Page 1

POST-SEASON UNDERWAY FOR

MOLSON FAMILY BINGO

HIGH SCHOOL TRACK

Molson Grange, Friday, May 17 at 6:00 p.m. Bring finger foods.

See Sports, Pages A10-11

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, MAY 16, 2013 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Armed Forces Legacy Project to be dedicated

Parade, air show, speakers and more BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket’s Armed Forces veterans and their supporters have created one of the state’s true crown jewels in its Legacy Project on the south end of the city. The Legacy Project, which serves as both a memorial and a service center, will be formally dedicated this Saturday,

May 18, with a parade and ceremony. The day will include a parade through Tonasket starting at 11:00 a.m., followed by a ceremony at noon at the Legacy Park site that will include the presentation of colors, a flyover and air show, and a pair of special guest speakers. “It’s been a lot bigger than I ever thought it would be,” said George Frank, who along with Roger Castelda originated the project, beginning with a 99-year lease of the site from the city for $1.00. “It shows what people can do when they get together to work on something. The public’s support has been unbelievable. It hasn’t been a few people giving a lot; it’s been a whole lot of people giving some.”

Tiger frosh surprise at FFA

The speakers include Captain Alan Walker of Curlew, who served 28 years in the U.S. Coast Guard, and Lt. Commander Allen Willey, at Tonasket High School graduate and current U.S. Navy civil engineer who has served 26 years of active duty. “Captain Walker is a very impressive man,” Frank said. “And Lt. Cmdr. Willey, it took some doing, but he’s traveling all the way here just for this dedication.” The parade route will begin heading north on Western Avenue, turn east in front of the North Valley Extended Care facility, then turn south on Whitcomb (U.S. 97) and proceed through town to the Legacy site, which boasts a freshly

paved and painted parking lot. Overflow traffic may park in the business lot below the site. Michael Stewart, who is organizing the parade, said that the list of entrants hasn’t been finalized but is likely to include the Desert Squadron Composite Civil Air Patrol; the Native American Color Guard; the Gold Star Mothers; American Legion contingents from Tonasket, Oroville, Republic and Okanogan; North Valley Hospital; Home Depot; a number of armored personnel carriers; VIP vehicles provided by OK Chevrolet; and even the Hyde brothers’ A Cavallo mobile carousel. There will also be refreshments pro-

vided by the Tonasket American Legion Auxiliary, and the on-site military library and Veterans Service Officer Shane Barton will also be available following the ceremony. Following the national anthem (by Kim Harriman), Paul Lewis will perform a flyover and air show in his Nanchang CJ6. “It’s a Chinese trainer painted in Russian colors,” Frank said. “It’s got a nine-cylinder radial engine, plus a smoke system and blank-firing machine guns developed by Hollywood special effects teams that they used to film ‘Tora! Tora! Tora!’ “It should be quite a sight, and that’s coming from an Air Force man.”

Query yields nothing

THREE LEGS, TWO BROTHERS, ONE RACE

Anonymous NVH complaint leads to L&I visit, but no violations found

Tonasket Rituals team wins state title, earns nationals bid

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - North Valley Hospital CEO Linda Michel reported at the Thursday, May 10, Board of Commissioners meeting that the hospital had recently been paid a visit by the Department of Labor and Industry thanks to an anonymous “report of concern” filed with the department. Michel said in her written report that the complaint listed concerns with safety inspections in the second floor and basement remodels; the qualifications of inhouse employees who had done electrical work in the building; and questioned who was responsible for bonding and insurance. Michel said that the Labor and Industry inspector did not find any violations, affirming that all inspections had been completed and logged as required. “The L&I inspector did meet with staff to check on all of the concerns,” she said. “(He) informed me that he was unable to respond to the person who submitted these concerns since the submission was sent anonymously.” In a separate instance, a letter was received by a local business signed by someone claiming to be one of the hospital leadership team, who said she had sent no such letter. That incident is under investigation, Michel said.

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

PULLMAN - When the Tonasket FFA’s parliamentary procedure team went to the national convention two years ago, ag teacher Matt Deebach called it a once-in-a-career experience. Turns out Deebach was wrong. Six Tonasket freshmen, competing in Rituals (a novice version of parli pro for freshmen to compete in), won the state title last weekend at the Washington State FFA Convention in Pullman and will be making their own trip to nationals this fall. “I don’t think we’ve ever had a team place higher than seventh,” said Deebach, who has built the Tonasket program into a powerhouse since coming to the district in the mid-90s. “This was the first time they’d ever been there in front of that type of crowd. Some of these contests are necessarily full, but this one is. It’s not like you can just show up at State; teams get weeded out. So everyone is good.” Deebach noted that many of the larger schools have middle school FFA programs, so their students enter high school with a couple of years experience on groups from smaller schools. “They’re judged on speaking, clarity and correctness,” Deebach

SEE FFA | PG A4

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Gus and Gabe Ray, ages 7 and 5, stuck together through thick and thin during the three-legged race as part of the Masons’ Kids Games at Saturday’s May Festival in Oroville. That was just one of many activities to take place during the annual event. For a two-page spread of this and other May Fest highlights, see pages A2-3.

ADDRESSING FOOD ISSUES Michel said that, in response

SEE NVH | PG A4

Oroville weighs park concession stand options City again delays final hearing on Critical Areas ordinance BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – No person or group has come forward to rent the concession stand at Oroville’s Veterans Memorial Park leaving the city to look for ways to make it more attractive to potential operators. “We’ve had no proposals for the concession stand as of yet and it was put in

the budget as a revenue generator,” said Kathy Jones, Oroville’s city clerk. “I can’t understand why no group wouldn’t want to rent it and make some money,” said Councilman Tony Koepke. To meet health department standards the prospective renter must have commercial grade equipment. Rod Noel, the head of the Parks Department suggested the city consider purchasing some commercial equipment for the concession stand to make it more attractive to potential renters, rather than expecting them to supply their own. “We may have to find some used commercial equipment. I think the fact that whoever rents it has to bring their own equipment, and it’s a little tough to find

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 20

off the cuff, is what scares them off,” said Noel. “Basically there are only two good months to really make some money, July and August, said the parks head, adding last year’s vendor had already sold their commercial equipment. Noel suggested the council consider purchasing items like a commercial refrigerator and freezer in the state bid or from a company that sells used restaurant supplies. He added that he had been looking at the state bid and there are some reasonable deals out there, although delivery costs would need to be factored into the final price. It might be less expensive to send someone to pick up the equipment and transport it back

to Oroville, he added. “I like the idea of the concession stand at the park, but for someone to have to buy the equipment and then just be open for two or three months is perhaps too much to expect,” said Councilwoman Neysa Roley. “I personally feel we should pursue trying to find some equipment and I think the concession stand should be used,” added Mayor Chuck Spieth. Clerk Jones suggested the city look for at least a refrigerator and a freezer if they could find one at a reasonable cost on the state bid. Police Chief Clay Warnstaff added that the prospect of finding someone to run the concession stand might increase if

SEE OROVILLE | PG A4

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

the operator had items like canoes and paddle boats to rent from there. In addition to agreeing to seek some used commercial equipment for the park concession stand, the council approved entering into an agreement with the state Department of Natural Resources to make the park available after Labor Day for a firefighters’ encampment should the need arise. The council directed Mayor Spieth to sign an agreement with the DNR similar to one they had with the agency last fire season. In other park business, staff is working on a new park ordinance for all the city’s

May Day Photos A2-3 Letters/Opinion A5 Valley Life A6

Community A7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Police Stats Sports Obituaries

A9 A10-11 A12


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | May 16, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Maddie West, granddaughter of this year’s Grand Marshals, shows off her skills on stilts (right). Someone must have a volunteer firefighter for a dad to get such a good view of the parade (below).

May Festival Queen Shelby Scott and Princess Angela Nelson greet the crowd from atop the Oroville Community Float which celebrates “Paradise in the Valley.” (left). Your announcer, Ken Neal, lets everyone know who’s who and what’s what during the Grand Parade (below).

OROVILLE MAY FESTIVAL Photos by Gary DeVon

Above center, Aaron Burks looks the part as he leads a group of horsemen and women in the parade. Above, a parade is doubly fun when you watch with your twin brother; just ask the Pooler twins.


May 16, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

Okanogan Valley Life

PARADISE IN THE VALLEY

Your Grand Marshals Jim and Marilyn Prince (near left). Blast from the Past, the Art’s Drivein entry (far left) driven by Dugan Henderson. Below, the May Pole Dance, a tradition as old as Oroville’s May Festival.

May Fest Parade Results

Queen’s Choice Trophy 8th Grade Royalty

Best Float: Trophy 3rd/6th Grade Royalty

Royalty 1. 7th Grade Royalty 2. Junior Class Royalty 3. 8th Grade Royalty

Senior School 1. Junior Class Royalty 2. Tonasket H.S. Band 3. Oroville H.S. Band

Junior School 1. 7th Grade Royalty 2. 8th Grade Royaltyy 3. May Pole Dancers Tie With Elementary Band

Community Youth 1. Madelyn On Stilts 2. Border Patrol Explorers 3. Head Start

Mounted Royalty 1. Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo Queen 2. Okanogan County Junior Rodeo Queen 3. Okanogan County Fair Queen

Horse Unit 1. Trailriders

Community Entry Best Community Entry: Plaque -Masonic Lodge/Train 1. Masonic Lodge 2. Garden Club 3. The Nourishing Hand

Church 1. United Methodist Worship Band

Cars/Boats 1. Dodge Viper: Bob Pelligrini tie w/ 48 Dodge: Ron Wisener 2. 1951 Dodge: Wisener Family 3. 1930 Ford: Dugan Henderson

Tractors

In sync, the Tonasket Flag Corps makes a colorful addition to any parade (top left). Above, the Mason’s Kids Games are always popular. Sheriff Frank Rogers, in his Batmobile, is a familiar sight each year at May Festival (center, left). Below left, the 2013 Grand Marshals Jim and Marilyn Prince with the May Festival Royalty Shelby Scott and Angela Nelson during the awards ceremony at the high school.

Best Tractor: Plaque: Jerry Milholland 1. 1939 Massey Harris Driven By Travis Loudon Tie With 1939 Flag Tractor Driven By Jim Barker 2. Italian Farrari Driven By Lamar Wolley Tie With 1948 C Allis Chalmers Driven By Chris Slivenson 3. 1948 Farmall Driven By Rodney Mellentine, Tie With 1948 Farmall Driven By John Glover, Tie With1955 Farmall Driven By Dan Gerth

Law Enforcement 1. Border Patrol 2. Custom’s And Border Protection 3. Okanogan County Search and Rescue

Commercial Best Commercial Entry/Plaque: P&D Beer Wagon 1. Art’s Drive-In 2. Gold Digger 3. Discount Fireworks


Page A4

VISTA positions open at Tonasket

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The VISTA program, a companion program to AmeriCorps, has five positions open in the Tonasket School District this summer, according to VISTA coordinator Bob Ashmore. The positions available include one that will begin to develop a Young Women in STEM Program (helping to position girls to succeed in science, technology, engineering and math careers); one that will coordinate summer events to continue the development of the Tonasket school garden; and three that will facilitate summer reading comprehension camps aimed at improving those skills among low-income students ranging from grades 3-9. The summer VISTA positions offer a living allowance for time serviced as well as a pro-rated AmeriCorps Education Award, which is an approximately $125/ month cash stipend. “This is an exciting opportunity for people in our community of any age,” Ashmore said. “But we’re certainly interested in college students coming home looking for a summer job. “Everyone in the U.S. can apply for these jobs. But while there are many talented people who could fill these, I would like to see local community members and students apply for these positions.”

Women in STEM This position is actually a threeyear position that extends beyond this summer. The others are 8-10 weeks in length. “We’re very, very excited about that,” Ashmore said. “We know at the federal and state level we’re not producing enough young people every year to go into what we describe as the STEM pipeline. That’s for both post-secondary opportunities as well as careers. Ashmore said the person in this position would set up a system that would connect female students with women in STEM fields that could provide more than just a one-time visit. “We’re kind of on our own with this,” he said. “I think we need to connect them more often in more meaningful ways with women STEM professionals, more than just a visit to the classroom, but relationships between professionals and our young female students. “So we want someone who can develop a system, where that’s their sole intent and purpose, that will launch us in that direction to address this.” School Garden committee The primary responsibility of the school garden postiion is to develop four or five summer community volunteer events for the garden, with the specific purpose of taking some steps to getting the garden accessible and

functional. “One of the biggest things is needing two strong pathways to the garden that address special needs,” Ashmore said. “We have four or five priority steps we would like to see accomplished this summer, and this person would organize these events.” He said those responsibilities would include everything from marketing to actually organizing the events.

Reading camps Three positions will involve helping to facilitate summer reading comprehension camps, which will be overseen by a certificated teacher, in various locations. “We’re going to offer three camps - one here, one at Ellisforde, and one at Loomis - and they’ll be two weeks each in length,” he said. “It’s going to use a peer-topeer model.” The VISTA position’s role will be to help older students in the peer-to-peer teaching model to instruct the younger students providing support rather than direct instruction. Web links For more information on the VISTA program, go online to: http://www.nationalservice.gov/ programs/americorps/americorps-programs/americorps-vista/vista-summer-associates To register, go to: https:// my.americorps.gov/mp/login.do

OROVILLE | FROM A1 parks. “We are continuing to refine the park regulations. We are looking at issues that need defining as far as enforcement,” said Clerk Jones. The council approved the draft ordinance revisions, with all voting in favor except Councilman Walt Hart, who voted in opposition. The council meeting started with a hearing on extending final adoption of the city’s new Critical Areas ordinance until May 21. There was no public testimony for or against the extension and Resolution 824 was adopted.

Delivery of the new ambulance will be delayed until after the first of the year so that the extra $25,000 for Stryker equipment can be part of next year’s budget. The council also learned that the point of sale will be Chehalis, Wash. where the sales tax rate is 8.1 percent, rather than 10 percent, as it was originally thought. The council has also agreed to renew its contract with the North Central Washington Narcotics Task Force at $1000. “Do you still think we are getting a benefit from it?” Mayor Spieth asked Chief Warnstaff. “Yes,” he replied.

Councilman Ed Naillon made a motion to approve renewal and it was seconded by Roley and passed unanimously. In addition, the mayor was authorized to sign the Construction Phase Agreement regarding Central and Cherry Streets, pending state Department of Transportation approval. The council approved waiving the fee for the ambulance crew to standby at the tennis courts during the May Festival 3 on 3 basketball tournament. Chief Warnstaff said he would have five officers on duty during the May Festival weekend.

FFA | FROM A1 said. Tonasket sent 42 students overall to the convention, the thirdlargest contingent in the state despite competing against schools of all sizes. Many of them competed in more than one event. The Tonasket contingent included three Rituals teams that had swept the top three spots in district competition this spring. The state champion group included Madison Bayless, Janelle Catone, Jordan Hughes, Rade Pilkinton, Rachel Silverthorn and Jenna Valentine. Bayless’ older sister, Haley, was on the national runner-up parli pro team in 2011. They will be traveling to Louisville, Kentucky, Oct. 28-Nov. 2 to compete for national honors. Rituals includes the execution of the opening ceremony, a trimmed down version of the parli-pro competition, and for those in the finals, a written test. “A lot of the other coaches question Matt’s approach,” said George Hill, who has been Deebach’s volunteer assistant for about a decade. “A lot of them believe you should just concentrate on four, five or six kids to get the highest finishes at these things. I don’t think they like it when they see us bringing in 40 kids. “But I think it’s better to give those 40 kids a chance to experience something like this. And as you can see, he’s still getting those results.” Tonasket’s parli pro team of Sadie Long, Alicia Edwards, Kathryn Cleman, Cassie Spear, Sierra Hughes and Grace Maldonado, a contender for the state title, brought home fourth place, which Deebach said wasn’t the easiest finish to accept, despite tying for the second-highest finish ever for a Tonasket team. “When your expectations are so high, it’s not easy, even when you accomplish something that hardly anyone ever does,” Deebach said.

“They really should be proud. I know I’m very proud of them. “When I first started teaching, I was just hoping to occasionally get a team into the top eight, let alone the top four. So many of these schools have seven or eight ag teachers and can pick and choose the best they can offer to compete. It’s pretty unreal to think they’d be feeling disappointed when in all reality I had a hard time imagining us ever being in the running.” The Ag Issues team - a group that included Wyatt O’Brien, Kelly Cruz, Claire Thornton and Maldonado - also had an outstanding day but lost out on a chance to compete for the state title thanks to tiebreak criteria. “That was a heartbreaker,” Deebach said. Tonasket finished tied with another school for the final position to get out of their flight into the finals. The team that won the tiebreak ended up as the state runner-up. “They were as good as those other teams,” Deebach said. “That was a tough one to swallow.” Tonasket FFA was also recognized for a number of awards earned earlier in the year. Breanna Howell brought home Bronze 1 in Equine Science Entrepreneurship and fifth in state in Horse Evaluation; Karlie Henneman earned Bronze 2 in Equine Science Entrepreneurship Placement; Dalton Wahl took Bronze 1 in Beef Production Placement; Jessica Puente earned Silver 1 in Fruit Production (with her work forwarded on for national consideration); Maldonado received Bronze 2 in Fruit Production; and Tonya Nelson received Bronze 1 for Swine Entrepreneurship. Breanna Howell, Brisa Leep, Vanessa Pershing, Elizabeth Jackson and John Symonds also took second in the state in horse judging last fall. Receiving their state degrees were Edwards, Henneman, Long,

Maldonado, Nelson, O’Brien, Puente, Thornton, Wahl, Breanna Hughes and Sierra Hughes. Also, 2012 graduates Trent Turner and KB Kochsmeier received their American Degrees. Deebach also noted that Robert Colbert, a Tonasket FFA alum now working for Callaway and Detro, PLLC, is now on the state board of directors and is going to be the legal counsel for the statewide organization. “I don’t know if he’s the first ever from Okanogan County to be on the board,” Deebach said, “but certainly he’s the first in recent history.” The weekend was complicated by the fact that a number of the state FFA participants also compete on the Tonasket track and field team, which had its district meet on Friday afternoon, and any who hoped to qualify for regional or state in track needed to be there as well. As a result, middle school principal Jay Tyus and school board member Lloyd Caton ferried groups of kids between Pullman and Tonasket so they could compete in both competitions. “I don’t know what we’d have done without them, and the rest of our chaperones were just awesome,” said Deebach. Those included Hill, Shannon O’Brien, Teresa Hughes, Pam Leslie and Amanda Chase. “We have to provide judges for all these events too, so it’s more work than just looking after the kids.” Deebach said he’s convinced that, regardless of finish, competing at state was beneficial for each of the kids who went. “Every one of them learned something,” he said. “Win, lose or draw, they all learned something about themselves, and they learned things that they can carry throughout their lives. Hard work, determination and dedication are things you carry with you forever and can use wherever you are in life.”

Spring BARREL TASTING Copper Mountain Vineyards

Okanogan Estate & Vineyards

Esther Bricques Winery & Vineyard

33345 Hwy 97 Oroville, WA 98844 Located in Taber’s Fruit Barn

1205 Main St. / Hwy 97 Oroville, WA 98844

42 Swanson Mill Rd. Oroville, WA 98844

509-476-2736

509-476-2861

509-476-2762 509-322-0011

www.okanoganwine.com

www.estherbricques.com

www.coppermountainvineyards.com

Tasting Room Open Daily

Summer Wine Tasting

Hours: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

1 to 6 p.m. Daily or by appointment

Esther Bricques Winery

Copper Mountain

NVH | FROM A1 to low scores on patient satisfaction surveys, she invited two women from Summit Healthcare in Arizona to evaluate and suggest changes to the North Valley Hospital food service. “I chose these ladies because I worked with them for nine years,” Michel said. “... When (Food Services Director) Syble Hartley was employed by Summit Healthcare in 2001 the scores from the Food Services Department were the lowest in the facility. Today they are at 99 percent and have been there for some time.” Michel said that Hartley and Debbie Goodman, a cook, spent a week with the NVH food services staff, providing training and discussing changes and concerns

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | May 16, 2013

Vineyards

about the changes. Michel and Kelly Cariker were to meet with the staff to begin implementing changes, which she said would not only improve food quality but reduce expenses. “Food costs were reduced by $85,000 at Summit Healthcare (which serves about the same number of patient meals as NVH) because they fixed only what the patient wanted, and therefore did not end up throwing food away,” Michel reported. “It has been proven over and over again that if patients get food they like and enjoy, they heal faster.”

Sink hole In an occurrence similar to last year, a sink hole opened in the

ground between the main hospital building and the administration. Unlike a year ago, this one was not caused by a water leak. “It appears that when one of the buildings was constructed the old wood and bricks from the demolition were used as fill for that area,” Michel wrote. “As the wood decayed, it produced the sink hole.”

Warrants The hospital’s warrant level dropped by $200,000 since the previous board meeting, approximately matching its low for the year at $1.361 million. The NVH Board of Commissioners next meets on Thursday, May 30, at 7:00 p.m.

Tasting Room Open Daily

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or by appointment

Come Enjoy Wine, Snacks and Music! Esther Bricques Winery & Vineyards

invites you to our annual

To honor those who gave all

To o hon r those who gave some

Spring Barrel Tasting

Listen to Live Music Steve Kinzie Sun: 1-3 PM Ruby Rust Sun: 3-5 PM The Deep Water Boys

Sat: 3-5 PM

Sample Our Wines

U.S. Armed ForceS LegAcy Tonasket, WA is dedicating the completion of the site with a Parade Ceremony, Saturday, May 18

Enjoy Our Setting

Come Join Us

Parade starts at north end of town at 11 a.m. All entries are welcome. Military theme: “Proud to Be An American.” Opening ceremony, 12 noon at the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Park South end of Tonasket

Parade info: 509-486-2144 General info: 509-486-1482 or 509-486-2724

Spring

BARREL Tasting Vineyard

from 1 to 5 p.m.

Please join us once again for our annual Spring Barrel Tasting, where you will be able to sample and compare wines straight from the barrel. While sampling wine enjoy a lite bite of nibbles and music. A blending of Friends, Wines, and a Spectacular View!

Introduction of Guests Guest speakers to be: Captain Alan Walker, 28 years U.S. Coast Guard, hometown Curlew, WA Lt. Commander Allen Willey, U.S. Navy civil engineer, 26 years of active duty. Tonasket High School graduate

Visit our Military Library and Service Officer, Shane Burton

www.estherbricques.com

Copper Mountain

Fly Over and Air Show by Paul Lewis, flying a Nanchang CJ6

Retirement of Colors

1:00-5:00 42 Swanson Mill Road Oroville, WAshington 509-476-2861

May 18, 2013

Presentation of Colors/Opening Invocation National Anthem by Kim Harriman

Closing ceremony Refreshments before and after provided by the Tonasket American Legion Auxiliary

Saturday, May 18 & Sunday, May 19

509-322-0011 33345 Hwy 97 N., Oroville N. on Hwy 97 approx. 3/4 mi past Prince’s on right hand side.

OROVILLE Two Locations:

Okanogan Estate & Vineyards from 1 to 5 p.m.

Come join us for our spring barrel tasting...we will be tasting wine straight out of the barrel. We will be offering an exculsive sale on released and unreleased wines during this event only. Come enjoy a glass of wine, snacks and wine-a-ritas.

Copper Mountain Vineyard Join us WINERY: 1010 Appleway Okanogan Estate & Vineyards at our... 509-476-2736


MAY 16, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Farms could lose land under State Senate proposal OPINION BY TOM BUGERT OUTREACH DIRECTOR WASH. WILDLIFE & RECREATION COALITION

Almost 1,000 acres of working farmland could be lost in Okanogan County, if the state Senate does not match the House’s budget proposal. Working the land is a part of our heritage, and as Washington continues to recover from the recession, it is an essential element in our future economic prosperity. Yet, the state Senate wants to eliminate funding for revenuegenerating projects in Okanogan County that rely on grants from the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program. The WWRP grant program is the only state source of funding for preserving working farms and ranches. The program’s success lies in its nationally recognized, competitive evaluation process. Projects are selected by a panel of independent experts based on merits alone. That’s why a bipartisan coalition of more than 275 organizations, including timber companies, hunters, anglers, farmers, recreation businesses and others are asking the legislature to restore funding for the WWRP this year, so our state can keep up with a growing population and increased demand for local produce and outdoor recreation opportunities. Governor Inslee and the state House have both taken an excellent first step, proposing $75 and $70 million for the program, respectively. Cutting funding for the WWRP grants means cutting essential protection for farms, keeping farmers working lands their families have owned for generations and keeping food affordable for the rest of Washingtonians. The Schell family’s farm near Havillah is one of the projects that hangs in the balance. For more than 70 years, the

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Schell family has raised crops and livestock on their land. A grant from the WWRP would allow the Okanogan Land Trust to ensure the Schell’s and the two other families who help maintain the farm could continue to work the land forever, protecting fertile soil that has provided above-average crop yield. It is in the community’s interest to make sure farms do not fail as farmers face increasing economic pressures. Local farms are essential to our food security, ensuring that all families have access to healthy and affordable food. Taking cropland out of production threatens that access. Hays Ranch, which provides more than 300 acres of rangeland and cropland just east of Oroville, is also at risk in the Senate budget. By protecting farms, we are also protecting one of Washington’s largest job creators. According to WSU, 39,500 farms statewide directly provide more than 82,000 jobs. This adds up to a $16 billion agriculture economy. Allowing families to continue to work their land ensures hundreds of support-industry jobs remain in the county as well. Our rich agriculture industry drives demand for transportation, machine maintenance, and food production workers. Full funding would not compete with other important costs like teachers’ and human services. The WWRP is funded by bonds in the capital construction budget. With interest rates at historic lows, they are more affordable than ever. The Senate has an opportunity to preserve Washington’s agriculture industry for our farmers; defend the state’s rank as one of the nation’s top producers of apples, hops and other goods; and keep jobs in the state. We hope they will seize it.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Similkameen to be sacrificed for the PUD Dear Gary, The Similkameen River is thundering over Coyote Falls, down through her canyon west of Oroville and putting on a show for all eager to witness the raw power of nature. Snow melt coming down the watershed, raising Palmer Lake, bringing new life into this diverse ecosystem as it has for 10,000 years. The river and all the life it sustains is a priceless treasure, and a source of life we must preserve and protect. Downstream at the PUD headquarters, our PUD Commissioners, Manager Grubich and staff are up to their eyeballs in debt, and planning to raise our rates another 13% this year and another 13% next year. All this on top of the added meter fees, added basic fees and 19% increase of the last three years. This was published in the Chronicle, “Utility Rate Hikes Proposed”, May 1, 2013. The PUD will spend $3.9 million this year just to service its $29 million dollar debt. The Utility also plans to sell 64.4 million dollars in municipal bonds to Wall St. investors. The bonds will sell because investors realize we are a captive market, with no choice except to pay whatever the PUD demands. $35.2 million dollars of the bond revenue is budgeted for the proposed powerhouse at Enloe Dam. At current wholesale power rates of $26/ megawatt/hour and a production cost of $58/megawatt/hour, we would lose $32 dollars on every megawatt produced. With new energy sources, wind and solar, providing new power to the nation’s grid and consumers using less energy, $1.75 million less in our utility district last year, wholesale prices are predicted to remain low into the future. The Similkameen River needs protection from this unwarranted destruction. Tens of millions have been spent on projects with little popular support, diesel generators, Pateros substation and Methow transmission line,

fiber optics cables, and a new Headquarters Building in Okanogan. Let’s limit the debt to the $29 million we already owe. Developing power at Enloe Dam would produce only two percent of the energy we require with many negative impacts on our tourism, outdoor recreation, salmon, steelhead and Similkameen trail $64.2 million dollars in bond sales with our small population, high unemployment, low wages and incomes, will be very hard to payback in the time required and could spell the end of this Public Utility as we know it. Is it time for new management at PUD headquarters? Joseph Enzensperger Oroville

Appreciate courthouse security improvements Dear Editor, We want to extend our sincere appreciation to County Commissioners Jim DeTro, Sheilah Kennedy and Ray Campbell for their forward thinking approach to improved security in our courthouse. Rather than wait for tragedy to strike, our Commissioners, in recognition of citizens’ needs to feel confident and safe in seeking access to courthouse services, adopted a resolution creating a courthouse security officer position. The courthouse building serves voters, jurors, employees, litigants, victims, tax payers, and people stopping in to get a passport, renew their tabs, record land documents, or get assistance from the noxious weed office. The courthouse is also where people come to resolve disputes and criminal charges, which can lead to volatile, sometimes dangerous situations. Time and again, we find that people act more civilly when there is an armed presence in the courtroom, and certainly our goal is to prevent problems and deescalate situations when possible. If you see one of your County Commissioners, please tell him or her thank you for making our Courthouse a safer

place for everyone. Heidi E. Smith, Presiding Judge Charles D. Short, Judge Okanogan County District Court

Molson Grange needs new roof, you can help Dear Editor, I know you have been to a few events at the Molson Grange Hall and know how important it is to local communities and even friends of Molson that live far far away now. The Molson Grange organization continues to be one of the most active in Washington State, but we have a huge problem. For over a decade we have patched the flat roof of the historic old building and have failed to stop the leaks. To save the Grange Hall we need a new roof. The Grange is adamant to have this done right and estimates are it will cost just under $40,000. The building was built in 1914 as a mercantile and the Molson Grange has owned it since 1944. The Grange Hall has hosted countless events for nearly 70 years including dances, school plays, reunions, 4H activities, parties, arts & craft fairs, shows, rollerskating, pinochle, meetings, festivals, plus memorials, and will continue to do so for decades in the future when we get the new roof. Volunteers of the Molson Grange will be having many upcoming fund raising events and we look forward to the support of neighbors and visitors. For those that wish to send a check to the Molson Grange in support of the Roof Project may mail it to: Molson Grange Secretary at PO Box 2637, Oroville, WA 98844. Make checks out to Molson Grange and on the “for” line note: New Roof. Thank you for listening. Preserving history by living it, Robin Stice, Molson Grange Member

Small businesses across political spectrum say raise minimum wage OPINION BY HOLLY SKLAR

Do you think a national poll of small business owners would show majority support for increasing the minimum wage? How about a poll in which the small business owners were predominately Republican? Well, 67 percent of small business owners support increasing the federal minimum wage and adjusting it yearly to keep up with the cost of living, a new poll shows. Forty-six percent of respondents identified themselves as Republican, 35 percent as Democrat and 11 percent as independent. The nationally representative opinion survey of small business owners was conducted by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research and released by Small Business Majority. Oft-heard claims that most small business owners oppose a minimum wage increase are wrong. Small business owners across the political spectrum believe a minimum wage increase would boost business and help the economy. They think it will help job growth, not hurt it. Sixty-five percent of small business owners agree that “increasing the minimum wage will help the economy because the people with the lowest incomes are the most likely to spend any pay increases buying necessities they could not afford before, which will boost sales at businesses. This will increase the customer demand that businesses need to retain or hire more employees.” Greater New York Chamber of Commerce CEO Mark Jaffe was not surprised the national poll found strong business support for increasing the minimum wage. “That’s what

our members have told us,” he said. “It makes good economic sense. A minimum wage increase will boost the consumer demand that spurs businesses to hire and grow.” Workers are also consumers. The minimum wage sets the floor under worker paychecks. Minimum wage increases have been so little and so late in recent decades that there’s been heavy erosion in the buying power of the minimum wage, and in worker wages up the ladder. The federal minimum wage was last increased in 2009 to $7.25 an hour – just $15,080 a year for full-time workers. Today’s minimum wage workers are paid much less than their counterparts decades ago. Adjusted for inflation to 2013 dollars, the minimum wage was $8.56 an hour way back in 1956. At its inflation-adjusted high point in 1968, the minimum wage was worth $10.70. Contrary to conventional portrayal, the overwhelming majority of small businesses don’t have any employees earning minimum wage. The poll found that 85 percent of small business owners pay all their employees more than the minimum wage. Minimum wage workers are more likely to work for big chains than small businesses. Sixty-five percent of small business owners agree that “increasing the minimum wage would allow people to afford basic necessities and decrease the pressure on taxpayerfinanced government assistance to make up for the low wages paid by some employers.” Lew Prince, owner of Vintage Vinyl in St. Louis, Mo., made similar points in testimony to a U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on minimum

wage in March. Prince spotlighted the irresponsibility of big corporations paying wages so low that workers qualify for food stamps and Medicaid. Citing the Missouri Healthnet Employer Report, Prince said, “In the first quarter of 2011 (the latest data available) Wal-Mart alone cost Missouri taxpayers $6,506,254 in Medicaid costs. McDonald’s cost $3,781,373.” “It hurts our economy when big chain stores pay workers so little they have to work two jobs or rely on public assistance to scrape by,” says Melanie Beam, President of Capital District Local First, an independent business alliance in New York. “Full-time workers should be able to afford the basic necessities businesses are eager to sell and no business owner who pays a living wage should be undercut by competitors who do not. A higher minimum wage would level the playing field for small businesses and keep more dollars circulating in our local economy and our tax base.” We can’t build a strong economy on a falling wage floor. The minimum wage would be over $10 if it had kept up with the rising cost of living since the 1960s instead of falling behind. Most small business owners, like most Americans, want a minimum wage increase. Let’s get it done. Holly Sklar is the director of Business for a Fair Minimum Wage (www.businessforafairminimumwage.org). She can be reached at hsklar.writer@gmail.com.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | May 16, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Everything and everyone came together at May Fest Saturday! What a day! What a wonderful day! The weather was perfect for a parade…only a few sunburns, no winds, and happy people all over the place. The works of many were evidenced by how well everything came together. The breakfast held at the Plaza for the former graduates, which is open to any and all didn’t THIS & THAT have the high Joyce Emry

attendance that was hoped for but those that did show had lots of stories to tell. It was good to have Bob Irwin, who has passed his 90th birthday, Vance Ramey, Al and Mary Alice Robinson, Darleene (Kidwell) Owyen, to name a few and some phone calls had come saying they couldn’t make it this year. Thanks to Laura Jean (Frazier) and Darleene for keeping this tradition alive. The parade was very nice and there were some giant sized trucks and what a fine showing of fire trucks (for a small town) and of course the candies that are thrown on the street for the little ones to chase and the giving out of apples from Gold Diggers warehouses is a great

HILLTOP Chesaw/Molson COMMENTS Yard Sale is coming soon by Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

The May Day Festivities have come and gone. The weather on Saturday was great and there was a big crowd to line the parade route. The Big Chesaw/Molson Yard Sale will be on the Saturday of the Memorial Day week end at the Molson Grange Hall. The day will start at 9 a.m. and go until 3 p.m. That’s Saturday, May 25th. Judy Bowling will have her “Famous” Cinnamon Rolls for sale until she runs out. Better

come early. Taco Salads will be prepared by the Chesaw Knob Hill Club for lunch, starting at 11 a.m. until gone. If you have crafts or goods you want to sell, please call Penny Cole at 509 485 2343 for the use of a table (no charge). Get your things together and join in the fun. Saturday, May 18th, is the Memorial Service for Dolly Brazle at noon at the Chesaw Community Building. This will be a Pot Luck so bring your favorite dish, salad or dessert to share. The Opening of the School

additive. A few pink noses and foreheads came from the sun but a light cloud cover kept severe burns from happening. At the barbecue it was like a Deep Bay reunion for us, with the Anderson sisters, Joan (Califonia) and Kathleen (Virginia) Lynn Dwyer and John L. Corrigan eating and visiting with us. We were close neighbors for a lot of years, as our children were growing up. Also a hi from Ted Landreth. The Museum was a spot for many to reminisce as the history of some of the older businesses in Oroville, i.e.: Princes, Zosels, The Peerless, is depicted with mementos from the past. You learn a lot, and it took several quarters for us to keep our three little great grandsons, Snohomish, trying to keep up with the train display in the building. The workers at the museum are to be commended for the fine work they do on the displays, making it so appealing to view. The refreshing raspberry ice cream was very tasty, on a hot day such as it was. The Free Methodist Church was a good place to “unwind,” relax and cool off, after all the festivities, and listen to

House Museum will be on Saturday, May 25, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily until Labor Day in September. The Watershed Explorers Club presents the ‘Great Green Stock Exchange’, a buy, sell, trade, or barter anything to do with gardening event, at Fiona Gallery in Chesaw, Saturday, June l, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. No vendor fee to set up. Master Gardener on hand for questions. Call 509 485 2281 if you need more information or have questions. Get your Daubers ready for another night of BINGO at the Molson Grange Hall at 6 p.m. Bring some treats to share with the others. The buy-in is $10 and you can purchase additional tickets each game if you want to. We need to say prayers and send get well wishes to Roger Trepanier and George Penner.

the International Chorus, as they entertained with a marvelous assortment of songs. And it was there I learned that Irv and Joanie Roller will be leaving our community. The very musically talented Joanie will truly be missed up and down the valley, for her expertise in making ordinary things so much better, when she had a part in them. Irv, as the local dentist for a lot of years and Joanie had been active participants in many areas, as they raised their family, which have “left the nest” and now it is time to move on, but they will surely be missed. The HOT few days we had last week made the Similikameen/Okanogan rivers the color or a cup of rich brown hot chocolate, and flowing to the edge (and in some places higher) causing concern in Tonasket for above the flood stage, but the cooler nights that followed slowed down the flow to some extent and the flood danger is probably out of the danger stage. The Ken Ripleys had as their guests, his sister Ann, her husband and two granddaughters, from Idaho. Vivian Emry’s daughters Luanne and Gayle were here for the May Day festivities

Community Schools asks: What can you teach? Submitted By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

Summer isn’t here yet and already we’re thinking about next fall’s classes. You’ll see many familiar offerings because they are always popular, but new classes are needed. That means new instructors are needed, too. Don’t be shy! Let us know where your skills and talents lie. Share them with people in our community who want to

and will drive their mom to Ellensburg to visit her sister Doris Rairdon. MOM…Made Of Money. That is what mom stands for isn’t it? Especially when you’re five or six years old that is what you think. There were a lot of happy moms, last weekend when they received a bouquet of flowers, a card or a hug, or a phone call. Everybody needs a mom or good memories of one. I even got a phone call from Marco, our exchange student from Brazil. Tomorrow….a noun. A mystical land where 99 percent of all human productivity, motivation and achievement is stored. It is so easy to say, “Oh!, I’ll do that tomorrow.” Sometimes we do and sometimes we don’t. Remember that tomorrow, Friday, May 17 is the Memorial for Ray Oliver, longtime resident of Oroville and for the past several months in North Valley Care Center, at the American Legion Hall, with a potluck dinner following the 11a.m. service. Ray was a quiet sort of fellow, friend to many, hard worker, and ready to give a helping hand to those who needed it. He will be missed by the community and especially by his family.

THE LEARNING TREE learn what you have to teach. Here are some ideas. Do any fit your skills? If not, what does? Consider - Making doll clothes; Public Speaking; Ceramic Tile, Do Your Own; Beginning Woodworking for Women; Money management; Felting; Needle Point; Upholstery and Silk Embroidery. The ideas for learning go on and on. How about – Working With Clay; Cartooning for Kids; Calligraphy; Knit a Cable Sweater; Archery; Learn to Play the Piano (yes, we have sev-

eral keyboards). The list is endless. What’s on your list? Classes coming up during the remainder of May include: • • •

It’s a Coverup on Monday, May 20th (bibs for grownups) Mushroom Hunt Tour on Wednesday, May 29 (call of the wild fungi!) American Heart Association First Aid/ AED on Tuesday and Wednesday, May 21 and 22nd.

Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 4762011 or leave a message community.schools@oroville.wednet. edu. You can also register online at our new website www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

Community Bulletin Board PAC presents Spamalot OMAK - The Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus will be presenting Monty Python’s “Spamalot” at the Omak Performing Arts Center on May 17-19. Friday and Saturday performances will be at 7 p.m. and Sunday matinees at 3:30 p.m. General admission is $17, Students with ID $12 and children under 12 are $8. Tickets in Tonasket are available at Roy’s Pharmacy and in Oroville at the Oroville Pharmacy. They can also be purchased online at www. brownpapertickets.com. More information can be found online at www.ovovinfo.com or by calling (509) 429-4007.

Try Your Hand at Gold Panning

Molson Family Bingo MOLSON - The Molson Grange will have Family Bingo on Friday, May 17 at 6 p.m. Bring finger foods to share at break. For more information call (509) 485-2266.

Music at the Market OROVILLE - As part of their goal to provide cultural enrichment to our community, the Oroville Public Library will host “Music at the Market” each Saturday during the 2013 Farmers’ Market season. Musicians who would like to showcase, (volunteer), their acoustic talents are invited to call the Oroville Public Library to book a date. On Saturday, May 18 Music at the Market will feature Alene Halliday and Steve Pollard. For more information call (509) 4762662.

OROVILLE - This is a popular North Valley Community School class. In the first session you will gain insider information on what to look for and how to find it. The second day you will go up the Similkameen River to try your hand at panning for gold. Chances are you will OROVILLE - The Oroville find some! You may find other interesting minerals, too. Learn Farmers’ Market season is what to do on Thursday, May Saturday, May 18, from 9 a.m. to 16, then do it on Saturday, May 1 p.m. at the Oroville Community 18. Your Kinross instructor will Library located at 1276 Main St. guide you all the way. Call Ellen Purchase art, crafts, plant starts, Barttels at 509-476-2011 or com- fresh baked goods and tamales munity.schools@oroville.wednet. plus the best produce on the planedu. And, of course, you can reg- et. The Oroville Farmers’ Market continues eachMake Saturday ister on ournot newstart website at www. Why a new holiday tradition? this through the October 26 and new vendors are northvalleycommunityschools. time of year that you help save for a child’s college welcome. Call (509) 476-2662 for com.

Oroville Farmers’ Market

Give a Holiday Gift That Doesn’t End When the aBatteries Give Holiday Run Gift Out. That Doesn’t End When the Batteries Run Out. Do You Do You PrepareGift Give a Prepare Holiday More Doesn’t for More forFamily Family That End When Vacations Than Vacations Than the Batteries Run Out. You Do College? Why not startfor a new holiday tradition? Make You Do College? To the make your college savings gift in timefor a this time offor year that you help save education.

www.edwardjones.com www.edwardjones.com

Edward Jones can work with you to develop a strategy save foracollege. One option is a Make 529 college Whytonot start new holiday tradition? this thesavings where giftsave can for have tax benefits for you, timeplan, of year thattoday’s you help a child’s college family members and the child.* education. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in

certainJones states forcan thosework residents. Edward with you to develop a strategy to save for college. One option is a 529 college savings plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, family and the child.*tradition? Having fun with youra family is important. But nothingMake is more Whymembers not start new holiday this the

for thecollege holidays, call or visit today.Jones can child’s education. Edward work with you to develop a strategy to save for can help putchild’s together a strategy to why saveat forEdward college.Jones, vital thanyou your future. That’s we education. Sandra Rasmussen college. One option is a 529 college savings can help put together atool, strategy save for college. Using our you education funding Advisor we canto estimate future Financial plan, where today’s gift have tax Edward Jones can worksavings with can you to develop abenefits strategy To make college gift in time expenses atyour more than 3,000 schools and then recommend a Using our education funding tool, we can estimate future for you, family members and the child.* to save for college. One option is a 529 college 32 N Main St Suite A financial strategy based on your unique needs. True, vacations savings

vital child’s That’s why Edward Jones, we *Contributions to a 529 plan future. may behelp eligible for aat state tax deduction or Having funyour with your family is important. But nothing is credit morein timethan of year that you save for a child’s college certain states for those residents.

.

for the holidays, call visit today. expenses 3,000 and then recommend a *Contributions to at a 529more plan maythan be eligible foror a stateschools tax deduction or credit in certain states for those residents. Omak, WA 98841 plan, where today’s gift can have taxbetter. benefits for you, are great. But graduation ceremonies are even

financial strategy509-826-1638 based on your unique needs. True, vacations family members and the child.* Sandra Rasmussen are even better. are great. But graduation For a free, personalizedceremonies college cost report,

more information.

The Mushroom Hunt

Taking Orders for Cinnamon Roll Fundraiser’ OROVILLE - The Oroville Catholic Church is taking orders for cinnamon rolls that they will have for Tuesday, May 21 deliver as part of an annual fundraiser. The cinnamon rolls are made by John Desjardin and are very generous in size with a caramel topping. Cost is $3 per each roll and will be sold in half and full dozen quantities. To place an order or for more information call Jane Lynch at (509) 476-2177.

Tonasket Chamber Change TONASKET -The Tonasket Chamber of Commerce will now be meeting on the fourth Tuesday of each month at The Kuhler, 302 S. Whitcomb, at noon. This month that will be Thursday, May 23. Chamber meetings on the second Tuesday of each month will continue to be hosted by Whistler’s, at 616 S. Whitcomb, also at noon. Check the GazetteTribune’s online calendar for updated schedules.

It’s a novel way to spend a spring day. If you hear the call of the wild fungi but don’t know how to heed it, let our connoisseur show you the difference between the edibles and the no-nos. The class scheduled for May 22 filled up quickly, but there is so much interest we’re offering a second class on Wednesday, May 29. If you want to go on this mushroom adventure to find some of these delicious delicacies, give Ellen Barttels a call at (509) 476-2011, community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu or register online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com. Bring a brown bag lunch and water.

Tonasket and Oroville Food Chesaw Wild Great Green Stock Banks TONASKET - The Tonasket Exchange CHESAW -Chesaw Wild Invites everyone to the Great Green Stock Exchange on Saturday, June 1 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the garden next to FIONA, Main Street Chesaw. The even will take place rain or shine and their is no vendor fee to buy, sell or trade

In conjunction with Tonasket Founder’s Day Tonasket Freedom 5k (3.1 miles) Community Fun Run Saturday June 1, 2013 - 8:00 a.m. - at Tonasket High School Track OFFICIAL 2013 ENTRY FORM Please Print

First & Last Name:________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address:__________________________________________________________________ Email Address:_______________________________Phone#:_____________________Age:_____

All Proceeds go to Tonasket Water Ranch For more information call: 429-2289 or Visit: www.TonasketWaterRanch.org Mail registration form to: PO Box 254 Tonasket, WA 98855 Make check payable to: Freedom 5k T-Shirt Circle One: Adult T-Shirt Size: Youth T-Shirt Size:

S

M M

L XL L

Financial Advisor .

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

Registration Fees: Kids in Strollers Free Kids 12 & Under $10 13 - Adult $15 Family of 4 or 5 $40 Family of 6 or more $40 for first 5 & $5 each additional child List additional participants, names, ages & t-shirt sizes on an attached x-tra page.

PLEASE READ & SIGN: In consideration of my entry, I, intending to be legally bound for myself, and anyone entitled to act in my behalf, do hereby release and discharge Tonasket Water Ranch, Tonasket School District, Volunteers, and any and all Sponsors, Contributors and Organizer from any and all liability arising from any illness, injury or damages I may suffer as a result of my participation in the Freedom 5K event. I provide and certify my compliance by my signature below. If participant is under 18 years old, I certify by my signature that the child has permission to participate; is in good physical condition; and that officials may authorize emergency medical treatment in the event of injury or illness. I understand that there is no refund due to me for any reason. This release and waiver extends to all claims of every kind whatsoever foreseen and unforeseen, known or unknown.

Sign & Date: ___________________________________________________________________________________________

Local Sponsors:

Financial Advisor

To make509-826-1638 your college savings gift in time for the holidays, call or visit today. Sandra Rasmussen

food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480. OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m.

An Event for Everyone

NORTH VALLEY

FAMILY MEDICINE

*Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in certain those residents. www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC call orstates visit. for today.

For a free,32personalized cost report, N Main St Suitecollege A Omak, WA 98841 call or visit today.

anything to do with gardening: Bedding plants, house plants, bulbs, baby trees and shrubs, lawn furniture, yard art, baskets, containers, veggie starts, seeds, tools, fencing and pathway materials, bird and bat houses, etc. Share ideas: Composting, greenhouses, creative watering, drying and preserving, hot and cold frames, raised beds, pest conrol, propagation, transplanting, etc… There will be Master Gardeners (and local masterly gardeners) on hand to share their expertise, and a display of old tools and how they were used. Coffee, tea and pastries available at FIONA More info: chesaw wild.org or call Sandy at 485-2281 Brought to you by the Meyers Creek Watershed Explorers Club.

OKANOGAN VALLEY

Physician-owned and patient-centered

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE This form brought to you by the Okangoan Valley Gazette-Tribune

to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386. Editor’s Note: Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. G.A.D.

At the

MOVIES

Oliver Theatre

Oliver, B.C.

Reg. Showtimes: Sun.-Mon.-Tue.Thur. 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7&9pm

250-498-2277

OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN FRI. - SAT. -SUN. - MON.-TUES. 14 MAY 10-11-12-13-14 SHOWTIMES ON FRI. 7&9:15PM

THE BIG WEDDING

SAT. -SUN. - MON.-TUES. MAY 18-19-20-21 PG

PAIN AND GAIN

THURS.-FRI. MAY 23-24 R SHOWTIMES ON FRI. 7 & 9:30

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

IRONMAN 3

130 min

PG13

ACTION/SCI/FI/THRILLER STARRING ROBERT DOWNEY JR., GWYNETH PALTROW, DON CHEADLE, BEN KINGSLEY. FRI. 6:45, 9:45. SAT. *3:45, 6:45, 9:45. SUN. *4:00, 7:00. WKDAYS 7PM

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

THE GREAT GATSBY DRAMA/ROMANCE STARRING PG13

143 min

LEONARDO DICAPRIO, JOEL EDGERTON, TOBEY MAGUIRE, ADELAIDE CLEMENS

STARTS Fri. 6:30 & 9:45 Sat.*3:15,6:30&9:45 Sun. *3:45, 7:00 WKDYS. 7:00

STAR TREK

PG13

132 min

INTO DARKNESS

ACTION/ADV/SCI-FI STARRING CHRIS PINE, BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH, ZOE SELDANA. STARTS THURS: Fri. 6:45 & 9:45

Sat.*3:45,6:45 & 9:45 Sun. *4:15, 7:15 WKDYS. 7:15

THE BIG WEDDING

COMEDY STARRING ROBERT DENIRO, KATHERINE HEIGL, DIANE KEATON, TOPHER GRACE, ROBIN WILLIAMS STARTS FRI: Fri. 6:45 & 9:30 R 90 min Sat.*4:15,6:45 & 9:30 Sun. *4&7 WKDYS. 7:00

Adults $7.50 Kids 11-under & *Discount Matinee-kids/adults $5 ea

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


May 16, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life Our scholarship raffle still going on in May

CAPITOL NEWS

by LYLE ANDERSON Tonasket Eagles #3002

The month of May has come in with a bang and giving us a taste of what is in store for us this summer. Make sure and keep that lawn watered. Don’t forget the scholarship raffle that is still going on with the drawing in June. Come in

TONASKET EAGLES and get your tickets, they are one for $5.00 and three for $10.00 for a chance to win either $400 in groceries or gas. The weekly Friday night bingo will start at 7 p.m. with the kitchen opening at 5:30 p.m. and serving some of those good ole cheeseburgers, so grab those daubers and get on down for a fun night and a chance at the Jackpot. On Saturday, May 18 there will be a

Memorial Service here for Mary Sasse. Donated salads and desserts are very welcome. There will be Saturday karaoke at 9 p.m. also. Sunday will be our weekly pinochle at 1 p.m. and don’t forget the monthly District meeting is here Sunday also at l p.m. Our Sunday pinochle scores are as follows. first went to Gib McDougal and second place to Wanda Sutherland. Low score for the day was Ron Wisener and last pinochle taken by Ken Cook and Gib McDougal. Way to go! We wish those that may be ill a speedy recovery. God bless you all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

Chamber gets a history lesson OROVILLE - The Oroville Chamber of Commerce got a quick history lessons from Kay Sibley, Executive Director of the Okanogan Borderlands Historical Society. Sibley started by giving a little quiz to those who attended the Thursday, May 9 meeting at the Pastime Bar & Grill. Among the questions was where was the first

commercial Apple Orchard, the first gold rush and the first fort in Washington State. The apple orchard was at Smith’s Point and was started by Hirum “Okanogan” Smith just northeast of Oroville. There are still apple trees today producing fruit well over 100 years later, according to Sibley. The first gold rush was at Rich Bar on the Similkameen River,

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

just northwest of Oroville and the first fort was near the confluence of the Okanogan and Columbia Rivers near Brewster. Sibley also told those present a bit of the historical societies history and that the current display at the museum is on the Prince and Zosel families, as well as on the Peerless Hotel, which is now a restaurant.

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Your Complete Eyecare Centre

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

Seventh District Washington State Senator John Smith and Legislative Page Bailey Griffin, from Oroville.

Sen. Smith sponsors Oroville girl, Bailey Griffin, as legislative page Submitted by Joe Jackson Majority Coalition Caucus Communications

OLYMPIA - Bailey Griffin, a homeschooled freshman from Oroville, spent a week working as a page for the Washington State Senate at the Capitol in Olympia. Griffin was one of 19 students who served as Senate pages for the 13th week of the 2013 legislative session. The Senate Page Program is an opportunity for Washington students to spend a week working in the Legislature. Pages, like Griffin, are responsible for such tasks as transporting documents between offices as well as delivering mes-

sages and mail. Pages spend time in the Senate chamber in addition to attending page school to learn about parliamentary procedure and the legislative process. “This was such an amazing experience,” Griffin said. “I loved being able to take this week and learn about politics with other students who are interested in similar things. One day this week I was asked to sit in the Lt. Governor’s office and answer the phones for his staff. That really was exciting.” 7th District Sen. John Smith, R-Colville, sponsored Griffin for the week. “There is nothing more important than educating our chil-

dren,” Smith said. “Allowing students the opportunity to come to Olympia and learn about the legislative process from the inside out is what makes this program so great. It was an honor and a pleasure to sponsor Bailey this week.” Griffin enjoys being a girl scout, organizing a local book club and aspires to be a future FBI agent. She is the daughter of Julianna and Eric Griffin of Oroville. Junior high/middle school and high school students who are interested in the Senate Page Program are encouraged to visit http://www.leg.wa.gov/Senate/ Administration/PageProgram/.

CBP seizes nearly 600 pills of ecstasy at Port of Entry Canadian taken into custody; small amount of marijuana found By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE - U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) took a Canadian man into custody after they found him in possession of nearly 600 pills of ecstasy at the Oroville Port of Entry Alexis Boudreau, 21, from Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada was taken into custody by CBP officers after he arrived at the Oroville Port of Entry as one of three passengers in a Mazda sports utility vehicle, according to the Office of Field Operations, (OFO), Seattle Field Office, which announced several actions that took place at ports of entry in Washington State during the week of May 5 through May 10/. The driver claimed that they had recently moved to British Columbia and had gotten lost in an attempt to locate a local beach on Osoyoos Lake. A search of the vehicle resulted in the dis-

covery of a backpack claimed by Boudreau containing 597 pills of the illicit drug ecstasy. One other passenger was discovered to be in possession of a small amount of marijuana and was issued a criminal citation by the Washington State Patrol for being in possession under of the age of 21. Ecstasy is the street name for the drug Methylenedioxy-

methamphetamine (MDMA) and was classified as a Schedule I drug in 1985, meaning it is deemed to have no medical use and a high potential for abuse. Under a United Nations agreement it has also been criminalized in most countries in the world. The long term health effects from abuse of the drug are generally of concern to public health officials.

PRESCHOOL REGISTRATION

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

TONASKET

OKANOGAN

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

(509) 826-6191

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

(509) 826-6191

Toll Free

www.wvmedical.com

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health (509) 826-5600

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Submitted photo

WATERFRONT

 Anti

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

 Behavioral

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion  Walk

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 MASSAGE

Su Ianniello

Licensed Massage Practitioner

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

OPTICAL

Advertise In The

Is your child ready for preschool?

Oroville Co-Op Preschool is now accepting applications for the upcoming 2013-2014 school season for both the 3 and 4 year old classes. The registration fee is $40.00, but from now until...

May 31, registration is only $30!

For more information, please contact Joey Bocook at

OROVILLE CO-OP PRESCHOOL (OROVILLE COMMUNITY & YOUTH ASSOCIATION) Located at 816 Juniper Street, Oroville, WA 98844.

476-3672 or Kathy Smith at 509-322-9889

The OROVILLE CO-OP PRESCHOOL (OROVILLE COMMUNITY & YOUTH ASSOCIATION) admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Call Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 Ext 3050

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MAY 16, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • May 16, 2013

$MBTTJĂ FE %FBEMJOF  /PPO 5VFTEBZ r $BMM  UP QMBDF ZPVS BE

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

LPN or MA Certified, Family Health Centers, Tonasket, WA 1 full time and several Per Diem positions at our Tonasket clinic. We’re seeking an energetic team player who has a desire to make a difference. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. Take vital signs, review history with patient, administer medications, perform EKG’s, performs, prepares for and assists with procedures in accordance with clinical protocols, coordinates and processes refill requests with Provider, documents information to EHR and other duties as assigned. WA State license/certification required. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job description and application. Send resume to HR@myfamilyhealth.org or HR, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840. EEO. Open until filled

www.gazette-tribune.com

Hillside Park Senior Apartments 515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA AVAILABLE NOW! 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

St. Charles Place Apartments

Houses For Sale

www.gazette-tribune.com

For Rent

207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION:

HOUSE IN TONASKET; 2 bedroom, 1 bath, huge yard, partially fenced, garage/ shed. Quiet, clean street, $79,000. 509-322-3015

LOW INCOME HOUSING

Tonasket 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, heat pump, single car garage with shop and storage shed. RV parking with dump site and AC power. Covered patio. $98,000. Bill: (509)486-1952

– Family & Singles –

Sudoku

“PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

509-476-4057

email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

1973

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 20 (Easy, rating 0.42) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

6 8

9

2

9

6

4

4

3

1 7

8

3

7

2

2

9

5 4

4

2013

6

8

1

2

9

3

7

8

4 1

5

8

9 4 3

1 5

2

2 4

9 1

8 5 3

7

6

3 1 5

2

7 6 8

9 4

5

8

3

7

6

1

4

3

1

6

9

2

7

5

2

4

8

9

9

1

2

9

4

3

8 5

7

6 3 1

Puzzle 22 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

6

8

1

9

5

4

2

7 4

4

2

2 4

5 6

9 7

8 3

1

4 1

3

3

6 8

1 3

9

8

5

4

2 7

5

5 7 2

6

4

9 6 8 1

1 2

5 8

7 3

8

6 5

9

1

7 9

5

7 2

8

4

2 3

6 1

9 1 4

6

4 9 3

8

3

5 2 7

Puzzle 19 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

7

8 6

5

2

5

2

8

1

6

3

9

4

7

4

6

7

2

5

9

8 3

1

9

3

4

7

8 6

1 2

5

6 7

2

8

1

5

4

1

3

2

4

9

8

9

5 6

7 3

8 5

2

6

3

4

7

1

9

3

1

7

4

6

9

8

9

7

2

5

4

5

2

1

3

8

6

Puzzle 23 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

P

4

2

6

1

7

6

5

8

9 3

7 2

3

1

5

9

8

4

7

9

8

4

3

2

5 1

6

8

2

1

3

5 6

4 9

7

5 7

4 8

9 1

6

2

3

6

3

9

2

4

7 8

5 1

3 5

2

9

7

4

1

6

8

9

8

6

1

2

3

7

4

5

1

4 7

5

6

8

2

3

9

Puzzle 20 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

P

3 9

21. Dance bit 23. “To Autumn,� e.g. 24. Association of Southeast Asian Nations (acronym) 25. Professional beggar 28. Course 29. “Seinfeld� uncle 30. Setting at an oblique angle 31. Whirring sound 32. Shallow dishes mounted on a stem and foot 33. Hand sewing items (3 wds) 39. Brief stanza concluding certain forms of poetry 40. Ashtabula’s lake 41. Usurps forcefully 43. Drink from a dish 44. Priestly garb 48. 45 degrees clockwise from N 50. All excited 51. “A Nightmare on ___ Street� 52. Australian runner 53. Aviator 54. Coin opening 56. Chinese characters, e.g. 59. Arid 60. Church donation 61. Same: Fr. 62. Moray, e.g. 63. Character 64. Flight data, briefly (pl.) 6 4 2 7

1 5 8

5 2

4 9 8 1 3

7 6

7 1

8 5

3 6

9 2

4

9

1

2

8

6

4

6

3

8 7 4

5 1

2

4

7 2

5 9 6

8

3

8 5

6

1 3 7

4 9

7 9 3

4

5 2 6

1

5 2 1

9

8 4 3

7

3 1 7 6

2

8 9 5

Puzzle 16 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

3 4

6 9 1 7

5 8 2

8 5

1 4 3 2 9

6 7

9 2

7 8

5 6

3 4

1

4

6

5

9

8

3

2

1

7

Crosswords

from 1 to 4 p.m. at the American Legion 314 14th Ave., Oroville, WA

1 9

5

7 6 8

4 2

3

2 6

3 5

4 9 1

7

8

7 8 4

3

2 1 6

5 9

6 1 8 2

9

5 7 3

4

4

7 9 6

8

3 2 1

5

1 3

6 9

8 2

7 5

9

2

7

1

5

3

4

8

7

8

3

2

4

6 1

9

2

5

4

3 6

7 8

1

6

1 2

7 9

4

5

3

4

7

5

8

1 9

2 6

3

6

8

5

7

1

9

4

5

4

9

6

2

8

3

7

8

9

1

4

3

5

6

2

Puzzle 17 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

5

3 2 1 7

4

8 9 6

Puzzle 13 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.38)

Across 1. Chesterfield, e.g. 5. Kind of line 10. Synthetic thermoplastic material (acronym) 13. “Miss ___ Regrets� 14. Series of six balls bowled from one end of a cricket pitch (pl.) 15. Pink, as a steak 17. Detachment 19. Original matter prior to the Big Bang 20. Modified car for speed (2 wds)

Down 1. Used to express lack of interest (2 wds) 2. Good-for-nothing 3. Tailor, at times 4. Religious community where Hindu holy man lives

5. 128 cubic feet 6. Egg cells 7. “What’s ___?� 8. Pie chart, e.g. 9. Cockeyed 10. Be nosy 11. Assign a value to 12. Sideboard 16. Came out 18. Family head 22. Mollify 25. “Buona ___� (Italian greeting) 26. Dogwood trees, e.g. 27. Back 29. Deception 31. Cheerful 33. Quality of just coming into being 34. One registered in a class 35. For a limitless time 36. Biblical verb 37. “Dang!� 38. End 42. Arab, e.g. 44. House with steeply angled sides (hyphenated) 45. Marine gastropod with low conical shells 46. Creator god in Hindu 47. Has a hunch 49. Sit in on 50. Balloon filler 53. Long, long time 55. ___ el Amarna, Egypt 57. Addis Ababa’s land: Abbr. 58. “Look here!�

Statewides

Buying Silver, Gold Coins, Collections, Jewelry, Flatware, Guns. Paying fair Prices. Call Spence (509) 429-4722

reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

Garage & Yard Sale 2 FAMILY GARAGE SALE! May 17th and 18th from 8am to 4pm. Furniture, camping, sporting, household, miscellaneous & more! Located at 580 Loomis Oroville Road, Tonasket by Specticle Lake.

Found

DUTY FREE AMERICAS, INC. is a travel retailer offering our customer (traveling into Canada) top shelf liquors, international brand fragrances and quality gift items at Duty Free and/or significant price savings. Get the chance to interact with international travelers in a clean, safe and enjoyable work environment! At our Oroville Location, we are currently in need of:

OR E-Mail us at

Saturday, May 18, 2013

Wanted

2 FAMILY yard sale. May 18th & 19th, 9-4. Lots of stuff! Corner of Norway Pine Drive and Crumbacher Rd. Rain cancels. Ellisforde 3 FAMILY Yard Sale. Half THANK YOU to everyone for mile South of Ellisforde the support and cards given Bridge, on the old highway me in memory of my good (West Side of River). Lots of Miscellaneous. Friday and friend, Phyllis Shenyer. Saturday, May 17th-18th, Ted Thorndike. Starts 9am. Look for Signs. Friday 9am - 5:30pm and Saturday, 8am - 3pm. Furniture, dryer and other household items. In town Lumas, DID YOU FIND AN ITEM Follow signs! AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? OROVILLE - LOTS OF NICE Furniture, Bookshelves, Bedding, Double Bed, Found items can be placed Tools, China & Dishware, Kitchen Gadin the newspaper for one gets, Clown Collection, Curio Cabinet. Two Family Sale. 8 West Lake (Road week for FREE. Limit 15 next to Napa in Oroville). Sunday, May words, or prepay for words 19th only. 10am - 3pm only. over the 15 word limit. Call Tonasket - Indoor Yard Sale, 509-476-3602 before noon Community Cultural Center of on Tuesdays. Tonasket, 411 Western Avenue, May 17th & 18th, 8amHelp 4pm. Cafe Lune Open Friday Morning. Wanted

33606D, Hwy. 97 & Canadian Border, Oroville, WA, 98844

9

7

509-476-3602

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Apply in Person:

3

Sponsored by

Announcements

SEASONAL SALES ASSOCIATES

Easy, difficulty rating 0.42

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

6

8 7

1 9

5 4

3 2

3

1

4

8

7

2

6

9

5

9

5

2

4

6

3

1 8

7

2

7

8

3

5 4

9 1

6

1 4

9 7

8 6

5

2

3

5

6

3

9

2

1 8

7 4

8 9

6

2

4

7

3

5

1

7

3

5

6

1

9

2

4

8

Puzzle 14 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

ANSWERS

40th Anniversary

3

7

8

You are invited to a celebration of Howard & Roberta Cole’s

6

6

ANSWERS

3

7

5

9

7

6

9

6

8

4

6

9

1

1

8

3

5

6

7 4

3

6

7

3

Oroville 3 BEDROOM HOUSE, 1 bath, garage, nice yard, 1 mile from border on Hwy 97. $700 month, $400 deposit. Utilities not included. (509)486-2685

DFAJobs@DutyFreeAmericas.com

Join the Team today! EOE M/F/D/V

Motorcycles 2008 YAMAHA VSTAR 1100/XVS11XB. Black with ghost flames, windshield, leather bags, two helmets and cover. $5,000 firm. 509476-2514.

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF MAY 13, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310 Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

MOVING AUCTION

IRV & JOANI ROLLER - WANNACUT LAKE SUNDAY, MAY 19 - 10:00 a.m.

632 Wannacut Lake Rd. - North end of Lake. From Tonasket take Loomis Hwy about 12 miles. Turn right on Wannacut Lake Rd and continue to Sale Site. From Oroville, take the Blue Lake Rd. on West side of River. Watch for signs. ****************************************************************

PARTIAL LISTING: 1997 Toyota Camry * 1989 Chev Suburban * 16 ft Canoe * Kayak * 14 ft Alum Boat w/Motor * 3500 W Generator,New * Drill Press * Scroll Saw * Belt Sander * 2 Routers * Radial Arm Saw * More Power & Hand Tools * Like New MTD Riding Lawnmower * Troy Bilt Rototiller * Household * Pool Table * Various Bldg. Supplies * Wizard Works large Wood Stove * Old Dental Chair * Olad Oak Buffet * Old Library Desk * Misc. * There will be more by Sale Time * Look for Handbills * We can Mail, E-Mail, or Fax a Handbill

Sales Tax * No Buyers Premium * Food Available $40.00 fee per titled vehicle

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DAL DAGNON DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2570 486-2138

ADOPTION ADOPT: A lifetime of Love & Security await your baby. Expenses paid. 1-866-440-4220 ADOPT: A Beautiful Home, Love & Laughter, Fashion Exec, Nurturing Family yearns for 1st bay. Expenses paid Claudine 1-800-561-9323 EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com BAJILLIONS STILL AVAILABLE for good R.E. Contracts, Notes and Annuities. Receiving Payments? It may be time to give us a call. Skip Foss 800-637-3677. FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS $5,000 SUMMERTIME Bonus. Foremost Transport is hiring drivers with ž-ton and larger pickups to transport trailers. No forced dispatch, industryleading rates, and excellent bonuses! Call 1-866-764-1601 or apply online at ForeMostTransport.com today! DRIVERS -- Looking for Job Security? Haney Truck Line, seeks CDL-A, hazmat/doubles required. Paid Dock bump/Benefits, Bonus program, Paid Vacation! Call Now 1-888-414-4467, www.gohaney.com DRIVER -- One Cent Raise after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. Daily or Weekly Pay. Hometime Options. CDL-A, 3 months OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices PUBLIC HOSPITAL DISTRICT NO. 4, OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON (North Valley Hospital) NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held pursuant to RCW 70.44.300(3) on the 30th day of May, 2013, for the purpose of receiving public comment on the sale of Oroville property commonly known as Oroville Family Medical Clinic, located at 1617 Main Street, Oroville, WA. Any interested person may present their comments by making oral comments at the time of the public hearing or by submitting their comments in writing prior to or at the time of the public hearing. The hearing shall be held at the Commissioner’s Board Room at North Valley Hospital located at 126 Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket, Washington, commencing at 7:00 p.m. on the date set forth above. PUBLIC HOSPITAL DISTRICT NO. 4 OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON (North Valley Hospital) /s/ Helen Casey President of the Commission Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 16, 23, 2013. #481013 PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 824 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington extending an adopted interim official control regulating development and other activity within those critical areas requiring protection under the Washington State Growth Management Act and under RCW 35A.63.220 and RCW 35.70A.390 providing for moratoria and interim official control and establishing an effective date. The above summary is of an ordinance adopted by the Oroville City

P

4

2 1

5

3

8

7

6

9 P


MAY 16, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune May 16, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Page A9

Court, 911 Calls, Jail Bookings

Public Notices Council during the May 7, 2013 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 16, 2013 #479942 PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 825 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington amending Chapter 9.22 of the Oroville Municipal Code to update regulations for the growing and changing park system of the City and setting an effective date. The above summary is of an ordinance adopted by the Oroville City Council during the May 7, 2013 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 16, 2013. #479944 SPECIAL MEETING OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT As authorized under RCW 42.30.080, the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District will be holding a special board meeting to evaluate the qualification of applicants for the Secretary/Manager position of the District. The meeting will be held at the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Office, 516 11th Street, Oroville, WA 98844 on May 20. 2013 at 1:30PM. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 16, 2013. #480448

Superior Court Criminal The court found probable cause to charge Phillip Lee Austin, 31, with unlawful firearm possession first and aiming a firearm at a human being. He was found guilty and received eight years and six months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Clint Black, 35, with failure to register as a sex offender. He was found guilty and received one month confinement.

Clifford Johnson, 50, of Omak was charged with two counts of disorderly conduct. He was found guilty and received a $368 fine. Johannes Lappin, 41, of Okanogan was charged with malicious mischief third. Donald Searcy, 57, of Omak was charged with assault fourth. Bradley Sweat, 23, of Okanogan was charged with two counts of violating a no contact order and three counts of obstructing a law enforcement officer.

Otoniel Lopez, 34, was booked for DUI. Matthew Seiersen, 35, was booked for violation of a protection order. Dottie Johnston, 48, was booked for forgery. Lane Forhan, 37, was booked for failure to register as a sex offender.

David Brandon, 38, of Okanogan was charged with two counts of DWLS third. Aaron Jacobs, 23, of Omak was charged with assault fourth. He was found guilty and received 15 days confinement and a $1,033 fine.

Thursday, May 9, 2013 Randy Timentwa, 32, was booked

delivery of drug paraphernalia. Gary Kelly, 47, was booked for assault fourth and criminal trespassing second. Judy Hicks, 43, was booked for assault fourth.

for displaying a weapon. Start yourCarrienewspaper Leslie, 37, was booked on a detainer. Klint Harbin, 53, was booked for Sunday, May 12, 2013 subscription today assault fourth. Gomez, 20, was booked for Tuesday, May 7,and 2013 May 10, 2013 intimidating a witness. seeFriday,the light. Walter Lisa Wolff, 32, was booked for meth Theodore Storm, 25, was booked 38, was booked for possession and possession Get Robert allAndfelt, on a detainer. DUIthe and DWLS first. of drug paraphernalia. Candace Detjens, 30, was booked Travis Duncan, 28, was booked for Kenneth Cate, 47, was booked for for FTA on DWLS third. reckless driving. DUI. latest business, Jacob Kendall, 21, was booked for Delores Taylor, 70, was booked for FTA on family nonsupport. a DUI. Marriages Licenses Jackie entertainment, Web, 32, was booked for FTA Rochell Zavala, 33, was booked for sports, on DUI. possession of drug paraphernalia and violation of a Elizabeth Cleman, age 19 of will wed Jeremy Wednesday, May 8, 2013 news and no contact order. local more. Tonasket, Delano, age 26 of Riverside.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings:

District Court

malicious mischief third.

8

Monday, May 6, 2013

Sharon Moses, 26, was booked for DWLS second and hit-andrun unattended. Bruce Wisner, 49, was booked on a detainer. Matthew Austin, 29, was booked for

In Okanogan, on Linden Street, there was a theft of money from an EDT card and food stamps. Only a dollar was left in the account.

Saturday, May 11, 2013

Joey Zellner, 50, was booked for a DUI. Alex Wright, 24, was booked for failure to appear and use/

Norberta Abrahamson, age 29 of Omak, will wed Jake Taylor, age 33 of Omak. Cynthia Fisher, age 52 of Omak will wed Stephen Rowe, age 56 of Omak.

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 1420 Main St. l P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 866-773-7818

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 h i l lt o p r e a lt y www.gazette-tribune.com Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon NEW LISTING Never Before Offered

LAKE AND COUNTRY

Just Reduced! Unobstructed views to die for! This open concept home features 2

Subscribe to the...

2 Homes on 80 Acres. Fenced and Cross-fenced.12 miles to Omak. Excellent Access.Over 2400 sq.ft. Main Home on 1 Level. Immaculate 3 Bdrm, 2-Bath. Super Good Sense. 3-car Garage. Finished Sleeping Room on end of Garage. Plus Storage. Beautiful Yard. Underground Sprinklers. 2nd Home is 3-bdrm, 1-Bath used for rental. Shop w/concrete Floor. Year-round Spring Fed Pond w/Fish. 2 Good Domestic Wells.Very Private. Lots of Wildlife. Ford Tractor Included. This Ad cannot do this property justice. Go to Website to see Pictures and complete information. Sellers Moving. Price is Right. - $375,000.00

living rooms, 2 master bedrooms with walk-in closets and beautiful hickory cabinets throughout. The attached garage is over sized with plenty of storage! There are a total of 11 covered parking spaces, RV parking with a 12 ft door and the big garage features a warm storage room heated bays. Enjoy the big horned sheep playing on the hill behind your home! MLS#353348 $297,700

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Call Today!

Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com l 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

www.gazette-tribune.com

SUN LAKES REALTY

509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

www.windermere.com

New On The Market

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee 3 Washington Ave., Oroville--.402 acres: Well built log cabin in Molson. Trout fishing in Molson and Sidley lakes just minutes away. Several other lakes and National Forest land close by as well. Don’t miss out on this quality cabin where recreational opportunities abound. NWMLS # 479350 $125,000.00

IMPECCABLE LAKE OSOYOOS HOME

Wonderful Styling w/Granite Kitchen, Open Concept Living Plus 2 Bedrm/2 Bath Guest Cottage. Beautiful Beach & Landscaping. Call Today For Private Showing $549,000

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

- 24 Hour Service Licensed & Bonded

509-486-2692

Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES RYAN W. GUNN Civil Criminal

Busted Knuckle

Attorney at Law

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Auto & Upholstery

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

Seats  Headliners  Door Panels Convertible tops / Vinyl roof covers — Auto & Small Engine Service — We Do Tire Repair & Balance! 124 Chesaw Rd, Oroville 509-476-2611

Concrete

Insulation

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Installed Insulation &

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 We Work Saturdays! 11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Garage Doors  Installed

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

Service & Trades

Advertise where the

Service & Trades Professionals Advertise • Affordable Full Color ads • Weekly exposure in newspaper and online

Call Charlene Helm For Rates & More Info

476-3602

Midway Building Supply All of your Automotive & Upholstery needs

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

Construction

Building Supplies Quality Supplies Since 1957

P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

OSOYOOS READI-MIX

Auto / Upholstery

chelm@gazette-tribune.com

HOURS: Mon. - Sat., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Pumps

Oroville Building Supply 33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

(509) 476-2929 LAWRECS928P3

Septic Service

Excavation and Septic Service

— Fred Cook — Over 25 Years experience!

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

okanoganconstruction.com

10 Years Experience • Licensed & Insured New Construction • Remodeling • Development “Quality You Can Depend On”

Got Water? Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Remodeling? Time for an Update, Addition or Deck? Check Us Out Online!

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Thank you for your continued support!  Septic Pumping

 Septic Installation  Portable Toilets

509-422-3621 Cell: (509) 322-4777 MORGASE983JS

Storage

Storage

Lakeside

OROVILLE

STORAGE Boat, RV & More! Weatherization with lease Rent unit for project  Contractors store tools / product  Additional Business space available  

Located at: 124 Chesaw Rd., Oroville

“YOU” in white

Mini Storage & U-Haul

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power n Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

www.orovilleministorage.com

509-421-7168

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

lakesidestoreit@gmail.com

Want to get noticed? Call today!

Well Drilling

Looking for something?

“The Water Professionals”

D

Check out the Business & Service

irectory

To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store  Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Zimmatic Pivots  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com


Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | May 16, 2013

SPORTS

Oroville girls make it a ‘four-peat’ Kindred, Smith, Mills qualify for boys district meet By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Terry Mills/submitted photo

The Tigers’ Kylie Dellinger qualified for this Saturday’s regionals with a third-place finish at last Friday’s District 6 meet.

Tigers pick up 16 regional slots By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Hot weather as well as scheduling conflicts with the state FFA convention in Pullman - made last Friday’s 1A District 6 track and field meet a challenge for just about everyone involved. Tonasket athletes worked through the heat to earn 16 slots to this week’s 1A Bi-District 6/7 meet, where the survivors will battle their counterparts from the Northeast A League for four berths in each event to the state finals at Eastern Washington University at the end of the month. The Tigers also recorded personal bests in 17 events. “We will have to be at our best to make it to state,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “I think we are peaking at the right time to give us a good chance to make it. We have competed against bigger schools and good athletes most of the season, so we are used to tough competition. “It’s time to lay it all on the line and give it all we’ve got.” Tonasket’s girls finished fifth in team scoring with 88 points, 3.5 points behind fourth place Quincy. Cashmere won the meet with 135.5 over Okanogan, with Chelan taking third. The Quincy boys dominated their meet with 191.5 points over

Chelan (107). Cashmere (97) finished third, followed by Cascade (79), Omak (74) and Tonasket (42) in the eight team meet. Emily Mills and Ethan Bensing won individual district titles for the Tigers. Mills won the 400 in 1:01.11, and also qualified for the regional meet with a third place finish in the 200 (26.87) and joined Rose Walts, Kylie Dellinger and Cassie Spear on the 4x400 team (4th, 4:38.15) that also qualified. Bensing uncorked a career best leap of 41-11 in the triple jump, which also puts him fourth on the state 1A top performances list. The sophomore also took second in the long jump (19-8). Other regional qualifiers for the girls included Kylie Dellinger in the 1600 (3rd, 5:57.26); Rose Walts in the 100 hurdles (2nd, 17.10) and triple jump (4th, 31-9); Shea Smith in the shot put (5th, 28-2.5); Yasmin Cervantes (2nd, 95-9) and Alissa Young (6th, 85-9) in the discus; and Kathryn Cleman in the pole vault (3rd, 8-6). Other boys qualifiers included Smith Condon in the 400 (4th, 56.58); Joaquin Polito in the javelin (6th, 129-10); and Dallas Tyus in the triple jump (4th, 37-8) and high jump (5th, 5-4). The Tigers’ regional qualifiers travel to Riverside (Chattaroy) on Saturday, May 18, for the bidistrict state qualifying meet.

OROVILLE - Track and field always have a measure of unpredictability, especially when combined with high school athletes trying to make their mark on the sport. But winning league meets has become a regular habit for the Oroville girls Class of 2013, as they made it four-for-four with a team domination of the Thursday, May 9, Central Washington League North Sub-district meet. “I was especially happy for our group of senior girls,” said Oroville coach Harold Jensen. “I was very excited and pleased with the effort of both the boys and girls teams.” The Hornet girls swept to victory with 92 team points to Bridgeport’s 69. Liberty Bell (58) was third and Manson (47) took fourth. Liberty Bell (79) edged Bridgeport (73) for the boys’ title, followed by Manson (63) and the Hornets (36). Seven Hornet girls qualified in multiple events for this weeks District 6 state qualifying meet. Sierra Speiker will race four times for state berths as she was a winner in the 800 (2:36.18), 1600 (5:31.60), 3200 (11:40.0) and the 4x400 relay with Callie Barker, Kaitlyn Grunst and Brittany Jewett (4:32.05). Grunst also won her three individual events, taking the high jump (5-0), long jump (15-7.25) and triple jump (32-0). Barker bounced back from the disappointment of not qualifying in the pole vault to win both the 100 hurdles (18.59) and 300 hurdles (54.19). Alexa Werner win the shot put (31-8.5) and took third in the discus (83-1), while Jewett placed second in the javelin (894) and fourth in the long jump (13-2.75). Breanna Ervin was a winner in the pole vault (6-6) and was third in both the 400 (1:10.70) and 100 hurdles (20.54) while Sammie Walimaki qualified in the 200 (3rd, 30.44) and Lisa Hartvig took second in the high jump (4-6). Jewett, Ervin, Hartvig and Walimaki also advanced to next week’s meet with a third place finish in the 4x200 relay (1:59.46). Luke Kindred and Tanner Smith did most of the scoring for the Hornet boys.

Top, Alexa Werner kept her head and won Thursday’s sub-district shot put competition. Left, Logan Mills (left) and Tanner Smith each qualified for next week’s District meet in both the 100 and 200-meter dashes. In the 200 (shown), Smith took first place and Mills was third.

Brent Baker/staff photos

Kindred won the javelin (1511) and pole vault (9-6) and took third in the discus, as well as combining with Logan Mills and Charlie Arrigoni to take third in the 4x100 relay (47.32). Highly-anticipated battles between Smith and Liberty Bell standout Austin Watson never materialized after Watson pulled up with what was eventually determined to be a torn hamstring during the 100-meter dash.

That left Smith virtually unchallenged as he won the 100 (11.74) and 200 (23.81). Mills, a freshman, stepped up to qualify in the 100 (2nd, 12.40) and 200 (3rd, 25.13). Jensen said Mills and Walimaki were, “two underclass athletes who met the challenge with great performances.” Mills (shot put) and Walimaki (100) nearly qualified in additional events as well.

“I personally want to thank the Oroville Booster Club for all of their donations for equipment this season,” Jensen said. “And all of the helpers, timers, recorders, staff and students who helped with all of the home meets this season.” The Hornets travel to Ephrata on Saturday for the 2B District 6 state qualifying meet. The top three in each event move on to the state finals in Cheney in two weeks.

FULL TONASKET AND OROVILLE TRACK & FIELD RESULTS 1A District 6 Top four in laned events, top six in 1600, 3200 and field events qualify for 1A Bi-District 6/7 Regional at Riverside * = personal best

Girls

Team Scoring: Cashmere 135.5, Okanogan 107, Chelan 106.5, Quincy 91.5, Tonasket 88, Cascade 63, Omak 48.5, Brewster 46. Individual (winners and Tonasket finishers): 100 - 1. Maddy Parton, CAS, 12.69. No Tonasket competitors. 200 - 1. Maddy Parton, CAS, 26.54; 3. Emily Mills, TON, 26.87*; 8. Shea Smith, TON, 30.29*. 400 - 1. Emily Mills, TON, 1:01.11; 6. Cassie Spear, TON, 1:07.47. 800 - 1. Angela Knishka, CSH, 2:25.69; 5. Devan Utt, TON, 2:46.39*; 11. Mary Naylor, TON, 3:00.43*; 12. Kallie Mirick, TON, 3:11.89*. 1600 - 1. Angela Knishka, CSH, 5:31.03; 3. Kylie Dellinger, TON, 5:57.26; 9. Jessica Puente, TON, 6:55.85. 3200 - 1. Kea Paton, CSH, 13:14.25. No Tonasket competitors. 100 Hurdles - 1. Jesica Bauer, CSH, 16.31; 2. Rose Walts, TON, 17.10*. 300 Hurdles - 1. Maddy Parton, CAS, 48.84; 8. Kathryn Cleman, TON, 53.68. 4x100 Relay - 1. CSH (Caudill, Green, B. Knishka, Bauer), 51.97. 8. TON - DQ 4x200 Relay - 1. CSH (A. Knishka, Bauer, B. Knishka, Green), 1:50.74; 6. TON (Cruz, Mills, Vugteveen, Spear), 2:00.0. 4x400 Relay - 1. CSH (Parker, Bauer, B. Knishka, Caudill), 4:17.68; 4. TON (Mills, Walts, Dellinger, Spear), 4:38.15. Shot Put - 1. Karle Pittsinger, CHL, 39-10.5; 5. Shea Smith, TON, 282.5; 11*. Allison Glanzer, TON, 25-2.5*; 12. Alissa Young, TON, 24-10.75*; 16. Kallie Mirick, TON, 17-3. Discus - 1. Karle Pittsinger, CHL, 12610; 2. Yasmin Cervantes, TON, 95-9*; 6. Alissa Young, TON, 859; 9. Allison Glanzer, TON, 76-1*; 16. Jessica Puente, TON, 47-9. Javelin - 1. Kara Staggs, OKN, 104-10;

11. Alissa Young, TON, 71-0; 12. Yasmin Cervantes, TON, 65-11; 16. Allison Glanzer, TON, 59-4; 18. Corrina Karrer, TON, 25-7. High Jump - 1. Haley Holiday, CHL, 5-0; 8. Devan Utt, TON, 4-6. Pole Vault - 1. Jesica Bauer, CSH, 100; 3. Kathryn Cleman, TON, 8-6; 7. Jaden Vugteveen, TON, 6-0*. Long Jump - 1. Jesica Bauer, CSH, 15-5.5; 7. Kathryn Cleman, TON, 13-8.5. Triple Jump - 1. Megan Parks, OKN, 32-4.5; 4. Rose Walts, TON, 31-9; 7. Devan Utt, TON, 30-1.75; 11. Jaden Vugteveen, TON, 27-0; 15. Mary Naylor, TON, 23-9.5.

Boys

Team Scoring: Quincy 191.5, Chelan 107, Cashmere 97, Cascade 79, Omak 74, Tonasket 42, Brewster 40, Okanogan 25.5. Individual (winners and Tonasket finishers): 100 - 1. Dennis Merritt, CAS, 11.25; 18. Jevonti Haney-Williams, TON, 13.34*; Zach Collins, TON, 13.54. 200 - 1. Dennis Merritt, CAS, 23.26; 13. Zach Collins, TON, 26.62. 400 - 1. Sammy Trudeaux, OMK, 55.25; 4. Smith Condon, TON, 56.58*. 800 - 1. Spencer Elmore, QCY, 2:11.40; 9. Abe Podkranic, TON, 2:34.10; 10. Luis Casarruibias, TON, 2:36.25; 11. Ivan Morales, TON, 2:40.40*. 1600 - 1. Spencer Elmore, QCY, 5:03.62; 11. Abe Podkranic, TON, 5:45.61; 13. Luis Casarrubias, TON, 5:59.39. 3200 - 1. Victor Salgado, QCY, 10:19.12; No Tonasket competitors. 110 Hurdles - 1. Carter Bushman, QCY, 15.79; No Tonasket competitors. 300 Hurdles - 1. Carter Bushman, QCY, 42.92; No Tonasket competitors. 4x100 Relay - 1. QCY (Stocker, Camacho, Guardado-Chavez, Hodges), 45.50; 4. TON (Smith, Condon, Bensing, Catone), 47.69. 4x400 Relay - 1. CHL (Stevens, Flowers, Oscarson, Miller), 3:41.05; 6. TON (Smith, Condon, Tellez, Haney-Williams), 3:53.75. Shot Put - 1. Armandon Tafoya, QCY, 48-4; 11. Chad Edwards, TON,

33-9.75; 14. Adrian Palomares, TON, 31-7.75. Discus - 1. Armando Tafoya, QCY, 167-2; 15. Joaquin Polito, TON, 84-2. Javelin - 1. Brandon Zaragoza, OMK, 161-7; 6. Joaquin Polito, TON, 129-10; 15. Adam Halvorsen, TON, 88-7; 16. Devyn Catone, TON, 88-3. High Jump - 1. Manny Munoz, CHL, 5-10; 5. Dallas Tyus, TON, 5-4. Pole Vault - 1. Darren Hodges, QCY, 14-9; No Tonasket competitors. Long Jump - 1. Blain Peck, CSH, 20-3; 2. Ethan Bensing, TON, 19-8*. Triple Jump - 1. Ethan Bensing, 4111*; 4. Dallas Tyus, TON, 37-8.

Pole Vault - 1. Breanna Ervin, ORO, 6-6. Long Jump - 1. Kaitlyn Grunst, ORO, 15-7.25; 4. Brittany Jewett, ORO, 13-2.75*. Triple Jump - 1. Kaitlyn Grunst, ORO, 32-0*.

Boys

Team Scoring: Liberty Bell 79, Bridgeport 73, Manson 63, Oroville 36. Individual (winners and Oroville finishers): 100 - 1. Tanner Smith, ORO, 11.74; 2. Logan Mills, ORO, 12.40. 200 - 1. Tanner Smith, ORO, 23.81; 3. Logan Mills, ORO, 25.13.

400 - 1. Cesar Dominguez, LB, 55.56; No Oroville competitors. 800 - 1. Liam Daily, LB, 2:08.86; No Oroville competitors. 1600 - 1. Liam Daily, LB, 4:55.39; 10. Nahum Garfias, ORO, 6:07.25. 3200 - 1. Ben Klemmeck, LB, 11:11.0; no Oroville competitors. 110 Hurdles - 1. Kip Craig, BPT, 16.96; no Oroville competitors. 300 Hurdles - 1. Kip Craig, BPT, 41.24; no Oroville competitors. 4x100 Relay - 1. MSN (Hannah, Tejada, Machus, Toolson), 46.69; 3. ORO (Mills, Arrigoni, Smith, Kindred), 47.32. 4x400 Relay - 1. LB (Ju. McMillan, Jensen, Dominguez, Daily),

3:36.48; no Oroville competitors. Shot Put - 1. Alex Vanderholm, MSN, 39-2.25; 6. Logan Mills, ORO, 322; 11. Dakota Haney, ORO, 27-8. Discus - 1. Alex Vanderholm, MSN, 139-2; 3. Luke Kindred, ORO, 109-9; 8. Dakota Haney, ORO, 82-8. Javelin - 1. Luke Kindred, ORO, 151-1. High Jump - 1. Jaymis Hanson, LB, 5-8. Pole Vault - 1. Luke Kindred, ORO, 9-6. Long Jump - 1. Austin Watson, LB, 20-6.25; no Oroville competitors.

2B North Subdistrict 6 Top four in all events qualify for 2B District 6 at Ephrata * = personal best

Girls

Team Scoring: Oroville 92, Bridgeport 69, Liberty Bell 58, Manson 47. Individual (winners and Oroville finishers): 100 - 1. Itzel Castro, MSN, 14.01; 5. Sammie Walimaki, ORO, 14.35. 200 - 1. Itzel Castro, MSN, 28.76; 3. Sammie Walimaki, ORO, 30.44. 400 - 1. Estrella Corrigan, LB, 66.87; 3. Breanna Ervin, ORO, 70.70; 5. Lisa Hartvig, ORO, 72.04. 800 - 1. Sierra Speiker, ORO, 2:36.18. 1600 - 1. Sierra Speiker, ORO, 5:31.60. 3200 - 1. Sierra Speiker, ORO, 11:40.0. 100 Hurdles - 1. Callie Barker, ORO, 18.59; 3. Breanna Ervin, ORO, 20.54*. 300 Hurdles - 1. Callie Barker, ORO, 54.19*. 4x100 Relay - 1. BPT (Trejo, Ai. Herrejon, Ay. Herrejon, Monje-Lopez), 53.93; No Oroville competitors. 4x200 Relay - 1. BPT (Ai. Herrejon, Trejo, Rivera, Monje-Lopez), 1:56.74. 4x400 Relay - 1. ORO (Speiker,, Barker, Grunst, Jewett), 4:32.05. Shot Put - 1. Alexa Werner, ORO, 31-8.5. Discus - 1. Ruby Garcia, MSN, 95-4; 3. Alexa Werner, ORO, 83-1. Javelin - 1. Sarina Williams, LB, 104-6; 2. Brittany Jewett, ORO, 89-4. High Jump - 1. Kaitlyn Grunst, ORO, 5-0; 2. Lisa Hartvig, ORO, 4-6.

Out On The Town

your guide to

Dining & Entertainment Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

WANT THEIR ATTENTION? Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at EVERY WEEK Phone: 509-476-3602


May 16, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A11

SPORTS

The change of seasons Reflecting on the end of my son’s college track career

I’ve had this story to tell for six years, since the end of my son A.J.’s sophomore year in high school. The sad thing about being the kid whose dad is the only sportswriter that covers your teams, as he was back HALF-BAKED then, is that Brent Baker your dad shortshrifts things you do that he’d make a big deal out of if it were someone else. There have been plenty of highlights throughout his 10 years of track, from middle and high school in AuGres, Michigan, to college at Seattle Pacific University. He eventually became the rightful owner of all three of his high school’s individual distance records, capping his senior year by heading to State in the 800, 1600 and 3200 and upsetting the state cross country champion (and owner of a fouryear Division I scholarship) in the process. At SPU he was essentially a walk-on, but served as cocaptain and captain of the cross country team from his sophomore year on. In track he took on the steeplechase - three kilometers with immovable barriers (topped by a 4x4) and a pool of water - earned a partial athletic scholarship and came so close to making the NCAA Division II nationals as a sophomore and junior that he could taste it. An injury late in this, his senior year, effectively ended that dream. But after missing almost a month, he finished third in the steeple at last weekend’s GNAC conference meet, earning the

Brent Baker/staff photo

Getting action shots of A.J. (left) running the steeplechase was pretty cool. But watching him celebrate his teammates’ accomplishments - here, after Seth Pierson (a Cashmere grad) won the conference 1500-meter championship - was even better. right to stand on the podium in his school uniform one last time. It wasn’t the triumphant end to a college career, culminating with a trip to Nationals, that he’d worked so hard for. I sat staring at the track as subsequent events ran on for about half an hour, keeping my sunglasses on even as the sun set. But my unwillingness to let go of the moment faded as I spent the rest of the weekend watching A.J. celebrating with or consoling teammates as they achieved or fell short of their own athletic dreams, watching this ... this man, who is graduating and getting married in the next few months ... and realized that the person this sports thing shaped and sometimes hammered into maturity isn’t so different than the little kid we used to have. And was a heck of a lot better than the “what might have been” of a trip to Nationals. So now that his formal sports career is over, and I’m wrapping my mind around the relentless progression of time, you’ll have to indulge me. *** It was one of those moments made for a sports movie. A.J.’s high school track coach, Kevin Loga, took me aside after

he’d pulled off a double stunner in the North Star League meet, winning both the 1600 and 3200 as a sophomore on a hot, humid Michigan afternoon against a pair of rivals he’d never beaten. “When we get back to the school, meet me at the locker room,” Kevin said. “I don’t think he has any idea.” The gym lights were off when the three of us walked the length of the court, with only sunlight filtering in from the setting sun. We stood below the school record board as Kevin pulled out the time sheet from the meet. “There’s your time,” he said, pointing to the printout. “And look at that,” he pointed at the record board. A.J. looked up at the board, still not quite comprehending what was going on, but then his eyes got big as it dawned on him. There was hugging and yelling and celebrating. The record was only a year old, set by a recent graduate, Jake Taylor, who a year earlier had gone out of his way to mentor A.J. as a freshman. But before that it had stayed unchanged on the board since 1974. And when you’re in a town of 1,000 with high school of 150 kids and a graduating class of 35, everybody knows in a flash.

He was the center of attention for about a week, and a big deal was made at the spring sports awards banquet. But was when the they mystical sports-movie-triumphmoment ended. That night when we got home he asked if I had the time sheets from the previous year’s meets. Of course I did, and I watched for a few minutes as he started digging through them. “What’s going on?”I asked. “I could swear that Jake broke the record twice last year,” A.J. said. “I don’t think the board is right.” The next day, my 16-yearold kid walked into his coach’s office with the time sheet from my archive that proved that the record board was wrong; Jake had indeed re-broken his own record with a time faster than what A.J. had run, and no one had noticed. No one (except maybe Jake) knew, and to A.J. it was a betrayal of a teammate who had inspired him, of the sport itself, and of his own desire to legitimately hold that record. He went out and told all of his friends that, hoopla or not, Jake still owned the school record. Tracked down Jake himself to let him know that his name still rightfully belonged on that board. It was a miserable few weeks trying to absorb all of the conflicting emotions that came with that. Having the record, not having it, “giving back” all the recognition, setting the record straight. Kim and I struggled with our own feelings almost as much as he did his. It was the thrill victory and agony of defeat in one package. A lesson in humility, dealing with an innocent error that at the time seemed like the biggest thing in the world. And learning the satisfying pain of doing the right thing, even when no one knew, or likely would ever have known, there was a right thing that needed to be done. It took another year, but A.J. finally broke that 1600 record, as well as the others. But that was the moment when I discovered who my kid was, and who he was going to be.

Beyers, Thornton advance in tennis By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

EAST WENATCHEE Tonasket seniors Megan Beyers and Claire Thornton were the only Tigers to survive the opening weekend of tennis district tournament play in East Wenatchee on Saturday, May 10. Other Tigers picked up some tournament wins, but with the opening two rounds running in single-elimination format, there was no margin for error. The second-seeded Beyers, a favorite to claim one of four state tournament spots, ousted opponents from Liberty Bell and Entiat in her first two matches to clinch an appearance in next Saturday’s second weekend of play. She finished the day off in the quarterfinals with a 6-2, 6-0 victory over Chelan’s Cheyenne Crose. “Megan is playing pretty well right now,” said Tonasket coach Dave Buchheim. “Anything can happen when it comes to getting to state. But (the district title) should come down to here and (Omak’s) Shaylyn Goodall, who hasn’t lost a game this year.” Thornton also advanced to the second weekend of play, winning her first two matches before losing in the quarterfinals to Cashmere’s Molly Kenoyer. Kenoyer also victimized the

Tigers’ Brisa Leep, eliminating her in an opening-round match. Both Tonasket girls doubles teams - Madie Villalva/Baillie Hirst and Abby Gschiel/Ye Jeong - lost their opening-round matches. In boys singles, both Brian Hendrick and Trevor Terris opened with relatively easy firstround wins before suffering close defeats. Hendrick was eliminated in the second round with a 7-5, 6-4 loss, and Terris was defeated in three sets by under-seeded Manuel Equihua of White Swan, who assured himself of as second weekend of play after entering the tourney as the 23rd seed. Walker Marks lost his openinground match to fourth-seeded Greg Sklar of Omak. In boys doubles, Colton Leep and Levi Schell won their opening match before being eliminated in the second round, while the team of Jesse Holan/Conner Williams lost their first round match in three sets. With the tournament brackets pared down to eight players each, double-elimination competition resumes on Saturday, May 18, at Eastmont. Beyers and Thornton will be vying for two of the four available singles spots for the state finals, which will be held in Yakima, May 24-25.

Oroville softball heads to district playoffs By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Oroville coach Dane Forrester knew the Hornets’ fastpitch softball squad would be better this year, but with a very youthful bunch that includes several eighth graders, wasn’t sure how much success to predict. The Hornets secured their next step in rebuilding their program on Friday, May 10, sweeping a doubleheader at Manson to clinch their first district playoff

spot since 2010. The Hornets won their final two games of the season, whipping the Trojans 26-11 and 29-17 to earn a loser-out game at Bridgeport on Wednesday, May 15. Oroville (4-15, 4-11 CWL North) can advance to Friday’s double-elinination tournament at the Sterling Sportsplex in East Wenatchee. A victory over Bridgeport (12-7, 9-6) would set the Hornets up with a 3:00 p.m. contest against Kittitas (15-2), the South Division champion.

Halvorsen, Hatch win May Day Fun Run 5k Hornet tennis ends year By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

By Gary A. DeVon

EAST WENATCHEE Oroville’s tennis team saw its season come to an end Saturday, May 11, in district tournament competition in East Wenatchee. The Hornets sent three singles players and one doubles team to the tournament. Faring the best of the group were 15th-seeded Joe Sarmiento and Ronel Kee, who won their opening match over a team from Liberty Bell, 7-5, 6-2. The duo fell

Managing Editor

OROVILLE – Damon Halvorson and Madison Hatch were the top finishers in the 5K and Elijah Antonelli and Lindsay Koepke had the best times in the 2-mile division of the 34th annual May Festival Fun Run. It was a great morning for a run, according to participants who took the starting gun just after 8 a.m. While 34 were the top finishers in their age groups, many are happy just to walk, with several participants pushing strollers. In the Men’s 5K Halvorsen finished with a time of 17:48, followed by Oroville School District Superintendent Steve Quick at 22:47 and Clint Lewis at 26:17 In the Women’s 5K Hatch had a time of 22:53, followed by Sheridan Blasey at 25:14 and Jennifer West, daughter of this year’s May Festival Grand Marshals, at 25:53. In the Men’s 2-Mile, Antonelli’s time was 15:17, followed close behind by Darryn Hughes at 15:55 and Bruce Thornton at 18:52. Koepke had a time of 16:08 in the Women’s 2-Mile, with Kyra Koepke at 17:54 and Laura Kinman at 18:59. By age group: Women 2-Mile and 5K Mixed Age 6-8 – 1.) Tori Moser, 32:44 Age 9-11 – 1.) Sheriden Blasey, 25:14; 2.) Marissa Hixon, 33:59; 3.) Lacy Moser, 43:06. Age 12-14 – 1.) Lindsey Koepke, 16:08; 2.) Kyra Koepke, 17:53; Abi Moser, 34:31 Age 15-19 – 1.) Tosca Pickering, 20:48; Madison Hatch, 22:53; Jenna Dairsson, 25:03 Age 20-29 – 1.) Sarah Thompson, 30:31; 2.) Kacey Cockle, 34:25; 3.)

Tonasket golfer on to bi-district Eli Antonelli is the first runner during to cross the finish during the May Festival Fun Run. Antonelli ran the 2-Mile course in 15:17. Left, Lindsey Koepke finished first for the women in the 2-Mile race with a time of 16:08 in this year’s 34th Annual May Festival Fun Run. Gary DeVon/staff photos

Julia Stimbaugher, 34:52 Age 30-39 – 1.) Brandye Diehl, 30:32; 2.) Cyndi Benitez, 32:45; 3.) Becky Lewis, No Time Listed Age 40-49 – 1.) Laura Kinman, 18:59; 2.) Donna Lepley, 21:53; 3.) Elaina Halvorsen, 25:28 Age 50-59 – 1.) Pat Lemus, 20:00; 2.) Jan Lilquist, 31:12; 3.) Lacretia

Living with VISION LOSS? If you’ve been diagnosed with macular degeneration, find out if special microscopic or telescopic glasses can help you see better. Even if you have been told nothing can be done you owe it to yourself to seek a second opinion.

Dr. Ross Cusic Toll Free: 877-823-2020

www.LowVisionOptometry.com

Warnstaff, No Time Listed Age 60-69 – 1.) Kathryn Langston, 26:22 Men’s 2-Mile and 5K Mixed Age 12-14 – 1.) Eli Antonelli, 15:17 Age 15-19 – 1.) Damon Halvorsen, 17:48; Adam Halvorsen, 23:50 Age 20-29 – 1.) Darryn Hughes, 15:55; 2.) Caleb Lemus, 21:44; 3.)

Chris Lawson, 26:42 Age 30-39 – 1.) Justin Scott, 29:17 Age 40-49 – 1.) Steve Quick, 22:47; 2.) Clint Lewis, 26:17; 3.) Matthew Hixon, 26:45 Age 60-69 – 1.) Bruce Thornton, 18:52 Age 70+ – 1.) Don Colbert, No Time Listed

going once… going twice… Advertise Your Auction in 102 Community Newspapers and Reach 2.8 Million Local Readers.* *Based on statewide surveys showing 2.3 people read each

copy of a community newspaper.

Advertise

Statewide!

Sold!

GYOU s NEED o HELP t a–rThey . need work. o

Reach over 2 million readers with many skills throughout Washington by advertising your job in 106 Community Newspapers!

tateWide

r

arGet

eGion

YOU NEED HELP – They need work. over•2 million readers•with manyBILL LOWReach COST ONE CALL ONE

QUINCY - Cayden Field, a freshman golfer for Tonasket, qualified for bi-district play by placing fourth at the Caribou Trail League meet on May 7. Field scored an 81 and finished four strokes out of second place. Omak’s Ryder Lewis was medalist with a score of 69. Chelan’s Ian Cowell carded a 77 while Jeremy Guthas also scored an 81. Field, who played as part of a co-op arrangement with Oroville during the regular season, advances the Chewelah Bi-district 6/7 tournament, which was scheduled for Tuesday, May 14. Of the 38 male qualifiers from the CTL and Northeast A Leagues, 19 will advance to the state finals in Spanaway, May 21-22.

to the second-seeded Cashmere team 6-0, 6-2 to see their day come to an end. Aya Cruspero, Connor BoCook and Nathan Hugus all lost their opening matches. “I am looking forward to the next couple of years,” said Oroville coach Billy Monroe. “I saw some good things and the kids are excited about tennis. They want to play this summer and some are even asking me to continue practice until the end of school, even though the season is over. “The future is bright.”

Little Diamond Lake KOA! Offering the best in RV camping Just 30 minutes North of Spokane

New RV Pull thru’s w/water & 50 amp Tent Sites • Spacious Family Lodge Swimming Pool (Seasonal) • Hot Tub Kids Activities • Store • Driving Range

Open Until October 14 onto Southshore-Diamond Lake Road. Follow for 2 miles to Diamond Lake. Turn right onto Northshore Road. Follow for 2 miles Turn right onto McGowen Road, follow for 1 mile to KOA. Directions Spokane: From Division St “Y” on north end of town, travel about 27 miles on US 2. Turn left onto Northshore-Diamond Lake Road. Follow signs for 4 miles Turn left onto McGowen Road. Follow for 1 mile to KOA. From Newport: Take US 2 S for about 6 miles. Turn right

800-562-4788 or reserve online @ KOA.com

MAY SPECIAL May 1st-31st

skills throughout Washington by State! advertising Buy a Region or the Entire your job in 106 Community Newspapers!

Request a free information kit today:

LOW COST • ONE CALL • ONE BILL 509-476-3602 Buy a Region or the Entire State!

Request a free information kit today:

509-476-3602

ContaCt Your LoCaL WnPa MeMber neWsPaPer to Learn More.

See What It’s All About! 224 West 4th St. Tonasket 509-322-2946


Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | May 16, 2013

May Fest Bass Tourney

Charlene Helm/staff photo

Elizabeth Verbeck photo

Jeremiah Riggle, Nick Verbeck, Ambrose Bessette, Ray Osbourne (not pictured in order) of the Go Spurs, an Omak/ Okanogan area team, beat a four-year winning streak by Oroville Duece Days to win the Men’s Open.

Go Spurs end Duece Days’ four-year winning streak

While the rest of the folks were enjoying a variety of May Festival Activities, the die-hard fishermen were competing in the annual May Festival Bass Tourney on Lake Osoyoos. Here Queen Shelby and Princess Angela pose with some of the winners at Oroville’s Deep Bay Park. Chris Corey and Jerrod Gibbons of Omak caught the big small mouth bass and James Glover and Randy Thornton of Oroville caught the big large mouth bass. Taking first place for most weight were Steve Brown and Lance Manning of Omak, in second place were Jeff Walter and Jake Walter of Okanogan and in third place were Cory and Gibbons of Omak.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE

Submitted by Oroville Booster Club

OROVILLE – The May Festival 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament attracted many teams to the OHS Tennis Courts in order to find out who had the best skills. The event is sponsored and organized by the Oroville Booster Club drawing teams from all over the valley, as well as those who return to Oroville each year for the May Festival. The winners were: Men’s Open - Go Spurs - Omak/ Okanogan - Jeremiah Riggle, Nick Verbeck, Ambrose Bessette, Ray Osbourne Women’s Open - Just Do It - Tonasket - Amber Kilpatrick, Kylie Delinger, Jenny Bello Boys High School - Studd Horses - Tonasket - Michael Orozco, Dyllan Gage, Derek Sund, Roberto Juarez GirlsHighSchool-College-Oroville - Briana Moralez, Becky Arrigoni, Lily Hilderbrand, Katie Tietje Boys 14 & Under - Sarcasm Osoyoos, BC - Aman Rai, Gogan Rai, Benson Cheng, Sukhuir Gill Girls 14 & Under - The Superheroes - Oroville - Machara Richter, Hanna Hilderbrand, Katie Egerton, Sydney Egerton Boys 12 & Under - Hoop Daddyz - Tonasket - Ethan Smith, Jordan Thrasher, Ethan Calus, Ryker Ayers Repeat winners were College, The Superheroes and Hoop Daddyz, although their names are all different from last year, but essentially the same team. Go Spurs ended a four-year winning streak by Oroville Deuce Days.

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church? To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Telatubbies fight it out in last Saturday’s annual May Day 3 on 3 Tournament held on the Oroville High School Tennis Courts. Teams from Oroville, Tonasket, Osoyoos and Omak/Okanogan were the victors this year in the various age groups

Obituaries

Luz Maria Gonzales

Luz Maria Gonzales Luz Maria Gonzales, age 74 of Ellisforde died May 8, 2013 at home. She was born November 19, 1938 in Ibarra, Guanajuato, Mexico to Bruno and Juanita (Rodriguez) Flores. In August 1955 she married Cirilo Gonzales in Texas. They moved to Ellisforde in 1962 and in 1977 moved to their home where she resided. Luz worked for many years as an apple packer in different warehouses. A major accomplishment for her was becoming a U.S. citizen. She studied very hard for this and was proud of this achievement. She was a board member of the farmworker clinic and a lifetime member of the Okanogan Co-op. Luz loved traveling, walking, gardening, and reading. She enjoyed attending and was a long time member of the Ellisforde Church of the Brethren where she also served as the caretaker for many years Luz is survined by her husband, Cirilo, at home; children:

Delia (Larry) Miller of Osoyoos; Magda Bradburn of Tonasket; Nora Gonzales of Centralia; Abel (Jan) Gonzales of Tonasket; Eva Gonzales of Ellisforde and Robert Gonzales of Ellisforde; brothers: Robert Flores of California; Bill Flores of Spokane; Johnny Flores of Montana; Joe Flores of Spokane; George Chappa of Omak; Simon Chappa of Omak; sisters Helen Flores of Texas and Carmen Cardenas of Brewster and 19 grandchildren and eight great grandchildren She was preceded in death by her parents Memorial services will be held Saturday, May 11, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at the Ellisforde Church of the Brethren with Pastor James Yaussy Albright officiating. A potluck luncheon will follow. Memorials may be made to Ellisforde Church of Brethren. Please share your thoughts and memories by signing Luz’s online guestbook at www.berghfuneralservice.com

Brian William Bassett Brian William Bassett, age 59, of Loomis, Washington died April 1, 2013 in Loomis. He was born March 18, 1954 in Detroit,

Michigan to Eileen M. and William R. Bassett. After high school he attended the University of Detroit-Mercy, majoring in criminology. Later his career path in the Merchant Marines took him all over the world. His most recent employment as a Merchant Marine, Second Mate was on Horizon Lines, specifically the Horizon Kodiak and Horizon Tacoma vessels. While underway, he was responsible for the safe operation of the vessel and 20 other shipmates. He was well liked and respected by crew members. Brian was passionate about motorcycles and enjoyed life to the fullest. Brian is survived by his sisters: Debra S. Beaver of Chagrin Falls, Ohio and Denise E. (Patrick W.) Marshall of Eagle Point, Ore.; brother-in-law Charles Spencer and nephew Wade Spencer. He is preceded in death by: father William R. Bassett, mother Eileen M. Bassett, sister Dianne L. Spencer and brother-in-law William Beaver At his request no services will be held. The family would like to invite anyone wishing to share memories of Brian to send them tobrianbassettremembered@ gmail.com. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday School is at 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, May 16, 2013  

May 16, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, May 16, 2013  

May 16, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune