Page 1

CEREMONY AT THE

MOLSON GRANGE SOCIAL

SIMILKAMEEN FALLS

Molson Grange Ice Cream & Pie Social on Thursday, April 25, 6:30 p.m. at Molson Grange Hall

See Page A12

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2013 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Riverside man charged with murder

IT’S RODEO SEASON

Sheriff’s office busy responding to shooting, stabbing and threats BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OKANOGAN – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Deputies were kept busy this weekend following reports of gun and knife-play at various locations around the county. The first of three incidents on Saturday alone, resulted in a Riverside man being arrested in the shooting death of a fellow Riverside area resident. “Okanogan County Deputies responded to 12 Foggy River Loop Rd. just north of Riverside in reference to a subject that had called in and said he had been stabbed and had shot the subject that had stabbed him,” said Sheriff Frank Rogers. At 4: 15 p.m. deputies, Lifeline Ambulance and the Riverside Fire Department all responded tot he scene and attempted to revive Bruce R. Molony, 55, Riverside, but were unable to and he was pronounced dead at the scene, according to the sheriff. Don A. Moore, 65, also from Riverside, who had several stab wounds to abdomen area, was transported to Mid-Valley Hospital in Omak for his injuries. Moore was arrested and charged with murder in the first degree after being treated and released from the hospital, said the sheriff. “The investigation shows that Moore had reported a theft earlier to the Sheriff ’s Office and had stated he felt Molony was the one that did it. Moore apparently had driven to Molony’s resi-

dence to confront him about a clutch missing from one of his vehicles,” Rogers said. During the confrontation Moore said Molony pulled out a knife and stabbed him on the side of the abdomen. “The investigation shows that Moore had shot Molony with a .22 caliber pistol and when he ran out of bullets he stabbed Molony several times; most of the wounds to Molony were in the back,” said Rogers. “Molony died at the scene from his injuries. Moore then attempted to drive away from the scene but ran off the edge of the driveway and the vehicle slid down an embankment. Moore called dispatch to report the incident was still on scene when deputies arrived.” Moore was kept overnight at the hospital for observation and was released Sunday and booked late Sunday afternoon into the Okanogan County Jail for first degree murder. The investigation is still on going and family members of Molony have been notified of his death. This is the third murder this year in Okanogan County, according to the sheriff.

Attempted shooting in Omak area

Later on Saturday, around 6 p.m., Colville Colville Tribal Police, Omak Police and Okanogan County Deputies responded to 37 Brooks Track regarding a shots fired call. When they arrived at the scene the investigation showed that James M. Gee, 59 of Omak, who had been drinking, had gotten into an argument with Rachelle M. Stanley, 40 of Omak,

SEE SHOOTING | A2

New ambulance over budget Stryker equipment adds $45,000 to cost of total purchase Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket hosted its first rodeo of the season April 20-21 as the Junior Rodeo kids showed off their skills over the weekend. Not all of the horses were entirely cooperative, but Joree Lee Scriver brought hers back to earth after a brief disagreement over who was in control of things. More pictures and rodeo results are on page A4.

Oroville wants CDBG Grant Funds would be used for studying water and sewer needs around lake BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – At the Tuesday, April 16 council meeting, Oroville held a hearing on a proposal to apply for a $35,000 state Community Development Block Grant to study water and sewer needs for residents living on the west and east side of Lake Osoyoos. “It would be a planning only grant to determine what kind of income levels there are. The west side of the lake has deficiencies in the water line sizes. The other side of the lake has the potential to hook up low to moderate income level residents without paying those connec-

tion fees,” said Chris Branch, director of community development. “We are doing a sewer and water system rate study and the city will complete

“...potential to hook up low to moderate income level residents without paying connection fees.” Chris Branch, Director of Oroville Community Development

as much as possible with the funding available,” added Branch. The resolution requesting the grant funding states, “… Oroville authorizes submission of this application to the state

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 17

Department of Commerce to request up to $35,000 to fund infrastructure planning, including rate studies, system development charges, income survey(s) and other related planning....” Mayor Chuck Spieth asked if there were any questions from those present about the grant application and there were none. Councilman Tony Koepke made a motion to approve a resolution applying for the grant and it was seconded by Councilwoman Neysa Roley and passed unanimously. In a related item, Champerty Shores, on the east side of the lake near the Canadian border, continues to work on their water project. Branch said that an application has to the DNR for the water and sewer lines to cross their property. The development will be connecting to the city water system and has agreed to connect residences to the Eastside Sewer System as well.

speaking for ambulance coordinator Debra Donoghue who was unable to attend the first of the council meeting. “That’s probably the hardest thing we do,” added Councilwoman Neysa Roley, who also serves on the ambuBY GARY A. DEVON lance crew. “There is also a stair chair to get peoMANAGING EDITOR ple down stairs. It is powered and there OROVILLE – At their Tuesday, is less opportunity to drop a patient using this chair or to April 16 Oroville hurt someone on the City Council meetcrew,” said Bouchard. ing the council heard the specifications of “This increases safety for “The power gurney the new ambulance the patients and crew, hydraulically lifts someone from the and safety equipment especially when load- ground. I am also an which pushes the EMT for Tonasket price about $30,000 ing bigger people.” and they have a over budget. Paul Brouchard, Oroville EMT power gurney and it According to City works really well.” Clerk Kathy Jones, Clerk Jones asked $185,000 was budthe council to look at geted to purchase a new ambulance, with the addition of the additions and to make the decision $45,000 Stryker items not in the bud- about whether to do a budget resoluget, the price climbs to $214,000 plus tion at the next meeting. “I also want to talk it over with the tax. The Striker equipment includes a Rural EMS,” said Jones, referring to the power loader, stair chair and power city’s partner in the purchase of the new gurney. Mayor Chuck Spieth asked a ambulance. “According to Debra rural is all for member of the Oroville Ambulance Crew what these extra items bring to it,” said Bouchard. Mayor Spieth asked if the ambulance the table. “The power loader actually brings can be delivered to Oroville so that the the gurney out of the ambulance lifts sale tax amount would be less than the it in. There is hardly any lifting on us. 10 percent charged at the designated This increases safety for the patients delivery point on the west side of the and crew, especially when we are loading bigger people,” said Paul Bouchard, SEE AMBULANCE | A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Community Valley Life Letters/Opinion

A3 A4 A5

Valley Life A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Sports Police Stats

A10-11 A12


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 25, 2013

BENEFIT CONCERT SHOWCASES LOCAL TALENTS

Gary DeVon/staff photos

The Oroville Junior High and Senior High Schools’ Spring Concert was a benefit for the Music Department this year.The event last Friday was organized by Scotty Frazier as his senior project. The concert featured performances by the Junior/Senior High School Choir, accompanied by Liz Grunst on piano. Narya Naillon (upper left) sang a solo with the choir and Casey Duran (lower left) sang a solo, “Chasing Pavements.” The Junior High Band and the High School Band performed, as well as the Touch of Grace Hand Bell Ensemble (lower right) and the Mathis Family Band (top right) with Fraizier helping out on guitar (behind amp). Directing the school music bands and choir was Eric Stiles, director of the music department.

Pastime Bar & Grill to open this Friday Downtown Oroville landmark to feature a new restaurant as well as reimagined bar

Ore. Kitchen and serving staff have been hired. The former Pastime Tavern operated over several decades under different owners

before closing in 2009. The new owners, Victoria and Brant Hinze of Chesaw, purchased the building in 2010 and began renovating it a year later.

Submitted by Sandy Lorentzen Pastime Bar & Grill

OROVILLE - One of Oroville, Washington’s most frequented establishments on Main Street, the former Pastime Tavern, will re-open its doors, Friday, April 26 as the Pastime Bar and Grill, a restaurant and full service bar. The restaurant will open at 5 p.m. and the bar will start serving food and drink at 3 p.m. The band, North Half, will perform Friday and Saturday evening after the dining room closes on opening weekend. The Pastime Bar and Grill plans to serve dinner daily and start lunch service 10 days after opening, offering a menu of seasonally-inspired cuisine. The wine list will feature the outstanding wines produced in Washington and Canada’s Okanagan Valley. Chesaw resident, Stacey Hinze, will manage the restaurant and bar. Patchen Gallagher has moved to Oroville to fill the position of head chef. A native of British Columbia, Gallagher has had experience in opening restaurants and has worked as a chef in Vancouver, B.C. and Portland,

Shooting | FROM A1 according to Rogers. “During the fight Gee had a .22 caliber pistol with him and had knocked Rachelle Stanley to the ground. Rachelle Stanley started screaming for her sister, Lynn Stanley to help her. Lynn Stanley said when she came out of her trailer and saw Gee and her sister on the ground fighting and Gee had the pistol but Rachelle Stanley was holding onto the pistol, trying to stop Gee from shooting her,” Rogers said. Lynn Stanley said she was able to grab Gee and wrestle him to the ground. Rachelle Stanley then grabbed the gun and ran back into Gee’s residence, according to the incident report. “Gee went back into the residence, found the pistol and fired one round which struck the kitch-

en floor, hit the refrigerator and ended up in a cupboard. When law enforcement arrived Gee still had the weapon with him as he was sitting on the couch. Gee was arrested at the scene without incident,” said Rogers. Gee was arrested by the sheriff ’s deputies and was transported to the Okanogan County Jail and booked for first degree assault. No one was injured in the incident.

Juvenile arrested At 10 p.m. on Saturday deputies and Brewster police responded to a call at 43 Max Goehry Rd. north of Brewster regarding a possible assault with a knife. The Brewster police arrived at the scene first and detained a 16-year-old juve-

nile until the deputies arrived, according to the sheriff. The investigation shows that the boy was upset with his parents because he did not want to go to church, Rogers said. “Apparently (he) assaulted his mother and then grabbed a knife, swiped at her with it and then chased her through the house. When the father got involved (he) also punched his father. (The juvenile) also told his parents he was going to get a gun and come back and kill them,” said the sheriff. There were three other children in the house during the incident. The boy was arrested at the scene and transported and booked into Okanogan County Juvenile detention for second degree assault and felony threats, said Rogers.

Ambulance | FROM A1 state. “We’d also like to have the tax here in Okanogan County and save on the overall price,” added Rod Noel, Oroville Fire Chief. Ambulance Coordinator Donoghue appeared later in the

meeting and confirmed that the ambulance could be delivered to Oroville. In other business, Jones told the council that the filing period for the September primary election will be May 13 through May

Out On The Town Submitted photo

Oroville and Tonasket will be observe Arbor Day with celebrations this week. Oroville’s event is on Thursday, April 25 in Centennial Park on Main Street and starts at 3:30 p.m. Tonasket’s is on Friday, April 26 at Chief Tonasket park and starts at 3 p.m. In Oroville, The scouts will provide a color guard and Harry Stockwell will sing the National Anthem. Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth will make a proclamation. Betty Bair of the Oroville Garden Club will discuss the origins of Arbor Day. The Oroville Chapterof the Royal Neighbors will serve punch and cookies. In Tonasket they plan on planting trees near the baseball fields in recognition of the day.

your guide to

Dining & Entertainment

The rosewood backbar has always been one of the Pastime’s most recognizable features. The historic bar is said to have started life in early day Loomis after making its way around the South American cape. The former Pastime Tavern, now the Pastime Bar & Grill, has been totally remodeled with exposed brick exterior walls, new windows out front, hardwood floors and many new touches. It will open up for business this Friday.

ARBOR DAY CELEBRATIONS THIS WEEK IN OROVILLE AND TONASKET

17 and that three positions were up for election. Mayor Spieth and council members Jon Neal and Roley have not announced whether they will seek reelection in the September primary.

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

WANT THEIR ATTENTION? Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at EVERY WEEK Phone: 509-476-3602


april 25, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

Okanogan Valley Life

Spray Park barbecue fundraiser this Sunday

EARTH DAY EDUCATION

Submitted by Linda Black

TONASKET - Come out and join us for a community fundraising event to help raise money for the Tonasket Water Ranch, a spray park slated to be built at Chief Tonasket Park. Big Splash BBQ will be held on Sunday, April 28, from noon5 p.m. at the Tonasket Visitors’ Center. Everyone is invited to come out for a nice dinner, entertainment and to gather together and build community support. The cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. The event will feature an array of barbecue specialties. Hamburgers, hotdogs, sausages, and steak will be available for an additional cost. Also included with the dinner are barbecue beans, macaroni and cheese, corn, asparagus, fries, mashed potatoes and fruit and s’mores for dessert. Soft drinks and a beer garden featur-

Above, Madeline Ashmore shows how the wetland game works at the Green Okanogan Earth Day Faire on Sunday. The object of the game was to build a wetland, using a spinner to select a plant adaptation to build using pipe cleaners and modeling clay. The game helps the players better understand how wetland plants are adapted to live in wet soils with low oxygen, and why these habitats are valuable. Right, Lola Orr repurposes fibered feed bags into shopping or carry bags, complete with handles. She said she’d meant to demonstrate to faire visitors how it was done, but many were actually more interested in buying the bags she’d made.

Submitted by Rick Braman

Oroville Friends of the Library

Busy Earth Day weekend By Brent Baker

TONASKET - Earth Day weekend featured a plethora of “green” and educational activities around Tonasket, both indoors and outdoors, as groups associated with the Community Cultural Center and Green Okanogan provided hands-on opportunities to educate the public on environmental issues. Green Okanogan collected 24 pallets of “e-cycled” waste (computer monitors, televisions, and other electronics).

It also hosted a tour of Pleasant Glade, Bob and Jane Thompson’s intentional green community being constructed on Havillah Road about a block off of Highway 97. There was also the “Plant Frenzy” in Triangle Park, as well as a tour of the Tonasket School District garden, hosted by Americorps VISTA volunteer Maggie Gruszka. The Earth Day Faire was Sunday in the high school commons, featuring booths on alternative transportation, permaculture, biodiversity, conservation,

ing Alpine brew will be available as well. This is an important community fundraiser for our local families and youth. To jump-start some summer fun there will be a children’s play area with water features, so bring a towel! We are featuring three bands, a dunk tank, a tug-o-war where losers will be sprayed down by our fire department, and our favorite host

- Bud McSpadden - who makes everything fun! The event is being sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce, TVBRC, Kiwanis, Lions, and the PTO. Please come have a nice meal and learn more about this community project. Find out more about the spray park project at www. tonasketwaterranch.org or contact Linda Black at (509) 486-2132.

tograph chosen at the previous show. There are ten artists contributing work this year, and as in past shows, we expect a fun and interesting range of interpretations. Those in attendance will be given the opportunity to vote on their favorite piece, and all artwork will be for sale, with a portion of the proceeds going to the library renovation fund.

This event is free to the public, and refreshments including coffee, tea, punch and a chocolate fountain with many goodies, will be provided. Live classical guitar music will be performed by Steve Pollard. Please mark your calendars and plan to attend this fun show, and help support your local library. We hope to see you there.

these regulations at a free informational session to be held at The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket on Thursday, May 2, 6:30 p.m. There will be a 30 minute presentation given by a Washington State Department of Agriculture employee, followed by a one hour question and answer session. The discussion will focus on how to qualify as a Cottage Industry by certifying your home kitchen. The term “Cottage Industry” in this case refers specifically to a business run from the home where the producer sells home

produced items in a public venue. There is a significant yearly fee for certification, and being certified makes you eligible to obtain the permits necessary to sell your wares to the public. The free event is open to the public and is sponsored jointly by the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket and The Tonasket Farmers’ Market Association. Questions regarding the event or the market may be directed to Margie Anderson, market manager, at (509) 846-9902. Anderson also announces May 16 as the opening day of the 2013 market season.

‘Oroville Creates’ Art Show at Library

Photos by Brent Baker and Julie Ashmore

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

A graphic representation of the Tonasket Water Ranch spray park, to which this Sunday’s fundraising barbeque will be dedicated.

recycled art, as well as some face painting and games. “It was great to have it up here at the school,” said Loreen Felstet, a.k.a. The Recycling Chick. “Some people would have liked to see more people come through, but I think having it here is a great thing to help us be seen by more of the community.” And though not directly associated with the above events, Hemp Fest at the CCC on Saturday and Similkameen Sunday, celebrating the significance of the Similkameen Falls, added to the variety of weekend activities.

OROVILLE - The annual art show fundraiser, “Oroville Creates,” will be held this Saturday, April 27 at 5 p.m. in the Oroville Public Library meeting room. This fun event features art created by local artists, depicting their interpretation of a pho-

Cottage industry meeting planned for May 2 New rules could affect selling at Farmers Markets Submitted by Susanne Dailey Howard Tonasket Farmers Market

TONASKET - Do you sell homemade baked goods at farmers’ markets or bazaars, or are you thinking about selling your goodies? Recent legislation regulating Cottage Industry will impact your small business. Learn more about

Tonasket Junior Rodeo wishes to give

“A GREAT BIG THANK YOU TO...” Robert N. Nau DDS, LLC Gold Digger Apples, Inc.

Lee Johnson/submitted photo

These Trumpeter Swans were photographed at Little Beaver Lake near Chesaw.

OHA to present program on Washington swans CCC hosts this spring’s final Highland Wonders series presentation Submitted by Julie Ashmore Okanogan Highlands Alliance

TONASKET - Martha Jordan, a well-known swan biologist, will present a slide program on Washington’s native Trumpeter and Tundra swans, including information about their life history, biology, and swan identification. Her presentation at the Community Cultural Center in Tonasket on Friday, May 3, is presented by the Okanogan Highlands Alliance, in its final “First Fridays” presentation of winter/spring 2012-13. Light will be shed on the problems and controversies these birds face on their wintering grounds, and what is needed to ensure their healthy future. Updates will be provided on the swan lead poisoning die-off, habitat issues, seasonal migration and movement of swan populations, and more. Jordan will also share some excellent slides that help clarify the difficult identification of these swans, and a free Swan Identification pamphlet will be available. “Trumpeter Swans, the largest waterfowl in the world, have been

brought back from the brink of extinction and once again grace our skies and waterways,” Jordan says. “They trumpet the success of our efforts and continue to call us to action for conservation of farmland and wetlands. Come, share and learn the facts, myths and legends of the swans of Washington’s winter.” Martha Jordan has a degree in Wildlife Science from Oregon State University. Her work with waterfowl began shortly thereafter. She began to look at swans in the late 1970s as an independent citizen and by 1984 had contributed much information to state and federal agencies on the status of trumpeter swans in Washington State, including the first swan management plan. Martha has been a Board member of The Trumpeter Swan Society since 1985 and chairs the Washington Swan Working Group. She is selfemployed, working as a human and animal massage therapist, dog trainer and professional wildlife biologist. Jordan encourages the public to visit the Skagit Valley where the largest concentration of Trumpeter Swans in the United States gather each winter, to observe swans, thousands of snow geese, eagles and many other birds. The May 3 presentation begins at 6:30 p.m. with desserts, tea and coffee; the dinner benefiting the CCC begins at 5:00 pm (the

meal is $6 for CCC members or $7 for non-members). Details are provided on OHA’s website: www. okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw. For more information, email julie@okanoganhighlands. org or call 509-433-7893. The Highland Wonders indoor educational series brings the natural history of the Okanogan Highlands and surrounding areas to Tonasket on the firt Friday of the month, from November through May (skipping December). After May’s presentation, Highland Wonders will transition outdoors with a field trip on Landscape Ecology offered by Herb Hammond, Forest Ecologist and Forester, a combination indoor/ outdoor event on June 28 and 29. OHA members will receive priority registration for the summertime events, which accommodate smaller groups. OHA’s Education Program is designed to build the capacity of the community to steward natural habitats and resources, by helping to develop an informed and empowered population. Okanogan Highlands Alliance is a non-profit that works to educate the public on watershed issues. The indoor educational series is offered by OHA, free of charge, at the Community Cultural Center, the “CCC,” of Tonasket (411 S. Western Avenue), and summertime events occur at a variety of locations.

OK Chevrolet Sales and Service Silver Nickel Logging Kinross Gold Corporation Midway Building Supply Steve and Pat Richey Colbert Excavation Cornerstone Custom Granite Gavin’s Petroleum Northwest Edison Oroville Reman and Reload Roy’s Pharmacy, Inc Coulee Dam Federal Credit Union Hickman’s Body Shop Knob Hill Forge Steve Richey Horseshoeing Ty Olson Construction Don Kruse Electric, Inc. Overland Fence and Construction, LLC Aeneas Valley Community Association Apple Valley Machine Shop Bob and Nancy Barnes Coleman Oil

Hanks Harvest Foods, Inc Hilltop Realty Levine Plumbing & Construction North Valley Family Medicine North Valley Hospital Oroville Golf Club Precision Gutters & Construction Rafter 12 Ranch-- Custom Haying Beyers Market The Junction Omak Stampede Rawson’s T&T Real Estate, LLC Beanblossom’s Backhoe Service Beltrami Plumbing Edward Jones George and Karen Zittel Grillo Orchards Inlow Angus Ranch Kiwanis Club of Tonasket Olma Cattle Co.

Smith & Nelson Inc. Upper Valley Disposal Valley Home Repair VIP Agency Inc. Whistler’s Family Restaurant Whitley Fuel All Creatures Veterinary Service Cowgirl Connection Baker’s Acres Russell and Nancy Burbank Facial Focus Seth Buchert Horseshoeing Tonasket Veterinary Service Naylor’s Air Conditioning and Heating Ogborn Plumbing Terry and Gayle Hueth Nulton Irrigation Okanogan Properties Stucker Quarterhorses Tonasket Pizza Company Wilbur Ellis Co.

~ SADDLE WINNERS ~

(Photos by Heather Popelier)

Abbi Popelier

Oliver Williams

Kaelyn Marchand

Bryson Butterfly

Saddle Sponsored by:

Saddle Sponsored by:

Saddle Sponsored by:

Saddle Sponsored by:

Silver Nickel Logging

OK Chevrolet Sales & Service

Beyers Market

The Junction

Thanks again. See you next year!!!


Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | April 25, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life 2013 TONASKET JUNIOR RODEO

Brent Baker/staff photos; saddle winner photo submitted by Heather Popelier

Highlights from the Tonasket Junior Rodeo last weekend included (top) Abbi Popelier hanging on during her Saturday morning Pole Bending run; (above, clockwise from left) Jaycie Richey flashing a smile; Jesse Luttrell rides with full intensity; rodeo royalty lining up during pre-rodeo pageantry; Brisa Leep flying the Stars and Stripes; and saddle winners (l-r) Bryson Butterfly, Kaelyn Marchand, Oliver Williams and Abbi Popelier reaping the rewards of weekend competition.

TONASKET JUNIOR RODEO RESULTS By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The 2013 Tonasket Junior Rodeo is in the books, highlighted by the winning of four saddle winners for boys and girls in their combined age groups. Saddle winners included PeeWee/Juniors Abbi Popelier and Bryson Butterfly, and Intermediate/Seniors Oliver Williams and Kaelyn Marchand. All-around winners were Chance Stucker (Senior Boy), Kaelyn Marchand (Senior Girl), Oliver Williams (Intermediate Boy), Krista Marchand (Intermediate Girl), Chantz Popelier (Junior Boy), Abbi Popelier (Junior Girl), Bryson Butterfly (PeeWee Boy), Lynda Rose Dietrich (PeeWee Girl) and Kassidy Bremner (Little People). The opening ceremonies included a host of rodeo royalty and a moving tribute to longtime rodeo and youth supporter Ray Colbert, who passed away in January.

Senior Girls All-Around Points

Kaelyn Marchand Connlee Gray Mikala Harris Shay Duclos Vanessa Pershing Karlie Henneman Sara Jo Holan Brittany Jewett Autumn Lanier Brisa Leep Menze Pickering Sarah Quinlan

Individual Winners

18 9 4 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Cow Riding: Kaelyn Marchand Goat Tying: Kaelyn Marchand Barrel Racing: Connlee Gray Pole Bending: Connlee Gray Steer Daubing: Kaelyn Marchand

Senior Boys All-Around Points

Chance Stucker Chase Nigg Dustin Nigg Randall Scull Baley Westberg Oliver Williams

Individual Winners

8 0 0 0 0 0

Calf Rope: Chance Stucker Steer Wrestling: Chance Stucker Bulls: none Chute Dogging: none

Intermediate Girls All-Around Points

Krista Machand Makenly Davis Beverlee Abrahamson Taylor Turner Sammi Walimaki Chloe Bass Keianna James

11 10 8 8 7 3 3

Jodi Nelson Chandra Shibley Mollee Gray Natlile Bonner Trinity DeJong Juanita Desjardins Kialeeh Harris Laatya James Jaylene Lelone Khaila Swan

Individual Winners:

3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Cow Riding: Beverlee Abrahamson Goat Tying: Makenly Davis Barrel Racing: Taylor Turner Pole Bending: Taylor Turner Breakaway Roping: Makenly Davis Steer Daubing: Krista Marchand

Intermediate Boys All-Around Points

Oliver Williams Austin Herrera Balely Westberg Dreamer Best Dylan Beck Shawn Burns Wade Bruemmer Blake Rise McGuire Hanson Donavan Abrahamson Wyatt Covington Jefferson Desjardins Dreyden Devers Austin Gordon Elijah Hoisington Ernest Nanamkin Wyatt Pershing Tyson Sundust

Individual Winners

9 8 6 5 4 4 4 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Bull Riding: Dreamer Best Calf Stake Tying: Baleley Westberg Bare Back: Shawn Burns Chute Dogging: Blake Rise Breakaway Roping: Oliver Williams Steer Daubing: Wade Bruemmer

Junior Girls All-Around Points

Abbi Popelier Lisie Mae Luttrell Brooke Richey Tate Draper Daisy Mae Allen Karlie Jo Richey Sammie Jo Merriott Daisy Mae Allen Jasmine Best Rebecca Hawley Claire Ives Juliana Nelson Joree Lee Scriver Jessie Walker

Individual Winners

13 7 7 6 4 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Steer Riding: none Goat Tying: Tate Draper Barrel Racing: Karlie Jo Richey Pole Bending: Lisie Mae Luttrell Breakaway Roping: Abbi Popelier Steer Daubing: Brooke Richey

Junior Boys All-Around Points

Chantz Popelier Clay Buchert Corey Olson Cameron Plaisted Braden Hennigs Cash James Cody Fields Tanner Hall Seth Hoisington Taylor McCoy

Individual Winners

13 9 8 4 2 2 0 0 0 0

Steer Riding: none Goat Tying: Corey Olson Barrel Racing: Chantz Popelier Pole Bending: Chantz Popelier Steer Daubing: Corey Olson Breakaway Roping: none

PeeWee Girls All-Around Points

Lynda Rose Dietrich Jentri Olson Hannah Beeman-Chlarson Quincy Downey Keely Maves Sage Olmstead Hattie Buchert Jadya Taylor Jaycie Richey Madison Baumberger Shelby Evans Sarah Silverthorn Sawyer Steffens

Individual Winners

9 9 8 8 7 5 4 4 2 1 0 0 0

Calf Riding: Jadya Taylor Goat Tail Tying: Hannah BeemanChlarson Barrel Racing: Quincy Downey Pole Bending: Sage Olmstead California Stake Racing: Hattie Buchert Dummy Roping: Lynda Rose Dietrich

PeeWee Boys All-Around Points

Bryson Butterfly Brier Selvidge Brit Egbert Jesse Luttrell Brody Deal Trace Fulwiler Willy Abrahamson Cole Fields Silas Hoisington Cooper Ives Owen Pershing Anthony Pichardo Gus Ray Wyatt Youngblood

Individual Winners

Calf Riding: Bryson Butterfly Goat Tail Tying: Brit Egbert

17 15 9 8 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Barrel Racing: Bryson Butterfly Pole Bending: Brier Selvidge California Stake Race: Bryson Butterfly Dummy Roping: Brit Egbert

Little People All-Around Points

Kassidy Bremner Rocksie Timentwa Lucchese Ford Wyatt Egbert Cannon Deal Diesel Downey Seth Austin Presley Steffens Trenten Seymour Ryder Abrahamson Jesse Olson Riley Stucker Isabela Timentwa William Austin Millie Baumberger Kady Burton Cain Fields Gabe Ray Benjamin Richey Cass Rothrock Truett Salazar

Individual Winners:

16 15 14 13 11 7 4 4 3 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Mutton Busting: Cannon Deal Goat Tail Untying: Rocksie Timentwa California Stake Race: Kassidy Bremner Barrel Racing: Kassidy Bremner Pole Bending: Kassidy Bremner Dummy Roping: Wyatt Egbert

Team Roping

1st - Oliver Williams & Chance Stucker 2nd - Connlee Gray & Chantz Popelier 3rd - Chantz Popelier & Oliver Williams


APRIL 25, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Administration’s tactics violate due process for farmers

Last summer, news reports broke that the U.S. Department of Labor was effectively holding hostage the crops of blueberry farmers in Oregon until they signed documents agreeing to alleged violations to federal labor laws. Since then, similar cases have popped up on the west side of our own State of Washington. Agents from the Department of Labor accused these farmers of a variety of labor violations and invoked an abusive tactic known as the “hot goods” provision – impounding the farmer’s crops until they agreed to sign a form admitting to breaking the law. Make no mistake, I believe that the enforceOpinion by ment of labor laws is important. However, I’m concerned with the manner in which these U.S. Rep. investigations were carried out. Many of the Doc Hastings growers that were victims of this “hot goods” policy believed that they were not guilty of the violations they were accused of. However, as we all know, blueberries are a perishable crop and our farmers are left with little choice: either admit to the violation and pay a substantial fine in order to preserve their harvest, or contest the investigation and lose their crop while waiting for a court resolution. No one in America should face the choice of giving up their ability to defend themselves against accusations from a government agency or losing the fruits of an entire year’s work – possibly even leading to bankruptcy. Prohibiting the shipment of produce is grossly unprecedented, unfair, and does not honor the right to due process afforded to all Americans. So far, to my knowledge no one in my district in Central Washington has yet been a victim of the “hot goods” tactic. However, I am concerned that it’s only a matter of time before it will be employed on growers of many of our region’s leading perishable crops, such as cherries, apples, and asparagus. Many believe, as I do, that the Obama Administration is overstepping its authority and that the “hot goods” order should only be used on nonperishable food items and only in extreme cases. I have long-advocated for policies that support our farmers and growers. That is why I’m proud to cosponsor H.R. 1387, introduced by Representative Kurt Schrader of Oregon, which exempts perishable agricultural commodities from being subject to the “hot goods” provision. The Department of Labor must take steps to ensure that perishable agriculture producers are provided due process and that producers can harvest, pack, ship, and market their fruit and produce in a timely manner – without having their crops held hostage for an admission of guilt. Hastings represents the Fourth U.S. Congressional District in Washington. He serves as the Chairman of the House Committee on Natural Resources. The committee has jurisdiction over most federal land use and water policies, including national forests, national parks and monuments, wilderness areas, national scenic areas, Indian reservations and BLM lands. Of importance to Central Washington and the Pacific Northwest, the Committee oversees the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation irrigation projects (Columbia Basin Project and Yakima Project), endangered species recovery, federal hydropower projects, Payment-In-Lieu-Of-Taxes (PILT) payments and firefighting on federal lands.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Making Oroville the best place to eat Dear Gary As both the Manager of the Camaray Motel and President of the Chamber of Commerce, I am encouraged by this week’s opening of the Pastime Bar & Grill. Together with the hoped for opening of Rancho Grande (in the old Peerless) and the soon opening of “America’s Family Grill” (Old FB’s), along with our existing full-service restaurants (Hometown, Eva’s, The Plaza, Trinos) one may well wonder if there is room in Oroville for seven full service restaurants in Oroville in addition to our other eateries? (there are over a dozen other places in town go get food) If done right, the answer is “yes.” I don’t remember a lot from college, but one teacher’s line still rings true. “The market is saturated with salesmen and managers, but there are never enough good managers and good salesmen.” The same can be said of restaurants. Oroville’s own population may be a bit thin to support so many restaurants year round. But a town full of good restaurants becomes a draw from the populations around us. Already people from Omak to Oliver come to Oroville to eat at their favorite restaurant. Let us as a community support our restaurants. And, please, take it from a manager who wants to get things right... if you have had a less than stellar experience at one of our restaurants, let the manager know. We can all have a part in making Oroville the best place to eat on the Okanogan. Clyde Andrews – President Oroville Chamber of Commerce

Grateful for help raising funds for library Dear Gary, I would like to personally thank Marc Palmore, and the rest of the band Project 3:16, for donating their time and talent to help raise funds for the Oroville Library last Saturday, April 20th. I would also like to thank Walt and Vicki Hart for the use of their wonderful facility. Folks like this make me proud to be a member of this caring community. Rick Braman, President Friends of the Oroville Library

Run hospital district with compassion Dear Editor, On April 1st the Assisted Living Facility officially closed. The sign was removed on April 3rd, Perhaps this makes the Administrator and her staff feel like the Assisted Living Facility never existed, perhaps they feel better now that they can rename this building , or repurpose this building. Now that Linda Michel has had her say in a rather large (letter

to the editor), has she gained the trust of the public? I think not. I personally ,would like to wash my hands of this Hospital Administrator, this Hospital Board of Commissioners and what is called the Senior Management Team, I speak only for myself, I do not speak for The Concerned Citizens Group, or the Hospital Board Recall Committee, but for myself. I unfortunately have much time to think as I am driving out of town four times a week to visit my mother in another town. Yes, I could have placed my mother in the Tonasket Nursing Home, but really why would I do that? I do not trust this Administrator, nor do I trust this Board of Commissioners, and I do not trust this Senior Management Team, why should I believe that they would not also close down a Nursing Home if that is what they want to do at their “discretion.” Although I would like to wash my hands of this Hospital Administration, I will not because I will be there at each and every Board meeting , I will ask questions, I will continue to work to replace you, until you have done something to earn the public trust, to earn my trust. Of course I will not be asking for your resignations at your Board meeting, as your attorney has advised you, as a Board, to restrict Public Comment. (Freedom of Speech)? I previously asked for these resignations in earnest. I do not believe this Administration has worked in the best interests of this community or hospital, but in the best interests of the CEO and Senior Staff that are receiving these exuberant salaries. You as an Administration have highly overpaid yourselves during a time when you should have been frugal (instead of closing the Assisted Living Facility) and this Administrator has given costly raises, to it’s Senior Staff, of course allies were needed in Linda Michel’s camp if she was going to insist on such a high salary for herself during a time of financial hardship for the hospital. Although I do not support this Administration, I do want our hospital to survive, with all the services that are left, but I would like to see it run with compassion for

the people it serves and the employees of the hospital that actually do all the hard work. See you at the next Board Meeting, Kathy Rawley Tonasket

China hacking into U.S. computers Dear Editor, Based on the activities of Chinese Army Unit 61398 Communist China continues to wage cyber warfare against the U.S. by hacking into the computers of U.S. corporations. An American computer security firm, Mandiant, completed a study of Unit 61398, and determined most of the attacks on U.S. corporations have emanated from this group. Companies targeted include electric utilities, gas lines and waterworks. The Chinese also attacked the computer security firm RSA, whose systems protect corporate clients and government agencies. “China steals blueprints, manufacturing processes, strategies and data from our heavy industry companies, satellite and telecommunications corporations and military contractors, including Lockheed Martin, our largest defense contractor.” The biggest concern is the infiltration of systems that control our power grids and other utilities. Unit 61398 broke into Televent Canada, which provides “software to oil and gas pipeline companies and utilities for remote access to valves, switches and security systems. Televent Canada services half the oil and gas pipeline companies in North and South America.” We have to wake up and take action to prevent these Chinese attacks on our corporations, government agencies and infrastructure. Mr. President, please address this problem. *Information came from a New York Times article of 2/19/13 Donald A. Moskowitz Londonderry, NH

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

75 YEARS AGO April 15-25, 1938: A crew of seven men are busy at the Old Triune Mine at Wanacut Lake, a few miles southwest of Oroville, owned by Dell Hart and Sons, getting the mill and mine ready to start operation in the near future. The Grand Summit, located further West on the mountain, is also reported to have men at work getting ready for a season’s operation. Deep snow preventing work during the past few months. Water, which was turned into the canals of the OrovilleTonasket irrigation system for use during application of the dormant spray, will be turned off for a period of 10 days on April 16, according to Wm. Murray, Superintendent. At a meeting of the Okanogan County and International Fair board, held at the Peerless Thursday noon, N. G. Barlas was elected as president of the fair this year. Roy Green, Vice President, Lyle Green, Secretary and Frank Bartell, Treasurer. A meeting has been called for the purpose of discussing pollination problems and to demonstrate the methods used in preparing, securing and applying pollen artificially at Oroville, Saturday, April 16 at 1:30 p.m. at the Fruit Exchange warehouse. The track boys turned out for track Monday night, with determination to make up for the time they lost during spring vacation. The frosh and seniors will battle against the sophomores and juniors in the interclass track meet, April 16. Coach Drummond believes that this will be evenly matched and has already stimulated much interest among the boys in the high school. Advertisement by The Washington Water Power Co. says “Electricity is Cheap” and the “More you use, the cheaper it is.” Grocery Ads: Meyer Prince Store: Rice, 1#, $.05; Fig Bars, 1#, $.10; Flour, 100# $1.25; Ben Prince Store: Cove Oysters, 2 cans, $.23; Pink Alaska Salmon, per can, $.11. Land owners and orchardists at the mouth of Nine Mile Creek, which flows into the east side of Lake Osoyoos at Smith’s Point, have been having their own flood troubles this week. Rising suddenly Monday night, this little creek, which is ordinarily but a small stream, became almost a river in proportions and threatened to wipe out considerable meadow and orchard land. Scott Motors Ad lists several rebuilt cars and trucks: 1928 Chevrolet coupe, $100; 1928 Chrysler sedan, $100; 1930 Ford Tudor, $150.00; 1930 Chevrolet pickup, $200.00; 1930 Ford Coupe, $200.00.

50 YEARS AGO: April 18-25, 1963: Due to the late departure of the ice from both Molson and Sidley Lakes, Roy Strickland decided to play it safe by leaving both aeration systems on until at least the first day of fishing season. Fish have been seen jumping in the open water on Sidley Lake. The Department of Natural Resources Honor Camp at Loomis is now in full operation with the arrival of inmates from Larch Mountain near Vancouver over the week-end. There are some 40 inmates and Department of Institutions personnel on duty at the camp. The primary job of the camp is the maintenance of an organized fire suppression crew for use within the district and Eastern Washington. In addition, they construct fire access roads for fire control and range management. The Board of Directors of the Oroville School District met on Tuesday April 2, to organize for the coming year. Clayton Emry was elected as Chairman of the Board and H. Ben Holden was elected as Clerk. Emry is a graduate of Oroville High School of 1944 and after serving in the army in 1945-47, enrolled at WSC for one semester. In 1948, he was employed as a bookkeeper at the Oroville State Bank Holden graduated from Oroville High School in 1935 and served in the U.S. Army, 194145. Holden operates a small orchard and has an insurance agency. Both Holden and Emry showed their aptitudes early by both marrying local Oroville girls. Weather wise by Marge Frazier for the past week as follows: April 3, 1963, 55 degrees Maximum and 30 degrees Minimum; April 4, 63 and 42; April 5, 62 and 35; April 6, 52 and 38; April 7, 49 and 32; April 8, 57 and 39 and April 9, 60 and 39. Total precipitation for the week, 1.59. The Annual Barbeque at the Oroville May Day Festival will be held this year come rain or shine, says the 1963 Festival Committee. Plans have been made to serve the beef in the Grade School Cafeteria, if the weather does not permit it to be held at the usual site. Mrs. Sidney Rise, Star Route, Oroville, has been chosen the County’s Homemaker of the Year. Mrs. Rise completed 20 years as 4-H Leader, also was a member of the Special Advisory Board of Washington State University last October. Two Oroville Students at Eastern Washington State College have been named to the winter quarter honor roll. They are, Juanita P. Corrier, a sophomore majoring in mathematics and Virginia E. Schons, a junior

majoring in language arts.

25 YEARS AGO:

April 21-28, 1988:The U. S. Port of Entry at Oroville has been designated as one of only three Commercial Ports in Washington State, making it the only such port in Eastern Washington. The new procedures, which start May 16, 1988, will pertain to overland cargo carriers other than trains. There will be 26 of these commercial ports across the northern United States. Oroville will be included in the Seattle District along with Sumas and Blaine in Western Washington. The nearest commercial port to the east will be Eastport, Idaho. Maxwell Kelley, an eighth grader in the Oroville Schools, is the number one speller in North Central Washington and is on his way to compete with 200 spellers in Washington D. C. at the end of May. “It still hasn’t sunk in yet. I won the trip but right now I’m still in Oroville,” Kelley said. Maxwell’s parents are Rosamunde Hanson-Kelley of Oroville and David Kelley of Monroe, Wash. Sam Cook, a member of the City of Penticton Pipe Band, Will be traveling with that band when they compete in Glasgow, Scotland in early August for the World Bagpipe Championship. Cook is a civil engineer technician with the Bureau of Reclamation in Oroville. “As far as I know, I am the only one playing the pipes in Oroville,” said Cook. Saturday, May 7 at 9:30 a.m., the Oroville Depot Historical Society is asking for help from the community to clean the caboose. The first layer of grime on the inside of the caboose was cleaned last Saturday by Cub Scouts and their leader Lisa Munson, and on the outside by several other dedicated volunteers. Wendy Hanson and Shannon Burke of Tonasket and Teresa Bowlin, Ariel Fleming and Janae Haney, all of Oroville, will participate in an Honors Piano Recital at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 1 at the Hammond-Baldwin Music store in Omak. It wasn’t all trout this past week. Greg Helm, of Oroville snagged a big bass. So big, he hurried down to Spence’s Sporting Goods to have it weighed. It was an even 7 pounds and caught on a Blue Rapala. A change in the times in the news. In this issue there are three full pages of Classified Ads. Headline, Persian Gulf; Jack Mathews, from Tonasket, was working aboard an oil drilling platform Monday morning, April 18, when the platform was fired on by Iranian gunboats. None of the 70 persons on board the platform were hurt but they were stranded for several hours before being taken to shore.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 25, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

There’s still some snow hiding in the hills Finishing up the month of April and still having to bring out the sweaters and jackets when we go outside. What happened to spring? The Mt. Hull Falls are still flowing, so I guess there is still snow hiding somewhere in “them thar’ hills.” My nearby neighbor, Bev Holden, who has been a patient in Sacred Heart hos- THIS & THAT pital, Spokane, is Joyce Emry home and her daughter from Alaska, will be here a few weeks to help her, as she gets stronger and then another

relative is to take over, thus she won’t have to go into rehab and can be at home, which is where she wants to be. Having loving and considerate family sure can make a difference. Since writing the above, Bev has had a setback and new problems have come forth or perhaps a continuation of the first issues, and she had another short stay in hospital, but as of Monday, she was once again home. Bud Gerken should be home by now, after a lengthy stay in the hospital, and still has questions as to why he had the fall in the first place, as it has not been determined why he blacked out. Friends will be saddened that Heidi Petty lost her long struggle with cancer and passed away last week. Neoma Vandiver has had surgery since she returned from her winter stay in

Arizona. The Episcopal Church sanctuary was filled to overflowing last Saturday to attend the Memorial Service for Phyllis Sheyner. Support was given by many members of the Thorndike family as Ted and Phyllis had been devoted companions for over seventeen years, as well as members of her family. I don’t think I’m over the hill yet. I’m too tired to climb it. Was told the Peerless is to be open the 1st of July and the Pastime Bar and Grill is shooting for a May opening. Soon we’ll have so many eating establishments we won’t know where to go. Didja’ ever wonder…why lemon juice is made with artificial flavor while dishwashing detergent is made with real lemons? Why does “slow down” and “slow up” mean the same thing? When you stop and think about it, we do have a lot of double meanings in our language. A phone call from Laura Jean (Rainsberry) Worthington, was received, asking that I remind graduates of Oroville High School, that the classes of ‘45, ‘46

and ‘47, will be having their annual get together, May 11th, May Day. There are some changes: In the past there have been two times for gathering. This year, it will just be a no host breakfast at 8 a.m. at the former Fat Boys. New name of the place is now America’s Family Diner. Other graduates are welcome to attend, as had been the practice when Darleene (Kidwell) Owyen hosted the function, until she moved out of town. There will be no evening at Sibley’s this year, as there has been the past two years. For information call (509) 476-4568. After breakfast you can then watch the annual May Festival Parade. Unless the weather warms up, the streetscape hanging baskets probably won’t be in place. It gets so cold at night it would probably be harmful for them. When most folks look at a patch of dandelions, they see a bunch of weeds that are trying to take over the yard. Little kids see a bouquet of flowers for mommy and blowing white fluff you can make a wish on. The Shop Tavern has new owners, according to their reader board.

Geology and gold mine tour BY JACKIE VALIQUETTE NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

May brings 11 classes for your learning pleasure. These are coming up: Mosaic in Glass will be four sessions beginning Wednesday, May 1 (you get to smash glass!); Geology and Gold Mine Tour is two sessions on May 2 and 4 (very popular, sign up early); Neo Tropical Song Birds is one session on Saturday, May 4 (an outing at the scenic Sinlahekin Wildlife

Grateful for help SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES AUXILIARY

The Oroville Eagles Auxiliary would like to give a big thanks to our community for all the support we received for this year’s annual Easter egg hunt. We had a great turn out and all the children had lots of fun. We would like to thank Harvest Foods, Frontier Foods, Hometown Pizza, The Oroville Senior Center, Loretta Harris at Back to the Basics, Jack Hughes at Princess Department Store, ReMAX Reality, Sun Lake Reality, and the Camary

Fishing Season opens BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Submitted photo

Yard sale helps save cats’ and dogs’ lives SUBMITTED BY JULIE ALLEY OKANOGAN SPAY & NEUTER PROJECT

OKANOGAN - Okanogan Regional Spay and Neuter Project (OK-SNIP) and Animal Foster Care Cat Shelter (AFC) are holding their annual spring yard sale, slated for May 3-4 at 2358 Elmway in Okanogan from 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. OK-SNIP serves 3 target populations ∑ Cats and dogs of low income families ∑ Feral cats (not socialized) ∑ AFC cats and kittens Donations of all kinds of items are needed and cash donations are also greatly appreciated. Call Karen at (509) 631-1449to drop off items.† Please mail cash donations to P.O. Box 3385, Omak, WA 98841. AFC and OK-SNIP are two separate non-profits. Fundraisers are joint efforts due to a small but committed group of volun-

Center Royalty selected SUBMITTED BY DOLLY ENGELBRETSON

OK-SNIP teers. Checks can be made out to OK-SNIP or AFC. Dianne Gray, Director of AFC and Co-Director of OK-SNIP said, “Neither organization receives any help from county or city governments in Okanogan County and there are very few grants available for cats and dogs. The most important source of revenue to keep the doors to AFC and OK-SNIP open is the donations that we receive from individuals and families.” “We are very excited about our new partnership with Big-R in Omak,” Gray added. “Big-R provides us a venue for our adoption tent on the second and fourth Saturdays of each month from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. If you donít find the companion you are looking for there, Animal Foster Care Cat Shelter is open every Saturday from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. for adoptions at 4 Spring Coulee Road in Okanogan.”

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

The Senior Center Royalty has been chosen and are ready for any and all Royalty duties before them. Their carriage will be the auto loaned to us by John and Becky Desjardins. May Day Royalty will be visiting us on Thursday,May 2. Shelby Scott, Queen, and Angela Nelson, Princess, will be here to have lunch with us and give us some insight to their summer

schedule. They will be joined at the guest table by Marge Finlay, Queen, and current vice-president of the Senior Center, and David Karaffa, King. This years Arbor Day Ceremony will be Thursday, April 25, at Centennial Park starting at 3:30 P. M. The banner is up now. The Scouts and other elementary students will be there to show their

Call (509) 422-3364 for further information. Many of adoptable cats can be viewed on Petfinder. com. “OK-SNIP re-opened February 26 on World Spay and Neuter Day after being closed for a year due to lack of funds.” said Dot Schank, Co-Director of OK-SNIP. “It’s only through financial support from the citizens of Okanogan County, that weíll be able to keep the clinic running on a yearly basis. You may have noticed that the numbers of animals spayed and neutered on the sign at OK-SNIP increasing each week since re-opening. Low income families must meet HUD qualifications for Okanogan County. For more information, (509) 422-9960. “Our goal for 2013 is to spay and neuter 1,000+ animals,” Shank said. “We only have funding for 70 operating days in 2013 and we are able to fix 20+ animals each of those days. Please help us reach the 1000 animal goal and significantly reduce the overpopulation of unwanted dogs and cats.”

displayed artwork.. Good News! Beverly Holden is home and says she is obeying doctor’s orders day by day. She hopes to be able to come play Bingo on Tuesday, but it depends on how she feels. If not Tuesday, then soon. Eva Law, of Eva’s Diner and Bakery, will be sharing her story with us on April 30. I am told that she will continue the Chinese Food Menu on alternate Friday evenings, starting with April 26. • Pinochle Scores for April 20, 2013: Door Prize was won by Zane Gazaway; Beverly Storm, most pinochles and was also high lady for the evening Larry Smith was High Man for the evening.

The weather has been a little chilly still, so don’t go putting those coats up quite yet. Don’t forget fishing season opens this weekend. Those fishing poles will be wanting some use, so get out there and enjoy the sun and the thrill of landing your first fish of the season. This Sunday, April 28, we are having our annual road clean up. We will meet at the Eagles here in Tonasket at 9 a.m. The Aerie and Auxiliary routes will be picked up, so come and support your club and help us to keep our sections of highway the cleanest in the area. Our Sunday Breakfast will be happening that day from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. so you will be able to get a good breakfast before heading out.

And instead of Ava’s it is Eva’s for the name change of Linda’s Bakery. I read it wrong the first time I drove by. Our great grandson, Caleb Haney, college student, missed his flight from a track meet in California and had to return back to Seattle, alone…a new experience and probably one he doesn’t wish to repeat. Try to clean two cupboards per day… and maybe you’ll finish by the time to start over again. While cleaning, remember to wash your can opener…it is one of the dirtiest items in the kitchen, because the cutting surface usually touches the contents of what it is opening, and then just sits there until used again. A long time resident of North Valley Extended Care, Louise Haskell, passed away recently. Louise had spent more than half of her lifetime living in each of the three facilities in Tonasket. Louise was a brilliant, learned woman, with unfortunate issues happening to her at quite an early age, thus spending so many years in a care center. Condolences to her daughter Drika, her brother John and other family members.

LEARNING TREE Area); and Alien Agenda will be three sessions beginning May 7 (Do you believe?). This two session class, Processing of Gold Ores with Gold Pour (tour) takes place June 6 and 10, but we want you to know about it now. You must sign up by Thursday, May 22 to allow time for required background checks. The class is hugely popular and often there’s a waiting list. If you want to experience something

truly spectacular, hold (or try to hold) a 60 lb. bar of solid gold! Sign up early for this one. Many thanks to merchants in Oroville and Tonasket who gladly place Community Schools catalogs for the public on counters and shelves. We count on this publicity to promote Community Schools classes. For information or to register for a class, call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011 or community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu. And, don’t forget to check out our new website, www. northvalleycommunityschools. com. It’s running well and we are receiving online registrations.

EAGLEDOM AT WORK Motel for their generous donations of eggs and money. We would also like to thank our volunteers Larry Johnson, Debra Shanks, Leea Mathis, Sandy Ray, Patty Gregg, Mary Stewart, Diana Shull, Stephanie Eisen, Linda Alexander, Tommy Mathis III, Kayla Mathis, Keith Mathis, Keaton Mathis, Dennis Evans, Jon Baugher, Crystal Baugher and Carlene Huckleby for all their hard work and dedication.

TONASKET EAGLES On Friday we will have our weekly bingo will start at 7 p.m., so come and try your luck and try and win the large jackpot. The kitchen will also be open at 5:30 p.m. for some of those good hamburgers and fries. Try one of the many good things on the menu. Our pinochle scores from Sunday were as follows: first place went to Gib McDougal with Joanne Michaels a close second place, low score was taken by Julie Hovland and last pinochle was Cindy Jones and Ken Hovland. We would like to send our best wishes to Jack Rawley who is in the hospital and hoping that he is home soon. We wish those that might be ill a speedy recovery. God bless you all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

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Adults $7.50 Kids 11-under & *Discount Matinee-kids/adults $5 ea

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

Nourish The “Roots” Of Your Investment FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

On Arbor Day, which we celebrate this week, people across the country plant trees. Of course, trees provide us with many benefits, including beauty, fruit and oxygen, as well as protection against land erosion. But the act of planting and nurturing trees can also guide our behavior in other areas of life — such as investing. First of all, consider the vision and patience exhibited by tree growers when they plant their saplings. As an investor, you, too, need this type of perseverance and long-term outlook. When you invest, you should be focused on the long term yet be prepared for the inevitable shortterm market downturns. How long is “long term”? Many investors hold quality investments for decades. It’s a long

process, but the potential growth you seek a variety of trees can prove beneficial if disease strikes one type. In some areas will need this time. of the country, for example, Dutch Elm What else can you, as an investor, learn Disease wiped out thousands of trees, from tree planters? For one thing, be leaving entire streets treeless. If some aware of how they keep their orchards other species had also been planted, these healthy. By providing proper irrigation and streets would still have had the benefits disease-prevention measures, they help provided by mature trees, even if the elms their trees stay on the long path toward were gone. As an investor, you don’t want maturity. Similarly, you need to nurture to own just one type of financial asset, such your investment portfolio by continually as growth stocks, because if a downturn providing it with the financial resources it hits this segment, your entire portfolio needs to stay “healthy.” During periods of could take a big hit. A better strategy would market volatility, it can be tempting to take be to populate your “financial orchard” with a “time out” from investing — but if you a variety of investments — such as stocks, do, you’ll miss out on the potential growth bonds and government securities — that opportunities that may follow. Since no are suitable for your situation. (Keep in one can really predict the beginnings and mind, though, that while diversification can endings of either “up” or “down” markets, help reduce the effects of volatility, it can’t you’re better off by staying invested. Also, guarantee a profit or protect against loss.) just as horticulturalists take steps to keep their trees from being subject to disease, As an investor, you can learn some lessons you can keep your portfolio in good shape from Arbor Day that could prove “treeby periodically “pruning” it of investments mendously” helpful to you as you chart your course for the future — and you won’t that no longer meet your needs. even have to “go out on a limb” to put these Here’s something else that tree planters strategies in place. can teach us: diversification. Consider an orchard that contains several different fruit trees; its commercial benefits may be This article was written by Edward Jones greater than a comparable orchard that for use by your local Edward Jones only grows apples. Plus, the presence of Financial Advisor.


april 25, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life In the NC Washington Garden Third Annual Health Annual Spring Plant Sale at Omak Civic League Park on Saturday, May 11 Mary Schilling and Laura Jones-Edwards Okanogan county Master gardeners

The Master Gardener Program originated in Washington State in the early 70’s. At the time, Pierce and King County extension agents David Gibby and Bill Scheer were attempting to respond to a renewed and burgeoning interest in gardening. Initially, they thought that gardening articles and radio and TV shows would meet the demand. Their approach was clearly inadequate; extension offices soon

became overwhelmed with requests for gardening information. So Gibby and Scheer considered other approaches. One possibility would be to recruit and train volunteers to serve the gardening public. This idea was presented to subject matter specialists at the Western Washington Research and Extension Center in Puyallup. Initially, the specialists were not enthused. They believed that volunteers would be difficult to recruit and possibly inadequate since most of them would not be horticultural specialists. Gibby and Scheer responded by presenting trial clinics at local malls. The clinics were very successful. The specialists were impressed; they became active supporters. The volunteers became “Master Gardeners,” a translation of the German term “gartenmeister;” gartenmeisters were well respected horticulturists in their communities. (I have to admit that some of our more modest members feel a little twitchy about the

word “master.” We’re all trying to live up to the title.) Today there are Master Gardener Programs in every state in the U.S. and in four Canadian Provinces. In general terms, WSU Extension Master Gardeners ‘promote gardening and agricultural land use, inform the public about best horticultural practices, enhance environmental conservation, and broaden gardening expertise in their communities.’ Specifically, Okanogan County Master Gardeners provide plant clinics, community service projects, classes, and demonstration gardens. We hope that you’ve had the opportunity to talk with a Master Gardener at the county fair or visit one of our demonstration gardens, the xeriscape (waterwise) garden at the fairgrounds or the rose garden near Mid Valley Hospital. Our plant clinics are a great opportunity to get your gardening questions answered. If oregano has taken over your vegetable garden, your

dogwood looks bad, or you need to identify an insect call (509) 422-7245. (Other questions are welcome too.) Master Gardeners will be on site at the Extension office from nine to noon on Tuesdays; that’s a good day to bring in dying leaves, unknown insects, or tomatoes that are rotting before their time. When gardening questions leave us scratching our heads, we can turn to excellent resources including WSU faculty and staff. Eleven new Okanogan County Master Gardeners will graduate this spring; anyone who is interested in becoming a Master Gardener should consider the next class which will probably be offered in the early part of 2015. One of our most popular events is the annual spring plant sale. This year it will be on May 11 at the Civic League Park in Omak from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. See you there and happy gardening.

& Spirituality Fair this Saturday in Tonasket Submitted by Julie Greenwood

TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket and Little Shop of Yoga present the Third Annual Health and Spirituality Faire on Saturday, April 27, from 9 a.m.- 6 p.m. This is a free event. Monetary or healthy food donations will be accepted to benefit the monthly Free Community Meals at CCC. Product & information booths, workshops, group conversations, and food will be at the CCC, 411 Western Avenue, by Wells Fargo Bank. The first workshop begins at 9:00 with the closing drum circle at 6:00. Five workshops will be held at Little Shop of Yoga, at 306 S. Whitcomb Avenue, next to Napa Auto Parts, beginning at 10:15 a.m. You can find the complete schedule on Facebook and at www.communityculturalcenter.org or call (509) 486-1045 for more information.

Community Bulletin Board OKANOGAN - There will be an Okanogan County Flood Season Coordination Meeting on Thursday, April 25 from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Okanogan County Commissioner’s Conference Room, 123 5th Avenue N., Okanogan. The meeting is open to the public. Anyone with comments or concerns is encouraged to attend.

Molson Grange Pie & Ice Cream Social MOLSON – The Molson Grange is asking people to help celebrate Grange Month with a free pie and ice cream social on April 25th beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Moslon Grange Hall. “Everyone is invited to come and join us for a social evening. Meet your new neighbors, greet your old neighbors and enjoy some pie and ice cream,” invite Grange Members

Don’t Blink Walking Tour CHESAW - Everyone is invited to the “Don’t Blink Walking Tour of Chesaw” and “Highland Handmade.” Season Opening at Fiona on Saturday, April 27. All four businesses in town will have maps with some local history of Chesaw, and visitors can take a self-directed tour with the maps, to find some interesting tidbits about our Highlands town. Businesses will be open at 10 a.m. (tavern and store open at 8 a.m.) and Fiona Art Gallery will open the season with an Artists Reception from 4-7 p.m. Several local artists will be there to meet with the public, and a wide variety of arts and crafts will be available for viewing and for sale. Refreshments will be served and of course espresso drinks will be for sale.

Health and Spirituality Faire TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket and Little Shop of Yoga present the Third Annual Health and Spirituality Faire on Saturday, April 27th, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. with product and information booths, presentations, and food for sale. Closing drum circle begins at 6:00; bring your drum. This is a free event. First presentation begins at 9 a.m. The complete schedule is on Facebook and at www.communityculturalcenter.org or call (509) 486-1045 for more information.

Molson Grange Pancake Feed MOLSON - There will be a pancake feed at the Molson Grange on Sunday, April 28 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come and enjoy all you can eat ham, eggs, hashbrowns, pancakes and applesauce.

Family Caregivers Support Group TONASKET - Held at North Valley Hospital, in the Board Room at 126 S. Whitcomb Ave.,

Tonasket. Monday, April 29, at 6:00 p.m. For more information contact Bill Colomb or Diane Moser at (509) 486-3110.

CCC: A Gathering of Friends TONASKET - Concert and evening workshop, Wednesday, May 1, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Cost is $5 at the door, plus a tip jar for donations for performers. Enjoy a warmhearted and spirited two-part evening with an unusual group of songwriters, musicians, and dancers. Contra dancing will be part of this interactive audience participation performance. After a short intermission, adventuresome guests can participate with them in their approach to selfknowledge, self-mastery and service through spiritually focused creative arts.

Mosaic in Glass OROVILLE – Mosaic in Glass has always been a hit. You will work with glass tiles (you get to smash glass) and grout to produce distinctive art. Hang in a window or set on a sill, and your glass creation will pick up the light and be a beautiful conversation piece. By the way, it makes a wonderful gift! Bring your desired picture or pattern to class or use one from the instructor. This four session class begins Wednesday, May 1. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 4762011 or community.schools@ oroville.wednet.edu for information or to register.

Tonasket Library Preschool Story Time TONASKET - The next Tonasket Library preschool story time and activity day is Thursday May 2 at 10:30 a.m. Any questions call the Library at (509) 486-2366.

Weather Spotter Training OKANOGAN - There will be a Weather Spotter Training session at the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Office Conference Room, 123 5th Ave. N. Okanogan, on Thursday, May 2 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The course is free. To register, contact Glenda Beauregard at the Emergency Management Department by calling (509) 4227206 or register online at: www. okangandem.org.

Dimensional,” interweaving melodies, harmonies and rhythms to create unique compositions with video backgrounds. Sound Travel’s music is evocative of time, place and emotion. Where you go on their musical current is up to you. Your imagination is your vessel. Preceded by dinner at 5:30 p.m, $5.

Dowsing and Divining Class OROVILLE – Our instructor, Michael Stewart, has taught many people the basics of dowsing and divining for water, gold, or anything you choose with a divining rod or pendulum. Michael will discuss stress lines, balancing energy, and connecting to light energy and will contribute a pendulum and instruction manual to new students. Those who also take the advanced class on Thursday, May 9 will save $5 on their registration fee. Call Ellen Barttels at North Valley Community Schools, (509) 4762011 or community.schools@ oroville.wednet.edu for information and to register.

Music at the CCC TONASKET - Stephen Talley on guitars and Carol Smith on keyboard/synthesizer, Saturday, May 4, 7:00 p.m. Cost is $7.00 for CCC members, $8.00 for non-members. Bringing Original Music described as “Inner

OROVILLE - The Oroville Catholic Church is taking orders for cinnamon rolls that they will have for Tuesday, May 21 deliver as part of an annual fundraiser. The cinnamon rolls are made by John Desjardin and are very generous in size with a caramel topping. Cost is $3 per each roll and will be sold in half and full dozen quantities. To place an order or for more information call Jane Lynch at (509) 4762177.

OROVILLE - The 79th Annual Oroville May Festival Parade is Saturday, May 11. Line up starts at 8 a.m.; Judging starts at 8:30 a.m.; parade starts at 10 a.m. Applications for the 79th Annual May Festival Parade are available at Prince’s Center (Customer Service), Sterling Savings Bank, and the Oroville School District Superintendent’s office, or by calling (509) 429-9397.

PAC presents Spamalot OMAK - The Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus will be presenting Monty Python’s “Spamalot” at the Omak Performing Arts Center May 10-12 and May 17-19. Friday and Saturday performances will be at 7:00 p.m. and Sunday matinees at 3:30 p.m. General admission is $17, Students with ID $12 and children under 12 are $8. Tickets in Tonasket are available at Roy’s Pharmacy and in Oroville at the Oroville Pharmacy. They can also be purchased online at www. brownpapertickets.com. More information can be found online at www.ovovinfo.com or by calling (509) 429-4007.

OROVILLE - OHS Class of 1963 will be having a picnic at Lake Osoyoos Memorial Park on May 11, 2013, to celebrate 50 years of successful and adventurous living. Other classes from the 1960’s are also welcome. Plan to eat (picnic style foods are being catered) or snack your way (bring munchies or dessert if you can) through the afternoon while you renew old friendships and celebrate new ones. If you were a student in the class of ‘63 at any time during freshman through senior years and have not received an information letter, please contact Sandra Hill Peterson at 509-476-3378 or check out the website for more information. http://ohs63.com/.

Food Banks TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480. OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

Editor’s Note: Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. G.A.D.

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Your Complete Eyecare Centre

May Festival Parade, enter now

Okanogan County OHS Class of 1963 Artists Luncheon picnic OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Artists are hosting a luncheon on Monday, May 6 at 11:30 p.m. at the Okanogan Presbyterian Church at 429 W Oak St. If interested in attending call Carol Cronfill at (509) 8261344 or Sharon Arbuckle at (509) 826-2409.

Taking Orders for Cinnamon Rolls

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

WATERFRONT eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

TONASKET

OKANOGAN

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

(509) 826-6191

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

(509) 826-6191

Toll Free

www.wvmedical.com

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health (509) 826-5600

HEALTH CARE Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Flood Season Meeting

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program

 Anti

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

 Behavioral

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion  Walk

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 OPTICAL

 

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 25, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • April 25, 2013

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale

ADOPT: A loving family longs to provide Tonasket for 1st baby. Beaches, laugh½ ACRE BUILDING LOT with everything ter, financial security. Tina 1-800-933power, water, phone and 1975 Expenses paid Tonasket 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, heat cable TV only $35,000. No pump, single car garage with mobile homes. Call 509 322 Kim and Betty Hirst and Family would like to extend a shop and storage shed. RV 4732 heart-felt Thank You to the parking with dump site and people and business and the AC power. Covered patio. community of Oroville. Their $105,000. Bill: (509)486-1952 generosity and support Tonasket Oroville: 1 bedroom 1 bath, through Betty’s Cancer diagSmall one bedroom cottage no smoking. Close to town. nosis and treatment have with a garage on a large lot $475 per month. Call: 509- been overwhelming. We are one block from grocery store. 476-2077 truly a community that takes Only $79,000. Call 509 322 care of our own. A special OROVILLE - Nice 3 bed- Thank You to Frontier Foods, 4732 room, 1.5 bath, garage, Rosa Schneider, Hometown Tonasket washer/ dryer, central air and Pizza, Mike and Lenore EgerThree bedroom, two bath, heat. $750 month, 1 year ton for their generous dona1248 sq. ft, vacant all new lease required. No smoking, tion of food for the dinner. To carpet and fresh paint, con- no pets. 509-476-2776 all the businesses and indivenient location in Old Orviduals for their donations chard Estates subdivision, ½ and support for the auction, miles north of Tonasket. Only you made it a great success! $145,000. Call 509-322-4732 There are so many people who stepped up to volunteer but a special Thanks to Larry FOR RENT: Business/Office Johnson for all of his work on unit(s), Main Street Oroville - Saturday. Also Ken Neal and IN MOLSON 2 BR LOG Cabin. Loft, all amenisites FOUR ACRES INDUSTRIAL optional sizes & prices. the Oroville Eagles for their & wood heat. Much more! LAND on the Canada to Oro- (509)486-1682 or (509)429- desserts and use of the Hall. Negotiable down & inter- ville Heavy Haul Corridor 0873. We couldn’t do it without you! est. Owner finances. Con- with railroad frontage and Tonasket Sincerely, Kim, Betty and sider newer 4x4 Truck truck access off of Jennings 1 BEDROOM, 1 full bath, 500 Family partial down. $126,000. Loop Rd. Only $60,000. Call sqft single unit apt. with car509-485-2171. 509 322 4732 port. Private. Tenant pays Say it in the classifieds! own utilities. $450 month. *Special deal* First, last and $100 deposit. *HAPPY BIRTHDAY Available May 10th. *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY (509)429-5572 *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? Tonasket MUST BE PREPAID LARGE INDUSTRIAL stor$6.00 for the first 15 words 126 S. Main St., Omak age warehouse. On 10+ additional words $1.00 acres with city water and OT 509-826-7310 each. Bold words, special irrigation water. Call for Defont or borders extra. Updated list of employment at tails 509-322-4732 Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Gazette-Tribune Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune. 509-476-3602 Looking for Vendors to fill 3rd street Tonasket Founders Day June 1, 2013 9 am - 2 pm 10 x 10 spot ANNUAL CONSIGNMENT AUCTION requested donation $10 DID YOU FIND AN ITEM TONASKET RODEO GROUNDS - TONASKET, WA Call Tonya for more info: AND WANT TO FIND SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 - 10:00 A.M. 509-322-1888 THE OWNER? PARTIAL LISTING BELOW - CONSIGNMENTS ACCEPTED UP TO SALE TIME - FOOD ALL DAY ****************************************************** Found items can be placed EQUIPMENT - MACHINERY - VEHICLES in the newspaper for one NH 853 Round Baler * NH 357 Grain Grinder * V-Rake * Manure Spreader * Cultivator * week for FREE. Limit 15 16-ft Hay Elevators * Brillion Seeder * 3-Bottom Plow * Hay Rake * Gopher Machine * words, or prepay for words DewEze Super Slicer * Fanning Mill * Bale Buster * 20-ft Auger, 4-inch * 16-ft Hay Trailer *PR St. Charles Place over the 15 word limit. Call Hand Head Catch * Calf Table * Cattle Trim Rack * 1992 Chev Pickup 4x4 w/Flatbed * 1993 Apartments 509-476-3602 before noon Chev Pickup 4x4 wFlatbed Box * 1996 Chev 4x4 Ext Cab, Auto, 6.5 Diesel, Clean, Runs Good on Tuesdays. * 1992 Nissan Maxima 4-door Car, 5-speed Standard, Air, Stereo, Other Extras, Clean * 207 Main St., Oroville, WA

Houses For Sale

For Rent

Commercial Rentals

Lots & Acreage

WorkSource Okanogan County

www.go2worksource.com

Announcements

Found

SHOP - MISCELLANEOUS - COLLECTIBLES

2 Trailers of Misc Hand Tools * Stihl Chain Saw * Coleman 2250 Generator * * 110 Mig Welder * Oxy-Acet Tanks * 700-Gal Fuel Tank * 50+ Railroad Ties * * Water Troughs * Rolls of Smooth Wire * 10 pieces 40-ft x 3-in Sprinkler Pipe * * 48-inch Wagon Wheels * Vintage Prints (see to appreciate ) * Crocks * Antique Doll * * Vintage Glassware * Old Oil Lantern * Extra Nice Chaps, Like New * * Several 8 & 10-ft Aluminum Ladders * 2 HP Honda Boat Motor, only used 2 hours * MUCH MORE BY SALE DAY * NO BUYERS PREMIUM * SALES TAX WILL BE CHARGED — Call and we will Mail, E-Mail, or Fax you a Handbill —

ATTENTION:

LOW INCOME HOUSING

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

DAL DAGNON 486-2570

“PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

509-476-4057

email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

22. O. Henry’s “The Gift of the ___�

3. Despise

23. Little, e.g.

5. Big laugh

24. Arctic ___

6. Family head

26. Alone

7. Address

27. Backboard attachment

8. ___ goods

28. Inability to swallow

9. Cable network (acronym)

30. Setting for TV’s “Newhart�

10. Amscrayed

31. Parody

11. Privets

33. Reduces the value of something

12. Nut

35. Shrek, e.g. 37. Small amount 38. Becomes hard 42. German cathedral city 46. Bull markets 47. Vacation souvenirs 49. “Walking on Thin Ice� singer 50. “Planet of the ___� 52. Eastern wrap 53. Bringing up the rear

ANSWERS

Across 1. Agreements 8. Turned violet-red 15. Deliberately arranged occasion for a candidate or celebrity (2 wds) 16. By and large (3 wds) 17. Colorless, flammable hydrocarbon derived from petroleum

Help Wanted

– Family & Singles –

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138

Crosswords

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

INCOME OPPORTUNITY

The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Board of Directors are accepting applications for the Secretary/Manager position. Interested parties please contact O.T.I.D. for information and application packet at 516-11th Avenue; PO Box 1729; Oroville, WA 98844 or (509)476-3696. Applications will be accepted through May 3, 2013. A drug free and equal opportunity employer.

Lots & Acreage Announcements

4. Aquatic mammal

25. NO3 28. Cipher 29. Met expectations? 32. Follow 34. “20/20� network (acronym) 36. Touched up

39. Fights against 40. Futile

57. Sterile

41. “Your majesty�

60. Avoiding association with others

43. Sub sandwiches 44. Subjugate

63. Take over for

45. Folded card for short informal letter

64. Examined by experiment

48. Poster heading

65. Fixed (2 wds)

51. Anatomical dividers 53. Clear 56. Gaucho’s weapon

1. Shows up

20. ___ Grove Village, Ill.

2. Very inexpensive item

There are two Seasonal Positions that consist of 40 hours per week. Positions include performing a variety of park maintenance and operations tasks. Applicants must be 18 years of age or older, have a valid Washington State Driver’s License and be physically able to perform required tasks. Applications may be secured at the Oroville City Hall, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday or on the city’s website at oroville-wa.com Applications must be received by 12:00 noon, Friday, April 26, 2011. The City of Oroville is an equal opportunity employer. The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Board of Directors are accepting applications for Irrigation/District Manager position. Interested parties please contact O.T.I.D. for information and application packet at: 516-11th Avenue; PO Box 1729; Oroville, WA 98844 or (509)476-3696. Applications will be accepted through May 3, 2013. A drug free and equal opportunity employer.

On-call CMA or LPN

CMA position

The Oroville Office of North Valley Family Medicine is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented CMA. Applicant must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Mon. - Fri. (approx. 40 hours). Medical/Dental/401K. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online

The Oroville Office of North Valley Family Medicine is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented applicant. Must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online

www.gazette-tribune.com

24. Crush

56. “Reveille� instrument

19. Fast finisher?

The City of Oroville is now accepting applications of employment for the following positions: Seasonal City Park Aide I.

21. Detective’s need

55. “What’s ___?�

Down

Proposals should be submitted to the City Clerks Office no later 4:00, Monday, May 6, 2013.

14. Ornamental patterns

54. Lacquered metalware

18. Small island

will be accepting proposals for leasing and operating the Concession Stand at Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial Park for the 2013 Season. Copies of the proposed lease, which outlines requirements and certain equipment that the lessee shall supply, and other information, may be obtained from the City Hall, 1308 Ironwood Street, Oroville, WA 98844 (509476-2926) or may be downloaded from the city’s website at oroville-wa.com

13. Chic

38. Large spiny lizard-like diapsid reptiles

62. Do museum work

The City of Oroville

58. Cracker Jack bonus 59. Anger 61. “Comprende?�

NEAL YARNELL ESTATE Between Okanogan & Malott - Old Hwy 97

Saturday, April 27, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.

Nice Offering of Clean Useable Shop & Tool Items, Plus Like-New Household and Various Collectibles. Partial Listing Below

*******************************

Delta 10-in Band Saw * Shop Mate Radial Arm Saw * Delco 14-in Band Saw * Oxy-Acet Set * 18-speed Drill Press on Stand * Craftsman Tool Box on Castors * 11-piece Slide Hammer HD * LOTS of Power and Hand Tools * 1980 GMC Diesel Sierra Classic Pickup, Auto * 1960’s Corvair Car, Needs work * Corvair Car Parts * 1947 K-5 Inter. 12-ft Flatbed, needs work * Craftsman 18 HP Riding Lawnmower * Craftsman 30-in Lawn Sweep * Snowblower / Rototiller Comb * Cub Cadet Tractor w/Hydro Snow Blower * COLLECTIBLES - Washboard * Draw Knife * Wood Planes * Sack Needle * Button Hook * Shoe Hook * Spindle Back Rocking Chair * Girls Schwinn Bike * Butter Churn * Cookie Jars * Wood Butter Mold * Wash Tubs, Round & Square * Unique Pitcher Pump * Unique OfďŹ ce Desk/China Cabinet Comb * Camel Back Steamer Trunk * Old, Old Books * Rectangle Milk Bottles * 2 Large Metal & Feathered Rooster Figurines * 2 Like New Swivel Stuffed Chairs * Large Whirlpool Refrig/Freezer Comb * Entertainment Center * Dining Room Table * Various Small Kitchen Appliances * Pots * Pans * Dishes * Electric Tea Maker *** MUCH MORE

No Buyers Premium –– Sales Tax Will Be Charged -

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DAL DAGNON DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2570 486-2138

Wanted Buying Silver, Gold Coins, Collections, Jewelry, Flatware, Guns. Paying fair Prices. Call Spence (509) 429-4722

Boats & Trailers Wanted ASAP-Coach Rice needs a new to him boat. 10 or 12 foot, light weight aluminum V bottom boat with lip along the outside edge. Good condition for a reasonable price. Call 509-476-2804, leave a message. 23FT JAYCO JayFlight Travel Trailer, 2007. Premier manufacturer. Gorgeous. Maintained by perfectionists. Barely used. Covered during Winter. Sleeps four, perfect for two. Everything inside comes with it. $10,000. Call 509476-3004

Motorcycles 2008 YAMAHA VSTAR 1100/XVS11XB. Black with ghost flames, windshield, leather bags, two helmets and cover. $5,000 firm. 509476-2514.

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF APRIL 22, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPT: Loving Family longs to provide Everything for 1st baby. Beaches, Laughter, Financial Security. Tina 1-800-933-1975. Expenses paid. EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 866-673-6209. www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com

continued on next page


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- $129,900 w/$7500 Credit to Spend as Buyer Desires

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1422 Main St. Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 888-838-3000

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www.gazette-tribune.com

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OLD WORLD CHARM w/Gracious Fireplace, Fir Floors, Sprawling Master Tub, Almost New Heat Pump, Double Garage on 3.64 Acres Abutting Hwy 7.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

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Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA SUN 509-476-2121 LAKES Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool REALTY

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Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

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Loomis Home, nice location! 3 bd / 2 ba home, 1680 sq ft, great open living space. MLS#427388 $126,000!

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE 1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

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Notice of Public Hearing and Final SEPA, Mitigated Determination of Non-Significance (MDNS) COLUMBIA RIVER CARBONATES, CUP 2013-1 TO AMEND 2007-12 Columbia River Carbonates has submitted an application to amend Conditional Use Permit (CUP) 2007-12. They propose to relocate their crushing operations 850’ to the east and construct a new haul road into the crushing site, and to lower the mining excavation 100 feet from the current maximum elevation of 3775 Feet to elevation 3675 feet. All activities will be within the existing boundaries of their CUP. Columbia River Carbonates submitted an environmental checklist and proposed mitigations for probable impacts. The SEPA responsible official has issued a threshold mitigated determination

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Notice of Application under the Shoreline Management Act and Determination of Non-significance under SEPA Splash Farm DATE OF NOTICE: 4/18/2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Tonasket, Washington who is the owner of the below described property has filed an application for a shoreline substantial and floodplain development permits and will file for related building permits with the City of Tonasket Building & Permits Department for the construction of a splash pad recreational facility. The project will be within a suburban environment of Okanogan River a tributary of the Columbia River. This project is proposed at the Chief Tonasket Park, 500 Railroad Avenue, also known as Tax 191, Tonasket in Section 16, Township 37 N., Range 27 E.WM. The City of Tonasket Building & Permits Department, who is the lead agency for this proposal, has determined that it does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required under RCW 43.21C.030(2)(c). This decision was made after review of a completed environmental checklist and other information on file with the lead agency. This information is available to the public on request or by visiting the City’s website at www.tonasketcity.org and following the Public Notice links. This DNS is issued under 197-11-340(2); the lead agency will

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HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS

Public Notices

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SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N

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FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 17 (Easy, rating 0.40) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. 7

of non-significance. The site is located off of Toroda Creek Road 5 miles north of Wauconda and is located within Sections 13, 18 and 24, of Township 38 North, Range 30 East and 31 East, of the Willamette Meridian. Project comments must be submitted, in writing, or attend the public hearing. The Okanogan County Board of Adjustment has scheduled a public hearing for May 21, 2013 at 7:30 p.m., located in the Commissioners Hearing Room in the Virginia Grainger Administration Building at 123 5th Ave. North, Okanogan, WA. 98840. This decision may be appealed in accordance with OCC 14.04.220. Appeals must be made in writing to the Board of Okanogan County Commissioners, 123 5th Ave N Ste. 150, Okanogan, WA 98840. Appeals must be submitted or postmarked by 5:00 p.m. on May 8, 2013. Appeals shall state with specificity the elements of the environmental checklist and resulting determination the appellant finds objectionable and shall state the reason therefore. Appeals must include the $300.00 appeal fee. The date of publication in Okanogan County’s legal periodical of record is April 24, 2013. Failure to file a timely and complete appeal shall constitute waiver of all rights to an administrative appeal under county code. Information is available at the Office of Planning and Development. Direct questions to: Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, Randy Johnson, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-7117. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 25, 2013. #474471

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BAJILLIONS STILL AVAILABLE for good R.E. Contracts, Notes and Annuities. Receiving Payments? It may be time to give us a call. Skip Foss 800-637-3677.

COLFAX -- RIVERFRONT. 9 acres was $75,000 now only $39,500. Lender Repo sale. Beautiful valley views, quiet county road with electric. Excellent financing provided. Call UTR 1-888-326-9048.

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not act on this proposal until May 15, 2013. The complete application, related drawings and documentation is available for inspection or purchase at the City of Tonasket Clerk’s Office during normal business hours. Said development is propose to be within the shoreline of the Okanogan River and/or its associated wetlands. Any person desiring to express their views on this proposal or attain party of record status and be notified of any subsequent record decisions on this application should notify in writing Christian Johnson, Permit Administrator, Box 487, Tonasket WA 98855 or cjohnson.oroville@nvinet.com Written comments must be filed no later than May 15, 2013. Christian D. Johnson, Permit Administrator This notice is given pursuant to Section 7.09 of the Tonasket Shoreline Master Program. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 18, 25, 2013. #473286

REAL ESTATE

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Statewides

Statewides

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APRIL 25, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE April 25, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

www.windermere.com

509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee 82 Eastlake Rd, Oroville - Spectacular view of Lake Osoyoos, surrounding area and mountains. 3 parcels, 8+ acres, sits overlooking private pond on the property, pasture and barn . Perfect location for horse, with a separate outdoor arena. Barn has a hay loft plus room to store things. Very unique property with fabulous views. Near the airport.

NWML® 461796

$343,500

h i l lt o p r e a lt y TONASKET OPPORTUNITY

Hwy 97 Frontage. Main Corridor to Canada. Lots of Parking. Was a Restaurant. All Equipment still there. Or use building for another business venture. $140,000.00 Possible Owner Contract or Lease/Option. Call Today!

Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com l 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

- 24 Hour Service Licensed & Bonded

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Midway Building Supply

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Oroville Building Supply

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Garage Doors  Installed

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Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Installed Insulation

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Attorney at Law

P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Building Supplies

Got Water? — Fred Cook — Over 25 Years experience! Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

Concrete

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Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 We Work Saturdays! 11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Storage

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Construction

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 25, 2013

SPORTS WIAA tweaks classification criteria

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Summer football Boys Soccer

Pts: 3=win in regulation or OT; 2=win in PK shootout; 1=loss in PK shootout; 0=loss in regulation or OT.

Caribou Trail League

League Overall Pts W-L W-L-T Chelan 30 10-0 11-1-0 Brewster 26 9-1 11-1-0 Quincy 24 8-2 9-3-0 Okanogan 15 5-5 7-5-0 Cascade 13 4-6 5-6-0 Tonasket 6 2-8 3-9-0 Cashmere 3 1-8 1-11-0 Omak 3 1-9 1-11-0

Central Washington League

League Overall Pts W-L W-L-T Manson 18 6-0 10-2-0 Bridgeport 9 3-3 4-5-0 Liberty Bell 9 3-3 7-4-1 Oroville 0 0-6 1-11-0

practices to be limited

WIAA Press Release

RENTON, Wash. - The Washington Interscholastic Activities Association announced the passed amendments for the 2013-14 academic school year, voted on by the Representative Assembly. The first two changes made by the Rep. Assembly affect the classification process. The first

amendment (HS #2: 4.1.0) alters the process to determine classifications to count students in grades 9-11 rather than the previous system, which counted students in grades 10-12. The next amendment (HS#4: 4.6.0) allows school districts with alternative high schools with a separate OSPI (Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction) number, or where students are housed away from the high school, to separate the alternative school enrollment count. There were two additional passed amendments (HS # 10: 57.1.0; HS #11: 57.6.0) that, both

deal with football, and only affect member high schools. Beginning in 2013, a minimum of three practices will be required for summer football before full pads and full contact may take place. In addition, a maximum of ten practices with full pads and full contact will be allowed. The second amendment causes 1B football games that reach a 40-point differential to switch to a running clock at any point in the contest. The previous rule would only go into effect in the second half. Two high school/middle school amendments also passed. The first (ML/HS #12: 60.6.1) allows

the combination of NFHS and FIFA rules to be applied for soccer games. This change should increase the number of available officials for the member schools. The other amendment (ML/ HS #8: 28.3.0) allows schools to appeal a penalty for the use of an ineligible participant in a team sport. A school may now appeal a ruling of forfeiture that is based on the contribution of an ineligible participant toward victory in a team sport. The passed amendments will be implemented the first day of fall turnout, except for the summer football amendment, which

Oroville girls set records

Baseball Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cashmere 9-0 14-1 Brewster 7-2 10-4 Cascade 7-2 8-6 Chelan 6-3 6-7 Quincy 4-5 8-6 Okanogan 2-7 6-8 Omak 1-8 2-12 Tonasket 0-9 4-10

By Brent Baker

CWL North Division

League Overall Liberty Bell 11-0 14-2 Pateros (1B) 9-3 10-4 Lk Roosevelt 7-5 10-7 Bridgeport 5-6 6-12 Oroville 2-10 2-12 Manson 1-11 1-14

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Softball (Fastpitch) Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cascade 9-0 14-0 Okanogan 7-2 11-3 Brewster 6-3 9-5 Cashmere 5-4 8-7 Chelan 5-4 8-6 Omak 2-7 2-13 Quincy 2-7 5-10 Tonasket 0-9 4-11

CWL North Division

League Overall Pateros(1B) 6-0 7-2 Liberty Bell 5-2 8-4 Lk Roosevelt 3-3 3-8 Bridgeport 3-4 6-5 Oroville 2-4 3-8 Manson 0-6 2-9

Girls Tennis Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cashmere 8-0 9-1 Omak 6-2 9-2 Chelan 5-3 8-3 Okanogan 4-4 6-4 Cascade 4-4 5-4 Tonasket 1-8 2-9 Quincy 1-8 1-9

Central Washington League

League Overall Pateros(1B) 8-0 9-2 White Swan 7-3 8-4 Lk Roosevelt 3-4 4-4 Entiat (1B) 3-4 3-5 Oroville 2-5 2-6 Liberty Bell 0-7 0-11

Boys Tennis Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cashmere 8-0 9-1 Chelan 6-2 9-2 Tonasket 6-3 7-4 Omak 5-3 7-4 Cascade 2-6 3-6 Quincy 2-7 2-8 Okanogan 0-8 2-9

Central Washington League

League Overall Liberty Bell 7-0 9-2 White Swan 8-2 9-4 Entiat (1B) 3-4 3-5 Pateros(1B) 3-4 4-7 Oroville 1-6 1-7 Lk Roosevelt 0-6 0-7

High School Sports Schedules, Apr. 25-May 4 Thursday, April 25 BB - Liberty Bell at Tonasket, 4:30 pm TR - Oroville at Mansfield, 4:00 pm Friday, April 26 TR - Oroville at Cascade Inv., 4:00 pm Saturday, April 27 BB - Lib. Bell at Oroville (2), 11:00 am BB - Tonasket at Quincy (2), 11:00 am SB - Oroville at Lib. Bell (2), 11:00 am SB - Quincy at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am SOC - Tonasket at Quincy, 11:00 am, SOC - Oroville at Lib. Bell, 11:00 am TEN - Oroville at Lib. Bell, 11:00 am TEN - Tonasket at Quincy, 11:00 am TR - Tonasket at Riverside Invite, 9:00 am Tuesday, April 30 GLF - Okanogan at Oroville, 2:30 pm SB - Oroville at Lake Roos., 4:00 pm SOC - Brewster at Tonasket, 4:30 pm SOC - Manson at Oroville, 4:00 pm TR - Oroville, Tonasket at Bridgeport Invite, 4:00 pm

Jeff Walter/Quad City Herald

Boone McKinney earned both wins on the mound against Manson as the Oroville baseball team earned its first two wins in two years on Tuesday, April 16.

Hornets snap two-year streak By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - The end of the Oroville baseball team’s two-year losing streak didn’t come easily, or particularly quickly. In fact, Oroville’s 19-5 win over Manson took 19 days to complete after the game was originally suspended due to darkness prior to Spring Break. But as a result, Boone McKinney ended up pitching the Hornets to two completegame victories as Oroville finished off the Trojans in one final inning of play and then held on for a 9-8 victory in the regularly-scheduled game on Tuesday, April 16. Play resumed in the opener with the Hornets leading 18-5, and Trevor Shearer added to the Oroville lead with a home run to get things started. McKinney retired the side in the fifth, striking out the final batter to end the game early via the 10-run rule. McKinney picked up the win in the second game as well, allowing four hits and striking out eight as the Hornets survived a shaky seventh inning to win 9-8. The Hornets didn’t get on the board until the fifth, when Brentt Kallstrom led off with a walk and eventually scored on

Oroville’s Rachelle Nutt leans back to avoid a pitch during Saturday’s doubleheader with Lake Roosevelt. The Hornets won two of three games last week.

Wednesday, May 1 TEN - Lib. Bell at Tonasket, 4:30 pm Thursday, May 2 GLF - Oroville vs. LR/RC at Banks Lake GC, 2:30 pm SOC - Chelan at Tonasket, 4:30 pm TEN - Oroville at Chelan, 4:00 pm TEN - Tonasket at Lake Roosevelt, 4:30 pm Friday, May 3 SB - B’port at Oroville (2), 3:30 pm TR - Oroville at Liberty Bell Invite, 4:00 pm TR - Tonasket at CTL Finals (at Cashmere), 4:00 pm Saturday, May 4 BB - Brew. at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am SB - Brew. at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am TEN - Chelan at Tonasket, 11:00 am

goes into effect May 26. Each school has the option to propose an amendment, as long as written support from four additional schools is received. The amendments get discussed at the Winter Coalition in March, while voting on the amendments takes place online. The Representative Assembly is comprised of a total of 53 (35 high school; 18 middle school) member school administrators from each of the nine districts. To pass an amendment, each amendment needs 60 percent majority approval from the Representative Assembly.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

a wild pitch. Oroville took a 4-2 lead in the top of the sixth when Eddie Ocampo hit a twoout, bases loaded double to drive in three runs. The Hornets added five more in the top of the seventh, highlighted by a Ryan Marcolin leadoff single, Will Shearer’s RBI double and a run-scoring single by Trevor Shearer. The lead wasn’t safe as, with one out, the Hornets made six straight errors to give Manson a chance for the walkoff win. Kallstrom ended the run of errors with a force play at third, and McKinney recorded his final strikeout to secure the victory.

Bridgeport 14-16, Oroville 4-10 BRIDGEPORT - Errors in the field proved costly as the Hornets dropped a doubleheader at Bridgeport on Saturday, April 20, 14-4 and 16-10. In the first game, Oroville took a 2-0 lead on a McKinney single that scored Dustin Nigg and a Jake Scott RBI single. The Hornets, though, gave up eight runs in the bottom of the first to erase the lead. Casey Martin, pitching in relief of McKinney, gave up two hits in five innings

of work. The Mustangs added six more runs thanks to four Hornet errors. Mathis added a two-run double and Ocampo and Trevor Shearer each added hits. In the second game, Trevor Shearer, McKinney and Martin hit back-to-backto-back doubles in the first as the Hornets built a 5-0 lead. But three straight errors behind McKinney to lead off the bottom of the first set up four Bridgeport runs, though McKinney used a pair of strikeouts to avoid further damage. Bridgeport took a 6-5 lead in the second, but Oroville took the lead back Mathis’ two-run triple and an RBI single by Ocampo. Bridgeport added four in the fourth, three in the fifth and one in the sixth, while Oroville stayed in the game with a two-run fifth on RBI singles from Jaxon Blackler and Trevor Shearer. Oroville had one last chance to get back in the game in the sixth, loading the bases with no one out, but Bridgeport’s pitchers struck out the next three Hornet batters to hang on to its lead. The Hornets (2-12, 2-10 CWL North) hosts league-leading Liberty Bell for a doubleheader on Saturday, April 27 in their final home contests of the season.

QUINCY - Oroville’s girls track and field team ran up a sixth -place finish at the 22-team Quincy Invitational on Saturday, April 20, securing the top finish of the 11 2B and 1B schools in attendance. The boys took 15th out of 20. Kaitlyn Grunst kept her unbeaten high jump streak alive with a school-record leap of 5-3 and took second in the long jump (15-4) to lead the Hornets. Sierra Speiker also ran to a 24 second victory with a school record in the 3200 (11:30.8, breaking her own meet record) and took fourth in the 1600 (5:36.09). Other top finishers for the girls were Alexa Werner in the shot put (4th, 31-5.5); and Callie Barker in the pole vault (4th, 8-6). Top finishers for the boys were Luke Kindred in the javelin (2nd, 153-6) and discus (10th, 112-6); and Tanner Smith in the 100 (7th, 11.75) and 300 hurdles (8th, 45.91). Smith, Kindred, Logan Mills and Charlie Arrigoni also took eighth in the 4x100 relay (47.55). Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) and Cashmere dominated girls the team scoring with 106.5 and 95 points, respectively. Ephrata (2A) had 66, followed by Naches Valley (58.5), Quincy (50.3), with the Hornerts and Medical Lake tying with 43. Toppenish, Chelan and Cascade rounded out the top 10. Ephrata (161) and Quincy (95.5) led the boys team scoring. The Hornets (12) beat out Brewster, Chelan, Manson, Okanogan and Othello. Oroville competes Thursday at Mansfield and Friday at Cascade.

Tiger soccer falls twice By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

LEAVENWORTH - Tonasket’s boys soccer team bounced back from a tough loss four days earlier to put together one of its most complete performances of the season on Saturday, April 20, in a 3-0 loss to Cascade. “It was the best overall game we have played,” said Tonasket coach Jack Goyette. “We played like a team (with) smart soccer and good passing and possession against a very good team. “It was a very physical game. It was excellently officiated; they let the boys play and kept the game flowing.” The Tigers travel to Quincy on Saturday.

Okanogan 10, Tonasket 2 OKANOGAN - Not much went right for the Tigers at Okanogan on Tuesday, April 16, in a 10-2 loss to the Bulldogs. “We had a number of injuries and we did not play well,” Goyette said. “But the team continued to stay positive and our very proud of our players - they are excellent people.”

Softball wins two of three OROVILLE - The Hornets picked up their second victory of the season Tuesday, April 16, with a 20-10, mercy-rule victory over Manson. Oroville bounced back from an early 4-0 deficit with a six-run first inning and added five more in the second and four more in the third and fourth innings before finishing it with a run in the fifth. Marissa Garcia and Rachelle Nutt each had home runs, Garcia added a double and Nutt added four stolen bases. Jasmine Nutt stole five bases and Shelby Scott, Pie Todd and Faith Martin each had hits, with Martin driving in a pair of runs. Oroville also hosted Lake Roosevelt for a doubleheader on Saturday, April 20. The Hornets won a wild 25-24 decision over the Raiders in the first game but lost the finale 5-4. The Hornets improved to 3-8 (2-5 Central Washington League North Division).


APRIL 25, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A11

SPORTS

QUITE A RACKET

Tonasket hosted Omak on Thursday, April 18, for a non-league tennis match, with both teams losing 4-1 to the Pioneers. The Tiger boys bounced back Saturday with a 3-2 win at Cascade, with the girls losing 3-2. Above, Grace Maldonado returns a serve against Omak; right, Levi Schell gets in a backhand during Thursday’s action.

Laurena Rehbein/submitted photo

The starting light, or the “Christmas Tree,” is the main thing standing between a racer and their victory. Dean Holder, of Newport, Wash. and Shana Cachola, of Oliver, B.C. line their cars up to see who’s got what it takes.

Spring: ‘Tis the season... for Christmas trees?

Brent Baker/staff photos

Tonasket track preps for stretch run By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OKANOGAN - Tonasket’s track and field team competed in an unscored Caribou Trail League quad at Okanogan on Tuesday, April 16, against Brewster, Omak and Okanogan. Winners for the girls included Emily Mills in the 100 (13.78), 200 (29.28) and 400 (1:07.43); Kylie Dellinger in the 800 (2:41.39); Rose Walts in the 100 hurdles (17.96); and Cassie Spear, Jenna Valentine, Walts and Dellinger in the 4x400 relay (4:47.4).

Others in the top three included Devan Utt in the 800 (3rd, 2:51.04); Kathryn Cleman in the 300 hurdles (2nd, 55.15); Jaden Vugteveen, Cleman, Walts and Spear in the 4x100 relay (57.55); Shea Smith, Vugteveen, Mills and Spear in the 4x200 relay (3rd, 2:04); Alissa Young in the discus (3rd, 75-6); Cleman in the long jump (2nd, 13-9); and Utt in the triple jump (2nd, 29-11). Dallas Tyus was the lone winner for the boys, leaping 36-6 in the triple jump. Other top three finishers included Smith Condon in the 200 (3rd,

26-09); Ryan Rylie in the 400 (2nd, 59.21); the 4x100 relay team of Dalton Smith, Ethan Bensing, Devyn Catone and Condon (2nd, 49.75); Jevonti Haney-Williams, Jonathon Tellez, Smith, and Catone in the 4x400 (2nd, 4:12.5); Joaquin Polito in the discus (3rd, 87-9) and javelin (3rd, 124-2); Ethan Bensing in the triple jump (2nd, 36-4.5); and Tyus in the high jump (2nd, 5-4) and long jump (3rd, 15-6). The Tigers travel to Riverside on Saturday for an invitational at the site that is also scheduled for the District 6/7 regional meet in a few weeks.

Washington League play as of April 26. “Our guys played hard and didn’t give up,” said Oroville coach Billy Monroe. “There were a lot of close games that went to deuce.” The Hornets’ run against tough competition continued April 13 against White Swan in East Wenatchee. The White Swan boys and girls are both second in CWL play The boys team lost 5-0 and the girls 4-1. “There were a lot of scores that didn’t show how well our guys

did,” Monroe said. The girls’ win came from Menze Pickering and Lily Hilderbrand in No. 1 doubles. “They beat a team they had lost to earlier in the season,” Monroe said. Aya Cruspero lost a tight three set battle in No. 2 singles. The Hornet girls lost to leagueleading Pateros 5-0 on Thursday, April 18, while the boys fell 4-1. The girls team is 2-6 overall (2-5 in Central Washington League play) while the boys are 1-7 (1-6).

First drag race of the season in Osoyoos May 5

Submitted by Shana Cachola Wine Country Racing Association

OSOYOOS, BC - When most people hear about Christmas trees it conjures up images of snow, excited children and Santa Claus. To your friendly, neighborhood drag racer, however, it means that spring is here and it’s time to burn rubber. The drag racer’s best friend and biggest enemy is the starting light, lovingly known as the Christmas tree. Races are won and lost in the tiny amount of time that it takes a driver to put the pedal to the floor.

As the rest of the world rests, covered in a blanket of snow the racing teams are busy in their shops tuning old cars or furiously getting new cars ready to hit the track. When our Okanagan Valley fruit trees display their blossoms the volunteers of Wine Country Racing Association (WCRA) are dusting off the equipment to put on a show, including the infamous Christmas tree. Sunday May 5 is opening day for the WCRA 2013 season. Fans, young and old have five chances to come to the Osoyoos airport - west of town on Highway 3 - to watch side by side racing. Richter Pass Motorplex offers a fun, safe environment for racers of all backgrounds and experience levels to get the adrenaline rush of driving competitively.

Gates open at 9 a.m. on race day. Time trials begin around 11 a.m. Final elimination round begins at 1 p.m. Drivers come early to register and to get your vehicle through technical inspection. Cost at the gate is $10 per person over age 12. Those under 12 are admitted at no charge, but must be accompanied by an adult. Drivers race for only another $25. Concessions are offered on site. There is plenty of room to set up your lawn chair, or find spot in the grand stands. This year’s 2013 Race Dates are May 5, May 26, June 9, Sept. 22 and Oct. 13. Go to the website www.winecountryracing.ca or call (250) 498-6443 for more information and check out the photos.

Oroville tennis girls pick up a victory By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - The Oroville girls tennis team earned its second victory of the season on April 9 with a 3-2 victory over Liberty Bell. Menze Pickering won a threehour match 4-6, 7-5, 6-1 to pace the hornets, while Maddie CoffeltRichardson took her match at third singles, 6-0, 6-1. Oroville also had a forfeit win at doubles. The boys lost to the Mountain Lions 5-0. Liberty Bell’s boys were still unbeaten in Central

Hornet soccer falters late By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

WINTHROP - Liberty Bell’s soccer team once was where the Oroville squad is right now. The Mountain Lions, who a couple of years ago needed eighth graders just to provide enough numers to keep the program going, improved to 7-4-1 on Tuesday, April 18, with a 5-1 victory over a Hornet team in just that same spot right now. “It’s good to see Liberty Bell

doing well this year after having gone through some tough years,” said Oroville coach Mike Pitts after the loss. That said, the Hornets haven’t won since the first game of the season. “I feel like a broken record with our team’s game play,” Pitts said. “We play well in the first half and have opportunities to score, but just aren’t able to capitalize.” Abe Capote scored the Hornets’ lone goal, though he got off eight shots.

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Pitts said that freshman goalkeeper Luis Reyes is stepping up as the squad’s goalkeeper. “He’s improving his ... play,” Pitts said. “He plays smart in the box and communicates well with the defense. “We have some tough games coming up, so I hope our team stays focused on improving.” The Hornets (1-11, 0-6 CWL) followed that up with an 11-1 loss to Manson, which has already clinched the league title on Saturday, April 20.

Submitted photo

Front row L to R- Caeleb Hardesty, Eric Owsley, Seth Whittington, Alex Owsley. Back row instructors - Shirley and Dan Keith.

Local kids place in Karate tourney Submitted by Shirley Keith

YAKIMA - Martial Arts Students from Cariker Academy of Self Defense and Okanogan Valley Martial Arts competed in the 36th Annual Central Washington Karate Championship tourna-

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Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | April 25, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life SIMILKAMEEN FALLS CEREMONY

Tonasket High School’s Flag Corps washed cars in the U.S. Bank parking lot on Saturday to help raise funds for the groups upcoming trip to Spokane’s Lilac Parade. Rose Walts (there to help a friend), Lynn Hendrix, Melanie Christensen and Alissa Young scrubbed down one of the vehicles that stopped by for cleaning. Each of the girls earned over $50 toward the trip.

Okanogan Valley

Herman Edwards (above) teacher, flute player and story teller with the Lower Similkameen Band, leads a ceremony in celebration of the Similkameen Falls last Sunday morning. He was joined along the Similkameen by his sister Gloria Bent, as well as many who oppose the Okanogan County PUD’s plan to generate electricity at Enloe Dam (right). A move they say would prevent most of the water from going over the falls. “I don’t give a damn about the dam,” he said.

CHURCH GUIDE Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor

Gary DeVon/staff photos

at your church?

Cops & Courts Superior Court Criminal The court found probable cause to charge Pamela Olson, 67, with 17 counts of theft second, theft third and four counts of stolen property second. She was found guilty and received 14 years and three months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Wilfrido Garcia- Gonzales, 25, with four counts of possession of stolen property second and forgery. He was found guilty and received 11 months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Kristina Gipson, 29, with possession of stolen property second and two counts of theft third. She was found guilty and received two years and four months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Jesus Castaneda, 18, with assault third, resisting arrest and harassment first. He was found guilty and received 12 years and five months confinement.

District Court Phyllis Adolph, 51, Omak, was charged with two counts of DWLS third. John Bengelsdorf, 48, Oroville, was found guilty of recreational fishing second. He received a $200 fine. Rogelio Carranza, 18, Oroville, was charged with two counts of use/delivery of drug paraphernalia. Tammy Cook, 40, of Omak was charged with two counts of reckless driving. She was found guilty and received 10 days confinement and a $1,318 fine. John Gelvin, 57, Okanogan, was charged with violation of a temporary protection order. He was found guilty and received one day confinement and an $833 fine. Alfredo Gonzales, 35, Omak, was charged with NVOL. Ashlan Laughery, 33, Omak, was charged with DWLS third. Laughery was found guilty and received one day confinement and an $818 fine. Wayne Mcghee, 63, Omak, was charged with two counts of disorderly conduct and criminal trespassing first. He was found guilty and received five days confinement and an $808 fine. Eva Mckinney, 23, Omak, was charged with DWLS third. She was found guilty and received a $618 fine. Jared Milam, 28, Omak, was charged with two counts of making a false statement to a public servant. He was found guilty and received 10 days confinement and an $808 fine. Gailin Olsen, 25, Omak, was charged with assault fourth and two counts of malicious mischief third. Olsen was found guilty and received five days confinement and a $383 fine. Bjarne Olson, 53, Tonasket, was

charged with DWLS third. Josephine Valdez, 20, Omak, was charged with two counts of DWLS third, two counts of marijuana possession less than or equal to 40 grams and two counts of use/delivery of drug paraphernalia. She was found guilty and received three days confinement and a $3,202 fine.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, April 15, 2013 In Okanogan, on Monroe Street, a newer yellow Chevrolet pickup was coming to the residence every morning at 4 a.m. for the last two weeks. The driver is not licensed. In Omak, on Highway 155, a female subject is living at the location and the caller is concerned that she may be using drugs in the home. She advised the subject that she has five days to leave. The subject got angry and left the residence leaving her four-year-old child there at the residence with her husband. Madison Martin, 22, was booked for use of drug paraphernalia and forgery. Jennifer Stone, 36, was booked for assault fourth. Joseph Shaul, 44, was booked for assault fourth. Tuesday, April 16, 2013 In Omak, on Juniper Street, a man kicked another man in the face at Pioneer Park on the levee. One was detained. The subject was tazed. John Hilderbrand, 19, was booked for violation of a contact order. Gary McDonald, 39, was booked for assault fourth. Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Near Oroville, on Eastlake Road, a resident returned home to find a party at his house. He believed his son is responsible. There is minimal damage. Darla Larkin, 26, was booked for failure to appear, DUI and DWLS first. Kevin Bailey, 44, was booked for DUI and defecating in public. Thursday, April 18, 2013 Near Oroville, on Eastlake Road, there is believed to be a prowler outside. The caller’s peacocks have started calling out and are disturbed. Police were unable to locate anyone on the premises. Marco Cruz, 24, was booked for FTA, DWLS first, possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia and DUI. Dustyn Hahn, 23, was booked for assault fourth. Friday, April 19, 2013 In Omak, on Jasmine Street, a man and a woman in their thirties are in a dispute. The man pushed the woman and the woman responded by kicking him. One party left in a red pickup before the police arrived. In Omak, on Engh Road, there was a fight in progress in the Wal-Mart parking lot near

McDonald’s. There are approximately 15 juveniles involved. No weapons were observed. The group headed toward the bowling alley. No further problems were observed. Carol Graves, 62, was booked for theft third and criminal trespassing. Cynthia Wilson, 46, was booked for theft third and criminal trespassing. Palmer Gunshows, 26, was booked for assault fourth. Rebecca Piper, 23, was booked for a DUI. Saturday, April 20, 2013 In Okanogan, on Elmway, roommates locked a man out of the residence. The man called requesting his options. The roommates state that they kicked him out because he refused to pay rent. In Tonasket, on Henry Road, a male subject was riding an ATV up and down the road disturbing a man and his wife. Brent Cooper, 26, was booked for theft third and possession. Jason Vargas, 27, was booked for failure to appear and DUI. James Gee, 59, was booked for assault first. Sunday, April 21, 2013 In Oroville, on Cherry Street, a male subject made threats to an officer saying he was going to set his patrol car on fire. Wiley Moulton, 28, was booked for DWLS third. Don Moore, 65, Riverside, was booked for murder first.

Key

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – POCS MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – FTA (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist INLAND MONUMENT CO.

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10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday School is at 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 25, 2013  

April 25, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 25, 2013  

April 25, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune