonasket Middle School students have decided to lend their own contributions to the effort by hosting a fundraiser for the pool in the midst of the city’s Founders Day celebration on June 1. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the U.S. Bank parking lot at the corner of Whitcomb and Third Street, the middle schoolers will be organizing games and a basketball shoot-off. They’ll also put to use the tried-and-true fundraising ploy - the dunk tank - with a number of teachers and administrators that have agreed to sacrifice themselves for the cause. All proceeds will be donated to the City of Tonasket’s swimming pool fund.

Submitted photo

Bo Silverthorn earned a seventh place trophy for his performance in a field of 134 students at last month’s fourth grade Math is Cool competition. Logan Clark, Parker Haug, Katie Keane, John Kennedy, Diego Maldonado, Rebecka Ornelas, Ariana Parez, Lily Reavis, Jayden

Stirek 8th at state MOSES LAKE - Speaking of the pioneering fifth grade Math is Cool team, one of them was still actively competing as recently as May 18. Cheyenne Stirik, who finished fourth in regional competition in March, brought home an eighth grade medal from state competition in Moses Lake. “This is a huge honor for both her and our district,” said Tonasket principal (and fifth grade coach) Jeremy Clark.

Subscribe to the...

Rothrock, Tyson Sams-Knapp, Kaitlyn Thornton, Gersain Valdovinos, Malia Whitmore, Whitney Wilson and Jeremy

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

An Event for Everyone

In conjunction with Tonasket Founder’s Day Tonasket Freedom 5k (3.1 miles) Community Fun Run Saturday June 1, 2013 - 8:00 a.m. - at Tonasket High School Track OFFICIAL 2013 ENTRY FORM Please Print

First & Last Name:________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address:__________________________________________________________________ Email Address:_______________________________Phone#:_____________________Age:_____

All Proceeds go to Tonasket Water Ranch For more information call: 429-2289 or Visit: www.TonasketWaterRanch.org Mail registration form to: PO Box 254 Tonasket, WA 98855 Make check payable to: Freedom 5k T-Shirt Circle One: Adult T-Shirt Size: Youth T-Shirt Size:

S

M M

L XL L

Registration Fees: Kids in Strollers Free Kids 12 & Under $10 13 - Adult $15 Family of 4 or 5 $40 Family of 6 or more $40 for first 5 & $5 each additional child List additional participants, names, ages & t-shirt sizes on an attached x-tra page.

PLEASE READ & SIGN: In consideration of my entry, I, intending to be legally bound for myself, and anyone entitled to act in my behalf, do hereby release and discharge Tonasket Water Ranch, Tonasket School District, Volunteers, and any and all Sponsors, Contributors and Organizer from any and all liability arising from any illness, injury or damages I may suffer as a result of my participation in the Freedom 5K event. I provide and certify my compliance by my signature below. If participant is under 18 years old, I certify by my signature that the child has permission to participate; is in good physical condition; and that officials may authorize emergency medical treatment in the event of injury or illness. I understand that there is no refund due to me for any reason. This release and waiver extends to all claims of every kind whatsoever foreseen and unforeseen, known or unknown.

Sign & Date: ___________________________________________________________________________________________

Local Sponsors:

NORTH VALLEY

FAMILY MEDICINE

Physician-owned and patient-centered

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE This form brought to you by the Okangoan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Reach 2.8 Million ReadeRs.* YOU NEED – They need Includes Just HELP By Placing One work. WNPA Reach over 2 million readers with many 102 2x2 by Impact skillsStatewide throughout Washington advertisingAd. newspapers yourgjob o sinTaTewIde or TargeT a regIon. 106 Community Newspapers! YOU NEED HELP – They need work. & 33 TMc coastal: 295,000 circ. 678,000 readers over•2 million readers•with many LOW COST ONE CALL ONE BILL publIcaTIons . Reach easteRn: 272,000 circ. 625,000 readers skills throughout Washington by State! advertising Buy a Region or the Entire MetRo 680,000 circ. 1.5 mil. readers* your job in :106 Community Newspapers! Request a free information kit today:

averagIng less Than

12

$

per paper!

*based

2.3

LOW COST • ONE CALL • ONE .BILL 509-476-3602 on sTaTewIde surveys showIng

read each copy of a coMMunITy newspaper

Buy a Region or the Entire State! contact YouR local WnPaRequest a free information kit today: MeMbeR neWsPaPeR 509-476-3602 to leaRn MoRe.

people

*

*

Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000


Page B4 4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MAY 30, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • May 30, 2013

$MBTTJĂ FE %FBEMJOF  /PPO 5VFTEBZ r $BMM  UP QMBDF ZPVS BE

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

www.gazette-tribune.com

Houses For Sale HOUSE IN TONASKET; 2 bedroom, 1 bath, huge yard, partially fenced, garage/ shed. Quiet, clean street, $79,000. 509-322-3015

For Rent Hillside Park Senior Apartments 515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA AVAILABLE NOW! 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

House for rent, July 1st 1 Bed 1 Bath, washer & dryer included. Big yard, close to schools. $500/m, $500 security deposit. No Smokers (509)476-3059 Oroville: 2 bedroom 2 bath apartment. W/D hookup. Good parking. No pets. No smoking. $525/ month + deposit. 509-223-3064 or 509899-2046. Oroville - Studio apartment. $335 a month. Water, sewer, garbage, power included. Call 509-429-3500

www.gazette-tribune.com Tonasket 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, heat pump, single car garage with shop and storage shed. RV parking with dump site and AC power. Covered patio. $98,000. Bill: (509)486-1952

For Rent **** 2 BR, 2 BA APT **** With Heat Pump, Spacious, Deluxe, $595 or 1 BR Apt In Town, $495; Furnished Lake Osoyoos Beautiful Home, 3 BR, 3 BA, $1495; 3 BR, 2 BA, Dbl Grg, $1000 **Call Sun Lakes Realty** (509)476-2121

Happy 75th Birthday!

OROVILLE WATERFRONT HOME Beautiful Views, 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath, Laundry and Craft Rooms. Appliances Included. 1/4 Mile to Town. Large Yard, Fruit Trees, Garden. Pets OK. No Smoking. $775, First, Last and $500 Damage Deposit. 808-783-5152 OROVILLE WATERFRONT HOUSE for rent in Oroville. Enjoy beautiful views from living room or deck of this 3 bedroom, 1 bath home. Laundry room, craft room. Appliances included. Close to town. Large yard, fruit trees, garden area and pets OK. No smoking. $775, first, last and $500 damage deposit. 808-7835152

St. Charles Place Apartments 207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION:

LOW INCOME HOUSING “PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

– Family & Singles –

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

509-476-4057

from your loving family ~

email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

Crosswords

Announcements

Wanted

Garage & Yard Sale

Found

Motorcycles

Help Wanted

Part time Housekeeper needed for resort. Some weekend work. Min wage to start. 509-223-3433

27. Toni Morrison’s “___ Baby�

6. Aims

28. Landlord

7. Cook, as clams

30. 20-20, e.g.

8. Objects of attack

31. Cobblestone

9. Back talk

32. Mortarboard attachment

10. Dental filling

34. ___ vera

11. Catch, as flies

35. Learned

12. Long, slender cigar

39. Miserly

13. Lift

41. Advance

14. Uninhabited

42. Sampler

21. Familiarize

44. At sea

24. Abominable Snowman

45. Absorbed, as a cost

26. Easing of distress

46. Armed ___

29. Short sharp taps on a drum (hyphenated)

54. California border lake 55. Brightly colored perching birds 57. Discontinue 59. Clip 60. Begin

31. Decline 33. “Please be ___.� 35. Mark used to indicate word omissions 36. Arrange in a new position 37. Disrupt

62. Biased (hyphenated)

38. “Silent Spring� subject (acronym)

64. ___ skates

40. Small attractive cave

Across

65. Confrontation (3 wds, hyphenated)

43. Space to maneuver a vessel (2 wds)

1. Most untidy

66. Upright stone with inscribed surface (pl.)

47. Plunder

9. Pronounced “s� as “th�

67. Affected

15. Greek myth maiden who lost footrace 17. Note to help remember 18. Flat surfaces 19. Gator’s cousin 20. Kind of palm 22. Mojave plant 23. Lift to heaven with praise 25. Cheerful

OROVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT has the following positions open:

Miscellaneous

52. Lieu

16. “...but I didn’t ___�

Help Wanted

Head HS Girls Basketball Coach The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Head HS Girls Basketball Coach. Position is open INTERNAL POSTING until filled. Please contact the District Office for an applicaCoaching: tion or available on the disVolleyball Coach – trict’s website at: • High School Assistant www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Coach Tonasket School District, • Junior High 7th and 8th 35 DO Hwy 20 E., grade Coach Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 486-2126. Basketball Coach – • High School Head and An Equal Opportunity Employer Assistant Coach • Boys Junior High 7th Grade Boys Coach THE FAMILY of Raymond J Open until filled. Oliver would like to express a heart felt thank you. First to HAVE SOMETING School Bus Driver - for the North Valley Extended TO SELL? morning and afternoon routes Care Unit for all their wonder(Hours to be Determined afClean out that garage, ful care and concern for Ray ter bidding in the fall) (apspare room or the stuff in during his stay there; for Gary proximately 2.75 hours up to your yard. Bring your items Berg for being a friend and 3.08 hours a day) to Oroville Mini Storage helping with all the arrangeSat, June 1 & Sun June 2 ments; Pastor Randy McAllis- Closes June 5 $10. for a 10x10 outdoor ter for officiating and the space. A central location for many prayers; to the Ameri- Paraprofessional – Para for special educational all the buyers. This sale will can Legion for the use of the be advertised. their building and the ladies speech department Call 509-560-0166 Closes June 5 for their much help organizing To Reserve Your Space the food and cleanup; a spePlease send letter of cial thank you goes out to interest to: Deanna Rowton for helping Oroville School District with the scanning of many (Position Interested In) pictures and the beautiful taBuying Silver, Gold Coins, 816 Juniper Street ble arrangements, they were Collections, Jewelry, Oroville, WA 98844 a big hit, and to her helper Flatware, Guns. Sheila Wooley. Also to everyPaying fair Prices. one that gave big hugs Call Spence (509) 429-4722 whether it be at the post ofLandscape Foreman fice, store or just on the street. We truly appreciate Veranda Beach Resort on the many prayers, flowers, beautiful Lake Osoyoos in cards and delicious foods. Oroville WA, is seeking an inWe are so greatful for living dividual for their landscape in a community that shares in foreman. This position is full our grief, sorrow and many time. This individual must be Oroville memories of my husband, knowledgeable and experi- GARAGE SALE, household, our father and grandfather enced in landscaping, and lots of misc., tools, yard tools, cords, power Ray Oliver..... He will be sod maintenance, with atten- extension equip. Friday & Saturday, missed by many..... We thank tion to the manicured mainteyou, Marilyn, Dan, Diane and nance of this unique commu- May 31st & June 1st, 8am. 108 Chesaw Rd. family. nity. Must be self-motivated with the ability to manage a STORAGE AUCTION crew of 6, being accountable Sat, June 1st, 10 am. to Landscape Supervisor. Pay DOE. Position requires a One 10x10 unit mandatory WA State back140 Chesaw Rd DID YOU FIND AN ITEM ground check & random drug 509-560-0166 AND WANT TO FIND tests. THE OWNER? Found items can be placed Interested parties need to in the newspaper for one submit resume w/ refs to: week for FREE. Limit 15 rhonda@verandabeach.com words, or prepay for words 2008 YAMAHA VSTAR Additional Information: over the 15 word limit. Call 1100/XVS11XB. Black with call Barry at 509-429-1563 509-476-3602 before noon ghost flames, windshield, on Tuesdays. leather bags, two helmets and cover. $5,000 firm. 509476-2514. Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

51. Anger

ANSWERS

Help Wanted

48. Muslim woman’s head covering 49. Second epoch of Tertiary Period

Down

50. Planted in soil 52. Hot spot

1. 1920s wavy hairstyle 2. Forever, poetically 3. Indian turnover 4. Floating film of oil (pl.) 5. “At Seventeen� singer Janis

53. Ritchie Valens hit on the flip side of “La Bamba� 56. Drudgery 58. Hammer part 61. Casual attire 63. “My boy�

www.gazette-tribune.com Irrigation Installation & Maintenance Manager Veranda Beach Resort on beautiful Lake Osoyoos in Oroville WA, is seeking an individual for their Irrigation Installer & Maintenance Manager. This position is full time. This individual must have experience in installation and maintaining irrigation for approximately 13 acres of vineyard and 130 + Cottage sites, with common green area’s; roughly 20 acres. Must be selfmotivated and be able to oversee workers, and accountable to the Landscape Supervisor. Pay DOE. Position requires a mandatory WA State background check & random drug tests. Interested parties need to submit resume w/ refs to: rhonda@verandabeach.com Additional Information: call Barry at 509-429-1563

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF MAY 27, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310 Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Statewides ADOPT: Active, Energetic, Professional Couple years for 1st baby. Sports, Playful pup, Beaches await! Joyce 1-800-243-1658. Expenses paid. EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com BAJILLIONS STILL AVAILABLE for good R.E. Contracts, Notes and Annuities. Receiving Payments? It may be time to give us a call. Skip Foss 800-637-3677. FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS FREE 10� Internet tablet when your order DISH installed free. Free HBO. Offer ends Soon Call for details. 1-866-845-7776. Restrictions apply with approved credit. SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS DRIVER -- One Cent Raise after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. Daily or Weekly Pay, Hometime Options. CDL-A, 3 months OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com DRIVERS -- Tired of Being Gone? We get you Home! Call Haney Truck Line one of best NW heavy haul carriers. Great pay/benefits package. 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices ARC NOTICE IMPORTANT NOTICE: Beginning with your July, 2013, Skyline Telecom invoice, you will notice an increase in the access recovery charge (ARC). The FCC is reducing the amount of support the Company receives from the federal universal service fund by the amount that is raised through the ARC. Under the rules adopted by the FCC, the Company must charge the ARC or lose the funds associated with that charge since that money can no longer be recovered through the federal universal service fund. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 30, 2013. #483914 LEGAL NOTICE NEGOTIATION OF STATE LEASES WITH EXISTING LESSEES BETWEEN JULY AND SEPTEMBER 2013 EXPIRES: NOVEMBER 2013. 10-C69441-GRAZING-GOV LOT 4, SW1/4NW1/4, S1/2SW1/4, SECTION 1; GOV LOTS 1 & 2, S1/2NE1/4, NE1/4SW1/4, SE1/4, SECTION 2; NW1/4, E1/2SW1/4, SE1/4, SECTION 12; N1/2, SECTION 13, ALL IN TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 28 EAST, W.M.; E1/2SE1/4, SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 28 EAST, W.M. Written request to lease must be received by June 30, 2013 at Department of Natural Resources, 225 S Silke Rd, Colville, Washington 99114-9369. Each request to lease must include the lease number, the name, address and phone number of applicant, and must contain a certified check or money order payable to the Department of Natural Resources for the amount of any bonus bid plus a $100.00 deposit. The envelope must be marked “Sealed Bid� and give lease number, expiration date of lease applied for and give applicant’s name. The applicant must be prepared to purchase improvements that belong to the current lessee. Persons wishing to bid to lease any of these properties can obtain more details, bid packet, and qualification requirements by contacting the Colville office or calling (509) 684-7474. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 30, 2013. # ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS CITY OF OROVILLE NORTH END RESERVOIR PROJECT Separate sealed bids will be received by the City of Oroville at the City Hall, located at 1310 Ironwood, Oroville, WA 98844, until 1:30 PM, June 13, 2013, and publicly opened and read aloud at that time.

continued on next page


MAY 30, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune May 30, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Proposals must be submitted on the forms provided in the Contract Documents. Bid bonds in an amount not less than 5% of the amount bid are to be made payable to the City of Oroville. 100% performance and payment bonds will be required from the successful bidder. All work performed on this project will be subject state prevailing wage rates. The City of Oroville reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive technicalities, and in its sole judgement, accept the bid which it deems is in its best interest. Additional bid acceptance and contract award provisions are specified in the Contract Documents. Copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be purchased at the office of Varela & Associates, Inc. for $60 per set (non-refundable, see address above). For additional information regarding this project, contact Jeff Moran at Varela & Associates, Inc., at (509) 328-6066. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 30, June 6, 13, 2013. #483658

624 Central Avenue Oroville, WA 98844 “OCCUPANT” S 618, LLC 618 Central Ave. Oroville, WA 98844 Randy Whrich (Registered Agent) 5 S. Wenatchee Ave., Suite 222 Wenatchee, WA 98801 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee shall, on the 28th day of June, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 A.M., at 149 3rd N., in the City of Okanogan, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, in an amount payable at the time of such sale, the following-described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, towit: Lots 17, 18, 19, 20 and 21, Block 32, Map of Oroville, as per plat thereof recorded in Book “A” of Plats, page 46, Okanogan County Records. Situate in the City of Oroville, County of Okanogan, State of Washington. (Assessor’s Tax Parcel No. 20-10-32-1700) which is subject to that certain Promissory Note (“Note) and Deed of Trust dated June 12, 2011, and recorded on June 16, 2011, under Auditor’s File No. 3164640, records of Okanogan County, Washington, executed by S618, LLC, a Washington limited liability company, as Grantor, to Inland Professional Title, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Samuel R. Peacemaker, as Beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligations in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts, which are now in arrears: DELINQUENT PAYMENTS: Nine (9) monthly payments of $965.02 each of principal and interest (July 2012 - March 2013) $8,685.18 TOTAL: $8,685.18 IV. The principal sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is $98,489.55, together with interest and default interest accrued thereon as shown above, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note, Deed of Trust, or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on the 28th day of June, 2013. The defaults referenced in Paragraph III must be cured by the 17th day of June, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a dis-

continuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 17th day of June, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults, as set forth in Paragraph III, are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 17th day of June, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation under the Note and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. On January 23, 2013, a written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower, Grantor and Guarantors at the following addresses: Name Address S618, LLC 618 Central Avenue Oroville, WA 98844 Stephan A. (“Tony”) Larson 1 9 1 8 Highway 7 Oroville, WA 98844 Randy Whrich (Registered Agent) 5 S. Wenatchee Ave., Ste. 222 Wenatchee, W 98801 Brian Larson 624 Central Avenue c/o bVisual, U.S.A. Oroville, WA 98844 by first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above on the 25th day of January, 2013, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor, and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor, of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. X. NOTICE TO GUARANTORS (1) The guarantor may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the Trustee’s Sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust; (2) the guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the grantor in order to avoid the Trustee’s Sale; (3) the guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the Trustee’s Sale; (4) subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington Deed of Trust Act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce

a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the Trustee’s Sale, or the last Trustee’s Sale under any Deed of Trust granted to secure the same debt; and (5) in any action for a deficiency, the guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the Trustee’s Sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit its liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the Trustee’s Sale, plus interest and costs. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. DATED this 19th day of March, 2013. Christopher S. Crago, Successor Trustee

717 West Sprague Avenue, Suite 1200 Spokane, WA 99201-3505 STATE OF WASHINGTON ss. County of Spokane I certify that I know or have satisfactory evidence that Christopher S. Crago is the person who appeared before me, and said person acknowledged that he signed this instrument and acknowledged it to be his/her free and voluntary act for the uses and purposes mentioned in the instrument. Dated: March 19, 2013. Print Name: Christy Ann Risley Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, residing at Spokane, WA My commission expires: March 18, 2017 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on May 30, June 20, 2013. #467177

8

Easy, difficulty rating 0.40 Sponsored by

3

9

509-476-3602

1

4

9

2

8

6

7

3

7 2 8 4 1 5

9 4 3 1 5 2

1 8 5 3 7 6

2 7 6 8 9 4

4 1 9 7 2 8

3 6 2 5 4 9

4

8

7

5

8

7

5

6

6

3 1

2

Puzzle 22 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

3 8

2

7

6

3

4

9

1

5 9

4

7

2

2 1 3

Construction 6

5

4

8

1

7

2

3

8 6 5 9

4 6 8 1 7 9 5

5 6 1 3 9 7 2 8 4

9 7 8 5 4 2 3 6 1

8 3 2 7 5 9 1 4 6

1 5 7 2 6 4 9 3 8

9

9

7

5

3

8

4

2

6 4

9

2

8

7

1

1

3

5

7

1 5 3 6 9 2

6 8 7 4 5 1

1 4 7 2 5 9 6 8

okanoganconstruction.com 8

6

4

2

3

8

2

9

5

8 6 1 3 7 4 9

7 3 4 5 2 6 1

6 5 2 1 9 8 4 3 7

4

4

9

1

6

5

8

6

1

8

3

7

2

4

“Quality You Can Depend On”

8

6

5 1 4

LAWRECS928P3

2

7

9 1

Storage

5 8

3 9 6

9 2 7 8 5 6

1 9 5 7 6 8

6 3 5 4 9

8 3 2 1

6 1 8 2 9 5

Storage

4

3 4

4 2

1 7

6 5

7 3

4 7 9 6 8 3 2 1

Lakeside

2

7

1

3

8

9

4

5

3 9 4 7

5 9 8 3 1

7 8 6 1 2 5

5

1

3

9

1

4

2

5

4

6

9

7

8

3

2

6

6

8

3

9

4

7

7

2

1

5

9

4

9 5 2 1 3 8 6

5

7

7

6 3 7 1

7 9 8 4 3

8 2 1 3 5

5

6

7

3

4

9

8

2

9

4

3

9

5

8

2

6

9

1

7

2

1 4 7 5 6

2

5 9 8 4

2 5 1 6

6 4 9 7

1

7

6

8

2

5

3

1

4

3

1

7

6

4

8

5

8 2 3 9

Puzzle 20 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

4

4

3

1

3

1

7

6

6

9

2

8

8

2

9

7

5

5

6 9

5

2

7

9

8

2

3

8

5

7

1

6

4

2

1

3

5

6

4

7

8

9

7 1

3 2

4 3

2

5

7

8

8

9

5

6

5 3

4 6

6 7

4 8

1 9

8 1

9 4 5 3

1 9

7

2

1

8

2 6

9

3

4

7

1 4 3 5 6 2

Puzzle 17 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

5

6

3

8

2

7

1

1

7

9 5

3 1 4 8 7

5 2 4 6

STORAGE Puzzle 13 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.38)

6 9 5

3

2 7 8 3 5

1 8 7

4

1 4 9 7 8

9 1 6

6

5 6 3 9 2

5 2 3

1

8

7

9

3

6

5

2

6

4

1

8 7 4

7

9

4 2 1 5 3

3 2

2

9

9

4

6

5 1 8 9 6

3

2

5

4

1

8

5 7 9 6 2 3 4

6 8 2 3 7 5 1

3 2 1 8 6 7 5

7 3 6 4 9 1 2

6 2 1 9 7 5 4 8 3

1 5 8 6 4 7 3 2 9

2 3 4 1 8 9 5 6 7

7 6 9 5 3 2 1 4 8

Puzzle 24 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.35)

7

8

1

2

6 7 4 5 3

9 2 3

4 3 5 6 1

6 8 4 5 9

2 5 9 3 6

3 1 7 8 2

1 7 3 9 5

5 4 8 1 7

9 2 6 4

5 4 6 8

8 9 2 7

1 3 7 2

7 1 8 4

4 6 9 5

2 8 4 6

6

8

2 3 9

3 7 5 1

Puzzle 21 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

8 1 7 9 5 6 4 2 3

6 5

9 2

3 9

4 7

5 8

7 6

1 4

2

3 8 2 4 9 1

4 7 1 3 8 5

1 2 6 7 5 4

2 5 3 8 6 9

6 4 9 1 3 7

9 3 4 2 1 8

8

3

6 7 5 2 3

5 1 8 9 7

7

6

8

1

2

5

9

6 4

Puzzle 18 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.31)

4 8

4 1

3

2

2

2 9

9

Puzzle 16 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

(509) 476-2929 3

6

2

4

Puzzle 23 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

Puzzle 19 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

Remodeling? Time for an Update, Addition or Deck? Check Us Out Online! 3

1

7

8 7 6 9

Puzzle 14 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

MORGASE983JS

2

5

8

Cell: (509) 322-4777

7

6

3

4

509-422-3621

1

8

3 9 8 7 6 4 2 1

5 2 4 9 1 8 3 6

6 1 7 3 5 2 9 4

9 4 3 2 8 5

7 6 1 4 3 9

2 8 5 1 7 6

1 3 6 8 9 7

4 5 9 6 2 3

1 7

8 5

4 3

5 2

7 8

8 7 2 5 4 1 6

5

7

8

6

2

9

4

1

9 3

Puzzle 15 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

Pumping Installation  Portable Toilets  Septic

6

5

509-486-4320

 Septic

5

4

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc.

Thank you for your continued support!

9

9

Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

8

9

Over 25 Years experience!

6

3

4

— Fred Cook —

8

10 Years Experience • Licensed & Insured New Construction • Remodeling • Development

Septic Service

Excavation and Septic Service

3

8

7

1

Got Water?

1

2

8

chelm@gazette-tribune.com

7

476-3602

3

Call Charlene Helm For Rates & More Info

4

• Affordable Full Color ads • Weekly exposure in newspaper and online

7

Professionals Advertise

1

Service & Trades

3

Advertise where the

5

Service & Trades

8

Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

8

11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

2

We Work Saturdays!

 Installed

7

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688

Garage Doors

6

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

3

&

9

Installed Insulation

6

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

4

OSOYOOS READI-MIX

Pumps

2

Insulation

5

Concrete

9

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

1

P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

2

Seats  Headliners  Door Panels Convertible tops / Vinyl roof covers — Auto & Small Engine Service — We Do Tire Repair & Balance! 124 Chesaw Rd, Oroville 509-476-2611

9

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

HOURS: Mon. - Sat., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

6

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

Oroville Building Supply  Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

7

ANSWERS

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

1

7

Auto & Upholstery

4

1

7

3

8

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

3

Midway Building Supply

33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

9

6

4 9

3

Busted Knuckle

5

9

5

509-486-2692

Quality Supplies Since 1957

4

1

Licensed & Bonded

Civil Criminal

Attorney at Law

1

3

- 24 Hour Service -

RYAN W. GUNN

All of your Automotive & Upholstery needs

8

4

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Building Supplies

8

1

2

Rick Edwards

Auto / Upholstery

6

6

Edwards Refrigeration

Attorney

www.gazette-tribune.com

6

7

Air Conditioning

3

9

Notice of Trustee’s Sale PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 RCW Grantor: S618, LLC, a Washington limited liability company Successor Trustee: Christopher S. Crago, of the Law Offices of Paine Hamblen, LLP Beneficiary: Samuel R. Peacemaker Abbreviated Legal: Lot 17 Through 21 Blk 32 Oroville Full Legal on: Page 2 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 20-10-32-1700 Prior Document Reference No.: 3164640 TO: S618, LLC, a Washington limited liability company (Borrower) 5 S. Wenatchee Ave., Suite 222 Wenatchee, WA 98801 Stephan A. (“Tony”) Larson (Guarantor) 1918 Highway 7 Oroville, WA 98844 Brian Larson c/o bVisual, U.S.A.

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 22 (Easy, rating 0.40) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

6

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES AUTO AUCTION June 7, 2013 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 509-476-3948 Viewing time : 10:00 AM Auction: 11:00 AM 1990 Dodge D2 PU License # WA B16728L Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 30, 2013. #484202

Subscribe to the...

Sudoku

8

NOTICE The Oroville Housing Authority’s regularly scheduled board meetings will now be held at 617 Hwy 97 at the Housing Authority Main Office. The June 12th board meeting is being rescheduled for June 19th. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 30 and June 6, 2013. #484995

1

The CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be examined at the following locations. 1. City of Oroville, 1310 Ironwood, Oroville, WA 98844 (509) 476-2926 2. Varela & Associates, Inc., 601 W. Mallon Ave. Suite A, Spokane, WA 99201 (509) 328-6066 3. Various plan centers - call Varela & Associates or visit www.varelaengr.com for list. The proposed work generally includes the following: Site clearing and grubbing Earthwork including excavation and removal of the existing material to the extent necessary to fit the reservoir and a 5 ft. walkway all around as shown on the plans and specifications Slope stabilization blanket and hydroseeding of the 1:1 cut slope Rock removal and offsite disposal of rock within the tank area, tank foundation area and walkway area around the reservoir Design and installation of the foundation to support the approximate 220,000 gallon potable water reservoir with 2 ft. thick gravel pad under the foundation Design, fabrication and installation of an approximate 25’ height by 40’ diameter, minimum 220,000 gallon AWWA D103 Bolted Steel Factory Epoxy Coated reservoir including ladder, exterior level gauge, vent, inlet pipe, outlet pipe, drain and overflow pipe, and appurtenances Removal and replacement of a portion of the existing chain link perimeter fencing and gate Furnish and installation of a 4’ PVC foundation drain pipe Furnish and installation of 8’-12’ ductile iron site piping including inlet piping, outlet piping, drain and overflow piping, valves and fittings Furnish and installation of a pre-cast concrete valve vault and 10” -12” pipe, fittings and valves as shown in the plans and specifications Furnish and install approximately 900 lineal feet of 12” PVC transmission main including pipe, valves, fittings and appurtenances Two connections to the existing Border Patrol Station including pipe, valves, fittings and appurtenances Removal and disposal of the existing concrete valve vault and connection of the existing reservoir to the new site piping Connection of the new 12” transmission main to the existing 6’ reservoir outlet line and 4’ reservoir inlet line Improvements to the existing overflow/drainage ditch Gravel surfacing and cover crop seeding Installation of (2) 2” electrical conduits paralleling the transmission main The project is located at the City of Oroville’s existing North End Reservoir Site located approximately 3.5 miles north of the City of Oroville’s City limits, and approximately 1/4 mile west of US Route 97 (see Vicinity Map on Sheet 1 of the Drawings). Oroville is located 41 miles north of the City of Omak on US Route 97 in Washington State

Public Notices

5

Public Notices

Public Notices

4

continued from previous page

Page B5 5

Boat, RV & More! Weatherization with lease Rent unit for project  Contractors store tools / product  Additional Business space available  

Located at: 124 Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-421-7168 lakesidestoreit@gmail.com

OROVILLE

“YOU” in white

Mini Storage & U-Haul

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power n Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

www.orovilleministorage.com

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

Want to get noticed? Call today!

Well Drilling

Looking for something?

“The Water Professionals”

D

Check out the Business & Service

irectory

To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Water

Well Drilling  Free Water Analysis Systems  Zimmatic Pivots Treatment  Hydrofracturing  Full Service Store  Geothermal Heat Loop  Free On-Site Estimates Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic  Pump  Water

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com


Page B6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | May 30, 2013

Cops & Courts District Court Ronald Allard, 51, of Okanogan, was charged with hit-and-run with an attended vehicle. Shawn Best, 52, of Omak, was charged with two counts of DWLS third. He received a $268 fine. Frank Bigwolf, 35, of Omak, was charged with DWLS third. He was found guilty and received five days confinement and a $658 fine. Tony Caddy, 45, of Tonasket, was charged with outdoor burning of a prohibited substance. He was found guilty and received a $200 fine. Andrea Calico, 33, of Oroville, was charged with DWLS third. Alfonso Cardenas, 55, of Omak, was charged with violation of a no contact order. Martin Castro, 49, of Tonasket, was charged with burning a prohibited outdoor substance. Richard Hester, 49, of Oroville, was charged with two counts of DWLS third. He was found guilty and received two days confinement and a $1,176 fine. Andrea Jones, 22, of Omak, was charged with two counts of criminal trespassing second. She was found guilty and received a $400 fine. Shannon Kiser, 24, of Omak, was charged with failure to transfer a title within 45 days. Tosh Mason, 25, of Tonasket, was charged with possession of wildlife. He was found guilty and received one day confinement and a $558 fine. Sharon Moses, 26, of Omak, was charged with attended hit-andrun and two counts of DWLS second. She was found guilty and received two weeks confinement and a $250 fine. Wade Reddington, 40, of Okanogan, was charged with DWLS third. He was found guilty and

received five days confinement and a $658 fine. Enrique Ortega, 23, of Tonasket, was charged with DWLS third. Catherine Welsh, 60, of Tonasket, was charged with two count of operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock and DWLS third. She received a $500 fine.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE

Johnathon Weber, 24, was booked for assault fourth. Wednesday, May 22, 2013 Near Tonasket, on Hwy. 20, a chainsaw was taken from a resident’s shed. A portable air compressor was taken as well. Keith Sartain, 52, was booked for assault third and felony harassment. Casey Nations, 30, was booked for a detainer. Christopher Brown, 28, was booked for intimidating a witness and felony harassment.

Superior Court Decrees of Dissolution

Tina Turk dissolved her marriage from Jeffry L. Turk.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings

Thursday, May 23, 2013 In Omak, on East Parkway St., a riding lawnmower was taken sometime overnight. The key was left behind. David Scheel, 31, was booked for malicious mischief third and criminal trespassing first. Zachary VanBrunt, 33, was booked for DUI.

Monday, May 20, 2013 In Riverside, on Sunset Lakes Rd., a beige Toyota pickup was taken from the residence during the night. The vehicle was not running and had to have been towed away. In Riverside, on Thompson Road, a resident’s cabin at Crawfish Lake, was burglarized. It is unknown when. The door was damaged and left open. Lisa Oliver, 40, was booked for a document hold. Arron Fellers, 20, was charged with possession.

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church? To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

Key:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Tuesday, May 21, 2013 In Okanogan, on Seventh Ave. South, a food stamp card was stolen. In Oroville, on Eastside Road, there was a burglary at a business via a broken window. North of Tonasket, on Crumbacher Rd., there was an unallowed vehicle reported on the premises. Police arrived and found no such vehicle. Joshua Moore, 25, was booked for assault fourth and theft third. Nicolas Clerk, 21, was booked for child rape third.

OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

Find The Right

HOME

If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you. Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

1422 Main St. Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 888-838-3000

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

Sandy & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

$214,000 – 10.55 acres – Lot 9 & 10 Thorndike Loop Rd, Oroville: 10.55 level, irrigated acres near Osoyoos Lake. Bureau Irrigation water runs about $130 an acre yearly and the property is currently in producing Alfalfa hay. Approx 400’ from the lake. There is a cabin on the property just used for storage. Well share ifyou desire it but the city water & sewer runs in the street by the property. Located just 3 miles from the Town of Oroville and a mile from the Veranda Beach Resort. This property would be a wonderful place to build your dream home. NWMLS#456141

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday School is at 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

Church of Christ

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

509/476-3378

Chesaw Community Bible Church

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Trinity Episcopal

Seventh-Day Adventist www.windermere.com

CHESAW

LOOMIS

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

Loomis Community Church

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville  509-476-4444 – Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon –

Beautiful new construction home with expansive views of the valley!

Situated on 1.43 acres, plenty of space featuring a master bedroom on the ground floor and 2 bedrooms upstairs. Attention to detail! Good access from paved road. Come see for yourself! MLS#489214 $205,000

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

H I L LT O P R E A LT Y

SMALL RANCH Havillah area.633 acres as per county. Has been used for livestock grazing for several years. Some acreage was farmed at one time. Small ponds for water. Seasonal Creek on South side. Borders State and National Forests on South side. Small single wide home. Old farm buildings. Excellent access. 22 miles to Tonasket and 22 miles to Oroville. Good domestic well. Some Beautiful Building Sites w/views. Excellent hunting area. Use for your private retreat, or build a Lodge for hunting and recreation. Owner moving to town. Priced Right - $791,000.00 – See pics on website – Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest sports, business, entertainment, local news and more.

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA SUN 509-476-2121 LAKES Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool REALTY

OKANOGAN VALLEY

New On The Market

IMPECCABLE LAKE OSOYOOS HOME

Wonderful Styling w/Granite Kitchen, Open Concept Living Plus 2 Bedrm/2 Bath Guest Cottage. Beautiful Beach & Landscaping. Call Today For Private Showing $549,000

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 or 888-838-3000 www.gazette-tribune.com


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 30, 2013

GRAD

Your family, friends, community and local businesses wish all Oroville and Tonasket Graduates the very best of luck!

PAGE C1


PAGE C2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 30, 2013

Tonasket Class of 2013 Sat., June 8th, 2013 at 2 p.m. Tonasket High School Gymnasium

Class Color: Blue & Black Class Flower: White Carnations Class Song: “See You When I See You” by Jason Aldean

Brent Baker / Staff Photo

Claire Thornton Beyers Central Market Place

ia n Va le d ic t o r

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Geoff & Dianne Thornton High School Activities: Cross Country, Tennis, FFA, ASB Plans After Graduation: Attend Washington State University Other: Favorite Teacher: Goyette, Deebach, Swanny, Mrs. Colbert. Memory: Homecoming BBQ!

Jose Hernandez Merida Beyers Central Market Place

Parent(s): Jose Hernandez and Leticia Merida High School Activities: M.E.C.H.A Club President for 3 years, FCCLA Plans After Graduation: Attend Spokane Community College for two years then transfer to Eastern and major in Criminology. Other: Favorite Teacher: Mrs. Grove

Megan Beyers Jesus Alvarez Beyers Central Market Place Beyers Central Market Place

S a lu t a t o r ia

Tonya Nelson

James Olson Levine Plumbing

Kelsie Kalma Grant‛s Market

Superior Auto Parts

Parent(s): Camilla Josh & James Olson High School Activities: FFA and Trapshooting Plans After Graduation: College

Parent(s): Chris and Lisa Kalma High School Activities: Softball, Volleyball, Yearbook, and Powder Puff Football Plans After Graduation: Go to college in Spokane or Everett and start my Nursing career. Other: High School Memory: When Courtney Jones clothes lined herself!

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Teri and Steve Nelson High School Activities: FFA and Basketball Plans After Graduation: Going to Wenatchee Valley College in Omak to become and X-Ray Tech. Other: Every Friday we had a BBQ in the parking lot.

n

Parent(s): Lana & Paul Beyers High School Activities: Tennis, Basketball, Volleyball, Soccer, Cross Country, ASB, T-Club, Link Crew, FFA, FBLA, Young Life, Gear-Up Tutor Plans After Graduation: Attend a 4 year university, most likely Pacific Lutheran or Whitworth University Other: I love fruit!

Lynn Hendrix Hidden Treasures

Parent(s): Laverne Hendrix High School Activities: Soccer, Choir, Flag Corps Plans After Graduation: I plan to become and English teacher so I am going to California to live with my family and go to college to earn my degree Other: Sanity is but a dream

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Eduardo Alvarez High School Activities: Varsity Soccer and Football Plans after Graduation: Attend the University of Washington in Bothell and major in Business Management

TONASKET 12 Year Seniors


PAGE C3

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 30, 2013

We’ll Find A Way Or We’ll Make One Kelly Cruz Gricelda Celestino Flores Gracie Maldonado Beyers Central Market Place Beyers Central Market Place Smith & Nelson

Raven Goudeau

Angela Jones

Courtney Jones

The Split End

Allen‛s Auto Parts

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Ferriol Celestino and Maria E. Flores High School Activities: M.E.C.H.A and FCCLA Plans After Graduation: Attend Spokane Community College and after two years, transfer to EWU or CWU and major in Criminal Justice Other: Favorite Teacher: Mrs. Grove

Parent(s): Michael & Rocio Goudeau High School Activities: Basketball, Band 9th, MECHA Club 9th Plans After Graduation: I plan to attend college and to become a Marine Biologist.

Parent(s): Roberta & Glenn Jones High School Activities: Softball Plans After Graduation: Go to University of Washington and become a Financial Manager.

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Gene and Brenda Jones High School Activities: Varsity Softball all 4 years Plans After Graduation: Attend Spokane Community College to obtain my Associates degree in Nursing to become a registered nurse. Then plan to further my education.

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Pablo and Maria Cruz High School Activities: Varsity Soccer, Basketball, Tennis, Track and Field, T-Club, Link Crew, FFA, ASB, Young Life, Honor Roll, Upward Bound Plans After Graduation: Attend Wazzu and double major in my career interests. Study abroad and of course play some more soccer until I can’t play no more! Other: Favorite Book: “The Lucky one” by Nicholas Sparks, Teachers: Pilk, Broman, Mitchell, Deebach, Food: Lasagna, High School Memory: 2 Time Defending Powderpuff Champs, Quote: “She is clothed with strength and dignity and laughs without fear of the future” -Proverbs 31:25

Emily Mills

Hughes Greenhouse

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Aristeo Maldonado and Evelia Maldonado High School Activities: FFA President, Student government, M.E.C.H.A, Varsity Tennis, ASB officer 3 years, FFA District Officer Plans After Graduation: Attend Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington Other: Favorite Teacher: Mr. Deebach, Memory: School parking lot BBQ

La Ultima

Austin Booker Beyers Central Market Place

Hair Designz

Family Health Center

Parent(s): Darin and Melissa Mills High School Activities: Track and Field, Soccer Plans After Graduation: Attend Spokane Community College or Glen Dow Beauty Academy in Spokane.

Marilu Morales

Gold Digger Apples, Inc.

Jake Barton

North Valley Hospital

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Julian Morales and Estela Morales High School Activities: Volleyball (9th), Track (9th) Plans After Graduation: Go to Wenatchee Valley College in Omak and work. Other: I want to thank all my teachers I once had and for pushing me to graduate and for my family for being a great support.

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Eric and Sasha Jones, Ken and Renae Long High School Activities: Active member of the FFA, 2 year Powder Puff champion, Varsity Volleyball (3 years), Varsity Softball (4 years), having Senioritis since Freshman year. Plans After Graduation: To be as successful as possible in whatever I actually choose to be and while in college I want to keep my GPA up. Other: Favorite Memory: All the ridiculous things we have done, not only as high schoolers but as seniors. We have been competitive in Homecoming (and have had the first place title for 2 years), barbecuing at lunch, building benches in to forts, and much more!

Parent(s): Ed and Daphne Booker High School Activities: Football, Wrestling Plans After Graduation: College and Military Other: Favorite Teachers: Pilk, Swanson, Rader, G, Mitchell

Brandon Holton Hughes Greenhouse

Becky Biernacki Smith & Nelson

Parent(s): Kristine & Clark West High School Activities: Soccer, Flag Corp, and Bend Bowling Club Plans After Graduation: College Other: Favorite Teacher: Mr Swanny and Ms. Lind

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Jim and Denice Hires High School Activities: 3 years Basketball, 4 years Varsity Soccer, 3 year T-Club member Plans After Graduation: Possibly go to SCC and study Criminal Justice then go into Law Enforcement Other: Favorite Memory: My junior year when we beat Okanogan in Soccer by one goal.

Quinn Mirick Beyers Central Market Place

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Toni and Mike Hennerman High School Activities: 4-H, FFA, Miss Tonasket Rodeo 2013, Volleyball, Basketball, Track and Field, T-Club, Junior Class Secretary, Senior Class VP, Junior Prom Committee, Showing a horse at Okanogan County Fair, Washington State Fair contestant with my horse. Plans After Graduation: Attend community college, representing Tonasket as Miss Tonasket Rodeo 2013, and also continuing to hold a job. Other: Favorite Quote: “Courage is being scared to death, but saddling up anyway!”-John Wayne

Michaela Newton Levine Plumbing

Devan Utt OK Chevy

Breanna Howell Allen‛s Auto Parts

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Grant and Judy Mirick High School Activities: Wrestling, Soccer, Freestyle Wrestling, Football, FFA Other: I couldn’t fix your brakes, so I made your horn louder.

Oscar Avilez Bob Raymer‛s Machine Works

Tashia West Beyers Central Market Place

Parent(s): Shane Barton and Mikki Lewis Plans After Graduation: To move to Spokane, find a job, and build cars on my down time. Other: Promise me…..

Karlie Hennerman Allen‛s Auto Parts

Sadie Long

Brianda Polito

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Cesar and Elidia Polito High School Activities: Soccer (9th) and M.E.C.H.A Plans After Graduation: Go off to college Other: Favorite Quote: “Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in raising everytime we fall.” –Confucius

Brayson Hires

RDL Auto Services

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Dave Utt and Clara Bradshaw-Utt High School Activities: Varsity Volleyball, Basketball, Track and Field, Band, Tiger Mascot, T-Club, Okanogan County Fair Participant, Middle School Volleyball Coach (Senior Project) Plans After Graduation: Go to college and continue with sports. Get a career in Athletic Training. Other: “Can’t play with the big dogs, stay on the porch.” –Too Short

Brandon Birdsong Lee Frank Mercantile

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Marcie and Kyle Howell High School Activities: 4-H, FFA, Miss Omak Stampede 2013, Okanogan County 4-H Camp Counselor, Junior Prom Committee, 4-H Horse Shows, Okanogan County Fair Horse, WA State 4-H Fair Horse Plans After Graduation: Attend Montana State University with the intent to major in Equine Science.

Sierra Hughes

Hughes Greenhouse

Ky Williams

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Randall & Teresa Newton High School Activities: Tennis, FFA, 6th Grade Camp Counselor, Multiple Volunteer Activities, FullTime Running Start Student, Honor Roll, Deans List (WVC), Presidential List (WVC) Plans After Graduation: Transfer with A.A.S. Degree to Whitworth University and start my major in Counseling/Psychology Other: I am an employee at Rooster’s Espresso.

Sarina McBride

12 Year Senior Christina‛s Buy, Sell & Trade Parent(s): Andres & Veronica Avilez High School Activities: Cross Country, Basketball, Soccer Plans After Graduation: Military/Navy Other: Riding Go Karts and Laser Tag!

Wyatt O’Brien Grant‛s Market

OK Chevy

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Stanley Biernacki-Father, Katrina Biernacki-Mother, Martin Elliot-Step-father High School Activities: Band, FCCLA Plans After Graduation: Move to Wenatchee and see where that takes me Other: Favorite Teacher: (Retired) Patti Middleton

Parent(s): Jana Ewing and James Williams High School Activities: Football, Basketball, Track Plans After Graduation: Go to SCC

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Glendia & Joe Birdsong High School Activities: Essential Espresso Plans After Graduation: Military/ Marines Other: Just like the lion, you got to make each day the way you want it to be.

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Teresa Hughes High School Activities: Proud to be a 4 year FFA member. Plans After Graduation: Attend Spokane Community College and be the best that I can be. Other: I can’t wait to graduate from high school so I can complain about college.

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Jay and Shannon O’Brien High School Activities: 4 years FFA, ASB, Varsity Soccer, 1 year Varsity Cross Country Plans After Graduation: College, still deciding where Other: Parking lot BBQ’s on Fridays

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Charlene Kennedy High School Activities: Varsity Girls Soccer, FFA Plans After Graduation: Attend Wenatchee Valley College to pursue my nursing and business degrees. Other: Favorite Teacher: Anita, Delfino, Braman, Quote: “She’s strong willed and independent. She’ll never take no for an answer; and when she’s told she can’t do it cause she’s a girl, she’ll prove you wrong everytime. She loves the thrill of the ride, and the romance of adventure.”


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 30, 2013

PAGE C4

Tonasket Class of 2013

Joel Cosino

Superior Auto Parts

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Gregorio and Faviana Cosino High School Activities: Wrestling, Soccer Plans After Graduation: Move away. Would love to get a mechanic job and live life! Other: Mr. Robeck and Mrs. Fancher are the best teachers ever!

David Hylton

Midway Building Supply

Johanna Wilcox

Family Health Centers

Ameerah Cholmondeley Family Health Center

David Williams

Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op

Parent(s): John & Kirsten Williams High School Activities: Track and Field, Football, Lawn Chair enthusiast and becoming a Pokemon Master. Plans After Graduation: Eastern Washington University Other: “It’s always been a dream of mine to have as many Tour de France titles as Lance Armstrong, now that dream has come true.” – Anonymous

Devin Hamilton Bob Raymer‛s Machine Works

Parent(s): John Hamilton, Jeanette Hamilton, Rusti Douglass High School Activities: Tonasket HS Band, FFA, most HS activities had to do with music. Plans After Graduation: Eventually I will go to a university, interested in field careers of Aviation/ Auto-Mechanics and of Music. My preference would be a Christian University. Other: Favorite Teacher: Kathleen Blair (Orchestra), Favorite Band: War of Ages (Christian Metalcore)

Kayla Davis

Levine Plumbing

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Kelly and Mona Davis High School Activities: FFA Plans After Graduation: Go to Wenatchee Valley to be a welder and train horses

Ryan Dejong OK Chevy

Jessica Puente

Tonasket Pizza Company

Parent(s): Juan & Maria Puente High School Activities: FFA, FCCLA, MECHA, Link Crew, Cross Country, Track and Field, Freshman class officer, Class representative, Club representative, Honorable Caribou Trail Plans After Graduation: Attend a university of my choice and get a job Other: Favorite Memory: Going to FFA State my Freshman year.

Dalton Wahl

Baker‛s Acres Nursery

Hans Rabenold Grant‛s Market

Allison Webster Superior Auto Parts

Shea Smith

Parent(s): Barbara Burbank and Louis Dejong High School Activities: FCCLA, Cross Country, Tennis Plans After Graduation: Get a job

North Valley Hospital

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Gordon & Leilani Cholmondeley High School Activities: FCCLA, Basketball Plans After Graduation: Go to a 4 year college.

Xochitl Ursino

Derek Rimestad OK Chevy

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Leighton & Trina Smith High School Activities: Volleyball, Track, Running Start, Multiple volunteer activities Plans After Graduation: Transfer from WVC-O to WVC in Wenatchee to complete nursing program. Eventually, head to the University of Washington for the Pediatric Nursing program specializing in special needs and terminally ill children.

Parent(s): LaDonna Webster and Robert Webster High School Activities: Life Skills Plans After Graduation: Raising money for Special Olympics and competing in Special Olympics Other: Dora the Explorer, Veggies, Mr. U and Miss Linda, helping the ladies in the cafeteria wash tables, “This is the life!”

Parent(s): Mark Rabenold and Jeri Reile Plans After Graduation: Go to Ferrier School Other: I appreciate the dedication of the Tonasket Alternative School teachers.

Ivan Rios

Smith & Nelson

Hunter Timm

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Loren and Janet Wahl, John and Candace Shively High School Activities: Football, Wrestling, FFA, T-Club, Tennis, ASB Plans After Graduation: Starting my career Other: Favorite Book: Fifty Shades of Grey

North Valley Family Medicine

Cheyenne Gardner Bob Raymer‛s Machine Works

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Doris and Bryan Timm High School Activities: Tennis, FFA Plans After Graduation: Go to Bellingham

Christina Southerland

Ahlia Young

Superior Auto Parts

Parent(s): Emily & David Rimestad High School Activities: 4 year FFA member, Trap team, Wrestling, Baseball Plans After Graduation: Military Other: Favorite Food: Kuhler Burger

Alicia Edwards Beyers Central Market Place

Wilbur Ellis

Jeff Stedtfeld

Dustee Sapp

Allen‛s Auto Parts

Roy‛s Pharmacy

Emily Schell Beyers Central Market Place

Parent(s): Jennifer Wells and Ronnie Dellinger High School Activities: Volleyball, Softball, FCCLA, Winter Cheer Plans After Graduation: Undecided Other: Favorite Memory: Junior year!

Ian Young

Superior Auto Parts

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Kim and Marty Supp High School Activities: FFA & ASB Plans After Graduation: Pursuing a career in Veterinarian Medicine Other: Favorite Teacher: Mr. Deebach, Quote: “It’s just a bad day, not a bad life”, Memory: All of the late night joy rides with Kenworth Silverthorn.

Family Health Center

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Sally Hulton and Greg Edwards High School Activities: Varsity Soccer, Basketball, Tennis, Track. I am the ASB President and have been class officer in previous years. Also an active FFA member for four years. Plans After Graduation: Attend Generation Interns at the City Church in Kirkland Other: Favorite Teachers: Mr. Pilkinton, Mr. Mitchell, Mr. Deebach, Mr. Rader, Mr. Goyette, Anita, Mrs. Deebach, Mrs. Colbert. If Pilk doesn’t come to school, I don’t come to school!

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Jeff & Robin Steddfeld High School Activities: Football and Wrestling Plans After Graduation: Spokane Community College to study Criminal Justice Other: Favorite Memory: The game winning field goal homecoming game against Tri-Cities Prep my Junior year.

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Richard & Diane Howard High School Activities: Honors and AP classes, Honor Roll, Certificate of Academic Achievement Plans After Graduation: Attend Eastern Washington University to study Psychology or Nursing. I want to be able to make a difference in someone’s life and be successful. Other: “Dream as if you’ll life forever, live as if you’ll die today.” –James Dean

We would like to take this opportunity to wish Tonasket Grads the Best of Luck!


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 30, 2013

PAGE C5

Oroville Class of 2013 Sat., June 1st, 2013 at 2 p.m. Coulton Auditorium

Class Color: Black & Silver Class Flower: Dusted White Rose Class Song: “It’s Time” by Imagine Dragons

Breanna Ervin

North Valley Hospital

ia Va le d ic t o r

n

Parent(s): Brittany Leslie (guardian) High School Activities: National Honors Society, Upward Bound, Class Secretary, Photography Club, Soccer, Track and Field, Knowledge Bowl, Gear-Up Plans after Graduation: Go to WSU to major in Nursing, become and RN and work in a hospital. Then I will specialize as either Nurse Practitioner or Nurse Anesthesiologist Other: Favorite Memory: Mr. Fancher was telling us that he wasn’t going to be in school because he had to have surgery. When we asked what he was having surgery for, he replied “my doctor said I have too much swag so I have to go and get it removed.”

Michael Ripley

Les Schwab Tire Center

S a lu t a t o r ia

Kelsey Stell-Hickman Frontier Foods

Lisa Hartvig

Vicki‛s Unique Boutique Thrift & More

Gary DeVon / Staff Photo

Callie Barker

Ali Miller

Thermal Air

North Valley Family Medicine

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Phil and Terri Barker High School Activities: Class President, Cross Country, Basketball, Track and Field, National Honor Society, National Society of High School Scholars, FFA, 4-H Plans after Graduation: Transfer to Eastern Washington University next fall after receiving running start 2 year A.A. degree from Wenatchee Valley College. Obtain a degree in Biology/Pre-Pharmacy. Afterwards apply for WSU’s Pharmacy school. Other: Favorite Memory: Participating at state track meet in Cheney

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Scott and Benie Miller High School Activities: Cross Country, Basketball, and Tennis Plans after Graduation: Attend Spokane Community College and earn my Associates degree Other: Favorite Memory: Senior year of tennis

n

Parent(s): Alden and Rosa Ripley High School Activities: Soccer, Wrestling, Cross Country Plans after Graduation: Go to Washington State University and major in accounting

Elisha Willis

Trino‛s Restaurant

Parent(s): James & Bonnie Hickman High School Activities: FFA, FBLA President, ASB President, Soccer, Volleyball, Cheerleading, LASC, Yearbook Editor, 6th Grade Camp Counselor Plans after Graduation: Attend the Art Institute of Seattle and study Culinary Arts Other: Favorite Teacher: Mr. Kindred

Maria Castaneda

Gold Digger Apples, Inc.

Parent(s): Diana Hartvig High School Activities: Cross Country, Track, Band, Upward Bound, Gear-Up/AVID Tutor Plans after Graduation: Move to Wenatchee with Donny Wise and Celene Cisneros. Finish up my 2 year (transfer) degree, then move to either CWU or WSU to become a band teacher. Other: Favorite Teacher: Mr. Fancher is definitely my favorite teacher, even after his swag reduction surgery, Quote: If you want to be happy, be.”

Angel Camacho

Gold Digger Apples, Inc.

Ezequias Layata

Gold Digger Apples, Inc.

Nathan Bowlin

Oroville Dental Center/Dr. Chen

Becky Arrigoni

Beattles Auto & Truck

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Ron and Kathy Arrigoni High School Activities: Basketball, Soccer, Track, and Tennis Plans after Graduation: Attend Eastern Washington University to become a nurse

12 Year Senior High School Activities: Drum major in Band, Pep Band Plans after Graduation: Go to Wenatchee Valley College and get my AA in Pima Medical Institute in Seattle and get my Bachelor of Science in Mortuary Science Other: “The only thing standing between you and your goal is the BS story you keep telling yourself as to why you can’t achieve it.

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Marcie Castaneda and Emillio Castaneda Plans after Graduation: Getting a job and moving to Seattle and starting cosmetology school. Once done with school, I’d like to start my business. Other: Everything that shines isn’t always going to be gold.

Parent(s): Jose Camacho and Herlinda Hernandez High School Activities: Soccer, Football, Wrestling, Be the Change Club Plans after Graduation: Attend a two year college, then transfer to a 4 year university for physical therapy

12 Year Senior: Yes Parent(s): Dan and Dottie Bowlin High School Activities: Special Olympics and Gear-up program Plans after Graduation: Get a summer job and mow lawns with my dad. Other: Favorite teacher – Shannon Smith, favorite food – chicken burgers, favorite book – Boxcar Series.

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Yocundo and Eugenia Layata High School Activities: Soccer Plans after Graduation: Planning to work during the summer and then go to Spokane Community College in the fall. Then transfer to a four year college and get a Computer Science Degree. Other: Favorite Food: Chinese and Mexican


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 30, 2013

PAGE C6

Our Lives are before us, Our Past is behind us, But our memories are forever with us. Eric Herrera

Briana Moralez

Marcus Rounds

North Valley Hospital

North Valley Family Medicine

Akins Harvest Foods

Parent(s): Diego and Gail Herrera High School Activities: Wrestling and Tennis Plans after Graduation: Attend a community college

Parent(s): Armando & Nicci Moralez High School Activities: Basketball and Track Plans after Graduation: Go to Skagit Valley College and study nursing. Other: Favorite Food: French fries, and Veronica’s Green Enchiladas. Memory: When we beat Lake Roosevelt girls in basketball on their senior nights

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Russell & Sandi Rounds High School Activities: Basketball, Golf , and two year Vice President of class of 2013 Plans after Graduation: United States Airforce for 6 years

Hailey Scott Java Junkie

Prince‛s Department Store

Conner Hughes

Katie Tietje

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Jack & Mary Hughes High School Activities: Cross Country, Basketball, Golf Plans after Graduation: Go to Central Washington University and pursue a degree in law enforcement

Parent(s): Theodore and Jennifer Tietje High School Activities: Basketball, Track, Cross Country, Soccer, National Honor Society, FBLA, Student School Board Representative, Class Officer Plans after Graduation: Going to Whatcom Community College to play basketball and work towards an accounting degree

Celene Cisneros

Leah Cathryn Day Spa

Buck Ednie

Gazette-Tribune

Corey Childers Oroville Golf Club

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Tim and Kathy Scott Other: Favorite Teacher: Ms. Allie

Parent(s): Rachel Davey and Chris Childers High School Activities: Football, Wrestling, Golf Plans after Graduation: Work Other: The choices you make turn the pages of your life.

Parent(s): Gordon Davis High School Activities: School work and social events Plans after Graduation: Go to Humboldt State University in California to get a degree Other: “I go to a school where the students are higher than their grades.”

Tosca Pickering

Dayna Roley

VIP Insurance

NAPA Auto Parts

Gill Ildelfonso

Gold Digger Apples, Inc.

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Petronilo and Teresa Ildelfonso High School Activities: Soccer, Wrestling and Basketball Plans after Graduation: I plan to continue working at the Okanogan County Corrections until I start college in the fall. I will attend Wenatchee Valley College in Wenatchee and go into Law Enforcement Other: Favorite Teacher: Mrs. Casssandra Orlando Fancher, Quote: “It’s not about how Oroville Building Supply hard you can hit, it’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward.” –Rocky Balboa “Pain is temporary. It may last for a minute, or an hour, or a day or even a year. But eventually it will subside and something else takes its place. If I quit however, it will last forever.” –Eric Thomas “Only God can judge me. That which does not kill me can only make me stronger. I don’t see why everybody feel as though they gotta tell me how to live my life.” – Tupac

Parent(s): Andrea Orlando and Kory Garcia Plans after Graduation: Moving to Seattle and going to a Dental Hygienist school. Other: Favorite Quote: “May you have the wisdom to find your purpose and the courage to make a difference.”

Gabriel Serrano

Gold Digger Apples, Inc.

Scott Frazier Paul‛s Service

Chris Oliver

Back to Basics

Parent(s): Ross & Neysa Roley High School Activities: Football & Basketball cheerleading (4 yrs), Yearbook (4 yrs), FBLA (3 yrs), Photography Club, 2012 May Day Festival Princess. Plans after Graduation: Move to Salt Lake City, Utah and go to LDS Business College to Study accounting. Other: “It would be easy to get bitter and cold while focusing on the dark side, but there is also an amazing, wonderful side of life.” Mark Ryden (my favorite artist). Parent(s): Loretta and David Harris (grandparents) High School Activities: Border Explorers, Welding Plans after Graduation: I plan to attend a trade school for welding or automotive repairs Other: Favorite Teachers: Mr. Arnold and Mr. Booker, likes to work on cars, weld, and go dirt bike riding

Ronel Kee

North Valley Family Medicine

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Ann and Pedro Cisneros High School Activities: Band, Knowledge Bowl, Softball and Cross Country Plans after Graduation: Move to Wenatchee and get a two year degree Other: Favorite Class: Hornet Scholars with Mr. Naillon and the group of students who were in there!

OK Chevy

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Douglas & Patricia Kee High School Activities: Cross Country, Basketball, Wrestling, Tennis, National Honors Society, GEAR UP/AVID Peers Tutor Plans after Graduation: I hope to attend Eastern Washington University and earn a degree in education to achieve my dream of becoming a high school history teacher. Favorite Song: Don’t Stop Believing by Journey

Parent(s): Julio & Martha Serrano Plans after Graduation: Move to Florida and attend art school

Alex Smith

Oroville Building Supply

Parent(s): Rick and Lisa Pickering High School Activities: Softball, Soccer, Volleyball, Basketball, Football and Basketball Mascot, Marching Band Drum Line Plans after Graduation: Go to Wenatchee Valley College to get A.A. degree, then transfer to a 4 year university Other: Gotta catch them all.

Tyler Vonderharr Oroville Pharmacy

Donny Wise

Northwest Wholesale

Enrique Martinez OK Chevy

Community Auto

Gold Digger Apples, Inc.

Parent(s): Roman and Mendy Combs-Boge High School Activities: Track and Photography Club Plans after Graduation: Move to Spokane, attend a community college and work

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Robin Smith and Jose Lopez High School Activities: Baseball, Wrestling, Knowledge Bowl Plans after Graduation: Go to WVC then transfer to Western to study some sort of science. Other: Favorite Book: The Hunger Games Series

Sarai Garfias

Ross Combs-Boge

12 Year Senior Parent(s): John and Amy Wise High School Activities: Playing drums, Tennis sometimes Plans after Graduation: Wenatchee Valley College Other: One of these days I’m just gonna get off the bus and I’m gonna run into the woods and never come back, and when I come back I’m gonna be the knife master.

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Jeff and Gail Frazier High School Activities: Football, Baseball, Track, Band, Knowledge Bowl Plans after Graduation: Go travel for a while then settle down and go to college Other: Favorite Memory: In football, when we held Liberty Bell at the half yard line and pushed them back and got a touchdown

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Kim Englin High School Activities: Cross Country, Track, Basketball Plans after Graduation: Enlisted with the US Army, 12B- Combat Engineer. Eventually work my way to drill sergeant; then head to college to major in Psychology or English Other: Favorite Class: History/ English

12 Year Senior Parent(s): Antonio and Florencia Garfias High School Activities: Photography, Publishing, Be the Change Club Plans after Graduation: Work and attend a community college then transfer to a university

We would like to take this opportunity to wish Oroville Grads the Best of Luck!


Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, May 30, 2013  

May 30, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you