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Knifemaker Salem Straub proves

EARTH DAY IN TONASKET

to be a cut above.

Plant Frenzy, Saturday at Triangle Park; Being Green, Sunday at Tonasket High School Commons

See Page A11

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Finding room for Guest Workers

NVH financial situation stabilizing

LET’S GO FLY A KITE

Hospital shows profit through end of February BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Significant investment approved by Oroville Housing Authority BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Last February representatives from Gold Digger Apples, Taber Orchards and Del Rosario Orchards approached the Oroville Housing Authority to ask if they could house more than 100 H2A guest workers, some staying for as much as half a year, at their farmworkers camp off Sawtell Road. Currently the OHA doesn’t have the capacity to house that many extra people in the 18 trailers it owns and housing them in the new Harvest Park is not allowed under the organization’s agreement with the US RDA which financed the facility. Last year the OHA put a couple dozen H2A workers and the overflow of migrant workers from the Harvest Park up in the trailers and in five large tents. The OHA board told the representatives from the orchards and fruit growers cooperative that they would invest in pouring additional concrete slabs so that they could rent another five 8-man wall tents and converting the recreation room to a bunkhouse to handle the influx of H2A workers. However, at their

SEE GUEST WORKERS | PG A3

Gary DeVon/Staff Photo

Isaiah gets a helping hand at Oroville Kite Day on Sunday, April 14, at Bud Clark Ballfields. A strong breeze in the morning helped get around a dozen kites airborne. Although rain threatened there were just a few drops among the sunshine. More on page A4.

TONASKET - The North Valley Hospital District’s financial situation is gradually improving, reported Chief Financial Officer Helen Verhasselt at the Thursday, April 11, NVH Board of Commissioners meeting. Verhasselt compared the hospital’s financial condition in a number of areas compared to a year ago: * Net income for the district through the end of February is about $196,000. Last year showed a loss of $321,000, a swing of more than a half million dollars. The hospital itself is showing a net profit of $330,000, while the Long Term Care division shows a loss of $134,000. * Compared to the budget, net revenue is over budget by about $95,000, operating expenses are under budget by $192,000. Net income is over budget by about $128,000. * On the balance sheet, the Accounts Receivable shows an improvement in collection of payments by about $800,000 compared to the same time last year. “We had some CPSI (rural hospital specialist) consultants here (Thursday),” Verhasselt said. “They were looking at our Accounts Receivable side and said ours were looking better than any facility they’ve been at. They commended us highly.” * Accounts payable waiting to be paid has been decreased by about $350,000 from the same point last year. * Registered warrants owed to the county are down $240,000 from the same point last year, but down $1.3 million from August. * Wages and benefits have decreased

by about $98,000. The warrants stood at $1.7 million on Thursday, up from $1.3 million two weeks earlier, thanks to a number of factors that Verhasselt said were temporary. “Medicare, a couple times a year, will hold up payments to us for several weeks at a time,” she said. “We’re going through one of those periods right now. They also have a nationwide glitch in their system (that is mistakenly kicking out legitimate charges). So we’ve had a significant cash flow issue with Medicare, which is why we haven’t continued that downward trend.” She said that expected payments of about $500,000 from Medicare and $270,000 from Medicaid will go directly into paying down the warrants. “Our warrants and our other liabilities are down,” Verhasselt said. “We’re looking way better. Some people would like quicker progress - like me - but the decisions we’ve made have us moving in the right direction.”

CEO REPORTS CEO Linda Michel, who attended the meeting by phone, submitted a written report that included a number of key findings about the North Valley Hospital district’s demographics. Among the key findings (dated for 2011), culled from a report from the Washington Hospital Association: * The hospital serves an average of 161 patients per day, an increase of 12.4 percent since 2006; * The combined Medicare and Medicaid in-patient payer mix was 82 percent. Medicare patients made up 53 percent of the overall mix, up 23.3 percent since 2006; Medicaid was at 29.0 percent, down 23.7 percent; * Charity care rose by more than 373 percent during that period to $437,574; meanwhile, bad debt for 2011 was

SEE NVH | Pg A2

Grant minutiae require city to find 5% to complete project Event vendor resolution passes BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket City Council voted unanimously on Tuesday, April 9, to direct city engineering firm Varela and Associates to delay awarding a bid for the Third/Fifth/Sixth Street stormwater repair project by 30 days in order to buy time to come up with about $19,000 that will be needed to finish the project. The need for the extension arose when Varela informed the council that a portion of the project that is to be completed by the Department of Transportation could not be credited to cover the five percent of the project not covered by a state Transportation Improvement Board grant that covers 95 percent of the project. The issue is the five percent, said Mayor Patrick Plumb, not the dollar amount. “The TIB project says that we can’t use what the DOT is going to do as the five percent match (which was previously thought to be allowed),” he said. “They want real money, which is about $19,000. “(Changing the project) wouldn’t help because they want the five percent regardless of the cost.” City clerk Alice Attwood said the options were to ask Varela for the extension in order to pursue the additional needed funding, or, she said, “decide the amount of match that we could meet, and

redesign the project to fit the cur- rational expectation for an exterrent financial constraints of the nal organization,” said Olson. city and rebid.” “We’ve got to have something to The council discussed multiple show the residents of the city that avenues to explore, including ask- they have a return on their investing the county for “.09 money,” ment with their taxes,” Plumb which is a portion of the state said. “There’s going to be plenty sales tax returned to economical- of it, but when you drive down ly depressed counties; a portion third (between OK Chevrolet and of the pool fund not allocated Subway)... I want something tanfor this year; or gible there.” a loan. Council memENDOR “For any agency look- VRESOLUTION ber Scott Olson particularly ing at us, if someone’s PASSES objected to taking giving us 95 percent, willOrganizations out a loan withnow be the out knowing if coming up with five final authority the funds would which venpercent is a rational on be available for dors can ply their repayment. expectation for an wares at public “But if (the sponexternal organization,. events road) fails comsored by those pletely, we or g a n i z at i on s Scott Olson, could be lookTonasket City Council Member on city proping at a loan for erty according $400,000,” Plumb to a resolution said. passed by the “I really want to encourage council Tuesday. finding the funds to do it,” Olson Organizations that purchase a said. “I don’t like the idea of a loan permit from the city may then unless we guarantee a way to pay charge vendors at their discretion for it. I like the idea of (Varela’s for the right to sell at their events. Kurt) Holland looking for other Organizations that encounter money. You say this is what we unauthorized vendors at their pay taxes for ... infrastructure events may seek city support (i.e. is what our city does. I would law enforcement) to have those encourage us to be willing to bite vendors removed. the bullet on this one and find a The permit this year will cost way to pay for it without taking $35 for one event (appropriate away from our bare bones budget for an organization like the socthat we have now.” cer league that sponsors one big The council voted after plenty tournament each spring) or $75 of additional discussion over the to cover a year’s worth of events benefits and pitfalls of various (more appropriate for groups funding sources. like the Community Cultural “For any agency looking at us, Center). if someone’s giving us 95 percent, The resolution had been discoming up with five percent is a cussed at several meetings

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 16

throughout the past year and was passed unanimously by the council with minimal additional discussion.

PILKINTON RECOGNIZED The contributions of former public works director Bill Pilkinton, who recently passed away, were recognized by the city council during Tuesday’s meeting. “I propose we do something to memorialize him,” council member Jill Vugteveen said. “Something permanent, like a park bench or a tree.” Plumb issued a formal statement of condolence. “I salute his service to our community,” Plumb said. “I’m saddened, and so are multiple people, on his passing. I commend Council member Vugteveen for coming up with ideas to memorialize his service to our community. I stand with the family; we’ll miss him greatly.” SURVEILLANCE CAMERA POLICY SUBMITTED

Police Chief Rob Burks submitted a revised camera surveillance policy for the council’s review, one which he said was based upon a similar policy currently used by the Pullman police. “The points I like - it talks two or three times about infringing on rights to privacy, “he said. “It also covers any and all cameras, because 8-10 years from now, as things advance who knows what will be a camera? Whether it’s in a pen or cell phone, this covers all possible cameras.” Plumb assigned the policy

SEE COUNCIL | PG A3

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb said at last Tuesday’s City Council meeting that he would do whatever he could to secure the final five percent of funding needed to complete the 3rd/5th/6th Street stormwater repair project. On Monday, April 15, Plumb said the Okanogan County Board of Commissioners approved the use of $19,510 of so-called “.09 money” to complete the funding of the project. A Transportation Infrastructure Board grant will fund the other 95 percent of the project. Without the final five percent, the city was at risk of losing a nearly $400,000 grant for much needed repairs to streets in the city’s business core. “I give a lot of credit to the commissioners,” Plumb said. “They looked very closely at how the grant was put together. They saw the project for its value, and really this is what that .09 money is for. This is an opportunity; it would be hard to let $400,000 vanish if we couldn’t come up with $19,000.” The .09 funding is a portion of state sales tax revenue that is returned to economically depressed counties for county and city governments to direct into projects to help enhance their local economies. Twenty percent of that is earmarked for “emergent opportunities,” and Plumb said this project perfectly fit that description. “It’s wise on the state and county’s part to set aside money for those reasons,” Plumb said. “This is right in the middle of downtown, and some of those streets are getting tough to traverse, especially when it rains. “Opportunities to get state funds are probably going to become a lot more limited in the future, and we’ve been in the right place at the right time to get some of this money for our infrastructure. And that, to me, is what we need to be doing: providing infrastructure so people can live, work and play, and I credit the council for staying on board with this.” Plumb also credited Roni Holder-Diefenbach, director of the Economic Alliance, and city planner Kurt Danison (Highland Associates), for their work. “Pretty much all of downtown is going to be torn up,” he said. “But the infrastructure fixes will be well worth it.”

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

UPDATE: COUNTY COMMISSIONERS HEED MAYOR’S REQUEST FOR ‘.09 FUNDING’ FOR REPAIRS

Valley Life A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9 Sports A10

Valley Life Police Stats Obituaries

A11 A11 A12


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 18, 2013

Omak’s Apple Springs providing senior care

PAINTING THE TOWN

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Tosca Pickering of Oroville High School takes a wire brush to a fire hydrant on Main Street in preparation for painting as a number of her friends look on. Pickering is repainting a number of hydrants around town for her senior project.

NVH | FROM A1 $861,271, up 78.8 percent; * The hospital’s percentage of revenue from the Maintenance and Operations Levy was 2.2 percent in 2011, down 27.4 percent from five years previous. In terms of patient health status, two key areas where the hospital district varied from state norms included: * 26.8 percent were classified as current smokers, as opposed to 16.0 percent statewide; * 14.7 percent received inadequate prenatal care (fewer than four visits, or care started during the third trimester), significantly better than the state’s rate of 25.3 percent. “During March,” she wrote, “our time was mostly spent on preparing for litigation and our annual audit by DZA (Dingus, Zarecor and Associates, PLLC). We have not seen the report yet but will present that report to the Board when it is complete.”

Space allocation Commissioner Clarice Nelson reported on the progress of the space allocation commit-

As

tee, which is studying potential uses for the now-closed Assisted Living building. Nelson said that the district is still waiting to hear about what state-imposed restrictions on space usage might entail, and that the priority as long as the hospital is in warrants is to not spend money on any upgrades. “We’re looking at some of the ways to save costs to the district, such as having apartments for our physicians, per diem, or VA providers (rather than renting that space elsewhere),” she said. “And we’re looking at our departments that interact with the public and making them more accessible to the community. “Lots of things are happening in that committee, but it takes some time.”

Attorney discusses public comment

NVH attorney Mick Howe advised the Board of Commissioners that a formal policy regarding public comment at board meetings was needed to ensure that the meetings would

be productive. “The Open Public Meetings act requires that the meetings are open to the public, but one of the most commonly misunderstood provisions ... is that it does not allow participation by the members of the public,” Howe said. “That is allowed based upon locally adopted rules or procedures. “I think that you should consider adopting some strategy or policy that governs how that takes place. Most agencies allow some participation to a limited extent for items that are on the agenda. Public participation is limited to those items and generally limited in time and scope. If you want to go beyond that, I think you ought to consider a policy that disallows harassment or harassing-type comments.” He said, referring to a summary of public meeting laws published in the Municipal Research and Services Center, that there was nothing that required the board to allow derogatory comments to be made during its meetings. “I didn’t understand the group we were dealing with until we

were actually in court, and actually witnessed the bailiff of the court having to summon the county sheriff to the court room,” he said. “I mean, that doesn’t happen very often. “In light of that, we really ought to adopt a policy and procedure that puts some rules into place so that we can have an orderly board meeting and not be subjected to the kinds of behavior that we saw.” Howe added that he felt some of the comments at previous meetings flew in the face of the democratic process. “You members of the board were elected by the voters of this hospital district,” he said. “You were elected to do this job. That’s (elections) the process for removing you if there’s going to be a removal. You saw where the recall process went. That’s another avenue that’s available. But to come in in a harassing way and ask that you all resign, I don’t think accomplishes anything.” Commissioner Lael Duncan agreed to formulate a policy that she would forward to Howe to evaluate.

OMAK - With the closure of North Valley Assisted Living, the closest assisted living facility to the North Okanogan Valley is Apple Springs Senior Living in Omak. One of nine senior living communities throughout Washington and Oregon owned by Artegan, Apple Springs is indeed seeking new residents. As a privately-owned facility, Apple Springs keeps waiting lists for private pay and Medicaid patients. But contrary to rumor - one which regrettably reached the pages of this publication - the wait for a Medicaid room is not years long. “I’m not sure where that came from,” said Apple Springs executive director Dana Hyde. “We do have waiting lists for both, and things change very quickly.” Medicaid rooms are in higher demand, and as a result availability may be limited. “We maintain the ability to accept Medicaid (residents),” Hyde said. “We had three residents recently move out because they required a higher level of care than we provide - two private pay and one Medicaid. So today we have those rooms available, but that can change almost daily.” Apple Springs is licensed for 60 residents in 53 rooms, including 38 studio apartments and 15 onebedroom apartments. “Our Chief Operating Officer, Warren Page, has been here seven years,” Hyde said. “He clarified for me that since he’s been in this position, we’ve never asked a resident to leave any of our facilities for financial reasons. When they run out of private funds, they get first priority on the Medicaid rooms. We’ve had six people recently who have done that.” Prospective residents undergo an evaluation prior to admission to ensure that they won’t be forced to move out in short order due to the level of care they require. “It’s important that whoever comes in can stay,” Hyde said. “We don’t want someone to have to move to a place that requires a higher level of care within weeks or months of moving here. It’s

very, very tough on anyone to have to move - especially in this population - and having to do that multiple times in a short period is that much harder.” Hyde said prospective residents or their families can contact her at (509) 826-3590 for further information or to schedule a visit. “People can either just stop by or schedule a tour and have a free meal,” she said. “There are opportunities to spend a weekend (on a pay-by-the-day basis) and see what it’s like to participate in our activities, get to know the residents, have your meals prepared for you and not have to do the dishes.” The next step, she said, is to set up an appointment with the facility’s nurse and resident services director to determine whether they would be a good fit for longterm residency. “We can see what kinds of health challenges they have, what kinds of things they like to do, get an idea of their orientation and where they’re at,” Hyde said. “Mental health concerns like dementia or Alzheimer’s aren’t in themselves necessarily a disqualifier. It’s more about whether the level of care we provide is appropriate for what their needs are. “As much as we want people to enjoy living here and enjoy what’s available, our No. 1 priority is safety.” Hyde said that there are plenty of activities that keep the residents engaged. “We have a fantastic activities program, and we have two standard poodles - a medical alert service dog and a therapy dog - who are the ‘belles of the ball,’ “ she said. “Our activity is starting an ‘Art of Life Club,’ where the residents find a deserving cause in the community - such as the Humane Society or a high school student with some kind of need - and do some fundraising. They’ve gotten excited about what projects they want to be involved with. “In a community like this, surrounded by 40 or 50 people with similar backgrounds, who are long-time local residents and know all the same people, there are a lot of things to do that really help to give people a purpose.”

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APRIL 18, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

COUNCIL | FROM A1 to the public safety committee, which would then issue a recommendation. “It’s a lot shorter than the last example of one you gave us,” Vugteveen said. “I love ‘simple,’ hope this covers everything we need it to. I just want to compare the two and make sure. “I also want to make sure it covers how those pictures can be posted, that pictures from cameras we use don’t get posted on public media.” “It’s in there,” Burks said. “Basically they would get treated like evidence. They’re Tonasket Police Department’s ... if anyone requests to see it and legally we have to show them, they will have to come to the police department to view it under supervision. So there is extra protection.”

Youth shine The council also saw a pre-

sentation by the Tonasket High School FFA’s Ag Issues team, which debated various viewpoints on wolf-human interaction in the state. Council member Dennis Brown announced that the annual Arbor Day celebration will be held this year at Chief Tonasket Park on Friday, April 26 at 3:00 p.m. Also, the council approved the use of Founders Day Park by Tonasket Middle School students on May 25 to hold a fundraiser for the city swimming pool, which has been closed for nearly two years. Council member Lee Hale was excused from attendance at the meeting due to a family emergency. The City Council’s next regular meeting will be Tuesday, April 23, at 7 p.m. in the Tonasket City Hall council chambers.

Guest workers | FROM A1 Wednesday, April 11 meeting the board was informed by Housing Authority Director Cheryl Lewis that this would not work because the health department would not allow guest workers to live in the air conditioned tents because of H2A regulations. Lewis and her assistant Cole Renfro informed the board that they had formulated an alternative plan which would cost about the same as pouring the concrete slabs, adding additional power poles and converting the recreation room. The plan would include building a 25 foot by 30 foot building for additional sleeping space, converting the recreation room and adding two cooktops to the kitchen area. Other costs would include purchasing the bunkbeds. “Del Rosario plans on bringing in 65 guest workers, Gold Digger 51 and Tabers 10,” said Renfro. “Del Rosario’s workers will be here about six and a half months,

Gold Digger’s four months and Taber’s for two.” Although the project will cost the Housing Authority in the neighborhood of $30,000, the board approved the measure a their April meeting with the understanding that the authority will recoup the investment and clear $70,000 profit from rentals which can be reinvested in future farmworker housing projects. H2A is a federal program under which employers can bring in guest workers who must be guaranteed housing. The OHA provided housing for a much smaller number last year. “We are going with the program because we want to guarantee a labor source above and beyond what we already employ. This shouldn’t affect any of the migrant workers we have employed in the past,” said Greg Moser, general manager of Gold Digger Inc. at the Oroville Housing Authority’s February meeting.

Science on Wheels coming to Oroville Submitted by Katelyn Del Buco Pacific Science Center

F A Pr oo c iz d ti e vi s ti es

OROVILLE – The Science On Wheels Van will be in Oroville on Tuesday, April 23 at Oroville Elementary. Space Odyssey will be bringing portable exhibits and lessons to students for a full day of hands-on activities, experiments, and most of all, fun. Each year Pacific Science Center’s Science On Wheels program delivers exciting, interactive science curriculum to elementary and middle schools in Washington State. Science On Wheels offers one hour and 45 minutes of student contact, making it the most extensive school outreach program in the country. The Science On Wheels program at Pacific Science Center, an independent, not-for-profit educational institution, began during the gas crisis of the 1970’s, when groups of school children could no longer visit the museum on field trips. Educators were quick to respond to the needs of these science-starved children and they began loading lessons and small exhibits into station wagons. From these small beginnings, Science On Wheels quickly grew into one of the largest science

outreach programs in the country. The demand for in-school and community based programs expanded so quickly in fact, that our offerings were expanded in 1999. These new programs emerged to meet the needs of community organizations who also wanted science fun brought to them. Whereas, earlier programs had focused on school children, these additional programs inspired a love for science at libraries, community centers, fairs, and festivals. A typical van visit to an elementary school includes: a lively, 30-minute opening assembly, 30 interactive exhibits set up in the library or gym, and five to 15 individual classroom visits by Pacific Science Center teachers. Currently, Science On Wheels offers seven subject areas; six designed for elementary schools and one for secondary schools. Over the past decade, Science On Wheels has brought the fun of science and math to more than 1.5 million children and adults throughout Washington. Our staff ’s varied backgrounds in science, education and theater, provide an exciting day for students and families as we inspire a fascination in math, science and technology.

OKANOGAN COUNTY

Boom Towns & Relic Hunters in its second printing Author looks at ghost towns around state, Okanogan and Ferry counties

of Northeastern Washington. In addition, he is frequently sought out to appear at book talks, book signings, trade shows, TV shows, and radio talk shows. During the summer months, Smith, an experienced adventure guide, stays busy leading his  “Premier Guided Ghost  TownTours,”  which allows tourists and vacationers to experience for themselves the ghost  towns, mining camps,

Submitted

Back in the glory days, gold was $21 per ounce; now, the price of gold is $1,641 per ounce. There was more gold left behind than was taken out. Today, it’s mainly a mother lode of memories; however, Jerry Smith states, “There’s still gold in them-thar hills!” Just when you thought that striking-it-rich was impossible, comes a fresh, new updated and revised book transporting one back in time to the boomtown days of yesteryear. Bring back to life the ageless Old West miningera of prosperous boomtowns, miners, prospectors, pioneers, desperados, and million-dollar gold and silver mines, all with one book. It is Boom Towns & Relic Hunters of Washington State. Boom Towns & Relic Hunters crew is composed of a diverse team including experts from specialties in GPS navigation, hightech computerized metal detectors, gold recovery, adventure seekers, and cultural historians. Along with his crew, Smith shows you the way to some of Washington’s most picturesque, abandoned sites whose yesteryears were as colorful as they were lively. Experience first-hand the excitement of historic ghost towns such as Gold Hill, Silver, Ruby and Nighthawk. Go back to the legendary boot hill grave site of famed desperado Frank Watkins, and million-dollar mines like the Montana, First Thought located by Smith’s team of experts. Probe

Author Jerry Smith in Old Molson the secrets of these unprecedented “time capsules” as well as the clues they offer to extraordinary pioneer and mining days dating back over one-hundred years. The author is a longtime native of Washington State. Along with his diverse Boom Towns & Relic Hunters team of experts, he spends much of his time researching, exploring, and seeking out long-lost and forgotten ghost towns, mining camps and historic sites of Northeastern Washington State. He has authored numerous articles for various periodicals, including national magazines on the history of Northeastern Washington State. His articles and photography have appeared in Lost Treasure magazine, Washington Prospectors magazine, Gold Prospectors & Treasure Hunters magazine, Cascade Valley Voices magazine, Aero Mechanic newspaper, and Nostalgia Magazine. He has served as an expert consultant on documentary TV shows about the history

Submitted image

Jerry Smith’s book, Boom Towns & Relic Hunters of Washington State, features the Old Molson Museum on its cover, a familiar sight to many who live in Okanogan County. His book explores such ghost towns as Gold Hill, Silver, Ruby and Nighthawk.

North Cascades Highway reopened Monday afternoon Half as much snow as last year made clearing faster for crews   Submitted by Jeff Adamson

WSDOT Communications

WENATCHEE – Lighter snowfall this past winter helped crews reopen the North Cascades Highway today, April 16, almost a month earlier than last year. Washington State Department of Transportation crews and drivers celebrated at 1 p.m. today, as both east and west side gates swung open. The highway reopened well in advance of the start of the lowland fishing season and the annual 49’er Days festival in Winthrop. WSDOT crews began the clearing process on State Route 20, the North Cascades Highway, on March 25, a day earlier than last year. On average, it takes four

A D FR M E IS E S IO N

and historic sites in beautiful Okanogan County. The book, ISBN 9781598491173, is soft bound and retails for $38.95. For more information about Boom Towns & Relic Hunters of Washington State, or to schedule an interview, book signing, or speaking engagement, please contact Smith at (206) 300-5056  or  Jerry@ GhostTownsUSA.com.

to six weeks for crews to clear the highway, but this year they accomplished it in three weeks. Crews cleared snow as deep as 35 feet over the roadway; last year, it was double the amount. “We all live up here and know how great it will be for local businesses to have the highway open earlier this year,” said Don Becker, WSDOT Twisp Maintenance Supervisor. The afternoon reopening allows crews time to “sweep” the entire 37-mile winter closure zone for sand, rocks and debris, clear snow from below a couple of avalanche chutes and apply any sand or deicer that’s needed.  Under partly cloudy skies, the first drivers on the North Cascades Highway today found the road conditions bare and dry

or bare and wet. The temperature at the west gate was 49 degrees, and 39 degrees at the east gate. The highway was closed Nov. 20, 2012, from milepost 134, seven miles east of Diablo Dam on the west side of Rainy Pass, to milepost 171, nine miles west of Mazama. The latest reopening for the highway was recorded on June 14, 1974. The earliest opening ever was March 10, 2005. In 1980, four years after the highway first opened, it remained open all winter due to a drought year. For more information, including a history of opening and closing dates, maps, photos and progress reports on the 2013 opening, visit the http://www.wsdot. wa.gov/traffic/passes/northcascades.

May Fest Parade applications are available OROVILLE - Entry applications for the 79th Annual May Festival Parade on May 11 are available from several locations around Oroville. Applications for the parade can be found at Customer Service at Prince’s Center, Sterling Savings Bank and the Oroville School District Superintendent’s office or by calling (509) 429-9397. Parade line-up starts at 8 p.m. with judging at 8:30 a.m. The parade starts at 10 a.m.

Out On The Town your guide to

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April 20th

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For more info visit

Fri. 9-5 • Sat. 9-5 • Sun. 10-2

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509-422-1621

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April 19th, 20th, 21st • Games • Crafts

12pm - 5pm

• • • • • •

Tractors • Lawn Care Irrigation • Baked Goods Plants • Garden Supplies Tupperware • Avon Handcrafted Wood Furniture And More!

Will be in the Arts & Crafts & Home Economics Buildings on April 20-21. Admission will be charged. CHECK OUT NorthwestGunShows.com

Activites will include: Music, Kids “Spray Events” Tonasket Theme Song introduction Hospital staff vs. School Staff Tug of WAR!

The Mighty Lions * Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin) Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Menu: Hamburgers, Sausages, Hot Dogs, Mac & Cheese, BBQ Beans, Vegetables, Dessert, Soft Drinks, Adults-Only Beer Garden

For more info visit

www.tonasketwaterranch.org Come join the FUN!

Get This Family’s Attention ADVERTISE SPECIALS HERE

Call Charlene at 476-3602 EVERY WEEK


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 18, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life OROVILLE KITE DAY BRIGHTENS UP THE SKIES

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Although it wasn’t the highest kite in the sky that day, Ed Weitrick Jr. certainly had the largest kite on Oroville’s Kite Day (above and bottom right). The all American, red, white and blue flag kite has a wingspan of 12 feet, said Weitrick, who said he had 150 lb. test line to keep it under control. He said he was a little worried about being lifted off the ground by the kite which had all of his 500 feet of line out last Sunday morning. At one point there were at least a dozen kites in the air, many of them provided for free to the kids by the Oroville Chapter of the Royal Neighbors. The organization, which sponsored Kite Day again this year, also provided cookies and lemonade and gave out other small gifts to the participants. Kids and their parents got lots of exercise trying to get the kites just up above the calm air near the ground and into the breeze that would take the kites skyward. The weather on Sunday was much nicer than last year, moving from warm and sunny to shady and cool. But it was a lot better than the no wind and lots of rain from the previous year.

SAVE THE DATE! ZOOM IN ON A BUYER

Tonasket Chamber of Commerce 78th Tonasket Founders Day You are cordially invited to

SATURDAY, June 1, 2013 at the Parade

Advertise your goods and services in the Classifieds and reach hundreds of potential buyers daily. Call today to place your AD and make a sale quickly. Watch for classified specials! OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 509-476-3602

The day starts with BREAKFAST at the rodeo grounds followed by the Freedom run at the Elementary school. Then, the PARADE begins at 11 am. The theme this year is Make a Splash in support of the new Tonasket Water Ranch Spray Park and the benefits it will have for our community. We are hoping for more floats this year, and are encouraging you to be creative! We hope you will have fun Making a Splash down main street! After the parade we will have ACTIVITIES in Founders Day Park for the children and food for everyone. There will be various non-profit booths. Third street will again be open for vendors. The day ends at the RODEO GROUNDS with the final night of BULL RIDING. We hope you can be a part of the event, either by entering the parade or participating in the activities.

We hope to see you there, Tonasket Chamber of Commerce.

6th Annual Earth Day Faire A FREE 2-Day Event Saturday, April 20, Tour & e-Cycle

Pleasant Glade Green Intentional Community & The Tonasket School Garden Our tour will being at Pleasant Glade, which features underground living and more. The tour will conclude at the Tonasket School Garden. Meet at Pleasant Glade at 10 am, one block up Havillah Road from Hwy 97. Bring a sack lunch.

Bring your e-Cycle to the Green Okanogan (GO) Recycle Center from 8-4 on April 20th ONLY. GO Recycle is at the corner of N Western Ave and Division St in Tonasket. e-Cycle is TVs, Computers, Monitors, Towers and Laptops ONLY. 10-4 Plant Frenzy in Triangle Park - bring seeds and plants!

Come learn about being Green in the Okanogan!

Sunday, April 21, Earth Day Faire The Tonasket High School Commons (35 HS Hwy 20)

Doors open @ 9 for Registration - First 50 attendees to register will receive a GREEN gift! TOPICS: GO Recycle Center - Tonasket School Garden - Alternative Transportation - Permaculture - Conscious Buying - Alternative Energy Conservation District - Biodiversity - Slow Food Okanogan - Rocket Mass Heaters - Recycled Art showing and more! These topics will be displayed from 9-2. Sign up for earth-friendly classes. At 2 we will show a movie about the effect of plastic bags on the environment called “Bag It”

~ Games and face painting for the children ~

A FREE 2-day Event

For more information call Green Okanogan at 486-2389 Find the Recycling Chick or Green Okanogan on Facebook Sponsored by: Okanogan Family Faire


APRIL 18, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Miscellanea that’s been on my mind

I thought I’d give it a couple of week’s before I talked about it, but one recent happening was the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune and the Quad City Herald, our former sister newspaper, unsuccessfully bid on the Okanogan County Legals. The bid went to the mid-county newspaper, although their bid amount was more than a dollar more per column inch than the G-T/QCH combo. The commissioners, Sheila Kennedy and Ray Campbell, reasoned that since the other paper’s circulation was higher than the two papers combined, they would go that way. State law says they can award to the lowest bidder and past performance by the G-T/QCH and before that the G-T and the Methow Valley News, proves that we can get the job done and at a much lower cost. Out of We didn’t bid in 2012, and then-CommisMy Mind sioner Bud Hover asked why and encouraged Gary A. DeVon us to do so this year. He said we had saved the county $20,000. Unfortunately Bud didn’t win reelection so we didn’t have a commissioner on our side and Jim Detro, the commissioner from the north end, did not vote because as board chairman he only votes in case of a tie. What we want to know is will Campbell and Kennedy have to return their Tea Party cards? Throwing away an extra $10,000 to $20,000 of taxpayer money seems like a good reason to get 86-ed from the party to us. Of course we never get invited anyway so maybe we just don’t understand the rules when it comes to spending the county’s tax dollars. Suffice to say, we will be back next year with our bid on the county legal advertising. We will no longer let our competitors in mid county be the sole bidder allowing them to go unchallenged as to what they charge to keep our fellow county citizens informed on the county’s business. Anyway, that’s enough on that subject; any more and it will just sound like sour grapes. What we are excited about is the Oroville Housing Authority’s continued support of our growers by expanding housing for what is expected to be an influx of H2A guest workers. In order to maintain a stable labor pool, Gold Digger Apples, which represents several growers and the Del Rosario and Taber orchards, have worked their way through the federal paperwork and regulations to bring guest workers to our area. Gold Digger’s Greg Moser told the Housing Authority that the workers are needed in addition to the migrant workers and others they employ annually, just to manage what the co-op produces annually. By agreeing to build more bunk space, the Housing Authority will get a new building and some improvements paid for. The authority will make enough profit from the rentals this year that they will be able to make more improvements to the farm worker housing in the future, ensuring that Oroville won’t seem like the end of the line for farm workers, but a good place to come and work. The other good news is the Housing Authority is educating itself on the Greenhouse Project which would allow it to build small elder care homes for up to six residents. Winthrop started with one of these and now is working on their third. The OHA would like to mimic that project because we all know that places for our elderly are getting harder to find not just in Okanogan County, but throughout the state.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Our treasure: the Similkameen Dear Gary, The Similkameen is rising with rains in the watershed up river, and we enter spring anticipating what flows and high waters she might bring us down here in the valley. We are dependent on this river, it charges the aquifer with the water we drink, 75 percent of the Okanogan River flow is contributed by her cold mountain water, she spills into Palmer Lake during spring high water adding to its diversity, provides an invaluable wildlife corridor and sustains our King Salmon and Steelhead fisheries. Now, the newly developed Similkameen Trail leads the way to a sustainable future based on outdoor recreation. Here in Oroville, we have been in a difficult economy for years, the big box stores hurt our Main St. merchants, low prices for farmers, high costs for contractors and in general not enough money to go around. Today, we have just what we need to bring fresh new money to town with generally pleasant people doing the spending. Year around Outdoor recreation is what we have to offer and the offerings just keep getting better. Oroville’s location directly on the 1,100mile Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail is great economic news for this community. We now find ourselves a gateway city to a national scenic trail. Through many hours of hard work by publicly minded volunteers, county employees, Okanogan Valley Chapter Backcountry Horseman of Washington, state and forest service employees, high school students, Oroville PNTA and others, we now have two beautiful sections of this trail to be proud of, Whistler Canyon Trail and the Similkameen Trail, with plans for connecting trails and more continuous trails west and east. Through hikers, walking or trail riding the Pacific Northwest Trail will be coming through, with others just coming to hike for the day. These trails are bringing people to Oroville to photograph wildlife, hike, bike,

and unwind from stressful lives, and leave some money in the local economy. Similkameen Falls just below Enloe Dam is a beautiful natural rock falls, its unique horseshoe shape, multiple cascades, chutes and stair steps, and its deep-green rocky pools below offer a cool contrast to our dry baked hills. It’s a beautiful, sacred place, and it must be protected. We need wild rivers and protected set asides for wildlife. We need to learn from the excesses of the past and learn to live within our limits, leaving enough for the rest of the species inhabiting our planet. Protect our treasure, the Similkameen. Coming generations will thank us if we do. Joseph Enzensperger Oroville

Just who is doing the harassing here? Dear Gary, Let me paint a pic for you. On March 16, two people in a red Landcruiser turn down a private drive violating the 10 mph sign posted, race down two driveways, back up after missing the one they were after; fly into the residential driveway past the children’s toys and the “no trespassing signs” and pull up on the property owner. Subsequently she is telling them to leave when the guy gets out starts waving his arms and getting in her face, talking about how he had a legal right to be there because “he was serving legal papers.” When they do leave they leave at the same breakneck speed they came in, once again disregarding the kids at play and the gentleman that just had his hip replaced walking his elderly dog. The surveillance video of the incident wasn’t publicized or put on Youtube like some of us would have liked, a report was made to the police and a letter was written to the judge asking that it not happen in the future and was left at that. Oddly enough since that letter was written to the judge there has been a sudden wave of allegations from NVH CEO, commissioners and administrators that they have

been harassed, threatened and/or alienated. So I’m calling bull! You can’t be belligerent, hostile and aggressive toward people for the last several months then turn around and claim you’re the victim. And people can’t violate someone’s privacy, invade their personal space and harass them in their own yard like they did on the 16th then turn around and cry foul. But let’s just entertain their accusations for a moment. Traditionally communities like ours are very trusting and forgiving. So if your getting a strong reaction, you better re-evaluate your actions and maybe your conscience. Colten Naclerio Spokane

Opening eyes about teenagers’ lives Dear Editor, I am a student at Tonasket High School and my Senior Project is a compilation of monologues with the theme of Teen Issues. I’m doing this as my project because I think people think they know what happens in the lives of teenagers, but they really don’t and I’d like to open their eyes. It will be on the 24th in the Tonasket commons on the stage and there is no cost. It will start at 6 p.m. and will be child appropriate. Lynn Hendrix Tonasket

Need to realize what you do affects others Dear Editor, This letter is addressed to everyone: When/ if you come to the realization that what you do affects the people around you, you might decide to care about how your actions or inactions affect others. Respectfully, Marcy King Oroville

Unemployment rates in 7th District show need to focus on job creation, not more taxation BY REPRESENTATIVE JOEL KRETZ AND REPRESENTATIVE SHELLY SHORT SEVENTH LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT

It didn’t take long for now-Gov. Jay Inslee to backtrack on his campaign-trail promise to voters that he would not support new or higher taxes on hardworking Washingtonians. His state budget proposal has $1.2 billion in tax increases. Following the governor’s lead, the House Democrats introduced a similar proposal that will raise taxes nearly $1.3 billion. As your state representatives, we think that before politicians start reaching for our wallets, they should first make sure folks around the state have an income source from which to pay them – you know, a job. Our proposal, House Joint Resolution 4206, to put the two-thirds vote requirement of the Legislature for tax increases in the state constitution is something we believe needs to be passed and sent to voters for approval. This provision would protect taxpayers from politicians who grab for our wallets at every turn rather than trim government waste. And, it would give employers some tax certainty. The unemployment rates in counties in the Seventh District are some of the highest in the state. In fact, Ferry County, with an unemployment rate of 15.1 percent, is the highest in the state. The remainder of Seventh District counties have unemployment rates as follows: Okanogan 12.8 percent, Stevens 13.7 percent, Pend Oreille 14.1 percent and

Spokane 10 percent. We are focused like a laser on balancing the budget within current tax collections and making smart policy choices that put people back to work in good-paying, private-sector jobs. With regard to tax increases, we don’t need them. As of the March 20 state revenue forecast, tax collections are growing by $2 billion, or 6.6 percent. In our estimation, what taxpayers have sent us is plenty and makes the case that we don’t need to raise taxes to fund an ever-expanding government. We believe that getting people back to work is the best economic stimulus. One solution that would help speed up project starts is House Bill 1236. It would require agencies to make a permit decision within 90 days or the permit is automatically granted. We saw what a long, drawn-out permitting failure did for job possibilities at the Buckhorn Mine. Getting answers from state government quickly to spur economic development is critical to our part of the state, and every other region as well. The state is further limiting counties’ options by buying up large swaths of land for conservation. Each year, the state buys up more land in the Seventh District. Some counties are as much as 80-90 percent government-owned land. This land is sheltered from economic development and, by default, property tax collections that pay for schools and local services. It’s time for an honest debate about the

state buying up land that it cannot manage and taking it out of the running for muchneeded economic development and job creation opportunities. Local governments are struggling – they need employers to locate in their communities and begin rebuilding their local economies. The Growth Management Act, or GMA, is also an issue hamstringing our local governments. Spending time and money on land use planning that is geared toward easing urban sprawl like that of downtown Seattle, and which we have none of, is a waste of resources. House Bill 1224 would have allowed small counties that voluntarily opted into GMA planning to opt out of the costly GMA regulations. It was again sidelined by majority Democrats in the House. Our effort to educate urban lawmakers of the impact of their policies on rural parts of the state is drowned out by environmentalists. It’s time to set aside social policies and focus on job creation. We’re committed to work with anyone and everyone to put in place policies that encourage employers to invest in our residents. Rep. Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, serves as the deputy Republican leader in the House and can be reached at (360) 786-7988 or joel.kretz@ leg.wa.gov. Rep. Shelly Short, R-Addy, is the lead Republican on the House Environment Committee and can be reached at (360) 7867908 or shelly.short@leg.wa.gov.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 18, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Lots to talk about, some good news, some sad Home again! Out of town for two weeks find many happenings and changes in and about town. Some good, some sad. A phone call from N o r e e n Harnasch tells us she and Verle are pretty well settled, in Kennewick. THIS & THAT New address Joyce Emry is 524 N. Hawt hor ne Ct. Apt. 2 A, Kennewick, WA 99336-

able prices. And I see the “Shop” tavern has new owners, as shown on the reader board. Dirt piles and fresh diggin’ in the parking lot next to the Gold Digger retail store, and my informant thought it was to be a park, but we’ll see, further down the line. There seems to be something going on at the Texaco station, which has been out of business for quite sometime. Such as numerous cars sitting on the parking lot, the door sometimes open, etc. And the new condo, by the Catholic Church, that has been empty since it was finished, has lights on at night, as if there are tenants living there. Beware of half truths. You may get the wrong half! Soon the mushroom and asparags hunters will be going to their favorite spots to gather the early spring additives for the dinner table. I’m always reminded, how I hated asparagus when I first came to this locale and was thinning apples, dragging a ladder through the bountiful amounts of the green stuff,

2586. After having lived most of their lives in Oroville, it was a big decision making the move, to strange territories, but they will adjust and having their daughter, Marcia and Mark (Kuntz) five minutes away, will be a great asset. Friends might want to drop them a card, as they are already missing folks and invite anyone passing by, to stop in and say hi. New name at Fat Boy’s eating establishment. Don’t know what it is to be, as at this writing the sign is being prepped to have a new name painted over the old. (America’s Family Grill). Linda’s Bakery is to be called Eva’s. Great new menu at the former hotdog place, “Back to the Basics,” with a lot of good sounding things, with most reason-

TERRIFIC KIDS

and now I pay good money for it. Where I came from it was a weed, to be used in flower arrangements. On reading back issues of the G-T and another paper, I learn of the deaths of Judge Jim Thomas and Dick Wisener. Then at the beauty shop word of the death of Phyllis Schenyer and Billie Essary. Sincere sympathy goes out to the families of the above mentioned. And one of my favorite comedians, Jonathan Winters, passed away. He was so funny without using undesirable words. My close neighbor, Beverly Holden, has had the misfortune of having had multiple strokes and is in Sacred Heart hospital, Spokane, wishing to be discharged, but doctors feel she isn’t ready for that. Peggy (Buckmiller) Wall is still having serious health issues, and hopefully some changes with doctors and medications will be beneficial. Can you imagine Peggy without four inch high heels? They have been her trademark for years, but a loss of balance, being one of

Community Schools wants to hear your comments By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

We occasionally ask for comments and suggestions about our catalog and the community schools program, but rarely get a response. We hope this means you like what you see. If you don’t, or think we can do some-

her problems prevents her from wearing anything but flats. Traveling doesn’t have the excitement for me that it does for my husband and my home looked so inviting when we returned, even with all the dirty windows and flower pots, still with dead flowers in them. And it is too cold at night to put new, fresh plants in them. So, I’m all finished with Gonzaga basketball and they didn’t do as well as I’d hoped for in the play offs, but they had a great year and provided a lot of entertainment for me and several of my friends. Now, it’s on to the Mariner’s and baseball. I don’t get nearly as wrapped up in those games and it doesn’t matter that I miss some of them because there is usually another one tomorrow. I got anxious for a BLT sandwich, and as usual the tomato tasted like cardboard but the other parts were quite good. Local grocery, Harvest Foods, is getting new shopping carts. That will be nice to have a cart that goes the direction I want it to go instead of having a stubborn wheel that goes every which way.

LEARNING TREE thing better, we want to hear from you. Our spring catalog has a new look and it’s much more appealing but a couple of suggestions are well taken. The next catalog will have a phone number and/ or email address on every page. Some folks miss the list of classes with page numbers, so we will likely return that feature to the catalog next fall, as well, although you may need to open the catalog to see it.

HILLTOP Chesaw ‘Don’t Blink’ Walking COMMENTS on Saturday, Tour April 27 toAprilthe 20.BingoLetCasino Marianne know if submitted photo

April’s Terrific Kids are pictured with the Kiwanis Club of Tonasket’s newest member, Terri Orford (far right). The Kiwanis will be holding a raffle to raise money to give our Terrific Kids a little extra. Since all the money from this raffle will go to the Terrific Kids, the Kiwanis are hoping it will be well received by the local residents.

We’ve lost one of our pinochle playing friends Submitted by Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

We were sorry to hear of the passing of our pinochle friend, Phyllis Shenyer. Ted Thomdike called to let me know that her service will be at the Episcopal Church on Saturday, April 20. The service starts at 1 p.m. Refreshments to follow. Bev Holden is still at Sacred Heart Hospital in Spokane. More tests were scheduled, but haven’t heard the results yet.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Bonnie Maynard should be home soon from Wenatchee and the Central Washington Hospital. Juanita Waggy is home and says she expects to be back playing pinochle before too long. We have quite a selection of books, puzzles and many talking books both CD’s and tapes; so the next time you are planning a trip stop by and check out our selections and take one, or more, with you. Joy and John Lawson and friends will be playing music this

Friday. They are always a favorite and people like to sing along and sometimes have been known to dance. Clayton and Boots Emry are back from their condo visit in Port Townsend. I hear they also hit Ocean Shores and a spot in Oregon. Of course they had to show up at Saturday night pinochle. Good to have them back. Senior Center Royalty have been chosen and they are: Marge Finley and Dave Karaffa; Pinochle Scores for April 13: Door Prize: Evelyn Dull; most pinochles: Boots Emry; high women: Mary Lou Barnett and Boots Emry; They started at the head table and didn’t have to move all evening, so they were tied for highest scores; high man: Jim Fry. More next time.

By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

Although our weather is still unsteady with snow, grapple, sun, rain and hail it is encouraging because it changes quite fast. Maybe the real spring is coming soon. All we can do is hope. Upcoming events on our Hilltop: The first of several bingo nights will be starting on April 19th at the Grange Hall in Molson. The buy-in is $10 for 10 cards with the option of buying more cards for $1 each. Bring your friends and some snacks to share with others and enjoy a night out. The Red Hat Ladies are going

Memorial for Bill Pilkinton April 20 by Sue Wisener

Oroville Pharmacy wins ‘Patriotic Business’ Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck NCW Blue Star Mothers President

In December we asked businesses and venues in North Central Washington to purchase, display and make available to their patrons this year’s Hometown Soldier Calendar. Sixteen businesses in the North Valley participated, the largest number to date. When patrons see the calendar in a business they know where the proprietor and employees stand in support of our nation’s Armed Forces. The

Tonasket Eagles #3002

NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS moral of the families and friends of Service Members is boosted and a loyalty in a particularly loyal group is created. “It’s the right thing to do,” said one business owner. “(The military) has a history in our country of defending our rights, and we support them and their family members. We appreciate what they go through. It’s all part of the community we live in. We’re just proud to support our military families. It’s very minimal; after all they do for us. [Blue Star Mothers’] children risk their lives to fight for our freedom.” Based on the number of cal-

509-486-0615

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endars purchased, Dick Larson’s The weather is starting to prominent display of the warm up so make sure you check Hometown Soldier Calendar and the American flag, plus the out your air conditioning and willingness to collect cell phones swamp coolers, so you can stay for the NCW Blue Star Mothers’ nice and cool. Fishing season is recycling fund raiser in lieu of right around the corner so make his own cell phone recycling service, Oroville Pharmacy was been named the Patriotic Hometown Business of 2013. We will be honoring him and his employees Wednesday, April 24 at 6:30 p.m. at this month’s gathering at The Plaza restaurant. All are welcome Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the to join us and find out more about www.gazette-tribune.com time of year that you help save for a child’s college the Blue Star Mothers group.

you want to be included in the perks. (509) 485 2103 The Knob Hill Club will meet on Wednesday April 24 at noon with a Pot Luck. They will meet at the Chesaw Community Building. The last of the regular Pancake Breakfasts will be held at the Grange Hall in Molson on April 28 starting at 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Last chance to purchase a raffle ticket for one of the nice baskets the Ladies of the Auxiliary put together. The proceeds will go to the Grange to help pay for a new roof. Bring your friends. Everyone is invited to the “Don’t Blink Walking Tour of Chesaw” and “Highland Handmade.” The Summer Opening of Fiona’s will

TONASKET EAGLES sure and dust off those fishing poles. In Saturday April 20th, there will be a memorial for Bill Pilkinton at 2 pm. We would like to thank all that came and ate and bought items in the auction to benefit Larry Steil for his medical expenses. The annual road clean up is approaching on April 28th at 9am, so make sure you come and

Classes coming next week include Meatless Mondays (the day to forego meat! On Monday, April 22); Your Estate – Don’t Put it Off (this is a must for every adult on Monday, April 22); The Essence of Yoga (become aware of your inner nature on Tuesday, April 23, four sessions); and Beginning Dowsing and Divining (amazing what you can find, Thurs April 25, two sessions). Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011 or email her at community.schools@oroville.wednet.edu for information and to register. Remember, too, that we have a new website. Check it out at www. northvalleycommunityschools. com.

start on April 27th. All four businesses in town will have maps with some local history of Chesaw and visitors can take a self-directed tour with the maps, to find some interesting tidbits about our Highlands town. Businesses will open a 10 am (Chesaw Tavern and Store at 8 a.m.). Fiona Art Gallery will open the season with an Artist Reception from 4 to 7 p.m. Several local artists will be there to meet with the public, and a wide variety of arts and crafts will be available for viewing and for sale. Refreshments will be served and of course espresso drinks will be for sale. Come see early spring in the Highlands . April is Grange Month so on the fourth Thursday of the month the Grange will host a “Pie Social.” Bring your Friends and a Pie and be Social. OK, that’s Thursday, April 25 at the Grange, a pie, a friend and have a good time.

sign up to help to keep our section of highway clean. This Friday we will be having our weekly bingo at 7 pm and The kitchen will be open at 5:30 pm for some of those terrific cheeseburgers. Our pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows; 1st place went to Julie Hovland, 2nd place was taken by Neil Fifer, with Penny Smith taking the low score. Last pinochle went to Jo Porter. We wish those that might be ill a speedy recovery. God bless you all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

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certainJones states forcan thosework residents. Edward with you to develop a strategy to save for college. One option is a 529 college savings If you own an start annuity,ait new just makes sense to review it every now Why not holiday tradition? Make plan, where today’s cancomplimentary have tax benefits for you, and then. That’s why gift we offer annuity reviews. To make your college savings gift in time this thecan time of ensure year that you help save for a family members and the child.* Then you work your tradition? annuity stays in sync with your Why not start a to new holiday Make this the for the holidays, call or visit today. child’s college education. Edward Jones can goals. Plus, may be features current annuity simply *Contributions to athere 529that plan may behelp eligiblesave for your a state tax deduction or credit in time of year you a child’s college work with you to develop afor strategy to save for certain states for those residents. doesn’t offer. education. Sandra Rasmussen

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APRIL 18, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE LOTS OF VENDORS AT BLOSSOM SPRING BAZAAR The Blossom Spring Bazaar (far left) took place last Saturday, April 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Oroville High School Commons. The event was packed with vendors, the most in the bazaar’s seven year history. Admission was free, but organizers asked for a donation of a can of food for the food bank. There were also door prizes given out by participating vendors throughout the day. Among the booths, there were hand crafted items, health and fitness information, information on various community services, a well as beauty and skin care products, jewelry, home interior, workshops and demonstrations. The bazaar was sponsored by Blossom Ministries with some of the organizers posing for a picture (near left). Gary DeVon/staff photos

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Library Preschool Story Time The next two Tonasket Library preschool story time and activity days are Thursday April 18th and May 2nd at 10:30 am. Any questions call the Library at (509) 486-2366.

Family Bingo MOLSON - Molson will host a family bingo on Friday, April 19 at 6 p.m. Children have to be with a parent or guardian. Bring finger food to share with friends and neighbors.

Habitat Yard Sale OROVILLE - Okanogan County Habitat for Humanity will be holding a yard sale on Saturday, April 20 at Gold Digger Warehouse on Main St., across from the Oroville Library. Donations will be accepted on Saturday, April 13, from 10 a.m. until 12 noon.

Grange Flea Market OROVILLE - This Saturday, April 20, 10 a.m -2 p.m. at 622 Fir. Watchfor the sing on Hwy. 97, south of town. A lot of new vendors and bargains. We rent tables to sell yours. Lunch available at 11:30 p.m.; coffee all the time. For more info, call Betty Steg at (509) 476-3878.

Similkameen Sunday TONASKET - Similkameen Sunday: Honoring the River, Honoring the People of the River, will take place Sunday, April 21 from 12 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the CCC of Tonasket (411 Western Ave.). Join us in welcoming members of the Lower and Upper Similkameen Bands and Colville Tribes for a celebration of the cultural, spiritual and historic significance of Similkameen Falls. For more information Jere’ and Rick Gillespie at (509) 485-3844 or Joseph Enzensberger at (509) 476-2100.

Preschool and Kindergarten Roundup OROVILLE - The Oroville Elementary School will be conducting kindergarten registration for next school year on Wednesday, April 24 and Thursday, April 25. At the same time they will be conducting screenings for any child age 0 to 4 for developmental delays. Early childhood screenings will be done in either Spanish or English. The children will be tested in the fine and gross motor skills and in the social-emotional areas.

Community Action Meeting OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Community Action

Council Board of Directors will hold their regular Board Meeting on Wednesday, April 24 at 5:15 p.m. at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Okanogan, Wash. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. OCCAC is a community building organization. If you have questions or need additional info please contact Lael Duncan at OCCAC, (509) 422-4041.

Flood Season Meeting OKANOGAN - There will be an Okanogan County Flood Season Coordination Meeting on Thursday, April 25 from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Okanogan County Commissioner’s Conference Room, 123 5th Ave. N., Okanogan. The meeting is open to the public. Anyone with comments or concerns is encouraged to attend.

Don’t Blink Walking Tour CHESAW - Everyone is invited to the “Don’t Blink Walking Tour of Chesaw” and “Highland Handmade.” Season Opening at Fiona on Saturday, April 27. All four businesses in town will have maps with some local history of Chesaw, and visitors can take a self-directed tour with the maps, to find some interesting tidbits about our Highlands town. Businesses will be open at 10 a.m. (tavern and store open at 8 a.m.) and Fiona Art Gallery will open the season with an Artists Reception from 4-7 p.m. Several local artists will be there to meet with the public.

Family Caregivers Support Group TONASKET - Held at North Valley Hospital, in the Board Room at 126 S. Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket. Monday, April 29, at 6:00 p.m. For more information contact Bill Colomb or Diane Moser at (509) 486-3110.

CCC: A Gathering of Friends TONASKET - Concert and evening workshop, Wednesday, May 1, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Cost is $5 at the door, plus a tip jar for donations for performers. Enjoy a warmhearted and spirited two-part evening with an unusual group of songwriters, musicians, and dancers. Contra dancing will be part of this interactive audience participation performance. After a short intermission, adventuresome guests can participate with them in their approach to selfknowledge, self-mastery and service through spiritually focused creative arts.

Weather Spotter Training OKANOGAN - There will be a free Weather Spotter Training session at the County Sheriff ’s Office

ProMote YourYour event ! One!COallne•COallne•BOillne•BSilltatewide ProMote event • Statewide YOU NEED HELP – They need work. “ i have uSed uSed the wnPa imPaCt ad ad “ i have the wnPa imPaCt

OROVILLE - There will be a benefit concert for the Oroville School Music Department on Friday, April 19 at 7 p.m. at the OHS Commons. The concert is part of a senior project for student Scotty Frazier. Frazier has invited some special guest musicians to play as well. Donations will accepted at the door. Conference Room, 123 5th Ave. N., Okanogan, on Thursday, May 2 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. To register, contact Glenda Beauregard at the Emergency Management Department by calling (509) 4227206 or register online at: www. okangandem.org.

Music at the CCC TONASKET - Stephen Talley on guitars and Carol Smith on keyboard/synthesizer, Saturday, May 4, 7:00 p.m. Cost is $7.00 for CCC members, $8.00 for nonmembers. Bringing Original Music described as “Inner Dimensional,” interweaving melodies, harmonies and rhythms to create unique compositions with video backgrounds. Sound Travel’s music is evocative of time, place and emotion. Where you go on their musical current is up to you. Your imagination is your vessel. Preceded by dinner at 5:30 p.m, $5.

OROVILLE – Our instructor, Michael Stewart, has taught many people the basics of dowsing and divining for water, gold, or anything you choose with a divining rod or pendulum. Those who also take the advanced class on Thursday, May 9 will save $5 on their registration fee. Call

509-476-3602

DENTISTRY

OROVILLE - OHS Class of 1963 will be having a picnic at Lake Osoyoos Veterans Memorial Park on May 11 to celebrate 50 years of successful and adventurous living. Other classes from the 1960’s are also welcome. Plan to eat (picnic style foods are being catered) or snack your way (bring munchies or dessert if you can) through the afternoon while you renew old friendships and celebrate new ones. If you were a student in the class of ‘63 at any time

EYECARE

Editor’s Note: Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. However, if space allows it may be included prior the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. G.A.D.

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

At the

MOVIES

FAMILY PRACTICE

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

WATERFRONT eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

HEALTH CARE

TONASKET

OKANOGAN

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

Oliver Theatre

Reg. Showtimes: Sun.-Mon.-Tue.Thur. 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7&9pm

ThE crOOdS

250-498-2277

april 18 - 19 - 20 - 21 - 22 - 23 pg Thursday @ 7:30 p.M. Friday @ 7:00 & 9:00 p.M. saTurday @ 2:00, 7:00 & 9:00 pM sunday 7:30 p.M.- Monday @ 7:30 p.M. - Tuesday @ 7:30 p.M.

Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

GI JOE rETalIaTIOn

Thurs.-Fri.-*saT.-sun. - Mon.-Tues. april 18 -19 -20 -21 -22 -23. showTiMes on Fri. & saT. aT 7:00pM & 9:10pM pg

OMAK THEATER oMaK and Mirage TheaTers are now digiTal 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

OBlIVIOn

126 min

pg13

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

42

Biography/draMa/sporT sTarring chadwicK BoseMan, harrison Ford, nicole Beharie, chrisTopher Meloni pg13 128 min Fri. 6:45, 9:45 saT. *3:45,6:45,9:45 sun *4:00,7:00 wKdays. 7:00

Scary MOVIE 5

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

pg13

85min

ThE crOOdS

Adults $7.50 Kids 11-under & *Discount Matinee-kids/adults $5 ea

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-6191

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Fri. 6:45 & 9:45 saT. *3:45, 6:45 & 9:45 sun. *4:00 & 7:00 wKdys: 7:00

(509) 826-6191

Psychiatric Services

In Tonasket & Oroville

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health

(509) 826-8496

www.wvmedical.com

acTion/advenTure/sci Fi sTarring ToM cruise, Morgan FreeMan,

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aniMaTion/advenTure/roMance sTarring nicholas cage, ryan reynolds, eMMa sTone Fri. 6:45 & 9:15 saT. *4:15, 6:45, 9:15 sun. 98 min pg *4:30, 7:15 wKdys: 7:15

ContaCtCY our Your ontaCt LoCaL WnPa LoCaL WnPa MeMber M neMber eWsPaPer neWsPaPer to Learn . More. earn toMLore

OROVILLE - The 79th Annual Oroville May Festival Parade. Line up starts at 8 a.m.; judging

Class of ‘63 picnic

during freshman through senior years and have not received an information letter, contact Sandra Hill Peterson at (509)476-3378 or check out the website for more information. http://ohs63.com/.

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Dowsing and divining class

coMedy sTarring lindsay lohan, charlie sheen, jerry o’connell, snoop dogg. Fri. 7:00 & 9:15 sat. *4:45, 7:00 & 9:15 sun. *5:00,7:30 wKdys. 7:30

Request a free information kit today:

Ellen Barttels at North Valley Community Schools, (509) 4762011 or community.schools@ oroville.wednet.edu for information and to register.

starts at 8:30 a.m.; parade starts at 10 a.m.. Applications for the parade are available at Prince’s Center (Customer Service), Sterling Savings and the School District Superintendent’s office, or by calling (509) 429-9397.

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BENEFIT FOR THE OROVILLE SCHOOL MUSIC DEPARTMENT THIS FRIDAY

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel (509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line (509) 826-6191

Toll Free

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826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


Page 8 A8

Okanogan APRIL18, 18,2013 2013 OKANOGAN Valley VALLEYGazette-Tribune GAZETTE-TRIBUNE|• April

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

WorkSource Okanogan County

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St. Charles Place Apartments

WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION:

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Nice Offering of Clean Useable Shop & Tool Items, Plus Like-New Household and Various Collectibles. Partial Listing Below

*******************************

Delta 10-in Band Saw * Shop Mate Radial Arm Saw * Delco 14-in Band Saw * Oxy-Acet Set * 18-speed Drill Press on Stand * Craftsman Tool Box on Castors * 11-piece Slide Hammer HD * LOTS of Power and Hand Tools * 1980 GMC Diesel Sierra Classic Pickup, Auto * 1960’s Corvair Car, Needs work * Corvair Car Parts * 1947 K-5 Inter. 12-ft Flatbed, needs work * Craftsman 18 HP Riding Lawnmower * Craftsman 30-in Lawn Sweep * Snowblower / Rototiller Comb * Cub Cadet Tractor w/Hydro Snow Blower * COLLECTIBLES - Washboard * Draw Knife * Wood Planes * Sack Needle * Button Hook * Shoe Hook * Spindle Back Rocking Chair * Girls Schwinn Bike * Butter Churn * Cookie Jars * Wood Butter Mold * Wash Tubs, Round & Square * Unique Pitcher Pump * Unique OfďŹ ce Desk/China Cabinet Comb * Camel Back Steamer Trunk * Old, Old Books * Rectangle Milk Bottles * 2 Large Metal & Feathered Rooster Figurines * 2 Like New Swivel Stuffed Chairs * Large Whirlpool Refrig/Freezer Comb * Entertainment Center * Dining Room Table * Various Small Kitchen Appliances * Pots * Pans * Dishes * Electric Tea Maker *** MUCH MORE

509-476-4057

email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

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EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING

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This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

LEGAL SERVICES

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2 4

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55. ___-Altaic languages

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50. Denials

2

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1

49. A primary subtractive color for light (pl.)

65. Amount to make do with

1

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47. Character preceding a number (pl.)

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63. Appears

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43. Coldest season

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22. Caribbean, e.g.

36. Victim of homicide

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35. Expert

34. Everlasting

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3

28. Wading birds with long slender down-curved bills 32. Faust author

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25. Excellent in all respects

7

7

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21. Something done to restore a broken chair

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58. Morse code device

3

56. Caterpillar, for one

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54. Additions to usual pay

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53. Appetite

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52. Anger

2

51. Victorian, for one

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48. “20,000 Leagues� harpooner ___ Land

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17. Loud electric horns

1

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14. Double-reed woodwind

2

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9

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12. Knock (hyphenated)

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11. Core

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36. ___ baseball (2 wds)

10. Dilation of heart chambers

3

15. 1/100th rupee

2008 YAMAHA VSTAR 1100/XVS11XB. Black with ghost flames, windshield, leather bags, two helmets and cover. $5,000 firm. 509476-2514.

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 16 (Easy, rating 0.44) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. 5

14. The “O� in S.R.O.

Motorcycles

Sudoku 1

33. Young raptor

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF APRIL 15, 2013

HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS

Buying Silver, Gold Coins, Collections, Jewelry, Flatware, Guns. Paying fair Prices. Call Spence (509) 429-4722

LICENSE NO. 2241

3

13. ___-American

Wanted

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DAL DAGNON DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2570 486-2138

4

8. Birch relative

The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Board of Directors are accepting applications for the Secretary/Manager position. Interested parties please contact O.T.I.D. for information and application packet at 516-11th Avenue; PO Box 1729; Oroville, WA 98844 or (509)476-3696. Applications will be accepted through May 3, 2013. A drug free and equal opportunity employer.

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

2

5. Half a dozen

ADOPT: A loving family longs to provide everything for 1st baby. Beaches, laughter, financial security. Tina 1-800-9331975 Expenses paid

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC

49. Mexican American

1. Mercury and Mars

Announcements

Consign Now so we can get your items on the Handbill and get them Advertised. This is NOT a beneďŹ t. You get paid for your items, less a commission.Ranch Items - Household Estate - Vehicles - Tools - Collectibles - Miscellaneous. SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE!

DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138

Across

Applicants must be 18 years of age or older, have a valid Washington State Driver’s License and be physically able to perform required tasks. Applications may be secured at the Oroville City Hall, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday or on the city’s website at oroville-wa.com Applications must be received by 12:00 noon, Friday, April 26, 2011. The City of Oroville is an equal opportunity employer.

SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855

Puzzle 18 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.31)

4

3

5

6

9

7

2

1

4

8

ANSWERS

Tonasket LARGE INDUSTRIAL storage warehouse. On 10+ acres with city water and OT irrigation water. Call for Details 509-322-4732

PLEASE NOTE DATE CHANGE

LICENSE NO. 2241

Crosswords

There are two Seasonal Positions that consist of 40 hours per week. Positions include performing a variety of park maintenance and operations tasks.

— TONASKET RODEO GROUNDS —

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC Licensed & Bonded

FOR RENT: Business/Office unit(s), Main Street Oroville optional sizes & prices. (509)486-1682 or (509)4290873.

ANNUAL CONSIGNMENT AUCTION

No Buyers Premium –– Sales Tax Will Be Charged -

DAL DAGNON 486-2570

The City of Oroville is now accepting applications of employment for the following positions: Seasonal City Park Aide I.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Tonasket

Statewides

Help Wanted

Commercial Rentals

6

TTY 425-562-4002

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA AVAILABLE NOW! 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

7

509-476-2808

Tonasket Three bedroom, two bath, 1248 sq. ft, vacant all new carpet and fresh paint, convenient location in Old Orchard Estates subdivision, ½ miles north of Tonasket. Only $145,000. Call 509-322-4732

www.gazette-tribune.com

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

9

Call for information and application

Tonasket 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, heat pump, single car garage with shop and storage shed. RV parking with dump site and AC power. Covered patio. $105,000. Bill: (509)486-1952

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

6

l Great Oroville Location l Picnic area l Spacious Floor Plans l On-site laundry l Park-like setting

Tonasket ½ ACRE BUILDING LOT with power, water, phone and Tonasket cable TV only $35,000. No Small one bedroom cottage mobile homes. Call 509 322 with a garage on a large lot 4732 one block from grocery store. Only $79,000. Call 509 322 Subscribe to the... 4732

Found

8

for 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

Subsidized for Income QualiďŹ ed Households

IN MOLSON 2 BR LOG Cabin. Loft, all amenisites & wood heat. Much more! Negotiable down & interest. Owner finances. Consider newer 4x4 Truck partial down. $126,000. 509-485-2171.

FOUR ACRES INDUSTRIAL LAND on the Canada to Oroville Heavy Haul Corridor with railroad frontage and truck access off of Jennings Loop Rd. Only $60,000. Call 509 322 4732

For Rent

1

1105 Appleway, Oroville

Now Accepting Applications

Lots & Acreage

5

American Legion Housing

Houses For Sale

4

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

3

COLFAX -- RIVERFRONT 9 acres was $75,000 now only $39,500. Save $10K April 20th. Bank Representative will be onsite. One day price $29,500. Beautiful valley views, quiet county road with electric. Excellent financing provided. Call UTR 1-888-326-9048.

Public Notices ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID OROVILLE ELEMENTARY REROOF Sealed bids will be received by the Board of Directors of Oroville School at the School District Office, 816 Juniper St., Oroville, WA, 98844, for the construction of the Oroville Elementary School Reroof. Sealed base and alternate bids must be re-

continued on next page


APRIL 18, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE April 18, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

continued from previous page

Public Notices ceived by 4:00 p.m. on April 25, 2013, and must be marked Sealed Bids - Oroville Elementary School Reroof. Bids received after this time will not be considered. Bids will be opened and publicly read at 4:00 p.m. on April 25, 2013. General contractors and subcontractors may obtain contract documents from Architects West, 210 E. Lakeside Ave., Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814, by depositing Fifty Dollars ($50.00) per set. General Contractors may obtain two (2) sets and subcontractors may obtain one (1) set. Plan deposits will be returned to actual General and Subcontractor bidders upon return of all contract documents; PROVIDED HOWEVER, that said plans are returned in good, unmarked and unmutilated condition within ten (10) days after the time set for receiving bids. No other plan deposits will be refunded. In addition, a non-refundable handling fee of $10.00 per set to be shipped is to be submitted by separate check. A

PAGE A9 9

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

complete set of contract documents will also be filed with: Associated Builders & Contractors, 12310 E Mirabeau Pkwy # 100, Spokane Valley, WA; Associated General Contractors, E. 4935 Trent, Spokane, WA; Spokane Regional Plan Center, 209 N. Havana Street, Spokane, WA; Yakima Plan Center, 528 N. 20th Ave., Yakima, WA; Wenatchee Plan Center, 34 N. Chelan, Ave., Wenatchee, WA; McGraw Hill Construction, 200 SW Michigan Street, Ste. 100B, Seattle, WA; Builders Exchange, 2607 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA; CORA, 10002 Aurora Ave. N., Ste. 86, PMB 3334, Seattle, WA; Architects West, 210 E. Lakeside Avenue, Coeur d’Alene, ID; and Oroville School District, 816 Juniper St, Oroville, WA. It is strongly suggested that bidders attend the non-mandatory Pre-bid Conference which will be held on April 19, at 10:00 a.m. at the project site, 808 Main St., Oroville, WA No bidder may withdraw his bid after hour set for opening thereof, unless award is delayed for a period exceeding 60 days. The Oroville School District reserves the right to

reject any or all bids and to waive informalities or irregularities in any bid. OROVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT MR. STEVE QUICK, SUPERINTENDENT Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 11, 18, 2013 #471976

County, Washington, off of Highway 20 near Moon Dust Road. The portions of said parcels that are being considered for condemnation are more particularly described as follows: A strip 100 feet wide commencing at the Southeast corner of Parcel No. 3727251009 and running Northwest approximately 2000 feet to the approximate center of the West boundary of Parcel No. 3727250021. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 4, 11, 18, 2013. #469364

partment for the construction of a splash pad recreational facility. The project will be within a suburban environment of Okanogan River a tributary of the Columbia River. This project is proposed at the Chief Tonasket Park, 500 Railroad Avenue, also known as Tax 191, Tonasket in Section 16, Township 37 N., Range 27 E.WM. The City of Tonasket Building & Permits Department, who is the lead agency for this proposal, has determined that it does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required under RCW 43.21C.030(2)(c). This decision was made after review of a completed environmental checklist and other information on file with the lead agency. This information is available to the public on request or by visiting the City’s website at www.tonasketcity.org and following the Public Notice links. This DNS is issued under 197-11-340(2); the lead agency will not act on this proposal until May 15, 2013. The complete application, related

drawings and documentation is available for inspection or purchase at the City of Tonasket Clerk’s Office during normal business hours. Said development is propose to be within the shoreline of the Okanogan River and/or its associated wetlands. Any person desiring to express their views on this proposal or attain party of record status and be notified of any subsequent record decisions on this application should notify in writing Christian Johnson, Permit Administrator, Box 487, Tonasket WA 98855 or cjohnson.oroville@nvinet.com Written comments must be filed no later than May 15, 2013. Christian D. Johnson, Permit Administrator This notice is given pursuant to Section 7.09 of the Tonasket Shoreline Master Program. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 18, 25, 2013. #473286

Notice by Publication To: SFI Holding, LLC 11221 Pacific Hwy. SW Lakewood, WA 98499 You are hereby notified, pursuant to RCW 8.25.290, that Okanogan Public Utility District No. 1 of Okanogan County will decide, at its Board of Commissioners meeting to be held on April 23, 2013, at 12:30 p.m., at 1331 Second Avenue North, Okanogan, Washington 98840, whether or not to take final action to authorize the condemnation of a portion of your property generally described as follows: A portion of Okanogan County Tax Parcel Nos. 3727250021 and 3727251009, being located in Section 25, Township 37, Range 27 E.W.M., being approximately 4.25 miles East of Tonasket, Okanogan

Notice of Application under the Shoreline Management Act and Determination of Non-significance under SEPA Splash Farm DATE OF NOTICE: 4/18/2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Tonasket, Washington who is the owner of the below described property has filed an application for a shoreline substantial and floodplain development permits and will file for related building permits with the City of Tonasket Building & Permits De-

REAL ESTATE GUIDE Find The Right

HOME

If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you. Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

OKANOGAN VALLEY

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OLD WORLD CHARM w/Gracious Fireplace, Fir Floors, Sprawling Master Tub, Almost New Heat Pump, Double Garage on 3.64 Acres Abutting Hwy 7.

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Lake Osoyoos, surrounding area and mountains. 3 parcels, 8+ acres, sits overlooking private pond on the property, pasture and barn . Perfect location for horse, with a separate outdoor arena. Barn has a hay loft plus room to store things. Very unique property with fabulous views. Near the airport.

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Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com l 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

- 24 Hour Service Licensed & Bonded

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Quality Supplies Since 1957

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Midway Building Supply

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Oroville Building Supply

Civil Criminal

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Garage Doors  Installed

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

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Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

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&

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Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Installed Insulation

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Attorney at Law

P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Building Supplies

Got Water? — Fred Cook — Over 25 Years experience! Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

Concrete

OSOYOOS READI-MIX

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 We Work Saturdays! 11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Storage

Lakeside

STORAGE Boat, RV & More! Weatherization with lease Rent unit for project  Contractors store tools / product  Additional Business space available  

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Construction

Remodeling? Time for an Update, Addition or Deck? Check Us Out Online! okanoganconstruction.com

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n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power n Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

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509-782-5071

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www.foglepump.com


Page A10

SPORTS

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 18, 2013

Hornet runners chill at Cashmere

GOTCHA!

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Through games of Apr. 13

Boys Soccer

Pts: 3=win in regulation or OT; 2=win in PK shootout; 1=loss in PK shootout; 0=loss in regulation or OT.

By Brent Baker

Caribou Trail League

League Overall Pts W-L W-L-T Chelan 24 8-0 9-1-0 Quincy 21 7-2 8-3-0 Brewster 20 7-1 9-1-0 Okanogan 12 4-4 5-4-0 Cascade 10 3-4 4-5-0 Tonasket 6 2-6 3-7-0 Cashmere 3 1-6 1-9-0 Omak 3 1-8 1-10-0

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

CASHMERE - The early-season spate of warm weather was just a memory for the Oroville track etam, but the Hornets still turned in some solid performances at the Cashmere Invitational, where they, Liberty Bell and LaConner were the only B schools in the 16-team field. That didn’t stop the Oroville girls from finishing sixth overall, while the boys took 11th. “We had great performances by everyone,” said Oroville coach Harold Jensen. “We are getting our technique straightened out in all events and now are going to concentrate on conditioning.” Lynden won the girls meet with 99 points, followed by Cashmere (76), King’s (64), Meridian (63) and Oroville (45). LaConner was the next-best B school finisher in 11th pace (11). King’s won the boys meet with 89 to edge Quincy (88). Lynden (66) was third, followed by LaConner (53), Meridian (41) and Liberty Bell (39). Sierra Speiker won the 3000meter run (10:48.97) and took second in the 1600 (5:13.42) while Kaitlyn Grunst won the high jump (5-1) and was third in the long jump (14-6.25) to lead the Hornet girls. Grunst is unbeaten in the high jump this year. The distance events were run at college standard distances instead of the typical high school 3200 and 1600 meters. Other top finishers were Alexa Werner in the shot put (3rd, 30-8.25); Callie Barker in the pole vault (3rd, 9-9); and Brittany Jewett in the javelin (7th, 97-8). Topping the boys’ performances were Luke Kindred in the javelin (2nd, 156-9) and pole vault (9th, 10-0); and Tanner Smith in the 100 (4th, 11.33). The top six finishers in each event scored in the meet. The Hornets travel to Quincy on Saturday, April 20.

Central Washington League

League Overall Pts W-L W-L-T Manson 12 4-0 8-2-0 Bridgeport 9 3-1 4-3-0 Liberty Bell 3 1-3 5-3-1 Oroville 0 0-4 1-9-0

Baseball

Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cashmere 6-0 11-1 Brewster 6-0 9-2 Cascade 4-2 5-6 Chelan 4-2 4-6 Quincy 2-4 6-5 Okanogan 1-5 4-5 Omak 1-5 2-9 Tonasket 0-6 4-7

CWL North Division

League Overall Liberty Bell 8-0 10-2 Lk Roosevelt 7-2 10-4 Pateros (1B) 6-3 7-4 Bridgeport 3-5 4-11 Manson 1-7 1-10 Oroville 0-8 0-10

Softball (Fastpitch) Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cascade 6-0 10-0 Chelan 5-1 8-3 Okanogan 4-2 8-3 Cashmere 4-2 7-5 Brewster 3-3 6-5 Omak 1-5 1-10 Quincy 1-5 4-8 Tonasket 0-6 4-8

CWL North Division

League Overall Liberty Bell 3-0 6-2 Pateros 3-0 4-2 Lk Roosevelt 1-1 1-6 Bridgeport 1-2 4-3 Manson 0-2 2-5 Oroville 0-3 1-5

Above, Tonasket’s Jesse Manring tags out a Lake Roosevelt baserunner that got caught in a rundown during last Thursday’s non-conference baseball game. Right, Tiger catcher Boyd Lorz dives after an errant throw. The Tigers lost to Lake Roosevelt 19-10 in the high-scoring contest. Tonasket (4-7, 0-6 Caribou Trail League) also lost to Omak on Tuesday, April 9, 11-5, and were swept by defending state champion Cashmere on Saturday, 18-1 and 11-0.

Girls Tennis Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cashmere 7-0 8-1 Chelan 5-2 7-2 Omak 5-2 7-2 Okanogan 3-4 5-4 Cascade 2-4 2-4 Tonasket 1-6 2-6 Quincy 1-6 1-7

Central Washington League

League Overall Pateros (1B) 6-0 7-2 White Swan 5-3 6-4 Lk Roosevelt 3-2 3-2 Oroville 2-4 2-5 Entiat (1B) 2-4 2-5 Liberty Bell 0-5 0-8

Boys Tennis Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cashmere 7-0 8-1 Chelan 5-2 7-2 Tonasket 4-3 5-3 Omak 4-3 5-4 Cascade 2-4 2-4 Quincy 2-5 2-6 Okanogan 0-7 1-8

Central Washington League

League Overall Liberty Bell 5-0 7-1 White Swan 7-1 8-3 Entiat (1B) 3-3 3-4 Pateros (1B) 2-4 3-6 Oroville 1-5 1-6 Lk Roosevelt 0-5 0-5

Schedule, April 18-28 Thursday, April 18 SB - Oroville at Curlew (2), 3:00 pm TEN - Omak at Tonasket, 4:30 pm TEN - Oroville at Pateros, 4:00 pm Friday, April 19 BB - Cascade at Tonasket (2), 3:30 pm Saturday, April 20 BB - Oroville at B’port (2), 11:00 am GLF - Oroville at Chelan GC, 2:30 pm SB - Lake Roos. at Oroville (2), 11:00 am SOC - Tonasket at Cascade, 11:00 am SOC - Manson at Oroville, 11:00 am TEN - Tonasket at Cascade, 11:00 am TR - Oroville at Quincy Invite, 10:30 am Tuesday, April 23 BB - Lake Roos. at Oroville, 4:00 pm BB - Tonasket at Omak, 4:30 pm GLF - Omak at Oroville, 2:30 pm SB - Tonasket at Omak, 4:30 pm SOC - Tonasket at Omak, 4:30 pm SOC - Oroville at Bridgeport, 4:00 pm TEN - Tonasket at Omak, 4:30 pm TEN - Oroville at Lake Roos., 4:00 pm TR -Quad at Tonakset, 4:30 pm TR - Oroville at Mansfield Inv., 4:00 pm Wednesday, April 24 TEN - Entiat at Oroville, 4:00 pm Thursday, April 25 BB - Liberty Bell at Tonasket, 4:30 pm Friday, April 26 TR - Oroville at Cascade Invite, 4:00 pm Saturday, April 27 BB - Lib. Bell at Oroville (2), 11:00 am BB - Tonasket at Quincy (2), 11:00 am SB - Quincy at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am SB - Oroville at Lib. Bell (2), 11:00 am SOC - Tonasket at Quincy, 11:00 am SOC - Oroville at Liberty Bell, 11:00 am TEN - Tonasket at Quincy, 11:00 am TEN - oroville at Liberty Bell, 11:00 am TR - Tonasket at Riverside Inv., 9:00 am

Brent Baker/staff photos

Tiger soccer team edges Cashmere By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s boys soccer team snapped a four-game losing streak on Saturday, edging Cashmere 2-1 on the Tigers’ home pitch. Michael Orozco scored one goal and Hugo Sanchez scored the other off an assist by Abran Alvarez. “We did some reflecting as a team (after the previous game against Omak),” said Tonasket coach Jack Goyette. “We really came together well on Thursday and Friday and played together and decently on Saturday. “I’m really proud of our team. It’s very hard to get and stay motivated when you’re having such a

tough season. But through injuries and trials we do the best we can with what we’ve got and where we are.” The Tigers (3-7, 2-6 Caribou Trail League) began a fourgame road trip on Tuesday at Okanogan and travel to Cascade on Saturday, April 20.

Tonasket’s Jesus “Chewie” Alvarez chases after the ball during the Tigers’ victory over Cashmere on Saturday.

Omak 3, Tonasket 1 TONASKET - Omak earned its first win of the season Tuesday, April 9, as the Pioneers took an early lead and held on. “Omak came ready to play,” Goyette said. “They scored early, got us back on our heels and we never recovered.” Michael Orozco scored the Tigers’ goal.

Brewster Co-Ed meet BRIDGEPORT - Oroville won three relays at the Brewster Co-Ed Relay on Tuesday, April 9, which were run at Bridgeport. Hornet winners were the 400 relay team of Jewett, Kindred, Barker and Smith; the javelin relay of Jewett and Kindred; and the weight relay of Jewett, Kindred, Grunst and Logan Mills. The 3200 relay team of Sierra Speiker and Diego Santana finished second. For Tonasket, coach Bob Thornton said that Kathryn Cleman surpassed her PR by more than foot in the long jump with a leap of 15-2. “It’s a fun meet,” Thornton said. “But it is hard to know how they did in normal events.” Tonasket hosts a Caribou Trail League quad on Tuesday, April 23.

Terry Mills/submitted photo

Wins hard to come by for Hornet soccer By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Oroville’s soccer team played its best game of the season against the best team on its schedule. It wasn’t a win - in fact, it was an 8-0 loss to Manson on April 9 - but Hornet coach Mike Pitts liked the improvement his team showed. “Manson is the best team we’ve played all year,” he said. “We were down 4-0 with about 25 minutes to go. Manson scored three goals in the last 3-4 minutes of the game, so aside from the end we moved the ball well. We had

several opportunities to score, but couldn’t capitalize.” The Hornets (1-9, 0-4 Central Washington League) host that same Manson team on Saturday, April 20.

Bridgeport 8, Oroville 0 OROVILLE - The Hornets suffered an 8-0 loss to Bridgeport on Saturday, but even that was a better showing than the 14-0 beating they absorbed at the hands of the Mustangs in March. “We did some good things,” Pitts said. “We had a couple shots hit the goal posts and some other scoring chances, but couldn’t put

the ball in the back of the net. “We’re getting there. I just need to keep their spirits high as we grow as a team.”

Newport 4, Oroville 2 NEWPORT - The Hornets had their chances at Newport on April 2, but couldn’t hold onto a 2-1 second half lead. “We had Newport on their heels for most of the first half,” Pitts said. Abe Capote scored early to give the Hornets a 1-0 halftime lead. After Newport tied it early in the second half, a Capote penalty kick put Oroville back in front before

Newport scored three goals late to win it. “I was happy we were in position to win it in the end,” Pitts said. “But disappointed we didn’t close it out. That’s two games (Moses Lake being the other) that we haven’t been able to seal the deal. “We’ll continue to get better.”

Quincy JV 11, Oroville 2 QUINCY - Oroville fell to the Quincy JV squad on Saturday, April 6, 11-2. “We were pretty much outmatched,” Pitts said. Abe Capote scored both Hornet goals.

Errors prove costly to Oroville softball By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

BRIDGEPORT - Oroville’s softball team stayed in its game with Bridgeport on April 9, until an error-filled fourth inning resulted

in a big inning by the Fillies that led to a 16-3 Hornet defeat. The Hornets scored first, with Shelby Scott singling and eventually stealing home, said Oroville coach Dane Forrester. Faith Martin, who walked,

scored on a second inning single by Celene Cisneros, and in the fourth, Kendal Miller singled and eventually scored. “In the bottom of the fourth we made five errors,” Forrester said. “That brought in several runs by

Bridgeport.” The Hornets fell twice at Pateros on Saturday, April 13, losing 15-0 and 20-0. Oroville (1-5, 0-3 Central Washington League) hosts Lake Roosevelt on Saturday, April 20.

Terry Mills/submitted photo

Sadie Long makes the stretch at first base on Saturday against Cashmere.

Omak, Cashmere top Tigers TONASKET - Tonasket’s softball game lost three games last week: 8-2 to Omak on April 9, and 13-2 and 14-4 to Cashmere on Saturday. Tonasket coach Emily Rimestad said the highlight of the week came in the final inning against Cashmere. “Our right fielder tripped and caught the outfield fly ball,” she said. “It was priceless. Everyone was excited ... it was pretty cool.” The Tigers are at Cascade on Saturday, April 20.


APRIL 18, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A11

Okanogan Valley Life

Local knifemaker/ chef sharpens his trade

The art of the blade

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The kitchen isn’t the only place Salem Straub is skilled with a knife. Actually, his skill with knives outside the kitchen has more to do with making them as using them. Straub, who partners with his wife Heather to run Cafe Lune five mornings a week in the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket, is a knifemaker by trade - or perhaps more accurately, a bladesmith as he employs a small forge to do some of his work - as the owners of Promethean Knives. His work varies from the mundane to the complex, including folding knives, Bowie knives, kitchen knives, integral hunting knives, or whatever strikes his imagination. “I kind of aspire to an Asian aesthetic,” Straub said. “Clean lines and a restrained beauty with function being foremost. That’s not to say I wouldn’t like to branch out to high embellishment, I just haven’t gotten there yet. “It helps to try to do a range of things,” he added. “Kitchen knives, for example, are a great market to get into. They get used more than the others and a lot more women use them, too. Even swords, but with those you really need to tool up and learn a lot for years before you’re ready to do the big blades.” Tooling up, learning a lot for years, has helped Straub develop and impressive and varied resume of blades. While living on Maui, Straub got his start making hunting and fishing knives for pig hunters. “It’s quite barbaric,” he said. “Dogs, knives, no guns.” When he later moved to Oahu, one of his neighbors turned out to be Ken Onion, who is as close to a household name as there is in the world of knifemaking. “I just went up and introduced myself, and he said he’d take me on as a learner,” Straub said. “Before I moved off the island I spent four or five months with him and really got my work polished and my basics more solid.” Other than Onion, and some engraving instruction from Tonasket’s Walter Henze, most of Straub’s learning has come

Above left, Salem Straub hammers at the beginnings of a blade just after heating it in his forge; bottom left, a partially completed folding knife; top right, one of Straub’s completed folding knives; bottom right, the workmanship on one of Straub’s knife handles.

Photos by Brent Baker and Salem Straub

through the local library. “I’ve read a lot of books,” Straub said. “The Tonasket Public Library either has on their shelves, or through their system, at least five good books on blacksmithing. The internet has been a huge help, too. “Other than that, it’s been trial and error.” Most of Straub’s “tooling up” has involved rescuing other people’s junk off the scrap heap at little or no cost and resurrecting it himself. His drill press, sitting derelict behind a factory, cost $20 and took an hour to get working; his bandsaw was a $45 Craigslist purchase; his lathe had been broken for a decade but Straub had it working shortly after taking possession of it; his power hammer came out of a Chesaw barn for $500 and took six months to rebuild; and his hydraulic forging press he built from scratch. “I have to get into these things

and puzzle them out,” Straub said. “I’m always looking for machines and tools that just need a new owner and a little love.” He learned to build his own tools out of necessity after his parents bought a Cobey Creek property above the Aeneas Valley. “I moved there that summer to help them with a log house,” Straub said. “They’re 40 miles out of town and off the grid by quite a bit. Occasionally we’d need a tool or some hardware that we didn’t want to drive that far to get. “So I just had a little railroad track anvil, made my first forge using wood charcoal that I would find in the area. I made hinges and draw knives and frontiertype stuff. Within a year or two I made a couple of knives and I really enjoyed that, so I started collecting tools when I could.” Now, he and Heather’s garage deep in the Okanogan Highlands bristles with the tools of his trade, though running the cafe has

taken some time away from his vocation. “(Productivity has) dropped sharply because of the cafe,” Straub said. “I was full time for three years before that. During that time, a I completed couple a of knives. The emails, the shipping, making sheaths takes time too. A lot of guys bang them out more quickly but I’m not really a production assembly kind of guy. You don’t have to forge to make knives - guys forge because

it’s cool. And it opens up your options a little bit more.” Different types of knives provide different challenges. Straub said that folding knives in particular require a lot of concentration. “There’s a lot of little parts in these dudes,” he said. “You can screw one up in a heartbeat. All it takes is for your mind to wander, and with a tolerance of a thousandth (of an inch), you can ruin it. You might have to cut out a

new piece entirely, right back to the drawing board.” Integral hunting knives, though they don’t have moving parts, pose a different set of challenges. “The bolster is made out of same metal as tang and blade,’ Straub said. “It’s quite simple, three pieces, but very difficult to get the radius to match and to size the stack pieces for thickness. “I can keep focus real hard for short periods, but when you are your own boss, with no one looking over your shoulder, it can be hard to stay focused and stay on task.” Straub conducts much of his business over the internet (his web site is at prometheanknives. com), and prices range from the low $200 range for a simple hunting knife, the high $200 range for chef knives with carbon steel, or Bowies and collector pieces between $400-500. The site is illustrated with pictures of dozens of Straub’s creations, as well as tutorials on how he does a lot of his work. “It’s a good place to just waste time and look at some pictures,” Straub said. “I helping people learn. I’ve had to learn the same things, and it wasn’t always easy. My website has a ton of tutorial material I’ve written over the years. “I’ve gotten a ton of random emails about it over the years. I got one from a dude in Malaysia the other day. ‘Hi, my name is something unpronounceable, I was wondering about your opinion on machines for basic knifemaking.’ So when someone from Malaysia writes, they’re pretty surprised that I’ll even write them back. But I enjoy that.” When it comes to the complexities of crafting a quality knife, Straub points out that it all comes down to one simple simple concept. “I spend a lot of time in here turning steel into dust,” he said. “That’s the old basic answer to, ‘How do you make a knife?’ You take a bar of steel and grind away everything that doesn’t look like a knife.”

COPS & COURTS Superior Court Criminal The court found probable cause to charge Theodore Storm, 25, with possession of a controlled substance and use of drug paraphernalia. He was found guilty and received three months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Timothy Edwards, 39, with possession of a stolen motor vehicle. He was found guilty and received 12 months. The court found probable cause to charge Jonathon Michael Day-Wedin with rape of a child second degree. He was found guilty and received 16 years and six months confinement with the possibility of life in prison. The court found probable cause to charge Karilyn Cline, 22, with theft second. She was found guilty and received one month confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Alicia Flores, 34, with unlawful possession of a firearm second. She was found guilty and received nine months confinement.

District Court

Brett Carlson, 23, Omak, was charged with two counts of DWLS third. Carter Coates, 25, Okanogan, was charged with DWLS third. Cory Cornella, 20, Omak, was charged with DWLS third. Robert Lange, 36, Tonasket, was charged with criminal trespassing second. He was found guilty and received two days confinement and a $608 fine.

Alfred Oliver, 37, Oroville, was charged with DWLS third. He received an $818 fine. Juan Ontiveros, 42, Omak, was charged with DWLS third. Brenda Webster, 50, Omak, was charged with two counts of DWLS third. Darwyn Zacherle, 18, Omak, was charged with two counts of DWLS third.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, April, 8, 2013 In Omak, on Hubbert Road, a resident has been told a male subject is going to retaliate against her by damaging her vehicle. The male subject is her ex boyfriend and has been harrassing her via text messages. In Okanogan, a male subject came to the location claiming that his four year old child was being abused by the mother. In Tonasket, on Aeneas Valley Road, items were placed in storage without the owner’s permission. There is also jewelry missing. In Okanogan, on First Avenue South, a woman’s son has not returned home since Saturday. In Oroville, on South Cordell Road, a male juvenile did not return home on the bus like he was supposed to. Marcos Rosas, 28, was booked for DWLS third and a detainer. Tuesday, April 9, 2013 James Dable, 39, was booked for a warrant. Shawn Best, 29, was booked for

failure to appear and DWLS third. Wednesday, April 10, 2013 In Okanogan, on Elmway, a resident was assaulted by an unknown subject in his early twenties the night before. No weapons were involved. Jimmie Smith, 20, was booked for assault. Jason McDaniel, 38, was booked for residential burglary and malicious mischeif second. Joseph Bowers, 21, was booked for non-support of a child and failure to appear. Thursday, April 11, 2013 In Tonasket, on Spur Road, a female subject came onto the property throwing clothes in the yard. She had sent threatening texts in the past making several threats. Dennis Goble, 46, was booked for failure to appear and DWLS third.

Key:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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Page A12

Obituaries

Billie Lee Essary

Billie Lee Essary Billie Lee Essary, age 66 of Oroville, went home to be with Jesus on April 12, 2013. Billie was born in Tonasket on January 11, 1947 to Lola Mae Willis and Joe Kenneth Keithey. Billie lived in Oroville and was a pillar in the community and in her church. She married Manford Essary on Nov. 4, 1961 and they had three daughters Tangie Studdard, Tina Rounds and Tammy Essary. Billie worked in the apple sheds for several years. She loved family get-togethers and she poured her life into family and her church, Valley Christian Fellowship. She was loved by all and will be greatly missed. Billie is survived by her dad Joe Keithly; daughters: Tangie Studdard, Tina Rounds and Tammy Essary; siblings: Carol Vandiver, Patricia Frazier, Steven Frazier, Cindi Dickerson and Teresa Roberts; six grandchildren and five great grandchildren She was preceded in death by her brothers Clifford Willis and Dennis Frazier, husband Manford Essary and mother Lola Nelson. Memorial services will be held Saturday, April 20, 2013 at 10 a.m. at the Valley Christian Fellowship with Pastor Randy McAllister officiating. Please share your thoughts and memories by signing Billie’s online guestbook at www.berghfuneralservice.com

Phyllis Shenyer

Phyllis Shenyer

Phyllis went to live with Clarence and Estella Frasier, her aunt and uncle in Okanogan, Wash. Phyllis graduated from Okanogan High School in 1945. In June of 1947 Phyllis married Ernest A. Shenyer, they made their home in Brewster, Wash. where they raised their family and owned and operated their own apple orchard. Phyllis and Ernie were happily married for 41 years. Phyllis moved to Oroville in 1996 where she lived with her friend and companion Ted Thorndike.Phyllis enjoyed spending time with her family and friends, gardening, traveling, fishing and camping, crafting, crocheting, playing cards, and “just going for a drive.” Phyllis was preceded in death by her parents, her brother Leslie and sister Adeline and her husband Ernie. She is survived by her children Melvin (Jodee) Shenyer of Ellensburg, Wash.; Bill (Kay) Shenyer of Brewster, Wash.; Terry Shenyer of Brewster, Wash.; and Susan Madden of Kennewick, Wash. as well as numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren and family members. A memorial service will be held for Phyllis 1 p.m. on Saturday, April 20th, 2013 at the Trinity Episcopal Church in Oroville. A private burial service will be held 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 18th, 2013 at the Packwood Cemetery in Brewster. Donations can be made in Phyllis’ name to the American Cancer Society or the American Heart Association. The Precht-Harrison-Nearents Chapel and the Okanogan Co. Crematory LLC of Okanogan are caring for the arrangements.

Louisa Frederika Haskell Louisa “Louise” Frederika Haskell, age 93, died March 11, 2013 in Tonasket, Washington. She was born May 30, 1919 in Wenatchee, Washington to Charles Thomson and Emma Louisa (Bourn) Haskell. Louise graduated from Wenatchee High School, and went on to attend the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor where she majored in Music. She married in September, 1940 and moved to New York City. While living in New York, Louise taught music theory and piano at the Manhattan School of Music. In the early 1960’s, she moved to an expatriate community in Mexico and lived there for a few years. Eventually she returned to the United States and lived in Tonasket at North Valley Extended Care. Louise was preceded in death by her sister and brother-inlaw Mary and Edward Biele, her brother Tom Haskell and her son Michael McHugh. She is survived by her brother and sister-in-law John and Marilyn Haskell, her sister-in-law Jane Haskell, her daughter Frederika (Drika) Haskell and husband Pete Olson, daughter-in-law Chantal McHugh, granddaughters Nadege

Stretz (Michel), Valerie Pfeffer (Thorsten) and Clotilde McHugh, five great-grandchildren, and many nephews and nieces. The family would like to acknowledge the wonderful care Louise received at North Valley Extended Care. Donations may be sent to North Valley Extended Care, 22 W. 1st Street, Tonasket WA 98855. A memorial service will be held on June 1st at 2 p,m, at Trinity Episcopal Church in Oroville, Wash.. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket is in care of arrangements.

Pool trophy headed back to Canada NORTH COUNTY - It’s a wrap! League pool is over for the year. The banquet is over, the awards are presented, everyone is congratulated and all are thanked. The Traveling Trophy is going back to Canada again this year. Lew’s Brew Crew did it again.

That’s four in a row. Lew’s team shot out of The Shop this year. Eagles #1, from the Oroville Eagles took second place and La Plaza finished in third. The banquet was a success thanks in the most part to Ernie and Catt. The food was excellent and there was lots of help to clean up. It didn’t look like we had the turn-out we expected but ended up serving about seventy meals.

OROVILLE - The Oroville Booster Club will be hosting its 21st annual May Day 3 on 3 Basketball Classic on Saturday, May 11. The registration fee is $70 if your registration is received before

May 6 and $90 if received after the deadline of May 7. Divisions will include, Mens & Womens Open, Boys & Girls High School, Boys & Girls 14 & Under and Boys & Girls 12 & Under. Questions/Comments:

Submitted by Gai Wisdom

North Valley Pool League

Looking ahead to next year is interesting. The Pastime Bar and Grill will have two tables if they decide to join us and The Shop has new owners. With a little luck the Peerless will be up and running and who knows what other changes are in store. Over the summer watch for pool events and remember all the venues are cool. Get out there and Play Pool.

May Day 3-on-3 hoops registration

call 560-0118 or 476-3052 or email orovilleboosterclub@gmail. com. Registration forms available online at  www.oroville.wednet. edu under the Booster Club link or at  www.orovillewashington. com on the events page.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Lee Bert Turner

Do you have a Lee Bert Turner Lee Bert Turner, 93, passed over the River Jordan on March 16, 2013. Lee is survived by his wife Marian of 67 years of marriage, five children, 17 grandchildren, 13 great grandchildren and one sister, Carol Colbert of Spokane. Lee served in the Army for six years, volunteering in April of 1941 and severed honorably in WWII. Lee was born in Chesaw on April 19, 1919. He lived in Oroville where he raised his family, owned the Standard Oil Distributorship for 10 years and then was a longterm apple orchardist. Lee moved to McKenna, Wash. in the 1990’s to be closer to his adult children. Lee was known as the kindest man who always had something nice to say about everyone. Whether he was hunting or simply taking a hike and enjoying the wild life. He was a fantastic father that taught each one of his children the importance of God, family and country. He taught that one should always treat others the way you want to be treated and lead by example. He was gentle, yet firm when it came to protecting his family as they were growing up. His love for his wife grew each day of their nearly 68 years together. He loved unconditionally and will be missed by his family and friends every day. Lee was surrounded by his loved ones at services in Auburn, Wash., followed by a Military Honor Guard graveside service in Oroville.

Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church? To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Phyllis Shenyer, 84 of Oroville passed away at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket on April 2, 2013. Phyllis was born on July 16, 1928 to Emil and Alice (Dickinson) Krupkat in Miller River, Wash. Her family moved to Windy Hill, near Okanogan, Wash. shortly after she was born. Upon the death of her mother in 1929,

k n i h T ! n e e Gr

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 18, 2013

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

Did you know?

We use... Soy Ink

Recycled Paper Excess paper recycled for gardens, fire starter & more! OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday School is at 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 18, 2013