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NVH faces cuts, interest rate hike

WATERING DOWN THE MAYOR

Medicare, Medicaid reimbursements reduced, federal sequestration cuts kick in as money continues to tighten

Additionally the interest on the warrants - loans from Okanogan County used for day-to-day operations that have TONASKET - Protests, pending litiga- been the focus of the hospital district’s tion and an attempt to recall the North moves to rein in costs - had their interValley Hospital Board of Commissioners est rates rise from 2.5 percent to 3.25 aren’t the only issues the hospital district percent, effective March 1. The district’s warrant level was $1.957 million to the is facing. Funding changes coming from all lev- county as of Feb. 28. “We received the notice from the els of government mean that Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements will be county treasurer,” Verhasselt said, noting that this was not a move reduced and the cost specifically targeting of maintaining warNorth Valley Hospital. rants with the county “Sit down with me, “It went to all of the is increasing. NVH Chief show me where I’m other hospitals that are in warrants as well.” Financial Officer wrong, and I’ll eat crow The district reported Helen Verhasselt reviewed a number as quick as I can get the a net loss of $330,000 for December. Verhasselt of notices the district ketchup and mustard.” also reported that for received last week 2012, the hospital disregarding the shifting Danny Gratrix, cosigner of trict wrote off $967,000 petition to recall the NVH Board of landscape of health Commissioners in bad debt and $1.052 care funding durmillion in charity care. ing her report at the “Hospitals have to Thursday, Feb. 28, carry the charity care write-off themBoard of Commissioners meeting. “This past week we received a notice selves,” she said. “(Unlike other states) from Medicaid that the hospital’s in- there is no state help for that.” Early in the meeting, the commispatient reimbursement rate will be going down 4.6 percent,” she said. “The out- sioners met with attorney Mick Howe patient reimbursement will be going up in executive session to discuss pending 1.8 percent. Between 2011 - 2013, in- litigation. Following the session, Danny Gratrix, patient reimbursement has decreased 9.1 percent, and out-patient has decreased who along with Rosa Snider filed a state4.8 percent. So even though this year the ment calling for a recall of all five hosout-patient rate went up, it’s still down pital commissioners, discussed his deciquite a bit from where it was a couple of sion to do so during the public comment segment of the meeting. years ago.” “My original intent was not ever to She also noted that she had received a notice from a senior living and com- have a recall petition to come up,” he munity services association that with said. “And if it did come up it would be sequestration - the across the board fed- much, much further down the line ... eral budget cuts that went into effect on Originally I was hesitant to get involved March 1 - that all health care providers with this issue at all. Because at this time were looking at a two percent reduction in Medicare reimbursements. SEE NVH BOARD | PG A2 BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Brent Baker/staff photo

Claire Jeffko waters down Mayor Patrick Plumb on Tuesday as part of Linda Black’s planned celebration of surpassing the $50,000 fundraising mark for the Tonasket Water Ranch. Plumb was later hosed down by a fire truck.

BIG SPLASH

Tonasket mayor gets sprayed down; council moves on ATVs BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET _ Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb had agreed to it. He just didn’t know that Tonasket Water Ranch coordinator Linda Black had already surpassed the $50,000 mark in fundraising for the spray park slated to be built in Chief Tonasket Park this summer. So while he was surprised that this was the night that he would be sprayed down by a Tonasket Fire Department truck during the Tuesday, Feb. 26 meeting of the Tonasket City Council, the mayor gamely got wet, multiple times, via squirt guns, water cans and, of course, the fire truck. “I also said I would only (spearhead funding the spray park) if the mayor agreed that when we get over $50,000, he would go next door (to the Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center) and get sprayed,” Black said. “So I’m here tonight to announce that we are at $54,700. Black handed Plumb a fresh change of clothes, including a bright orange swim suit and Tonasket basketball t-shirt. “Patrick Plumb is a man of his word,” Black said. “The fire department is waiting next door to honor him.” That turned out to not quite be true. The fire department did indeed arrive, but not until Plumb had been hit with water balloons, splashed with a bucket of water and doused with a watering can by Claire Jeffko in the 40-degree latewinter chill. The proceedings were witnessed by a crowd that was gathered for a City Council meeting discussion on a proposed ATV ordinance, as well as other community members involved with the water ranch project. While the mayor was being sprayed

Brent Baker/staff photo

Above, Mayor Patrick Plumb gets hosed down by a a Tonasket Fire Department truck. Below, Mayoral First Daughter Symarah Plumb continued fundraising efforts for the Tonasket Water Ranch even as her dad was getting soaked. down, his determined daughter, Symarah, was circulating through the crowd with her pink basket, adding even more to the spray park fundraising coffers. The project is expected to cost between $150,000 and $200,000. “You’ll be noticing around the community, donation pedestals,” Black said. “They are set up in our two grocery stores, Ace Hardware and the Junction and will be in Prince’s next week.... We have a street banner. We’ve begun a newspaper campaign. We have fliers in local busineses. We have a website, a Facebook page, a Gmail account and a QR code and I don’t even know what half these things are. But I have really smart, young volunteers that understand this stuff.” Black noted she’s been getting a lot of help from all corners of the community. “This is a park we’re building without any new taxes,” she said. “It’s being done all with community funds.”

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 10

ATV ordinance to be drafted soon Area ATV enthusiasts were pleased with the outcome of Tuesday’s meeting, at which the council voted 3-1 to direct city staff to write an ordinance that would allow ATVs on city streets. Okanogan County Commissioner Jim DeTro was on hand to answer questions about the county’s plans to connect the city to off-road trails (i.e., make it possible to legally drive an ATV from the city to trails that could get a rider to Conconully). DeTro said he only saw positive economic benefits from increased ATV access and added that criminal activity actually decreased. “Small places like Conconully and Chesaw, they have events around these situations,” he said. “It’s an economic gain for them. To you, 11 cents of every gallon (of gas) comes back to the county and the cities. We share in that, and that’s something a lot of people don’t consider.” DeTro added that ATV clubs tend to minimize the impact of scofflaws. He said a recent chat with the Stevens County sheriff illustrated that. “Your incidence rate of people outside the law goes down,” DeTro said. “You have a lot of people in these clubs, they tend to be older and more mature and police themselves. In their experience, the outlaws will break the law anyway

SEE ORDINANCE | PG A2

TSD to mull change in vocational program New state scoring system presents areas of concern BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket School District is looking at changing the focus of its vocational program, and superintendent Paul Turner is hoping that those who want to have a voice in whether to do so or not will be in attendance at the next school board meeting. Turner said at the Monday, Feb. 25 meeting that he and high school principal Jeff Hardesty would be presenting data on a proposal that would shift the vocational program curriculum from family consumer science to agricultural science. “When you look at the data of the number of kids taking certain courses, that’s driving this,” Turner said in an interview on Friday. “Number one, when you look at offerings for kids, we can meet some of the board’s goal of increasing different offerings. We’ve got offerings now, but they’re not ones that kids are taking. “Number two, this will give us more flexibility for scheduling at the high school.” In that regard, Turner said it would, for instance, allow students taking agricultural biology to meet state biology testing standards, which could in turn free up portions of some teachers’ schedules. Still, Turner said, it won’t be an easy decision to make.

RESPONDING TO NEW SCORES Turner also informed the board of the school’s initial scores under new guidelines as part of ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act), which resulted from a waiver the state received from the Annual Yearly Progress system. While the scores are primarily measured internally against previous internal data, the recently-released scores also left a number of questions. The good news: the high school ranked as a reward (high progress) school and the middle school met requirements. The elementary, however, was listed as an “emerging priority” school, based largely (though not entirely) on its scores from three years ago. The school’s scores for low-income

SEE SCORES | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

“It would take away an opportunity for kids to learn things they need to know,” he said. “But we don’t have kids taking those courses. So lets put in something the kids want to take and it lines up with STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math requirements).” Additionally, it could help with the districts efforts to get the full school day reinstated as that schedule flexibility would mean that the high school could get by on one fewer staff person than is currently projected in planning for that eventuality. “Losing the home ec stuff isn’t good,” Turner said. “I get that. It’s a sad deal that we get pinched to do that. But economically, and offerings for kids, I think it’s what we’ve got to do.”

Schools A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Valley Life A6-A7

Classifieds/Legals A8 Real Estate A9 Sports A10

Arts Obituaries Police Stats

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 7, 2013

scores | FROM A1 students were the area of greatest concern. “We’ve got work to do in the low-income arena,” Turner said. “But we know that. This just solidifies that discussion.” One problem, Turner said, is that the implications are unknown. Elementary principal Jeremy Clark and special education director Liz Stucker were to have attended a seminar in Wenatchee a couple of weeks ago, but Tonasket was one of several districts not informed that it had been canceled until they arrived on site. “We have no idea what the implications are,” Turner said. “The scores were working off a three-year average, and they retroactively used data from 200910 and 10-11 to create that. “We don’t know if there are funds to help. We haven’t been told what hoops we’d have to jump through. But if I look at these numbers, three years ago we had a ‘struggling’ score and the past two years we’ve had ‘fair’

scores... The problem is that the categories have a wide range - our ‘fair’ score two years ago was just above the ‘struggling’ line. Last year’s was just below the ‘good’ line, but they count the same.” He said that if the improvement of the last two years continues, the overall picture will improve. “If this year’s scores are up into the ‘good’ or ‘very good,’ then (the first struggling year) would drop out. “We’re real excited about what we anticipate our scores to be this year,” Turner added. “Preliminary results are showing some great growth. I don’t know what we’ll hit, but we’re very optimistic.” Some of the categories the district was graded on (for the first time under the new system) are vaguely defined, particularly one called “achievement vs. peers.” “We have no idea how it’s calculated,,” Turner said. “You can only take so much from what a category is called. The biggest struggle we run into is that we get these

laws coming down, but until we get to some of these workshops, there’s no way to know what some of these things mean.” According to the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction website, there are currently no penalties in place, but could be in the future. “Washington stateís ESEA Flexibility Request does not include penalties for schools that do not meet their AMO targets for a specific year,” it reads. “But because the Priority, Focus and Emerging schools lists are based on three-year proficiency averages, it is possible that a school not meeting its AMO targets in one year could be placed on one of those lists in future years. Possible penalties if a school does not meet its overall target in 2017 remain to be determined.” The school board’s next meeting will be Monday, March 11. It will be the first meeting of the year under the district’s Daylight Saving Time schedule, starting at 7:30 p.m.

NVH BOARD | FROM A1 in my life I would much rather sit back and fade into the background. It did not have to get to this point.” He reviewed his perspective of the chronology of events leading to the commissioners’ decision to shut down the Assisted Living facility. “The rapidity of this action gave the appearance, rightly or wrongly, that regardless of what the community was told, plans

had already been decided to close the A/L, and use of the building was already planned,” Gratrix said. He said that requests for records haven’t been fulfilled on a timely basis, if at all. “The appearance again was of stonewalling,” he said. He added that he believed that issues with rising warrants were related more to hospital spending than to issues with the Assisted

Living. “Sit down with me, show me where I’m wrong,” he said, “and I’ll eat crow as quick as I can get the ketchup and mustard.” The NVH Board of Commissioners’ regular meeting scheduled for Thursday, March 14, was cancelled due to scheduling conflicts. In its place, a special meeting is slated for Monday, March 11, at 7 p.m. in the hospital board room.

Submitted photo

Jina Nelson photographed the Snowy Owl on Saturday, March 3, between Oroville and Molson.

MARCH

ORDINANCE | FROM A1 and do it on a daily basis. You’ll still have that faction, but you have more people on the ground, more eyes, more people in these clubs concerned about safety. “The same has been true in Montana and Idaho. There was a big hullabaloo with the city of Okanogan, but there’s less than a hundredth of one percent. People thought there would be a huge problem and it hasn’t been the case.” Asked if the county was waiting for the city to make a decision, DeTro said, “We like the cities to take the lead, and then we try to deal with the connectivity. The clubs are doing most of the footwork on this. They’re very energetic.” And, as it turns out, ATV use is already legal in certain circumstances. “Right now, if you buy a a street legal one and buy a license plate for it, you can drive it anywhere,” he said. “It’s just like a motorcycle that has a license plate on it.” Additionally, he said the state was looking at lifting many restrictions on ATV use. “So it’s coming one way or another,” said council member Jean Ramsey. “To me, that makes it a moot point. If it’s licensed, it’s already legal.” Council member Lee Hale

moved for the ordinance to be drafted, with Ramsey seconding the motion. Jill Vugteveen cast the dissenting vote, while council member Scott Olson was not in attendance due to illness.

Also ... The council heard a report from Kinross Corporation Community and Government Relations specialist Deana Zakar, who touted the mining company’s economic benefits to the region and state, including both direct and indirect employment (240 Kinross jobs plus approximately 380 indirect jobs in Okanogan and Ferry counties), $4 million dollars in payments to local government entities (i.e. taxes, utilities), and approximately 100 students in local schools (helping boost their per-student state funding). She also answered a number of questions from Claire Jeffko, a member of the Okanogan Highlands Alliance, which has served as an ecological watchdog of the mining operation. Cheryl Lewis of the Oroville Housing Authority was on hand to further discuss the possibility of forming a joint housing authority with Tonasket. “I’m kind of waiting on you guys,” she said. “I met with

Jeannie and Dennis and talked about whether or not you were still interested in a joint housing authority.” “We need a little more time,” Plumb said. “We need to do more homework, and I didn’t get on these guys enough to get a report.” “I’ll wait for you to contact me, then, and let me know when you’re ready and what you’re ready to do.” Tonasket’s City Council next meets on Tuesday, March 12, at 7 p.m. in the council chambers at City Hall.

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MARCH 7, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

Okanogan Valley Life

‘Hermana’ Quick prepping for an Argentine mission Oroville grad will spend 18 months on mission for the LDS Church

Dems to hold JeffersonJackson dinner March 9 Valerie Rongey, state Democratic Party Vice-Chair will be guest speaker Submitted by Karen Keleman Douglas County Democratic Party Chairwoman

CASHMERE - Valerie Rongey, Vice-chair for the Washington State Democratic Party, will be a featured speaker at the JeffersonJackson Dinner on Saturday, March 9. The annual partybuilding event is sponsored by the Democrats of Chelan and Douglas Counties. Rongey is a secondterm vice-chair for the Party. She is responsible for grassroots training throughout the State. As a Spokane resident, she concentrates particular effort on communicating with county and leg-

Submitted by Marsallai Quick Missionary’s Mother

OROVILLE - Reinna Quick has been called to serve a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, in the Resistencia, Argentina mission. She will be traveling around the area for 18 months, with different missionaries of the church, while serving the people of Argentina and teaching the gospel. She entered the Mission Training Center in Provo Utah, on Feb. 27 for two months. There she will learn the Spanish language, the culture of the Argentine people, and how to teach those people about our Father in Heaven and his son Jesus Christ.

islative district Democratic organizations in Eastern Washington. Also featured at the March 9 dinner will be live music performed by The Saddle Rockers, a popular Wenatchee area band playing bluegrass and vintage rock music. They promise to share new danceable and singalong pieces. Auctions and presentations will also be on the evening’s agenda. The event will begin with a social hour at 5:30 p.m. at the Cashmere Riverside Center. A barbecue buffet dinner will be served at 6:30, followed by the program. Additional information may be obtained by calling 8847488 or 663-1950 or by emailing NCWDems@gmail.com.

DesJardins celebrating 30 years Steve Quick/submitted photo

Volunteering Missionaries with the Church of Jesus Christ on Latter Day Saints volunteer their time and pay for their own expenses while taking time out from college and other endeavors, while in the prime of their youth.

Reinna Quick is the youngest daughter of Steven and Marsallai Quick. Steven Quick is Oroville’s School District’s Superintendent. He also served a mission in the Uruguay, Montevideo mission in 1987 for two years. In the LDS church, the age requirements to serve a mission have now changed. Men now can go on missions at age 18, instead

Reinna Quick gets ready to take off on a flight to Provo, Utah to prepare for an 18-month mission to Argentina for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The Oroville High School graduate comes from a large family of returned missionaries. of 19, after graduating from high school or the equivalent, and women can now serve at age 19 instead of 21 years old. Another local member of the LDS church who is currently serving a mission and lives here in Oroville is Charlie DeMartino, who is now a district leader and serving in the Brazil, Maceio Mission. He loves the people of Brazil and will return in October 2013. Also serving is Eric Roley who is in the California, Roseville mission until June 2013. There has been an overwhelming flood of men and women eager to serve missions - a huge 500% increase in the last few months because of the decision to lower the age requirements.

Quick is one of them. Her younger brother Connelly has decided to serve a mission as soon as he graduates from high school next year. Her older sister Austianna Wilson is now married and living in Orem, Utah with her husband Bruce, who also served a mission in Mexico. Reinna comes from a large family of returned missionaries as most of her uncles and cousins have served in places like Finland, British Columbia, the Netherlands and even Argentina. Missionaries volunteer their time and pay for their own expenses while taking time out from college and other endeavors, while in the prime of their youth. Some may think this is a huge

sacrifice, but for missionaries, it is a privilege and honor to spread the gospel of Jesus Christ. There are 59,000 full-time missionaries currently serving in 350 missions around the world, with more arriving every day. They proselytize in every country where the government and political climate allow it. Many missionaries grow to love the people and areas in which they serve and truly have a difficult time leaving when it is time for them to come home. As returned missionaries they are knowledgeable ambassadors of the nations and cultures where they served. More information can be found online at www.mormon.org and www.lds.org.

John and Becky Desjardins of Oroville celebrate their thirtieth Anniversary on Tuesday, March 12th. Friends and family invite all to stop by Hometown Pizza and Pasta and wish them a happy anniversary.

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Minerals in everyday life People often don’t realize how much we rely on minerals in everyday life. From the moment you wake up in the morning, to all of the activities you take part in throughout the day, you will constantly be using items either made of minerals or that rely on minerals to be produced. Some of these items include: • Electricity • Alarm clocks • Toilet and shower • Clothing • Refrigerator, stove and microwave • Cereal • Silverware • Cupboards and countertops • Pens and pencils • Computers • Carpeting • Coins and currency • Television • Musical instruments • Toothbrush and toothpaste • Cell phones • Bicycles • Transportation

Not only do we use minerals in our everyday lives, but efforts to upgrade our country’s infrastructure and expand renewable energy production also require metals and minerals. Renewable energy production requires significant amounts of copper, steel, molybdenum, zinc, gold, silver, cobalt, lead and uranium. As an ex-

ample, our country has been focusing on technological improvements to conserve energy, including the manufacture of hybrid cars, solar power and wind energy. A single hybrid car needs the following metals and minerals: iron, rare earths, steel, zinc, molybdenum, copper, silicon, cobalt, titanium, lithium, platinum, gold, lead, nickel, and cadmium. In fact, hybrid cars use twice as much

copper as non-hybrid cars, and about 50 pounds of rare earth metals. Solar photovoltaic systems use arsenic, aluminum, boron minerals, cadmium, coal, copper, gallium, indium, iron ore (steel), molybdenum, lead, phosphorous, selenium, silica, tellurium and titanium dioxide. The manufacturing of a single 3-megawatt wind turbine requires 335 tons of steel, 4.7 tons of copper, 1,200 tons of concrete (cement and aggregates), 3 tons of aluminum, 2 tons of rare earth elements, aluminum, zinc, and molybdenum.

So, what about gold? Not only is gold used for financial currency and jewelry, but it is also used for medical and dental purposes, electronics, computers and aerospace. It is used to treat certain forms of arthritis and cancer, and is essential to some life support systems. It can be used on a nanoscale to detect pregnancy, progression of HIV, and salmonella. Because gold is very conductive and non-corrosive, it is used in many electronic devices including cell phones, smoke detectors, and computers. Gold is used around the world in catalytic convertors in cars, trucks and heavy duty vehicles. In aerospace, it is used to coat objects to reflect radiation and heat. On the US Columbia space shuttle, 41 kg of gold was used to protect astronauts from radiation and gold coatings protect the Hubble telescope from corrosion. Similarly, it has been used in windows to reflect heat energy, keeping buildings cool in summer and warm in winter. Take a moment to look around your home, classroom, or workplace, and examine the items you use every day. Think about where they come from and how they are made. You’ll notice that the phrase, “If it’s not grown, it’s mined” rings very true. More information on minerals in everyday life can be found at: National Mining Association www.nma.org Mineral Information Institute www.mii.org Minerals Education Coalition www.mineralseducationcoalition.org Mining.com www.mining.com Northwest Mining Association www.nwma.org


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 7, 2013

SCHOOLS

A BIRTHDAY LIKE NO OTHER

Submitted photo

The Oroville FBLA team attending regionals in Wenatchee included (l-r) junior high members Jennifer Vazquez, Annabella Valverde, Sandra Hilstad, Lena Fuchs, Xochil Rangel, Pie Todd, (high school members) Meagan Moralez, Kelsey Hickman, Dakota Haney, Shelby Scott, adviser Tony Kindred, Kali Peters, Katie Tietje, Luke Kindred, Ashley Macolin, Bethany Roley, Dayna Roley and Yessica Nemecio.

Oroville qualifies nine for state FBLA competition Tonasket Elementary kicks

Brent Baker/staff photo

Horton the elephant (TES principal Jeremy Clark) has his students’ attention during Friday’s Dr. Seuss assembly.

off reading challenge with Dr. Seuss birthday assembly

Luke Kindred running for North Central Region VP

BY BRENT BAKER

SUBMITTED BY TONY KINDRED

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OHS FBLA ADVISER

OROVILLE - Future Business Leaders of America, or FBLA, at Oroville high school is once again sending students to state competition. This year state competition will be held in Spokane, Washington in April. It is exciting to see these young business leaders make it to state. A highlight this year at state will be Luke Kindredís campaign for Regional Vice President in which he will be running against three other individuals from the North Central Region. The Oroville Chapter of Future Business Leaders of America attended their Regional competition in Wenatchee, Washington recently. At the NCR competition, over a thousand tests were scheduled. Tests were administered in Entrepreneurship, Business Communications, Public Speaking, Business Math, Accounting, Business Law and numerous other areas. Students were allowed to test individually and in teams. Students from OHS com-

Submitted photo

Luke Kindred delivers an introduction to the North Central Regional FBLA members. Kindred will be running for North Central Region Vice President against three other candidates from the region. peting and moving on to State Competition in April include the following members: TEAM Luke Kindred, Katie Tietje (1st Entrepreneurship, including the second straight year for Kindred) Luke Kindred, Ronel Kee (2nd Management and Decision Making) Kali Peters, Shelby Scott, Bethany Roley (3rd Network Design)

INDIVIDUAL

Ashley Marcolin (1st Help Desk) Kelsey Hickman (2nd Help Desk)

Shelby Scott

(4th Help Desk)

ON A MID-LEVEL NOTE: The mid-level chapter of FBLA at Oroville Junior Senior High School has been reactivated by adviser Tony Kindred. This means that junior high students also traveled to competition this year. Students from the junior high have spent time together since the fall leadership conference and have worked hard to reorganize their chapter including fundraising, and practicing competition.

TONASKET - The birthday of legendary children’s story creator and cartoonist Theodor Seuss Geisel (known almost universally as Dr. Seuss) was Saturday, March 3. But Friday was the big day for the students at Tonasket Elementary School, where staff and students alike were dressed in pajamas or Seuss-inspired clothing. A number of staff were costumed as specific characters, including superintendent Paul Turner as the Mayor of Whoville and principal Jeremy Clark as Horton (as costume which Clark reportedly wore for the entire day). The all-school assembly, which featured the costumed characters and readings of Dr. Seuss rhymes by students, also launched a month-long reading challenge. “The kids have 22 days to read (for a total of) 10 hours,” said reading specialist Jamie Barker, who organized the assembly. “For the ones that do, they get a free ticket to Silverwood (Theme Park) through a program they offer called ‘Reading is the Ticket.’” Silverwood, located near Couer d’Alene, ID, is the Northwest’s largest theme park. The Tonasket district offers a different reading challenge each year. Dr. Seuss’s birthday celebration didn’t stop when the early-morning assembly ended. Students were able to get a start on their reading challenge hours by reading in their pajamas for much of the day, as well as partner-reading with classes from other grade levels. The Cat in the Hat also read to the kindergarten through third grade classes. “The staff gets into it,” Barker said. “Sometimes I have to beg a little (about the costumes) but they’re really good about it.” Other characters included Ann Cook as the Mayor’s Wife; Sarah Prock as Cindy Lou Who;

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Cat in the Hat (Sue Johnson) captivated the Tonasket Elementary School student assembly on Friday in honor of Dr. Seuss’s birthday. Kim Fitzthum, Tricia Cummings, Kristi Denison, Donna Zabreznik, Ben Blaney, Adriana Capote and Norma Gutierrez as the Who Friends; Martha Wisdom and Brenda Mitchell as the Australian Fish; Cindy Williams as Maisie Bird; Elizabeth Norblad as Foo Foo the Snoo; Gianina Gronlund as Polka Dot Polly; Kari Alexander as Myrtle the Turtle; Jamie Barker and Brittany Hacker as Thing 1 and Thing 2; and Sue Johnson as the Cat in the Hat.

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Senator Bruce Dammeier, R-Puyallup, connected with Oroville High School students last week to discuss the legislative process and his reading education bill.

Oroville students connect with Senator Dannmeier Legislator discusses lawmaking process, grade-level reading bill with high schoolers BY AMANDA WEBB OFFICE OF SEN. BRUCE DAMMEIER

OROVILLE - Sen. Bruce Dammeier, R-Puyallup, used a live video hookup Tuesday, Feb. to connect with students more than 300 miles away about his proposed measure to help give children a strong reading foundation. TVW, the state-supported public-affairs cable network, hosted the discussion as part of its Capitol Classroom educational program. Dammeier spoke with students

at Oroville High School, which is easily farther from the Capitol than the other 10 schools taking part in this year’s program. “Capitol Classroom is a great program that enables students from all across our state to play an active role in the legislative process and it truly bridges the miles between schools and Olympia,” Dammeier said. “It gives kids a hands-on approach to learning; Senate Bill 5237 has seen a lot of activity and movement over the first six weeks of this legislative session, so it is a great bill to use as an example.” Dammeier’s bill has been revised since the students began following it. For instance, a provision that would retain third-graders until they can read at grade level is gone, eliminating one of the Oroville students’ concerns;

now retention is only an option that would be considered at the parent/guardian’s discretion. The latest version of SB 5237 also includes earlier identification (as early as kindergarten) and interventions for struggling young readers, as well as additional resources and tools for parents and teachers. “I am honored that Oroville High’s contemporary world problems class chose to focus on my bill; I value their suggestions and thoughts, and I appreciate their time. “They were correct in assessing that the measure addresses a major issue in our state’s educational system, and reflects my passion for making sure every student has the necessary skills to be successful in school and ultimately in life.”

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MARCH 7, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER Sequestration will LETTERS hurt our state too TO THE EDITOR We’ve been hearing a lot about how sequestration is going to hurt states with big military facilities. Washington State will also suffer under this axe if congress and the president don’t come up with some kind of deal – something more permanent this time we hope – to put an end to these automatic cuts. For Washington there’s a lot to be concerned about. According to the White House, impacts will affect Middle Class families, jobs and economic security. These include approximately $11.6 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 160 teacher and aide jobs at risk statewide. Statewide that might just seem bad, but cuts for our rural schools always seem to be magnified as they already struggle with tight budgets. So much so that Tonasket still hasn’t been able to meet its goal of returning to a full Out of school day. More cuts won’t help. My Mind Some of the biggest impacts will be to public Gary A. DeVon health. In this week’s issue, reporter Brent Baker writes specifically about the affect the sequester will have on our already struggling local hospital district. According to a recent financial report to the board, the acrossthe-board the federal budget cuts that began at the first of the month mean the district is looking at a 2 percent reduction in Medicare reimbursements. That, plus a 4.8 percent drop in Medicaid reimbursements and a nearly 1 percent increase in interest on all county warrants, really hurts the district’s bottom line. Mental health, an issue that has gotten a lot of attention because of the recent mass shootings, will be cut and up to $373,000 seriously mentally ill adults and seriously emotionally disturbed children could go untreated. This will most likely lead to increased hospitalizations, involvement in the criminal justice system and homelessness for these individuals, according to the report. Law Enforcement and Public Safety Funds for Crime Prevention and Prosecution in the state will lose $271,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement and crime victim and witness initiatives. Being so near the Canadian border, another issue hits close to home, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) would not be able to maintain current staffing levels of border patrol agents and CBP officers as mandated by Congress. CBP would have to reduce its work hours by the equivalent of over 5,000 border patrol agents and the equivalent of over 2,750 CBP officers. Funding and staffing reductions would increase wait times at airports, weaken security between land ports of entry, limit CBP’s ability to collect revenue owed to the federal government and slow screening and entry for those traveling into the U.S. There’s a lot more that’s going to be cut and a lot in areas that will impact us personally or someone we know. Military Readiness, Veterans Services, the Forest Service, BLM, Head Start, Protection for Clean Air and Water, Job Search Assistance and Training, Child Care, Vaccines for Children, Nutritional Assistance for Seniors, Small Business programs, food safety, FBI and law enforcement, aviation safety and security and emergency responders, just to name a few, are all looking at deep reductions in funding. Our families, jobs and economic security shouldn’t be part of a political game of chicken. We need real leadership in the other Washington to end the sequestration and to look at cuts and revenues that are less harmful and more helpful to our situation.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

A response from the NVH board chairperson Dear Editor, To: Citizens for the Tonasket Assisted Living RE: Response letter for Closure of Assisted living Facility, Mr. Don Atchison, The Board of Commissioners appreciates the time and comments of the public as we enter into a period of change with the closure of the Assisted Living Facility. We wish to express to the community that this was the most difficult decision we have had to make in recent times. We feel the same sorrow and in some ways the same anger that some of you do. Government reimbursements are inadequate to support this facility as well as the other facilities that have recently been forced to close in Davenport and Goldendale. We urge you to write to your congressional representative (Doc Hastings) and ask for more support for the sake of all elders. The facts of this decision however, are incontrovertible - The Hospital District is in warrants to the county. These warrants cannot be used to support the Assisted Living facility. Previous fiscal reports indicating that the Assisted Living Center was making a profit were incorrect. Fund accounting for an organization as complex as the district is in itself complex and we believe that in an effort to provide a “lay person” explanation of finances, some misconceptions began and then were perpetuated and are now considered to be fact when they are not. Our new CFO has gone through the profit and loss for the AL from 2005 to the present time. This information has been published and reflects the reality that we have been operating at a loss for some time. Many folks ask why it took so long to let the public know this. We recognized issues in greater detail when our new CFO and CEO Linda Michel brought this information to our attention. Over time, several solutions were attempted which included reduction to staff, and reduction of purchasing within all departments to free up funds for this important facility and to reduce warrants. These solutions did not bring about the needed savings and shortly after, we received a letter from the county Treasurer indicating her concern about the state of the warrants. The warrants, we were reminded, were supposed to be a temporary measure and not financing of ongoing losses. We were also reminded that this trend could not continue. The board worked with the senior management staff to review our financial position and to solicit community solutions that might have been outside the obvious solutions most folks seek such as grants or staff reductions (which were already at minimum levels). A community meeting was held that did not yield any immediate solutions and a subsequent meeting of the Hospital’s Assisted Living committee was attended by several community members who discussed the potential of a levy. The reality here is that a levy requires further financial investment and is not an immediate solution nor does it solve the problem of reducing reimbursements for Medicaid and increasing costs for operations over time. If a levy was to pass it would take at a minimum, eighteen months for any finding to be received and begin reducing expenses. There remains a quest as to whether the taxpayers of the district would be willing to continuously finance increased levies to provide an Assisted Living facility for thirty people. In our survey of the community regarding services (which was sent out to over 3,000 households within the North Valley Hospital District), only four out of 800 returned surveys indicated that the AL was a primary consideration. The board did meet in Executive Session to try and find alternate solutions but none were found. We, as a governing board, were sadly forced to put the finances of the entire district at a higher priority than the residents of the Assisted Living Facility. We voted to accept the recommendation arrived at by the Senior Management Team - a group of highly skilled and technically proficient people who had spend many months trying to craft an alternate solution. We all felt sick about the choice that we were forced to make - many of us might have needed this facility in the coming years just as much as the loved ones who currently reside there. This decision was made as a part of our fiduciary duty as public officials. We did not decide on a future use for the facility. This has been intimated and is untrue. There are possibilities for use of the facility in the future so that it is not left vacant; however, nothing has been decided as of this date. These decisions will be made according to the recommendations of the professional staff and require full financial projection to demonstrate projected viability. In the interest of further transparency, we have invited three private citizens who expressed their concern and interest to participate in the committee reviewing our options. As the hospital’s committee works on our plan we will report out to the community when actual plans are proposed. There is no reason why the concerned citizens group cannot continue to pursue additional funding independently. If funding is found we would welcome the opportunity

to bring the facility up to the appropriate standards so that seniors can have a full service facility again. To be clear, the solutions we are seeking are long term. (Others programs are being looked at in the North County that could be a possible solution and would not be as restricted to the rules that Assisted Living Facilities are.) Of the seniors in the facility at the first of January, 25 have found new homes and three are still in the process. It is our intention that no one will be put out on the street. We as commissioners are legally obligated to do our utmost to protect the financial viability of the hospital. Certainly we feel deeply sorry for the situation our residents are in, but again, we are charged with protecting the business of the entire district and making sure that our losses in the AL do not impact the long term viability of the hospital which serves all the people of the district. We are heartened to see the engagement of the community in this issue and look forward to coming together to work on these important issues. Thank you. Respectfully submitted, Okanogan County Public Hospital District No. 4 Board of Commissioners Helen Casey - Board Chairperson

Disinformation, misinformation and the misuse of same Dear Editor Disinformation, misinformation; misuse of same... does nothing to help our community pull together during this sad, but necessary transition of our ability to provide care of all phases to our aging community members. I speak of the ongoing controversy surrounding NVH in North Okanogan County. And, I say community because NVH is a part of our voting district! I did attend the first meeting of the “Concerned Citizens Committee,” but found that I did not feel as some of those in attendance do. As this controversy continues to grow weekly in our newspaper I felt the need to respond. Mistakes have been made on both sides of this issue. Communication most of all! NVH needs to keep the public informed better and we as community members must be more involved. Leaders need input to effectively lead. So despite the disputes at hand, it must be said that this hospital does a lot of good for our community and it is a growing business that has to adjust to the financial numbers that present themselves. The challenges for our rural hospital to stay “current” are huge! Technology costs alone to stay ‚“current” are driving the numbers even higher. One reason the hospital had to rebuild was to “stay current!” This involves all the nice new procedures that we all want when our health is concerned. And that was the bigger issue of the Oroville Clinic closure. The costs of keeping it open became too much. Many patients who were being seen could not pay for services provided. You attack new programs that have been put in place, i.e. the Dripline and the VA clinic. These programs will support themselves in the future and will also create informal gathering areas where many topics of “communication” take shape. I have even heard of complaints concerning our Veterans clinic not making money. That is true, it wasn’t! We now have about 540 enrolled veterans and the numbers are turning to the good. It takes awhile to make all that happen, especially when dealing with the federal government. Do you know how long it takes to “vet” (clearance) a doctor to be a VA Doc? Its daunting. This rural area isn’t the biggest draw for doctors either. It appears to me that some of the protesters are perhaps just disgruntled exemployees voicing their anger, given the chance! There may even be some in that group that don’t want the responsibility of caring for their own family members financially. It is obvious that much of our community does not understand hospital reimbursement and has not taken the time until now to find out how it all works. I read in a past letter in the GazetteTribune that “someone in the know” stated to a Tonasket businessman that the hospital was to receive a “payment” of some sort to cover the costs of the AL and it would be in the black this year (2013). Whoever started that rumor, please step forward with the data to support your statement! This is misinformation and confuses the issues even more. To those that have filed this attempt at a recall of the entire NVH Board, your actions are not helping to find working solutions and I for one will not vote in favor of such action. This is all a big distraction. So, if you are not just disgruntled ex-employees, perhaps you

could use your alleged expertise in a positive manner via participating in the meetings that are ongoing and attempting to utilize the full potential of our hospital without sinking the whole ship. I may get spoken to about this: but with tongue in cheek, if one looks at the various ages of the NVH board members it seems they also may soon be in need of AL type services - So why would they cut that program without good reason? In closing, it seems that it is time to pull together as a community. The Hospital has healing work to do. This includes regularly communicating with the community. The community needs to stop working against itself in spite of the sad closing of the AL. Michael Stewart Oroville

We let the NVH Board get away with it Dear Gary, I write this with tears in my eyes and pain in my heart as I now realize that the NVH Commissioners have abused and violated our trust. Many of us are deeply wounded by the Board’s decision to support an administration that has so traumatically affected our community, with obvious deficiencies in their job knowledge and/or integrity, over the very community that has so generously given their trust and until recently the benefit of the doubt that maybe the unthinkable was true and the assisted living was the problem. Even hearing the board and administration keep saying the AL was losing an average of $116,000 a year and them not answering why the hospital has been taking an average of 220,000 a year of our tax money from AL didn’t really want to sink in because we wanted so much to believe that they cared about our community and seniors as much as we do. And yet there is so much more than just the tax money they are taking. The thought that we have been so hard on the picketers and “rabble rousers” in defense of those commissioners that have been a part of our community for so long, only to find those very commissioners have chosen an overpaid “outsider” over the needs of the very people that have supported them makes me ill. Well, they’ve gotten away with it and we let them. I hope the families of the nursing home residence are preparing themselves and their loved ones because Wenatchee Valley doesn’t run assisted living or nursing home programs. Elona Tracy Oroville

Sold us out and not even to the highest bidder Dear Editor, Having just gone over the latest stack of info regarding NVH, it reads like a hostile takeover. It really leaves one asking how much of a kickback are these people getting from Wenatchee Valley? They pretty much have the Oroville Clinic deal closed, the assisted living building empty, won’t be long before the nursing home goes and after the sale of the hospital and the other campus buildings I wouldn’t be surprised to see a pharmacy deal. Without any evidence of morals, these people have tossed out our seniors, torn apart our community and told all paying their ridiculous salaries to shut up and sit down. The beggars of our votes, money and trust have effectively sold out and not even to the highest bidder! For those of you out there still believing the lies about cuts and losses, educate yourself, the hospital’s own documents scream the very information we haven’t wanted to fathom possible. And having read them I would think the administration and board would consider the consequences of legal action. It’s going to put people on the stand and it can only get worse from here. Since their apparent lack of scruples leaves them valuing money and material things over integrity, they also might want to check the laws; One would hope the fact that they can be personal held liable for damages to our elders and community would at least give them pause to rethink or exit stage left. Jason Morris Oroville Editor’s Note: Due to the fact we have again been overwhelmed with letters regarding North Valley Hospital and the hospital board’s decision to close the Assisted Living facility at the end of the month, we haven’t enough space to print them all this week. However, you can read the letters that didn’t make it this week online at www.gazette-tribune.com and in an upcoming edition of the G-T. Remember to keep your letters concise and to the point so everyone has some space to comment here. G.A.D.


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 7, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life March brings both bluster and sun March is sometimes blustery and sometimes nice. We are beginning to think about putting the cover on the porch swing … but just thinking about it, not it. Easter THIS & THAT doing comes early this Joyce Emry year and will be the last day of March, the 31st. So, it will be a busy time for the lady Eagles and their helpers, and please, no colored raw eggs this year, as they prepare for the annual egg hunt. They have enough to do without cleaning up the unnecessary messes.

How about a new green Jell-O salad for either St. Patrick’s Day or Easter? 1 pkg. Lime Jell-O 1 cup hot water 1 cup marshmallows 1 T. Lemon juice ½ cup cottage cheese 1 cup whipping cream ½ cup chopped nuts 1 small can crushed pineapple Mix Jell-O, hot water, and marshmallows and cool slightly. Add lemon juice. Cool and add pineapple, cottage cheese and nuts. After partly congealed, whip cream and fold in. And I suppose you could use cool whip, but cream is better. I was very surprised to see the obituary of Jim Fray in last weeks G-T. Jim and Kathy, Cory, Kevin and Brigid were our

neighbors for a lot of years. Jim’s health had been deteriorating for a number of years and he’d required special care and now he can be at rest. A lot of fun and laughter was had at the father/son basketball game last Thursday evening when the game was played, as a fund raiser for the Oroville Booster club. Can’t you just imagine the groans and grunts from some of the dads as they attempted to get out of bed the next morning? Running into someone the size of Jack Hughes might be a little bit intimidating, don’t you think? Congratulations to Edith Holmes as she reached her 94th birthday. Edith grew up in the wheat country and she was no sissy when it came to hard work. She and Dr. Holmes enjoyed a good life together, and she carries on alone, (in the house they designed together,) with the able assistance of Ginger (Cody) Miller and her church friends. Being a lover of wildlife and nature, she is in a great spot overlooking the river where birds are abundant and water animals show up periodically. George Day, father of Cheryl Perry and her husband, had been making his

home with her here in Oroville, as they had purchased the Ira Core home some time back. He is now residing at Colonial Vista, Wenatchee. He had been ill with double pneumonia and needed more care than they could any longer provide for him. Joyce Ward reports that the Falls on Mt. Hull are flowing altho there is still ice at the site. We American shoppers think the price of butter and cheese is expensive, but just talk with a Canadian and find out just how expensive it can be. Thus, they fill shopping carts with butter, cheese and other dairy products to take home with them. It was most interesting to listen to Mr. Akins give the history of how his family got into the grocery business and how he stocked the low shelves with merchandise, at age 5. He pretty much knows all phases of what it takes to make a store operate, successfully, and I’m sure the community is behind him and wishes the best for the family enterprise, as he carries on the family tradition from the Prince family. The grapevine has it that Fat Boy’s eating place has new owners. Every exit is

an entry to somewhere. Condolences to Ivetta (Eylar) Howell and other family members due to the death of her husband, Gene. Community members are sorry to learn of the health issues of Pastor Randy McCallister. He has had a recurrence of stroke like symptoms, similar to what he encountered a few weeks ago, but perhaps more severe. Soon the pinochle games will be ending at Molson Grange, for another session. Play usually goes from November to March. Then what will we do on Monday nights? Linda’s Bakery/Café has new ownership. What used to be the Pastime Tavern is having extensive remodeling and will be pretty fancy, when finished, from the looks of the photos shown on the internet. Yet, another place to eat!!! Perhaps a May Day opening. The Peerless isn’t open but I understand new tables and chairs have been seen being unloaded, and the furnishings have the appearance of Mexican motif, but no signing is in sight yet, so we’ll have to wait for the final word there.

Oroville Dollars for Scholars changes name Auction scheduled for March 15 Submitted by Glenna Hauenstein Oroville Scholarship Foundation

OROVILLE - Recently the Oroville Dollars for Scholars, a non-profit, tax exempt organization, has received the Secretary of State Certificate of Approval to change the name to “Oroville Scholarship Foundation.” After being a chapter affiliate of the national organization, “Citizen’s Scholarship Foundation of America” for nineteen years, the local chapter has decided to become independent because of some restructuring of the national group, the closure of the regional office in the Seattle

NVCS 101! By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools Submitted photo

The memory of longtime Tonasket Gun Club member Dennis Lorz will be honored on March 10 at the club’s Dennis Lorz Memorial Shoot.

Dennis Lorz Memorial Shoot The Tonasket Gun Club will be holding a memorial shoot in honor of Dennis Lorz on Sunday, March 10. Dennis was a long time trap shooter in our valley with over 40 years experience and the past president of the Tonasket Gun Club.

March 3 Shoot Results 16 yard AA Noah Olmstead A Duane Fulfs B Jeff Ellenberger C Alana Hagerup D Roger Owens V Butch Johanson

Spaghetti Dinner and Auction, March 9 Submitted by Sue Wisener

Hey it’s almost spring time! Time to start your garden. Coming up on March 9, there will be a spaghetti dinner and desert auction from 5:30 - 7:00 p.m. This will be for Tonasket School District’s student trip to Washington DC (dinner by donation). Please come and support our kids. Karaoke to follow by Linda Wood. Our kitchen will be open on

TONASKET GUN CLUB Over his life. Dennis has helped mold many young shooters and introduced many individuals to this sport. At the Dennis Lorz Memorial Shoot buckles will be given for

OROVILLE GUN CLUB L FR

Elizabeth Jackson Pete Valentine

Handicap Champion - Lyle Sattler Runner Up - Robert McDaniel

TONASKET EAGLES Fridays at 5:30 p.m. Bingo at 7 p.m. - over $12,000 to win. Come and enjoy yourself. We also have many pull tabs and other fun things to do. Don’t forget to shake and sign for other winnings. If you don’t play you can’t win. Hope to see you soon. We have a scholarship fund in place: $5 for two tickets and 3 for $10. Your choice of $400 in gas or groceries. Drawing will be June 1. Pinochle scores from Sunday,

winners and money will be added for the handicap event. The events for the program are as follows: 50 bird 16-yd. singles, 50 bird handicap, 50 bird doubles. Registration starts at 8:00 a.m. and shooting starts at 9:00 a.m. Please come and commemorate Dennis’s life and love of this sport with us. We wish to extend our thoughts to the entire Lorz family during their time of loss.

Doubles A Noah HOlmstead B Duane Fulfs C Jeff Ellenberger High Overall: Jeff Ellenberger Also, please remember the Dennis Lorz Memorial Shoot at the Tonasket Gun Club, March 10.

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HILLTOP COMMENTS

strong. We serve more than 300 members of the community during three quarters of the year. Many students come back year after year, and we strongly encourage new folks to sign up for classes. Learning is a lifelong endeavor and you can count on finding one or more class offerings that will be of interest to you. The NVCS office telephone number is 509-476-2011 and our email address is community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu. Our office is located at the south end of Oroville High School and the mailing address is P.O.Box 2075, Oroville, 98844. Our website is www.northvalleycommunityschools.com and we have a Facebook page. See you in school!

take place during the evenings at Oroville High School. Some classes are offered in Tonasket and some at the “site,” such as the Kinross Gold Pour in Republic. We maintain an office at Oroville High School. Our classes appeal to adults, teens, and sometimes younger children. We count on donations, in-kind contributions, class registration fees, paid catalog advertising, grants and fund raisers to keep us in business. Our financial situation presents a continuing challenge, but we have operated since 2005 and weíre still going

New chairs are in

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

Submitted by Dolly Engelbretson

The chairs have arrived! A very grateful thank you to all who helped unpack, inventory or cut up the boxes and hauled the remains away. We still have boxes to unpack but we have the routine

down now. Saint Patrick’s Day will soon be here; the dining room is decorated for the occasion. A thank you to Ethel Dunnitt and her sister Jessie, who lives in Osoyoos. They have added their special touch to

the decorations. They are working on Easter decorations for later in the month. We have several items for use to those with disabling afflictions, including: wheel chairs, canes, walkers and a shower bench. There is no charge for the use of these items, but we ask that they be returned clean. No pinochle scores this week. More next time.

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March 3: 1st place was William McKnight, 2nd place Lyle Anderson, low score Ken Cook, last Pinochle, Nellie Paulsen and Joann Michels. We wish anyone who is ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless Whyyou notall. start a new holiday tradition? Make this the Thetime biggest little that Eaglesyou in the www.gazette-tribune.com of year help save for a child’s college state. education.

Edward Jones can work with you to develop a strategy save foracollege. One option is a Make 529 college Whytonot start new holiday tradition? this thesavings plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, time of year that you help save for a child’s college family members and the child.* education. *Contributions to a cold 529 plan may be eligible for akeep state taxyou deduction or credit in Drought and weather may from

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for thecollege holidays, call or visit today.Jones can child’s education. Edward work with you to develop a strategy to save for education. Sandra Rasmussen college. option is and a 529 savings can reviewOne your investments helpcollege you prepare for Financial Advisor plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits can worksavings with you gift to develop a strategy retirement. ToEdward make Jones your college in time for you, members thecollege child.*savings to save forfamily college. One is a 529 32 N Main St option Suite Aand for the holidays, call or visit today. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in certain states for thoseyou, residents. Omak, WA 98841 Call today to schedule a complimentary portfolio review. plan, where gift can have tax benefits for Call todaytoday’s to schedule a complimentary .

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interest earned on endowment and memorial accounts. For the continuing education awards given to OHS graduates already attending college, a fundraiser event is held each March. This year the Variety Show/ Silent Auction is scheduled for Friday, March 15 at the Oroville High School commons. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. We encourage your participation and attendance. At our last meeting we were pleased to welcome in new board member Sally Preston Bull. We are always looking for more help. If you are interested, please contact one of the board officers: Teresa Kitterman, Nancy Woodruff, Doreen Cleman, Terri Barker, or Susan Geisler. The meetings are usually at 3:15 p.m. at the high school on the last Tuesday of each month.

Despite all the newspaper articles, class catalogs in stores, fliers on business windows, fund raisers and special events, we still come across those who have no idea what North Valley Community Schools (NVCS) is all about. So, hereís a quick bio of NVCS, and we hope youíre reading it! We are a 501(c)3 organization with one paid employee and hundreds, if not thousands, of volunteer hours. We have a seven member Board of Directors and an Executive Director. Recreational, cultural and educational classes are offered, most of which

*Contributions a 529that plan may behelp eligiblesave for a state deductioncollege or credit in time of to year you fortax a child’s certain states for can’t those residents. While we control the weather or the markets, we

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area, and the much higher annual fees charged. The local, all volunteer board has decided that we can do as well, or even better, without the more nationally recognized name. The board members, goals, and funding will all remain the same. Our purpose will continue to be to provide encouragement and financial support for Oroville High School graduates who are continuing their education whether it be in a twoyear, four- year, or technical/ vocational school. Since 1994, we have appreciated the strong support, assistance and involvement of our community, which has allowed us to give financial help to over three hundred students. The graduating senior scholarships are funded from the

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MARCH 7, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

Community Bulletin Board

Tonasket Preschool Story Times The upcoming Preschool Story Time is Thursday, March 7th at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Public Library. Call (509) 486-2366 with any questions.

Randy McAllister Benefit Benefit Dinner/Auction for Randy McAllister to help cover medical expenses. It will be held on Saturday Night, March 9 at the American Legion. It will be a Chili Feed with Salad, Chips and Dessert. The dinner will start at 6:00 p.m. and the auction will begin at 7:00 p.m. The prices will be $7.00 for adults and $5.00 for children 12 and under. Please come out to support Randy and his family.

Dennis Lorz Memorial Shoot The Tonasket Gun Club will be holding a memorial shoot in honor of Dennis Lorz on Sunday,

Change is in the Air for Rodeo Submitted by Bud Mc Spadden

Well Doggies, another busy year on tap for the Tonasket rodeo club is coming up fast, and there is change in the air! We have a new president, Lloyd Caton runnin’ the show. And unlike our government, “We’re gettin’ ‘er done!” Along with the Ives family, we have decided to change from the Jeremy Ives Memorial Rodeo to the Tonasket Bulls and Broncs Founders Day Rodeo. A new venue in conjunction with the Elite Bull Riding Association and the World Class Bucking Horse futurity. It is our hope for a very exciting three days of events

March Events Submitted by River Jones CCC of Tonasket

March events at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket include: * Friday, March 8 - Friday night coffeehouse with Denny Richardson and friends playing Grateful Dead tunes. Dinner of homemade pizza served starting at 5:30 p.m. $5 for a slice of pizza and $1 for a side of organic salad. For more info call the office at #486-1328. * Sunday, March 10 - Free Community Dinner - Sunday dinner provided by the CCC and others. Dinner served from 2-4p.m. Free for those who need it, by donation for others. Call Janet at 486-2061 for more info. * Sunday March 10 - Spring Concert Series Classical Music Event ñ “Encore” Entertainment will be Cello by Bracken Stevens and North American Flute played by Jimmy Johnson. Starts at 4 p.m. Sweet and savory refreshments will be served. Admission is $6 for CCC members and $7

Bridges Out of Poverty The Okanogan Community Action Council will be sponsoring “Bridges out of Poverty: Strategies for Professionals and Communities” on Friday, March 15, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. The free seminar is designed for employers, managers, staff and volunteers who work with individuals from under-resourced backgrounds or entry-level employees. The session will take place at the Cornerstone Christian Fellowship, 328 N. Riverside Drive, Omak. For more information, contact Faith Wakefield-Mills at (509) 422-4041, FaithWM@occac.com, or register online at https:// bookwhen.com/bridges. March 10. Registration starts at 8:00 a.m. and shooting starts at 9:00 a.m.

Assisted Living citizens’ forum Citizens’ forum discussing the NVH Assisted Living concerns, pending legal action and fund will be held at the Oroville High School Commons on Tuesday, March 12 starting at 7:00 p.m.

Habitat for Humanity RIVERSIDE - The monthly

TONASKET COMANCHEROS planned June 1, starting with the kids games and barbecue. I can assure you it will be slicker than a bucket of eels swimming in snot! The rodeo dinner and benefit auction will be March 30 at 5:00 p.m. with auction to follow at 7 at the Tonasket Eagles at $10 a plate for a steak dinner and live entertainment. We are still looking for donations; if you have an idea for donations let us know. But we can take and auction dang near anything - from manure to house cleaning we can sell it! (No, Gerry, you can’t auction Bert Beeman off. Who would take care of the rodeo grounds?) Another big project coming up

COMMUNITY CULTURAL CENTER for the general public. * Wednesday, March 13 and 27 - CCC Game Night and Acoustic Music Jam - All kinds of games including cards, board games and ping pong hosted by Janet Culp and acoustic musical jam hosted by Pat Liley from 6-9 p.m. Dinner for $5 prepared by Tryg Culp and crew. Call Janet Culp at 486-2061 for more info. * Friday, March 15 - Tonasket Outreach Program Benefit Concert and Auction. Spaghetti dinner from 5-6 p.m., cake, pie and quilt auction from 6:30-7 p.m. and music from 7-8 p.m. Admission by donation. For more info call #486-1691 * Sunday, March 17 Auditions for June performance of “Cat Ballou” by the Tonasket Community Theater - 10 men and four women are needed plus two people to sing and play guitar/banjo. Auditions start at 4

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

meeting of Habitat for Humanity will be Tuesday, March 12 at 7 p.m. at Mike and Peggy McDaniels’ home - 170 Hubbard Road, Riverside, WA. For further information call Arlene Johnson at (509) 429 8369.

Japanese meal prep OROVILLE - Have you been to one of those Japanese restaurants where the chefs throw knives above their heads, catch them deftly as they come down and expertly twirl them around? There’s a tendency to duck. Then they chop so fast you wonder how they keep their fingers. No, that won’t happen in this class. this spring is the grandstand restoration (commonly known as “Citizens Against Splinters.”) Our rodeo queen Karlie Henneman and Miss Omak Stampede Breanna Howell (who also hails from Tonasket) have decided to repair and repaint the grandstands as a senior project. Here is your chance to get to know our queens, and your neighbors - there’s lots to do! Just think: it will be like an old time barn raising and picnic! Contact Karlie or Breanna or anyone in the club for more info. Thanks to Home Depot and Midway and numerous others for their support. And as always, we are looking’ for new members. Our next meeting is March 14 7:00 p.m. at the Eagles meeting room. Y’all come down, ya hear?

p.m. Contact Sarah Kaiser at sarahdrama@ncidata for more info. * Friday, March 22 - OHA Presents: Rally for Buckhorn “Trashion Show” Membership meeting at 4:30 p.m., dinner at 5:30 p.m. and Showtime at 7 p.m. For more info go to www.okanoganhighlands.org. * Sunday, March 31 - Free Community Dinner - Sunday dinner provided by the CCC and others. Dinner served from 2-4 p.m. Free for those who need it, by donation for others. Call Janet at 486-2061 for more info. Also there are dance classes every Thursday evening; learn to waltz, two-step, four-step swing. Fee is $5 per class, with the first class free. 6-8 p.m. Call the Center at 486-1328 for more information. Check out the calendar for dates and times of community meetings and regular weekly classes at the Center.

What you will do is learn about the flavorful, healthy foods used in Japanese cooking and prepare and share a traditional Japanese meal. It’s a one evening class on Wednesday, March 13, from 5:308:00 p.m. Call Ellen at Community Schools,509-476-2011, to register. Enjoy!

Women’s Ministry Beginning March 14 Is there someone in your life, office place, social gathering or family that ruffles your feathers or loves to ruin your day? And you do not know what to say or do, so you simply keep quiet or simply walk away … Well, here is your chance! The Oroville SDA Women’s Ministry invites you to join us for our weekly dissuasion about “Dealing with People You Can’t Stand: How to Bring Out the Best In People At their Worst.” We meet in the fellowship hall of the Oroville SDA Church, Thursdays at 6:00 p.m. beginning on March 14.

Dollars for Scholars Variety

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The Kiwanis Club of Osoyoos is holding a Spring Craft Fair Saturday, March 16, at the Osoyoos Royal Canadian Legion located at Veterans Way and 78th Street. The hours are from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There are a few tables available. For information, contact Wayne at (250) 449-2191. Admission is by a donation to the Osoyoos Food Bank. There will be a 50/50 draw and some door prizes. We will have some food available. See you there!

Auditions!! Tonasket Community theater is presenting “Cat Ballou” at the

Food Banks TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church.

DENTISTRY

EYECARE

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Your Complete Eyecare Centre

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome.

FAMILY PRACTICE

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

WATERFRONT eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

HEALTH CARE

TONASKET

OKANOGAN

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

Oliver Theatre

250-498-2277

Thurs. & Fri. March 7-8 ONE SHOW NIGHTLY AT 7:30PM

IDENTITY THIEF

SAT.-SUN.-MON. - TUES., THURS.-FRI. 14 March 9-10-11-12,14-15 SHOWTIMES FRI. & SAT. 7&9:10PM

Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

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SHOWTIMES FRI. & SAT. 7&9:10PM

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

OZ- THE GREAT & POWERFUL

ACTION/ADVENTURE/FANTASY STARRING JAMES FRANCO, MICHELLE WILLIAMS, RACHEL WEISZ, MILA KUNIS 130 min

Fri. 6:30 & 9:30 Sat. *3:15, 6:30 & 9:30 Sun. 3:30 & 6:45 Wkdys: 7:00

The

PG

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

JACK THE GIANT SLAYER ADVENTURE/DRAMA/FANTASY STARRING NICHOLAS HOULT, EWAN MCGREGOR, STANLEY TUCCI

Fri. 6:45 & 9:30 Sat. *3:45, 6:45 & 9:30 Sun. 3:45 & 6:45 Wkdys: 6:45 114 min PG13 Late shows on Fri. & Sat. at 9:30

THE LAST EXORCISM PART 2 HORROR/THRILLER STARRING ASHLEY BELL, JULIA GARNER, SPENCER TREAT CLARK

Fri. 7:00 & 9:15 Sat. *4:45, 7:00 & 9:15 Sun. 5:00 & 7:15 Wkdys: 7:15 PG13 88 min

FILM FESTIVAL WEEK 2 (3/1-3/7)

THE IMPOSSIBLE

DRAMA/HISTORY/THRILLER STARRING EWAN MCGREGOR, NAOMI WATTS, TOM HOLLAND, SAMUEL JOSLIN 114 min

Fri.6:30 Sat. *1:00, 6:30 Sun. *1:00, 6:30 Wkdys: 6:30pm

PG13

Adults $7.50 Kids 11-under & *Discount Matinee-kids/adults $5 ea

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

(509) 826-6191

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

www.wvmedical.com HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health

(509) 826-8496

ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH SAT.-SUN.-MON. - TUES. MARCH 16-17-18-19 MATINEE ON SAT. AT 2PM.

CLINIC

Oliver, B.C.

Reg. Showtimes: Sun.-Mon.-Tue.Thur. 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7&9pm

OMAK THEATER

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Spring Craft Fair

The Tonasket Kiwanis honored February’s Terrific Kids at Tonasket Elementary School at the end of the month.

ZERO DARK THIRTY Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

OROVILLE - The Oroville Dollars for Scholars has scheduled this year’s Variety Show/ Silent Auction for Friday, March 15. Application forms are available from Eric.Styles@oroville. wednet.edu or call (661) 3133448. To donate auction items please contact Glenna Hauenstein at (509) 476-2416.

Community Cultural Center June 23,26,28,29. Auditions will be March 17, at 4:00 p.m. at the CCC. Rehearsals will start midApril or mid-May depending on the role. Sarah Kaiser is directing, and she needs one young woman, (leading role) and three other women (any age). She also needs one young man and one older man (leading roles) and eight other men (varying roles, any age). No singing, but must be willing to ride stick horses, act tipsy, fire cap guns, rob trains, etc... This IS a Western, classic comedy. Contact Sarah for more information about the play, auditions, rehearsals. Sarahdrama@ ncidata.com

TERRIFIC KIDS!

Care Credit

At the

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Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel (509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line (509) 826-6191

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Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

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826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

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916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 7, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • March 07, 2013

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Commercial Rentals

Lots & Acreage FOUR ACRES INDUSTRIAL LAND on the Canada to Oroville Heavy Haul Corridor with railroad frontage and truck access off of Jennings Loop Rd. Only $60,000. Call 509 322 4732

FOR RENT: Office/Business unit. 806 Central, Oroville. New tile & paint. Excellent location. $395/mo. (509)4861682 or (509)429-0873.

Tonasket ½ ACRE BUILDING LOT with power, water, phone and cable TV only $35,000. No mobile homes. Call 509 322 4732

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

For Rent

LAKEFRONT house, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, garage, $950. IN TOWN 2 bedroom, 2 bath, garage, family room, $875. LAKEFRONT apartment, a bargain at $500. IN TOWN, nice 1 bedroom Tonasket Small one bedroom cottage apartment, $400. with a garage on a large lot CALL Sun Lakes Realty, one block from grocery store. 509-476-2121 Only $79,000. Call 509 322 4732 Oroville NEW and NICE! One Bedroom house with Walk in closet, eat in kitchen, laundry Tonasket LARGE INDUSTRIAL stor- and lots of storage. Patio with age warehouse. On 10+ valley view. acres with city water and OT Call: 509-476-0199 irrigation water. Call for DeSt. Charles Place tails 509-322-4732

Houses For Sale

Announcements CONGRATULATIONS

– Howard –

on completing your 75 trip around the sun

th

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Help Wanted

Apartments

207 Main St., Oroville, WA

Tonasket Three bedroom, two bath, 1248 sq. ft, vacant all new carpet and fresh paint, convenient location in Old Orchard Estates subdivision, ½ miles north of Tonasket. Only $145,000. Call 509-322-4732

ATTENTION:

Love & Prayers for many more from all your family & friends

LOW INCOME HOUSING “PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

Stop by Hometown Pizza and wish

– Family & Singles –

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

John & Becky

a Happy 30th Anniversary on March 12

509-476-4057

www.gazette-tribune.com

email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310 Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

Crosswords

Love from Mom & Dad ADOPT: Adoring couple, Architect & Internet Executive yearn for precious baby to LOVE FOREVER! Expenses paid. 1-800990-7667

www.gazette-tribune.com 23. Chinese dynasty

6. Rocks containing Fe

24. ___ Master’s Voice

7. Kentucky college

27. “Wanna ___?�

8. Criticizes

28. Sub-Saharan scourge

9. Infomercials, e.g.

31. A chorus line

10. Literary club, e.g.

33. 365 days (pl., 2 wds)

11. Start of a quip (2 wds)

35. ___ list

12. “Cogito ___ sum�

37. Cashew, e.g.

13. Long, long time

38. Insects between larva and adult stages

18. Concrete section

39. Start too soon (3 wds)

23. Toni Morrison’s “___ Baby�

42. Allocate, with “out�

24. Pilgrim to Mecca

43. Confines, as in jail

25. Terminal portion of small intestine

44. Pistol, slangily 47. “-zoic� things

26. Those who involuntarily repeat and hesitate when speaking

48. Assail

28. Full development

50. Shrewish women

29. About to explode

52. Paid post with minimal duties (pl.)

30. Money in the bank, say

56. Sundae topper, perhaps

34. Big galoot

57. Writer whose characters symbolize a deeper moral meaning

36. Digress

58. “Dear� ones

45. Art ___

46. Undertake, with “out�

ANSWERS

Across

21. Tumors on mucous membranes

59. City on the Arkansas River 60. 100 centavos

1. Cat’s scratcher

61. “___ on Down the Road�

5. Seventh zodiac sign

62. Chaotic

10. Fishing, perhaps

63. Knocked off, in a way

14. Halo, e.g.

MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITY Veranda Beach Resort has an employment opportunity for “Front Desk Manager Vacation Rentals�. This is a full time position w/ opportunity for advancement in a dynamic and growing company. Applicants require excellent computer and communication skills, the ability to multi-task and work as a team. Preference will be given to candidates with hospitality industry and or management exp. Apply with resume in writing to: Patty Lawrence General Manager Veranda Beach Resort P.O. Box 3000 Oroville Wa 98844 P-T maintenance must pass screening. Wage TBD. 617 Hwy. 97, Oroville, WA. 509-476-3059 Seasonal site personnel must pass screening, bilingual preferred. Resume preferred. Job description at 617 Hwy. 97, Oroville, WA. 509476-3059 Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is currently recruiting for Seasonal Firefighter and NRW2 Engine Leader positions. Positions are open until filled. For more information, or to apply please visit our website, www.dnr.wa.gov. If you have further questions (after reviewing our website) contact Heidi Seitters at (509) 684-7474. DNR is an equal opportunity employer.

Help Wanted

Statewides

NOW SEEKING APPLICANTS Oroville’s new Pastime Bar and Grill is looking to fill the following positions: bartender, bar-back, server, cocktail server, dishwasher, prep & line cook, and kitchen lead. Email resume to: info@pastimebarandgrill.com with desired position in subject line or mail to P.O Box 2043, Oroville, WA 98844. The City of Oroville is now accepting applications of employment for the following positions: Seasonal Park Aid Level II, Office/Reservation Supervisor This position consists of up to 40 hours per week, depending upon the time of the park season; starts in April and ends in October. Other park maintenance duties may also be assigned, as needed. Applicants must be 18 years of age or older, have a valid Washington State Driver’s License and be physically able to perform required tasks. Applications may be secured at the Oroville City Hall, 7:30 am to 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday, and must be received by 12:00 noon, Friday, March 22, 2013. The City of Oroville is an equal opportunity employer.

submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

Business Opportunities 1950’s DINER - BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY This is an exciting business opportunity at an established resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington! Veranda Beach Resort seeks an experienced and successful food and beverage operator for the 2013 season. This fully equipped 1950’s themed Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Rhonda Hinkley for further details at: rhonda@verandabeach.com. Check out our website at: www.verandabeach.com

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF MARCH 4, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy

Think Green!

ADOPTION ADOPT -- Adoring couple, Architect & Internet Exec. year for precious baby to love forever! Expenses paid. 1-800-990-7667 ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTER TO WIN a $1,000 prepaid Visa card! Take our survey at www.pulsepoll.com and tell us about your media usage and shopping plans. Your input will help this paper help local businesses. Thank you! EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified.. Call 866-483-4429. www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (800) 563-3005. www.fossmortgage.com CASH NOW for Good Notes, Top Dollar from Private investor. Yes, Bajillions Available for quality Contracts, Mortgages, Annuities, Inheritance. Receiving Payments? Call Skip Foss 1-800-637-3677 FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS GORDON TRUCKING Inc. CDL-A Drivers Needed. Dedicated & OTR Positions Available! Consistent Miles, Benefits, 401k & EOE. Sign On Bonus! Recruiters available 7 days/wk! Call: 866-725-9669 TIRED of Being Gone? We get you home! Call Haney Truck Line one of the best NW heavy haul carriers. Great pay/benefits package. 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com DRIVER --Daily or Weekly Pa., $0.01 increase per mile after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months OTR experience.. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com REAL ESTATE COLFAX -- RIVERFRONT. 9 acres was $75,000 now only $39,500.

continued on next page

Did you know?

We use...

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40. “For ___ a jolly ...� (2 wds) 41. Bouquet 48. Paper money 49. Paint thinner, British 50. Cheat, slangily

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1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com


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ANSWERS

Sponsored by

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: ROBERT DAVIS UNDERWOOD, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00014-7 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time

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DISTRICT COURT FOR THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN DOUGLAS D. MORRISON, an individual, Plaintiff, v. KEITH ROYLANCE, an individual, Defendant. NO. 22354 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO: KEITH ROYLANCE AND JOHN DOE ROYLANCE You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after the 14th day of February, 2013, and defend the above-entitled action in the above-entitled court, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison at their office below stated; and in case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the

Public Notice Radio Jingle Nursery Rhymes Baker’s Acres Nursery is having a sale in May. At Baker’s Acres Nursery it’s our Anaversary. Landscap ideas, also garden supplies, meditation drip pools, and new ideas to try. Bakers Acres Nursery is next to the rodeo grounds. Tonaskets’ got a nursery and that’s the news that’s getting around. Bakers Acres! Reff: Same terms as It Mutters My Mind. Published=Other Legal. Okanogan Valley Gazette. Dec. 2, 2013 #43764 or #44631Nihgt Hawk Tail Tales Jan 6, 2011 #45324 Both: Feb 3, 2011 Roger Rylander 288 Howard End Rd. Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1834 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 7, 2013. #462569

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Lender Repo sale. Beautiful valley views, quiet country road with electric. Excellent financing provided. Call UTR 1-888-326-9048.

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Statewides

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 10 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

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the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: February 11, 2013 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: February 21, 2013 /s/Wayne Pretts WAYNE PRETTS Personal Representative s/Anthony Castelda Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Underwood Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 21, 28, March 7, 2013 #457855

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PUBLIC NOTICE POSTED CONFIRMATION OF OWNERSHIP HOMESTEAD -- FARMLAND NON-ABANDONMENT ALL TAXES PAID IN FULL CONCERNING THESE CONJOINING PARCELS. STATUTORY WARRENTED DEED JULY 2, 1996 CORRECTED SURVEY, IMPROVED, MAINTAINED, TO DATE. ANY CLAIMS OF LIENS OR CLOUDED TITLE HAVE SIX WEEKS FROM DATE OF PUBLICATION TO RESPOND WITH CERTIFIED DOCUMENTS AND OR RECEIPTS. INCLUDES ALL RECORDED PERMITS. ALL PARCELS TAXED IN OKANOGAN COUNTY, STATE OF WASTHINGTON. PARCEL NO. 3727264005 3727260002-3727260053727260006-3723260017 /s/ ROGER RYLANDER ROGER RYLANDER 288 HOWARD END RD. TONASKET, WA 98855 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 7, 14, 2013 #455374

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demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The complaint arises from default under a Promissory Note dated September 5, 2006. Shawn K. Harju, WSBA No. 29942 CARNEY BADLEY SPELLMAN, P.S. 701 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3600 Seattle, WA 98104-7010 Attorneys for Plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 14, 21, 28, March 7, 14, 21, 2013. #457807

Sudoku

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March 07, 2013| •OKANOGAN OKANOGANVALLEY VALLEYGAZETTE-TRIBUNE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE MARCH 7, 2013

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 2

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Lake and Country

Wannacut Lake Lodge 5800 sq. ft. Ideal swimming/boating. 12 fenced private acres. Vaulted ceilings w/ trestle beams, expansive waterside deck, Pella windows, 4 bedrooms, library & family room. Daylight Basement has full apartment. Additional barn/garage. 1st rate tennis court. $419,900

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Very cute, fully remodeled home right in town! New laminate flooring, new vinyl windows and fully finished basement. Located 1/2 block from tennis courts. Features 2 car detached garage, underground sprinkler system, 3bd, 1.75 bath and 1,584 sqft of living space!

#453753 $140,000

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Advertise

Air Conditioning

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Insulation

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Installed Insulation &

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Licensed & Bonded

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Attorney

Building Supplies Quality Supplies Since 1957

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Midway Building Supply

RYAN W. GUNN

Oroville Building Supply

Attorney at Law

Civil Criminal Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 7, 2013

SPORTS ALL-CARIBOU TRAIL LEAGUE TEAMS Jacob Durfee, sr., Quincy Honorable Mention Michael Orozco, jr., Tonasket Dyllan Gage, jr., Tonasket Justin VanderWeide, jr., Okanogan Jason Perez, fr., Okanogan Jordan Christensen, sr., Cashmere Erick Oscarson, sr., Chelan Hank Hollingsworth, so., Chelan Josh Hammons, fr., Brewster Mario Figueroa, sr., Quincy Gerardo Mendoza, sr, Cascade Chance Williams, fr., Omak

DYLLAN GAGE Boys Basketball

Runners-up 106 - Victor Salgado, Quincy 113 - Brandon Medina, Brewster 120 - Ivan Reyes, Chelan 126 - Jeffrey Stedtfeld, Tonasket 132 - Ethan Visser, Cashmere 138 - Alexander Aguilar, Omak 145 - Isias Jimenez, Quincy 152 - Sammy Trudeaux, Omak 160 - Antonio Melendez, Quincy 170 - Bobby Anderson, Chelan 182 - Jayden Elmore, Quincy 195 - Jacob Cuttrell, Omak 220 - Bernardo Maravilla, Cascade 285 - Jason Guzman, Quincy

Abby Phelps, jr., Chelan Emily Schramm, sr., Chelan Lauren Johnson, jr., Cashmere Caitlyn Behymer, sr., Okanogan Sydney Coffin, jr., Cascade

AUSTIN BOOKER Wrestling

MVP - Dylan Boyd, jr., Cashmere Coach of the Year: Tim Taylor, Brewster Sportsmanship: Tonasket

Champions 106 - Christian Alejandrez, Quincy 113 - Gabe Martinez, Quincy 120 - Collin Aitcheson, Tonasket 126 - Julio Vera, Chelan 132 - Erick Garcia, Chelan 138 - Jacob James, Cashmere 145 - Juan Garcia, Chelan 152 - Carter Bushman, Quincy 160 - Austin Booker, Tonasket 170 - Cody Harvill, Omak 182 - Cade Wallace, Quincy 195 - Alex Cortez, Chelan 220 - Asa Schwartz, Chelan 285 - Luis Garcia, Chelan

Girls Basketball MVP - Chandler Smith, jr., Brewster Coach of the Year - Frank Phelps, Chelan Sportsmanship - Quincy

1st Team Justin Rivas, jr., Okanogan Jim Townsend, so., Okanogan Coleman McElroy, sr., Cashmere Michael Amsel Jr., sr., Chelan Easton Driessen, jr., Brewster

1st Team Kara Staggs, sr., Okanogan Monica Landdeck, jr., Brewster Becky Taylor, sr., Brewster Courtney Dietrich, sr., Chelan Angela Knishka, sr., Cashmere

2nd Team Quinton Oliver, sr., Okanogan Casey Ruether, jr., Cashmere Aaron Schramm, sr., Chelan Timbo Taylor, fr., Brewster

2nd Team Brette Boesel, jr., Brewster

KYLIE DELLINGER

Honorable Mention Kylie Dellinger, jr., Tonasket Jessie Hammons, sr., Brewster Hailey Habich, sr., Chelan Kaylee Caudill, sr., Cashmere Megan Parks, sr., Okanogan Johnna Rieke, jr., Cascade Kaycee O’Brien, so., Cascade Shawnee Covington, jr., Omak Cayden Diefenbach, fr., Omak Aurorah Davis, sr., Quincy

Third Place 106 - Anthony Payton, Okanogan 113 - Tony Klepec, Okanogan 120 - Randy Hamilton, Okanogan 126 - Jorge Juarez, Tonasket 132 - Raf Varelas, Brewster 138 - Chris Truini, Chelan 145 - Marcos Fonseca, Okanogan 152 - Brock Steele, Cashmere 160 - Andy Vargas, Quincy 170 - Steven Gomez, Quincy 182 - Nikita Stata, Cascade 195 - John Rawley, Tonasket 220 - Adrian Urias, Brewster 285 - Tanner Good, Tonasket

ALL-CENTRAL WASHINGTON LEAGUE NORTH DIVISION TEAMS Chance Garvin, Fr., Lake Roosevelt Alex Vanderholm, Jr., Manson Logan Szafas, Jr. Liberty Bell Austin Watson, Jr., Liberty Bell Olegario Orozco, Sr., Manson

Trey Nicholson, So., Lake Roosevelt Juan Lopez, Fr., Oroville

1st Team

Cameron Cavadini, Sr., Bridgeport Bailey Morris-Evenson, Fr., Bridgeport Miguel Garza, So., Bridgeport Jaymis Hanson, Jr., Liberty Bell Salvador Leyva, Sr., Manson

Boys Baketball MVP: Connor Hughes, Oroville Sportsmanship: Liberty Bell Coach of the Year: Dan Cavadini, Bridgeport

2nd Team

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Briana Moralez, Sr., Oroville Katie Tietje, Sr., Oroville Danielle Laramie, Sr., Lake Roosevelt Jenny Salazar, So., Bridgeport Rickyna Sam, Sr., Lake Roosevelt

MVP: Lily Hilderbrand, Oroville Sportsmanship: Manson

Honorable Mention Sarina Williams, So., Liberty Bell

Honorable Mention

LILY HILDERBRAND

Joseph Sarmiento, So., Oroville Liam Daily, Sr., Liberty Bell Justus DeWinkler,, Sr., Lake Roosevelt Kendall Piccolo, Sr., Lake Roosevelt Kevin Alvarez, So., Bridgeport

1st Team Connor Hughes, Sr., Oroville

Rachel Vanderholm, So., Liberty Bell Tamera Klein, Sr., Liberty Bell Alex Martinez, Sr., Bridgeport Johnny McCraigie, Sr., Lake Roosevelt

Lily Hilderbrand, So., Oroville Itzel Castro, Sr., Manson Hailey Chaney, Sr., Lake Roosevelt Keya Fasthorse, Jr., Lake Roosevelt Katelyn Schilling, So., Lake Roosevelt Deycy Monje-Lopez, Sr., Bridgeport

2nd Team

CONNOR HUGHES

Coach of the Year: PeeWee Pleasants, Lake Roosevelt

JORDAN SMITH (state qualifier)

FINAL WINTER STANDINGS Caribou Trail League

Boys Basketball

Caribou Trail League

Girls Basketball

League Overall W L PF PA W L PF PA * Okanogan 13 1 67.7 51.4 25 2 67.4 48.0 * Cashmere 11 3 71.7 53.8 19 9 67.7 54.8 * Chelan 11 3 51.4 40.1 17 7 50.3 41.9 * Brewster 8 6 54.5 49.4 16 9 55.2 47.7 * Quincy 6 8 48.6 51.2 9 11 47.0 49.0 * Tonasket 4 10 52.9 64.3 9 12 54.1 59.4 Cascade 2 12 45.1 59.6 4 16 45.5 56.4 Omak 1 13 42.0 64.1 5 15 44.3 58.6 * Qualified for post-season play Regional Qualifiers: Okanogan, Cashmere, Brewster State Qualifiers: Okanogan (4th place), Cashmere (6th place)

League Overall W L PF PA W L PF PA * Brewster 13 1 68.8 40.4 26 1 68.6 40.5 * Chelan 11 3 55.4 37.4 21 5 54.3 38.3 * Cashmere 9 5 50.8 40.5 14 11 50.5 44.9 * Okanogan 9 5 60.9 37.1 19 8 62.5 37.0 * Cascade 8 6 47.9 45.6 14 7 51.5 40.0 * Omak 3 11 38.9 56.1 5 16 39.1 49.6 Quincy 2 12 23.6 54.9 5 15 27.8 49.3 Tonasket 1 13 24.8 59.1 3 17 29.3 57.0 * Qualified for post-season play Regional Qualifiers: Brewster, Chelan, Okanogan State Qualifiers: Brewster (state champion), Chelan (3rd place), Okanogan.

Central Washington League North Division

Central Washington League North Division

League Overall W L PF PA W L PF PA * Liberty Bell 7 4 50.5 42.9 13 10 49.5 46.3 * Manson 6 5 51.9 51.4 12 10 53.1 47.7 * Bridgeport 6 5 49.4 52.0 13 11 45.9 49.6 Lk Roosevelt 5 6 50.6 54.5 7 13 47.0 56.3 Oroville 3 8 44.6 53.5 6 14 46.5 55.2 * Qualified for post-season play Regional Qualifiers: Liberty Bell, Bridgeport State Qualifiers: none

League Overall W L PF PA W L PF PA * Oroville 8 3 47.0 37.4 13 10 42.5 39.2 * Lk Roosevelt 8 3 54.7 35.7 15 8 50.6 44.5 * Bridgeport 4 7 31.5 46.9 7 14 31.0 45.5 Manson 3 8 29.2 45.5 4 13 29.7 44.9 Liberty Bell 0 11 28.6 55.6 0 19 27.9 57.6 * Qualified for post-season play Regional Qualifiers: Lake Roosevelt State Qualifiers: None

Wrestling Caribou Trail League

League Duals W-L Quincy 7-0 Chelan 6-1 Tonasket 5-2 Omak Cascade 2-5 Cashmere 2-5 Okanogan 1-5 Brewster 0-6

4-3

State 1A finals finish: Quincy, 2nd place; Chelan, 5th place; Tonasket, 10th place; Omak, 15th place; Cashmere, 30th place; Brewster, 34th place; Okanogan, 39th place. State 1A medalists: Quincy 6 (2 state champions); Chelan 4 (2 state champions); Tonasket 4; Omak 4; Cashmere 2; Okanogan 1; Brewster 1. Also Brewster girls 2.

Central Washington League North teams

(Wrestling does not compete as CWL, but several schools do field teams) State 1B/2B finals finish: Liberty Bell - state champion; Lake Roosevelt, 2nd place; Pateros 24th place; Oroville 30th place. State 1B/2B medalists: Liberty Bell 6 (2 champions); Lake Roosevelt 5 (1 champion); Pateros 1.

SPRING SPORTS Preview 2013

Our Spring Sports Section will be coming out in March!

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Contact Charlene at 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712


MARCH 7, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A11

Arts & Entertainment Missoula Children’s Theatre shines light on local kids By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - On Monday, February 25, the Missoula Children’s Theatre tour staged tryouts for roles in its production, “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” By Saturday, more than 50 local students performed an hour-long production, complete with memorized lines, costumes and sets. Director David D’Andrea and actress Hannah Carey provided the Missoula Children’s Theatre’s expertise through the week, with Carey (as Witless the Woodsman) taking the one acting part not performed by local talent. The Missoula Children’s Theatre, in its 40 years, has worked on similar productions with more than one million children. This year they expect to work with 65,000 kids in more than 1,200 communities in all 50 states, as well as 17 countries. More information about the organization can be found online at www.mtinc.org or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ MissoulaChildrensTheatre. The cast of Saturday’s production included: Snow White - Tallulah Rietveld King Backwards - Tiarnan Savage O’Neal Queen Bella - Abby Duchow Magic Mirror - Phoenix

Bruce Thornton/submitted photo

Justice Owens is 11 years old and playing with the OVOC orchestra. He is seen here with Jim Kalberer and Jackie Chambers.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Most of the cast of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs with King Backwards (Tiarnan Savage O’Neal) at center. Willging Phineas - Emma Alexander Foxy - Noni Alley Fernando - Joseph Coleman Dwarfs - Sara Alexander, Brianna Gutierrez, Skylar Hardesty, Katie Keane, Quaid McCormick, Carson Timm, Brielle Wahl Henchmen - Seven Closson, Jared Savage Black Forest Creatures - Marsie Brazil, Jessie Burks, Grace Cory, Teigan Field, Allison Glanzer,

Erica Good, Sarah Green, Elizabeth Hylton, Maya Johann, Shiann McCallum, Maria Martinez, Lyndzi Scott, Jewel Vanderwaal Bats - Megan Heinlen, Jake Hilton, Arwen Holt, Daniel Keane, Joey Skavinsky, Brody McCormick, Chloe McFarland, Elizabeth Olson, Bradon Prock, Mary Lu Tafolla, Kate Thompson Forest Animals - Erica Breshears, Treshelle Caddy, Stella Crutcher, Tyler Duchow, Miriam

Gutierrez, Jessica Heinlen, Myah Hirst, Sheyann LaBelle, Amaya Norell, Tait Olson, Arianna Perez, Madison Prock, Makala Ramsey, Lily Reavis, Athena Rietveld, Jenelle Skavinsky, Alexis Swanson, Jeffery Wisdom Accompanist Maryliz Romano Witless the Woodsman - Hannah Carey (Missoula Children’s Theatre) Director - David D’Andrea (Missoula Children’s Theatre)

Overflow crowd glitzes up, hits the dance floor SUBMITTED

TONASKET - The evening was elegant, beautiful and rich in happy, smiling guests. The “Ball” that was held at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center on Saturday night was a huge success. The tables were decorated with white linens, black fan-folded napkins, mirrors and candles. The black and white balloons displayed by Dave and Peggy Swanberg were a fabulous added touch. As the guests were seated and served their beverages. After dining on shrimp cocktail and salad, a main entree of gouda chicken, au gratin potatoes and Malibu blend veggies was served. A relaxing and “non intimidating” dance lesson was enjoyed even on full tummies. Dancing the evening away was next on the list. “I came out of the kitchen to the see 67 out of 73 gorgeous dancing people twirling, swinging and holding each other close. What a terrific sight”, said Jinnie Bartholomew. The dance lesson class was presented by an impromptu performance by Heather and Salem Straub and Jen and Sam Steinshouer. Both couples were dressed in formal attire and displayed the dance steps they have been taught at Thursday night lessons at the CCC. As others gained the courage to dance the couples were available for assistance on steps and moves. Patty Spade, a local photographer was constantly busy with guests wanting their personal photos taken for purchase. The line for the photo shoot lasted almost two hours with no break, as the laughing, giggling and fan-

Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus spring concert, Mar. 24 Submitted by Vera Zachow OVOC

OMAK - The Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus will hold their spring concert, Sunday, March 24 at 3 p.m. at the Omak Performing Arts Center in Omak. OVOC is delighted to have several generations playing in the orchestra this year. Pictured is Justice Owens, 11 years old, Jim Kalberer and Jackie Chambers playing violin. We also have a mother and daughter, Sera and Sonja Thornton playing in the OVOC orchestra. Bruce Thornton, father of Sera and husband of Sonja, is our unofficial photographer. The chorus will feature “Somewhere” from West Side Story, “Stopping By Woods,” words by Robert Frost with music by Richard Manners, Stephen Fosterís “Nelly Bly” and O Crux

Meredith Arksey recital in Tonasket Submitted by Roz Nau Photos by Janet Culp and Brent Baker

Left, Don Swanson and Elda Vejraska, both in their 90s, were named King and Queen of the BAll at Satuday evenings’ dinner and dance event at the CCC. Right, Heather and Salem Straub demonstrate some dance steps prior to the floor opening up. tastic poses were met with the camera’s lens. A short comedy lecture by “Dr. Chocolate Bittersweet” The outfit the good doctor wore was an embarrassing blue and black printed skirt with a yellow and brown lion print blouse, orange scarf, and pink boa, pink cat-eye glasses and tennis shoes, an outfit that no one would be caught dead in out in public. “The problem was I lost my speech notes and had to wing it. but I think the audience thought that was the funny part, I of course, did not”, Jinnie said. “My heart was overflowing with joy,” said Janet Culp. “The tables were stunning, the disco ball donated by Quill Hyde was a great touch. All in all, it was an amazing event.” Don Swanson, a young 90 year

old from Brewster and a vibrant, 91 year old, Elda Vejraska from Omak were crowned King and Queen of the Ball. “You know, not too many people our age are still dancing,” said Elda. As Jinnie and Dave Bartholomew, Janice Hutton, Judy Bunch, Gretchen Harris, and Jamie and Clinton Cable dished up and served the plates of fabulous food, you could hear the laughter and fun being had by all at the tables. “I think I even heard some lovely kissing and lots of hugs by guests that haven’t had a romantic evening in along time” said Jinnie. “It was an intimate and cuddly night with more smiles than have been seen for a long time. The women were dressed to the nines in their flowing gowns

and the men followed suit in their dapper-dan clothes. I don’t think it could have been any more beautiful.” Though originally intended for 60 people, 73 bought tickets and 20 more were turned away due to seating capacity. Guests were refunded $3 apiece and encouraged to donate the money to the CCC fund, the Tonasket Pool fund, or the Splash Park fund. The three canisters that were available to hold the donations were handed to Jenny Gardinier from the Split End Hair styling salon, Janet Culp from the CCC, and Linda Black from the Splash Park organization. Jenny and Alisha Wallace, from Split End volunteered to donate their time to “do” womens hair for free if they would donate to the swimming pool fund.

TONASKET - Meredith Arksey, Associate Professor of Violin at Washington State University, will present a fun and informative recital at the Studio of Roz Nau ON Saturday, March 9, at 7:00 p.m. She will include solo violin works by Bach, Vieuxtemps, Nero, Brustad, Ysaye, and others. The public is invited, and donations will be accepted towards scholarship funds administered by the Okanogan County Music Teachers Association, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. A Seattle native, Meredith received her Doctorate in Violin Performance from Michigan State University and has performed as a soloist and in ensembles and orchestras in Europe and throughout the United States. She now teaches at WSU and reaches out to others in the surrounding area through clinics, adjudicat-

Submitted by Janet Culp CCC of Tonasket

‘Encore’ Jimmy Johnson and Bracken Stevens will be performing on Sunday, March 10, in the first of three Spring Concert Series events this year. The CCC’s doors will open at 3:30 p.m, with the concert beginning at 4. Cost is $6 for members and $7 for non-

Jimmy Johnson members, with refreshments by donation. Jimmy Johnson has been attracted to the soothing, haunting, heartfelt sound of the Native American Flute since the first time he heard it, and taught himself how to play it while on a ten month long solo hiking tour/spiritual retreat in our western National Parks and National Forests. He has often integrated this music into his work as a Hospice

RN. He will be playing some original material, but you’ll also hear songs from the Native American tradition, and more contemporary songs with Native American inspiration. Plus, there will be Beatles and Leonard Cohen and lullabies and something you might recognize from the Woodstock album. He’s currently learning to play the Japanese shakuhachi flute, and some original compositions on this instrument will also be part of his performance. Bracken Stevens is a master cellist, having picked up the cello in Australia about 13 years ago. The last 4 1/2 years he has performed all over the United States, spending the most time in New Orleans, California, and Seattle, mostly playing Street Music for fun. His cello’s name is “Agnes Rose”, and he has basically supported himself playing on street corners and coffee shops with a tip hat. He is also a hand drummer and a “shy” singer. His playing is professional quality, and we are very lucky to have him in our area. He will preform everything from Bach to Beatles, jazz to folk. This will be a magical time for all

Meredith Arksey ing, master classes, and festivals. Dr. Arksey will be adjudicating local string students during the day on March 9, helping both students and teachers grow in their learning of musical skills. At the 7 p.m. evening concert she will offer entertainment for all Okanogan County residents who would like to attend. The studio is located at 42 East Winesap, Tonasket. For additional directions, please call 486-4673.

Get All Your Community News in 2013!

Two concerts at CCC this weekend TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket will be hosting a pair of concerts this weekend. The first, on Friday, March 8, is part of its Friday Night Coffee House Series. Ruby Rust, featuring Denny Richardson and Mike Bowling from Omak, will be playing music from the Grateful Dead in a selection entitled, “Dead Set. Other musicians are also welcome to join in. Dinner is from 5-6 p.m., featuring handmade pizza by Morningstar. Cost if $5 per slice for dinner, plus $1 for organic salad with beverages and goodies by donation.

by Knut Nystedt. The orchestra will honor the late Omak Schools superintendent Art Himmler with “The Typewriter” by LeRoy Anderson as it was one of his favorites. They will also perform “Marche No. 1” by Edward Elgar, and “Overture From Russlan and Ludmilla” by Reinhold Gliere. The orchestra and chorus will combine to perform “Hallelujah From The Mount of Olives” by Ludwig van Beethoven. Tickets are $12.00 for adults, $10.00 for seniors, $8.00 for youth 12-18 with those under 12 admitted free. Tickets can be purchased at Brewster Drug, Rawsons in Okanogan, The Corner Shelf and North Cascades Broadcasting in Omak, Roys Pharmacy in Tonasket, Oroville Pharmacy or at the door. Tickets are also available at www.brownpapertickets.com.

DONKEY BASKETBALL

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OWL Informational presentation Friday, March 23 PAGE A3

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

Watch Donkey Basketball at the OHS Commons March 28 See page B3

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GLOWING PERFORMANCE Concern TonasketSubscribe/Renew council Today! expressed updates on projects

over coaches resignation

City’s engineers seek to clarify priorities regarding upcoming street improvement projects

Bracken Stevens attending. Both Jimmy and Bracken have moved to Tonasket recently, and have been delighted with what we have to offer in our community and valley. They will play both individually and together. You won’t want to miss this golden opportunity presented in our concert hall. All proceeds will benefit the CCC. Call 486-1328 for additional information.

The council authorized Councilwoman BY BRENT BAKER Jill Vugteveen and Danison to make a BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM final decision to move forward, with TONASKET - The Tonasket City a priority on creating a “straight shot” Council provided updates on a num- from one end of town to the other along ber of civic projects that are progress- at least one side of the road with ADAing through their planning stages at the approved curb access ramps. The airport runway seal project’s tarTuesday, March 13, council meeting. Tonasket city planner Kurt Danison get schedule is for completion before the said he met with three property owners Father’s Day Fly-in. Meanwhile, the council granted public affected by the need for an easement to complete the Mill Drive/Bonaparte works director Bill Pilkinton a leave of Creek sewer project and said that they absence of indefinite length and appointseemed to be willing to provide the ease- ed Hugh Jensen as acting public services director. ment access. “They’re willing to provide easement through their property so we can connect up the sewer through there,” Danison said. “They were under the impression that water was included in this... I don’t Police Chief Robert Burks said that know how it came about... I don’t think we said we were going to put in a water he is working on a policy governing the department’s handling of data collected system there. “I think they walked away with a better during video surveillance. Burks also announced that officer understanding.” The council planned an open house Audra Fuller passed her civil service for March 20 for residents to interact exam and has been hired as a full-time with the engineers and councilmembers officer. Burks said he is finalizing a “wish on the sewer project committee. The council also responded to a memo list” to be submitted for Stonegarden Varela and Associates seeking to clar- describing how potential grant money ify priorities on the upcoming street would be used. Stonegarden grants proimprovement projects that had been dis- vide money for local law enforcement cussed at a previous council meeting. entities to use while assisting in U.S. The project was facing a delay without Border Patrol operations, although any such a prioritization as funding for the equipment purchased is not limited to those operations. project may not be enough to complete In County, home delivery “Oroville was able to get an SUV the entire “wish list.” “We want the (hospital parking cross- through Stonegarden grant money,” ing) beacon as the base project,” said Burks said. “This is the initial part of the Mayor Patrick Plumb. “The rest we will process that we do every year. We don’t have done as we have the funding to SEE COUNCIL | PG A3 complete.”

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Teresa Hawkins expressed her concern over the resignation of varsity basketball coach Glenn Braman during the public comment portion of the Tonasket School Board meeting on Monday, March 12. Hawkins, wife of longtime varsity football coach Jay Hawkins, said she was concerned that the direction of the school district concerning its coaches was taking an ugly turn. “I’m concerned with the resignation of coach Braman,” she said. “I’m concerned because my husband is also a coach. I’m not comfortable with how that came about.” Hawkins said she had heard secondhand remarks attributed to a school board member that fed into her concern. “I’m hoping the school board acts as a board, and not on individual agendas,” she said. “I hope we’ve learned from the process that went down. “I think it’s sad if we let a group of parents who are upset or who have a vengeance with a coach from a long time ago to come in and rally people up to make a decision to not reinstate a coach. I think it would be really sad if we have to go around the community to bring in support to show that a coach has just as many people, and more, (supporting him) as those who complained 50 about him.” Citing her experience as a coach’s wife and as a mother of an athlete coached by others, Hawkins said that athletics teaches kids to deal with adversity, but that parents encourage that growth. “We want the situation to be perfect for our kids,” she said. “But what do we teach them when we run to every need they have? “(Coaches) love the game, they’re competitors, and they want to teach kids to work together, to go out in life and be successful. Kids can’t be successful if their parents don’t let them grow as individuals. That’s a part of athletics. Nothing is going to be perfect.” Hawkins said she was concerned that situations that contributed to Braman’s resignation, as well as rumors about her husband’s position, could damage the reputation of the district. “People want to come to this district,” she said. “It’s because of you guys (the school board) up here. You have done a great job of keeping this school district as one of the elite. “Don’t ruin that. Don’t let that happen, you guys.” In other business, superintendent Paul Turner read a proclamation from Governor Christine Gregoire honoring classified school employees.

BUY 1 YEAR & GET 1 MONTH FREE! BUY 2 YEARS & GET 2 MONTHS FREE! Fuller passes exam, video policy progress

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Kaylee Clough performs Glow”90 at the Variety Show andmonths Auction presented(56 by Dollars 26 months (112 issues) only“The $54 13 issues) only $30 for Scholars and the Oroville High School Music Department on Wednesday, March 14 in the high school commons. The eight-year-old has been taking ballet for five years and recently performed at the Seattle Dance Workshop Competition and took a silver medal. The annual talent show is used to raise funds for the Oroville Dollars for Scholars Continuing Education awards. For more from the event see page B2.

CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED OR CREDIT CARD PAYMENT

Former Oroville killed Check or Money Order CreditPrincipal Card Card #for TeenCredit may be charged second degree murder

Expiration Date:

DONKEY BASKETBALL

LOCAL WILDLIFE

OWL Informational presentation Friday, March 23

Crimes Detectives. He was booked into the Spokane County Jail on the charge of felony assault. Motta, who was in critical condition at Sacred Heart Hospital, died of his injuries on March 15. Information Officer Chamberlain speculated that the charges against Lewis would be upgraded to Mail to: second degree murder by the Spokane County Prosecutor’s office, but as of Monday they were still listed as first degree assault. When Motta came to Oroville in 1981 to take his first principal’s job he was just 34-years-old and stayed here for four years, according to his good friend Don DeVon, who served under Motta as a high school councilor in Oroville, as well as in Palm Desert, Calif. DeVon described Motta as a “highly innovative” educator who always had an open door policy to students, staff, parents and the community in gen-

Signature________________________________________________________________

BY GARY A. DEVON

PAGE A3

MANAGING EDITOR

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

Watch Donkey Basketball at the OHS Commons March 28 See page B3

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SINCE 1905

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SPOKANE – Former Oroville High School Principal Frank Motta died from injuries sustained while trying to help a neighbor whose Spokane area home had been overrunWWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM by a teenage | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE party. GLOWING PERFORMANCE Apparently Motta was asked to keep Concern an eye on the house by his neighbor expressed and on Saturday, March 10 when he saw there was a party going on he over coaches City’s engineerswho seek to was clarify priorities called the neighbor out ofregarding

Tonasket council updates on projects

PO Box 657 Kirkland, WA 98083


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 7, 2013

Court, 911 Calls, Jail Bookings Superior Court Criminal The court found probable cause to charge Kara Fithen, 28, with four counts of theft second, identity theft second, two counts of forgery, theft third and malicious mischief third. She received three years and five months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Laurence Kruger, 35, with failure to register as a sex offender. He received 10 days confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Dylan Mitchell, 28, with theft second. He received 13 months confinement The court found probable cause to charge Matthew Velasquez, 35, with two counts of possession of a controlled substance, use of drug paraphernalia, and possession of stolen property third. He received two years and nine months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge David Edwards, 29, with burglary second, taking a motor vehicle without permission second, possession of stolen property second, theft third and malicious mischief third. He received six years and three months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Leroy Stringfield with unlawful possession of a firearm second. He received four months confinement.

Juvenile A Tonasket juvenile, 15, was charged with assault fourth. He received two days confinement.

District Court Criminal Raymond Ballard, 49, Oroville was charged with DWLS third. Ambrose Bessette, 27, of Okanogan was charged with two counts of DWLS third. Roxanne Boyer, 64, of Omak was charged with DWLS third. Amy Ergenbright, 29, of Omak

was charged with two counts of DWLS third. Jessica Freiley, 20, of Omak was found guilty of assault fourth and a no contact/ protection order violation. She received one day confinement and a $1,776 fine. Aaron Fry, 44, of Tonasket was charged with assault fourth. Cameron Gregg, 53, of Omak was found guilty of a no contact/protection order violation. He received four days confinement and a $1,058 fine. Kathleen Hansen, 48, of Okanogan was charged with two counts of DWLS third. Rebecca Irsik, 59, of Okanogan was charged with criminal trespassing first and two counts of drug possession. Margarito Lopez, 38, of Omak was charged with DWLS third. Diana Matthiesen, 41, of Omak was found guilty of reckless endangerment and three counts of DWLS third. She received a $2,176 fine. Jordan Monahan, 22, of Omak was charged with DUI. Chantelle Norris, 26, of Omak was found guilty of DWLS third. She received an $818 fine. Joseph Parnisi, 31, of Okanogan was found guilty of assault fourth, no contact/ protection order violation, disorderly conduct and theft third. He received eight days confinement and a $1,841 fine. Casey Peone, 19, of Omak was found guilty of theft third and received two days confinement and an $808 fine. Jared Peterson, 25, of Tonasket was charged with DWLS third. Ashley Picard, 30, of Omak was charged with DWLS second. Michael Ross, 46, of Tonasket was charged with criminal trespassing second and two counts of malicious mischief third. Joan Stiles, 61, of Omak was found guilty of assault fourth. She received a $500 fine. Chad Vanatta, 26, of Tonasket was found guilty of marijuana possession less than or equal to 40 grams. He received a $400 fine. Ricardo Sibaja, 51, of Tonasket was found guilty of NVOL with identification. He received an $818 fine. Jackie Wells- Webb, 32, of Omak was found guilty of DUI. She received 30 days

confinement and a $1,936 fine. Casey White, 26, of Omak was charged with was found guilty of DWLS third. They received a $618 fine.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings: Monday, February 25 In Tonasket, on Hwy. 7, there was a 911 call with only static on the line. In Okanogan, on First Ave. South, someone found a woman on the corner and left her at the location. She is an Alzheimer’s patient who walked away from her home. In Omak, on Weatherstone Rd., a 911 call was received and immediately was disconnected. Police called it back and the woman who answered refused to give an address. A male subject could be heard yelling at her in the background. She then disconnected. When police tried to call back again the call went straight to voicemail. In Omak, on River Overlook St., there are vehicles at the location that are not supposed to be there. The home owners are out of state. A male is supposed to be checking on the residence but should not be there during the day and no other cars should be there. The caretaker stated that everything was fine. Near Tonasket, on Mill Drive, a woman’s husband locked her out of their residence. The woman stated that he has hit her in the past. Police arrived to help her gather her children and leave the residence. In Okanogan, behind the high school, two males were on the hill vandalizing the “OK” sign. In Omak, on Conconully Rd., a male subject was intoxicated and threatening a second male subject with a gun. He left in a white car and struck another vehicle with his car.

Tuesday, February 26 In Oroville, on Jennings Loop Rd., several unknown subjects are camping on land adjacent to a residence. The

ObituarY Eugene H. Howell With his sense of humor intact and surrounded by family, Eugene “Gene” H. Howell died on March 1st, 2013, peacefully at his home in Tonasket, Wash. Gene was born June 11, 1934 in Bakersfield, Calif. to Claude and Margie Rena Ferrill Howell. He married Doris Owens Nov. 24, 1958 in McFarland, Calif. She died in 2000. They owned and operated apple and pear orchards in the Tonasket area. His ability to improvise and build things is a

trait he instilled in his family. In 2001 Gene married Ivetta Eylar and thus joined their children into a combined family. Gene is survived by wife Ivetta; brother Gary (Sheryl); children, Steve (Diane, Meleah, Kristopher), Vicki (Rena, Jeanna and Isabella Clark), Kyle (Marcie, Breanna and Alexee. “Papa Gene” we will have you always in our memories and hearts. We have admired and loved you so much. We were honored to celebrate your life at a Memorial service held Monday,

March 4th at the Tonasket Community Church where we celebrate your return to God’s arms. Memorials may be made to the Tonasket Community Church, Habitat for Humanity, or Hospice.

Glenn Cook There will be a Memorial Dinner for Glen Cook on Saturday, April 6, 1913 at the Tonasket Eagles at noon. Internment following at the Loomis Cemetery.

Best Killer Bee tournament ever Submitted by Anne Marie Ricevuto

OROVILLE - Over 285 young wresters from Oroville, Tonasket, Omak, Okanogan, Liberty Bell, Brewster, Pateros, Chelan, and Republic represented the largest ever Killer Bee Invitational Wrestling Tournament. Normally we are done before 2 p.m., but this tournament went past 3:00 with almost double the average number of kids that show for our invitational. Part of the reason stemmed from the fact that Omak sent a full complement of over 70 kids, thanks to volunteer coach Dean Agee and Omak High School coach Dewey Ives. The other two larger than usual groups came from Okanogan and Tonasket. Killer Bee Wrestlers finished as follows: Pre School/Kindergarten: Ivan Bulgarin - 2nd place; and Ryken Harris- 4th place. Also wrestling: Shawn Merringer

First/Second Grade: Travis Darrow - 1st place; Koda Hirst2nd place; Tommy Spikes and Lance Fox, 3rd place; Issaiah Ocampo and Riley McCoy - 4th place. Also wrestling: Reanna Hunter, Nathaniel Smith, Frisco Sanchez. Third/Fourth Grade: Kolo Moser, Shane Marques, and Oscar Cervantes - 3rd place; Daegan Harris and Julian Lopez - 4th place; also wrestling: Katie Maynard, Victor Ocampo, Cody

Field, Kael Harris, Taylor McCoy, and Sergio Ocampo. Fifth/Sixth Grade: Brigido Ocampo, Colby Guzman, and Sam Allenby - 2nd place; Brayden Thompson, Seth Baugher, Chris Worell, and Jaxon Rise 3rd place; Trevor Marques - 4th place. Also wrestling: Ronnie Glover, Taralyn Fox, and Steven Lopez It was a great start for the Killer Bee wrestling season. Next stop at Tonasket High School for tournament number two.

property owners are not in the area and the resident does not believe they have permission to be there. In Okanogan, on Fifth Ave. South, a male subject has been taking tools from a residence and is refusing to return them. The last incident was approximately three weeks ago.

Wednesday, February 27 In Okanogan, on Elmway, a male who is trespassing came onto the property by the dumpster, retrieved something out of the cigarette disposer and left. In Omak, on Omak Riverside Eastside Rd., at the Omak Middle School police are investigating child abuse but have not spoken with the victim yet. They have contacted the mother, and the child has visible welts from being hit and whipped with a charger chord.

Thursday, February 28 In Omak, on Pine St., a daughter is being assaulted by a male subject. Police arrived and restrained him. In Oroville, on Westlake Rd., a male subject working for a construction company stole an air compressor. When

asked about it he claimed it was his.

Friday, March 1 Lucas Cook, 28, booked for malicious mischief third. Matthew Hall, 24, booked for theft third. Amanda Trujillo, 20, booked for harassment, theft second and eight counts of forgery. Garret Elsberg, 24, booked for DWLS third. Daryl Mccaigie, 23, booked for failure to appear and DUI. Lawanna Hoffman, 50, booked for DUI. Charles Hess, 31, booked for reckless driving. Ray Tachell, 50, booked for assault fourth.

Saturday, March 2 Kelly Greene, 35, booked for possession of meth with intent to deliver, possession of drug paraphernalia and DWLS first. Arthur Sims, 44, booked for four counts of failure to appear, two counts of DWLS third, reckless driving, failure to pay child support and a detainer. Christopher Adams, 39, booked for failure to appear and DWLS third. Martin Aguilar, 24, booked for two counts of DWLS third

and malicious mischief third. Victor Ledesma, 18, booked for stolen property third, residential burglary and theft first. Alfonso Rincon, 30, booked for residential burglary and theft first. Anthony McFarlane, 44, booked for five counts of DWLS third.

Sunday, March 3 Daniel Ray, 41, booked for failure to pay child support. Ashley Huner, 24, booked for failure to appear and DWLS third. Key DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – POCS MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – FTA (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

Join us for Lenten Fellowship / Wednesdays with soup & bread 6 p.m. Service at 7 p.m. 11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10:30 a.m., Worship & Youth Sun. School Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church? To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 07, 2013