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SPRING SPORTS HIT THE

OROVILLE FARMERS MARKET

STRETCH RUN

Opens Saturday, May 4, 9:00 a.m.-Noon at the Oroville Library

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SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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Hometown Pizza fire caught on video

FUN IN THE SUN

Owner credits neighboring business, police and fire departments with limiting fire damage BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket School District staff joined forces with a posse of kids in one of several Tug o’ War battles that took place at Sunday’s Big Splash BBQ. The fundraiser for the Tonasket Water Ranch spray park drew about 500 people and netted about $5,000 toward the project on an afternoon filled with food, fun and games.

BIG SPLASH, BIG PARTY

Big Splash BBQ fundraiser nets $5,000 for Tonasket Water Ranch spray park BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - A sun-kissed spring afternoon, a common cause for the community to rally around, and the seemingly bottomless pool of ingenuity offered by Linda Black and her team of energetic volunteers turned the Big Splash BBQ into a memorable day in Tonasket. The community party, which drew around 500 people to Founders Day Park on Sunday, April 28, was set up as a fundraiser for the Tonasket Water Ranch spray park project, which Black has spearheaded both as an enhancement to the community and a bridge to give area kids a summertime activity until the condemned city pool can be replaced, which is a years-long proposition. Black hopes the spray park can be built this summer. “It was a really good community feeling,” she said. “It was great to see so many young families and kids.” While there was plenty of food on hand, the park was filled with activity. Quill and Barley Hyde’s A Cavallo (mobile carousel creation) served both backdrop and stage for musical entertainment. Julie Ashmore and the group SPARoW (Steve Sher, Leaha Passaro, Tim Alley, Mariliz Romano and Doug Wilson) provided the music for about three hours. Bud McSpadden emceed the event, asking for donations for the water park and engaging in good-natured mockery with “victims” that agreed to take a dive in the dunk tank. Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb, who has advocated for both the spray park

Brent Baker/staff photos

Above, Jensen Sackman (right), trying to raise money from for dunk tank bids, tries to separate Mayor Patrick Plumb from his money. Below, Community mastermind Linda Black rounded up a team of energetic volunteers to pull off the massive Big Splash BBQ fundraiser, which turned into as much of a town celebration unto itself as it was a vehicle for raising money. and swimming pool, was predictably in the middle of much of the action. “It was one of the greatest things I have participated in as Mayor,” he said. “As the Tonasket Tiger mascot can attest, it may have been so much fun that it should have been illegal.” Kiddie pools and spray guns kept the younger portion of the crowd (as well as the mayor) busy, though things really got wet in the aftermath of a number of Tug o’ War contest, which culminated in the watering down of contestants with a fire hose (including Plumb, who two months ago had a similar encounter with the fire department). “It was fun to see what a little bit of water can do,” Black said. “It doesn’t take much.

SEE PARTY | PG A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 18

OROVILLE – A fire in the early morning hours last Sunday at Hometown Pizza and Pasta in Oroville was limited to mostly smoke damage because of the quick reporting by the owner of the recently opened Pastime Bar and Grill. “Vicki (Henzie) from next door told a police officer that she saw smoke coming from the roof. Officer Patterson called the fire department and broke the front door glass with his flashlight. He came in and used a fire extinguisher to put it out,” said John Desjardin, who owns the popular restaurant with his wife Becky. Desjardin said he and his wife were awakened with a call sometime after 1 a.m. on Sunday morning. “She’s still crying but it could have been a lot worse, we plan to get the whole crew in here tomorrow and open back up on Wednesday,” said Desjardin. He was surveying the damage on Monday morning while a crew from Omak Glass was working on replacing the glass in the front door and Vinnie DeMartino from Vinnie’s Carpet Cleaning was steam cleaning the carpets. The smell of smoke could still be distinguished, but was not overpowering as Desjardin pointed to a bakers rack where he had stacked a pile of dishrags on the top rack next to a box of pasta to dry after their second run through the washing machine. “They were clean, but they still had some grease in them. They obviously caught fire and the fire spread to some plastic pitchers we had on the shelf below. The fire melted the pitchers and scorched a cooler that is behind the baker’s rack, but otherwise was limited to mostly smoke damage. “Vicki saw smoke coming through the ceiling vent. If the Pastime hadn’t opened this week... say it opened a week from now, we probably wouldn’t have a restaurant to open up again on Wednesday,” said Desjardin.

As much time and energy as the spray park project has consumed, it does highlight the magnitude of what it will take to get a swimming pool funded and built to replace the city pool that was condemned two years ago. It isn’t just the price tag of building it (likely upwards of $2 million), but the costs associated with running and maintaining a pool, which will not be a major factor when it comes to the spray park. “I think we are going to have an immense challenge in front of us to get working on a community swimming pool,” said Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb. “I have faith that this community can step up and assist us with this project. If we address this issue with the same energy and turnout as the Big Splash BBQ, we can accomplish this project too.” Part of the issue with the swimming pool is that because of the money required both to build and maintain it, it needs to be

SEE POOL | PG A2

BY BRENT BAKER

TONASKET - Yard sale season is beginning in Tonasket, and with it complaints of traffic and congestion in residential areas. The City Council has been mulling an ordinance to limit the number of yard sales permitted in the city. However, after plenty of discussion at the Tuesday, April 23, council meeting, it was clear that the council was undecided on exactly how to move forward. The proposed ordinance defined a yard sale as a yard, patio, garage, rummage or similar type of sale by an individual or group for profit. The ordinance would limit such sales to three per calendar year with a maximum length of four consecutive days, to be held no fewer than 30 days apart. It was unclear whether or not it would also apply to business properties. “I need the clarification,” said council member Scott Olson. “There is the weekly yard sale at Sarge’s (the closed restaurant that also serves as the food bank on the north end of town). Does this not apply because he’d a business?” “He does have a business license,” said Mayor Patrick Plumb. “Note that (being a yard sale) doesn’t exempt them from collecting sales tax.” Noting the extreme rarity of anyone collecting sales tax at yard sales, Olson said he didn’t want to use whether or

“We were lucky.” On the ceiling pointed towards the kitchen and the baker’s rack Desjardin has a video camera. On top of the cooler that was scorched facing toward the front of the restaurant is a monitor. He said he believed the fire would have been caught on that camera. While Fire Chief Rod Noel, DeMartino and Father David Kuttner from the Oroville Catholic Church looked on, Desjardin played back what happened in the early morning hours. The area around the rags fills with dark smoke and soon the pile of rags seems to suddenly burst into flames. These continue to get higher as the video is played and then you can see more flame from the area where the plastic pitchers are stored. Eventually a flashlight can be seen in the kitchen and the fire goes out as it is hit with a dry powder extinguisher. Not long afterwards

SEE FIRE | PG A2

not someone licensed to collect sales tax, whether they did so or not, as a litmus test for whether or not their business activity could be considered a yard sale. “If we do that, that means that if it’s illegal, we’re calling it a yard sale,” he said. “I just want it to be clear what is a yard sale and why. I think of it as residential places.” Olson added that when he has received complaints about yard sales, it has been about traffic and congestion in residential areas. “The definition should be ‘residential,’” said council member Lee Hale. “The main problem is with some in residential areas making it into a business. But in town that’s different.” Council member Jean Ramsey, saying it was past time something was done, added that a number of people come from out of town to hold yard sales in town. Signs left up after the yard sale was over have also been an issue as they quickly turn into litter. “If Sarge is holding a yard sale (on the restaurant’s own property) that’s different,” she said. “But someone else using it over and over is a problem... After a set number of times it becomes a business and revenue is not being collected.” “I struggle with this issue,” Olson said. “I hear what you’re saying. But I want to respect property owner’s rights and that includes business owners with business property... But when I drive by (Sarge’s)

SEE COUNCIL | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

The scorched cooler and rack where the fire started at Hometown Pizza and Pasta in Oroville last Sunday morning.

Tonasket weighs yard sale ordinance BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

What about the pool?

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Schools A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Valley Life A6-7

Calendar A7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Sports Police Stats Obituaries

A10-11 A11 A12


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MAY 2, 2013

COUNCIL | FROM A1 it looks like a yard sale to me. Are we protecting residential areas with this or do we have something against this type of sale?” The mayor assigned Olson and Ramsey to an ad hoc committee to examine the issue further.

Leaha Passaro and the group SPARoW performed a series of classic tunes from the stage on A Cavallo, as did Julie Ashmore earlier in the afternoon Brent Baker/staff photo

PARTY | FROM A1 “The great thing was seeing how diverse the crowd was. There were a lot of people there that you never see at the same event.” Black estimated that the barbecue profited around $5,000, though the exact amount has yet to be determined. So far the spray park crew has raised about $87,000. She’s hoping for a couple of larger donations to help get closer to the $200-250,000 goal, but said that a lot of the fundraising will need to come from smaller donations. “It really boils down to each individual making efforts to support the greater good and allow themselves to have fun in the process,” Plumb said. “To each person that has donated in the boxes, participated in this weekend’s events, or simply promoted us on social networking, I salute you.” Some of the costs are still fluid, Black said (no pun intended), depending on the results of the permitting process and how much in terms of labor and materials are donated. Plumb said he was looking forward to the spray park’s completion. “Thanks to the leadership of Linda Black and Elise Peacemaker, I really think this effort is going to pay off in another great resource for our community’s youth,” he said. “Much like what we witnessed with Georgine Epley and a determined group of bikers, boarders and bladers, we will have another tremendous asset to our area.

“It is community leaders such as these that make living in an arid desert environment second to none, and now we are going to have our own oasis of kids activities at Chief Tonasket Park. “The efforts of our Tonasket City staff should also be recognized. They have been steadfast in their resolve to make sure they are helpful to this process. They keep our ideas coordinated, accountable, and accomplish-

able.” Black’s biggest push is for donors to buy a fish - part of the part decor, which will include the donors’ names on them. Those cost anywhere from $100 to $1,000, depending on the size of the fish and number of names to be included. “I think Sunday showed that people do want this,” Black said. “But now it’s time to buck up and buy a fish.”

POOL | FROM A1 supported by more than just the city. The Tonasket City Council has encouraged community groups to form that would draw from a wider coalition of interests than just the city residents, since the pool would benefit the whole of the north county and would need to draw resources from the whole area to become a reality. Plumb said that the pool, spray park and similar projects should be a factor for candidates in this fall’s election. The mayor and four of the five city council members will be on the ballot. “Any people that are going to be running for office this fall should be asked how they are going to contribute to our kids,” Plumb said. “And if running for office is not your style, could you help us with a few weekends? How can you help an organization that you are a member of to direct their energies to helping out our pool project?” The mayor said he hoped for more participation in local civic groups that could contribute to getting those types of projects off the ground. “I know we have professionals in this area at the school, the forest service, the hospital, and in the retail services businesses that are great at what they do.,” he said. “These groups need to strongly consider volunteering to help. When you contribute to a club, group, organization, or association, you can see something tangible be created. Community leaders in the past worked hard to give you what we inherited today. Can you pass along the favor?”

Looking after Zeus Noni Alley recently read a a story in “Chicken Soup for the Pre-Teen Soul” about a police dog that had been shot. Thanks to that story, the 12-year-old Tonasket girl said, she was inspired to begin raising funds for a bulletproof vest to protect Zeus the Tonasket Police Department’s narcotics dog. She asked the City Council for permission to raise the approximately $600 it will cost for Zeus’s vest. “I was thinking about putting up cans around town to donate to,” she said. “And I was going to speak at some of the clubs around town that my mom (Julie) is in.” Sgt. Darren Curtis said that, as the department looks to do further training with Zeus, a vest would be beneficial. “Right now he is strictly narcotics,” Curtis said. “We’re wanting to get him cross-trained for tracking and bite work.” City Clerk Alice Attwood suggested that Alley bring in her collected money on a weekly basis, and Plumb seeded the fund with

Brent Baker/staff photo

In recognition of Arbor Day, (l-r) Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb, Bob Twigg and Tonasket city council member Dennis Brown planted several trees at Chief Tonasket Park between the soccer and baseball fields. $30. When asked, Curtis said that getting Zeus the additional training could cost as much as $10,000 (including the 12 weeks that he would be committed to the training when his shifts would need to be covered)and would require additional fundraisers on a larger scale.

Other business With the final five percent of required funding secured from Okanogan County, the council voted unanimously to accept the low bid on the Third/Fifth/Sixth Street stormwater project. The bid

was awarded to J&K Earthworks, LLC, of Rock Island, WA, for $308,406. The council also approved a revised municipal code that brought the city’s firearms regulations into compliance with state law, and approved change orders to the Bonaparte/Mill Drive and Whitcomb Pedestrian Crossing street projects. Plumb also read a proclamation naming Friday, April 26, as Arbor Day in Tonasket. He and council member Dennis Brown planted several trees in Chief Tonasket Park on Friday for the city’s official celebration.

FIRE | FROM A1 the flames start back up and are extinguished a second time. Once again they reignite and finally a third blast from an extinguisher knocks them out for good. The Oroville Fire Department made sure that the fire was completely out and the truck was back in the station by 1:40 a.m., according to Chief Noel. On her Facebook page Becky Desjardins said the last thing you want to hear is someone pounding on your door telling your restaurant is on fire. “The words thank you do not seem enough for everyone that saved our restaurant. Chris Patterson, Oroville Fire Department, Brant and Vicki at the Pastime, Brian, Winter who patched Chris up, Scott and Michael Eisen who boarded our door up, and Colleen and Troy Brown who helped us out today with the door and a shoulder to

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The fire was caught on one of four security cameras, in this case camera two, which faces the kitchen. The video was reviewed by the owner and Oroville Fire Chief Rod Noel who asked for a copy for training purposes. cry on,” she writes. “There are many blessings of living in a small town but you truly realize them

when something like this happens. Thanks to everyone with offers of help, John and I are truly grateful.”

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

“The best-trained team that is never used” In the event of a mine the equipment). Team members cation systems, and other available mine rescue fire, roof collapse or exare cross-trained to hold mul- equipment and supplies. plosion, mine rescue tiple positions. Competitive mine rescue training takes hours teams may be tapped The Buckhorn Mine Rescue of time and a significant amount of dedication. to search for colleagues team includes Jason Archuleta, The team trains twice a month and competes disoriented by toxic gas, Dan Bacon, Glen Booin at least one trapped beneath layers her, Lee Hale, Cody competition per of rock or severely inBrown, Mike Olson, year. This year, jured. The teams underTim Scriver, Corey the team will be go rigorous training to Sattler, Eric Turner, competing in develop skills that often Cameron Patrick, Wilthe Kellogg, IdaAt CMR spring training, Cameron Patrick, save lives. liam Kellogg, Jacob ho CMR comTim Scriver and Eric Turner watch as forKettle River – Buck- mer Hecla Knob Hill Mine shifter and mine Covert, Kalin Booher, petition as well horn (KRB) belongs to rescue trainer Ed Sinner teaches the art of Joe Grubbs, and Jim as Nationals in rope rescue. Central Mine Rescue Webster. Of these, Reno, Nevada. (CMR), an organization eight members are on Intensive consisting of eight underground gold and silver the mine rescue competition team. training includes Former Buckhorn safety guy and mine rescue trainer Danny Grove watches as Cody mines that work together Each contest four hours of to provide backup to other consists of sev- Brown and Jim Webster put to use the rope instruction on skills they learned as a CMR composite underground mines in case eral events. In the team, preparing for a first aid rope rescue. self-contained of a mine emergency. If an field competibreathing appaoperation needs help with tion, teams must navigate ratuses (Drager BG-4) and in-smoke training eva situation, they can call on through a simulated mine ery quarter. The team also trains in advanced first CMR for help, manpower emergency while judges aide, mine gases and ventilation as well as rope and equipment. Included in rate them on how well they rescue and confined space rescue. “We want to the consortium are mines adhere to mine rescue pro- be the best trained team that is never used,” states from Montana, Alaska, Idaho, cedures and how quickly Dave Hamilton, Trainer. However, last year Kinand Washington. At Buckthey complete specific ross sent part of our team to the Sunshine mine in horn, 15 miners volunteer to tasks. In the first aid con- Kellogg, Idaho to help with an underground fire. be part of the mine rescue test, emergency medical “Mine rescue teams are essential to the safety team, which is overseen by Jim Webster and Cody Brown enter a smoky technicians tackle real-life and health of our nation’s miners. They spend Dave Hamilton in our Safety tunnel. scenarios. The technician countless hours preparing for an emergency they Department. The team consists of a trainer, team team must make necessary checks of equipment hope never happens and they hold themselves to captain, map specialist, command center, support to see that it works properly, including multi-gas the highest standards, even in competition,” states team, first aid team, and benchmen (keepers of instruments, the Drager BG-4, portable communi- Nick Toney, Regional Safety Manager.


MAY 2, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

CELEBRATING LIFE

Charlene Helm/staff photo

Chris Morris offers supplies and repairs for motorcycles and ATVs at his business south of Tonasket.

CJ Cycle offers repairs, accessories TONASKET - It’s the only repair shop for motorcycles and ATVs between Omak and Canada. Chris Morris is realizing a lifelong dream, opening CJ Cycle south of Tonasket about a year ago. Located about five miles south of town at 16A Highway 7, CJ Cycle offers motorcycle and ATV parts and accessories in addition to repair services, riding apparel and fly racing products. Morris hopes that in the future

More to Life, Darin and Elaina Halvorsen’s youth-centric non-profit organization, hosted its second annual variety show/silent auction on Friday, April 26, to fund both summer activities and the youth center they are planning to build in the future. The variety show featured the talent of a number of local youth. Left, Hayley Larsen dazzled with her dance routine. Above, the youngest of all the youth, Grace Kenney, brought down the house with her a capella rendition of “Joy to the World.”

he’ll be able to expand his offerings. “Eventually, I’d like to be come a dealer, or a franchise dealership,” he says. Morris moved to the Tonasket area with his wife Gail 14 years ago. They have two sons, Riley (age 12) and Tiler (10). CJ Cycle is open Tuesday through Saturday from 9:00 a.m.6:00 p.m. He can be contacted at (509) 486-2720 or (509) 4862595.

Camaray Motel to Prescribed burning near Tonasket host Open House Brent Baker/staff photos

SUBMITTED BY OKANOGAN-WENATCHEE NATIONAL FOREST

OKANOGAN - Prescribed burning continues on National Forest Lands southeast of Tonasket Washington. “The crews are continuing work in the Upper Aeneas Burn area,” said Shannon O’Brien, Information Officer on Saturday. “All new ignitions today will done by hand; we don’t have any more helicopter ignitions planned on the District this season.”

(Saturday’s) fire was lit by crews using drip torches, handcarried devices that pour out a small stream of burning fuels. Treatments taking place will clean-up slash left behind from ladder fuel reduction work in the area. Burning the branches and debris left behind by thinning returns nutrients to the soil and reduces concentrations of fuel that might lead to catastrophic wildfires. Prescribed fires are part of the comprehensive OkanoganWenatchee National Forest Restoration Strategy. Forest

Service managers began implementing the strategy in 1999 to reduce the threat of uncharacteristically severe wildfires and to return resiliency to unhealthy forest ecosystems. All Okanogan-Wenatchee N.F. prescribed burns are weatherdependent and fire specialists will cease burning as soon as possible if objectives are not being met or weather conditions are unfavorable. Their primary concerns include favorable winds that can minimize smoke impacts to public health and the

risk of fire escape. The Washington State Department of Natural Resources regulates smoke management and must approve all controlled burns on national forests within the state. Okanogan-Wenatchee N.F. fire specialists closely coordinate with the state’s air quality managers. Information about prescribed burning on the Methow Valley Ranger District is available at (509) 996-4040. For Tonasket Ranger District Prescribed Fire information, call (509) 4865128.

OROVILLE - The Camaray Motel will be holding an Open House on May 4 and May 5 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Rooms will be open to tour, refreshments will be served and prizes will be given away. “We want the local community to come see all the improvements we’ve made in the two and a half years we’ve been here,” said Clyde Andrews, who manages the motel with his wife Sandy. Since they arrived in November 2010 every room has been dramatically improved. Each with newer

furniture and drapes, many with complete makeovers including complete painting, new carpeting and new beds. All of the room doors have been replaced with new doors and frames, as well as a new electronic key card system. The exterior has been repainted and the lobby renovated. Not including the updated furniture, over $130,000 has been spent on improvements since the Andrews arrived, most of this purchased locally. Other than installing carpet, they have done all the work themselves.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MAY 2, 2013

Schools

Kinman honored with Friends of Children Award

Brent Baker/staff photo

Third graders from Mrs. Mensik’s third grade class at Tonasket Elementary School interact with Smithsonian American Art Museum instructor Rebecca Fulcher during their art class on Friday, April 26.

Videoconference art class benefits Tonasket 3rd graders By Brent Baker

Submitted photo

Kevin Kinman (left), pictured with his wife Laura and Oroville superintendent Steve Quick, recently was honored by the North Central Educational Service District with its annual Friends of Children award. Submitted by Steve Quick

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket students won’t be traveling en masse to the Smithsonian American Art Museum anytime soon. But thanks to a free videoconference offered by the Smithsonian, Tonasket Elementary’s third grade classes were able to benefit from an hour-long class on visual literacy conducted by a Smithsonian instructor through the magic of live internet video. The class, “To See is to Think: Visual Literacy,” taught students concepts of contour, shape, texture (created through the use of different types of lines), value (light and dark), and line types, and gave them a chance to utilize some of those concepts while with their own drawing. The session provided plenty of give-and-take between the kids and Smithsonian instructor Rebecca Fulcher. Comments from students in Mrs. Lissa Mensik’s class showed what the kids themselves liked the experience, which teacherlibrarian Mrs. Kim Fitzthum, who helped with the program, likenend to a field trip. “I didn’t know I could add texture to drawings,” one said following the class. “I learned how to make things look lumpy, rough or smooth,” said another.

Superintendent, Oroville Schools

Brent Baker/staff photo

Students applied some of what they learned during Friday’s class. The art class was designed to help the students prepare for their required classroombased assessment later this spring. And of course, there was the videoconference experience itself. “That was pretty awesome,” said one boy. “It was pretty cool to see and talk with someone all the way across the country.” All of the third grade classes, taught by Mrs. Amy Cheeseman, Mrs. Julie Conkle and Mr. Steven Robeck, also had a period with the videoconference. Cheeseman became aware of the course through her involvement with the Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration (CLIC), which includes over 1,800 teacher-evaluated video distance learning programs offered by more than

230 content providers. “Each year we give the art classroom-based assessment (CBA) to our third graders,” wrote Cheeseman about the program. “I think it is important that our students see the importance of using space when creating art. “For the CBA, they will be creating a shoe design by drawing the contour line of a shoe that fills their space on the paper, dividing it into shapes (the parts of the shoe ...) and filing each space with difference values, textures and lines. They need to do this to create the illusion of a threedimensional shoe with texture by only using a pencil.”

Not like it used to be By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Fire drills don’t resemble anything like they did in the days when most of today’s parents were in school. Gone are the days students lining up to go outside, waiting five minutes for an all-clear, and then tromping back into rooms (or loading directly onto buses to go home). In today’s world, there is far more involved than just getting out of the building safely. Tonasket Elementary School, on Thursday, April 25, conducted a full-scale fire drill that included first responders - EMS and fire - who swept the building for “victims” (and even found two more than had been planned for in the drill). Hoses were unfurled, the EMS crew “treated” one of the fire victims, while school staff had to account for visitors (and took just minutes to track down and communicate the position of a reporter who wasn’t where he was supposed to be). Following the drill, school

WENATCHEE - This Spring the North Central Educational Service District (NCESD) recognized Kevin Kinman for their annual “Friends of Children” award at their annual banquet held in Wenatchee on April 16th. Nominations were received from the four counties served by the NCESD for this award. The Friends of Children award is the highest honor given annually by the ESD to citizens who have exemplified a lasting commitment to children in north central Washington. The nominations came from superintendents and principals who wished to honor the best of the best. They nominated those

who serve unselfishly, without wish for fame, giving willingly to make a better school and a better community. This year’s award winner, Kevin Kinman, was nominated by Oroville School District Superintendent Steve Quick. Quick stated in his nomination letter, “Every community has a certain few members who tend to show up when things need to be done to make things better, to serve on a committee, or to help with a fundraiser, and many times it seems to be the same people who work tirelessly to make things better for everyone else. Most of the time, even the beneficiaries of volunteers’ efforts are unaware of the people behind the scenes making life better for everyone else.

In the Oroville community, Kevin Kinman is one of our unsung heroes who works behind the scenes and does so willingly and tirelessly to improve conditions, especially for our children. Kevin has been an avid community activist for many years. He is one of those people who is willing to serve and does so without hope of accolades or recognition, and I think it would be great to recognize him for his efforts.” Kinman currently serves as the president of the Oroville Booster Club, an organization that consistently fundraises over $30,000 annually and then works diligently to put this money back into programs that benefit the students in the Oroville School District. He has been a member of the booster club since 1995.

campus to electronically register students to vote. College Civics Week will be taking place Monday, May 6 through Friday, May 10. The College Civics program started in 2005 to improve students’ understanding of elections and empower Washington’s youngest voters to make real changes in their communities and the world.

Currently more than 60 campuses throughout Washington state participate in College Civics. Student and staff ambassadors to the College Civics Week program have registered thousands of college-age voters and organized oncampus civic education events. For more information, visit the College Civics Week Web page at www.sos.wa.gov/elections/collegecivics.

Secretary of State to visit WVC-Omak Submitted by Livia Millard

WVC-Omak Communications Manager

OMAK - Secretary of State Kim Wyman will visit the Wenatchee Valley College at Omak campus at 9 a.m. on Monday, May 6, in Mary Henrie Friendship Hall, to encourage students to vote as part of College Civics Week. Laurie Thomas, Okanogan County Auditor, will also be on

Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus Presents

A new musical Lovingly ripped off from the motion picture

Monty Python and the holy Grail

Brent Baker/staff photo

Teachers and students evacuate Tonasket Elementary School last Thursday as they take part in a full-scale fire drill that included everything - including fire and EMS crews - except for actual flames and smoke. administrators assessed response times and evaluated weak points in the drill’s execution. The district plans fire and other types of emergency drills through-

out the year, some of which, like this one, involve cooperation between different first-responder groups that would be involved in live situations.

Stage direction by Judy Johnston Musical direction by Don Pearce Produced by Kim Harriman

MAY 10, 11 12 & 17, 18 19 - 2013 Fri/Sat Performances 7 p.m. - Sunday Mainees 3 p.m. at the

OMAK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER General Admission $17 Students w/ID $12 • Children under 12 $8 This show is PG-13

$10 Rabies SPECIAL! at Alpine Veterinary Clinic! Schedule an appointment today!

Alpine Veterinary Clinic P.L.L.C. Denise S. Krytenberg, D.V.M.

509-826-5882 741 E. Riverside Dr., Omak

Tickets available at: Brewster: Brewster Drug Okanogan: Rawson’s Omak: Havillah Road Printing & The Corner Shelf Tonasket: Roy’s Pharmacy Oroville: Oroville Pharmacy Online at www.brownpapertickets.com For more information visit www.ovocinfo.com or call 509-429-4407 Monty Python’s Spamalot is presented through special arrangement with and all authorized performances materials are supplied by Theatrical Rights Worldwide (TRW). 570 Seventh Avenue, Suite 2100, New York, NY 10018 (866)378-9758 www.theatricalrights.com


APRIL 25, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Blowing off a little steam

Gary DeVon/staff photo

It was a full house on opening day at the Pastime Bar & Grill in Oroville. Oroville’s downtown was buzzing with activity and the parking was at a premium on Main Street.

The ‘new’ Pastime: I think dad would have liked it

The iconic neon Pastime Tavern sign is gone, so is the balcony, card room, the hot dog machine and even the famous window into the gent’s bathroom. But enough of the old PT remains, especially the historic rosewood backbar, billiard tables and shuffleboard to make you feel at home. The feeling of the newly opened Pastime Bar & Grill still evokes special memories in many of us and will continue to make new memories for patrons well into the future. Vicki and Brent and all the contractors and staff have come together to create a new Pastime that hopefully will live on in Oroville for even longer than the PT of old. If there’s one question I’ve been asked over and over again since the bar and grill opened, it is, “What do you think Larry would think of the Pastime?” I think dad would have liked it, there’s still Oly on tap, and the tables and chairs were even arranged how he liked them on the bar side. And, the old girl was jumping, full of customers, just like the old days. I think he would have liked the new look and appreciated the outdoor seating in back and in front of the building. He often said some younger, fresher ideas were needed to continue to draw in customers - there were plenty of these new ideas evident. In fact, it was so much like the old days last Friday that nearly as far as you could see down Main Street it was packed with parked cars. Obviously people were not only enjoying the Pastime, but Hometown, the Plaza and the other downtown businesses. It was like stepping back into the late 1960’s and 1970’s, even the early 1980s, when Oroville was “shaking” as dad would say. Back when folks from both sides of the border went from establishment to establishment seeking a good time. It might not be quite as wild, but seeing our downtown full of cars and people out and about (and was only late April) is a positive sign. All our businesses are important, but a town, big or small, seems to survive on its downtown. Just the impression of things happening makes people want to stop and check things out. Dad wasn’t afraid of competition, he understood that the more things your town has to offer the better his and his partner’s business was going to do. Let’s hope that Oroville regains a downtown parking problem, there could certainly be worse problems to have.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Dear Editor, I must blow off a little steam in how I think Hospital Administrator Linda Michel is handling the commissioners (the tail is wagging the dog in my opinion). I was at your December meeting and had all the intentions of mentioning how you might cut the budget over time and possibly save the assisted living. I learned very quickly that I was not welcome (Linda, this is not my first rodeo), so I decided to just ask a question. Has there been any significant salary or benefit raises? You answered “absolutely not.” I believe that was not true, because the former administration promised the raises, I kept the articles. I have no great qualms about employees taking raises at all, I see it as part of your little package. This is hard for me to criticize my friends and good neighbors. Helen Casey and Herb Wandler have been in this community as long as I have, I don’t know the other members at all. I do think you forgot what you learned from the previous administrator. I really do hope the hospital is successful in making it on its own because we need it. If it can’t make it on its own don’t ask me for any M&O or a bond issue my trust is gone. I almost forgot I thought at one time Mick Howe could be axed, but I think now you should keep him. I believe you do need an attorney, he could show you a lot about communication skills and parliamentary procedures. Gerald Green Tonasket

‘Standing tall’ and still pursuing legal action Dear Gary About a month ago several of us “tasked” ourselves with educating the community about the issues relating to our continued pursuit (with legal counsel this time) of the NVH Commissioner recalls and Administration resignations and/or terminations. For weeks now we have endeavored to maintain key facts in the process of condensing the massive amount of information, while continuing to consult with government agencies and those generous folks in the public health industry with whom we have been checking and double checking our facts and in doing so have belabored the subject. After setting this aside for a moment to track down some elusive ag history, As things usually do these last few months, conversations rolled around to hospital “stuff ” and I found myself being “educated” or Re-educated as the case maybe. Which leaves me laughing at myself while reminding me why we have such a deep love and respect for the people in our community and Their unique way about things. What was repeatedly impressed upon me is, while we continue to discuss the finer points our community at large has already made their decisions based on simple principle and have summed it up beautifully as “Right is right and wrong is wrong.” • Construction should have waited and not been allowed to jeopardize other services • The inflated budget should not have been released in October leading us to believe everything was going to be in the black • Honest attempts should have been made to engage the community • The community should have been able to fully participate w/o choices being limited, i.e. bond option • M&O money should have been used to help support the AL • The Dripline coffee shop should not have

been opened especially at the expense of Elder housing • Salaries should be realistic • Raises should not have been given especially in light of the layoffs, asking employees to reduce hours and pay, asking providers and EMS to reduce rates and asking Elders to leave their home • The decision to sell the clinic should not have been made without, again, honest community engagement and participation. Community involvement and communication with the Board should not be restricted as suggested by the CEO, Duncan and the hospital attorney. The Board and administrations accountability to the community at large needs to be acknowledged and respected not ignored, minimized or laughed at Many have already picked up on the inconsistent excuses for the recent travesties. They are wise to the fact that the “rumors” now coming to fruition are not just coincidence. They certainly didn’t miss the comment about the M&O money being used for “whatever we chose to use it for”, in effect admitting the AL was not a priority for them. They resent that the generations of vested interest and ownership the community has in the hospital district are being dismissed so easily while they are being “made out to be idiots”. And while the CEO, the commissioners and the lawyer talk about broad discretion, the community talks about the abuse of discretion, neglect and the irreparable violation of community trust. There have been some that have referred to the commissioners service or their relationship with the community; no one discounts their service. All things considered though, there are so very very many people in this community that give just as much if not more but is the commissioners service anymore important than the different ways others give back? It is also true that many people in this community have known the commissioners and some administration personally, some their whole lives, but it does not take away from the fact that several of those family/ friends/acquaintances do not agree with their actions or inactions. The vast majority of the community is saying “don’t take it personally but do take it seriously.” There was a request for action to stop and “let them get on with the business of providing a solid foundation for the district”. The overwhelming response seems to be “No! We do not like how you do business.” The track record of providing “solid foundation” exemplified in programs or projects like ACES, The Dripline, the clinics, the construction, etc. does nothing to support claims of being able to accomplish what is promised? That being said, all anyone really wanted from me or any of the Group now called “People for Responsible Public Servants” was assurance that we are still pursuing legal action. And of course the answer to that is “yes”. This is not unlike any other job, company or household there are fundamental principles that are non-negotiable. Like it or not they are public servants and the community

they are accountable to and have confessed to “standing tall against” have in essence fired each of them and in their own patient way they are just waiting for the pieces to fall. Rosa Snider Oroville

Oppose border fee study Dear Gary, The Department of Homeland Security wants Congress to authorize the study of a fee that could be collected from everyone who enters the U.S. at land crossings bordering Canada and Mexico. If implemented, could it for instance a border crossing fee close Prince’s Department Store in Oroville? Suggest that U.S. Citizen oppose the study and any border crossing fee and instead ask the Congress to focus on issues that really matter to society, including how taxes are allocated and used and subsequently also within the Department of Homeland Security! Understanding and common sense please! Kell Petersen Osoyoos

China hacking into U.S. computers Dear Editor, Based on the activities of Chinese Army Unit 61398 Communist China continues to wage cyber warfare against the U.S. by hacking into the computers of U.S. corporations. An American computer security firm, Mandiant, completed a study of Unit 61398, and determined most of the attacks on U.S. corporations have emanated from this group. Companies targeted include electric utilities, gas lines and waterworks. The Chinese also attacked the computer security firm RSA, whose systems protect corporate clients and government agencies. “China steals blueprints, manufacturing processes, strategies and data from our heavy industry companies, satellite and telecommunications corporations and military contractors, including Lockheed Martin, our largest defense contractor.” The biggest concern is the infiltration of systems that control our power grids and other utilities. Unit 61398 broke into Televent Canada, which provides “software to oil and gas pipeline companies and utilities for remote access to valves, switches and security systems. Televent Canada services half the oil and gas pipeline companies in North and South America.” We have to wake up and take action to prevent these Chinese attacks on our corporations, government agencies and infrastructure. Mr. President, please address this problem. *Information came from a New York Times article of 2/19/13 Donald A. Moskowitz Londonderry, NH

Cold War thinking is dangerous OPINION BY PETER G. COHEN

The people who brought you to the very cusp of nuclear war in the Cold War want the US to keep doing so. Well, some of them do. Others don’t. The American people need to think about this and insist on a solution. We should be moving past those insane risks toward a world that is sustainable, not just a bluff-and-hope flirtation with The End. Claiming “Obama’s ‘nuclear zero’ rhetoric is dangerous,” four very distinguished defense experts have warned of the dangers of pursuing nuclear disarmament. In their March 29, 2013 opinion-editorial for The Washington Post, Douglas Feith, Frank Gaffney, James Lyons and James Woolsey write that they believe that by saying U.S. policy is to create a world without nuclear weapons, Obama is emboldening our enemies and causing our friends to consider building their own nuclear weapons. In fact, they believe that all efforts at reducing the nuclear threat and the missiles, planes and submarines to deliver them weaken the “nuclear umbrella” that reassures our allies of our readiness to provide a nuclear deterrent for their safety. Among others signatories of an open letter to President Obama, they urge that we “modernize all three legs of the Triad; ensure the safety and deterrent effectiveness of the weapons with which they are equipped; and restore the critical industrial base that supports these forces.” The problem with the ideas of these Cold

War Warriors is that they are attempting to apply the strategies of the past to the present without facing the profound changes that have taken place in the world. Here are just four changes or developments in the last 60 years or so that Feith and friends should consider, some of which are well noted by the other experienced insiders who advocate progress toward zero nuclear weapons (e.g. Henry Kissinger, George Schultz, Sam Nunn, William J. Perry): 1. As China, Russia and many others have developed their own economies, our relative position in the world is declining. Our effort to maintain the world’s most expensive military in a time of national debt and a stagnant economy is exhausting our treasury and causing the neglect of urgently needed investments at home, a policy that threatens the future of the United States. 2. This is not 1950. The nations for which we provide a nuclear umbrella are now quite capable of developing their own regional defenses. Even with the best international cooperation, signing a nuclear weapons convention and achieving a nuke-free world will take decades to complete. This gives the “umbrella nations” adequate time to strengthen their conventional arms and build regional defense arrangements. 3. Climate change threatens the whole world with droughts, floods, fires, violent storms and rising seas. Maintaining the triad and rebuilding its weapons at huge cost will do nothing to calm climate change. The

money, energy, science and construction required to maintain the triad indefinitely would be much better invested in alternative energy development and a hardened national transmission system to efficiently deliver the new energy to areas where it is needed. 4. We now know that even a relatively modest nuclear exchange would create a cloud of debris that would circle the Earth and distribute radioactive fallout around the world. The nations of the world are becoming aware of this threat and protesting the terrible risk to all life created by the nine nuclear weapons nations. The world is not made more secure by maintaining any level of nuclear weapons. The U.S., with the world’s greatest conventional forces, is in the best position to lead the way toward nuclear abolition. By outlawing and reducing these weapons, we tell the world that we are concerned and working to preserve life on Earth. There is still a long way to go and many challenges to be overcome. As we negotiate the step-by-step process of a Nuclear Weapons Convention and their worldwide abolition, we free our energies and imagination from the sinful incineration of human beings to their preservation in a complex and changing world. Peter G Cohen is the author of the website www.nukefreeworld.com, and writes for PeaceVoice.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 2, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Don’t forget, soon it will be Mother’s Day May has arrived and now and then we have some warmer days. And who isn’t ready for that. A recent phone call from a cousin, in Texas, was complaining because it was 93 degrees there and here, we had a fire going in the fireplace. Whether we’re ready or not, one of these days it is THIS & THAT going to get hot Joyce Emry outside and folks will be swimming in the lake, and they’ll come out of the water wanting some refreshments, and if some ambitious person will go to city hall and find out about opening the concession stand, they could be served a drink or something of their choice. If you’ve going to have a lot of time on your hand this summer, look into that opportunity, and probably make some money.

This is an announcement of the memorial for Warren and Dolly Brazel, who passed away last winter. The memorial will be on Saturday, May 18 at twelve o’clock noon at the Community Center in Chesaw. This is to be a potluck luncheon and friends and families of the Brazels are invited to attend. Then, at 4 p.m., the same day, there will be a graveside ceremony for interment at the cemetery in Loomis, where both of them resided as children. Information was given by Carol Mills, Chesaw. In just ten days from today it will be the day in which mother’s are honored. Mother’s Day is the same weekend as the May Day celebration here in our town, so that brings people in from all directions and now a few class reunions are celebrated at that same time Friends and families are what makes this country the great place in which to live and sad as it seem there are some who are trying to spoil many of the traditions. Human life just doesn’t mean as much, to some, as it did in years of the past. My mother died quite a lot of years ago, and although we didn’t always see eye to eye on things,

there isn’t a day that I don’t think of her for one reason or another. If you still have your mom in your presence, be kind to her, give her a hug and tell her you love her. Because, after all, where would you be without her? No matter how high in the military you get, you just can’t outrank your mom! Granddaughters are forever! I’m so glad I have four… and three that came along with the three grandsons. And we’ll miss the one granddaughter that is moving to London for two months to work. We’ve been so blessed to have our families nearby so we could see them mature into to special people. A large number of folks were on hand last Sunday for the last pancake feed at the Molson Grange, for the close of the winter season. However I suspect there will be another breakfast in June when they have the Molson Midsummer Festival. The drive up found no bits of snow hiding in the highlands. Have you tried the new frosting, by Cool Whip, on a big juicy strawberry? Very tasty! Better than chocolate, in my opinion. At the Senior Center last week we had visitors that used to live here. Rena (Bedient), the crochet queen of the Community Bazaar, some years ago. She now resides in Canada, after the death of her husband and I’m sorry I don’t remember her current name. The other visitor was one of the Milicia girls and her husband, who are the parents of Mrs.

Tonasket High School announces Honor Roll Seniors

Honor (3.5-4.0) Rebecca Biernacki (4.0), Lynn Hendrix (4.0), Claire Thornton, Megan Beyers, Jesus Alvarez, Jessica Christopherson, Sierra Hughes, Wyatt O’Brien, Tashia West, Alicia Edwards, Dustee Sapp, Derek Rimestad, David Williams, Devin Hamilton, Karlie Henneman, Jessica Puente Arroyo, Grace Maldonado, Kelly Cruz, Raven Goudeau. Merit (3.0-3.49) Breanna Howell, Quinn Mirick, Emily Mills, Sadie Long, Zachary Zanoni, Dalton Wahl, Brayson Hires, Tonya Nelson, Christina Southerland, Bianca Carrera, Shea Smith, Joel Cosino, Oscar Avilez, Xochitl Flores, James Olson.

Juniors Honor (3.5-4.0) Savannah Clinedinst (4.0), Leslie Iniguez (4.0), Norma Ramos (4.0), Sara Holan, Brisa Leep, Cassandra Spear, Jamie Wilson, Lupita Maria Ornelas, Anna Chavez, Elizabeth Jackson, Makalapua Goodness, Christa McCormick, Kjeld Williams, Mahter Warren, Kaitlyn GildroyMacGregor, Diante HaneyWilliamson, Amber Monroe, Sarah Green, Tucker Pardue, Yazmin Cervantes Orozco, Daniela Capote, Kathryn Cleman, Marcelino Ruiz-Martell, Chance

Stucker, Michaela Rampley. Merit (3.0-3.49) Amanda Johnson, Selena Cosino, Zachariah Collins, Parker Kenyon, Norma Ornelas, Levi Schell, Trevor Terris, Walker Marks, Jonalynn Glover, Michael Goudeau, Kaleb Cholmondeley, Jeffery Fry, Abigail Gschiel, Pete Valentine, Madison Villalva, Lindsay Rhodes, Collin Aitcheson, Kenneth Freese, Jair Chavez, Tyler Farver, Lawrence Njoroge.

Sophomores Honor (3.5-4.0) Abran Alvarez (4.0), Jesse Holan (4.0), Alexander Mershon (4.0), Mary Naylor (4.0), Abraham Podkranic (4.0), Aspen Verhasselt (4.0), Antonio Sanchez Jimenez, Dalton Smith, Kallie Mirick, Hilda Celestino, Colton Leep, Devyn Catone, Yessica Gomez Chavez, Yejee Jeong, Anna St. Martin, Tiffany Ferdon, Travis Deggeller, Dimitriy Holubovych, Shoshanna Thomas-McCue, Haley Montkowski, Tallulah Rietveld, Smith Condon, Jesse Manring, Brooke Nelson, Lucas Vugteveen, Allison Glanzer, Timmarica Spellman, Daniela Bravo, Chad Edwards, Alissa Young. Merit (3.0-3.49) Amber Burton, Frank Holfeltz, Austin Knowlton, Jose Ortega, Kahlil Butler, Blaine Hirst, Elvira

Alvarez, Colt Hatch, Jensen Sackman, Morgan O’Brien, Charles Carrera, Cassandra Blaney, James Coleman, Brock Henneman, Timothy FrazierLeslie, Esgar Mendez, Raylynn Ussery, Esmeralda Cano, David Curtis, Maria Salas Ramirez, Somer Hankins, Michael Timm, Charlie Sanchez, Rachael Sawyer, Carlos Moreno, Rosemary Luna.

Freshmen Honor (3.5-4.0) Micala Arnesen (4.0), Madeleine Graham (4.0), Trevor Peterson (4.0), Rade Pilkinton (4.0), Jenna Valentine (4.0), Jaden Vugteveen (4.0), Omar Calderon, Rachel Silverthorn, Leighanne Barnes, Pablo Chavez, Kasey Nelson, Janelle Catone, Baillie Hirst, Treven Nielsen, Cayden Field, Jordan Hughes, Rosared Walts, Ashley King, Bryden Hires, Alexee Howell, Samantha Earley, Jonathan Freese, Vanessa Pershing, Hugh Sanchez Jimenez. Merit (3.0-3.49) Esmeralda Flores, Jevonti Haney-Williamson, Corrina Karrer, Daisy Alcauter, Melanie Christensen, Christian Garcia Herrera, Dallin Good, Ulyses Morales, Cade Hockett, Adrian McCarthy, Madison Bayless, Kyra Whiting, Sarah Quinlan, Ashley Tobel, Nicholas Crandall.

Tonasket Middle School third quarter Honor Roll Top Honors (4.0) Sixth graders: Ellie Alberts, Kaylee Bobadilla, Dawson Bretz, Ethan Castrejon, Riley Haug, Eric Owsley, Quincy Vassar and Garrett Wilson. Seventh graders: Zachary Clark, Nicole Juarez Zelaya and Joseph Schell. Eighth Grader: Thomas Kennedy.

Honor Roll with Distinction (3.7-3.99) Sixth graders: Tianna Alley, Bautista Chavez, Abigail Duchow, Mitchell Fitzthum, Christopher Freese, Brianna Gutierrez Carbajal, Caleb Hardesty, Missy Martinez Zelaya, Adam Kaleb Steinshouer, Keann Wilson and Austin Wood. Seventh graders: Rycki Cruz, Mikah Haney-Williamson, Katie Henneman, Kyle Holborn, Chyna Kinkade, Justin McDonald, Riley

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Morris, Taylon Pilkinton and Jesse Ramon. Eighth graders: Elijah Antonelli and Seth Smith

Honor Roll (3.0-3.69) Sixth graders: Marlene Aparicio Pena, Aniya Brown, Cassidy Caddy, Cheyenne Davey, Cora Diehl, Teigan Field, Christopher Goddard, Isaac Gomez Chavez, Elizabeth Hylton, Eyleen Jimenez-Garcia, Maya Johann, Madilynn Larson, Shiann McCallum, Melissa MoralesLegaspi, Alexandria Perez, Juan Puente, Rene Ramirez, Sarah Rhoads, James Rothrock, Axel Salas Ramirez, Levi Silverthorn, Ethan Smith, Arrora Thomas, Ian Vanatta, Megan West and Brandon Wirth. Seventh graders: Griselda Alvarez-Torres, Megan Bolich, Darren Bowers, Sydney Breshears, Chadwick Bretz,

Antonio Chavez, Madyson Clark, Elijah Harris, Meri Hirst, Elsbeth Hjaltason, Maya Holmes, Hayley Larson, Nicole Moritz, Joseph Ogborn, Rodrigo Ornelas, Maria Polito-Vazquez, Kallysta Ray, Sergy Salas Ramirez, Carmela Salazar, James Silverthorn, Logan Thompson, Alycia Tibbs, Morgan Tyus, Alina Vlahovich, Brooklynn Ward, Ruby White, Samantha Whitney, Myhe Williams, Camille Wilson and Jacob Wilson. Eighth graders: Brenden Asmussen, Zion Butler, Lorena Cervantes, Samantha Ehrhard, Timothy Freese, Eddie Hogan Jr., Cheyan Kinkade, Benjamin Mills, Wyatt Pershing, Lucas Scott, Bonnie Siegfried, Hunter Swanson, Richard Temby, Johnna Terris, Conner Timm, Jamin Truitt, Jacob Villalva and Lexie Wahl.

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Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Calling all Queens & Princesses: 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Tiaras Galore!

Turner, minister’s wife, at the Assembly of God Church. Another visitor in the community is Joan Anderson, former neighbor of ours, when we lived on the lake, at Deep Bay. Her sister Kathleen will be joining her shortly to attend class reunions. Why is it at class reunions you feel younger than everyone else looks? The Pastime Bar & Grill opened last weekend and I’m told there was good support. The photos I’ve seen on the internet make it look real “classy” and we’ll have to check it out soon. Jokes about German sausages are the “wurst!” In watching the RFTD station on TV we saw some of the entertainers from days of yore. Among them were the Lennon Sisters, who were so popular with Lawrence Welk and Andy Williams shows. They are still performing in Branson, harmonizing, and looking pretty…. in the Andy Williams Theatre. Country celebrity, George Jones, has sung his last song as at 81, he died. Like him or not, he was quite popular in Nashville, especially with Tammy Wynette. When I learned the Guy Fisher’s had moved into a new house (three years ago) he told me I needed to go in the northerly direction for some of my news. He’s correct. I don’t get out that way very often. Haven’t even seen the new Border Patrol facilities, which I understand they are using now. I can’t help but think in

the forties, when I came to Oroville, Marc Kiser and Johnny Lee were the border riders, one going east and one going west… and how many do we have now? Of course, “that was then and this is now.” We didn’t have the “drug thing” then. Pastor Leon Alden, United Methodist Church, Oroville, and Tonasket Community Church, will be running in a marathon this weekend for the benefit of the Leukemia-Lymphoma Foundation. “A Touch of Grace” was added to the United Methodist Church last Sunday, as the congregation was entertained by the bell choir from the Free Methodist Church. Did you ever sit on your own porch, be surprised by a dog, that barked like he wasn’t the intruder, and soon have a second one join him, both barking and looking suspiciously like pit bulls (and they were). Not a good feeling. Life usually gives you a second chance. It’s called tomorrow. Reminder to graduates of ‘45, ’46 and ‘47 (and others that wish to attend, there will be a no host breakfast at the former (Fat Boy’s Restaurant) now, America’s Family Grill, at 8 a.m. on May 11 before the parade, May Day. This will be taking the place of the party that Darleene (Kidwell) Owyen hosted for many years and there will be no get together at the Sibley home this year. Just the one function.

HILLTOP Several enjoyed COMMENTS the walking tour of Chesaw BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The last of the pancake breakfast’s are over for now. The next scheduled one will be in September. The winners of the Baskets for April were: Howard Cole, Don

Field, Bobbie Kosier and Evelyn Dull. Congratulations to you all. The first ever “Don’t Blink Walking Tour of Chesaw” complete with maps, was held on Saturday, April 27. Several people were seen walking and checking the maps and stopping at each business. Those I spoke with, enjoyed the tour.

Sign up early for the Gold Pour

THE LEARNING TREE

SUBMITTED BY JACKIE VALIQUETTE NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Check it out! Our new website offers the choice of just registering for a class (and paying another way), or registering and paying for your class, in just a couple of smooth moves. It’s easy, it’s userfriendly, and the comments about the new site are good! Give it a try - www.northvalleycommunityschools.com. We love getting comments about the classes NVCS offers. We

pay close attention to them and occasionally we need to make an adjustment. The vast majority of comments we receive go like this: From Don’t Put it Off: “Thank you, this answered so many questions”; From Thai Cooking: “Fun and good food. All in all, great!” From CPR: “Much more informative than any other CPR class.” From Soap Making – “Awesome!” And, from Patterns for Lakes – “A great class for local anglers.”

Great weekend of fishing BY SUSIE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

TONASKET - Well opening day has come this past weekend and we hope you all had a great weekend fishing. Gardening time is here to so get out and enjoy the weather and get some things planted around the house. Don’t forget this Friday is our

TONASKET EAGLES weekly bingo starting at 7 pm. The kitchen will also be open for Hamburgers and those good fries at 5:30pm. There will be karaoke at 9 p.m. on Saturday. Our Sunday pinochle scores were as follows. In first place were Betty Paul and Gib McDougal. second place went to Ken Cook and Jo Porter. Low Score was taken by Dale and Cindy Byers. Last Pinochle of the day went to

May Fest Parade forms areGift available Give a Holiday

That Doesn’t End When the aBatteries Give Holiday Run Gift Out. That Doesn’t End When the Batteries Run Out. OROVILLE - Entry applications for the 79th Annual May Festival Parade on May 11 are available from several locations around OrovilleApplications for the parade can be found at Customer Service at Prince’s Center, Sterling Savings Bank and the Oroville School District Superintendent’s office or by calling (509) 429-9397. Whyline-up not start a new tradition? thisa.m. the Parade starts at 8holiday p.m. with judgingMake at 8:30 of year you help save for a child’s college Thetime parade startsthat at 10 a.m. education.

www.edwardjones.com

You can’t control Give a Holiday Gift the market, but you That Doesn’t End When can control yourRun decisions. the Batteries Out.

Edward Jones can work with you to develop a strategy save foracollege. One option is a Make 529 college Whytonot start new holiday tradition? this thesavings where giftsave can for have tax benefits for you, timeplan, of year thattoday’s you help a child’s college family members and the child.* education. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in

certainJones states forcan thosework residents. Edward with you to develop a strategy to save for college. One option is a 529 college savings Sometimes the market reacts poorly to changes in the Why nottoday’s start a new holiday tradition? Make plan, where gift can have tax benefits for you, To make your college savings giftdoesn’t in time world. Buttime just because thethat market reacts mean this the of year you help save for a family members and the child.*tradition? Make this the Why not start a new holiday forshould. thecollege holidays, callevents or visit you Still, if education. current are today. makingJones you feel can child’s Edward *Contributions a 529that plan may behelp eligiblesave for a state tax deductioncollege or credit in time of to year you a child’s uncertain about your finances, you should schedule a for work with you to develop afor strategy to save certain states for those residents. education. Sandra Rasmussen complimentary you cansavings help college. Oneportfolio optionreview. is a That 529way, college Financial Advisor today’s can have benefits ensurewhere control ofgift where you want go aand Edward Jones can work with you to develop strategy Toplan, makeyou’re your. incollege savings gift intotax time for you, family members thecollege child.*savings how youfor can potentially there. to save college. One option is a 529 32 N Main Stget Suite Aand for the holidays, callforor visit today. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible a state tax have deduction ortax creditbenefits in certain states for thoseyou, residents. Omak, WA 98841 plan, where today’s gift can for 509-826-1638 family members and the child.* Take control. Schedule your free portfolio review today.

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If you missed the “Pie Social” at the Grange Hall on Thursday you missed a good “treat.” George was especially pleased that he got a piece of “Pecan Pie.” That’s his favorite. There will be a Memorial Service for Dolly Brazel on the May 18 at the Chesaw Community Building in Chesaw at noon. This will be a potluck. The yealy Yard Sale for Chesaw and Molson will be on the Saturday of Memorial Weekend (May 25th). More details to come. Tables are available. Until next week

Remember, the popular June 6 and 10 class, Processing of Gold Ores with Gold Pour, requires that you sign up two weeks in advance (by May 22) to allow for background checks. Other classes coming up in the next two weeks: Alien Agenda (do you believe?) May 7, 3 sessions; Advanced Dowsing & Divining (bring your dowsing tools) on Thursday, May 9; Is Your Dog Training you? (get back to top dog status) on Mon. May 13, six sessions; and Landlord & Tenant Law (learn your responsibilities) on Mon. May 13. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email her at community.schools@oroville.wednet. edu, or use our new website.

Gene Michels and Neil Fifer. We wish those that may be ill a speedy recovery. God bless you all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

At the

MOVIES

Oliver Theatre

Reg. Showtimes: Sun.-Mon.-Tue.Thur. 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7&9pm

Oliver, B.C.

250-498-2277

42 thurs.-fri. sat. maY 2-3-4. shoWtimes fri. & sat. at 7Pm & 9:25Pm. chadWick boseman, harrison ford.

OblIVIOn

Pg

Pg13

Fri - Sat - Sun - Mon - Tues. May 10-11-12-13-14 SHOWTIMES Fri. & Sat. 7&9:25PM

OMAK THEATER omak and mirage theaters are noW digital 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

IrOnMan 3

130 min

Pg13

action/sci/fi/thriller starring robert doWneY Jr., gWYneth PaltroW, don cheadle, ben kingsleY. fri. 6:45, 9:45. sat. *3:45, 6:45, 9:45. sun. *4:00, 7:00. WkdaYs 7Pm

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

42 biograPhY/drama/sPort starring chadWick boseman, harrison ford, nicole beharie, christoPher meloni Pg13 128 min fri. 6:45, 9:45 sat. *3:45,6:45,9:45 sun *4:00,7:00 WkdaYs. 7:00

OlyMpuS HaS FallEn action/thriller starring gerard butler, aaron eckhart, morgan freeman.

r

120min

fri. 6:45 & 9:45 sat. *3:45, 6:45 & 9:45 sun. *4:15, 7:15 WkdYs. 7:15

OblIVIOn

126 min

Pg13

action/adVenture/sci fi starring tom cruise, morgan freeman, olga kurYlenko, nikolaJ coster-Waldau

fri. 6:45 & 9:45 sat. *3:45, 6:45 & 9:45 sun. *4:00 & 7:00 WkdYs: 7:00

Adults $7.50 Kids 11-under & *Discount Matinee-kids/adults $5 ea

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


MAY 2, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Community Bulletin Board CCC: A Gathering of Friends TONASKET - Concert and evening workshop, Wednesday, May 1, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Cost is $5 at the door, plus a tip jar for donations for performers. Enjoy a warmhearted and spirited two-part evening with an unusual group of songwriters, musicians, and dancers. Contra dancing will be part of this interactive audience participation performance. After a short intermission, adventuresome guests can participate with them in their approach to selfknowledge, self-mastery and service through spiritually focused creative arts.

Mosaic in Glass offered at NVCS OROVILLE – Mosaic in Glass has always been a hit. Work with glass tiles and grout to produce distinctive art. Bring your desired picture or pattern to class or use one from the instructor. This four session class begins Wednesday, May 1. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011 or community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu for information or to register.

Ruby Rust performs at Esther Bricques OROVILLE – Tonight’s performance, Thursday, May 2 at Esther Bricques Winery’s Tasting Room will feature the foursome entitled Ruby Rust. Their performance earlier in the year was so much fun, the winery has decided to have them back for more of their vocal hits and mellow tunes. Doors open at 6 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Tonasket Library Preschool Story Time TONASKET - The next Tonasket Library preschool story time and activity day is Thursday, May 2 at 10:30 a.m. Any questions call the Library at (509) 486-2366.

Weather Spotter Training OKANOGAN - There will be a Weather Spotter Training session at the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Office Conference Room, 123 5th Ave. N. Okanogan, on Thursday, May 2 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The course is free. To register, contact Glenda Beauregard at the Emergency Management Department by calling (509) 4227206 or register online at: www. okangandem.org.

Oroville Farmers’

Market Begins OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library 2013 Farmers’ Market season begins Saturday, May 4, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Purchase art, crafts, plant starts, fresh baked goods and tamales plus the best produce on the planet. The Oroville Farmers’ Market continues each Saturday through October 26 and new vendors are welcome. Call (509) 476-2662 for more information. As part of their goal to provide cultural enrichment to our community, the Oroville Public Library will host “Music at the Market,” Saturday mornings during the 2013 Farmer’s Market season. Musicians who would like to showcase, (volunteer), their acoustic talents are encouraged to call the Oroville Public Library at (509) 476-2662 to book a date.

Music at the Cultural Center TONASKET - Stephen Talley on guitars and Carol Smith on keyboard/synthesizer, Saturday, May 4, 7 p.m. Cost is $7 for CCC members, $8.00 for nonmembers. Bringing Original Music described as “Inner Dimensional,” interweaving melodies, harmonies and rhythms to create unique compositions with video backgrounds. Sound Travel’s music is evocative of time, place and emotion. Where you go on their musical current is up to you. Your imagination is your vessel. Preceded by dinner at 5:30 p.m, $5.

Camaray Motel Open House OROVILLE - The Camaray Motel is pleased to announce an Open House on May 4 and May 5 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Rooms will be open to tour, refreshments will be served and prizes will be given away. Since they arrived in 2010 every room has been dramatically improved. Not including the updated furniture, over $130,000 has been spent on improvements since the Andrews arrived, most of this purchased locally.

Silent Auction/Pie Social OROVILLE - A Silent Auction/ Pie Social will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church - 604 Central Ave. in Oroville on Saturday, May 4 from10 a.m. to 4-p.m. Also: Bake sale, craft sale, book sale and homemade pie.

Dowsing and Divining Class OROVILLE – Our instructor, Michael Stewart, has taught many people the basics of dowsing and divining for water, gold, or anything you choose with a divining rod or pendulum. Michael will discuss stress lines, balancing energy, and connecting to

light energy and will contribute a pendulum and instruction manual to new students. Those who also take the advanced class on Thursday, May 9 will save $5 on their registration fee. Call Ellen Barttels at North Valley Community Schools, (509) 4762011 or community.schools@ oroville.wednet.edu for information and to register.

dent in the class of ‘63 at any time during freshman through senior years and have not received an information letter, please contact Sandra Hill Peterson at 509-4763378 or check out the website for more information. http://ohs63. com/.

OHS Class of ‘45, ‘46 and ‘47 Mini Okanogan County Reunion Artists Luncheon OROVILLE - A mini reunion OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Artists are hosting a luncheon on Monday, May 6 at 11:30 p.m. at the Okanogan Presbyterian Church at 429 W. Oak St. If interested in attending call Carol Cronfill at (509) 8261344 or Sharon Arbuckle at (509) 826-2409.

PAC presents Spamalot OMAK - The Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus will be presenting Monty Python’s “Spamalot” at the Omak Performing Arts Center May 10-12 and May 17-19. Friday and Saturday performances will be at 7:00 p.m. and Sunday matinees at 3:30 p.m. General admission is $17, Students with ID $12 and children under 12 are $8. Tickets in Tonasket are available at Roy’s Pharmacy and in Oroville at the Oroville Pharmacy. They can also be purchased online at www. brownpapertickets.com. More information can be found online at www.ovovinfo.com or by calling (509) 429-4007.

May Festival Parade, enter now OROVILLE - The 79th Annual Oroville May Festival Parade. Line up starts at 8 a.m.; Judging starts at 8:30 a.m.; parade starts at 10 a.m. Applications for the 79th Annual May Festival Parade are available at Prince’s Center (Customer Service), Sterling Savings Bank, and the Oroville School District Superintendent’s office, or by calling (509) 4299397. Don’t miss out on being in this fun-filled family event. Start planning your entry now and plan on having a great time being a participant in the 79th Annual May Festival Parade.

Oroville High School Class of 1963 picnic OROVILLE - OHS Class of 1963 will be having a picnic at Lake Osoyoos Memorial Park on May 11, 2013, to celebrate 50 years of successful and adventurous living. Other classes from the 1960’s are also welcome. Plan to eat (picnic style foods are being catered) or snack your way (bring munchies or dessert if you can) through the afternoon while you renew old friendships and celebrate new ones. If you were a stu-

is planned for the Oroville High School Classes of 1945, 1946 and 1947 on Saturday, May 11 (May Day) at America’s Family Grill (Formerly FB’s Family Diner). There will be a no host breakfast at 8 a.m. Anyone it welcome to meet there. There will be no evening get together. For information call Laura Jean Worthington at (509) 476-4568.

Is your doggie training you? OROVILLE – Oh, that doggie is so cute, but his manners are not so endearing. Our puppy whisperer will have you back at

top dog status in no time with straightforward techniques. This course takes place indoors for six sessions starting Monday, May 13. Pups must be six months or older. Bring choke collar, leash, favorite treats and toy, along with your beloved hound. To register call Ellen Barttels at (509) 4762011, email community.schools@ oroville.wednet.edu, or use our updated, user-friendly website, www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

Taking Orders for Cinnamon Roll Fundraiser OROVILLE - The Oroville Catholic Church is taking orders for cinnamon rolls that they will have for Tuesday, May 21 deliver as part of an annual fundraiser. The cinnamon rolls are made by John Desjardin and are very generous in size with a caramel topping. Cost is $3 per each roll and will be sold in half and full dozen quantities. To place an order or for more information call Jane Lynch at (509) 476-2177.

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

Food Banks TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480. OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386. Editor’s Note: Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. G.A.D.

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Your Complete Eyecare Centre

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

WATERFRONT

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

TONASKET

OKANOGAN

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Mental Health (509) 826-6191

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

(509) 826-6191

Toll Free

www.wvmedical.com

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

 Anti

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

 Behavioral

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion  Walk

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 MASSAGE

Su Ianniello

Licensed Massage Practitioner

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

OPTICAL

Advertise In The

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This space donated by the...

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1420 Main St., Oroville, WA. 98844  509-476-3602 or 888-838-3000  www.gazette-tribune.com

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Call Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 Ext 3050

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MAY 2, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • May 02, 2013

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

Houses For Sale Tonasket 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, heat pump, single car garage with shop and storage shed. RV parking with dump site and AC power. Covered patio. $98,000. Bill: (509)486-1952

For Rent

For Rent

Oroville May Festival Oroville: 1 bedroom 1 bath, Road Closure no smoking. Close to town. The Oroville May Festival $475 per month. Call: 509would like to remind every476-2077 one that the parade route along Main Street and Hwy OROVILLE - Nice 3 bed- 97 will be closed to through room, 1.5 bath, garage, traffic during the parade, Satwasher/ dryer, central air and urday, May 11. The parade heat. $750 month, 1 year will begin at 10:00 a.m., and lease required. No smoking, there will be detours set up for traffic wanting to pass no pets. 509-476-2776 through town until the end of the parade. Oroville - Studio apartment. $335 a month. Water, sewer, Say it in the classifieds! garbage, power included. *Special deal* Call 509-429-3500 *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words Tonasket additional words $1.00 1 BEDROOM, 1 full bath, 500 each. Bold words, special sqft single unit apt. with carfont or borders extra. port. Private. Tenant pays Add a picture own utilities. $450 month. for only $1.50 more. First, last and $100 deposit. Call to place ad Available May 10th. Okanogan Valley (509)429-5572 Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

For Rent

For Rent St. Charles Place Apartments

Hillside Park Senior Apartments 515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA AVAILABLE NOW! 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

Found

– Family & Singles –

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

509-476-4057

Help Wanted

207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION:

LOW INCOME HOUSING “PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home� email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

Oroville School District has the following positions available School Board Director #2

ANNUAL CONSIGNMENT AUCTION TONASKET RODEO GROUNDS - TONASKET, WA

SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 - 10:00 A.M.

PARTIAL LISTING BELOW - CONSIGNMENTS ACCEPTED UP TO SALE TIME - FOOD ALL DAY

******************************************************

EQUIPMENT - MACHINERY - VEHICLES

NH 853 Round Baler * NH 357 Grain Grinder * V-Rake * Manure Spreader * Cultivator * 16-ft Hay Elevators * Brillion Seeder * 3-Bottom Plow * Hay Rake * Gopher Machine * DewEze Super Slicer * Fanning Mill * Bale Buster * 20-ft Auger, 4-inch * 16-ft Hay Trailer *PR Hand Head Catch * Calf Table * Cattle Trim Rack * 1992 Chev Pickup 4x4 w/Flatbed * 1993 Chev Pickup 4x4 wFlatbed Box * 1996 Chev 4x4 Ext Cab, Auto, 6.5 Diesel, Clean, Runs Good * 1992 Nissan Maxima 4-door Car, 5-speed Standard, Air, Stereo, Other Extras, Clean *1997 Dodge 2500 Diesel 4x4 Pickup, Auto, New Tires, 5th Wheel Package * Ford 800 Tractor, Runs Excellent

SHOP - MISCELLANEOUS - COLLECTIBLES

2 Trailers of Misc Hand Tools * Stihl Chain Saw * Coleman 2250 Generator * * 110 Mig Welder * Oxy-Acet Tanks * 700-Gal Fuel Tank * 50+ Railroad Ties * * Water Troughs * Rolls of Smooth Wire * 10 pieces 40-ft x 3-in Sprinkler Pipe * * 48-inch Wagon Wheels * Vintage Prints (see to appreciate ) * Crocks * Antique Doll * * Vintage Glassware * Old Oil Lantern * Extra Nice Chaps, Like New * * Several 8 & 10-ft Aluminum Ladders * 2 HP Honda Boat Motor, only used 2 hours * MUCH MORE BY SALE DAY * NO BUYERS PREMIUM * SALES TAX WILL BE CHARGED — Call and we will Mail, E-Mail, or Fax you a Handbill —

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DAL DAGNON DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2570 486-2138

Help Wanted

Announcements

Positions open until filled. Please send letter of interest/application to Oroville School District 816 Juniper Street Oroville, WA 98844. Oroville School District is an equal opportunity Employer.

Help Wanted

INCOME OPPORTUNITY The City of Oroville

TONOASKET

will be accepting proposals for leasing and operating the Concession Stand at Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial Park for the 2013 Season. Copies of the proposed lease, which outlines requirements and certain equipment that the lessee shall supply, and other information, may be obtained from the City Hall, 1308 Ironwood Street, Oroville, WA 98844 (509476-2926) or may be downloaded from the city’s website at oroville-wa.com

CMA position

The Oroville Office of North Valley Family Medicine is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented CMA. Applicant must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Mon. - Fri. (approx. 40 hours). Medical/Dental/401K. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, Proposals should be submitwvmedical.com for more ted to the City Clerks Office no later 4:00, Monday, May information and to apply online 6, 2013. The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Board of Directors are accepting applications for Irrigation/District Manager position. Interested parties please contact O.T.I.D. for information and application packet at: 516-11th Avenue; PO Box 1729; Oroville, WA 98844 or (509)476-3696. Applications will be accepted through May 3, 2013. A drug free and equal opportunity employer.

On-call CMA or LPN

The Oroville and Tonasket Office of North Valley Family Medicine is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented applicant. Must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State LiTonasket Preschool cense required. Must sucAssociation is accepting cessfully pass a background applications for a check and urine drug screen. Teacher position to start Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more the 2013-14 school year. This is a part-time position information and to apply online teaching 3-5 year olds. Applicants must have a related degree or work experience in a preschool setting. Salary DOE. Position open until filled. For more information contact the preschool at HUGE Cooks Annual MultiVendor Yard Sale: May 3rd (509) 486-8872. & 4th ‌Friday & Saturday at Fred & Jessie Cooks house 950 Hwy. 7 (4 1/2miles north of Tonasket) 9am-? Please no earlies. Many Vendors, Buying Silver, Gold Coins, prepare to pay separately! Collections, Jewelry, ‌Lots of Craft supplies, PerFlatware, Guns. ennial Plants, Household, Paying fair Prices. Call Spence (509) 429-4722 Collectibles, Antiques, Outdoor stuff, Guy stuff, You name it, Something for everybody! Food too!!! See ya there!

Garage & Yard Sale

Wanted

WorkSource Okanogan County

OROVILLE

GARAGE SALE! SATURDAY, MAY 4th from 9am to 3pm located at 1299 Highway 7. Items include saddles, tack, dressers, coins, two rifles, tools, childrens toys, large birdcages and more!

126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310 Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Crosswords Start your newspaper subscription today and see the light. Get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

TONASKET

ANNUAL HOLY ROSARY CHURCH Rummage Sale!! Many great items at rock bottom prices! Thursday, May 2nd and Friday, May 3rd from 9am to 5pm and Saturday, May 4th from 9am to 1pm. Located at First and Whitcomb. Look for signs/ balloons. All proceeds benefit the church.

22. Breathed noisily during sleep

12. Some suits

24. “Yikes!� (2 wds)

14. Grace word

29. Dwarf buffalo

17. Arabic for “commander�

30. Go-___

18. Hardly haute cuisine

31. Bodyguard to British monarch (3 wds)

22. “Buona ___� (Italian greeting)

39. Beehive, e.g. 40. Brawl

23. Remaining after all deductions (variant spelling)

41. July 4 (2 wds)

24. Bender

48. One who requires something

25. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir.

49. “Aquarius� musical

26. Long, long time

50. IV part

27. Congratulations, of a sort

51. Curved

28. Amscrayed

55. South African province settled by Boers in 1836 (3 wds)

32. Bound

60. “Sesame Street� watcher

34. Checkers, e.g.

61. Cy Young, e.g.

35. “All the Things You ___�

62. Add up

36. Free from, with “of�

63. “A Chorus Line� number

37. Bygone bird

64. Contradict

38. Chester White’s home

65. Hex

41. Altogether (2 wds)

33. “... happily ___ after�

42. Brain cell 43. Formal argument

ANSWERS

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 1420 Main St. ď Ź P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA. 98844 Phone: 509-476-3602 Toll Free: 866-773-7818

www.gazette-tribune.com

Down

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1. P.I., e.g.

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Across 1. Small northern India hand drum 6. Bind 10. 100 lbs. 13. “Snowy� bird 14. Indicates

21. Not yet final, at law

Garage & Yard Sale 2 FAMILY YARD SALE! Horse tack, horse packing equipment, pellet stove, Montana 5th wheel, table and chairs, kids toys and lots of miscellaneous. Friday and Saturday, May 3rd and 4th from 8am to 3pm. Just North of Crumbacher, mile post 308.

Motorcycles 2008 YAMAHA VSTAR 1100/XVS11XB. Black with ghost flames, windshield, leather bags, two helmets and cover. $5,000 firm. 509476-2514.

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF APRIL 29, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION WARM. FUN Professional Couple Eager To Provide Your Child With Love And Happiness Forever. Expenses Paid. Ann and Peter. Call 1-800-593-1730 ADOPT: Loving Family longs to provide Everything for 1st baby. Beaches, Laughter, Financial Security. Tina 1-800-933-1975. Expenses paid. EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 866-673-6209. www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com BAJILLIONS STILL AVAILABLE for good R.E. Contracts, Notes and Annuities. Receiving Payments? It may be time to give us a call. Skip Foss 800-637-3677.

Continued on next page

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Think Green!

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

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1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 www.gazette-tribune.com


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Puzzle 15 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

2 Pine Chee Rd, Chesaw – 2 bed, 2 bath Quiet country living. All the furnishings included!! Built in 2008 & on 4.9 acres you’ll love this 2,016 sq’ home nextled in the woods. It’s a little piece of wonderful!! The timberland is freshly cleaned. There is an RV hookup with 50 amp plug. Good well & easy access off paved County Maint road. Additional access road to the east of the parcel. Central location to fishing, hunting, 2 large sno-parks & lots of hiking trails. 30 minutes to Lake Osoyoos & the Canadian Border crossing. Truly charming, come enjoy the quiet. NWML#477471 $124,900

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ANSWERS

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LEGAL SERVICES

Notice of Public Hearings City of Oroville The Oroville City Council will hold a public hearing at its regularly scheduled meeting on Tuesday, May 7, 2013 in the City Council Chambers beginning at 7:00 pm to consider extending the existing interim Critical Areas regulations for an additional two weeks to allow a reasonable

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DRIVER -- One Cent Raise after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus Daily or Weekly Pay, Hometime Options. CDL-A, 3 months OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com

Summary of Ordinance #727 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, amending Chapters 9.22, 9.24 and 9.50 of the Tonasket Municipal Code in order to bring such weapons and firearms regulations in compliance with state law. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-4862132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on May 2, 2013. #477047

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 18 (Easy, rating 0.31) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

6

public notice period for a hearing that will be held May 21, 2013 to take public input for the final adoption of the draft Critical Areas Ordinance by the City Council. The Oroville Community Development Department has been working with its Planning Commission to address initial state agency comments directed at the interim ordinance, and to incorporate Department of Ecology’s new and flexible buffer recommendations for small communities. The Planning Commission held a hearing on the proposal on March 21, 2012. Designation, classification and protection of Critical Areas utilizing the Best Available Science are requirements of the Growth Management Act for all counties and cities in the state of Washington. The Interim Critical Areas Ordinance and proposed revised ordinance, and related documentation is available for viewing on the City’s website at www.orovillewa.com under the “Public Documents” section. Additional information for this hearing is available from Chris Branch, Community Development Director, at 509-560-3535. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on May 2, 2013. #477654

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VENDOR LIST PROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT As authorized under RCW 87.03.437 and Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Resolution No. 2010-03, the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District is advertising for vendors who desire to be placed on the vendor list for materials, supplies, or equipment which cost less than $40,000.00. The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District is an equal opportunity employer and seeks participation from women and minority vendors. Vendor list application must be submitted to the manager of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, PO Box 1729; Oroville, WA 98844. Inquiries and requests for applications may be directed to the manager at 509-476-3696. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on May 2, 9, 2013. #476526

Sudoku

2

Public Auction There will be a Public Auction at Budget Towing, 32156 Hwy 97, Tonasket 509-560-1056, on Thursday , May 16, 2013. Viewing time starts at 11 a.m. with the auction at 12 p.m. Up for auction will be: ‘96 Nissan. WA: 534-WGL. IN4AB42DOTC528667 ‘95 Ford. WA: AEX-5292. 3FALP6532SM135288 ‘82 Toyota. WA: A012562 JT4RN48DIC0029938 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 2, 2013.

Continued from previous page

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Statewides

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May 02, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

2

MAY 2, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE


Page A10

STANDINGS Track and Field

State-Ranked Athletes (event, rank, season best result) Tonasket - Class 1A Ranking 200 - Emily Mills (10th, 26.98) Oroville - Class 2B Ranking 100 - Tanner Smith (3rd, 11.33) 800 - Sierra Speiker (5th, 2:30.41) 1600 - Sierra Speiker (3rd, 5:28.16) 3200 - Sierra Speiker (1st, 11:30.80) High Jump - Kaitlyn Grunst (2nd, 5-3) Pole Vault - Callie Barker (3rd, 9-0); Breanna Ervin (9th, 7-6) Long Jump - Kaitlyn Grunst (6th, 15-10) Javelin - Luke Kindred (2nd, 157-7)

Boys Soccer

Pts: 3=win in regulation or OT; 2=win in PK shootout; 1=loss in PK shootout; 0=loss in regulation or OT.

Caribou Trail League

League Overall Pts W-L W-L-T Chelan 34 11-1 12-2-0 Quincy 30 10-2 11-3-0 Brewster 29 10-1 13-1-0 Okanogan 18 6-6 8-6-0 Cascade 13 5-7 6-8-0 Tonasket 9 3-9 4-10-0 Cashmere 3 1-10 1-13-0 Omak 3 1-11 1-13-0

Central Washington League

League Overall Pts W-L W-L-T Manson 21 7-0 12-2-0 Bridgeport 12 4-3 6-5-0 Lib. Bell 12 4-4 8-5-1 Oroville 0 0-8 1-13-0

Baseball Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cashmere 12-0 17-1 Cascade 10-2 11-6 Brewster 9-3 12-5 Chelan 7-5 7-9 Quincy 6-6 10-7 Okanogan 2-10 6-11 Omak 2-10 3-14 Tonasket 0-12 4-13

CWL North Division

League Overall Liberty Bell 14-0 17-2 Pateros (1B) 11-4 12-5 Lk Roosevelt 8-5 11-7 Bridgeport 6-6 7-12 Oroville 2-13 2-15 Manson 1-14 1-17

Softball Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cascade 12-0 17-0 Okanogan 10-2 14-3 Brewster 6-4 9-6 Chelan 6-4 9-6 Cashmere 5-7 8-10 Quincy 4-8 7-11 Omak 3-9 3-15 Tonasket 0-12 4-14

CWL North Division

League Overall Pateros (1B) 10-0 11-2 Liberty Bell 7-2 10-4 Lk Roosevelt 4-3 4-8 Bridgeport 3-4 6-5 Oroville 2-7 3-11 Manson 0-10 2-13

Girls Tennis Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cashmere 8-1 9-2 Omak 8-2 11-2 Chelan 7-3 10-3 Cascade 4-5 6-5 Okanogan 4-5 7-5 Tonasket 2-9 3-10 Quincy 1-9 1-10

Central Washington League

League Overall Pateros (1B) 9-0 10-3 White Swan 7-3 8-4 Lk Roosevelt 5-4 6-5 Oroville 4-6 4-7 Entiat 3-6 3-7 Liberty Bell 0-9 0-13

Boys Tennis Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cashmere 8-1 9-2 Chelan 8-2 11-2 Omak 7-3 9-4 Tonasket 6-5 7-6 Quincy 3-7 3-8 Cascade 2-7 4-7 Okanogan 0-9 2-10

Central Washington League

League Overall Liberty Bell 9-0 11-2 White Swan 8-2 9-4 Entiat 5-4 5-5 Pateros (1B) 3-5 4-8 Oroville 1-8 1-9 Lk Roosevelt 0-7 0-8

Schedules May 2-9

Thursday, May 2 SOC - Chelan at Tonasket, 4:30 pm TEN - Tonasket at Lake Roos., 4:30 pm Friday, May 3 SB - Bridgeport at Oroville (2), 3:30 pm TR - Oroville at Lib. Bell Inv., 4:00 pm TR - Tonasket at CTL Finals (Cashmere), 4:00 pm Saturday, May 4 BB - Brewster at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am SB - Brewster at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am TEN - Chelan at Tonasket, 11:00 am Tuesday, May 7 GLF - Oroville vs. LR at Bear Creek GC, 2:30 pm SB - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 4:00 pm Thursday, May 9 GLF - Oroville at Alta Lk GC, 2:30 pm SB - Oroville at Manson (2), 4:00 pm TR - CWL meet at Oroville, 4:00 pm

SPORTS

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MAY 2, 2013

Oroville baseball closes season By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Oroville’s baseball team finished out its season on Saturday, April 27, losing a pair to league champion Liberty Bell at Stan Nelson Field. The Mountain Lions who finished unbeaten in league play and are 17-2 overall, beat the Hornets 22-2 and 9-1. The score of the first game was a bit deceptive as Oroville gave up 11 runs in the fifth inning as the game spun out of control. Hornet coach Tam Hutchinson said he’s already looking forward to next season. Nursing the youngest high school team in school history through the season, ending a two-year (47-game) losing streak, finishing the final game with five eighth graders on the field against the league champ and avoiding a mercy rule loss, Hutchinson saw the level of improvement and ability to compete that he was looking for. “The boys are really just starting to play with consistency,” he said. “Liberty Bell is by far the best team in the league and one of the best in the county. The boys played well against them.” Despite finishing with all that youth on the field, the Hornets ended the game and season with a double play on a throw from center field to third base. “To end the season (that way) was great,” Hutchinson said. “Our pitching got better each game as well as the defense. With more experience, the hits will come. The boys already miss it.” The Hornets finished at 2-15 (2-13 Central Washington League North Division), with two victories over Manson helping them avoid the cellar for the first time since 2009. “Looking forward to next year,” Hutchinson said.

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Above, Brentt Kallstrom is one of the Hornet’s “young guns” that Tam Hutchinson will be depending on in future seasons as the program continues to rebuild. Left. Jaxon Blackler reaches back to barehand a ball in the outfield after it shifted direction with a bad hop in the outfield.

Brent Baker/staff photos

Oroville soccer falls in heartbreaker By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

WINTHROP - Oroville’s soccer team bounced back from a two goal deficit on Saturday at Liberty Bell, but had their hopes for an upset scuttled in the last minute of the second overtime. The Mountain Lions converted an indirect kick to win the “golden goal” extra session. “Both teams played a tough, tough game,” said Oroville coach Mike Pitts. “Unfortunately (only) one team could win and it wasn’t us.” Despite trailing 2-0 at the half, Pitts was optimistic the Hornets would get back in the game. “I kept telling the kids to keep up the attacking pressure, and the opportunities would come,” he said. Abe Capote cut the deficit to one goal, and Moises Capote (no relation) tied the game by faking out three defenders and hammering home a shot from 20 yards out. Abe Capote twice nearly won the game in the first overtime with shots that went inches wide. “It was hard to see a game end on that type of call when both teams played so well,” Pitts said.

By Brent Baker

ENTIAT - Oroville’s girls tennis team earned a 3-2 victory against Entiat on Wednesday, April 24, while the boys fell 5-0. Ali Miller won first singles 6-2, 6-3 while Maddie Richardson took her third singles match 6-4, 6-1. Kaylee Foster and Lillie Gronlund won their second doubles match by forfeit. For the boys, Joe Sarmiento and Ronel Kee played well. “They played against good competition,” said Oroville coach Billy Monroe. “Joe and Ronel played against a returning state qualifying doubles team and won some games off them.” The boys (1-9-1, 1-8-1 Central Washington League) also lost to league champion Liberty Bell 5-0 on Saturday, while the girls (4-7, 4-6) topped the Mountain Lions 4-1. Oroville wraps up the regular season May 2 at Chelan. “We are working extra hard these next two weeks to prepare for districts and put ourselves in position to be successful,”

PESHASTIN - Oroville’s track squads battled the field at the 16-team John Rieke Invitational at Cascade, with the girls finishing fourth and the boys 13th on Saturday, April 26. Connell won the girls meet with 96 points, with Cashmere (82) second, followed by Ephrata (69), the Hornets (67), Entiat (65), Cascade (62) and Okanogan (53.5). The boys scored 11 but were in the middle of the pack of the B squads in attendance. Ephrata (106.5) and Granite Falls (97) led the way, with CWL foe Liberty Bell (65) placing fourth for the boys. “We did well, with many PRs,” said Oroville coach Harold Jensen. “With so many other extracurricular activities going on that the students are involved in, it is hard to field a full team for meets.” Leading the Hornet girls were Sierra Speiker with a win in the 3200 (11.37.89) and second in the 1600 (5:30.64); Kaitlyn Grunst in the long jump (1st, 15-10), high jump (2nd, 4-10) and triple jump (5th, 31-0.5); and Alexa Werner in the shot put (1st, 30-5). Other scorers (top eight) included Breanna Ervin in the pole vault (5th, 6-6) and 400 (8th, 1:10.03); Callie Barker in the pole vault (2nd, 9-0), 100 hurdles (7th, 18.35) and triple jump (8th, 28-10.5); and the 4x200 relay team of Speiker, Erving, Lisa Hartvig and Sammi Walimaki (6th, 2:02.49). “The meet was very balanced from top to bottom in scoring,” Jensen said. Scoring for the boys was Tanner Smith in the 200 (3rd, 23.71) and 100 (4th, 11.64).

Tonasket soccer splits two By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Mike Pitts/submitted photo

Oroville’s Connelly Quick works his way upfield against Liberty Bell during the Hornets’ overtime loss last week. “But that’s soccer. “Robbie Dudley had a tremendous game in his first start as goalkeeper. We are playing very

Hornet girls tennis picks up victory over Entiat bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Hornets make mark at Cascade

well here towards the end of the season and that makes me optimistic for next year considering we’ll return 14 players.”

Out On The Town

Monroe said. “My athletes haven’t hit their peak yet, which is good. I’m stressing that their best tennis be played in two weeks and not in our most recent matches.”

Boys tie, girls lose to LR COULEE DAM - The Hornet girls fell 3-2 at Lake Roosevelt on Tuesday, April 23, while the boys tied the Raiders 2-2 as both teams were unable to field full teams. For the girls, Ali Miller won her first singles match 6-3, 7-5 while Menze Pickering and Lily Hilderbrand won 6-2, 7-5 at first doubles. Aya Cruspero, as well as Gronlund and Foster in doubles, lost close matches. The shorthanded boys got an on-court victory from Sarmiento and Key, who defeated the Raiders’ two singles players 8-6 in a pro set. “Nathan Hugus accepted the challenge of playing no. 1 singles but lost in two sets,” Monroe said. “Connor BoCook also stepped up and played no. 2 singles and lost in a three-set marathon, 4-6, 6-3, 4-6.”

The Hornets (1-13, 0-8 Central Washington League) closed out the season on Tuesday against league champion Manson.

QUINCY - It’s too late to salvage a playoff birth, but the Tonasket soccer team is playing the best it has all season as the year nears its end. The Tigers earned their third CTL victory of the season last Tuesday at Omak, 5-1, last Tuesday, and lost at Quincy 3-0 on Saturday, April 27. Tonasket lost to Quincy 10-0 in their first meeting of the year. “It was a much better showing,” said Tonasket coach Jack Goyette. “The guys have excellent attitudes and continue to work hard.. “I expect our team to come out ready to play and do our best (in the last two games of the year). I’ve really appreciated the attitude and strong character of this team.” Tonasket finishes out its campaign against Chelan at home on Thursday, May 2.

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MAY 2, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A11

SPORTS

Cops & Courts

Tiger track tested at Riverside By Brent Baker

Superior Court:

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

The court found probable cause to charge Arnulfo Cortes- Zabalza, 46, with Alien in possesSion of a firearm. He was found guilty and received four months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Dakotah Condon, 21, with Trafficking stolen property second and theft third. He was found guilty and received one year and three months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Justin Nanpuya, 36, with telephone harrassment and violation of a restraining order. He was found guilty and received two years and three months.

CHATTAROY - Tonasket’s track teams traveled to the site of May’s regional meet on Saturday, April 27, for the 23-team Riverside Invitational in Chattaroy. As they have through most of the season, the girls fared better against competition from multiple classes with a 10th-place finish, while the boys were 21st. The top finish for the Tigers came from the 4x400 relay team of Kylie Dellinger, Cassie Spear, Rose Walts and Emily Mills, which took third place with a time of 4:28.97. Those four figured in much of the Tigers’ scoring in individual events as well. Mills finished fourth in the 200 (26.98) and fifth in the 400 (1:01.92); Walts took seventh in the triple jump (30-8.5) while Dellinger just missed the scoring column with a ninth-place finish in the 1600 (5:54.32). Also scoring were Devan Utt in the high jump (4th place tie, 4-8); Mills, Walts, Spear and Jaden Vugteveen in the 4x100 relay (5th, 54.93); Walts in the triple jump (7th, 30-8.5); Kathryn Cleman in the 300 hurdles (8th, 55.09); and Vugteveen, Spear, Kelly Cruz and Shea Smith in the 4x200 relay (8th, 2:00.06). Dallas Tyus provided the lone team points for the boys, finishing seventh in the triple jump with a leap of 38-4. Tonasket was a the Bridgeport Invitational on Tuesday and travels to Cashmere for the Caribou Trail League finals on May 3.

Tigers host league quad TONASKET - Tonasket hosted Brewster, Quincy and Okanogan on Tuesday, April 23, for an unscored Caribou Trail League quad meet. Winning girls’ events for the Tigers were Dellinger in the 1600 (6:02.00); Vugteveen, Walts, Spear and Cruz in the 4x100 relay (55.66); Dellinger, Cleman, Vugteveen and Jenna Valentine in the 4x400 relay (5:00.92); Walts in the triple jump (32-0) and Devan Utt in the high jump (1st place tie, 4-4). Winners for the boys were

District Court:

Ryan Rylie in the 400 (55.56); and Ethan Bensing in the long jump (17-8.5) and triple jump (38-11.5). Other girls finishing in the top three were Mills in the 100 (2nd, 14.05) and 400 (2nd, 1:02.68); Utt in the 800 (2nd, 2:50.74); Cleman in the 300 hurdles (2nd, 55.71) pole vault (2nd, 7-6) and long jump (3rd, 14-3); Vugteveen,

Joshua Allen, 31, Oroville, was charged with escape third. He was found guilty and received 13 days confinement and an $808 fine. Cain Bivins, 32, Okanogan, was charged with DUI. He was found guilty and received a $1,125 fine. Tyler Boquist, 20, Omak, was charged with two counts of use/ delivery of drug paraphernalia. Matthew Jane, 37, Omak, was charged with DUI. He was found guilty and received three days confinement and a $1,381 fine. Above, Devan Utt clears the high jump bar Damen Condon, 37, Omak, was during last Tuesday’s home meet. charged with DWLS second degree. He was found guilty and Left, Kylie Dellinger win the 1600-meter run received 15 days confinement against three other Caribou Trail League and a $1,058 fine. Lucas Cook, 28, Okanogan was teams. charged with malicious mischief third. He was found guilty and received five day confinement Terry Mills/submitted photos and an $808 fine. Denny Dare, 50, Tonasket was charged with harassment and two counts of assault fourth. Clarisa Fonseca, 18, Omak, was charged with DWLS third. Matthew Jane, 30, Omak, was charged with DWLS third. Martin Lawson, 44, of Omak, was charged with DWLS third. He was found guilty and received 10 days confinement and a $358 fine. Dacia Mackarness, 40, Tonasket, was charged with criminal trespassCruz, Spear and Shea Smith in (2nd, 59.25); Smith, Bensing, ing second. He was found guilty the 4x200 (2nd, 2:02.17); Alissa Condon and Devyn Catone in and received one day confinement and a $608 fine. Young in the discus (2nd, 76-4); the 4x100 relay (2nd, 47.79); Amy McGraw, 35, Omak, was Yasmin Cervantes in the discus Catone, Smith, Jonathon Tellez charged with assault fourth (3rd, 72-6); Utt in the long jump and Jevonti Haney-Williams in and two counts of malicious (2nd, 14-4) and triple jump (2nd, the 4x400 relay (2nd, 4:05.87); mischief. 30-9.25). Tyus in the high jump (2nd-tie, Cory Michels, 21, Omak, was Other top three finishers for 5-4), long jump (3rd-tie, 16-10) charged with two counts of negligent driving first. the boys were Smith Condon and triple jump (2nd, 35-1); and Charles Nanamkin, 34, Okanogan, (2nd, 12.55) and 200 (3rd, Rylie in the long jump (3rd-tie, was charged with theft third. He 25.66); Dalton Smith in the 400 16-10). was found guilty and received a $468 fine. William Nearants, 54, Okanogan, was charged with two counts of legend drug possession and theft third. He was found guilty and received an $808 fine. Dyllan Walton (132) finished seventh and Collin Silverthorn Lillian Nomee, 23, Omak, was eighth in the same age division. (80) took eighth. charged with two counts of In the Cadet (age 15-16) divi“All in all it was a very good no valid operator license. She received one day confinement sion, Tim Frazier (132) won two day,” Mitchell said. “There were and an $858 fine. matches and Vance Frazier (106) 24 mats, so the tournament went Jack Obryan, 48, Okanogan, was won one. quickly (10 a.m.-8:30 p.m.). charged with DWLS third. In the Schoolboy (13-14) divi“All of these guys represented Amanda Pakootas, 27, Omak, was sion, Devin Walton (112) won themselves and Tonasket with charged with DWLS third. Sunnyside Chamber of Commerce twice. good sportsmanship and good ToddThPerez, 39, Oroville, was 25charged AnnuAL with DWLS third. He In the Intermediate (9-10) divi- tough wrestling. I’m very proud was found guilty and received a sion, Troy Wood (95) finished of them.” $500 fine. Michael Rouse, 42, Omak, was charged with DUI. He was found guilty and received a $1,425 fine. Cheryl Ryland, 57, Oroville, was charged with no valid operator license. She was found guilty and received a $618 fine. Fri., SAT., JenniferSun. Stone, 36, Omak, was charged MAy 3, 4, 5 with assault fourth. Terry Vranjes, 34, Omak, was SunnySide, WAShingTon charged with criminal trespasss He was found guilty ing ndfirst. Top Baand All received 30 days confineg n i m r Perfo ekment and a $708 fine. d n e WeAlex Walker, 23, of Tonasket, was charged with malicious mischief third. VendorS And CArniVAL ALLOmak was charged Jake Walter, 26, WeeKend! Join Themalicious Fun! with mischief third. He found guilty and received ChArro was one confinement and a hoday Competi rSe tion$783 Aftefine. r the PaTamara rade! Wilson, 51, Tonasket, was charged with obstructing law enforcement. Call 509-837-5939

Junkyard Dogs wrestle at Tacoma Dome By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TACOMA - Tonasket’s Junkyard Dogs sent seven to the state freestyle wrestling finals in the Tacoma Dome, with four earning medals and two others earning wins. They have all been working hard and practicing for this

event,” said Junkyard Dogs coach Dave Mitchell. Collin Aitcheson (120 pounds) led the way with a third place finish in the Junior (age 17-19) division. “Collin’s only loss was to state champion Gabe Martinez of Quincy,” Mitchell said. “He dominated the rest of his competition.”

4-23-13 - TG

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, April 22, 2013 In Tonasket, on Clarkston Mill Rd., a landlord is removing a resident’s belongings. The resident’s parents moved out approximately a month ago and the belonging were still there. In Okanogan, on Chiliwist Rd., a male subject is harassing a resident and his wife while driving up and down the road. He is yelling and calling them vulgar names and flipping them off. There has been a long history of this problem. Mark Stanger, 35, booked for manslaughter. Jacob Jackson, 25, booked for hitand-run unattended. Martin Pearsall, 54, booked for a commitment warrant. Tuesday, April 23, 2013 In Tonasket, on 3525 Rd., there was call about a man possibly doing methamphetamine in front of a small child. Amy Mcgraw, 36, booked for failure to register as a sex offender, assault fourth and malicious mischief third. Blane Moor, 19, booked for rape second. David Ness, 41, booked for DWLS third. Wednesday, April 24, 2013 Near Tonasket, on East Cayuse Rd., an unknown female was caught stealing toolboxes. Timothy Witlock, 51, booked for possession. Zachary Arthur, 23, booked DWLS third. Randy Erwin, 55, booked for possession of stolen property and forgery. Thursday, April 25, 2013 In Tonasket, on Summit Lake Rd., a dining room window was shattered at the location. Owners live on the West Side. Kelly Marchand, 33, booked for DWLS first and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock. Friday, April 26, 2013 In Riverside, on Main St., there was a gas drive off with a value of $55. In Omak, on Copple Rd., an aunt punched a resident in the mouth and nose. The uncle and sister are on the scene providing mediation. Saturday, April 27, 2013 Near Oroville, on Palmer Mountain Rd., two chainsaws were taken from the residence. Sunday, April 28, 2013 In Okanogan, on First Ave. South, a male subject assaulted a resident. No weapons were involved. The resident took pictures of a drug deal and the male subject came inside and started assaulting him. Sunnyside Chamber of Commerce 25Th AnnuAL

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A U C T I O N Tonasket’s softball team couldn’t get the bats going against Quincy on Saturday as the Tigers lost both games of a doubleheader, 16-1 and 15-1. Above, Courtney Jones tags out a Quincy baseruner trying to advance to third base as Amber Monroe stands ready to assist. Right, Shyane Lewis guns out a Quincy batter at first base. The Tigers finish the season Saturday at home against Brewster.

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Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MAY 2, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Donna Benitez

Donna Benitez After a long battle with cancer, Donna Lois Benitez, 61, of Tonasket, Wash., passed away at home with family by her side on April 22, 2013. She was born June 25, 1951 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Donna was a long time resident of Tonasket. She found meaning and purpose serving as a member of the Oroville Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses. For many years her focus was on helping families and children realize their potential as an early childhood educator and parent advocate for Head Start. She also enjoyed her work as a member of the Okanogan Family Faire and the Tonasket Farmer’s Market. Her children often came to her for advice and as the perpetual optimist she was, her favorite piece to give out was, “It always works out.” With a gift for always seeing the best in every person and situation, Donna approached life with gentleness and kindness. One of Donna’s favorite quotes was “People won’t remember what you said or what you did, but they will remember how you made them feel.” – Maya Angelou; and she lived by this; she always made people feel loved, respected and cherished. She was an avid reader with an adventurous spirit who loved spending time with her family and friends. She often traveled to the Oregon Coast and California’s Beaches with her family. Last summer, as her battle with cancer drew closer to the end, she rallied for a final trip to Seaside, Ore. It was a last time for her children, grandchildren, and extended family to come together to honor her and enjoy each other in a setting that carried special meaning and memories for her. She is survived by her husband of 38 years, Tony Benitez; five daughters, Renee Moser and husband Ted of Moses Lake, Wash., Christina Britts and husband Bill of Issaquah, Wash., Cynthia Benitez of Tonasket, Rachel Benitez of Culver City, Calif. and Jessica Benitez of Tonasket; one son, Jeremy Cranford and wife Kendra of Laguna Niguel, Calif.; nine grandchildren, Tyler, Elijah,

Abi, Lacey, Torie, Eva, Eden, Camille and Piper; two sisters, Gayla Smith of California, Debbie Burke of Oklahoma; one brother, David Gravely of California and a large extended family. A public memorial service will be held Friday May 3rd at 11 a.m. at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witnesses, 32501 U.S. 97, Oroville, Wash. A reception will be held following the service at the Community Cultural Center, 411 Western Ave, Tonasket. The family wishes to extend their heartfelt gratitude to Omak Hospice, her community and congregation for their support during her final days and throughout her illness. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made in Donna’s name to the LeioMyoSarcoma Direct Research Foundation LMSdr.org For Donna, friend of mine Bless the friend who will never leave you, / this permanent resident of your heart / whose example of how to touch / is a picture that will never fade; / whose voice you hear on a silent night / when you have lost some faith in love; / she brings you back to where you were / when she listened so well and understood. / Bless the friend who will never leave you, / whose life itself is proof enough / that goodness wins / no matter how unjust the fight.

during Decembers to view his Christmas decorations. Local television stations would air pictures and videos of the decorated home on nightly news brodcasts. He is survived by his mother and step father, Nadean Fisher and Ike Fisher of Tonasket; sisters, Sherri Thomas and Ronni Sandoval of Tonasket, and sister Christine Richie of Spokane; brothers, Steve Long of Stringer Miss. and Mark Long of Taylorsville Miss., former wife Chiyoko Long of Yasatodai Japan. Dirk is also survived by numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews, step-brothers and step-sisters throughout the U.S. Dirk will be sadly missed by friends and family. Private services will be held at a later date.

shared or written down.

Coordinator, TPA Board of Directors

The Tonasket Co-Op Preschool started the 2012 school year last September with enthusiasm and excitement over some recent changes and updates, including hiring and introducing Aldona Graves as the age 3-4 classroom teacher and Amber Tillman as the Pre-K teacher. The preschool board was excited to offer the two age groups and classes to the community, helping to provide more options for parents and assistance in getting preschoolers ready for kindergarten. Both classrooms have experienced a successful fall quarter and winter fun has been abundant with wonderful seasonal activities in the classroom and on field trips. Aldona Graves welcomed our young new students with patience and a caring nature at the start of the year. She has been working with the 3-4 year-olds leading them in socialization, routine and lessons. While assisting in the classroom I have been impressed with Aldona’s constant encouragement and easy structure for the day that the students seem to really enjoy and follow well. The day is broken into different activities/stations, plus recess and snack. The children are excited for each stage. With her background and experience in Early Childhood Education,

30th Walk for Peace Submitted by Rick Gillespie

On Sunday May 12, Mother’s Day, citizens, mothers, families, friends and peace makers from Washington state and British Columbia, will meet at the Oroville/Osoyoos International Border to share our truths, songs and messages of Peace and Justice from 2-4pm. at this annual event. U.S. Walkers leave the Oroville Library at noon for the 2 hour, 4.5 mile walk up the west shoulder of N. Hwy 97 to the border ceremony, carrying banners, placards and prayers for peace. We will fly peace doves and rainbow streamers, walking with strollers, buggies, red wagons and people of all ages.

If you are a U.S. participant and can’t walk to the border, you can park at Super Duper south parking lot or in the 6-8 spaces at U.S. port of entry. Canadian peace makers, including a large contingent from the Doukhobor communities of western Canada will walk from Haynes Point Park 1.5 miles north of the border, or arrive by bus at the border. Mother’s Day has been celebrated as a day of peace since 1877 when Julia Ward Howe, a suffragette, organized women, many who had lost husbands and sons in the tragedy of our civil war, to march in protest to all wars. “Enough of this Madness?” How many innocents must die before we put an end to war and work for the betterment of our green planet and all humanity.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Okanogan International Chorus Tommie June Riste

Members are from Oroville, Osoyoos, Oliver & Midway

Invites you to our

Annual Spring Concert

Tommie June Riste

Dirk Long

Dirk Herbert Long Dirk Herbert Long, 55, KailuaKona Hawaii died April 10, 2013 at the Kona Community Hospital. Born in Pittsfield, Ill., March 6 1958 the son of Richard Leon and Ina Nadean Spann Long, he was the owner of American Housing in Japan. Dirk was a well-liked and respected builder, erecting everything from log cabins to hospitals on two continents. He was locally famous for his self-built home in Komatsu City Yasatodai Ishikawa-Ken Japan, where his home was awarded “Best Home in the City.” A constant stream of cars would drive past his house

Tommie June Riste of Twisp, Wash. passed away at home April 9, 2013 surrounded by her family. She was born June 21, 1940 in Ventura, Calif. to Earl and Norma Jones. She grew up in Naches, Wash. where she met and married Tom Riste on June 7, 1958. Tommie held many various jobs over the years from cooking at White Pass Ski Area, horse pack trips and fire camps. She also worked in the potato shed and various shops like the ore house in Winthrop to branding fish and the Oroville Golf Course. She worked a lot of construction with Tom but her favorite job through the years was mom and grandma. Mom quit school when she was 17 and got married. When she was in her forties she went back to school and got her GED. She remained an inspiration to us all for her determination. She had a passion for gardening, preserving food, fishing and rock hounding. Her artistic side was expressed in her painting, leather work and spinning and weaving. Known for her quick wit, many folks succumbed to her skill at cribbage or to her practical jokes. She loved sports and played basketball and softball however in later years she loved to watch the Seahawks. She

Tonasket Cooperative Preschool celebrates change Submitted by Kathy Olson

had been a member of the Eagles, Elks and TOPS. She is survived by daughter Tammy (Karla) Rime of Twisp, daughter Shari (Kip) Fletcher of Selah, grandchildren Erica (Chase) Matthew of Selah and TJ (Heather) Fletcher of Travis Air Force Base and great grandchildren Hudson and Asha Matthew and Cooper Fletcher and her sister Winona Anderson and brother Dean Jones. Many nephews, nieces and cousins held a special place in her heart. She was preceded in death by husband Tom Riste, parents Earl and Norma Jones and her best friend Nita Pope. A potluck memorial to celebrate her life will be held at 2:30 p.m. the Twisp Senior Center on June 1, 2013. The family would like your favorite memories to be

it is clear to see and understand her dedication to this age group. She has previously worked at preschools in London, England and Ephrata, Wash., and has continued to gain valuable knowledge as she instructs and assists with preschoolers. Her classroom has a “playbased” curriculum where the children learn through play and are encouraged to learn through hands-on activities. This 3-4 year old class has been introduced to materials such as glue, paint, play dough, scissors and will work on mastering these skills as the school year goes by. Amber Tillman has energized the Pre-K classroom with a love for art, projects and hand-on lessons that the students have loved. Amber is from the Wenatchee area with a background in management and elderly care. She brings structure to the classroom and an environment of fun-filled learning for each student. The Pre-K class has focused

each month on a color, three letters, pre-math, shapes and a sight word. Amber has used hands-on activities and stations in the classroom to keep the students engaged and excited about these new lessons. As a mother of a Pre-K student, I have been amazed at the new things my son has been learning and mastering. He loves school and Mrs. Amber, and always looks forward to each Tuesday and Thursday! We are happy to welcome spring and invite students currently for both classrooms. Please contact the preschool classroom at (509) 486-8872 for more information, enrollment forms, and questions. Teachers and/or parent volunteers are available in the classroom Monday ñ Thursday. If no one is available, please leave a detailed message and a teacher or board member will return your call as soon as possible. Also, we welcome you to email the Tonasket Preschool Association at tpa4kids@hotmail.com.

under the direction of Lloyd Fairweather

Sat., May. 11th at 2:00 p.m.

Oroville Free Methodist Church

FREE Admission... Our Gift to YOU!

OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday School is at 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study

God’s Word gives us the truth with nothing added nor taken from it! ~ Revelations 22:18-19 2 Timothy 2:15~”study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the Word of truth”

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, May 02, 2013  

May 02, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, May 02, 2013  

May 02, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune