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Tonasket FFA wins District

SENIOR TRIP FUNDRAISER

Program of the Year award

Spaghetti feed at Oroville High School, Saturday, April 13, 6:008:00 p.m. More on page A2.

See Page A3

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Council hears reports from Public Works, Parks

Oroville looks for ways to control mosquitoes BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – The Oroville City Council heard reports from the head of Public Works and Parks departments at their Tuesday, April 2 council meeting. In what turned out to be one of the shortest meetings of the year, Superintendent Rod Noel said that he and the Street Committee, Councilmen

Ed Naillon and Jon Neal, had reviewed all the quotes for replacement of the motor in the city’s grader which quit while doing snow removal last winter. Noel said it was decided to award the contract to U.S. Diesel Remanufacturing at a cost of $10,385. Supt. Noel said the investigation into septage being dumped into the city’s sewer collection continues. “We have been notified by the Department of Ecology regarding someone dumping things into our system and putting us over our limit… we were in violation in one section last week,” said Noel, adding that the problem started about six months ago and could result in

Tonasket projects slight decline

fines to the city if it is not stopped. Noel explained to the council that it appeared someone was dumping “septage” into the city’s waste collection system through a manhole or other access point. “It just started happening out of the blue… all of the sudden we got issues,” Noel said. “We had an investigator up from the DOE and we’re trying to find them. The DOE says they have had issues elsewhere where septic haulers dump into a city’s system through a manhole.” Noel added that Oroville has never come close to approaching the limits set by the state before these incidents started.

Parks Department

with washed out rock which holds the ramps in place.

In other business, Noel reported that the park’s department was working to get Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park open and they had started a new employee at the park that day. “We are keeping the park open during the day and trying to get the campground ready. We are also soliciting people who might be interested in running the concession stand, he said. The park’s head said the work on the Deep Bay Park boat launch was completed. He said that eight concrete slabs in the ramp had been replaced, along

Mosquito Spraying Oroville is looking at alternatives to joining with Omak for mosquito spraying this summer. Jones said that Omak, which has a state permit for spraying, has had to make financial cutbacks. These included eliminating funds for mosquito spraying from their budget. “I’ve made some preliminary inquiries with Okanogan as to whether they will

SEE COUNCIL | PG A2

Spring means time to clean

FIT FOR THE QUEENS

Enrollment drop tempered by departure of small senior class

Oroville, Tonasket set for Spring Clean-up days

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket School District will be projecting a slight decline in enrollment as it prepares to set next year’s budget, approving superintendent Paul Turner’s proposal to estimate an average student population next year of 1,030. That represents a decrease from this year’s budgeted number of 1,040. Turner noted that a year ago at this time the district was serving 1051 students. The number is currently at 1,041, though the average is still at 1,056 for the year. Asked if the projected number was cutting it too close, Turner noted that this year’s senior class of 64 students was unusually small. “We should have a cushion of about 27 kids,” he said. Turner added that he had recently met with Seventh District Reps. Joel Kretz and Shelly Short, as well as Rep. Cathy Dahlquist (R-Enumclaw), who is the senior ranking minority member of the education committee. “We had a discussion around funding,” Turner said. “They didn’t want to hear it. He told me to do my job and let them do theirs, and he left. The other three, the conversation wasn’t too bad. “I wrote a letter back to

NORTH COUNTY - Earth Day - Monday, April 22 - was recently declared the annual Spring Clean-up Day by Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth. There will be no charge for burnable yard trash, though burnables must be separated and placed into cardboard boxes or paper bags (no plastic bags). Limbs may be bundled for easy pick-up. Collection fees may be assessed for appliances, tires, large pickups, etc. Batteries and hazardous materials will not be collected. The mayor and city council encourage all residents to take pride in the community by participating in the Spring Clean-up. Contact the Oroville City Hall at (509) 476-2926 to arrange for pick-up.

Omak Stampede Queen Breanna Howell (left) and Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo Queen Karlie Henneman joined forces for their Tonasket High School senior projects, organizing and executing a significant cosmetic upgrade to the grandstands at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds. With help from about 20 volunteers and local businesses (including Home Depot, right), the queens cleaned, sanded and painted the stands, replaced some broken boards, installed lattice work along the back, and even painted the picnic tables. See story on page A3.

Tonasket The week of April 15-19 was scheduled by the Tonasket City Council for the city’s spring clean-up dates. Burnable yard waste will be picked up by city crews, excluding tree stumps, as time permits. Prunings must be under four feet long and piled for easy removal; leaves and grass clippings should be bagged in paper bags. Contact City Hall at (509) 4862132 to be put on the pick up list.

Brent Baker/staff photos

SEE SCHOOL | PG A2

Take ‘A Three Nation Reading Vacation’ Arnie Marchand’s new book features a collection of old-timers’ recollections BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Arnie Marchand has put together a collection of stories he has heard from the Okanogan Country in “The Way I Heard It: A Three Nation Reading Vacation,” a new book recently

published by Xlibris books. on the table.” “I’ve been collecting stories and talkBut he wasn’t ready to say if there was ing to people for a long time,” said a volume number two in his future. Marchand. “I needed “I didn’t want these to get them all together stories to be lost. and get them out in Many of our elder “I didn’t want these a book. You can only people told me the go and give so many stories years ago and stories to be lost” talks.” before I wrote the Arnie Marchand, Marchand, an book I spoke with Local author Okanogan with the them or their families Colville Confederated and they’d say ‘that’s Tribes, said even the way I heard it’ though the book covers a region in and that’s the way I’ve told it,” said the his traditional territory stretching author, recalling a specific conversation from Wenatchee north to lower British he had with an elder named Isabella, Columbia, many stories were “left sitting who is now 102-years-old.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 15

Marchand received help in his efforts that,” he said. from the Borderlands Historical Society, There are tales of cowboys and Indians, especially from Kay and Mike pioneers and paddle wheelers. Sibley. “There’s still a lot of issues “Not all of these are native that are unresolved, even after stories... they’re stories told 100 years,” Marchand said. by the old timers in the area,” “I think it was good you explains Mike Sibley. included McLaughlin Canyon,” “A lot of the stories they had said Kay Sibley, about the area forgotten that the last person southeast of Tonasket where they had told was me,” said Indians planned an ambush of Marchand Marchand. the McLaughlin Party in 1873. Marchand said some of the The author said that not stories are from those he was everyone who witnessed the told by his mother and father. battle would agree about what happened “I thought jeez it would be neat if everyone knew this or if anyone knew SEE MARCHAND | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Schools Sports Valley Life

A3 A3 A4

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6 Classifieds/Legals A8-9

Real Estate Police Stats Obituaries

A9 A10 A10


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 11, 2013

COMMUNITY SUPPORT

Tony Kindred/submitted photo Terri Orford/submitted photo

North Valley Hospital received a $5,000 donation from Sterling Bank in recognition of board chair Helen Casey’s (right) service to the hospital district and service to the community. Above, Casey and CEO Linda Michel receive the check during the March 28 Board of Commissioners meeting. A letter from Sterling Bank VP Nacalee Smith said that bank employees have also donated more than 53,000 volunteer hours in five states.

MARCHAND | FROM A1 to these men seeking gold. “A GI wrote it this way and civilian wrote it that way. (David) McLaughlin told how it all started with a horse and an accident. I have a story about an Okanogan who sat up... that guy caused it to be a battle when it was planned to be a massacre,” said the author. “If he had just stayed hidden... McLaughlin saw something because one guy didn’t do something right,” said Marchand, who heard it all from Charlie Thorp, who had the whole battle explained to him when he was a child. “All day his dad and Sus-cepkne talked about it. He learned how the chief had a different perspective,” he said. Marchand said the stories kind of thinned out when he got to the Canadian border. The Sibleys are hoping he will take them further in another book. “I’ve been collecting stories since I went to work for the Tribe in 1977,” said Marchand, who retired from the Colville Confederated Tribe a few years back. He will be having an author talk and book signing in Oroville on Wednesday, April 17 at the Oroville Public Library starting at 7 p.m. He will have a similar event at the Omak Visitor Information Center at noon and again at 1 p.m. on Friday, April 19. Marchand will also be available to sign books at the Oroville Depot Museum during May Festival. Right now the books are available at Oroville Pharmacy and the Oroville Museum and Visitor Information Center (which

Eastlake Sewer Jones reported on the meeting she, Noel, Mayor Chuck Spieth and Director of Community

Spaghetti feed fundraiser for Oroville senior trip Submitted

OROVILLE - As the fourth quarter begins at Oroville Junior/ Senior High, senior students are working on senior projects, scholarships, purchasing yearbooks, and of course working towards a fun-filled senior trip to Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif. Students and Parents of the Oroville Class of 2013 are announcing a fundraiser at the

Oroville Eagles on Saturday, April 13 to raise funds to help with the senior trip to Disneyland Gradnite. Gradnite is a Disneyland experience for graduating seniors that includes a day in the Disney parks, as well as a private graduation party that begins when the Disney California Adventure Park closes. The Oroville seniors will also spend a day at Huntington Beach

and Universal Studios. Students who have signed up for the trip are working with their parents to provide an evening including dinner and a desert auction. This fun evening will consist of a Spaghetti feed with French bread, Caesar salad and a drink for $7 per plate. The fundraiser starts at 5 p.m. and a dessert auction will begin at 6 p.m.

Matsura highlighted at Friday Night Coffee House Submitted by Janet Culp CCC of Tonasket

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Arnie Marchand will be having author talks and book signings in Oroville and Omak. Marchand’s new book is available at the Oroville Pharmacy and at the Oroville Museum and Visitor Information Center (opening in May). opens May Festival Weekend). The books are $20 including tax. Marchand and the Sibleys say

they are working on additional outlets and author talk and book signing venues.

COUNCIL | FROM A1 be able to assume the permit,” said Jones. The plane that has done the spraying for Omak and Oroville in the past was involved in an accident and can no longer do the spraying. A helicopter service was located to do the spraying, but they want $10 per acre, which is a higher price than last year, said Jones

Pictured are 15 of the seniors who are working toward a senior trip to Disneyland’s Gradnite.

TONASKET - The 100th anniversary of photographer Frank Matsura’s death will be remembered with a presentation of his work at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket’s Friday Night Coffee House, April 12. Matsura, a frontier photographer in Okanogan County from 1903 till 1913 at the time of his death, will be remembered in a Powerpoint presentation by Okanogan teacher Doug Woodrow. The lecture is free, and doors will open at 5:30 p.m., with presentation at 6:00. Refreshments will be available by donation. Call (509) 486-1328 for more info.

Photo courtesy Okanogan Historical Society

Frank Matsura

SCHOOL | FROM A1

Development Chris Branch had with the county commissioners and County Planner Perry Huston regarding the Eastlake Sewer System. “The county commissioners are working on their resolution to transfer the system to the city,” Jones said. “I think we had a very good outcome. We should probably see a draft of the resolution in the next two weeks.” Noel said he hadn’t worked with the two new county commissioners before, but felt they were easy to deal with. “I was especially impressed with Commissioner (Jim) Detro,

Out On The Town

he explained things really well,” said Noel.

Transportation On Ballot The city has received brochures and the final draft of the Transit Service Plan from the Okanogan County Transit Authority to review. The OCTA is proposing a ballot measure for November of this year asking four-tenths of one percent be added to the local sales tax to fund countywide transit services.

Dahlquist (stating) that our job here is to get outcomes, based on what we’re mandated to do... “The thing that frustrates me right now is that I haven’t gotten a reply in more than a week. So, where’s the legislature at (with funding)? I don’t think they know where they’re at.” The school board also tabled

until the fall further consideration of changing the vocational program from family consumer science to agricultural science. Turner was directed to provide information that would allow that decision to be made for the 201415 school year. In addition, board saw a demonstration by the district-winning

Tonasket FFA Ag Issues team, and the Middle School ASB showed a PowerPoint presentation of its trip to We Day in Seattle over Spring Break. The Tonasket School Board will next meet Monday, April 22, for a work session, and will hold its regular board meeting Monday, April 29, at 7:30 p.m.

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APRIL 11, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

SCHOOLS/SPORTS

Tonasket FFA earns district program award Tonasket dominates sub-district, rakes in state degrees and proficiency awards BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket’s highly-decorated FFA program added to its collection of honors recently, headlined by its naming as the Program of the Year by the Washington Association of Agriculture Educators at district competition in March. That should have come as a surprise to no one as Tonasket boasted 11 of the 25 district members who received their State FFA Degrees. “Getting the program of the year was a really big deal,” said Sierra Hughes, who herself was one of the state degree winners. “The district (agriculture) teachers all chose us. Plus with the state degrees, all 11 of our seniors who applied ended up getting them.” “One of the keys to (the success of the program) is (ag teacher) Matt Deebach’s devotion to the students and their success,” said Tonasket School District superintendent Paul Turner. “He does a great job of engaging the students in their learning.” The state degrees include such requirements of 360 hours of Agricultural Ed coursework, at least two straight years of FFA membership, investment of $1,000 or 1,000 hours in a Supervised Agriculture Education (SAE) project, five activities above the chapter level and 25 hours of community service. Tonasket also had seven individuals receive proficiency awards that will qualify them for recognition at the state level, including one that qualified for national consideration. The proficiency awards are awarded to FFA members who have developed quality SAE projects. In addition to the state proficiency award, Jessica Puente’s Fruit Production SAE will be submitted to be evaluated at the national convention. “They rank these bronze, silver, gold,” Deebach said. “The state goes through and basically says, is this of national caliber? Several of the kids actually won their area but didn’t move on to nationals, because it didn’t meet national criteria. “Jessica’s won the state for fruit production and met those national criteria, and that will be judged at the next national convention. Plus having seven at the state level, that’s a pretty big deal.” Tonasket also turned in a remarkable performance at the sub-district level, sweeping all of the banners in the leadership and speaking categories: Creed, Prepared Speaking, Extemporaneous Speaking and Rituals. Sweeping those categories didn’t mean taking the first place spots. Tonasket took the top four spots in Extemporaneous Speaking and the top three spots in each of the other three categories. All of them, plus two parli pro teams, were set to compete

Terry Mills/submitted photo

Masen McCormick, who attended Tonasket Elementary School for two years, recently signed a letter of intent to play football at the College of Idaho.

Submitted photo

The Tonasket FFA’s Ag Issues team of (l-r) Kelly Cruz, Wyatt O’Brien and Claire Thornton was the top finisher in District VII competition and will compete at the state finals in May, along with an impressive number of their teammates in other events. in Chelan on Wednesday, April 10, at the District VII Leadership CDE competition. “That’s only happened here one other time since I’ve been teaching,” Deebach said. In District VII competition on March 28, Tonasket added victories in Ag Issues and Marketing while finishing third in Ag Sales, all of which will move on to state competition. Tonasket also edged Chelan at the Sunny Okanogan Angus Ranch Invitational Cattle Judging. Tonasket FFA had about 40 kids out of 100 participants (also from Omak, Manson, Bridgeport, Cle Elum and Okanogan) at the event and finished with 1040 team points to Chelan’s 1039, with Omak third at 965. Individuals in the top 10 included Rade Pilkinton (3rd place), Claire Thornton (5th), Derek Rimestad (8th) and Cade Hocket (10th). “They not only judge the cattle, but they teach us how to judge,” Hughes said. “It’s a good learning experience, and they give a lot of prizes away too. “FFA overall is a great learning experience,” she added. “I’ve learned a ton about agriculture and livestock, and I know I wouldn’t be as good a speaker without FFA. I was afraid to speak (in public) before, but FFA really changed that. All the competitions changed that; I’m not scared now. So I hope that the program can continue to be as big here as it is.” State competition will be at Washington State University, May 9-11, and, as Hughes pointed out, everyone is still in the running to get there. “April 10 will be really stressful,” she said. With 22 freshmen, six upperclassmen and 11 competing in parli pro, Tonasket has big contingent heading to the Chelan district. The FFA will be holding its plant sale the first week of May to help defray the costs of attending state for those who qualify. Last year, Hughes said, proceeds from the plant sale reduced the cost per attendee from a potential $175

STATE DEGREES (TONASKET ONLY) Alicia Edwards Karlie Henneman Breanna Hughes Sierra Hughes Sadie Long Grace Maldonado Tonya Nelson Wyatt O’Brien Jessica Puente Claire Thornton Dalton Wahl

STATE PROFICIENCY RESULTS (TONASKET ONLY)

Beef Placement - Dalton Wahl, Bronze 1 Equine Entrepreneurship Breanna Howell, Bronze 1 Equine Entrepreneurship Karlie Henneman, Bronze 2 Fruit Production E/P - Jessica Puente, Silver 1 (forward to Nationals) Fruit Production E/P - Claire Thornton, Bronze 2 Fruit Production E/P - Grace Maldonado, Bronze 2 Swine - Tonya Nelson, Bronze 1

DISTRICT 7 RESULTS Ag Sales CDE 1. Wenatchee 2. Cashmere 3. Tonasket 4. Cashmere 2 5. Wenatchee 2 6. Bridgeport Ag Issues 1. Tonasket 2. Chelan 3. Chelan 4. Eastmont Marketing 1. Tonasket 2. Tonasket

down to $40. “It’s a really neat things for the kids to see that there’s more kids that have gone out to do a leadership, public speaking type of activity than there are in other whole chapters in our district,” Deebach said. “It speaks a lot to their dedication, their ability to adapt, and the skills they’ve built or are striving to build. “There’s a lot of turmoil with

Financial Services

BY BRENT BAKER

TONASKET FFA SUB-DISTRICT LEADERSHIP RESULTS

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

(Tonasket swept all top spots in four categories) Creed 1. Jenna Valentine, Tonasket 2. Rade Pilkinton, Tonasket 3. Jordan Hughes, Tonasket Prepared Speaking 1. Ashley King, Tonasket 2. Colt Hatch, Tonasket 3. Charlie Sanchez, Tonasket Extemporaneous Speaking 1. Wyatt O’Brien, Tonasket 2. Grace Maldonado, Tonasket 3. Claire Thornton, Tonasket 4. Jessica Puente, Tonasket Rituals (teams of six) 1. Tonasket 2. Tonasket 3. Tonasket

CHENEY - College of Idaho is reinstating its football program after a 30-plus year hiatus, and one of the school’s class of “zero year” group of 16 (so far) recruits is former Tonasket resident Masen McCormick, who is graduating from Cheney High School in June. McCormick, who attended kindergarten and first grade at Tonasket Elementary School, is the grandson of longtime Tonasket residents Terry and Jerry Mills. McCormick was a two-time Great Northern League all-con-

ference selection as a 6-1, 235 lb. offensive lineman and team captain for the Blackhawks, who in 2012 advanced the state 2A playoffs. He intends to major in business and hopes to eventually attend law school and with a semester to go sports a 3.89 GPA. The fledgeling program will hold its first spring practices in early 2014 and kick off its first game on Aug. 30, 2014. College of Idaho, located in Caldwell, Idaho, is an NAIA school that will compete in the Frontier Conference in football, which stretches from the Southern Oregon to Dickinson State in North Dakota.

SPORTS SCHEDULES HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULES, APR. 11-20

Note: Rep. Joel Kretz (R-Wauconda) was named District VII Legislator of the Year.

Thursday, Apr. 11 BB - Lake Roosevelt at Tonasket, 4:00 pm

SUNNY OKANOGAN ANGUS RANCH INVITATIONAL CATTLE JUDGING Team 1. Tonasket 2. Chelan 3. Omak 4. Manson 5. Bridgeport 6. Cle Elum 7. Okanogan

Former Tonasket resident to help reboot C of I football

1040 1039 965 937 866 858 831

Individual 1. Cle Elum 3. Rade Pilkinton 5. Claire Thornton 8. Derek Rimestad 10.Cade Hockett

227 211 210 208 206

kids getting bad press. But for every bad things you see, there’s 10-20 times the amount of good kids out there doing good, positive things.”

Saturday, Apr. 13 BB - Cashmere at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am BB - Pateros at Oroville (2), 11:00 am SB - Cashmere at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am SB - Oroville at Pateros (2), 11:00 am SOC - Cashmere at Tonasket 11:00 am (followed by JV game) SOC - Bridgeport at Oroville, 11:00 am TEN - Cashmere at Tonasket, 11:00 am TEN - Oroville vs. White Swan at Eastmont, 1:00 pm TR - Oroville at Cashmere Invite, 12:00 pm Tuesday, Apr. 16 BB - Tonasket at Okanogan, 4:30 pm BB - Oroville at Manson, 4:00 pm SB - Okanogan at Tonasket, 4:30 pm SB - Manson at Oroville, 4:00 pm SOC - Tonasket at Okanogan, 4:30 pm (followed by JV game) SOC - Oroville at Liberty Bell, 5:00 pm TEN - Tonasket at Okanogan, 4:30 pm

TR - Tonasket at Okanogan (quad), 4:00 pm GLF - Oroville vs Manson/RC at Alta Lakes GC, 2:30 pm Thursday, Apr. 18 SB - Oroville at Curlew (2), 3:00 pm TEN - Omak at Tonasket, 4:30 pm TEN - Oroville at Pateros, 4:00 pm Friday, Apr. 19 BB - Cascade at Tonasket (2), 4:00 pm Saturday, Apr. 20 BB - Oroville at Bridgeport (2), 11:00 am SB - Tonasket at Cascade (2), 11:00 am SB - Lake Roosevelt at Oroville (2), 11:00 am SOC - Tonasket at Cascade, 11:00 am (followed by JV game) SOC - Manson at Oroville, 11:00 am TEN - Tonasket at Cascade, 11:00 am TR - Oroville at Quincy Invite, 10:30 am

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Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 11, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

More to Life gears up for second fundraiser By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

Volunteers that helped Tonasket’s two rodeo queens (front, row, l-r) Breanna Howell and Karlie Henneman complete their senior project at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds included (middle) Toni Henneman, Marcie Howell, (back) Ted Randolph (Home Depot), Katie Henneman, Megan Bolich, Brisa Leep, Kyle Howell, and Tyler Armstrong. Not pictured are Butch Woolbert (Home Depot), Jonalynn Glover, Savannah Clinedinst, Kenny Freeze, Sterling Clinedinst, Austin Wood, Sarah Quinlan, Tyler Field, Erin Quinlan, Elizabeth Hylton, Bonnie Sigfried, Brock Henneman, and Bud McSpadden.

Rodeo queens complete bleacher makeover By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - It was an intricate plot many years in the making. And while spending several long days at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds without horses, pageantry, or even makeup was a different gig for Breanna Howell and Karlie Henneman, seeing the fruits of their labors was worth it. Howell and Henneman joined forces for their Tonasket High School senior projects to give the bleachers at the rodeo grounds a facelift, a project that included power washing, sanding, painting, replacing some rotted boards, adding latticework and even painting the picnic tables. They also installed concrete “bottom steps” at the base of the bleachers, that were imprinted with a commemoration of the project on two and gave homage to 1957 Miss Tonasket Rodeo Gerry Beeman, on the third. Howell, this year’s Omak Stampede Rodeo Queen, and Henneman, the Tonasket

Submitted photo

Henneman (left) and Howell had their work cut out for them as they started preparing the rodeo grounds bleachers for their new look. Founders Day Rodeo Queen, spent their spring break finishing up their project with the help of a team of volunteers and donations from Home Depot of Omak and Mac, Cass and Becky Gebbers of Brewster, as well as help from the Tonasket Fire Department and Lee Franks of Tonasket. “Breanna conned me into it,” Henneman said. “This was back in 2011 when we were in junior rodeo and both wanted to be the Tonasket Rodeo Queen. She

F A Pr oo c iz d ti e vi s ti es

OKANOGAN COUNTY

thought it would be a great senior project.” “Since our sophomore year, it’s been a big brainstorming process,” Howell said. “We couldn’t imagine what it was going to look like when it was done, because we’ve seen it the way it was for so long.” What this year’s fans will see is a complete makeover of the stands, with light gray paint and red steps replacing the mostly peeled-off coat of yesteryear.

A D FR M E IS E S IO N

Combo senior projects are rare, but the dual queen project seemed appropriate given the size and nature of the project. “The senior projects are really about individuals,” Howell said. “But once the school saw how big this was, they said to go for it.” As with any major project, not all went exactly to plan. There were multiple hardware store runs, a miscalculation on how much paint was needed and, Howell said, “last minute funding issues.” But with the help of their families, friends, volunteers, a pair of Home Depot employees (not to mention the ever-present and ever-effervescent Bud McSpadden), the makeover was complete by Thursday. “It doesn’t seem real,” Henneman said. “We’ve been looking at chipped paint, broken boards and rust for so long.”

DENTISTRY

TONASKET - A year after making a successful splash with its first fundraiser, More to Life is hoping to continue the momentum built over the past 12 months. They’ll be hosting a fundraiser at the Tonasket High School Commons on Friday, April 26, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tickets are $10, $5 for children 10 and under. Darin and Elaina Halvorsen, founders of the local non-profit, have been working their way through the painstaking process of building their organization, with the eventual goal of building a youth center in Tonasket that would, their words, “provide academic, social and athletic activities in a safe and encouraging environment.” Over the past three years they have also spearheaded the Fifth Quarters held after nearly every Tonasket home football game. More to Life held its first fundraiser last April, raising about $3,000 for the purpose of hiring a grant writer to go after larger sums of money. As the Halvorsens discovered, that’s not a process that goes quickly. “We found a good grant writer for quite a bit less than that,” Darin Halvorsen said. “So we’ll continue to use the rest of that money for that. That has taught us the real speed this is going to go. Being a young organization we thought we’d hire a grant writer and the big money would start rolling in. But it’s more along the lines of being a teenager having to build their credit before buying their first home. So she has done an excellent job of educating us about that and turning our focus to the smaller

EYECARE

foundational grants, building our resume and organizational history.” He said that while the Halvorsens knew it was a project for the long haul, this past year has given them a sense of what their timetable will actually look like. “We’re still on track, but it’s a matter of changing our timelines and expectations,” he said. “It’s becoming more clear.” He said that a verbal agreement to purchase the property for the youth center is still in place, “As long as the group that controls that property doesn’t change hands or change direction. So that’s all OK.” This year’s fundraiser will be use to purchase a sound system, as well as to upgrade and expand the Fifth Quarter program. “We want to take that to another level,” Halvorsen said. “So securing the right funds will help us to do what we want, rather than be restricted to our current budget. “One thing we’re exploring is to kick off Fifth Quarters in Oroville this fall. It’s not a done deal by any means, but we’re exploring the option of doing that.” He added that a summer activity is also in the early planning stages. As for the fundraiser, it will be similar to last year in that it will feature a silent auction and talent show of local youth, but with some different twists. “The menu is going to be way better,” Halvorsen said. “We have two guys who will be cooking smoked gouda chicken penne alfredo, and have the youth serve as waiters and waitresses to give it more of a sit down feel as opposed to a potluck. “Last year was quite a success. We got very good feedback. We didn’t want to do too many big changes to something that worked.”

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Life is full of ups and downs — and the financial markets are no different. As an investor, you’re no doubt happy to see the “ups” — but the “downs” can seem like a real downer. Isn’t there any way to help smooth out the volatility in your investment portfolio? First of all, to cope with volatility, it’s helpful to know what causes it — and there can be many causes. Computers that make trades in milliseconds, based on mathematical models, are sometimes blamed for intraday volatility, but large price swings can also occur following the release of government economic reports, such as those dealing with unemployment and housing starts. Global events, such as the European economic malaise, can also send the financial markets into a tizzy. By being aware of the impact of these events, you can see that the workings of the markets

Care Credit

FAMILY PRACTICE

— especially their volatility — may not be as mysterious as you thought. Still, while knowing the causes of volatility can help you prepare for market swings, it won’t blunt their impact on your portfolio. To do that, you need to create a diversified mix of investments because your portfolio can be more susceptible to negative price movements if you only own one type of asset.

To illustrate: If you owned mostly bonds, and interest rates rose sharply, the value of your bonds would likely drop, and your portfolio could take a big hit. But if you owned stocks, bonds, government securities, certificates of deposit (CDs) and other investment vehicles, the rise in interest rates would probably affect your portfolio less significantly. Unfortunately, many investors think that if they own a few stocks and a bond, they’re diversified. But you can actually extend your diversification through many levels — and you should. For the equity portion of your portfolio, try to own stocks representing many market sectors and industries. Also, consider international stocks. And rather than just owning U.S. Treasury bonds, consider corporate bonds and municipal bonds, and diversify your fixed-income holdings further by purchasing short-term, intermediate-term and long-term bonds. Work with your financial

advisor to determine the mix of asset classes and investments that are appropriate for your financial goals and objectives. How you ultimately diversify your portfolio depends on your risk tolerance, time horizon and long-term goals — there’s no one “correct” asset mix for everyone. And over time, your diversification needs may change. To cite one example, as you enter your retirement years, you may need to increase your percentage of income-producing investments while possibly reducing the amount of growth investments you own. These growth-oriented investments tend to be more volatile, and you may want less volatility during your retirement. However, even during retirement, you will need to own a certain percentage of growth investments to provide you with the growth potential you’ll need to stay ahead of inflation. Keep in mind that diversification can’t guarantee a profit or protect against loss. Nonetheless, building a diversified portfolio may help take some of the volatility out of investing — so look for diversification opportunities whenever possible. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

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APRIL 11, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

A new era in state government

It can be done. This past week the Majority Coalition Caucus proved that what many in Olympia said was impossible is actually possible. It is possible to balance the state’s budget, while at the same time substantially increasing the public investment into education and protecting our state’s most vulnerable, without new taxes. We applied the same rules people in the real world live by. We had adult conversations with a refreshing level of transparency and bipartisan cooperation. We accomplished some of the efficiencies necessary to do this by holding government agencies accountable to the standard of productivity that so many of our small businesses face each day. There is still a long way to go, but we have made the first step. Obviously, there are those who are pretty attached to the old-fashioned politics of wornOpinion by out talking points, and consequently did not like process. It showed that just like the T-Rex, Sen. John Smith this those old predatory ideas have come to the end (7th District) of their age of dominance. Voters expect better from us. They are tired of egos battling over who will raise taxes more or who will regulate who more. As moms and dads struggle to balance their personal budgets, they know deep inside that the days of the taxpayer-funded gravy train are over. It is time for state government, and those that operate within it, to live within their means. It is time for legislators to have the character and integrity to say no to deep-pocketed special interests and for once represent the real people who sent them to Olympia. I do believe that better days are ahead of us. Those days will not come from more government spending, another program, more taxes or more agency expansion. The solution is the American Dream. We have been so focused on making our political points that we have forgotten what America is about. We were founded on the idea that there were absolute principles that guarantee inviolate rights to each citizen, chief of which is the right to build the better mousetrap. Sometimes the best way to identify that new idea is to fail repeatedly and earn the discovery. In America your latest failure is the first step to your next success. We don’t need government masking mistakes; we don’t need “Olympia whitewash” spread over things that don’t work. A better future is predicated upon an honest admission that politics as usual doesn’t work. Our systems are broken. More money without reform won’t fix things. We need fundamental government reforms, and that sort of remodeling will not happen with a single bill, a vote of the Legislature, or the swipe of a pen by a governor. It will happen with hard work, a determined long-term commitment, and the character to see it through. There are those of us who are determined to commit to that task, but it will not happen overnight and it will not happen without your input and assistance. I am always open to your comments and ideas. Real solutions come from home, not from Olympia Sen. John Smith, R-Colville, is serving his first term in the Washington State Senate and represents the 7th Legislative District. He serves as Vice Chair for both the Senate Natural Resources and Parks Committee, and the Senate Trade and Economic Development Committee. He is also a member of the Senate Transportation Committee. Editor’s Note: In last week’s editorial I stated that the North Valley Hospital District CEO’s salary had increased 100%, it was more like 23%, from roughly $130,000 (not $75,000) to $160,000. CEO Linda Michel also wanted point out that she, not the board approved the staff salary increases. Michel also has a letter in this week’s issue. G.A.D.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Hospital Board gives of their time and energy Dear Editor, I am having difficulty with the fact that some in the community feel the Board of Commissioners need to be recalled. I have a different opinion, which I must state whether it changes those feelings or not. Several of the NVH District Board of Commissioners are long standing members who have given much of their time and energy to the District year after year. Any Board only knows what they are told and shown. In the past they were only told and I, on the other hand, must have the data to support what I tell them. As anyone on the Senior Leadership Team can tell you, I am a data person. Data supports the facts and there is no denying such information. The Senior Leaders, the Board of Commissioners, and I have worked diligently these last two and a half years to build a strong team that communicates, and supports the entire District. We know that we all could be more involved in communicating at a higher level, and we are forming a plan on how to communicate more effectively and efficiently with our service area. Culture change takes several years and as we continue to evolve, I would hope the community could see through their (understandable) emotions and let us all, including the Board of Commissioners, get on with the business of providing a solid foundation for the District. Respectfully, Linda Michel, Administrator NVH Public District #4

Can no longer remain silent on this issue Dear Editor, In the wake of last week’s article “NVH CEO defends...,” I can no longer remain silent about the management issues your healthcare system has been experiencing. After several decades of watching administration come and go, my husband and his colleagues have run into administrators like the one you’re dealing with now and believe me in cases like yours they don’t go fast enough but hopefully they go before the system as a whole is lost. She talks of provider shortages like they are something new, go on to the HRSA website, your state DOH, talk to other rural healthcare systems, they are nothing new. In fact they are addressed through government programs. Why hasn’t your administration utilized these programs? Why has there been no solicitations through industry mediums interested providers would rely on? Your administrations’ dependence on recruitment companies alone spells out certain death to anyone who understands the process. But one has to question the reasons the providers left the system to begin with. Your administrations delight in accounts receivable being 50 days out is nothing short of mystifying. That is unacceptable in any COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

75 YEARS AGO April 1 - 8, 1938: There was an appreciative audience at the PTA sponsored play, “Patsy Strings Along”. The total amount of $67.50 was realized from the sale of tickets and these funds will go to reduce the erase the soup fund debt. DeLuxe is the way Tonasket sportsmen are putting on their annual seafood dinner this year on April 6, 1938. Cracked crab on ice was selected as the main dish. One half of a thousand of the “Jumbo Size” crustaceans have been ordered from Dungeness world famous as the habitat of the finest ocean crabs. 1938 Psalm: “Mr. Roosevelt is my Shepard, therefore I am in want; He leadeth me to lie down on the park bench; He leadeth me beside the still factories; He disturbeth my soul; He leadeth me in the paths of destruction, for my parties stake; Yea, tho I walk through the valley of depression, I anticipate no recovery; He prepareth a reduction in my salary and in the presence of mine enemies, He anointeth my income with taxes and my expense account runneth over; Surely unemployment and poverty will follow me All the days of my life and I will dwell in a mortgaged house forever.” (Remember, this is in 1938.) The Valedictorian for the Molson Senior Class is John Dart and the salutatorian if Rita Carver. Graduation is June 9 with the Baccalaureate sermon by Rev. E. Juday. Groceries: Meyer Prince’s; 1# Bakers cocoa, $.14; Corn Flakes, 2 for $.15; 3# coffee, $.79; Ben Prince’s: 3# can coffee, $.74; Carnation milk, $3.19 per case; Brown sugar, 5# for $.25. Food for Thought: I have my money and my friends. I loan my money to friends. I ask for my money of my friends. I lose my money and my friends. Notices have been posted in the Post Office this week from the U.S. Civil Service Commission for the examination for fireman-laborer. Duties will include; cleaning heating and ventilating a small building, all manual work incident to the duties for minor repairs and/or related work. Applicants must have at least six months experience in firing steam boilers or locomotives and three months experience in firing with wood. Experience in firing small home heating with wood. Ladies Dress & Sport Sandals in white, black and combination colors available for $2.49 and $2.95 at W. H. Neller in the Covert building.

business, not just healthcare, especially with today’s technology. Additionally, The CEO’s statement about the audits being changed to biannually because “the books are so clean” is misleading. Agencies can use the state auditors office to do their audits or use a private company, your hospital just decided to audit through a third party. As per the auditor’s website, though the district has not been “cited” there have been findings when the state was doing the audits. And last but certainly not least, we have known and worked with Rosa for over 12 years, and the hospital districts attempts at discrediting her have gone from humorous to absurd. Because of her dedication and years of successful experience in many areas including, recruiting, credentialing and contracting countless specialties, managing multiple clinic and ancillary services (not just radiology) simultaneously in rural healthcare systems both not for profit and private, in addition to writing many grants, some of which are multi-million dollar grants used to develop programs all of which are still in existence and thriving on there own; the systems and communities she has worked with have done nothing but benefit from her involvement and will continue to benefit for years to come. Can your administration say the same? Vi Thompson Vancouver, Wash.

Look for the big picture Dear Editor, I think the Tonasket Hospital Commissioners need to realize the bigger picture. They have been on county warrants and this involves the whole county. Are there those of us out there that would support the continued use of warrants to support any of our hospital systems, if they were being run efficiently? Without a doubt. But you are treating the whole county like idiots. You are try to convince us it is the Assisted Living or any other service creating problems, when warrants were going down

ITEMS FROM THE PAST 50 YEARS AGO: APRIL 4 - 11, 1963: Enthusiasim for a community float and a variety of jobs combines April 1 as Oroville High School students worked and donated their money for a community float. $551.20 had been tallied April 2 with approximately 62 percent of the students having turned in their money. Finishing touches were put on the Molson-ChesawKnob Hill Community History Book in the bindery room of the Oroville gazette recently. A picture showing but a few of the 500 books now available to anyone interested in stories of “The Old Days.” Appearing in the picture were but a few of those who had a hand in the writing, printing and binding of the books. Those pictured were: Raymond Dart, Carl Rounds, Mary Rounds, Harry Sherling, Sid Rice and Bill Davies. The annual meeting of the Oroville Television Association was held on March 29 at the Oroville Grange Hall with some thirty citizens attending. Three new members were elected to replace John Haskell, Vernon Valentine and Paul Loe and they are Wayne Callison, Ed Scott and Don Thorndike and they will join Fabian Kresek, George Ueland, Ward Johnston, Ezra Buckmiller and Clarence Rise. May Day Princesses were selected by their classmates on April 2 at the Oroville High School. The chosen princesses are; Senior, Patsy Buckmiller, Junior Patricia Hemry, Sophomore, Luanne Emry and Freshman, Nancy Zosel. Attendants for each class are; Lindy Syring, Sandra Hill, Angie Milicia, Donna Nealy, Susan Lundgren, Kay Walker, Sally Byers and Nancy Rader. The Board of Directors of Oroville School District #405 met on April 2 to organize for the coming year. Clayton Emry was elected Chairman and H. Ben Holden as Clerk of the board. Both Emry and Holden showed their aptitudes early when they both married local Oroville girls. Other member of the board is: Kem Smith, Wesley Rogers and Ted Thorndike. A business transaction was completed last week, whereby Dick Suryan, of Sedro Woolley, Washington has leased the Peerless Coffee Shop and Glow Room. Dale Bartell, former operator of the business has

until you and your administration decided to do all that construction. The recent salary raises are absurd and yet you continue to blow smoke about technical language and “lay persons,” now you are using the tax paid attorney! When will it stop? Ansel Grove Okanogan

Appreciate the kindness Dear Editor, Randy and I want to thank Princes Department Store and their amazing employees for initiating and organizing Randy’s benefit dinner. We appreciate and are extremely grateful for every business and individual that donated their time, their money or item/service to auction off, for every person that baked some delicious sweet treat to be auctioned off, to everyone who came and ate the incredible homemade chilli cooked by Akins Harvest Foods and the many donated items from Frontier Foods. We were completely overwhelmed at the number of precious people that came out to buy dinner and then stay to bid on items and services that had been donated, often paying far more than the original value. We did not take lightly the hard earned money that was given so graciously in our behalf to help with medical bills! Thank you Jack Hughes who with his “unique” sense of humor stood and auctioned all night and Michelle Smith who tried to keep Jack in check all night, to Mary Hughes and her team of fast fingered calculator operators who managed to keep the income tallied and everything organized throughout the night to the Department Store employees who served through the night...set up and clean up crew.... It was overwhelming and deeply appreciated to be blessed with all the help! Thank you, Thank you, Thank you, Randy and Cindy MacAllister Oroville

taken over the management of FAO’s Café. Weather Wise, Provided by Marge Frazier: High and low temperatures for the previous week are: April 3, 55 degrees maximum and 30 degrees minimum; April 4th, 63 and 42; April 5th, 62 and 35; April 6th, 52 and 38; April 7th, 49 and 32; April 8th, 57 and 39 and April 9th, 60 and 39. Precipitation for the week; April 5th, .22; April 6th, .18; April 7th, .09; April 8th, .38; and April 9th, .68.

25 YEARS AGO: April 7 - 14, 1988: Smokey’s Saw Shop, formerly located on old Highway 7 South and owned by Larry Lempke, now has a new owner and location. Mike and Peggy McDaniel are now the proud owners of the shop. The name will remain the same, but the shop will be in a new location. They are now located a 306th West 4th, right across from the Riverview Market in Tonasket. What started as a simple inquiry a year ago, has turned into what Fred Richardson, local Tonasket man, thinks could be a thriving industry in the economically Okanogan County area. It seems that he had had a contact from North Okanogan County Economic Development about manufacturing chopsticks. Several Japanese companies have indicated they would purchase all of the chopsticks that could be manufactured in this area. Governor Booth Gardner appointed Arlie Clinkenbeard of Okanogan, as Okanogan County Commissioner for District 2 Last Friday, April 8. The Governor made his decision after interviewing Clinkenbeard and two other candidates in the Governor’s office on April 17. The Washington State Liquor Control Board announced that it will distribute its third quarter excess funds for fiscal year 1988 amounting to $11,900,000 on March 31, 1988. Okanogan County will receive $9,252.62, the City of Oroville will receive $3,299.58 and the Town of Tonasket will get $2,174.58. The Bridgeport-Pateros combined baseball team, The Mustangs, had a field day against Oroville in a non-league contest last Saturday. The Hornets even had problems picking off runners and trounced Oroville 15 – 0. Saturday, the 16th, the Oroville High School Band will be sponsoring a Pancake Breakfast in the elementary school cafeteria. The cost will be $3.00 per person, $2.00 under 12 and $12.00 per family. All proceeds will be used to pay the expenses of the bank trip to the Spokane Lilac Festival parade and buy much needed instruments as well as repairing those already in use.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 11, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Time to wash the windows Good ole’ sunshine and warmer days. There is just one bad thing about bright sunshine and that is it brings to mind just how dirty the windows really are. Soon will be the “worry time” for the orchard owners. The temperatures can get down right THIS & THAT cold, some- Joyce Emry

times, at night, and frost can damage the forthcoming crops. But, if all goes well, we’ll be seeing pretty, fragrant apple blossoms before too long. And isn’t it amazing that we can go into the grocery and purchase just about any kind of apple, now. Technology is a wonderful thing. Did you know that the silks on an ear of corn represents how many kernels of corn there are on each ear? Now, I didn’t count them but a Nebraska farmer told me that for a fact. What are we gonna do on Monday nights? Pinochle is over ‘til next November.

Folks are wondering when Fat Boy’s (FB’s Family Diner) will be reopening. I drove by, as I thought there was a sign on the door and there was, but it was from the previous owners thanking folks for their patronage, and saying they were retiring after several years of “cookin’ up a storm.” I don’t believe anyone ever went away hungry from Fat Boy’s, because they gave mighty big servings. Good people, helping out the community in many ways, behind the scenes. A can of chili has two medium servings in, until you drop one of the bowls and then it seems to triple in size, and there are beans and stuff in places you can’t even imagine. It didn’t go to the ceiling, but many other hard to get to places. My mother-in-law would have said, “Oh! dear!” That isn’t what I said, as I was on my knees digging beans out from under

PRESERVING HISTORY

the dishwasher, and wondering if I’d be able to get back up on my feet. A very pretty sight is Mr. Robin Redbreast! Gorgeous birds! But my first love is the quail, with their cute little hats on. It’s time to put away the winter sweaters… and remember, wash them first, so they’ll be fresh and ready for next season. We moved into our new house eight years ago. For eight years my white crocheted tablecloth has been missing. Some silly woman had put it in a black plastic bag with a quilt, and has been on a shelf. Isn’t it amazing what you find when you clean cupboards and closets? I’m so glad to have found it, as Erna Grunert had made it, and she was such a delightful lady! Someone said, “Marriage is like eating

April marks the Month of the Military Child Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck NCW Blue Star Mothers President

The April meeting is our favorite meeting of the year! During the 6:30 p.m. hour we

with chopsticks or twirling a baton… not as easy as it looks”. Do you get notions about changing things around a bit, when you start the spring cleaning? Maybe paint a wall blue and change places with some of the paintings, or move the couch, and then hear from the man of the house, “Why do you always have to be changing things? (after eight years) Maybe some new pillows or new covers for the old ones! Then, we come to the drawers, and just as soon as you throw out something, you need it the next day. But tell me, why we need seven wire pliers and three hammers in an already full drawer of stuff? Sleeping on the couch or in your favorite recliner is called “pre-sleep.” Yep! That sounds about correct.

BLUE STAR MOTHERS will be packing up boxes to send to our area’s military children. Stuffed animals, affirmation jewelry and gift cards will be sent showing our communities’ appreciation of their service. If you know of any children whose

parent’s home town is located somewhere in North Central Washington and their parent is currently serving in the Armed Forces, send us their names, age, and address so that they, too, can be included in this year’s mailing. Contact us at (509) 485-2906 or www.facebook.com/ncw.blue. star.mothers. We will also be presenting this year’s winner of our area’s Most Patriotic Business!

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Blossom Spring Bazaar Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Okanogan Borderlands Historical Society auction last Saturday brought out a crowd to bid on several items to raise funds for the operation of the Depot Museum and the Visitor Information Center. Ken Neal volunteered his skills as auctioneer for the live auction. The event was held at the American Legion Hall and the American Legion Auxiliary had hamburgers for sale for those who wanted to eat..

Hoping rain brings flowers for May festivities Submitted by Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

I certainly hope all the April showers this week will bring us beautiful May flowers; Certainly for all the May Festival Activities. The Center is planning to have our own Festival Royalty. Not yet named. Beverly Storm is back home after a lengthy visit in Southern California and Arizona. She

Oh no, more snow By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS always comes back with the nicest tan. Also, apparently she had some surgery while in Southern California. A nice place to recuperate in the winter. While playing cards with the Pinochle bunch on Sunday afternoon, Beverly Holden was suddenly taken ill and was transported to North Valley Hospital in Tonasket by ambulance. Hope she soon recovers from whatever

HILLTOP COMMENTS

Can you believe the weather we had today? (Sunday). Just when we get use to having a few days of sunshine and warmth and the tables turn and it looks like the first snow of fall. We have a good two inches of snow here at our house. Along with the good weather we were having, the wild life on our Hilltop start to come out of hiding and be seen. Over in Molson there was a sighting of a raccoon, and a gray wolf. And between Molson and Chesaw an elk and eagles have been seen. Over on Nealey Road four small

deer were eating along side the road where the new grass was sprouting up. We have seen a couple of baby horses and of course lots of calves. Hopefully, the snow will not last long and we will be back to spring. The winners of the Easter Baskets at the Mercantile were Carol Mills and Terry Miller, both with guesses of 245 and the winner of the Jelly Bean Jar was Feather, with a guess of 243. Everyone is invited to the “Don’t Blink Walking Tour of Chesaw” and “Highland Handmade”. Season Opening at

Dinner/Auction for Larry Stell, April 13

TONASKET EAGLES

by Sue Wisener Tonasket Eagles #3002

Spring is here, waiting for more rain to green up the grass, so we can start mowing, lots have already have done so. Or feed your animals. On Saturday, April 13 there will be a Dinner/Auction for Larry Stell to help with medical

New NVCS classes coming up in April By Jackie Valiquette

expenses. Dinner will be fried chicken and will be from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Karaoke to follow. On Sunday, April 14 there will be awards given out for those involved with NBHA at 1 p.m. We will be having road clean up on April 28 starting at 9 a.m. Please come in and sign up (support your Eagles).

LEARNING TREE

North Valley Community Schools

Our new website is up and running, but not altogether dependable just yet. Log on and see the new look. You can review all the classes, but registering for them requires another tweak or two. Should be running smoothly very soon. www.northvalleycommunityschools.com You have plenty of time to sign up for these classes: Let’s Start Scrapbooking (get those photos in order!); Voice Training (so you think you can sing!); Meatless

Mondays (an international campaign to improve your health); Your Estate (Don’t Put it Off!); and The Essence of Yoga (cultivating focus and calmness in your life). And, if the following classes have reached the minimum number of students needed to ‘make it go,’ we will continue to take registrations right up to the last minute. Introduction to Squash (two sessions April 13 and 20); Beginning Guitar (six Mondays starting the 15th); Make a Piñata!

the problem is. We hear everyone likes Indian Tacos so well that the Center is planning such an event. No date yet, but soon. Ever wonder how television happened to come to Oroville years ago. Clayton Emry, who is a great story teller, will give us the scoop on April 23. Pinochle scores for April 6: The drawing was won by Wilma Colburn; Most pinochles went to Sally Eder. High Woman Score went to Beverly Storm and High Man Score went to Ed Craig. Ed seems to be recovering well from his recent hip surgery. More next time.

OROVILLE – The seventh annual Blossom Spring Bazaar will be Saturday, April 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Oroville High School Commons. Admission is free (please bring a Food Drive Donation). Door Prizes, from the participating vendors, throughout the day. Come and enjoy a variety of booths, including: hand crafted items, health and fitness information, various community services information, beauty and skin care, jewelry, home interior, workshops and demonstrations and much more. Sponsored by Blossom Ministries - Potential Vendors may contact Melisa Turner at (509)-733-1941.

Oroville Kite Day OROVILLE - The Oroville Royal Neighbors is sponsoring Kite Day Sunday, April 14 at Oroville’s Bud Clark ballfields at 9 Sawtell Rd. Free kites and cookies to kids from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m., or while supplies last. Enjoy a great day flying your kite in the park.

a family bingo on Friday, April 19 at 6 p.m. Children have to be with a parent or guardian. Bring finger food to share with friends and neighbors.

Concert to Benefit Music Department Flood Season Meeting OROVILLE - There will be a benefit concert for the Oroville School Music Department on Friday, April 19 at 7 p.m. at the OHS Commons. The concert is part of a senior project for student Scotty Frazier. Donations will accepted at the door.

Habitat for Humanity Yard Sale OROVILLE - Okanogan County Habitat for Humanity will be holding a yard sale on Saturday, April 20 at Gold Digger Warehouse on Main St., across from the Oroville Library. Donations will be accepted on Saturday, April 13, from 10 a.m. until 12 noon.

Fiona on Saturday, April 27. All four businesses in town will have maps with some local history of Chesaw, and visitors can take a self-directed tour with the maps, to find some interesting tidbits about our Highlands town. Businesses will be open at 10 a.m. (Tavern at noon) and Fiona Art Gallery will open the season with an Artists Reception from 4-7 p.m. Several local artists will be there to meet with the public, and a wide variety of arts and crafts will be available for viewing and for sale. Refreshments will be served and of course espresso drinks will be for sale. Come see early spring in the Highlands..... Remember - BINGO starts on Friday, April 19 at 6 p.m. at the Molson Grange.

Similkameen Zumba with NVCS Sunday

Bingo is every Friday at 7 p.m. and the kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m. (Great Burgers) Name Game and Shake A Shift are up there, come in and you may win. Pinochle scores as follows: 15t place Joanne Michels, rd place Wanda Sutherland Last Pinochle Wanda and Gene, last score went to Ken Cook. Sam Swager in Wenatchee Hospital, We wish him well. All other that are Ill we wish them a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless you all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

So you think you can sing! Regardless of your level of skill, learn how to use your voice correctly in this class. It’s all about support and breathing. Through this North Valley Community School offering you will learn about posture, diaphragm and tonal quality. Acquiring proper singing techniques will make you into a more accomplished singer and you will enjoy it far more. Six Wednesday classes begin Wednesday, April 17. Call Ellen Bartells at (509) 476-2011 or community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu for information and to register.

(two sessions on April 16 and 23 and Patterns for Lakes (two Tuesdays, the 16 and 23). Call Ellen Bartells at (509) 476-2011 or community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu for information or to register.

Help Wanted?

OROVILLE – Zumba! Have you tried it? Exercising can be a bummer, but not with Zumba. This is a fitness party and you will move, dance, laugh and do the Limbo to Latin and International music. The moves work up a sweat while toning and melting inches from your body. There’s high impact and low impact, so it’s fitness for everyone. Bring a water bottle and towel. Call Ellen Bartells at North Valley Community Schools or community.schools@oroville.wednet.edu to register for any five remaining classes, Tuesday, April 16 through Tuesday, June 25.

Use Your Voice

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Exámenes de la primera infancia se llevará a cabo en español o en Inglés. Los niños se pondrán a prueba en las habilidades motoras finas y gruesas y en las áreas socio-emocionales.

TONASKET - Similkameen Sunday: Honoring the River, Honoring the People of the River, will take place on Sunday, April 21 from 12 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket (411 Western Ave.). Join us in welcoming members of the Lower and Upper Similkameen Bands and the Colville Tribes for a celebration of the cultural, spiritual and historic significance of Similkameen Falls. For more info contact Jere’ and Rick Gillespie at (509) 4853844 or Joseph Enzensberger at (509) 476-2100.

Preschool and Kindergarten Roundup OROVILLE Oroville Elementary School will be conducting kindergarten registration for next school year on Wednesday, April 24 and Thursday, April 25. At the same time they will be conducting screenings for any child age 0 to 4 for developmental delays. Early childhood screenings will be done in either Spanish or English. The children will be tested in the fine and gross motor skills and in the social-emotional areas. Oroville Elementary School estará realizando inscripciones para Kindergarten para el año escolar próximo 24 de abril y 25. Al mismo tiempo, se llevará a cabo pruebas de detección de cualquier edad en niños de 0 a 4 para el retraso en el desarrollo.

OKANOGAN - There will be an Okanogan County Flood Season Coordination Meeting on Thursday, April 25 from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Okanogan County Commissioner’s Conference Room, 123 5th Avenue N., Okanogan. The meeting is open to the public. Anyone with comments or concerns is encouraged to attend.

Don’t Blink Walking Tour CHESAW - Everyone is invited to the “Don’t Blink Walking Tour of Chesaw” and “Highland Handmade.” Season Opening at Fiona on Saturday, April 27. All four businesses in town will have maps with some local history of Chesaw, and visitors can take a self-directed tour with the maps, to find some interesting tidbits about our Highlands town. Businesses will be open at 10 a.m. (tavern at noon) and Fiona Art Gallery will open the season with an Artists Reception from 4-7 p.m. Several local artists will be there to meet with the public, and a wide variety of arts and crafts will be available for viewing and for sale. Refreshments will be served and of course espresso drinks will be for sale.

Weather Spotter Training OKANOGAN - There will be a Weather Spotter Training session at the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office Conference Room, 123 5th Ave. N., Okanogan, on Thursday, May 2 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The course is free. To register, contact Glenda Beauregard at the Emergency Management Department by calling (509) 4227206 or register online at: www. okangandem.org.

Food Banks The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480. The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

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APRIL 11, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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SPRING HAS SPRUNG SPRING HAS SPRUNG Time to start building, spruce up your home, yard and garden here! s i g n i r p S

How to clean dirty windows Submitted

Dirty windows are unsightly, and they can prevent beneficial sunlight from entering a home. Cleaning windows need not be done every week, but it shouldn’t be overlooked completely, either. While it certainly may be a chore to clean windows, there are ways to make the task much more tolerable. Curb appeal can be very important when selling a home. Even ahome with a perfectly manicured

lawn and the newest roofing and siding can seem unappealing if the windows are dirty. Keeping windows clean requires a good deal of work. For the acrophobics, cleaning second-story windows can test the nerves. Having the right tools on hand and a strategy in place will make the job easier to manage.

Cleaning windows

Cleaning windows won’t necessarily be easy, but the following nine-step process can make the task less difficult and time-consuming. 1. Choose a day when it is overcast so you will not be blinded by the sun while cleaning. This also helps prevent streaking. Begin by gathering what you’ll need to get the task done. Having everything at the ready will enable you to move from one window to the next. Here are the basic supplies you will need: * cleaning solution * cloth, newspaper or squeegee * towel * spray bottle * extension pole to reach high windows * vacuum * ladder or step stool * garden hose 2. Take down and clean drapery or blinds when cleaning the windows. Remove the curtains so you will have an unobstructed surface with which to work. 3. Start with the interior side of the windows, as they are easier to access. Place a towel on the sill to catch any drops so the sill or the floor will stay dry. 4. Spray a lint-free cloth or the window directly with the cleaning solution. The edges and corners of the window tend to accumulate the most grime, so begin by cleaning those areas first. Once they are clean and you will not exchange dirt to the center of the window, work on the middle. Wipe the windows in a horizontal direction to help alleviate dripping. 5. To create a streak-free surface, some people prefer to use a squeegee to drag out any pockets of moisture for more even drying. Be sure to wipe the rubber strip of the squeegee after each pass on the window. You may choose to buff out any other streaks with newspaper. 6. Vacuum the window sill and frame afterward to catch any dust and debris. 7. Repeat the process for all interior windows. 8. Move outdoors and start off by spraying the window with a garden hose to loosen any of the accumulated grime. Use your cleaning solution to dissolve the rest of the dirt. You may want to let it sit on the window if there is stubborn grime. Repeat the cleaning process used indoors for each window. 9. If exterior second-floor windows are hard to reach, consider using a ladder and extension pole to extend your reach. Upper windows will not be scrutinized as closely as lower windows, so you may have a greater margin for error. If the windows are simply too high up, rely on a professional window cleaner to get the job done rather than risk falls or other injuries. Mix your own cleaning solution It may take trial and error to find a solution that works. Here is one recipe you may want to start with. 1 cup white vinegar 1 1/2 cups rubbing alcohol 2 drops of dish soap Pour into a clean and empty spray bottle. Remember: Never mix bleach and ammonia together to create a cleaning solution, as toxic fumes will result.

Make your garden unappealing to deer

Welcome to Spring Party –– Saturday, May 4 HOURS: Mon. - Fri. 8-5 Saturday 9-2

Submitted

Creating a beautiful and bountiful garden is a popular pastime for people all across the country. It is important to keep in mind that aesthetically appealing plants may be appetizing to area wildlife, including deer. Those who do not want their gardens to turn into all you-can-eat buffets for deer, rabbits and other wild animals can take a more proactive approach to gardening. Deer are opportunists who will no doubt see your garden as a salad bar ripe with all of their favourite foods. As housing developments continue to encroach on the natural habitats of deer and other animals, these animals are becoming more visible. Deer may not be able to forage for food effectively in their smaller, natural surroundings, or they may become accustomed to the “easy pickings” they find in neighborhood yards. Either way, you may encounter a deer in or around your area. Keeping deer at bay involves some work and maintenance on the part of a homeowner. There are safe and humane methods to repelling deer, or at least blocking access to the plants worth protecting. Here are the main ways to deer-proof a garden.

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Deer are opportunists who see your garden as a salad bar with all their favorite foods. Try some of these techniques, including changing the plants within your garden to deter them.

Scare Them

Deer are naturally skittish around people, but over time they can become quite complacent around human beings. Once a deer decides that something will not present a threat, the deer can adapt to its presence. Motionactivated devices may not work, nor the presence of pets. Predator urine is typically an effective way of keeping deer at bay. Bottled coyote urine can be quite effective, although human urine may work as well. Reapplying the product weeklyaround the plants is a good idea.

Fence It

Fences are one way to deter deer from entering a yard and dining on your garden. Keep in mind that deer can jump fences that are quite tall, but they have to be especially motivated to jump an eightfoot-tall fence. Still, they tend to be wary about scaling a fence when they cannot see what is on the other side. Therefore, if you are fencing out deer, choose a fence that camouflages the garden well and completely encloses the area to be protected. If you do not want the fence to be solid, consider putting stakes or thorny plants within the garden so that the deer will hesitate to jump into the garden.

Repel the Deer

There are many organic or chemical based products on the market that deer may find offensive to the taste or smell. Hot pepper, sulfur and eggs or even the use of soapy water have been successful in certain instances. The use of blood meal or even human hair around the garden may repel the deer and keep them on a different foraging path. However, re-

440 Hwy 7 S, Tonasket 486-2206

member that any deer that is very hungry may ignore unpleasant tastes or smells for a quick bite.

Change Plants

If other food sources are available, there are some species of plants and trees that deer will avoid. Filling your garden with these plants can help you maintain a beautiful, albeit untasty, environment for deer. When planting annuals, select among: Alyssum, Begonias, Calendula, Celosia, Dianthus, Foxglove, Geraniums, Parsley, Poppy or Snapdragons. In terms of perennials, plant these items once, and deer may stay away: Ageratum Anemone, Astibe, Bearded iris, Catmint, Honeysuckle, Lantana, Monkshood, Rock rose, Rosemary, Soapwort or Wisteria. Plant these herbs alongside flowers for even more protection: Chives, Eucalyptus, Garlic, Mint, Thyme or Wintergreen. Gardeners who use a combinationof methods to keep deer out of their yards and gardens may have a higher success rate at deterring these animals.

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Wedding Registry

Spring Decorating Ideas  Books  Children’s Gifts  Garden Decor  Yarn / Quilts  Signs  Western Decor LOCATED: ¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496

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Pump Screen Program helps irrigators comply with fish laws venile fish protection requirements in support of the statewide strategy to recover salmon, steelhead, and bull trout. The Upper-Columbia steelhead is a State of Washington species of concern and a federal threatened species in the Okanogan Basin. Compliance with these state and federal fish protection laws is mandatory. How irrigators achieve compliance with these state and federal laws is each individual’s choice: anyone can install their own fish screen as long as it meets juvenile fish screen criteria. However, the Okanogan Conservation District can make it easier for irrigators through

Submitted by Kirsten Cook Education & Outreach Coordinator Okanogan Conservation District

The Okanogan Conservation District is ready to assist irrigators who withdraw from the Okanogan River and need to install appropriate fish screens on their pump intakes. As of September 2012, seventeen screens have been installed in the Okanogan River Basin under the screen replacement program with twenty-four more slated for installation early this year. These screens were installed at no cost to the irrigator thanks to grant funding. Screens on intakes must meet ju-

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its voluntary screen replacement program. Benefits of the program include: 100% Cost Share for screen and installation. Irrigator prepares site and maintains screen. Technical support providing screens that work for irrigators. Easy Permit Applications. Permitting process is streamlined and handled by the District. No guesswork. Irrigators will know their screen meets mandatory criteria and that regulatory agencies have been informed of their screen’s compliance with fish laws. An approved maintenance and operation plan is provided for the irrigator. There are over 100 screens along the Okanogan River that do not meet fish protection criteria. The Okanogan Conservation District has secured funds through the Colville Confederated Tribal Fisheries Department and the Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board to install more screens. These funds are limited and projects must be completed in 2013, so it is important to enroll in the program now. If you are interested in this screen replacement program, please contact Bob Clark at the Okanogan Conservation District (509.4220855, ext. 122; bobc@okanogancd. org) or stop by the office at 1251 South 2nd Avenue, Room 102, Okanogan, WA 98840.

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Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 11, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • April 11, 2013

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Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

First Aid and CPR Class will be held on April 15th, 16th, & 17th, 7:00pm to 10:00pm in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow the first night. For information call Ben Hylton 509-223-3412, leave message

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continued on next page

Puzzle 13 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.38)

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6

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1

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Puzzle 23 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS

Puzzle 16 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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Puzzle 15 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

9

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509-476-3602

ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details.

SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N

Easy, difficulty rating 0.43 Sponsored by

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7

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1

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7

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49. Crows’ homes

3

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6

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6

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5

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1

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8

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3

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4

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27. “Laugh-In� segment

1

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EVENTS-FESTIVALS

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ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 866-673-6209. www.CenturaOnline.com 2

40. “Dear� one

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3

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8

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9

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An Equal Opportunity Employer 9

Crosswords

23. Knack

4

WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

A BIG THANK YOU to everyone who donated their time and items for Kim Mathis’ March 30th benefit auction. Many thanks, Tommy & Kim!

1

www.go2worksource.com

8

Updated list of employment at

7

126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

3

WorkSource Okanogan County

4

TTY 425-562-4002

www.gazette-tribune.com

7

509-476-2808

1

Call for information and application

3

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

l Great Oroville Location l Picnic area l Spacious Floor Plans l On-site laundry l Park-like setting

5

for 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

Subsidized for Income QualiďŹ ed Households

8

Announcements

Now Accepting Applications

8

1105 Appleway, Oroville

2

Call: (208)794-2447 after April 20th

7

American Legion Housing

6

OPEN HOUSE Friday & Saturday, 10:30-11:30 33436 Hwy 97, Oroville

425-949-7992

3

Large fully fenced back yard. Walking distance to downtown Oroville. Avail April 1st. $625 per mo. No pets. No smoking. 214 Main St, Oroville.

9

1 BR, 1 BA WELL KEPT HOME

6

$1 per SqFt, Min. 250 SqFt. Mini mall style. Great location. Hwy frontage. Est. buisness next door.

OROVILLE

4

$250 per month!!

2

For Rent

Statewides

5

START YOUR OWN SHOP

9

Oroville

Motorcycles

1

FOR RENT: Business/Office unit(s), Main Street Oroville optional sizes & prices. (509)486-1682 or (509)4290873.

Multi Family Yard Sale, April 13th, 9am-2pm. No early Migrant Education Program sales. One mile out Eastlake (MEP) Recruiter Road. Location: Sheila’s The Tonasket School District Shoppe is now accepting applications for a Migrant Education Program (MEP) Recruiter. Applicants must have an AA degree, 72 quarter or 48 YAMAHA VSTAR semester college credits, or 2008 documentation of successful- 1100/XVS11XB. Black with ly passing the State Assess- ghost flames, windshield, ment. Position will remain leather bags, two helmets open until filled with a screen- and cover. $5,000 firm. 509ing date of April 15. Please 476-2514. contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Help Tonasket School District, STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK Wanted OF APRIL 8, 2013 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Middle School Secretary This newspaper participates in a Phone 509-486-2126. statewide classified ad program The Tonasket School District sponsored by the Washington Newsis now accepting applications Publishers Association, a for a Middle School Secretary An Equal Opportunity Employer paper statewide association of weekly Position will remain open until newspapers. The program allows Okanogan County filled with a screening date of classified advertisers to submit ads Department of Public Works for publication in participating weekApril 15. Please contact the is accepting applications until lies throughout the state in compliDistrict Office for an applicawith the following rules. You tion or available on the dis- April 19, 2013 at 4:30 pm for ance may submit an ad for the statewide Temporary M-2 Truck Drivers trict’s website at: through this newspaper or and Traffic Control Striper program www.tonasket.wednet.edu. in person to the WNPA office. The Crewperson. Wages will be rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus Tonasket School District, $15.40/hour. Applicants must $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA 35 DO Hwy 20 E., possess a Commercial reserves the right to edit all ad copy Tonasket, WA 98855. and to refuse to accept Driver’s License, current up- submitted Phone 509-486-2126. any ad submitted for the statewide dated health card, and flag- program. WNPA, therefore, does not An Equal Opportunity Employer ging card. Okanogan County guarantee that every ad will be run in is also excepting applications every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide inforAlternative School Parapro for Flagger and General La- mation on which newspapers run a The Tonasket School District bor positions at $12.52/hour. particular ad within a 30 day period. typographical error is now accepting applications Positions are available in Substantive (wrong address, telephone number, for a Alternative School Para- various maintenance areas. name or price) will result in a “make pro. Applicants must have an good�, in which a corrected ad will be Applications, supplemental run the following week. WNPA incurs AA degree, 72 quarter or 48 and job descriptions may be no other liability for errors in publicasemester college credits, or tion. obtained by contacting the documentation of successfulDept. of Public Works, ly passing the State AssessADOPTION 1234-A 2nd Ave. S, ment. Position will remain Okanogan, WA 98840 ADOPT: Your baby will be raised open until filled with a screenwith Love & security. Exp. paid. Sue or go online to: ing date of April 15. Please contact the District Office for www.okanogancounty.org/HR/ & Frank, 1-888-449-0803. Telephone (509) 422-7300. an application or available on ADOPTION -- Active Executive and Equal Opportunity Employer. Future Stay-Home Mom, Uncondithe district’s website at: tional love awaits miracle 1st baby. www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Expenses paid 1-888-919-1604 Tonasket School District, Steve & Norma 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING Phone 509-486-2126. 2

Commercial Rentals

Veranda Beach Resort 299 Eastlake Road, Oroville, WA 98844. Phone 509-476-4000

9

3 Nice Homes $900-$1,500 Lakefront, Furnished, 3 BR, 3 Bath. And Near Town 2 BR, 2 Bath w/ Garage. ON LAKE-1 BR Park Model MH, Furnished, $535 Call Sun Lakes Realty ******509-476-2121*******

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Garage & Yard Sale

7

Tonasket LARGE INDUSTRIAL storage warehouse. On 10+ acres with city water and OT irrigation water. Call for Details 509-322-4732

Bartenders Dishwashers Line Cooks Servers Baristas Front of House Manager

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

8

www.gazette-tribune.com

Diner Staff

Buying Silver, Gold Coins, Collections, Jewelry, Flatware, Guns. Paying fair Prices. Call Spence (509) 429-4722

3

Equal Housing Opportunity

Found

5

509-476-4057

email: stcharles@gdicom.net

Front Desk Services Housekeeping Housemen

1

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

Wanted

RESORT STAFF

3

Tonasket ½ ACRE BUILDING LOT with power, water, phone and cable TV only $35,000. No mobile homes. Call 509 322 4732

Positions in the following departments will be offered

4

“PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

2

LOW INCOME HOUSING

Invites you to our annual job fair

April 12th - 10am to 1pm.

6

ATTENTION:

7

207 Main St., Oroville, WA

WE BUY Estates. We buy Gold and Silver. We clean yards and properties. We haul junk and scrap. Free quote. Call Aussie Antiques, 509-322-3400.

9

Tonasket Three bedroom, two bath, 1248 sq. ft, vacant all new carpet and fresh paint, convenient location in Old Orchard Estates subdivision, ½ miles north of Tonasket. Only $145,000. Call 509-322-4732

St. Charles Place Apartments

Miscellaneous

6

Tonasket Small one bedroom cottage with a garage on a large lot one block from grocery store. Only $79,000. Call 509 322 4732

FOUR ACRES INDUSTRIAL LAND on the Canada to Oroville Heavy Haul Corridor with railroad frontage and truck access off of Jennings Loop Rd. Only $60,000. Call 509 322 4732

Help Wanted

8

Tonasket 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, heat pump, single car garage with shop and storage shed. RV parking with dump site and AC power. Covered patio. $105,000. Bill: (509)486-1952

Announcements

1

IN MOLSON 2 BR LOG Cabin. Loft, all amenisites & wood heat. Much more! Negotiable down & interest. Owner finances. Consider newer 4x4 Truck partial down. $126,000. 509-485-2171.

For Rent

5

Houses For Sale

Lots & Acreage

4

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275


APRIL 11, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE April 11, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

continued from previous page

Statewides Excellent equipment & Full Benefits! Consistent Miles & Hometime. 1 yr. Exp. Req’d. 800-762-3776 www.systemtrans.com GORDON TRUCKING Inc. CDL-A Drivers Needed. Dedicated & OTR Positions Available! Consistent Miles, Benefits, 401k & EOE. Sign On Bonus! Recruiters available 7 days/wk! Call: 866-725-9669 DRIVER --Two raises in first year. Qualify for any portion of $0.03 quarterly bonus: $0.01 Safety, $0.01 Production, $0.01 MPG. 3 months recent OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com GET ON the road fast! Immediate Openings! Top Pay, Full Benefits, CDL-A, Doubles Required! Haney Truck Line, Call Now. 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com DRIVERS -- Inexperienced/Experienced. Unbeatable career Opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 www.centraldrivingjobs.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com REAL ESTATE COLFAX -- RIVERFRONT. 9 acres was $75,000 now only $39,500. Lender Repo sale. Beautiful valley views, quiet county road with electric. Excellent financing provided. Call UTR 1-888-326-9048.

Public Notices ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID OROVILLE ELEMENTARY REROOF Sealed bids will be received by the Board of Directors of Oroville School at the School District Office, 816 Juniper St., Oroville, WA, 98844, for the construction of the Oroville Elementary School Reroof. Sealed

PAGE A9 9

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

base and alternate bids must be received by 4:00 p.m. on April 25, 2013, and must be marked Sealed Bids - Oroville Elementary School Reroof. Bids received after this time will not be considered. Bids will be opened and publicly read at 4:00 p.m. on April 25, 2013. General contractors and subcontractors may obtain contract documents from Architects West, 210 E. Lakeside Ave., Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814, by depositing Fifty Dollars ($50.00) per set. General Contractors may obtain two (2) sets and subcontractors may obtain one (1) set. Plan deposits will be returned to actual General and Subcontractor bidders upon return of all contract documents; PROVIDED HOWEVER, that said plans are returned in good, unmarked and unmutilated condition within ten (10) days after the time set for receiving bids. No other plan deposits will be refunded. In addition, a non-refundable handling fee of $10.00 per set to be shipped is to be submitted by separate check. A complete set of contract documents will also be filed with: Associated Builders & Contractors, 12310 E Mirabeau Pkwy # 100, Spokane Valley, WA; Associated General Contractors, E. 4935 Trent, Spokane, WA; Spokane Regional Plan Center, 209 N. Havana Street, Spokane, WA; Yakima Plan Center, 528 N. 20th Ave., Yakima, WA; Wenatchee Plan Center, 34 N. Chelan, Ave., Wenatchee, WA; McGraw Hill Construction, 200 SW Michigan Street, Ste. 100B, Seattle, WA; Builders Exchange, 2607 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA; CORA, 10002 Aurora Ave. N., Ste. 86, PMB 3334, Seattle, WA; Architects West, 210 E. Lakeside Avenue, Coeur d’Alene, ID; and Oroville School District, 816 Juniper St, Oroville, WA. It is strongly suggested that bidders attend the non-mandatory Pre-bid Conference which will be held on April 19, at 10:00 a.m. at the project site, 808 Main St., Oroville, WA No bidder may withdraw his bid after hour set for opening thereof, unless award is delayed for a period exceeding 60 days. The Oroville School District reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive informalities or irregularities in any bid. OROVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT MR. STEVE QUICK, SUPERINTENDENT Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 11, 18, 2013 #471976

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: DOLLY MAE BRAZLE, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00022-8 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: March 18, 2013 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 28, 2013 JULIE A. McCORKLE Personal Representative Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Brazle P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 11, 2013 #466559

on April 23, 2013, at 12:30 p.m., at 1331 Second Avenue North, Okanogan, Washington 98840, whether or not to take final action to authorize the condemnation of a portion of your property generally described as follows: A portion of Okanogan County Tax Parcel Nos. 3727250021 and 3727251009, being located in Section 25, Township 37, Range 27 E.W.M., being approximately 4.25 miles East of Tonasket, Okanogan County, Washington, off of Highway 20 near Moon Dust Road. The portions of said parcels that are being considered for condemnation are more particularly described as follows: A strip 100 feet wide commencing at the Southeast corner of Parcel No. 3727251009 and running Northwest approximately 2000 feet to the approximate center of the West boundary of Parcel No. 3727250021. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 4, 11, 18, 2013. #469364

moderate-income persons and persons residing in Oroville. Up to $35,000 for a single jurisdiction (e.g. City of Oroville) or $40,000 for a multiple jurisdiction project (e.g. City of Oroville and Okanogan County) may be available to help fund a planning project that principally benefits low- and moderate-income persons. A summary of the proposed Infrastructure Rate Studies & Income Surveys will be available for review at Oroville City Hall, Tuesday, April 16. Comments may also be submitted in writing to the City of Oroville, P.O. Box 2200, Oroville, WA 98855 until April 17. The City of Oroville council room is handicap accessible. Arrangements to reasonably accommodate special needs, including handicap accessibility or interpreter, will be made upon receiving 24-hour notice. Contact Kathy Jones, 509-476-2926. Persons interested in commenting should attend this hearing or send written comments prior to the hearing. ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 11, 2013. #471960

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Notice by Publication To: SFI Holding, LLC 11221 Pacific Hwy. SW Lakewood, WA 98499 You are hereby notified, pursuant to RCW 8.25.290, that Okanogan Public Utility District No. 1 of Okanogan County will decide, at its Board of Commissioners meeting to be held

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1422 Main St. Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 888-838-3000

Public Hearing NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the City of Oroville council in the City council room at 1308 Ironwood on Tuesday, April 16, 2013 at 7:00 pm. The purpose of the public hearing is to review community development and housing needs, inform citizens of the availability of funds and eligible uses of the state Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), and receive comments on proposed activities, particularly from low- and

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon Lake and Country Beautiful Similkameen Riverfrontage! This property is within walking distance of town and sits on a premier fishing river! Features 150 feet of waterfront, irrigation and domestic water and gorgeous mountain views. This property is a must-see! MLS#446897 $67,900

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 SUN Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool LAKES

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Oroville School District No. 410 816 Juniper Street Oroville,WA 98844 Legal/Public Notice Capital Projects Fund Budget Extension Notice is hereby given that the Board of Directors of Oroville School District No. 410 will hold a public hearing on April 29, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. to extend the 2012-2013 Capital Projects Fund Budget. The hearing will be held in the boardroom, 816 Juniper Street. The public is invited to attend, and comments will be heard for or against any part of the budget extension. /s/ Steve Quick Superintendent of Schools Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 4, 11, 2013. #468506

REALTY

Impeccable in all ways Big open custom home with workshop, acreage & fruit trees, overlooking Okanogan River; heartwarming circular central fireplace, dream expensive kitchen with Silestone & SS appliances, 4 baths. Must See! $524,000

Public Notices

Public Notice The City of Oroville will be accepting proposals for leasing the Concession Stand at Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial Park for the 2013 Season. Copies of the proposed lease, which outlines requirements and certain equipment that the lessee shall supply, and other information may be obtained from the City Hall, 1308 Ironwood Street, Oroville, WA 98844 (509-476-2926) or may be downloaded from the city’s website at oroville-wa.com Proposals should be submitted to the City Clerks Office no later 4:00, Monday, April 15, 2013. Publish March 28, April 4, and 11, 2013 Attest: Kathy M. Jones Clerk Oroville is an Equal Opportunity Employer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 11, 2013. #463718

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HAROLD FLYNN, Deceased. Case No. 13-4-00026-1 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 28, 2013 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: YOLONDA J. PETERSEN ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Christina M. Davitt, Esq., WSBA No. 41272 ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: Davitt Law Group, PLLC 1630 N. Wenatchee Ave., Ste. 18 Wenatchee, WA 98801 (509) 888-2925 tel. (509) 888-2926 fax Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 11, 2013 #467321

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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h i l lt o p r e a lt y

TONASKET OPPORTUNITY -

Hwy 97 Frontage. Main Corridor to Canada. Lots of Parking. Was a Restaurant. All Equipment still there. Or use building for another business venture. $140,000.00 Possible Owner Contract or Lease/Option.

RIVERSIDE

- 40 ACRES. Nice 2-bdrm, 1-1/2 Bath Home. Garage/Shop. Fenced. Tree Farmed. Lush Pasture. Excellent access. Far Reaching Views. PRICE REDUCED TO $190,000.00

Call Today!

Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com l 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

www.windermere.com

509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee 33311A Highway 97. Oroville - 4 bedroom/3.75 bath home on 6.59 acres. Approx 3,796 sq’ of living space. Panoramic views of Lake Osoyoos! You’ll love this NW Contempory Cedar custom built home. The home is located just at the city limits of Oroville and is on 6.59 acres (4 of the acres are in orchard). There is an attached 2 car garage and several outbuildings. The home has 2 lovely fireplaces and a wonderful east facing balcony overlooking the lake! NWML#466675 $325,000

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

- 24 Hour Service Licensed & Bonded

509-486-2692

Attorney

Quality Supplies Since 1957

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Midway Building Supply

RYAN W. GUNN

Oroville Building Supply

Civil Criminal

Pumps

Garage Doors  Installed

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

Insulation

&

33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Installed Insulation

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Attorney at Law

P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Building Supplies

Got Water? — Fred Cook — Over 25 Years experience! Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

Concrete

OSOYOOS READI-MIX

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 We Work Saturdays! 11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Storage

Lakeside

STORAGE Boat, RV & More! Weatherization with lease Rent unit for project  Contractors store tools / product  Additional Business space available  

Located at: 124 Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-421-7168 lakesidestoreit@gmail.com

Construction

Remodeling? Time for an Update, Addition or Deck? Check Us Out Online! okanoganconstruction.com

10 Years Experience • Licensed & Insured New Construction • Remodeling • Development

(509) 476-2929

“Quality You Can Depend On” LAWRECS928P3

Storage

Well Drilling

OROVILLE

“The Water Professionals”

Mini Storage & U-Haul

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power n Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

www.orovilleministorage.com

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store  Free On-Site Estimates

“YOU” in white

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Zimmatic Pivots  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com


Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 11, 2013

OBITUARIES Michelle (Chad) Smith Oroville, Mary (Jack) Hughes Oroville, and numerous nieces and nephews. Bill was preceded in death by his parents John and Allene and brothers Sid and Rex. Throughout his journey Bill never once complained about his illness to anyone. He was a proud, strong, and caring man who was more worried about his family than himself. He died with honor and will truly be loved and missed. Rest in peace Poppy! A memorial service will be held on Saturday, April 20th at 2 p.m. at the Tonasket Eagles. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Bill Pilkinton

Bill Pilkinton Bill Pilkinton was born in Springfield Missouri to John and Allene (Essary) Pilkinton. He passed away April 7th at home surrounded by his family. Bill grew up in Springfield until his family moved to Washington State at an early age. He attended school in Oroville, then moved to Tonasket schools where he graduated. Bill worked for Law Brothers orchard until 1978, then became employed and worked 35 years for the City of Tonasket. He became City Superintendent in 2002 through 2013 until his retirement March 1. He took pride in his work and went above and beyond for his community. His work ethic was unparalleled by others and he believed in an honest days work. He was honest and loyal to his profession. Bill married the love of his life Patti (Pete) Walter on July 21, 1972. Tonasket was home to them where they raised two boys and enjoyed their lives together. Bill was a family man, a loyal and devoted father and husband, and later a doting grandfather. He will always be “Poppy” to his babies. Bill enjoyed playing sports and later followed his sons throughout their playing days. Rain or snow he was committed and never missed a game. His passion was the outdoors. He mostly loved to hunt and cut firewood. He enjoyed family get-togethers, 4-wheeling, yard work, barbequing, watching westerns, grandkids, and mostly his wife. Bill is survived by his wife Pete, son Ryan (Pam); grandkids Rade, Taylon, Milana and Max of Tonasket; Barry (Lisa), granddaughter Lexi of Yakima; brothers Lee (Gail) Winthrop, John (Jackie) Spokane, Dave (Elena) Tonasket, Ron (Tammy) Chelan, and Joe of Springfield. Sisters Ann (Chuck) Lane Springfield, Sue (Gordy) Reeve, Anacortes; Kay (Greg) Thrapp Republic, Pat (Andy) Griffith Manson,

L. and Mark Link of Gresham, Ore., Adam E. Hunter of Spokane Wash., Kameo L. Hunter of Lowesville, Va. and Kathryn L. Hunter of Lowesville, Va.; 15 grandchildren and a great number of friends and loved ones from all over the country. Dencia was deeply loved by many and will be dearly missed by all. She was preceded in death by her father Al Yost of Ellensburg, Wash. and mother Marion Pedersen of Billings, Mont. Funeral services will be held at Piney River Baptist Church on Monday, April 8, at 2 p.m. Any contributions in her honor can be sent to PRBC at 1190 Woodson Road Lowesville, VA.

Dencia Ann Pedersen Hunter Dencia Ann Pedersen Hunter, 66, of Lowesville, Virginia, went to be with the Lord on Wednesday, April 4, 2013. She was born December 18, 1946 in Sterling, Colorado. She was first a mother but also a homemaker, seamstress, artist, thrift shop enthusiast, entrepreneur, plant and animal lover. She was a creative and free spirited visionary, always remaining true to her conviction to live a life free from conformity. Dencia was blessed with the gift of hospitality and never hesitated to cook meals for family, friends and even strangers. She had such a generous spirit that many of her children’s friends and her friends children thought of her as their second mother and often returned to her home for a warm home cooked meal and a place to rest. She embraced people of all backgrounds and walks of life and her laughter warmed the hearts of many. She lived her life by faith, trusting that the Lord would always provide abundantly. She was extremely resourceful, always making due with very little yet able to provide much. Her life’s work was raising her 9 children and her legacy will live on through them and their children. Dencia’s desire was to live out her final years on the Piney River close to many of her grandchildren. She is survived by her two sisters, Debbi Pedersen and Dori Pedersen of Omak, Wash. and her brother Clay Pederson of Roundup, Mont. She was a loving mother of nine children: Kristen L. and Mark Anderson of Wheat Ridge, Colo., Kenyon L. and Johnny Gibson of Lowesville, Va., Kourtney L. Hunter of Blacksburg, Va., Robert A. and Christina Hunter of Moneta, Va., Samuel I. Hunter and Amy Reese of Lowesville, Va., Klarity

Criminal

The court found probable cause to charge Patrick Sprinkle, 31, with assault third. He was found guilty and received 11 months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Aaron Zigler, 23, with vehicular assault. He was found guilty and received 10 months confinement.

Juvenile

A 14-year-old Omak juvenile was charged with two counts of theft third and malicious mischief third. They received one week confinement.

District Court Crystal Baker, 38, of Omak was charged with cyber stalking. Leslie Bebee, 42, of Omak was charged with two counts of assault fourth. She was found guilty and received two days confinement and a $1,033 fine. Dennis Best, 58, of Omak was charged with two counts of use/ delivery of drug paraphernalia and marijuana possession less than or equal to 40 grams. He was found guilty and received a $400 fine. Chelcy Bucholtz, 26, of Okanogan was charged with two counts of DWLS third. Myra Gowen, 53, of Oroville was charged with assault fourth. She was found guilty and received a $218 fine. Tanya Hayner, 24, of Okanogan was charged with a protection order violation. She was found guilty and received a $500 fine. Randy Lepire, 23, of Okanogan was charged with a no contact/ protection order violation. He received five days confinement and a $1,033 fine. Mark Napoli, 43, of Tonasket was charged with littering greater than one cubic yard. Deborah Nissen, 61, of Tonasket was charged with two counts of operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock, DWLS second and DUI. She was found guilty and received 45 days confine-

ment and a $3,419 fine. Daniel Parks, 19, of Okanogan was charged with assault fourth. Wade Reddington, 40, of Okanogan was charged with two counts of tampering with an ignition interlock. Chayse Wiggins, 19, of Omak was charged with marijuana possession less than or equal to 40 grams. He received was found guilty and three days confinement and a $608 fine.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, April 1, 2013 Near Tonasket, on Five Mile Rd., a subject built a cabin on another person’s property. He has been advised that he cannot be there and the property owner has called an attorney. Near Oroville, on Six Gun Way, a man called reporting that his neighbor had told him that people in pickups and jeeps were on his property tearing up his grass. Michael Dickason, 60, was booked for possession of a stolen firearm. Kami Huff, 39, was booked for assault fourth. Alfred Oliver, 37, was booked for possession of heroin, possession of marijuana and DWLS third. Jacki Tasker, 54, was booked for revoked DUI. Derek Browning, 43, was booked for DUI. Michael Hogan, 51, was booked for child rape first. Chella Hiatt, 57, was booked for theft third. Tuesday, April 2, 2013 Alicia Saulman, 43, was booked for failure to appear and DUI. David Webster, 57, was booked for possession of a firearm. Billy Santana, 24, was booked for failure to appear, DUI and DWLS third. Derek Osborn, 37, was booked for possession of drug paraphernalia. Roy Herriman, 25, was booked for

Mooney and husband Gordon; Linda Cook (husband, Lawson, passed away in 2011) of Tonasket. Grandchildren include Kenneth Cook and wife Jessica of Buena Vista, Colo.; John Shepard and wife Ann of Seattle, Wash.; Sheri Shepard of Pennsylvania; Kevin Libby of Huntington Beach, Calif. and wife Marta; Randy Libby of Durham, Calif. and wife Patty; Debbie Carriere of Chico, Calif., plus all the great grandchildren which he loved. The memorial service for Albert was on March 30th at the local Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witnesses, officiated by Jim Walker, a special friend of Albert’s. We want to extend a big thank you to Jim, the service was just like dad would have wanted, to talk about the Bible truths and what the future holds for our loved ones who have passed away and the comfort it brings to the

ones left behind. Albert had been one of Jehovah Witnesses since 1963 and was a faithful witness for his God, Jehovah, right to the end. Even at age 100 he took part in the meetings at the Kingdom Hall and still called on ones at their homes that were interested in the Bible. He lived his life in a fine way and set a good example for others. We want to extend a big thank you to Dr. Hellison for all the years of good care he gave our dad and for being so kind to him. A thank you also to the hospital staff and doctors, too, for the good care of our father for his last days that he spent in the hospital. A thank you, too, to all our friends and family for all their help and encouragement in this difficult time, to us and our father when he was still in the hospital and after. We really appreciated it and we love all of you.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Do you have a

Albert H. Libby

Special Event

Albert H. Libby Albert H. Libby, age 100, passed away peacefully on March 21, 2013, at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash. He was born on October 10, 1912 in Standish, Maine. He married Elsie, his wife of almost 73 years, on June 30, 1934 and they had four children. Albert worked as a power hydro operator for an electric power plant in Maine for several years and also owned a farm where he had dairy cows and raised turkeys every year. He had a very inventive mind, and what he couldn’t get, he made. One of his projects was building a large popup camp trailer, wind the top up and canvas sides came down, probably one of the first ones ever made. He used it to move the family to California in 1956 and was in the newspapers all across the country. He invented other things too, one was an ice cutter for PG&E to use on their canals in the winter in northern California and he received an award for that. He worked for PG&E at a power station down at the American River, in a canyon, near Pollock Pines,

COPS & COURTS Superior Court

Calif., until he retired. Albert loved horses, always had some around, and loved to ride. In 1973 he and Elsie moved to Tonasket, he brought his horses with him, and bought a farm near the Janis Bridge where he grew and sold hay and enjoyed riding in the hills. In 2000 he sold the farm and moved to a smaller place north of Tonasket on River Loop Rd. He and Elsie enjoyed watching the bird life on the pond there and they also had the horses, cows and Emus around to enjoy too. Still was life on the farm, just in a smaller place, and as long as he had his tractor and could farm a little he was happy. His wife, Elsie, passed away in 2006 and his daughter, Patricia, passed away in 2008. His survivors include his son David Libby of Durham, Calif. and wife Roberta; daughters Jeanette

failure to appear and resisting arrest. Wednesday, April 3, 2013 Dusty Diebel, 32, was booked for DUI, DWLS first and telephone harassment. Lance Torres, 40, was booked for failure to appear, DWLS third and residential burglary. Thursday, April 4, 2013 Bryan Crow, 20, was booked for failure to appear, residential burglary and malicious mischief. Kevin Lacourse, 39, was booked for assault fourth. Richard Carver, 61, was booked for residential burglary and theft second. Friday, April 5, 2013 Jacob Sommers, 30, was booked for harassment. Saturday, April 6, 2013 Roy Moon, 35, was booked for DWLS first, criminal trespassing first, failure to appear and DUI. Kerrie Louie, 50, was booked for criminal trespassing first. Sunday, April 7, 2013 Jennifer Cooper, 35, was booked for assault fourth. Dane Anderson, 27, was booked for DUI. Charlie Craig, 19, was booked for MIP.

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

Monuments & Bronze

CEMETERY MARKERS

See Us First for Greater Savings BUILD A LASTING TRIBUTE TO YOUR LOVED ONE

~ 62 years of serving you ~ Where pride in craftsmanship still exist today!

Sales Representative Joy Lawson

1-509-476-2279 OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

or Special Person you want to honor at your church? To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday School is at 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 11, 2013  

April 11, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 11, 2013  

April 11, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune