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Hornets host their annual track

INVASIVE SPECIES MEETING

invitational.

Threat to be discussed at Sonora Community Centre, Osoyoos, Thursday, April 4, 7-9 pm.

See Sports, Pages A10-11

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CEO stands by decisions, board

EGGS, CHOCOLATE BUNNIES VANISH IN A FLASH

Michel lays out reasoning behind closures of A/L, clinics, defends integrity of commissioners

Clinics. An oft-suggested option was to have the district attempt to sell the Assisted Living to a private company. TONASKET - “Yikes.” It’s not that it wasn’t tried, Michel said. That, in a word, was the response of the only person who expressed any But there was little interest from buyers. “One gentleman ... said DSHS had interest in buying the financially strugasked him to call me,” gling North Valley Michel said. “He was Assisted Living facil“I thought my letter from Oregon and ity when he was preindicated (the need for an had other privatelysented with financial assisted living and bond informaimmediate solution), but owned facilities. They were tion to examine. that is not the perception all much bigger than Actually, that was He asked me to his entire response, of the Concerned Citizens ours. send financials and said NVH district information about group. So that was my CEO Linda Michel bond. Whatever in an interview on mistake for not spelling it the he asked me for, we Thursday, March 29, sent him. where she defended out better.” “The only response the recent deciLinda Michel, I got back from him sions of the Board North Valley Hospital District CEO was, ‘Yikes.’ And I of Commissioners, never heard from hospital administrahim again.” tors and herself. The closing of the Assisted Living has The hospital district recently won its day in court, at which an attempt to been controversial, to say the least, but halt the closure of the assisted living Michel said that every effort that stood facility was denied and a petition ask- any chance of success was considered by ing for the recall of the entire Board of her and a committee consisting of herCommissioners was rescinded before a self, four hospital senior leaders and two commissioners. final decision on it could be rendered. “We looked back at seven years of Michel reviewed the recent financial history of the hospital district, including financials to find a profitable year to the hospital’s indebtedness to Okanogan mimic,” she said. “We didn’t find one.” County and decisions to close the Tonasket and Oroville Family Medical SEE HOSPITAL | PG A4 BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Saturday’s sunny, warm weather was perfect for Easter egg hunts all over the area. Top, Amelia Costner nibbles the ears off a chocolate bunny in Chesaw; right, a Tonasket girl claims her treasure; bottom right, Tonasket kids are released to find their eggs; bottom left, there was plenty of excitement in Oroville, as well.

Tonasket passes ATV ordinance

Photos by (clockwise from top) Marianne Knight, Brent Baker, Kelly Denison and Charlene Helm.

BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - It wasn’t a unanimous vote by any means, but proponents of an ordinance allowing ATVs on Tonasket city streets left the Tuesday, March 26, city council meeting with smiles on their faces as the council passed the longdiscussed ordinance by a 3-2 vote. Jean Ramsey, Lee Hale and Dennis Brown favored the ordinance, with Scott Olson and Jill Vugteveen opposing. “The council had raised some questions,” said Tonasket mayor Patrick Plumb. “There had been questions about taillights and headlights, but those were

already included in the ordinance. They asked if monetary penalties could exceed the applicable RCW, and the answer is ‘No.’ “RCWs regarding negligent driving can be enforced and are already included.” Also, dune buggies were removed from the definition of off-road vehicles, but trail bikes and golf carts are included. Snowmobiles also are not included in the definition. Much of the ordinance was based upon a similar ordinance drafted for Okanogan. “We stole it,” Plumb joked.

SEE COUNCIL | PG A2

County, Oroville come to understanding on sewer BY GARY DEVON

MANAGING EDITOR

OKANOGAN – Although it still needs to be redrafted, representatives from Oroville and the Okanogan County Commissioners came to an understanding on several points regarding the county’s Eastlake Sewer System. While Oroville operates the system, which utilizes the city’s wastewater treatment facility, the project was built by the county using a low interest state Public Works Trust Fund loan. The lions share of paying back the loan is still the responsibility of the county, except for about 27.2 percent which the city used to make improvements to its existing system in order to handle the increased capacity of the project, now and into the future. As the areas north of the city limits annex into the city, the responsibility for those parts of the system then become

Oroville’s and will be paid through connection fees, similar to what the county is doing now. The county and Oroville have been working on resolving some conflicts in a resolution the county was working on regarding the assumption of ownership of the system, according to Kathy Jones, Oroville City Clerk. Jones attended the meeting in the commissioners’ hearing room along with Mayor Chuck Spieth, Rod Noel, head of Public Works and Chris Branch, Director of Community Development. The county was represented by Commissioners Jim Detro, Ray Campbell and Sheila Kennedy, as well as Perry Huston, head of the Planning Department. “One of the first conflicts involved sewer connection policy. We wanted to make sure that we had some input if the county was thinking of granting a waiver to anyone who didn’t connect to the

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 14

sewer,” said Jones. “We have adopted a policy where if you get water (from the city’s water system), you get sewer. We want to be all on one page,” said Jones. She envisions a scenario where the county might grant a waiver based on a failing septic system on a property that could not get to the sewer system or where the property was miles from the nearest connection and it would be cost prohibitive. “We just want to be involved in those decisions,” she said. The second issue had to do with how the county and city differed in the way they divided up the system. The city uses a south, central, north division, starting from the Cherry Street Bridge. The county divided up the system going east and west depending on what side

SEE SEWER | PG A2

Gary DeVon/Staff Photo

Okanogan County Commissioners (seated above) Jim Detro, Ray Campbell and Sheila Kennedy, as well as County Planner Perry Huston (standing), met with Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth, City Clerk Kathy Jones, Public Works Superintendent Rod Noel and Community Development Director Chris Branch to discuss issues with the Eastlake Sewer System. The meeting took place at the Commissioners’ Hearing Room and was very positive according to those in attendance.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Letters/Opinion Community Valley Life

A5 A6 A7

Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Police Stats A9 Sports A10-11

Real Estate Obituaries

A12 A12


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 4, 2013

FINAL HEAD START GROUP SINGS AT A/L

Carlene Denison/submitted photo

On March 28, the Tonasket Head Start children sang for the last time at the assisted living facility. The four lovely ladies, or grandmas, as the children call them, enjoyed the singing and hugs, as did the children. Head Start kids have been singing there for over 10 years.

Meeting to assess zebra mussel threat Submitted by Corinne Jackson Okanagan Basin Water Board

OSOYOOS, BC - The Okanagan Basin Water Board, it’s Okanagan WaterWise program and the Town of Osoyoos have teamed up with invasive species experts to hold a public meeting to discuss the potential threat of invasive zebra and quagga mussels infesting valley waters and how to keep them out. The meeting is today, Thursday, April 4, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Sonora Community Centre in Osoyoos, B.C. at 8505 68 Avenue. “This is the most important issue that has faced Osoyoos Lake and the waters of the Okanagan – on both sides of the border – since the arrival of Eurasian Watermilfoil,” said Anna Warwick Sears, Executive Director for the OBWB. “In fact, an infestation of zebra and/or quagga mussels in our waters is an even more significant threat than milfoil, but there’s still time to do something.” Zebra and quagga mussels, which originate from Europe, were first introduced to the Great

Lakes of Ontario in the 1980s in a container ship’s ballast water. Since then they have been spreading quickly through Ontario and Quebec and through several U.S. states, sometimes unknowingly, but mostly by recreational boaters. Today the mussels are as far west as Lake Mead, Nevada and the Red River just south of Manitoba, fouling beaches with sharp shells, encrusting boats, ruining sport fisheries, and more. Recent research conducted for the Water Board by aquatic biologist Heather Larratt conservatively estimates an infestation of Okanagan waters at $43 million annually to just manage the impacts. Those items most at risk are fisheries, tourism, real estate values and water infrastructure (including public and private water intakes). “The Okanagan is ideal habitat for these tiny – sometimes invisible to the naked eye – rapidlybreeding mussels. An Okanagan invasion would have devastating economic and environmental impacts,” said Warwick Sears. Knowing the potential impact to B.C. communities, the

Provincial Government recently brought in fines for moving the mussels, dead or alive. And, if the mussels do end up in Okanagan waters, it will be illegal to move boats to uncontaminated lakes without full decontamination. Educating people on how to spot the mussels and prevent them from entering our waters is key, Warwick Sears added. Thursday’s meeting is open to the public and should be of interest to boaters, fishers, kayakers and other outdoor water enthusiasts, tourism operators, realtors, elected officials and community leaders of Osoyoos, Oliver, Oroville, RDOS, Osoyoos Indian Band and Penticton Indian Band and neighbouring communities. All are welcome. Presenters include: Stu Wells, Mayor of Osoyoos; Anna Warwick Sears, Okanagan Basin Water Board Heather Larratt; Larratt Aquatic Consultants; Lisa Scott, Okanagan and Similkameen Invasive Species Society and Jodi Romyn, Invasive Species Council of BC. For background information the report can be found here: http://tinyurl.com/cvloyo6.

COUNCIL | FROM A1 None of the council members voiced opinions that had been different than what they had said at previous sessions, ranging from Ramsey’s, “It’s all been said,” to Hale’s, “I haven’t heard any objections that have convinced me there will be a problem,” to Olson and Vugteveen’s concerns about issues involving enforcement. Police chief Rob Burks, who wasn’t present at Tuesday’s meeting, has long been a proponent of allowing ATV use in town and has said in the past that police use of ATVs could help keep his staff mobile at big events such as the Founders Day parade. As for connecting to other trails outside the city, areas have been mapped out up Pine Creek Road and Highway 7 that will allow connectivity to the Conconully loop. Now that Tonasket’s ordinance is finalized, Okanogan County will be able to schedule a public hearing in order to finalize those routes.

Vendors / yard sales The council directed city clerk Alice Attwood to draft a pair of ordinances, one to govern the presence of vendors who operate at events sponsored by civic organizations, and one to cover the frequency and duration of yard

sales within the city limits. Regarding vendors, the council wants civic organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce, the Community Cultural Association or the soccer association putting on public events to have the option to purchase a low-cost license from the city, which then gives them the right to determine which vendors can sell their wares at their events. They, in turn, would be able to charge vendors who wish to sell at their events, or to have unwanted vendors removed should they wish. The license would be optional but would provide for law enforcement to help police their events. Attwood was also given the example of a yard sale ordinance from Pateros with which to draft one for Tonasket. The idea behind the ordinance was to give law enforcement something to stand on if it received a complaint about persistent yard sales. “It just seems like we get into these rash of month-long yard sales,” Plumb said. “We don’t want our neighborhoods turning into what they’re not zoned to be.” “I agree that it’s a good idea to have a standard that we’d like to uphold,” Olson said.

Also... Plumb directed the streets committee (Ramsey and Hale) to meet with city engineering firm Varela and Associates to discuss the shortfall of bids for the 3rd/5th/6th Street project, for which bids came in higher than available funding. The bids have not yet been rejected, but have been tabled until the council determines the best course of action. They still could be re-bid, with the council and mayor hoping that local contractors could be involved. The council also approved a resolution declaring the week of April 15-19 for the city’s spring clean-up dates, when burnable yard waste will be picked up by city crews, excluding tree stumps, as time permits. Prunings must be under four feet long and piled for easy removal; leaves and grass clippings should be bagged in paper bags. Contact City Hall at (509) 486-2132 to be put on the pick up list. The Tonasket Water Ranch spray park will be holding a barbecue at the Founders Day Park, next to City Hall, on Sunday, April 28, beginning at noon. The city council next meets on Tuesday, April 9, at 7:00 p.m.

with the loan payments, according to Jones. “This was just a discussion, nothing the final draft of the agreement has not been drawn up. Overall I felt it was very positive meeting on these and other issues regarding the Eastlake system,” said Jones. At Monday’s meeting Commissioner Detro indicated he wanted to make sure the county charge a fee that would allow them to have a “viable product.” “What’s the cost to the county to hook up.... do we have to pay to extend the line,” asked Commissioner Campbell. “The developer in most cases is required to pay for the development costs up front,” said Branch. “If they can they do recovery through a late-comers agreement.” “So collection of our fee is just to pay our debt?” asked Commissioner Kennedy.

“That’s right,” responded Huston. “Oroville’s fee is to pay for the system from the Cherry Street Bridge on. The county fee is not paid by those who live in the city,” said Noel. “Those people have been in the city’s system for a long time and have bourn the brunt of it’s development over the years,” added Branch.

SEWER | FROM A1 of Eastlake Road the property fell on. The city prefers the south, central, north division because the further north you live the more it should cost because of the length of pipe required to get to the Oroville system and the number of lift stations needed, according to Jones. “After they heard our reasons they were very supportive,” said Jones. The third issue involved the PWTF loan repayment. The county has re-amortized from a 20-year payback to a 30-year payback. The city asked that they be included in the 30-year term as well in repaying their percentage of the loan. This too met with the commissioners’ approval after the city reassured the county they would not oppose an assessment on property owners if the rate of connection was not keeping up

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Kinross honored for safety record “No job is so urgent, and no directive is so days, without an LTA. This equates to 393,276 data as reported by MSHA), we find that when important, that we cannot perform our work in man hours. At the Kettle River Mill site, employ- we compare the Buckhorn Mine against una safe, healthy or environmentally friendly man- ees have made it 2,593 days without an LTA, or derground mines with the same amount of emner.” This is the Kettle River – Buckhorn En- 7 years, 1 month, and 8 days! This is 956,790 ployees, the national mining average is 42 lost vironmental, Health and Safety motto for time days. When our Mill site is similarly the Buckhorn Mine and Kettle River Mill compared against mining processing with sites. Fostering a culture of a safe work the same amount of employees, the mine environment is our team’s number one priprocessing average is 13 lost time days. ority. The Kettle River – Buckhorn operaRecently, we celebrated seven years tion takes safety very seriously. We have without a lost time accident at the Kettle tracked over 800 hours of employee safety River Mill, and one year at Buckhorn. This training in 2012 alone. This included anis a notable achievement. A Lost Time nual safety training that is required of every Accident (LTA) is a MSHA (Mine Safety employee, as well as environmental trainand Health Administration) injury classifiing, mine rescue training, new hire training cation that is applied when an injury is one and “tailgate” meetings, where crews and that results in your being unable to report departments regularly share thoughts on to work the next day that would otherwise safety with their peers and supervisors. The Kettle River ‒ Buckhorn mill site was recognized at last year's be a workday for you, or an injury that re- International Society of Mine Safety Professionals award banquet “Our employees are our most valuable sults in your being restricted in what you for five years without a Lost Time Incident through 2011. The mill asset at Kettle River-Buckhorn. We entrust can do for a time, so you cannot perform has been nominated again this year for its six years without an the responsibility to every employee to stop LTI; the mine is also nominated for its one year without an LTI. all the regular aspects of your job. As an a job or task when they feel it is unsafe, so example to better understand what this that at the end of the shift, every employee really means, if this were applied to the home man hours of work accomplished without hav- goes home to their family and friends, illness environment, if you broke your ankle from falling ing an accident that resulted in lost work time. and injury free. These accomplishments that we off a ladder while painting your house and the Imagine going over seven years working around have achieved are a reflection of our employees’ doctor told you that you had to stay off your leg your home without anyone in your family hav- commitment to safety and come about by teamand do nothing for three weeks while your ankle ing an accident that resulted in being unable to work - everybody looking out for not only their heals, this would be considered a Lost Time Ac- complete the project as originally planned. own safety, but for the safety of others as well. I cident if the MSHA classification were applied. If you look at both the mine and mill accom- am privileged to be part of this team,” comments As of March 21, 2013, the Buckhorn Mine plishments against mining industry averages Ernie Miranda, Health and Safety Manager at has met 522 days, or 1 year, 5 months, and 5 in the year of 2011 (the last complete year of Kettle River-Buckhorn.


APRIL 4, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

VA clinic continues growth Response to court decision criticized BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The North Valley Hospital District’s VA clinic continues to grow, reported NVH Director of Ancillary Services Noreen Olma at the Thursday, March 28, Board of Commissioners meeting. Olma said that as of the end of February, there were 569 veterans enrolled in the program. “Our goal is to add 10 new physicals per provider each month,” she said. “Also, starting this month, we’ll be reporting monthly to the county commissioners monthly about the the VA clinic.” Business Development Coordinator Terri Orford added that credentialing is proceeding smoothly thus far with the new VA provider, Dr. Cynthia Durante. “She’s pretty vested in completing her paperwork and getting it turned in,” Orford said. “We’re keeping close tabs on that.” She added that the district also finalized a contract with TriCare insurance, which covers retired veterans. “It’s a pretty big deal.”

WATER LEAKS Water system upgrades by the City of Tonasket have increased

the water pressure going into the hospital buildings, which in turn has created issues with the sprinklers outside of the Extended Care building. “They’re developing pinhole leaks,” said Kelly Cariker, support services director. “It could be very bad in the winter when the water freezes, so it needs to be addressed. I’m obtaining competitive quotes and will bring the bids to discus, but it could run in the $20-30,000 range.”

REACTION TO REACTION During the public comment portion of the meeting, Kathy Rawley criticized the board and administrators for their reaction following court rulings that favored the Board of Commissioners the previous week, and called for their resignations. “I witnessed jubilation by the senior management team, board of commissioners and CEO,” Rawley said. “Some hugging and handshaking went on, as happens with most celebrations. You were also proud and happy that you had won this decision over the very citizens of Public Hospital Distroct No. 4 that had elected this board of commissioners. “Linda Michel, I believe that you should resign. You have led this board own the road path. Commissioners, you should resign because you allowed yourselves to be led down the path that violates the public trust. And

senior managers, you should either resign or take a cut in pay to help pay down the hospital warrants. 28 seniors citizens made a huge sacrifice. You should do the same.” Lisa Andrews asked that in the future, the board rely less on written reports submitted at its meetings and more on verbal presentations. “As a result of that change there are very few discussions or deliberations before there are any actions taken in the public forum,” Andrews said, suggesting the written reports should also be posted on the hospital’s website. “Then actions will be taken and deliberations openly,” she said. “One of the reasons we changed to a written report is for the opportunity to sit and read and review it,” said board chairwoman Helen Casey. “But we’ll be asking our senior leaders as they present those reports, to ask them to go through perhaps one item they’d like to go through. It is filed here so that if people want to read these ... it gives us the opportunity to really review what’s going on.” Casey added that the warrant level would be reported at each Board of Commissioners meeting from here on, and that the warrants currently stood at $1.372 million, down from a high of $2,955 last August 29. The NVH Board of Commissioners next meets on Thursday, April 11, at 7:00 p.m. in the hospital board room.

Seasonal road closures extended in Tonasket Ranger District SUBMITTED BY SHANNON O’BRIEN

PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST

TONASKET - In a typical year, many of the winter closures on U.S. Forest Service roads in Okanogan County are lifted at the beginning of April. With this year’s snowpack, some higher elevation closures will need to remain in place for a while longer. Each year the Tonasket Ranger District implements winter road closures to maintain deer win-

ter range and snowmobile routes. Those closures typically expire March 31. “Many roads remain snowcovered,” said Shannon O’Brien, Public Affairs Specialist. “Other roads are too soft to open to access. We’re anticipating a two or three week delay.” Opening roads to wheeled vehicle travel too early can result in substantial road damage. With spring thawing and high soil moisture content, vehicles can sink into the roadbed. “Most of the roads will likely

be free of snow and firmed up by mid to late April,” said O’Brien. U.S. Forest Service personnel will continue to monitor snow levels and road conditions. They will open roads and remove barricades as soon as conditions permit. Information about Forest Service Road conditions in Okanogan County is available online at www.fs.usda.gov/goto/ okawen/conditions and by calling Methow Valley Ranger District (509) 996-4000 or Tonasket Ranger District at (509) 4862186.

Spring

KILLER BEES WRAP UP SEASON

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Oroville killer bees wrestling team finished a successful season. This year, Enrique Martinez worked with the Killer Bees as part of his senior project.

Oroville schools score ‘the best in the valley’ school year 2011-12. “We are also getting a good start on our one to one computing program,” said DeVon. “Ed (Naillon) has got two new mobile iPad carts now and we will have six by the end of this year.” The plan is to add six more through next year, according to DeVon. One to one computing is one of the board’s goals. They want to put a computer or iPad in the hands of every student. “I believe each cart has 28 iPads. By the end of next year we will have two-third of our total need. We may not go with 100 percent iPads but the first twothirds will be at this time.

BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OLYMPIA – Oroville schools were all graded “C” or “good” by the Washington State Public School Achievement Index, while Tonasket High School got a “C” and the middle school and elementary were each given a “D” meaning they were “fair.” “Oroville scored the best in the valley. We are still looking to improve our performance in all aspects of our district,” said Oroville School Board Chairman Rocky DeVon. The Index is based on the State Board of Education’s Achievement Index for the

Naillon is looking at some of the netbooks and similar devices for some of the upper grades. “The main thing is that we don’t want to limit our options on what is possible by solely focusing on the iPads. We are also working on the implementation of Apple TV in all the classrooms. “This will give the teacher the ability to project from their iPad as they move around the classroom. “It will allow wireless projection of the teachers or any student that the teacher designates to present on the screen from their mobile device,” said the school director.

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Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 4, 2013

HOSPITAL | FROM A1 A letter asking the community for input was published in the Dec. 6, 2012 issue of the GazetteTribune, but in the week between its publication and the next Board of Commissioners meeting on Dec. 13, Michel received just one phone call. Michel said that she and the board were not expecting the full house that arrived for the Dec. 13 board meeting. “(That was when) we found out that the Concerned Citizens group had been formed,” Michel said. “They made many comments, they were already angry. I understand that emotion. I have parents too, that I’m morally responsible for (noting that her father, who had been in an assisted living facility, recently passed away). “It was my mistake not to put that we needed an immediate answer, that we could not go on,” she added. “I thought my letter indicated that, but that is not the perception of the Concerned Citizens group. So that was my mistake for not spelling it out better.” The Concerned Citizens group hosted a meeting the following week at the Tonasket Community Church, which Michel, Chief Financial Officer Helen Verhasselt and Long Term Care director Linda Holden attended. But during that week, the district also received a letter from county commissioner Leah McCormick urging immediate action on reducing the hospital’s warrants, which had neared $3 million. “That made us even more concerned about our losses,” Michel said. “I took that letter (and read it at) the meeting. “We had been excited and were just going to go and write down their ideas. But it turned into more of an inquisition, and anger. We came away from that feeling quite deflated.” The ideas that came out of that meeting - primarily to sell or lease the A/L to another entity, or to run a special levy, Michel said, weren’t going to happen given the time frame. “With a levy, it would have taken 18 months for that money to start coming in. We would have to survive for that long, and we decided, in the best interest of the district, that we could not. “It was a very emotional decision,” Michel said. “We’re taxpayers too. I’m 62 years old and am going to need to a place to live at some point. So, was this just something we came up with as something we wanted to do? No. We worked on it day and night for months... There was no solution. “Brewster is closed, Goldendale is closed, Davenport is closed, and it’s all because of Medicaid reimbursement. I know people need Medciaid - I’m from Appalachia, Eastern Kentucky, so I understand that. I’m not against Medicaid, but if you can’t take care of someone with the reimbursement, what do you do? If you are that far behind on your mortgage, what do you do?”

- to come in and advise on splitting the district into the two divisions that exist today: Hospital and Long Term Care. The Hyatt report noted major drawbacks to selling or leasing included the fact that the full kitchen and laundry were in the hospital; heating and cooling came from the hospital plant; and water and sewage were also tied to the hospital. Hyatt also noted, “The problem with the A/L is that, despite its good occupancy history ... the census is almost all Medicaid funded with an average reimbursement at about $72 (per patient) per day. Right now the hospital is paying in excess of $77 per resident.” That was 2005. In 2012, the reimbursement was just over $59, while the cost per day was about $82. “There were comments at the time when we went into warrants,” Michel said, “that we should close the Assisted Living and the nursing home. “As a public hospital, we can’t choose (whether to accept patients based on their Medicaid status,” Michel said. “Apple Springs (in Omak, which is privately owned) can, and because of that, according to the Concerned Citizens group, there is an eight year wait for a bed.” Michel said claims that faulted the district for not adequately assessing patients for their level of care - which could have meant greater reimbursements or transfers to the nursing home, which is not in such dire straits - were false. “According to law, DSHS is the only one who can assess Medicaid patients,” she said. “They’re here every Wednesday to do that. They do it weekly.” And though it didn’t factor into the decision to close the Assisted Living (which was announced on Jan. 9), 2013 has seen even further cuts to Medicaid reimbursements. The board approved Michel’s recommendation to close the facility as of March 31, a span of 87 days. Michel pointed out that the law required 60 days. She also took exception to the reaction of some who objected to the district sending letters directly to the Assisted Living residents informing them of the closure. “That was required by law,” Michel said. “We had to send those to the main caregiver and to the resident. We didn’t want to do that, but we had to do that, according to DSHS. “I understand the emotions.... I’ve seen people leave that I’ve cried about. I understand those emotions. We’re not hard-hearted people.”

Previous changes Last August, before the Assisted Living closure came to fruition, Michel and the commissioners pushed through a number of changes to try to bring down the warrants, which had grown to about $3 million. After evaluating each area of hospital operations - something the Board of Commissioners noted had not been done previously - the district canceled five contracts (with entities such as Hyatt and Harmony Health Care) for a 2013 full-year savings of $104,000, suspended its contract with NAC Architects ($125,000), renegoti-

Medicaid woes The Medicaid question was an issue even back in 2005, when the district asked the Hyatt Management Corporation - an in-state consulting firm that specializes in long term care issues

ated contracts with Caribou Trail Orthopedics and Coast to Coast (which provides emergency room physicians) to the tune of nearly $80,000; closed the Tonasket Family Medical Clinic ($85,000); and laid off three senior administrators, two maintenance workers and did not re-fill a position vacated by a retirement. Also, construction on the west wing of the second floor was halted. Construction on the east wing continued because nearly all of the required materials had already been purchased and was recently completed using mostly in-house workers. “The west wing will not be completed until we’re out of debt,” Michel said. “We may put in some sheet rock that we had already purchased, but beyond that there will be no more construction there.” The east wing opened earlier this year and houses the specialty clinics and recovery rooms. The clinics, Michel said, simply were unable to see enough patients to even come close to breaking even. The Oroville clinic closed earlier this year after its one remaining family practice physician left. “We closed the Tonasket clinic because its volumes were so low and there were other options in town,” Michel said. “It was totally an issue of not being able to see enough patients.” As for the Oroville clinic, when Dr. Theresa Dicroce resigned, it legally could not stay open. “We were looking for over a year for a second M.D. to add to the clinic system,” Michel said, producing documentation from other clinics’ struggles across the country. “There have been allegations that we do not know how to recruit and that there are other ways to find physicians. I beg to differ; there are family practice shortages all over the United States, especially in rural communities.” The resignation of Dr. Dicroce proved to be the final straw for the Oroville clinic. “A rural health care clinic has to have one M.D.,” Michel said. “We had to close. So in an effort to continue to provide the community with health care that they need, I chose to contact Wenatchee Valley (Medical Center). Whether that was a mistake or not - we all make mistakes. I don’t think it was. They have the resources, it’s easier to recruit from Wenatchee, and they already had half of the building. “I didn’t want the community to go a day without the doctors they needed. I negotiated with (WVMC’s) Peter Rutherford to lease the other half of the building and bring providers in. We left the building one day and they started practicing there the next day.” Michel said WVMC wants to buy the building. “We have to get three appraisals; we’re waiting on the last one,” Michel said. “It will probably be May before we proceed. We’ll have to post the intent to sell for two weeks, and then we have to have comments at an open public board meeting. Then the board will decide whether or not to sell. “There have been allegations that we’re not following the RCWs. Things have been sent to Mr. Rutherford to cease and

HIGH HIGH SCHOOL SCHOOL ESSAY ESSAY CONTEST CONTEST

desist from talking to us. “We’re following the RCWs. We have representation by (attorney Mick Howe) that’s very keen on the RCWs. We’re very confident we’re following them. In the meantime, they are leasing, and that’s within the board’s scope of responsibility to lease the property without discussion.” Michel said moving Physical Therapy to Oroville is not an option because construction would be required. The layoffs, Michel said, also account for an overall savings in administrative costs for the district. “The other senior leaders absorbed the positions of those that were laid off,” Michel said. The layoffs themselves will save the district about $503,000, though half of that was offset by a combination of raises to the existing administrators who absorbed those jobs; and the hiring of Kelly Cariker late last year as Chief Information Officer to manage the district’s computer systems (and who absorbed other duties such as food service and laundry). Other raises included in an estimated $278,000 in increases between 2010 and 2013 include the restoration of a five percent temporary wage cut, negotiated by previous CEO Warner Bartleson, that he had promised would end in 2011, along with raises to those affected. Michel, who took over as CEO in early 2011, also gave raises to several administrators who, according to Milliman’s health cost guidelines, were paid significantly below the low end of the industry standard for their positions. Milliman, based in Seattle, provides what is considered a “gold standard” for such estimates. “They rate hospitals according to size and salaries,” Michel said. “I did find that some of our senior leadership was underpaid.” Overall the net effect of the $278,000 in raises over that threeyear period combined with the $503,000 saved through staff reductions, is a savings of just $225,000 for 2013. (Managing Editor Gary DeVon’s editorial, page A5, covers more on the salary issue.)

Books Michel said that accusations

that the hospital district’s books aren’t being properly kept are off base, and that one needn’t take her word on the issue. Audits both by the state and by health care auditing firm Dingus, Zaracor & Associates (DZA) have consistently yielded high marks. “(The state) is changing our audits to every other year (from annually) because our books are so clean,” Michel said. “We follow general accounting principles. I’m confident that if we’d been booking anything wrong in either division over the last seven years, one or the other of those would catch it. Have we had recommendations (for changing some practices)? Absolutely. That’s their job. But as far as booking anything wrong, we’ve never been cited for that.” She said that accusations that $120,000 that have been made that supposedly have not been going to the Long Term Care division are incorrect. “One individual keeps saying we’re booking (the $120,000) as both general revenue and as Long Term Care revenue.” The budgeted income statement shows columns for the Hospital Division, the Long Term Care Division, and a Consolidated column that adds the total of the two divisions. “You just need to look at the headers,” Michel said. “The $120,000 goes to the Assisted Living.” The exception to that is Maintenance and Operation (M&O) funding, which goes into the district’s overall fund and can be used wherever needed. “We have two divisions, but we also have the district, and that’s where the M&O money goes,” Michel said. “It goes into the district, and it gets used for whatever we choose to use it for, operations of any kind. “If there is any left - and there has been lately - everything extra goes to the treasurer. We don’t even write a check that the county doesn’t sign off on. Everything we do. Payroll checks, everything. “The first thing she does every month is take $18,000 off the top of our income to pay for the bond. It comes out of the district’s M&O levy, because that was the way it was designed. The bonds were financed through M&O. There was no vote. It was just an M&O levy bond.”

The end result is that the warrants, as of Thursday, stood at $1.3 million, down more than half since the beginning of the dramatic changes that began last year.

The future Of course, this leaves the Assisted Living building standing empty, at least for the short term. Michel said a committee including herself, commissioners Lael Duncan and Clarice Nelson and community member Karen Schimpf, will determine how the building will be used. Two other community members were invited to participate, Michel said; one declined, and the other didn’t respond. “The first thing we need to do is wait, and wait, and wait for the state to tell us what we can do with the building,” Michel said. The committee has options they have considered, moving Physical Therapy and some physician apartments into the building, among other things. “That will make some people mad, but it’s a huge revenue generator, and it’s not very accessible. And that rumor was out before we even decided to close it. “We will not do any construction. We can use it the way it is.” Michel said, despite the uproar, she believes the decisions were the right ones. “I feel that the board and senior leadership have stood tall,” she said. “We haven’t demeaned them the way we feel we have been demeaned. I feel our morality has been challenged. It is a moral issue and I understand that. But I am a moral person and have faith that my senior leaders are as well as the board. “I understand their emotions and I absolutely respect their opinion. During the course of government, presidents and governors have been elected and things have happened that I really don’t like at all. But that’s government. We elect people to make those decisions. “I’m a taxpayer, too,” she added. “I pay taxes to this county, as do all of the senior leaders. We care about this community. We live in this community. I spend my money at Grant’s, at Roy’s, at Rancho Chico, just like everyone else here. I’m not trying to destroy this community, nor is the senior leadership, nor is the board.”

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APRIL 4, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER Need best we can LETTERS ‘afford’ at NVH TO THE EDITOR In this space I’ve written the groups fighting the closure of the NVH Assisted Living that since 2010. They claim the top nine administrative staff at North Valley Hospital had been given pay increases by the hospital board totaling nearly $280,000. We published a chart based on public records provided by the district that seemed to bare out the group’s claims. In the light of closing the A/L and the clinics in Oroville that sounded outrageous and I said so. That amount alone would more than cover the A/L’s annual losses and maybe even the Oroville clinic’s. However, after sitting down and crunching the numbers with district CEO Linda Michel last week some surprising facts were revealed that were not taken into account by those who wanted to stop the AL closing, as well as those seeking a recall of the hospital board. In fact, since 2010 several top positions have been elimOut of inated entirely or combined into other peoples’ My Mind responsibility and resulted in a $225,403 savings Gary A. DeVon for the district. While many top people did get salary increases, amounting to $278,033, there was an overall decrease in total salary for the that resulted in the net savings of $225,403, according to the district’s financial numbers. This is a step in the right direction while paying down warrants owed to the county is still a top priority to improve the district’s overall health. According to Michel, many of the salary increases were part of a five percent raise promised by the previous administrator. We argue that giving any raise while still owing $1.3 million in warrants, even while promised by “a previous administrator,” is bad timing at best. And when some of the top paid salaries are double, triple and even quadruple what your average person is earning in the county it is objectionable. Many of us in the private sector have had to forego pay increases, and even pay cuts, for the overall good of the company. We continue to insist that $160,000 a year for a CEO is too much money and we’re sorry but a human resources director earning over $100,000 a year is unrealistic no matter how many years she has worked at the hospital. This shouldn’t be taken as a reflection of the people working there, but more a reality check. While economic growth is still slow and many people are still without jobs we need to be realistic about what our little hospital district can afford. Any savings we get from eliminating positions or combining jobs (at higher pay for the person taking on the extra work) should be used to pay down the district’s debt, not for pay increases. Even so we could probably live with an actual five percent increase, but going from $75,000 annual salary in 2010 for the CEO to $160,000 in 2013 is a more than a 100 percent increase no matter whose math you use. You can argue she was underpaid in 2010 and we’re sure that’s true compared to other hospital districts, but $79,726 underpaid - I have a hard time relating to that. The CEO wasn’t one of those who was promised the five percent though. Someone who was went from an annual salary of $71,344 in 2010 to $76,336 in 2011 to $104,000 in 2012. The HR director got a lot more than five percent, even if your increasing her 2011 salary. Having the added responsibility of the Drip Line ... well, don’t get us started on that. We were shown salary comparisons for senior leadership at other regional hospitals indicating NVH was below the median. Probably true, but we’ve got to compete based on our local economy and not on what others are doing. Yes, you have to pay to attract the best people, but it is a matter of what the district can afford. We were told by the board we can’t afford the clinics and the A/L, can we afford these salaries, even with the savings from eliminating or combining positions?

Still intend to seek recall of NVH Commissioners Dear Editor, To the North Okanogan County Community: By now, we are sure you have heard about the withdrawal of our petition for recall of all Okanogan County Public Hospital District #4 (OCPHD#4) Board of Commissioners. After listening to the judge’s reasoning regarding his ruling on the preliminary injunction to stop the closure of the Tonasket Assisted Living on Tuesday March 19th, our realizations of some procedural errors, hearing that the ballot synopsis did not meet statutes, we reasoned that the recall would not get past the hearing. Thinking that the judge might then also rule that a recall could not be re-filed on similar charges, we decided to withdraw to regroup, sharpen the charges, and get legal counsel to help us re-file the recall. We sincerely appreciate the tremendous amount of support we have received and feel you should know, we are not admitting defeat, only sharpening and bolstering our positions. We still intend to seek recall as mentioned above. Danny Gratrix Tonasket

Who was in control of the court that day? Dear Editor, Though, I don’t live in the district the Tonasket hospital is in, it interests me because one way or another it touches our lives, be it monetary, a little bit of something citizens all over the country are standing up to, an example of integrity vs entitlement syndrome, etc. Going in with nothing but my interest, I left with much frustration and some serious

concerns with the behavior of many. When the man with the black suit came in (he wasn’t at the first hearing) I was thinking he was with the defense, given the jovial way he approached them and started conversing with Mr. Howe about some statute. Imagine my surprise when he was introduced as the Civil Deputy from the Prosecutor’s office! The judge did relay his inexperience with the recall process and I think he lost control of the court room after that. The plaintiffs ask some real valid procedural questions. Mr. Howe having apparently worked with the gentleman in different legal capacities over a couple of decades, was that a conflict of interest? Living in small communities many have had to use the same professionals and have had to deal with the same issue. The second question, this is not an action against the hospital district but the commissioners as individuals, is using the district paid attorney a conflict of interest? Hmmm both great points. When the judge let Mr. Howe answer that it seemed questionable. After that it just turned ugly. In my opinion since the judge and Mr. Howe had created terms that if it were dismissed on technicality or charges were heard and found insufficient they couldn’t be brought back. Which seemed

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Appreciate the generous benefit on our behalf Dear Gary, Tony and I want to say Thank You, Thank You, Thank You for the benefit put on for me in Chesaw on March 2nd! Thank You for the hard work and generosity of everyone who put it on and to everyone who was there. Also to Mike and Clay for providing the entertainment, you guys are great. The Lutheran Church in Havillah went above and beyond, Thank You so much. I have never been as surprised in my life as I was that night, my heart is over-flowing with gratitude. Everyone’s generosity is overwhelming from homemade sugar free cookies, to huge gift baskets and a steady stream of beautiful cards. Also Thanks to everyone for your thoughts and prayers, I want you to know they are working! I am doing exceptionally well. I have now had the surgery and that also went very well, now I just need to heal, get through three months of chemo and get back to this wonderful life! Pauline Waits Chesaw

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dubious after the judge explained the process, listening to them talk about procedural issues and that ‘it would fail’ from the very beginning. Many were left thinking that the hospital attorney wanted the plaintiffs to take the bait and just go through with it. And when they refused to push through Mr. Howe asked for a judgement against them and the judge allowed it. This is the furthest thing from frivolous and there seemed to be technical errors on all sides, so what are the grounds for the judgement? Since one commissioner was out of state and on was on the phone, If their administration was not part of the hearing why did they take the day off and why should the judgement include their time as Mr. Howe insisted? Now I don’t think I believe what the couple sitting in front of me seemed to take from it, “a perfect example of one elected official protecting other elected officials on the tax payers nickel” but it really does leave one wondering who was controlling the courtroom that afternoon. Jill Guzman Winthrop

Harsh words may bring some satisfaction, but not results There’s nothing quite like watching parents at Little League all-star tournaments. I was chatting, some years ago, with the coach of such a Little League team that I covered at a district baseball tournament. Our conversation was interrupted by the unfolding drama of the tournament organizer (who also happened to be the county sheriff) compelling a dad to leave the premises after his objections to the decisions of his son’s coach became so belligerent that the kids on the field stopped playing to watch the ongoing discord. “I was that guy,” my friend the coach said. “I hate to admit it. I was Half-Baked the one who always rode the coach about Brent Baker my kid and thought I knew better than the coaches what they should be doing.” To his credit, this guy stepped up to try coaching himself, rather than being content to Monday-morning manager, as it were. He got more than he bargained for. “I didn’t know anything,” he said. “I had to worry about what was best for 15 kids, not just mine. And they’re all counting on me to make the right decisions. And all of a sudden, I had parents yelling at me like I used to yell at coaches.” Actually, I was wrong. Watching politics unfold - both national and local - is a lot like watching those tournaments. It’s very easy to criticize the decisions of public officials when we disagree with them or they impact us negatively. I do it all the time. Following politics is a bigger threat to my blood pressure than a high sodium diet. That includes the local variety, particularly when it’s come to the politics of making

the North Valley Hospital District financially viable. I’ve heard the closure of the Assisted Living compared to giving up on something worth preserving. And while I have no doubt of the value of the A/L, I think that is too narrow a view. I may be a prisoner of sports analogies - 20 years covering athletes, coaches and their world will do that to you - but I find them all-to-applicable. So, moving on the professional level: if a player’s performance is hurting the team, he (or she) is going to get cut. It’s not a statement on the player’s value as a human being. Cutting him is going to hurt him and damage his family’s financial well-being. If he or she is not prepared to consider another direction for their life, it can be a complete and life-changing disaster. And their family and friends are not going to be complimentary of team management, teammates, or anyone else deemed responsible for their loved one’s dream crashing against reality. But the coach and general manager are primarily responsible for the well-being of the whole team, not just the individual. The bestrun organizations do their best to help players with their personal issues and see them as more than just a collection of skills, but ultimately if that player’s performance is causing the team to lose winnable games, they’ll be sent on their way and replaced by a player that hopefully will perform better. Some of those moves work out well, and others don’t. So when it comes to the hospital district, the Assisted Living (and the clinics, for that matter) were that player whose performance was threatening to bring down the whole team. This is not a statement about the A/L’s value, and certainly not about the people living there whose lives were turned upside down. The hospital board, administrators and CEO were tasked with the decision. Knowing

a number of them outside the hospital board room, from seeing them serve in other parts of the community, it has taken a toll on them as well. These aren’t career politicians cloistered in Washington, D.C. They live here, work here and deal with the consequences of their decisions - including outright hostility from some (not all) of those who disagree with them. Some of those who made the hard decisions have been completely shunned at public events. Some of them are even afraid to walk to their cars after dark, the reaction has been so strong. It’s one thing to criticize the decisions. It’s another to impugn the morality of the decision-makers because the choices they were obligated to make came with a terrible cost. Unless someone has done a good enough job of falsifying the hospital’s financial statements to fool both state and private auditing firms, this was a decision that should have been made years ago. That decision, as well as assessments of the financial performance of other areas of the district (without which intelligent decisions couldn’t be made), were overdue. Bringing in a fresh perspective without the biases that we all develop after years in the same place - an “outsider” as CEO Linda Michel has been unflatteringly called was absolutely the right decision, particularly when mixed with the input of the board of local residents that hired her. Time will tell if it’s enough to keep the North Valley Hospital District afloat. Heartbreak, frustration, and conversations about our priorities as a society are understandable and appropriate. Demonizing our friends and neighbors faced with options varying from “bad” to “worse” won’t cause anything but more anger and bitterness -- whether it be running a Little League baseball team or a hospital district in an era of heart-rending choices.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 4, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

You should also take your kids to church So, Easter has come and gone, for this year. Little children happy for the day of gathering eggs and too much candy, and adults going to their respective churches… and therein lies part of the problem, adults going but not taking their children. I still remember going to Sunday school, with my pennies, n i c k els and maybe, even a dime, tied THIS & THAT in a knot, Joyce Emry in the corner of one of our prettiest hankies, to put in the collection plate. Remember those days? Then you’re just as old as I am. The topic of the day is sometimes, “how much are you paying for gas these days?” Twenty cents a gallon difference between Oroville and Okanogan is quite a difference, don’t you

Pinochle ends, Bingo starts soon BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

To finish up the Pinochle Season for Monday nights over to Molson, the winners were: High Al O’Brien and Mary Louise Loe (the Birthday Girl) Low’s went to Larry Smith and Jan Harper. Doug Knight won the Traveling award. The Five Week Champion was Ray Visser. This last week there were 42 Players, the most we had all season.These players will start up again in October. To answer the question from last week about what the Pinochle

think?

April is supposed to bring showers but we seem to have a continuation of March winds. About the only thing nice about the wind, is that it makes the flags flutter and remind us that we’re blessed to be living in a country, that is still free. Have you got your income tax ready? Won’t be long ‘til that is due, again. Put politicians on a minimum wage and watch how things change!! A recent phone call from Ms. Ellie Cook sent greetings to friends and saying she would be home in a few days. Don’t get hit by a rock hitting your windshield, especially in cold weather. It sometimes cracks, even after having had it repaired. To replace it wasn’t as costly as I figured, and one can’t often say that about repair work on cars, these days. There are too many fancy gadgets to deal with. Like having to take the fender off to get to the source of the window washer fluid container that sprung a leak. Doris Hughes has been

HILLTOP COMMENTS Players will do with no Pinochle Playing available. Well .... The Molson Grange has made all of the arrangements and filed all of the paper work and licensing to hold BINGO on one Friday a month starting on April 19th at 6pm at the Grange Hall. Mark your calendar. The Ladies Auxiliary will meet on April 4, 2013 at the home of Mary Louise Loe with a pot-luck at noon. I hope you all had a very nice Easter. The Chesaw Community Bible Church had an Easter Dinner after the service with at least sixty in attendance. It was open to the public and the meal was wonderful.

Military Brats!

BLUE STAR MOTHERS

SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK PRESIDENT, NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

For 77 years our nation has officially honored Armed Forces’ kids during the month of April. “The Month of the Military Child” honors the 1.9 million children who have parent(s) serving in the military. We set aside this month to recognize the contribution military children (MKs) make on behalf of our freedom and security. Their sacrifice and resilience makes it possible for their parents to serve. It has been particularly difficult for MKs 12 years old and younger for they have known nothing but war in their lifetime. “Military brat” is a term of endearment that describes children of a parent (or parents) serving full-time in the Armed Forces and their unique life story. Their lifestyle, with few exceptions, involves moving to new states or countries many times while growing up as the family is transferred, along with the soldier-parent, to new non-combat assignments; consequently, many military brats never have a home town. War-related family stresses are a common occurring part of military brat life. In comparison to the normal American civilian child’s lifestyle, they will often live in several foreign countries or diverse regions within the U.S., have broad exposure to foreign languages and cultures even while living on an American base overseas or state side, plus a deep immersion in the military culture. Military brats are largely viewed by sociologists as a “distinct, 200 year-old American subculture,” with millions of members. It has been described as one of America’s oldest and yet least known subcultures, described as a “modern day nomadic” society. In military circles “military brat” is a term of endearment and respect that implies a cer-

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tain “spunkiness” and adaptability. The term also connotes their mobile upbringing, or as being a world traveler, or global citizen referencing a sense of worldliness. Military children hold a very special place in a Blue Star Mother’s heart. It is often the mother of the soldier who steps in to help with the care of a child and with running the military family while the parent(s) is away on an exercise or deployment. It is often the Blue Star Mom they call when help is needed adjust-

astounded at the response she has gotten on her “bear project.” A lady from Riverside came all the way to Oroville to drop off a bag of bears. Keeps ‘em coming!!! Beverly Storm is home and glad of it, and so is the community. Now, we’re waiting for Neoma Vandiver to get back for cards etc. And, no more waiting, Neoma is back. Our most special Barbie Friemuth has the shingles. They are such a nasty thing to have and so painful, and Barbie has enough problems without that. We miss her and her motorized wheelchair, flitting around at the senior center, spreading laughter and happiness. Ellen Roberts, 102-years-old, took a fall a few weeks ago, and I’m happy to report, that she is able to walk and bear weight on the afflicted leg. Ya’ just can’t keep a good gal down! Kay (Sherling) Tracy is now a resident at Apple Springs, Omak care center. Take time to stop and visit. Even 15 or 20 minutes is sufficient to stop and say, “Hi and how are you? We miss you and your happy, smiling face.” She is On Saturday the Children’s Activity Club had an Easter Egg Hunt for the Hilltop Children. There were twenty five kids out in the Rodeo Grounds with their baskets in hand looking for those Gold and Silver eggs. The Silver egg winners were: Alejandra Perez, Kadin Graf, Liberty Trump and Paul Graf. The Gold egg winners were: Noah Covarribias, Logan Gough, Bowe McKinney, and Erin Quinlan. These winners received a large chocolate egg with big ears. Each child that was entered in the hunt received an Easter Basket with a small stuffed animal and small toys and a small Chocolate Egg. They all had a good time all said “thank you.” The weather was great and the mud in the Rodeo arena was not messy. Until next week

ing to the absence of a parent or spouse away at war. This month is a good time for us to take note of the contribution these children make. We can help put a smile on their face! As a token of our communities’ appreciation of their service, our chapter will be sending a Thank You gift to every child of our Hometown Soldiers! If you know of any children whose parent is in the Armed Forces that are from North Central Washington, send us their name, age, and address so that they, too, can be included in the mailing this month. We don’t want any area children left out. Contact us at ncw.bluestars@ yahoo.com or (509) 485-2906.

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such a special person, to so many and it’s sad that she had to make this move, at this stage of her life, but that’s the way it is. She tires easily, so short visits are just fine. Apple Meadows is located behind the clinic, north Omak. Mary (Nigg) and her sister Katherine, were recently in Oroville. Mary had lunch with classmates, Betty Deitrich, Perry Blackler, Lloyd Curtis (and I think that is all). Mary has lived in Montana many years and Kay, in Spokane. And, I’m happy to report that yours truly still doesn’t have to have cataract surgery! Yet! I’ve worn glasses for 80 years…I

wouldn’t feel dressed without them. It has been reported that Lee Turner has been buried at Riverview cemetery, without services, but services were held in Federal Way, where he had resided for quite some time with his wife, Marian, (Thompson). And I repeat, we live in a great area. Another snow storm recently hit the Midwest. And one of our Canadian friends, who comes to Oroville for winters, says there is still five feet of snow at his home, in Sask, Alberta. I think he will extend his stay a bit longer than he was expecting. The Verle Harnasches have left

our area for new residence in Kennewick. When the fourth of July rolls around what will their family and friends do for a party place? They hosted many a celebration at their lake home. They will truly be missed for reasons other than that one function. But, Verle will have a new audience to spin his many tales to. Did you hear about the two silkworms that had a race? They ended up in a tie! And then there were some cannibals that ate a missionary. They got a real taste of religion. (Maybe I’d better quit with those lines).


APRIL 4, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

BY SUSIE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES 3002

Time for fishing and flip flops The 70’s are upon us, so break out those shorts and flip flops. Spectacle Lake opened for fishing this week and it is time to try out your new trout techniques. Don’t forget our Scholarship raffle for $400 in either gas or groceries, come get those tickets. It is meeting time this Wednesday, with the joint meet-

New website for community schools BY JACKIE VALIQUETTE North Valley Community Schools

OROVILLE - We hope, we think, we plan to have our new website up and running by the end of this week! As of this writing there is only a tweak or two left to do. We are excited to provide a new look and a more userfriendly site. The name is the same, www.

This Month at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket Friday, April 5 - OHA presents First Friday Highland Wonders presentation on “The Best of All Things: Clean Water.” Dinner served at 5:00 p.m., presentation at 6:30. Saturday, April 6 - Spring Concert Series. “Come Dance With Us - Livin’ For Spring” with performances by The Randy Battle Blues Band, Lota Durate, Kyle McConnell, Bonsai Sequoia, Leo Brett and Jason Emersley, and Ruby Rust. Admission is $6 for CCC members and $7 for nonmembers. Starts at 7:00 p.m. and refreshments will be available by donation. Friday, April 12 - Friday Night Coffeehouse. Doug Woodrow presents: The Story of Frank Matsura, 20th Century Okanogan County photographer on the 100th anniversary of his arrival in the valley. 6:00-9:00 p.m. with refreshments available by dona-

TONASKET EAGLES

ing at 6pm and the Aerie meeting at 7 p,m. The Auxiliary meeting will be Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Bingo will be on Friday at 7 p.m. this week so come give a go at winning the big jackpot.The kitchen will be open at 5:30 p.m. for some of those good ol’ 1/3 lb. cheeseburgers and other items. Our Sunday pinochle scores were as follows: 1st place went to Dave Russell and Ken Cook,

The Learning Tree northvalleycommunityschools. com. Once you’re there, just two quick clicks will take you to all the classes we have to offer. You can register online with PayPal and/or your credit card. With 41 classes from which to choose during Spring Quarter, 19 of them are in April. Here are a few coming up: Zumba (any six

APRIL AT THE CCC tion. For more info call the office at (509) 486-1328. Sunday, April 14 - Free Community Dinner. Sunday dinner provided by the CCC and others. Dinner served from 2:004:00 p.m. Free for those who need it, by donation for others. Call Janet at 486-2061 for more info. Friday April 19 - “Girls Night Out.” Free admission, comfort food, vendors, massage demo, entertainment, art work and free shopping for second hand clothes and books. Dinner served from 5:30-6:30 p.m. will cost $6 for CCC members and $7 for nonmembers. Saturday April 20 - Hemp Fest all day at the Center. Saturday and Sunday April 20-21 - Celebrate Earth Day with Green Okanogan. Tour and E-cycle on Saturday starting at 10 a.m. at the Green Intentional Community on Havillah Rd. Saturday also features a “Plant Frenzy” at Triangle Park from 10 a.m. -4 p.m. Sunday will feature “Being Green” programs at the

CELEBRATING 63 YEARS

2nd place was Jerry Cooksey and Penny Smith. Last pinochle was taken by Dave Russell and Ken Cook, way to go guys. Low score was Julie Hovland and Lyle Anderson. For those wishing to attend the funeral of Dick Wisener it will be at the Catholic Church in Oroville April 4th at 10 a.m. This Saturday is the memorial for Glen Cook at 12 p.m. and lunch at l p.m. To all that are ill we wish a speedy recovery. God bless you all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

classes between April 9 and June 25); First Aid/CPR (three sessions beginning April 8); Making Seed Tapes (good timing for this April 9 class); and The UkelelePluck Away (four classes beginning April 11). Welcome to our new instructors this quarter and welcome back to those who have shared their skills and talents over the years. There is so much talent in our area and Community Schools wants to tap into all of it. Would you like to teach? Call Ellen Bartells at (509) 476-2011. Tonasket High School Commons. For more info call (509) 4962389. Sunday April 21 - Similkameen Sunday: Celebrating the Cultural, Spiritual and Historical Significance of Similkameen Falls. 12:00-3:30 p.m. Call Jere and Rick for more info at (509) 485-3844. Saturday April 27 - 3rd Annual Health and Spirituality Faire Free event with lots of workshops sponsored by the CCC and Little House of Yoga with events at both locations. Event runs from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Call Linda or Jody Pries at (509) 486-2886 for more info. Sunday, April 28 - Free Community Dinner - Sunday dinner provided by the CCC and others. Dinner served from 2:004:00 p.m. Free for those who need it, by donation for others. Call Janet at (509) 486-2061 for more info. Sunday, April 28 - Special CCC Membership Meeting, 4:00-6:00 p.m. This will be a dessert potluck with coffee, tea and water available. Wednesday, April 10 and 24 CCC Game Night and Acoustic Music Jam - All kinds of games including cards, board games and ping pong hosted by Janet Culp and acoustic musical jam hosted by Pat Liley from 6:00-9:00 p.m. Dinner for $5 prepared by Tryg Culp and crew. Call Janet Culp at (509) 486-2061 for more info. Dance Classes every Thursday evening - learn to waltz, twostep, four-step swing. Fee is $5 per class, with the first class free. 6:00-8:00 p.m. Call the Center at (509) 486-1328 for more information.

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Clean Water Discussion TONASKET - On Friday, April 5, John Crandall will come to Highland Wonders to discuss water quality and its importance in our lives. Crandall will share the story of water quality protection in the U.S., including the role of the Clean Water Act – what it does and what it means for our water. Drawing on his extensive experience in monitoring water quality, Crandall will provide an overview of the characteristics of water that are most commonly analyzed, and why. He will discuss important local issues such the relationship between water temperature and fish survival, and the impact of pesticide use in our waterways. The effects of beavers, as well as wetlands, on water quality will also be discussed.

Historical Society Auction OROVILLE - Borderlands Historical Society Auction (at the American Legion Hall) to raise monies for historical signs downtown on Saturday, April 6. Doors open at 5 p.m., hamburgers by the American Legion Auxiliary, silent and live auction beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Conservation District Native Plant Sale OKANOGAN - Native Plant Sale will be held on Saturday, April 6, 2013 at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds Horticulture Building (175 Rodeo Trail Rd., Okanogan) from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Purchase bareroot native plants including ponderosa pine, serviceberry, woods rose, and many other species. Quantities are limited, so come early for best selection. Cash, checks, and MasterCard/VISA will be accepted. Okanogan County Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer questions about plants and planting. Information on noxious weeds will also be available. For more information, please contact the Okanogan Conservation District at (509) 4220855 ext 100.

DENTISTRY

MOVIES

TONASKET – It’s the first Community Schools offering of Spring Quarter. This comprehensive class covers the basics of first aid including medical, injury and environmental emergencies and adult, child and infant CPR. Students will receive a Dept. of Labor & Industries card, valid for two years upon completion. There are three sessions, in Tonasket, beginning Monday, April 8. Call Ellen at (509) 476-2011 or email community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu for information and to register.

Zumba with NVCS OROVILLE – Zumba! Have you tried it? Exercising can be a bummer, but not with Zumba. This is a fitness party and you will move, dance, laugh and do the Limbo to Latin and International music. The moves work up a sweat while toning and melting inches from your body. There’s high impact and low impact, so it’s fitness for everyone. Bring a water bottle and towel. Call Ellen at North Valley Community Schools or community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu to register for any six classes, Tuesday, April 9 through Tuesday, June 25.

Habitat for Humanity Meeting RIVERSIDE - The monthly meeting of Habitat for Humanity will be Tuesday, April 9 at 7 p.m. at Mike and Peggy McDaniels home - 170 Hubbard Road, Riverside, WA. For further information call Arlene Johnson at (509) 429 8369.

Blossom Spring Bazaar OROVILLE – The seventh annual Blossom Spring Bazaar will be Saturday, April 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Oroville High School Commons. Admission is free (please bring a Food Drive Donation). Door Prizes, from the participating vendors, throughout the day. Come and enjoy a variety of booths, including: hand crafted items, health and fit-

EYECARE

ness information, various community services information, beauty and skin care, jewelry, home interior, workshops and demonstrations and much more. Sponsored by Blossom Ministries - Potential Vendors may contact Melisa Turner at (509)-7331941.

Oroville Kite Day OROVILLE - The Oroville Royal Neighbors is sponsoring Kite Day Sunday, April 14 at Oroville’s Bud Clark ballfields at 9 Sawtell Rd. Free kites and cookies to kids from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m., or while supplies last. Enjoy a great day flying your kite in the park.

Flood Season Meeting OKANOGAN - There will be an Okanogan County Flood Season Coordination Meeting on Thursday, April 25 from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Okanogan County Commissioner’s Conference Room, 123 5th Avenue N., Okanogan. The meeting is open to the public. Anyone with comments or concerns is encouraged to attend.

Weather Spotter Training OKANOGAN - There will be a Weather Spotter Training session at the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Office Conference Room, 123 5th Ave. N., Okanogan, on Thursday, May from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The course is free. To register, contact Glenda Beauregard at the Emergency Management Department by calling (509) 422-7206 or register online at: www. okangandem.org.

Food Banks TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 4862480. OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Your Complete Eyecare Centre

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

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New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

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ThE CrOODS

AnimAtion/Adventure/romAnce StArring nicholAS cAge, ryAn 98 min reynoldS, emmA Stone

Fri. 6:45 & 9:15 Sat. *4:15, 6:45, 9:15 Sun. *4:30, 7:15 wkdys: 7:15

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No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

Family Health Centers

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MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

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Sun. - mon. - tueS. APril 14 - 15 - 16

Submitted photo

Call us . . . Se Habla Español

(509) 826-8496

ShowtimeS At 7:30Pm

Pat and Dick Robbins will be celebrating their 63rd wedding anniversary this month. Dick Robbins took Pat Mitchell’s hand in marriage in Seattle in 1950. Their family is wishing them all their love on this momentous occasion, says daughter Rebecca Desjardins.

CLINIC

Oliver, B.C.

Reg. Showtimes: Sun.-Mon.-Tue.Thur. 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7&9pm

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916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 4, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • April 04, 2013

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7 8 1

3 4

6

5

2 4 3

7 8 1 9

2 6

2 3 6

8 5 7 1 9 4

1

5 4 9

6 2 8 3 7

6 8 7 9 4 3 2

3 1 4 8 7

2 6 9 5

9 5 2 4 6 3

1 8 7

2 7 8 3 5 4

9 1 6

1

4 9 7 8 6

5 2 3

5 6

3 9 2 1 8

7 4

8 9 6

2 4 7 3 5 1

7

3 5 6

1 9 2 4 8

Puzzle 14 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

7

6 8

3 2

7

1

4

8

1

6

9

3

9

4 7 3 2 9

5 1

8 9 6

9 6 2

3 4

2 3 7 5

1

1

8 6 7 5

6 4

9 1 2

7 5 4

8 3

6

9 5

8

3 2

5

1

6

4

7

8

Puzzle 24 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.35)

8 6

2 7 4 9

5 1 3

7 9 1

4 3

6 8

2

5

3 1

5

4

9

7

2 3 5 4

6 8

6

1

5 9

3

8

6

2

8 9 2

7

1

7

4

1 7 3

9 5 2 8 6

3

1

6

7 2

8 4

9 5

4

5

9

4

2

8

6

1

4

7

8

6

3

2

7

3

5

9

1

Puzzle 21 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

7 8

9 1 4 3

5 6 2

Puzzle 17 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

5

5 2

1

2 1

3

8

2

8

1

1 7

9

9

509-476-3602

9

5

Sponsored by

4

1

8

4

3

Easy, difficulty rating 0.44

3

5

1

Puzzle 20 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

6 5

7 9

7

Puzzle 19 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

5

5

3

3

4

6

9

6

5 8

5

2

1 6

3

3

3

1

7

Puzzle 23 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

2

1

3

7

9

8

1

7

6

5 3

9

2

3

9

4

7

5

8

9 5 6

4 2 3

8

4 7

1 2

2 5

6 4

2 4 9

1 7

1 3 8 5

6

6

3

9

7

8

1

7

6 9

3 4 2 1 5

5

6

3

4 8

9 1

7 2

8

1

4 8 6

7 5 2 3 9

2

3

5 1 8 9

7 6 4

Puzzle 18 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.31)

ANSWERS

6

2

9

7

2

3

5

5

4

1

8

3

6

2

7

3

4

4

8

2

1

9

5

7

9

5

1

1

6

6

2

8

4

5

4 2

1 5 3 8

7 6 9

3 9

8 7 6 4

5 2 4

9 1

6 1 7

9 4

7

6

2 8

3

1

5

3

2

4

1

5

8

3

7

8

2

5

9

6

58. “... ___ he drove out of sight�

5

2

57. Undertake, with “out�

6

9

52. Third canonical hour

6

51. Open, as a bottle

2

48. Coastal features

1

47. Covered with fine black carbon particles

5

44. Lean

43. Discuss again

4

2 1 5

3

6 7

9 4

8

1 7 6

8 5 2

4

3 9

1 3 6

8 9 7 5 2 4

4

5 9 6

2 3 7 8 1

Puzzle 15 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

8 7

2 5 4 1

6 9 3

4. Cougars

42. New newts

7

22. Cold cuts, e.g.

39. Carpet cleaner

8

3. Playing marbles

38. Science of flying planes

3

20. Small bell-shaped bomb

37. Hard outer layer of cheese (pl.)

4

2. Ginger ___, dancer

36. The Kennedys, e.g.

1

18. Black mineral, MnO(OH)

35. Teaches new skills

6

1. Italian brandy

34. Crack

5

17. Small, long-tailed Old World tropics lizard

31. Carve in stone

30. Abounding

9

16. Airy

Down

25. Bowl over

8

15. Pith helmet

21. Goddess of the hunt

3

14. Scalawag

19. Above

7

7

3

10. “___ Smile� (1976 hit)

13. Buttercup family member

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 14 (Easy, rating 0.44) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

46. Plagiarist

64. Ballyhoo 65. Demands

5

6. Kuwaiti, e.g.

63. Medical advice, often

12. Courtroom do-overs

2

2

1

1. Pie chart, for one

62. Santa’s reindeer, e.g.

2

Across

6

ANSWERS

61. Antares, for one

8

60. Coastal raptor

5

59. About to explode

4

56. Power

9

53. Pilot’s announcement, briefly 55. Unsaturated alcohol

11. Beekeeper

www.gazette-tribune.com

Sudoku

32. Altar avowal (2 wd)

50. Fertilization 54. Comparative word

9

49. “To ___ is human ...�

4

45. “Wheel of Fortune� buy (2 wd) 46. Telekinesis, e.g.

1

41. Male sheep

8

40. Antipasto morsel

7

34. Decorative handicraft and design (3 wd) 39. Particular, for short

3

10. “My boy�

4

31. Boredom 33. “Cast Away� setting

9. Having two spouses simultaneously

7

29. Wanton

8. Pertaining to the temporary cessation of breathing

1

28. “Dig in!�

7. Drifts

3

27. Balaam’s mount

6. Store convenience, for short

5

26. “Flying Down to ___�

5. Encourages

8

24. As fast as possible (music)

8

Crosswords

23. Branch

On-call position to share with both the Oroville and Tonasket offices of North Valley Family Medicine. We are seeking a caring, compassionate, patient-oriented LPN. Applicant must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, www.wvmedical.com for more info and to apply online.

An Equal Opportunity Employer 2

WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

7

www.go2worksource.com

6

Updated list of employment at

I would like to thank my family, friends and this great community that we live in for all of the support that they have given to me and so many others. Without them we would not be able to keep our faith, hope and courage alive. Thank you again to everyone, Peggy Burton and family.

3

126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

9

WorkSource Okanogan County

6

Equal Housing Opportunity

4

email: stcharles@gdicom.net

First Aid and CPR Class will be held on April 15th, 16th, & 17th, 7:00pm to 10:00pm in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow the first night. For information call Ben Hylton 509-223-3412, leave message

LPN

Alternative School Parapro The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Alternative School Parapro. Applicants must have an AA degree, 72 quarter or 48 semester college credits, or documentation of successfully passing the State Assessment. Position will remain open until filled with a screening date of April 15. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 509-486-2126. 2

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

An Equal Opportunity Employer

5

ADOPTION: Active Executive & Future Stay-Home mom, Unconditional LOVE awaits miracle 1st baby. Expenses paid. 1-888-919-1604. Steve & Norma

9

– Family & Singles –

“PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

1

Announcements

ATTENTION:

2

LOW INCOME HOUSING

St. Charles Place Apartments

9

207 Main St., Oroville, WA

Tonasket LARGE INDUSTRIAL storage warehouse. On 10+ acres with city water and OT irrigation water. Call for Details 509-322-4732

7

425-949-7992

8

Large fully fenced back yard. Walking distance to downtown Oroville. Avail April 1st. $625 per mo. No pets. No smoking. 214 Main St, Oroville.

FOR RENT: Business/Office unit(s), Main Street Oroville optional sizes & prices. (509)486-1682 or (509)4290873.

3

1 BR, 1 BA WELL KEPT HOME

5

OROVILLE

1

Commercial Rentals

Okanogan County Department of Public Works is accepting applications until April 19, 2013 at 4:30 pm for Temporary M-2 Truck Drivers and Traffic Control Striper Crewperson. Wages will be $15.40/hour. Applicants must possess a Commercial Driver’s License, current updated health card, and flagHelp ging card. Okanogan County is also excepting applications Wanted for Flagger and General Labor positions at $12.52/hour. Middle School Secretary The Tonasket School District Positions are available in is now accepting applications various maintenance areas. for a Middle School Secretary Applications, supplemental Position will remain open until and job descriptions may be filled with a screening date of obtained by contacting the April 15. Please contact the Dept. of Public Works, District Office for an applica1234-A 2nd Ave. S, tion or available on the disOkanogan, WA 98840 trict’s website at: or go online to: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. www.okanogancounty.org/HR/ Tonasket School District, Telephone (509) 422-7300. 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Equal Opportunity Employer. Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 509-486-2126.

3

OROVILLE Newly remodeled 3 bedroom house for rent / option to buy. Central air and heat. Large yard. Close to schools. $750 a month. Call 509-322-0347 or 509-476-2234

An Equal Opportunity Employer

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

4

By River - 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage, $1,100 p/m Near Town - 1 Bdrm, Adorable Cottage w/ furnishings, $525 p/m In Town 1 or 2 Bdrm, Deluxe Condo Units w/ carports, $625 + p/m Call Sun Lakes Realty ******509-476-2121*******

Found

2

Oroville NEW and NICE! One Bedroom house with Walk in TONASKET closet, eat in kitchen, laundry 2 bedroom apartment in and lots of storage. Patio with town. $500 a month. Call valley view. 509-322-0347 or 509-476Call: 509-476-0199 2234

6

For Rent

7

Tonasket ½ ACRE BUILDING LOT with power, water, phone and cable TV only $35,000. No mobile homes. Call 509 322 4732

509-476-4057

www.gazette-tribune.com

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA AVAILABLE NOW! 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

Help Wanted

Migrant Education Program (MEP) Recruiter The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Migrant Education Program (MEP) Recruiter. Applicants must have an AA degree, 72 quarter or 48 semester college credits, or documentation of successfully passing the State Assessment. Position will remain open until filled with a screening date of April 15. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 509-486-2126.

9

Tonasket Small one bedroom cottage with a garage on a large lot one block from grocery store. Only $79,000. Call 509 322 4732

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

6

Tonasket 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, heat pump, single car garage with shop and storage shed. RV parking with dump site and AC power. Covered patio. $105,000. Bill: (509)486-1952

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

Help Wanted

8

IN MOLSON 2 BR LOG Cabin. Loft, all amenisites & wood heat. Much more! Negotiable down & interest. Owner finances. Consider newer 4x4 Truck partial down. $126,000. 509-485-2171.

Announcements

1

Tonasket Three bedroom, two bath, 1248 sq. ft, vacant all new carpet and fresh paint, convenient location in Old Orchard Estates subdivision, ½ miles north of Tonasket. Only $145,000. Call 509-322-4732

FOUR ACRES INDUSTRIAL LAND on the Canada to Oroville Heavy Haul Corridor with railroad frontage and truck access off of Jennings Loop Rd. Only $60,000. Call 509 322 4732

For Rent

5

Houses For Sale

Lots & Acreage

4

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

Invites you to our annual job fair

April 12th - 10am to 1pm. Positions in the following departments will be offered

RESORT STAFF

Front Desk Services Housekeeping Housemen

Diner Staff

Bartenders Dishwashers Line Cooks Servers Baristas Front of House Manager Veranda Beach Resort 299 Eastlake Road, Oroville, WA 98844. Phone 509-476-4000

HS Custodian The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a full time HS Custodian. Work hours are 11:00 pm to 7:30 am Monday -Friday. Position closes April 12. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 509-486-2126. An Equal Opportunity Employer

Oroville School District has the following positions available School Board Director #2 Junior High Volleyball Coaches (2) High School Boys’ Basketball Coaches (2) High School Volleyball Assistant Coach Positions open until filled. Please send letter of interest/application to: Oroville School District 816 Juniper Street, Oroville, WA 98844. Oroville School District is an equal opportunity Employer. The Tonasket Community Cultural Center of Tonasket, a non-profit organization, is seeking a part-time Building Manager to work 15 hours/week at a starting salary of $12.50/hr. Primary duties are managing finances, scheduling building use and keeping records. Experience bookkeeping, working with computers and grant writing highly desired. Please submit a resume, references and cover letter, postmarked no later than May 1st 2013 to: Board of Directors Community Cultural Center 411 S. Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855

Business Opportunities 1950’s DINER - BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY This is an exciting business opportunity at an established resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington! Veranda Beach Resort seeks an experienced and successful food and beverage operator for the 2013 season. This fully equipped 1950’s themed Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Rhonda Hinkley for further details at: rhonda@verandabeach.com. Check out our website at: www.verandabeach.com

Home furnishings Oak table, 6 chairs, & china Hutch, Excellent! $450. Call 509-476-3145


APRIL 2013 April4,04, 2013| OKANOGAN • OKANOGANVALLEY VALLEYGAZETTE-TRIBUNE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Miscellaneous WE BUY Estates. We buy Gold and Silver. We clean yards and properties. We haul junk and scrap. Free quote. Call Aussie Antiques, 509-322-3400.

Motorcycles 2008 YAMAHA VSTAR 1100/XVS11XB. Black with ghost flames, windshield, leather bags, two helmets and cover. $5,000 firm. 509476-2514.

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF APRIL 1, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPTION -- Active Executive and Future Stay-Home Mom, Unconditional love awaits miracle 1st baby. Expenses paid 1-888-919-1604 Steve & Norma ADOPT: A Beautiful Home, Laughter Love Art Music, Many Opportunities waits for 1st baby. Expenses paid. Astrid 1-800-844-1670 EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 866-673-6209. www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL PROTECT YOUR IRA and 401(k) from inflation by owning physical gold or silver! Tax-free, hassle-free rollovers. Free “Gold Guide” American Bullion, 800-527-5679 LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com CASH NOW for Good Notes, Top Dollar from Private investor. Yes, Bajillions Available for quality Contracts, Mortgages, Annuities, Inheritance. Receiving Payments? Call Skip Foss 1-800-637-3677 FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N

Statewides

PAGE 9A9

Public Notices

HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS YOUR ¾-TON or larger pickup can earn you a living! Foremost Transport has flexible schedules, great rates and super bonuses. Call 1-866-764-1601 or foremosttransport.blogspot.com today! DRIVER --Qualify for any portion of $0.03 quarterly bonus: $0.01 Safety, $0.01 Production, $0.01 MPG. Two raises in first years. 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com TIRED of Being Gone? We get you home! Call Haney Truck Line one of the best NW heavy haul carriers. Great pay/benefits package. 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com DRIVERS -- Inexperienced/Experienced. Unbeatable career Opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 www.centraldrivingjobs.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com REAL ESTATE COLFAX -- RIVERFRONT. 9 acres was $75,000 now only $39,500. Lender Repo sale. Beautiful valley views, quiet county road with electric. Excellent financing provided. Call UTR 1-888-326-9048.

Public Notices Basic Service Annual Ad Skyline Telecom is a quality telecommunications services provider that provides basic and enhanced services at reasonable rates within its service territory. Basic services are offered at the following rates: Single Party Residence Service, Monthly Service Charge, $19.50; Single Party Business Service, $25.00; Federal Subscriber Line Charge - Single Line, $6.50: Access Recovery Charge-Single Line $.50. Touch Tone Service: Touch Tone service is provided as a part of local service rate. Toll Blocking: Available at no charge; Emergency 911 Services: Surcharges for 911 services are assessed according to government policy. Low-income individuals may be eligible for Federal and State Lifeline telephone assistance programs that include discounts from the above basic and local service charges. Basic services are offered to all consumers in the Skyline Telecom service territory at the rates, terms and conditions specified in the Company’s tariffs. If you have any questions regarding the Company’s services, please call us at (888) 7824680. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 4, 2013 #469436

Civil Service Exam The City of Tonasket Civil Service Commission will be testing for an entry level patrolman eligibility list on Friday, May 3rd, 2013. Call 509-486-2132 for an application packet or write to City of Tonasket, P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Applications will be accepted until 4:30 pm April 25th, 2013. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Civil Service Secretary Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 2013. #468199

Columbia River Carbonates, Conditional Use Permit 2013-1 Application and Threshold SEPA Determination (MDNS) Columbia River Carbonates has submitted an application to amend Conditional Use Permit (CUP) 2007-12. They propose to relocate their crushing operations 850’ to the east and construct a new haul road into the crushing site, and to lower the mining excavation 100 feet from the current maximum elevation of 3775 Feet to elevation 3675 feet. All activities will be within the existing boundaries of their CUP. Columbia River Carbonates submitted an environmental checklist and proposed mitigations for probable impacts. The SEPA responsible official has issued a threshold mitigated determination of non-significance. The site is located off of Toroda Creek Road 5 miles north of Wauconda and is located within Sections 13, 18 and 24, of Township 38 North, Range 30 East and 31 East Willamette Meridian. Project comments must be submitted in writing, or attend the public hearing. The public hearing for this project is not yet scheduled. Project comments and SEPA comments will be reviewed separately. SEPA Comments must be submitted in writing no later than 5:00 p.m., April 17, 2013. According to Washington SEPA (State Environmental Policy Act) regulations, Okanogan County Planning and Development issued a MDNS (Mitigated determination of non-significance) for this proposal. Failure to comment by this date denies a party standing to appeal the final determination. Information is available at the Office of Planning and Development. Direct questions and comments to: Randy Johnson, Planner II, Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 4227117. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 4, 2013. #468821

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In Re the Estate of RALPH W. PATTERSON, Deceased Probate No. 13-4-00008-2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: March 21, 2013 Personal Representative: LeaAnn Hairston Attorney for Personal Representative: W. Scott DeTro Address for Mailing or Service: 700-A Okoma Drive, Omak, WA 98841 Court of Probate Proceedings and Cause No: Okanogan County Superior Court Cause No. 13-4-00008-2 CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC W. Scott DeTro, WSBA #19601 Attorney for Estate Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 21, 28, April 3, 2013 #465664

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: DOLLY MAE BRAZLE, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00022-8 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: March 18, 2013 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 28, 2013 JULIE A. McCORKLE Personal Representative Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Brazle P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 11, 2013 #466559

NOTICE OF PETITION FOR CHANGE IN BOUNDARIES OF THE OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT Notice is hereby given that petition exclusion of land have been filed with the Board of Directors of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, praying that the Board of Directors of said District enter an order changing the boundaries of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District to include or exclude the tracts of land described below from the boundaries of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District. The name of the petitioners, together with the descriptions to be excluded from the boundaries of the OrovilleTonasket Irrigation District in Okanogan County, State of Washington, is as follows: EXCLUSIONS: Linda Gann, 247017004; 16-37-27, .14 acres. Notice is also given that Thursday, April 11, 2013, at the hour of 1:30 p.m. at the main office of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, is the time and place that all persons interested in or that may be affected by such change in the boundaries of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation district must appear and show cause in writing, if they have any, why the change in the boundaries of said district as proposed in said petition should not be made. Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, Tom W. Scott, Secretary. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 2013. #468200

nating this organization’s nondiscrimination compliance efforts and may be contacted at Skyline Telecom PO Box 609, Mount Vernon, OR 97865, (541) 932-4411. Any individual, or specific class of individuals, who feel that this organization has subjected them to discrimination may obtain further information about the statutes and regulations listed above from and/or file a written complaint with this organization; or the Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington DC 20250; or the Administrator, Rural Electrification Administration, Washington , DC 20250. Complaints may be filed within 180 days after the alleged discrimination. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 4, 2013 #469437

Notice by Publication To: SFI Holding, LLC 11221 Pacific Hwy. SW Lakewood, WA 98499 You are hereby notified, pursuant to RCW 8.25.290, that Okanogan Public Utility District No. 1 of Okanogan County will decide, at its Board of Commissioners meeting to be held on April 23, 2013, at 12:30 p.m., at 1331 Second Avenue North, Okanogan, Washington 98840, whether or not to take final action to authorize the condemnation of a portion of your property generally described as follows: A portion of Okanogan County Tax Parcel Nos. 3727250021 and 3727251009, being located in Section 25, Township 37, Range 27 E.W.M., being approximately 4.25 miles East of Tonasket, Okanogan County, Washington, off of Highway 20 near Moon Dust Road. The portions of said parcels that are being considered for condemnation are more particularly described as follows: A strip 100 feet wide commencing at the Southeast corner of Parcel No. 3727251009 and running Northwest approximately 2000 feet to the approximate center of the West boundary of Parcel No. 3727250021. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 4, 11, 18, 2013. #469364 Oroville School District No. 410 816 Juniper Street Oroville,WA 98844 Legal/Public Notice Capital Projects Fund Budget Extension Notice is hereby given that the Board of Directors of Oroville School District No. 410 will hold a public hearing on April 29, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. to extend the 2012-2013 Capital Projects Fund Budget. The hearing will be held in the boardroom, 816 Juniper Street. The public is invited to attend, and comments will be heard for or against any part of the budget extension. /s/ Steve Quick Superintendent of Schools Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 4, 11, 2013. #468506

Public Notice The City of Oroville will be accepting proposals for leasing the Concession Stand at Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial Park for the 2013 Season. Copies of the proposed lease, which outlines requirements and certain equipment that the lessee shall supply, and other information may be obtained from the City Hall, 1308 Ironwood Street, Oroville, WA 98844 (509-476-2926) or may be downloaded from the city’s website at oroville-wa.com Proposals should be submitted to the City Clerks Office no later 4:00, Monday, April 15, 2013. Publish March 28, April 4, and 11, 2013 Attest: Kathy M. Jones Clerk Oroville is an Equal Opportunity Employer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 11, 2013. #463718 Summary of Ordinance #725 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, authorizing the operation of off-road vehicles within the City limits of the City of Tonasket and within designated usage areas, prohibiting certain conduct thereon and providing penalties for violations. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact City Hall, 509-4862132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 4, 2013. #469736 Statement of Nondiscrimination Skyline Telecom is the recipient of Federal financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The USDA prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-9410, or call (800) 795-3272 (voice), or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). “USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender”. The Equal Employment Opportunity Coordinator is responsible for coordi-

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HAROLD FLYNN, Deceased. Case No. 13-4-00026-1 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 28, 2013 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: YOLONDA J. PETERSEN ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Christina M. Davitt, Esq., WSBA No. 41272 ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: Davitt Law Group, PLLC 1630 N. Wenatchee Ave., Ste. 18 Wenatchee, WA 98801 (509) 888-2925 tel. (509) 888-2926 fax Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 11, 2013 #467321

Veranda Beach Resort PDM 2010-2 Hearing & Resolution Adoption The Board of Okanogan County Commissioners scheduled an open record public hearing in order to consider adoption of a development agreement and then adopt a resolution formalizing their decision. Adoption of the development agreement would complete the current application process for a major modification of Veranda Beach Resort Planned Development (PDM 2010-2). The final SEPA mitigated determination of non-significance was issued January 19, 2011. The hearing is April 23, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. located in the Commissioners Hearing Room in the Virginia Grainger Administration Building at 123 5th Ave. North, Okanogan, WA 98840. Information is available at the Office of Planning and Development. Direct questions and comments to: Ben Rough, Senior Planner, Okanogan County Planning & Development, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-7122. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on April 4, 2013. #468805

COURT, 911 CALLS, JAIL BOOKINGS Superior Court CRIMINAL The court found probable cause to charge Carrie Leslie, 37, with possession of a controlled substance. They received 30 days confinement.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS

Find The Right

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013 In Oroville, on Sawtell Road, a Honda and Mercury Cougar were taken. SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 2013 In Tonasket, on Highway 7, there was a vehicle fire at the location. Two male subjects were seen running from the location. In Tonasket, on No Name Road, a resident observed a dead dog on the road at the location with a sign that read “keep your

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dogs at home. It was in my trash”. He believes that this is animal cruelty. The neighbor and the dog owner are unknown. In Tonasket, on West Lost Lake Road, neighbors are shooting guns and spooking a resident’s horses. This is a possible target shooting. There has been an ongoing problem with scaring animals. In Oroville, on Offwhite Rock Road, two vehicle were taken a few days ago.

SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 In Okanogan, on Third Avenue North, roommates locked a man out of their motel room. The man is at the jail lobby for contact. In Okanogan, on Apple Way Road, a TV was taken from the Okanogan Inn lobby room sometime the night before. There is also graffiti on the wall. MARRIAGE LICENSES Nancy Santos, age 41 of Riverside, will wed Nina Layne,

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age 30 of Riverside. Patsy Morgan, age 65 of Omak, will wed Gale Louie, age 60 of Omak. Tanya Becker, age 21 of Tonasket, will wed Aaron Isaac, age 22 of Linden.

BIRTHS Milagros Sarai Castaneda Cerritos, a girl, was born to Alma Rosa Cerritos and Manuel Castaneda of Tonasket on Wednesday, March 6, 2013

at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash. Jacqueline Lopez Salas, a girl, was born to Margarita Salas Francisco and Maraquias Lopez Sanchez of Loomis on Monday, March 18, 2013 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash. Tristan Joseph Venturo, a boy, was born to Ashley Ranae and Talon Haley Venturo of Republic on Sunday, March 24, 2013 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash.

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 4, 2013

SPORTS

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES

2013 OROVILLE EAGLE HOME MORTGAGE INVITATIONAL

Boys Soccer

Pts: 3=win in regulation or OT; 2=win in PK shootout; 1=loss in PK shootout; 0=loss in regulation or OT.

Caribou Trail League

League Overall Chelan Brewster Quincy Cascade Okanogan Cashmere Tonasket Omak

Pts 15 15 9 9 9 3 3 0

W-L W-L-T 5-0 5-0-0 5-0 7-0-0 3-2 4-3-0 3-3 4-3-0 3-3 4-3-0 1-4 1-6-0 1-5 2-6-0 0-5 0-7-0

Central Washington League

Manson Liberty Bell Bridgeport Oroville

Pts 6 3 3 0

W-L W-L-T 2-0 5-1-0 1-1 5-1-0 1-1 2-3-0 0-2 1-5-0

Softball (fastpitch) Caribou Trail League

League Overall Cascade 3-0 5-0 Brewster 2-0 5-2 Cashmere 2-1 4-2 Chelan 2-1 4-2 Quincy 1-1 4-4 Okanogan 1-2 3-3 Tonasket 0-3 4-5 Omak 0-3 0-8

CWL North Division

League Overall Bridgeport 0-0 3-1 Lk Roosevelt 0-0 0-3 Liberty Bell 0-0 1-2 Manson 0-0 0-1 Oroville 0-0 1-2 Pateros 0-0 0-2

Baseball Caribou Trail League

League Overall Brewster 3-0 4-1 Cashmere 3-0 6-1 Cascade 3-0 3-3 Chelan 2-1 2-5 Okanogan 1-2 4-2 Tonasket 0-3 4-3 Quincy 0-3 3-4 Omak 0-3 1-6

CWL North Division

League Overall Liberty Bell 5-0 6-2 Bridgeport 3-2 4-6 Lk Roosevelt 4-2 5-4 Pateros (1B) 3-3 4-3 Oroville 1-5 1-7 Manson 1-5 1-8

Girls Tennis Caribou Trail League

League Overall Chelan 5-0 6-0 Cashmere 5-0 6-1 Omak 3-2 5-2 Okanogan 2-4 2-4 Tonasket 1-4 2-4 Cascade 1-4 1-4 Quincy 1-4 1-5

Central Washington League

League Overall Pateros (1B) 5-0 6-0 Lk Roosevelt 3-2 3-2 White Swan 3-2 3-2 Entiat (1B) 2-3 2-4 Oroville 1-3 1-4 Liberty Bell 0-4 0-6

Boys Tennis Caribou Trail League

League Overall Chelan 5-0 6-0 Cashmere 5-0 6-1 Tonasket 3-2 4-2 Omak 3-2 4-3 Quincy 1-4 1-5 Cascade 1-4 1-4 Okanogan 0-6 0-6

Central Washington League

League Overall Liberty Bell 4-0 5-1 White Swan 4-1 5-3 Entiat (1B) 3-2 3-3 Pateros (1B) 2-3 3-3 Oroville 1-3 1-4 Lk Roosevelt 0-5 0-5

Schedules, Apr. 4-13 Thursday, Apr. 4 SOC - Oroville at Newport, 1:00 pm Saturday, Apr. 6 SOC - Oroville at Quincy JV, 1:00 pm Tuesday, Apr. 9 BB - Omak at Tonasket, 4:30 pm BB - Oroville at Liberty Bell, 4:00 pm SB - Omak at Tonasket, 4:30 pm SB - Oroville at Bridgeport, 4:00 pm SOC - Omak at Tonasket, 4:30 pm SOC - Oroville at Manson, 4:00 pm TEN - Omak at Tonasket, 4:30 pm TEN - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 4:00 pm TR - Tonasket and Oroville at Brewster Relays (at Bridgeport), 4:00 pm GLF - Manson and Lk Roosevelt at Oroville, 2:30 pm Thursday, Apr. 11 BB - Lk Roosevelt at Tonasket, 4:00 pm Saturday, Apr. 13 BB - Cashmere at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am BB - Pateros at Oroville (2), 11:00 am SB - Cashmre at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am SB - Oroville at Pateros (2), 11:00 am SOC - Cashmere at Tonasket, 11:00 am SOC - Bridgeport at Oroville, 11:00 am TEN - Cashmere at Tonasket, 11:00 am TEN - Oroville vs. White Swan at Eastmont, 4:00 pm TR - Oroville at Cashmere Invite, 12:00 pm

Tonasket, Hornet girls top Oroville Invite By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Tonasket and Oroville’s girls provided the majority of big performances for North Okanogan County athletes Saturday as the Hornets hosted their annual Eagle Home Mortgage Invitatational at Ben Prince Field. The teams were graced by sunny, 65 degree weather, which was a far cry from the mid-30s and rain of recent years. “It’s the best day I can ever remember for weather,” said Oroville coach Harold Jensen. “All of the Oroville trackers had great results.” Tonasket’s girls won team honors with 112 points, with the Hornets second at 83. Okanogan (72) took third before a big drop to fourth place Entiat (46) out of 16 teams. “I was very pleased with how everyone stayed focused and competed well in the meet,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “We had many PRs. After competing against some 4A schools to start the season it was nice to have a meet against our size.” Liberty Bell’s boys (72) edged Republic (71), with Oroville (51) taking fifth and Tonasket (33) finishing eighth. “All of the teams commented on how they like coming to Oroville for a meet,” Jensen said. “This is a direct result of the staff of timers and helpers. “Again, I want to thank Eagle Home Mortgage for their sponsorship and all the helpers coming out and running the meet.” Sierra Speiker hadn’t exactly been slacking on the track the past couple of years, which made her day all that more remarkable as she claimed PRs (personal records) in the 800 (2:30.41 while finishing second) and the 3200 (11:34.0), and was seconds short of making it PR sweep with a 5:28.16 in th 1600. Her times in the 1600 and 3200 were meet records. Her PR in the 3200 also came just minutes after running a leg of the 4x200 relay, in which the Hornets finished third (Kaitlyn Grunst, Sammi Walimaki and Brittany Jewett also running) in 1:59.02. Other event winners for the hosts were Grunst in the high jump (4-10) and Barker in the pole vault (meet record 9-0). Alexa Werner also had a solid day in the shot put (3rd, 29-5); Jewett was third in the javelin (87-8); and Grunst was third in the long jump (14-3.5). Tonasket freshman Rose Walts continued her early-season success with wins in the 100 hurdles (17.31) and triple jump (31-8) and joined with Emily Mills, Jaden Vugteveen and Cassie Spear for a second-place finish in the 4x100 relay (55.44). Mills, who last year posted one of the fastest 200 times in the state and his year is currently ranked #10 in the 1A 400, ran into someone just a little bit faster on Saturday. Northport’s Kassie Guglielmino - defending state 1B champion in the 100, 200 and 400 (as well as the runner-up in the long jump) edged out Mills in the 400 by a tenth of a second (1:02.44) and by a quarter second in the 200 (28.09). Mills also took fourth in the 100 (13.63). “Good competition in all our meets is what makes us better,” Thornton said. “It makes us better and gets us ready for the end of the season. Hopefully this nice

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Emily Mills (right) and Northport’s Kassie Guglielmino - a defending state champ in three events - cross the finish line together at the end of the 400-meter dash at Saturday’s meet. Guglielmino’s lean earned her the win by a tenth of a second. Top (l-r) images are of Callie Barker in the pole vault, Ethan Bensing and Devyn Catone in the 4x100 relay; Luke Kindred in the discus; and Devon Utt in the 800. weather will stay around.” Kylie Dellinger also finished third in the 1600 (5:45.03), Kathryn Cleman was third in the 300 hurdles (55.26), Alissa Young finished second in the discus (8810), Devan Utt placed third in the high jump (4-6), while the 4x400 relay team of Dellinger, Utt, Cassie Spear and Jenna Valentine took second (4:40.44). For the boys, Oroville’s Luke Kindred won the javelin (1573) and was the only competitor in the pole vault (10-0), while Tonasket’s Ethan Bensing won the triple jump (38-8). Other top Oroville finishers were Tanner Smith in the 100 (2nd, 24.71) and 200 (2nd, 24.71); and Smith, Kindred, Charlie Arrigoni and Logan Mills in the 4x100 relay (2nd, 47.56). Other top finishers for Tonasket were Bensing, Dalton Smith, Smith Condon and Devyn Catone in the 4x100 relay (3rd, 47.94); and Dallas Tyus in the high jump (3rd, 5-6) and triple jump (4th, 35-6).

Tonasket and Oroville results (with event winners) Boys

Team - Liberty Bell 72, Republic 71, Cascade 59.5, Bridgeport 52, Oroville 51, Entiat 45, Omak 41.5, Tonasket 33, Manson 26, Soap Lake 18, Lake Roosevelt 13, Okanogan 10, Curlew 7, Pateros 6. 100 Dash - 1. Watson, LB, 11.57; 2. T. Smith, ORO, 11.58; 5. D. Smith, TON, 12.16; 6. Condon, TON, 12.24; 14. Mills, ORO, 12.59; 23. Arrigoni, ORO, 13.34; 26. Collins, TON, 13.54. 200 Dash - 1. Lee, CAS, 24.67; 2. T. Smith, ORO, 24.71; 9. Condon, TON, 26.00; 15. D. Smith, TON, 26.54; 21. Collins, TON, 28.26. 400 Dash - 1. Brown, REP, 52.49; 8. D. Smith, TON, 58.94; 17. Tellez, TON, 1:03.81; 21. Morales, TON, 1:16.07. 800 Run - 1. Varrelman, BPT, 2:13.30; 9. Catone, TON, 2:28.63; 13. Podkranic, TON, 2:41.35; 17. Morales, TON, 2:53.53. 1600 Run - 1. Forsman, REP, 4:45.58; 14. Haney-Williams, TON, 5:48.45; 16. Podkranic, TON, 5:51.00. 3200 Run - 1. Forsman, REP, 10:57.55. No Tonasket or Oroville competitors. 110 Hurdles - 1. Craig, BPT, 16.02. No Tonasket or Oroville competitors. 300 Hurdles - 1. Craig, BPT, 41.52; 6. T. Smith, ORO, 45.18.

4x100 Relay - 1. MANS, 47.52; 2. ORO (Smith, Kindred, Arrigoni, Mills), 47.56; 3. TON (Bensing, Smith, Condon, Catone), 47.94. 4x400 Relay - 1. REP, 3:53.82; 5. TON (Catone, Halvorsen, Polito, Haney-Williams), 4:21.38. Shot Put - 1. Zaragoza, OMAK, 421.5; 8. Palomares, TON, 33-9.5; 10. Mills, ORO, 32-3; 21. Haney, ORO, 27-11.5; 23. DeJong, TON, 27-1. Discus - 1. Vanderholm, MANS, 1301; 11. Palmoares, TON, 92-3; 11. Polito, TON, 92-3; 20. Haney, ORO, 76-1; 23. Catone, TON, 65-8. Javelin - 1. Kindred, ORO, 157-3; 5. Polito, TON, 133-8; 10. Williams, TON, 114-4; 19. DeJong, TON, 104-4. High Jump - 1. Hanson, LB, 5-10; 3. Tyus, TON, 5-6; 7. Mieirs, ORO, 5-0. Pole Vault - 1. Kindred, ORO, 10-0. Long Jump - 1. Watson, LB, 19-3; 6. Bensing, TON, 17-3; 11. Tyus, TON, 16-5; 20. Condon, TON, 14-10. Triple Jump - 1. Bensing, TON, 38-8; 4. Tyus, TON, 35-6.

Girls

Team - Tonasket 112, Oroville 83, Okanogan 72, Entiat 46, Pateros 44, Cascade 36, Northport 35, Lake Roosevelt 24, Bridgeport 24, Omak 23, Republic 19, Almira/Coulee-Hartline 12, Manson 12, Curlew 3, Soap Lake 3, CBSS 2. 100 Dash - 1. Guglielmino, NPT, 13.10; 4. Mills, TON, 13.63; 6. Walts, TON, 14.10; 9. Walimaki, ORO, 14.24. 200 Dash - 1. Guglielmino, NPT, 27.79; 2. Mills, TON, 28.09; 5. Spear, TON, 29.01; 15. Smith, TON, 32.24. 400 Dash - 1. Guglielmino, NPT, 1:02.34; 2. Mills, TON, 1:02.44; 3. Spear, TON, 1:06.85; 10. Ervin, ORO, 1:12.52; 16. Cruz, TON, 1:33.22. 800 Run - 1. Woldridge, ENT, 2:29.51; 2. Speiker, ORO, 2:30.41; 7. Utt, TON, 2:50.10; 14. Valentine, TON, 3:08.00; 17. Naylor, TON, 3:31.00. 1600 Run - 1. Speiker, ORO, 5:28.16; 3. Dellinger, TON, 5:45.03; 11. Valentine, TON, 6:53.00; 12.

Puente, TON, 6:55.00. 3200 - 1. Speiker, ORO, 11:34.00. 100 Hurdles - 1. Walts, TON, 17.31; 6. Barker, ORO, 19.73. 300 Hurdles - 1. Parton, CAS, 51.13; 3. Cleman, TON, 55.26. 4x100 Relay - 1. PTR 55..08; 2. TON (Mills, Vugteveen, Walts, Spear), 55.44; 4. ORO (Barker, Grunst, Walimaki, Jewett), 56.79. 4x200 Relay - 1. OKAN, 1:57.34; 3. ORO (Grunst, Speiker, Jewett, Walimaki), 1:59.02; 6. TON (Smith, Vugteveen, Davisson, Puente), 2:08.50. 4x400 Relay - 1. OKAN, 4:37.15; 2. TON (Dellinger, Spear, Utt, Valentine), 4:40.44. Shot Put - 1. Kilgor, OMK, 31-6.75; 3. Werner, ORO, 29-5; 9. Smith, TON, 25-10.5. Discus - 1. Vanderholm, MANS, 91-5; 2. Young, TON, 88-10; 5. Cervantes, TON, 83-4; 16. Werner, ORO, 66-0; 28. Puente, TON, 42-11. Javelin - 1. Sanford, ENT, 90-2; 3. Jewett, ORO, 87-8; 15. Walimaki, ORO, 66-4; 18. Young, TON, 64-4; 22. Cervantes, TON, 60-1; 28. Alcauter, TON, 45-2. High Jump - 1. Grunst, ORO, 4-10; 3. Utt, TON, 4-6. Pole Vault - 1. Barker, ORO, 9-0; 2. Ervin, ORO, 7-6; 3. Cleman, TON, 7-6. Long Jump - 1. Kelly-Marconi, LR, 14-8.75; 3. Grunst, ORO, 14-3.5; 10. Cleman, TON, 12-5; 13. Davisson, TON, 11-3.5; Vugteveen, TON, 11-3. Triple Jump - 1. Walts, TON, 31-8; 5. Utt, TON, 29-0; 9. Vugteveen, TON, 26-7.5.

League quad at Chelan CHELAN - The Tigers were at an unscored CTL quad at Chelan on Tuesday, March 26. There were no event winners for the boys. Top finishers included Dalton Smith in the 200 (2nd, 59.40); Devyn Catone in the 800 (2nd, 2:29.9); and Dallas Tyus in the high jump (3rd, 5-2) and long jump (3rd, 16-10). Rose Walts won the long jump

(14-9) and teamed with Mills, Vugteveen and Spear to win the 4x100 relay (57.89). Other top finishers were Walts in the 100 (2nd, 13.97) and discus (2nd, 85-8); Mills in the 200 (2nd, 29.82); Dellinger in the 400 (3rd, 1:09.23); Utt in the 800 (2nd, 2:52.28); Utt in the long jump (2nd, 13-3); Vugteveen in the triple jump (3rd, 24-5); and Alissa Young (3rd, 84-7) and Yasmin Cervantes (4th, 80-7) in the discus.

Tigers travel to Ephrata EPHRATA - Tonasket’s track teams traveled to Ephrata on Saturday, March 23, to compete in the 30-team Ray Cross Invitational. The Tiger boys finished 22nd, while the girls were 16th. Top finishers for the girls included Cruz in the 100 (9th, 13.96); Dellinger in the 1600 (10th, 5:54.92); Utt in the high jump (4th, 4-10); and Walts in the triple jump (7th, 31-9.75). The boys were led by Bensing in the triple jump (5th, 39-1) and Tyus in the high jump (10th, 5-4).

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Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close City of Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth has declared Earth Day as the date of annual Spring Clean-up. Residents may schedule pick-ups by contacting City Hall at 476-2926. Pickup date is Monday, April 22nd. For collection information contact City Hall at 476-2926. The Mayor and City Council are encouraging all residents and property owners to take pride in our community by participating in the Spring Clean-up. Take advantage of this opportunity to cleanup your neighborhood.

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APRIL 4, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A11

SPORTS

Tiger softball rebounds By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Two days after a big defeat at Okanogan, the Tonasket softball time seemed none the worse for wear as the Tigers came out swinging in a 12-5 non-league victory over Liberty Bell on Thursday, March 28. Tonasket took the lead in the second as Vanessa Pershing and Carrisa Frazier led off with singles. Selena Cosino drove in Pershing for the go-ahead run with an RBI groundout, and Sadie Long followed with a run-scoring single. Courtesy runner Shyane Lewis later scored on a wild pitch. “We really didn’t see anything bad coming from Tuesday (the loss to Okanogan),” said Tonasket coach Emily Rimestad. “The girls knew what they needed to work on in practice, and tonight we came out ready to enjoy playing the game. I thought that really showed.” The Tigers put the game away with a fiverun fourth inning, highlighted by Jenny Bello’s run-scoring single and Amber Monroe’s RBI double. The Tigers also got some solid defense, particularly from Cosino in center field on a pair

Republic downs Oroville softball team on the road

of throws to home plate that nearly cut down Mountain Lion baserunners, and Pershing at first base. Long had two hits, scored twice and had an RBI; Courtney Jones scored two runs; Bello had a pair of hits, and Monroe had two hits two lead the Tigers. Long was the winning pitcher, allowing eight hits and three walks while striking out six. The Tigers (4-5, 0-3 Caribou Trail League), who lost 15-0 and 13-0 at Chelan on Saturday, next play Tuesday, April 9, at home against Omak.

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Okanogan 30, Tonasket 0 OKANOGAN - The Tigers got a big wakeup call in their first Caribou Trail League game of the season, but Rimestad said she liked the way the team responded to a 30-0 defeat to Okanogan. “The girls got their eyes opened,” she said. “That was not what they were expecting. But it was the first game they’d actually played together as a team. They kept their attitudes up and didn’t give up.” Rimestad was encouraged that the Tigers

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Vanessa Pershing makes a grab at first base during the Tigers’ victory Thursday. came away from the game with specific things they learned. “They didn’t come away feeling like losers,” she said. “They saw what they needed to work on and were able to express it. In a lot of ways it was encouraging.”

Tough week for Oroville soccer squad By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - After a rough week on the road, the Oroville boys soccer team had hoped to end an early-season skid on Saturday, March 30, in a rematch with the Moses Lake C squad that the Hornets beat two weeks ago. It looked good for a half as the Hornets took a 2-0 lead over the Chiefs. But after Oroville was unable to take advantage of several scoring opportunities, Moses Lake stormed back with five goals in the fina 30 minutes of play to defeat the Hornets 5-2. “We really just ran out of steam,” said Oroville coach Mike Pitts. “The boys played well, other than a couple of miscommunications on defense that cost us. “We had a lot of great opportunities and kept the pressure on them, especially in the first half. We had a couple that we couldn’t punch in, and if we had been up four at halftime it would really have changed the game.”

As

Abe Capote scored both of the Hornets’ goals, with Daniel Castrejon assisting on the first. The second goal was unassisted. The Hornets kept the pressure on in the second half as well, earning eight corner kicks and twice grazing the right post with close-in shots. But Moses Lake was able to take advantage of the Hornets on several counterattacks that led to three quick goals midway through the half that seized the game’s momentum for good. “Like I said, I thought we played well,” Pitts said. “This one will hurt a bit, though, because it was a game we looked forward to, and we had the lead.” The Hornets (1-5) have a Spring Break road trip to Newport on Thursday, April 4, and travel to Quincy two days later to take on the Jackrabbits’ JV squad.

Liberty Bell 6, Oroville 1 TWISP - The Hornets, playing without Pitts and a player who received red cards during

“(Assistant coach) Tony Flores said we played pretty well,” Pitts said. “Right now we’re about where they were two years ago, with a really young team, first year with eighth graders, just starting to find our way. So we’re hoping to show similar progress as we go.” EZ Layata scored on a penalty kick for the Hornets.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s EZ Layata heads the ball goalward during Saturday’s 5-2 loss to Moses Lake. the Hornets’ loss to Bridgeport earlier in the week, put together a solid effort against the Mountain Lions in a 6-1 loss on Thursday, March 28.

Bridgeport 14, Oroville 0 BRIDGEPORT - Six cards, including two of the red variety, made for a tough outing for Oroville as the Hornets lost 14-0 at Bridgeport last Tuesday. “It was a rough game on all of us,” Pitts said. “I thought both teams played tough, but in the end Bridgeport was the better team.” The two red cards made for automatic one-game suspensions. Pitts said he didn’t think Bridgeport received any card in the game. “Hats off to their players,” he said.

REPUBLIC - Oroville’s softball team took to the road for the first time this season, falling 13-3 in a non-league contest at Republic on Thursday, March 28. Oroville coach Dane Forrester said that a late arrival at Republic’s field led to the Hornets not having enough time for pre-game warm-ups. “That contributed to some of our defensive errors,” Forrester said. “We did have some good defensive play as Cruz Ortega

caught a pop fly to left field, stopping two runs from scoring, and Faith Martin tagged (a runner) out at first base.” The Hornets started the game with Rachelle Nutt, Tosca Pickering and Marissa Garcia all stealing bases in the first inning. Nutt and Pickering each scored runs in the fifth. “I’m proud (the girls) didn’t give up even when Republic was ahead,” Forrester said. The Hornets (1-2) open Central Washington League North Division play at Bridgeport on Tuesday, April 9.

Hornet baseball forced by darkness to wait for win By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Oroville’s baseball team, winless the past two seasons, must wait a little longer for its first victory of the season. Leading the second game of their doubleheader on Friday, March 29, the game was called due to darkness with the Hornets

leading Manson 18-5. Five innings needed to be completed for the game to be declared official. It will pick up where it left off when Oroville travels to Manson on April 16, prior to the regularly-scheduled game that afternoon. The Hornets (0-7, 0-5 Central Washington League North) lost Friday’s first game, 12-2.

YOUTH WRESTLING Oroville Killer Bees Submitted by Chuck Ricevuto TWISP - It might have been the smallest tournament of the season but it sure had diverse competition: Liberty Bell, Naches, Cashmere, Chelan, Omak, Brewster, Pateros, Tonasket, Okanogan, Wenatchee, and the Killer Bees from Oroville made for about 100 kids or so that finished early at about 1:30. Here is how the Killer Bees finished: Pre-School and Kindergarten: Isaiah Ocampo (2nd place);

Shawn Marranger (3rd); Ivan Morales (4th); and Kane Booker (4th). Second Grade: Travis Darrow (2nd place). Third and Fourth Grade: Sergio Ocampo (2nd place); Julian Lopez (3rd); Oscar Cervantes (3rd); Kolo Moser (4th); Shane Marques (4th); Victor Ocampo (4th). Fifth and Sixth Grade: Seth Baugher (champion); Bradon Thompson (2nd place); Colby Guzman (2nd); Sergio Ocampo (2nd); Sam Allenby (3rd); Chris Worell (3rd); Brigido Ocampo (4th); Ronnie Glover (4th); and Trevor Marques (4th).

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PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 4, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE POOL LEAGUE BANQUET

OBITUARY

Richard “Dick” Wisener

RICHARD ‘DICK’ WISENER Richard “Dick” Wisener, age 93 of Oroville, died March 28, 2013 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. He was born January 25, 1920 in Peaceful Valley, Washington. Dick attended school in Spokane then moved as a young man to Republic. He worked there at Black’s Beach and the Republic mine. In 1947 Dick moved to Oroville, working for several businesses, the primary being a telegrapher with the Great

Northern Railroad, which he retired from in 1982. On May 24, 1953 Dick married Patsy Roselius in Oroville. Dick enjoyed hunting, fishing and horseback riding and was a member of the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Posse, the Oroville Catholic Church, a Charter member of the Oroville Golf club, a Charter member of the Border Aerie Eagles of Oroville, Tonasket Eagles, and he was the oldest member of the Oroville American Legion, He was preceded in death by his wife Patsy, son Dick, grandson Scottie Roan and brothers Bob and Ed Wisener. Dick is survived by his son Ronald (Sue) Wisener of Oroville and daughters: Patty (Ron) Harp of Sacramento, Calif. and Cathy (Chuck) Roan of Bonney Lake, Wash., as well as seven grandchildren. Mass of Christian Burial will be held Thursday, April 4, 2013, at 10 a.m. at the Oroville Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, with Father David Kuttner officiating. Interment with military honors will follow at the Molson Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the Oroville Catholic Church or the charity of your choice. Please share your memories of Dick by signing his online guestbook at www.berghfuneralservice.com.

CCC presents Livin’ for Spring Music Fest TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket will be presenting the Livin’ for Spring Music Fest on Saturday, April 6, starting at 7:00 p.m. This event will be the second Spring Concert Series of the year. Three different bands will be performing on this night. Refreshments will be available by donation. “The Randy Battle Bluz Band” will include the following performers: Lota Duarte, Linda Pruitt, Ray Dispenza, Pat Liley, Randy Battle, Ed Matel, and Kyle

McConnell. “Bonsai Sequoi”î will feature Leo Brett and Jason Emersly “Ruby Rust” musicians Denny Richardson and Mike Bowling will be joined by Steve Pollard and Steve Bell. This will be a fun evening of dancing to rhythm and blues, rock and roll, including some oldies, both slow and fast. There will be plenty of seating for the listeners, also. Cost is $6.00 for members and $7.00 for non-members For more info, call 486-1328.

The Pool League banquet is Wednesday, April 10 at the Oroville Eagles. This year, The Brew Crew, pictured here at the Shop Tavern, won again.

Submitted photo

County has significant problem with DUIs SUBMITTED BY JUDGE HEIDI E. SMITH OKANOGAN COUNTY DISTRICT COURT

OKANOGAN - Beginning this fall, Okanogan County District Court is set to launch a DUI Court, a specialized treatment court with the goal of targeting repeat drunk drivers. In a recent 12 month study, 313 people in Okanogan County were charged with DUI. Of those charged, 78 had two or more prior DUI charges, 31 had three or more prior DUI charges, and 27 had four or more prior DUI charges. Many of these repeat offenders also have a history of alcohol related and/or domestic violence charges. Clearly, we have a significant problem with chronic drunk drivers in this county and our traditional approach to sentencing has not been effective enough in reducing recidivism. The goal

of the DUI Court is to improve public safety by addressing the underlying cause of these offenders’ behavior: alcohol and/or drug addiction. DUI Court participants will be regularly tested for alcohol and drug use, subject to random home visits, required to appear weekly in court, required to have jobs or perform volunteer work, and receive incentives for doing well and sanctions for not living up to their obligations to themselves and our community. Accountability is only half the strategy; participants also receive long-term, rigorous treatment. This combination of close supervision and intense treatment has been proven to get repeat offenders to stop drinking and driving. Due to a generous grant from the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, our DUI Court team recently attended national training developed by the National Center for DWI Courts

in Newport Beach, California, where we joined teams from Louisiana, North Dakota, New Mexico, and Colorado. Okanogan County team members include Judge Heidi Smith, treatment professionals Nancy Barnes and Dan Boyle, defense attorneys Mike Prince and Dustin Burke, Deputy Prosecutor David Gecas, District Court Administrator Sandra Ervin, Probation Officer Carrie Port, and OCSO Sargent Tony Hawley. At the four day training, we learned evidence based practices for operating our DUI Court. Topics ranged from psychopharmacology, assessment and screening tools, treatment models, community supervision methods, sanctions and incentives, ethics, court development, program evaluation, and strategies for sustaining the court financially. As part of the training we visited a DUI Court in action and

saw firsthand the transformation that is possible when the criminal justice system takes a team centered approach to drunk driving. The next steps in our planning process are to visit the DUI Court in Spokane and continue developing our policies and protocols, with the aim of starting a pilot DUI Court this October. While our large, rural county does present some practical challenges for us, our team is enthusiastic and committed to finding solutions to improve outcomes for DUI offenders and create a safer, healthier community. An ambitious goal, but we have to start somewhere.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 04, 2013  

April 04, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 04, 2013  

April 04, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune