Page 1

Tonasket 5th Graders earn

EASTER EGG HUNTS

trophy at Math is Cool regional

Saturday in Oroville and Tonasket See Community Bulletin Board, page A6.

See Page A4

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.Gazette-Tribune.com | thursday, MARCH 28, 2013 | 75 Cents NEWSSTAND PRICE

Run for the Border gets council nod Reports on pilots conference, Oroville veterans memorial By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE – Stan and Tina Janowicz appeared before the Oroville Council at their Tuesday, March 15 meeting to ask their support for the 11th annual Run for the Border motorcycle ride. The charity ride, which can attract upwards of 300 riders, begins in Wenatchee and travels the 150 miles to Oroville, arriving around 1 p.m. “This year it will be Saturday, May 18 on Armed Services Day, the Columbia River Harley Owners Group lost their chapter for awhile because Wenatchee Harley went out of business, so we are a little behind in planning,” said Tina Janowitz, adding that the chapter had started working with a Yakima dealer who took on the event. “We are working with two Christian groups in raising money for their causes,” added Janowitz from Okanogan, who coordinates the ride with her husband Stan. They asked for support and assistance from the city as it has in the past. “We’d like some assistance with parking and help with the cones,” she said. After saying the city would again support the event, Mayor Chuck Spieth asked Police Chief Clay Warnstaff had any comment. “Just that we look forward to

TSD stands pat on program

PRINCIPAL ON THE ROOF

them coming,” said Warnstaff.

By Brent Baker

Representing City Airports Leroy Orr reported on his recent attendance at the Washington Pilots Association Conference and Trade Show. Orr, a member of the OkanoganFerry County Chapter from Tonasket, helped to represent the chapter at an information booth at the conference. The local chapter includes eight public use airports, including seven in Okanogan County and one in Ferry County. “About ten to 12 thousand people come through there,” Orr said. “Our info booth is to show people our area. We have lots of literature from pretty much every corner of the area.” He added that he was always amazed at how many people don’t know where Okanogan County is. “They say things like… ‘you mean you have mountains here’ and ‘you mean all your airports are paved.’ They think we have dirt runways,” Orr said. Orr said those that dropped by the booth were interested in things like recreation and real estate guides and were looking for things like hanger building sites. “We have three new hangers moving into Tonasket just this year,” Orr said. “It’s something for Oroville to think about. Retired people bring in Seattle dollars; they don’t need jobs, they just spend (money).” He said that his group gave out seven boxes of local apples on Saturday. “These people are just really interested in our area, these

See COUNCIL | PG A2

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Photo by Steffi Fuchs

Oroville Elementary Principal Joan Hoehn and her dog Sadie on the roof of the elementary, as part of her students’ reward for reading over 6000 books during the Principal’s Challenge. This year’s theme was “Raise the Roof.” Hoehn sent award certificates down from the roof with a fishing pole. Other rewards included a dance, called the Jam in the Gym, and Nerd and Neon Day. For more on this year’s Principal’s Challenge see page 3.

NVH prepares to move forward after day in court By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - A full day in court on Tuesday, March 19, resulted in a pair of favorable outcomes for the North Valley Hospital Board of Commissioners, which according to board chairwoman Helen Casey will allow the board to begin moving forward with finalizing the closure of the district’s Assisted Living facility. In a pair of separate hearings in the Okanogan County Superior Court, the Concerned Citizens for Tonasket Assisted Living’s request for an injunction to temporarily halt the closing was denied, and a petition from Rosa Snider and Danny Gratrix requesting the recall of the entire board of commissioners was withdrawn. The hospital was represented by attorney Mick Howe during both hearings. Casey said that the hearing requesting the injunction went through the full process. “It was a matter of due process, of presenting your case and being prepared,” she said. “Basically (the ruling was) that we were doing what was right as far as the process. There are people that want

to find something different. But when two or three discussions with the judge you look at the total picture, the hospital about whether they should go forward or acted in accordance with all of the proper not, and they chose to withdraw. Once he procedures to do what we were doing. called the hearing to order, he was very “(Superior Court Judge Henry) explicit that once they withdrew they Rawson was very fair to both sides,” could not go back.” Casey added. “He Casey said that, for said he saw things for those wanting changes both sides. It appeared in the makeup of the as though he’d read board, there was still all the materials and of opportunity “I’m very concerned for plenty was well-prepared. I for that to happen with thought it was handled how this has affected two seats up for elecwell, regardless of the this fall. our community. We’re tion“There outcome.” are opportuFor the recall hearnities to get involved trying to do what’s ing the prosecuting in these decisions,” she right.” attorney prepared a said. “That’s the way, if synopsis of the alleyou’re willing to make Helen Casey NVH Board of Commissioners Chair gations to present to the time commitment, the court, which was that you can make a then ruled upon by the difference. judge. “I’m very concerned “Mr. Rawson for how this has affectwas very clear in the process of how it ed our community. We’re trying to do worked, the ramifications both financial what’s right. It’s right that people have and for outcomes, and he explained it to the ability to make these decisions (to both sides. oppose the closing), but you need to have “There was some conversation, about all of the facts.”

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune Volume 109 No. 13

See ScHOOL | PG A2

City moves forward with improvements By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE – Since Oroville will be making improvements to Central Avenue and Cherry Street the city has planned to replace some old water line under the streets at the same time. Toward that end the city has hired the firm, Shea, Carr and Jewell Inc. to engineer the water line replacement as part of the overlay of Central and Cherry Street. During the process the city will also be making improvements to the handicap ramps along the sidewalks. “We want to do the waterline improvement at the same time the streets are being fixed. The actual construction of the line is within the amount we budgeted for,” Rod Noel, Superintendent of Public Works told the Oroville Council at their last meeting. “Most of the design is finished, the street part that is. There are two projects, some of the sidewalk cuts will require the fire hydrants be moved. This will save us money on the water project because the ramps are part of the street project and will be picked up under the federal tab.” Noel said the ramps are being changed because of new codes that

only allow single ramps on corners in very limited situations. The state is now going with two ramps, one on each side of the corner that enter into crosswalks, rather than the street. “The design of the water portion of the project is moving along, I think it will be done shortly,” said Noel. Varella and Associates, the city’s engineers, has asked the council whether they would like the firm to do a study on Oroville’s Utility Rates and on their ERU levels and to ask if the county would like to participate. The study would look at the East Lake area for grants for low to moderate income people that would like their residences hooked up to the sewer system. “If there was no funding that Varella would not charge a fee for doing the study. The last census says there are low to moderate income families in the city, but does not survey income on either side of the lake,” said City Clerk Kathy Jones. The council met in a closed-door executive session after they were asked to reconsider an appointment to the ambulance crew that the mayor had turned down last month. After the council returned they voted to continue to support the mayor in his decision.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket School Board members said they had never received as much feedback on an issue as they had over the potential elimination of the family consumer science vocational program at Tonasket High School. For the second consecutive school board meeting, the board room was filled with parents, students, staff and community members defending the value of the program and asking that a way be found to avoid cutting it in lieu of expanding the agricultural science program. Superintendent Paul Turner and high school principal Jeff Hardesty had approached the board about making the change, citing dwindling numbers in the family consumer science program, a backlog of interest in FFA and agricultural biology, and the need for greater flexibility in the schedule that the expanded ag program could provide. That, in turn, was part of a response to a mandate given by the board in February that the administrators seek creative ways to get the district back to a full school day (40 minutes longer than it has been for about 15 years) while dealing with fewer resources than had been anticipated when a two-year plan to lengthen the day was originally put into place. The meeting opened with a public hearing at which about 10 people spoke about the positive effects the program has had on the lives of students and their families. That, along an equal number of speakers at the previous meeting, dozens of emails and personal contacts with school board members advocating for the program, had the board unwilling to make the change at this time, particularly on such

Schools/Sports A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Valley Life A6

Sports A7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Police Stats Obituaries

A10 A10


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 28, 2013

School | FROM A1

Submitted photos

Command of the Northern Desert Composite Squadron is transferred from Maj. Barry Corson (left) to Maj. Vickie Scholla (right). Lt. Col Tom Green, Washington Wing Vice Commander for Eastern Washington looks on (center).

Major Scholla assumes command of local Civil Air Patrol Squadron Submitted by Armando Tirado CAP NDS Public Affairs Officer

OMAK – Major Vickie Scholla assumed command of Civil Air Patrol’s Northern Desert Composite Squadron during a change of command ceremony held on Tuesday, March 19 at the Omak High School Library. Maj. Scholla took command from Maj. Barry Corson, who had served as squadron commander since January 2012. During the ceremony the squadron charter was handed from Maj. Corson to Maj. Scholla, symbolizing the transfer of command of the squadron. Presiding this event was Lt. Colonel Tom Green, CAP Washington Wing vice commander for eastern Washington. Also present was Lt. Col. Clay Shepherd, Northeast Area Commander for Washington Wing. Col. Shepherd presented Maj. Corson the Civil Air Patrol Command Service Ribbon and the CAP Achievement Award

Jerry Asmussen. “There’s been a lot of other things outlined.” “So do we put this off for a year? I that’s where we want to go, that’s fine, I just want some direction.” Olson suggested a work session to explore the questions and alternative suggestions made. “So many of the decisions we are asked to make are difficult, and we don’t get a lot of feedback,” Olson said. “So hearing from you guys is great; there are many things that need public attention.” “Maybe it could be not only saved, but enhanced,” Caton said. “I’m going to take that directive, basically delay it and keep it on the burner,” Turner said. “We need to address doing some things to make it robust, look more at getting those numbers up.” “At the work session, one thing we need to look at is these numbers,” Olson said. “This was your recommendation because the numbers were down. So, why are they down? We can’t make this decision unless we further understand why this trend is here.” Sequestration, enrollment to hit budget Across-the-board federal cuts to school funding will trickle down to local school districts as well. Turner said that Tonasket will take at hit of somewhere between five and 15 percent to its Title funding, which means somewhere between $70,000 and $200,000. “It’s the federal government’s way of saving cuts and saving their behinds by not having to vote on it,” Turner said. “That’s

my opinion, anyway. At any rate, they made the cuts. So there’s another cut coming our way, and it’s coming from our federal school grants.” That cut will go into effect for the 2013-14 school year. Stangland said she had been told at a recent conference that those cuts were likely to be permanent. Additionally, March enrollment numbers were down, which will necessitate further reducing next year’s projected budget. “We’re looking at possibly reducing our budget by about 10 kids,” Turner said. “It’s down this year from where we were at the beginning of the year, and we’re anticipating lower yet in the fall.” This year’s budget was based upon a projected enrollment of 1,040 students but had been near 1,070 at the beginning of the year. The March enrollment number came in at just under 1042. Also, state funding issues have not been put to rest despite last year’s court ruling that mandated full funding of K-12 education. “The good news is there was no downward turn in forecast state revenues,” Turner said. “The way it’s going they probably won’t have the budget finalized until June, so again we’ll be stuck trying to figuire out our budget without knowing what’s coming from the state.” Stangland said that it was key that community members express to their legislators their opinions on state education funding. “They tend to listen to who they get the most feedback from,” she said. “Writing a couple of sentences, that’s something that will get read.”

Council | FROM A1 guys looking for places to go for recreation,” he said. Orr said that all the chapter asks from the cities with airports is money to cover their expenses – gas, food and hotels.

Roley Clark from the local American Legion Post updated the council on the plans for a new Veterans Memorial at the city’s Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park. He, along with Oroville

High School Senior Hailey Scott and Rod Noel, Oroville’s head of the park’s department, discussed various locations where the memorial might be built in the park. They have decided it will be near the flag pole and an existing memorial along the highway. The memorial will include a 12 foot high wall with wings on each side of the wall. On the wall will be placed the names of veterans engraved on copper leaves which will be made at the high school. The leaves on the smaller memorial currently in the day park will be moved to the wall and 130 plus

additional names will be placed there as well. “The names are all of local veterans,” said Clark. “People can contact members of the Legion Post or the school to get a name on the wall. The students are making the leaves with the names and the benches.” Scott is doing the project as her senior project this year. The ongoing project will be picked up by various seniors in the future, according to Clark. “We’d like to at least get the concrete wall, which will be tiled, up this year,” Clark said.

OKANOGAN – An Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Deputy returned fire after a man who is suspected of killing his own father opened fire last Thursday evening. Deputies were called to 56 East Dry Coulee Road around 8:20 p.m. regarding a possible assault. “When the Deputy arrived two adult females ran out of the residence and reported that shots had been fired inside the residence.

Inside the residence still was the father and son. Information at the scene was that the father had been shot by the son,” said Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers. The Okanogan County Special Response Team was called to the scene and they attempted to communicate with the occupants of the residence, according to the sheriff. “When entry was made to res-

cue the victim, shots were fired by the suspect. The suspect was shot by law enforcement,” said Rogers. The suspect was transported to Mid-Valley Hospital. “The father had been fatally wounded by his son and was pronounced dead at the scene,” said the Sheriff. The incident is being investigated by the Chelan County Sheriff ’s Office.

Veterans Memorial at Park Cadet Haley Little from the Northern Desert Composite Squadron in Omak is promoted to Cadet Master Sergeant. Awarding is Lt. Col. Clay Shepherd, Northeast Area Commander for Civil Air Patrol’s Washington Wing. try. The Northern Desert Composite Squadron was chartered on 12 May 2005 and is the

Cadet Nathan Rawson from the Northern Desert Composite Squadron in Omak is promoted to Cadet Senior Airman. Awarding is Lt. Col. Clay Shepherd, Northeast Area Commander for Civil Air Patrol’s Washington Wing. for his leadership as squadron Commander. In addition to the actual change of command, three youngsters were promoted and received awards that night. Haley Little was promoted to the rank of Cadet Master Sergeant and receivedthe Charles Lindbergh Ribbon. Nathan Rawson was promoted to Cadet Senior Airman and received the Mary Feik Ribbon. Also, Ruth Ingram was promoted to Cadet Airman First Class and received the General “Hap” Arnold Achievement Ribbon. All these cadet awards are named after distinguished people in the aerospace indus-

short notice. No motion to make a change was made, and it’s likely that any final decision won’t be made in time to make any changes for the 2013-14 school year. Each of the board members expressed their unwillingness to make the decision at this time. “People have come up with some very good ideas that maybe we need to explore before we decide to cut the program,” said Lloyd Caton. “I’m not sure that we’ve done enough work on our end to be able to make a decision. Some of these schedule changes and alternative routes need to be examined. “I have not made up my mind. It’s important to the students, but the dollars and cents I understand as well.... But if we don’t have this program, where are the students going to get what they need?” “I’m nowhere near ready to vote,” said Ty Olson. “I have lots of questions. Budget questions. Cause and effect questions. A lot to be asked.” “I’m not ready either,” said Ernesto Cerillo. “I was excited that so many people expressed their opinions,” said Catherine Stangland. “Usually getting a couple of letters is significant, but we got about 40 or so.... I’m also not ready to vote. And if that means we take our time to go over this over the next year, then I think we need to do that.” Turner asked for direction. “I’m not willing to be forced into a decision just to get it done,” Stangland said. “I think the board will be more comfortable with it depending on the alternatives that are explored,” said board chairman

only CAP unit in the Okanogan and is part of the all civilian, all volunteer U.S. Air Force Auxiliary. The squadron has adults, called senior members that train in various emergency services and

aerospace education tasks. It also offers a cadet program for youth ages 12 to 18. Civil Air Patrol, the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with more than 61,000 members nationwide, operating a fleet of 550 aircraft. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary  role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the  Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 80  lives annually. Its volunteers also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug  interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to 27,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet programs. CAP received the World Peace Prize in 2011 and has.been performing missions for America for 71 years. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit  www.gocivilairpatrol.com or www.capvolunteernow.com for more information.

Police say man killed his father


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 28, 2013

SCHOOL | FROM A1

Submitted photos

Command of the Northern Desert Composite Squadron is transferred from Maj. Barry Corson (left) to Maj. Vickie Scholla (right). Lt. Col Tom Green, Washington Wing Vice Commander for Eastern Washington looks on (center).

Major Scholla assumes command of local Civil Air Patrol Squadron SUBMITTED BY ARMANDO TIRADO CAP NDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER

OMAK – Major Vickie Scholla assumed command of Civil Air Patrol’s Northern Desert Composite Squadron during a change of command ceremony held on Tuesday, March 19 at the Omak High School Library. Maj. Scholla took command from Maj. Barry Corson, who had served as squadron commander since January 2012. During the ceremony the squadron charter was handed from Maj. Corson to Maj. Scholla, symbolizing the transfer of command of the squadron. Presiding this event was Lt. Colonel Tom Green, CAP Washington Wing vice commander for eastern Washington. Also present was Lt. Col. Clay Shepherd, Northeast Area Commander for Washington Wing. Col. Shepherd presented Maj. Corson the Civil Air Patrol Command Service Ribbon and the CAP Achievement Award

guys looking for places to go for recreation,” he said. Orr said that all the chapter asks from the cities with airports is money to cover their expenses – gas, food and hotels.

Sequestration, enrollment to hit budget Across-the-board federal cuts to school funding will trickle down to local school districts as well. Turner said that Tonasket will take at hit of somewhere between five and 15 percent to its Title funding, which means somewhere between $70,000 and $200,000. “It’s the federal government’s way of saving cuts and saving their behinds by not having to vote on it,” Turner said. “That’s

Roley Clark from the local American Legion Post updated the council on the plans for a new Veterans Memorial at the city’s Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park. He, along with Oroville

additional names will be placed there as well. “The names are all of local veterans,” said Clark. “People can contact members of the Legion Post or the school to get a name on the wall. The students are making the leaves with the names and the benches.” Scott is doing the project as her senior project this year. The ongoing project will be picked up by various seniors in the future, according to Clark. “We’d like to at least get the concrete wall, which will be tiled, up this year,” Clark said.

Cadet Haley Little from the Northern Desert Composite Squadron in Omak is promoted to Cadet Master Sergeant. Awarding is Lt. Col. Clay Shepherd, Northeast Area Commander for Civil Air Patrol’s Washington Wing. try. The Northern Desert Composite Squadron was chartered on 12 May 2005 and is the

only CAP unit in the Okanogan and is part of the all civilian, all volunteer U.S. Air Force Auxiliary. The squadron has adults, called senior members that train in various emergency services and

aerospace education tasks. It also offers a cadet program for youth ages 12 to 18. Civil Air Patrol, the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with more than 61,000 members nationwide, operating a fleet of 550 aircraft. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 80 lives annually. Its volunteers also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to 27,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet programs. CAP received the World Peace Prize in 2011 and has.been performing missions for America for 71 years. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit www.gocivilairpatrol.com or www.capvolunteernow.com for more information.

OKANOGAN – An Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Deputy returned fire after a man who is suspected of killing his own father opened fire last Thursday evening. Deputies were called to 56 East Dry Coulee Road around 8:20 p.m. regarding a possible assault. “When the Deputy arrived two adult females ran out of the residence and reported that shots had been fired inside the residence.

Inside the residence still was the father and son. Information at the scene was that the father had been shot by the son,” said Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers. The Okanogan County Special Response Team was called to the scene and they attempted to communicate with the occupants of the residence, according to the sheriff. “When entry was made to res-

cue the victim, shots were fired by the suspect. The suspect was shot by law enforcement,” said Rogers. The suspect was transported to Mid-Valley Hospital. “The father had been fatally wounded by his son and was pronounced dead at the scene,” said the Sheriff. The incident is being investigated by the Chelan County Sheriff ’s Office.

Police say man killed his father

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my opinion, anyway. At any rate, they made the cuts. So there’s another cut coming our way, and it’s coming from our federal school grants.” That cut will go into effect for the 2013-14 school year. Stangland said she had been told at a recent conference that those cuts were likely to be permanent. Additionally, March enrollment numbers were down, which will necessitate further reducing next year’s projected budget. “We’re looking at possibly reducing our budget by about 10 kids,” Turner said. “It’s down this year from where we were at the beginning of the year, and we’re anticipating lower yet in the fall.” This year’s budget was based upon a projected enrollment of 1,040 students but had been near 1,070 at the beginning of the year. The March enrollment number came in at just under 1042. Also, state funding issues have not been put to rest despite last year’s court ruling that mandated full funding of K-12 education. “The good news is there was no downward turn in forecast state revenues,” Turner said. “The way it’s going they probably won’t have the budget finalized until June, so again we’ll be stuck trying to figuire out our budget without knowing what’s coming from the state.” Stangland said that it was key that community members express to their legislators their opinions on state education funding. “They tend to listen to who they get the most feedback from,” she said. “Writing a couple of sentences, that’s something that will get read.”

High School Senior Hailey Scott and Rod Noel, Oroville’s head of the park’s department, discussed various locations where the memorial might be built in the park. They have decided it will be near the flag pole and an existing memorial along the highway. The memorial will include a 12 foot high wall with wings on each side of the wall. On the wall will be placed the names of veterans engraved on copper leaves which will be made at the high school. The leaves on the smaller memorial currently in the day park will be moved to the wall and 130 plus

Veterans Memorial at Park

AUCTION

Saturday, April 6 at the Oroville American Legion 5:30pm Food 6:30pm Auction

Jerry Asmussen. “There’s been a lot of other things outlined.” “So do we put this off for a year? I that’s where we want to go, that’s fine, I just want some direction.” Olson suggested a work session to explore the questions and alternative suggestions made. “So many of the decisions we are asked to make are difficult, and we don’t get a lot of feedback,” Olson said. “So hearing from you guys is great; there are many things that need public attention.” “Maybe it could be not only saved, but enhanced,” Caton said. “I’m going to take that directive, basically delay it and keep it on the burner,” Turner said. “We need to address doing some things to make it robust, look more at getting those numbers up.” “At the work session, one thing we need to look at is these numbers,” Olson said. “This was your recommendation because the numbers were down. So, why are they down? We can’t make this decision unless we further understand why this trend is here.”

COUNCIL | FROM A1

Cadet Nathan Rawson from the Northern Desert Composite Squadron in Omak is promoted to Cadet Senior Airman. Awarding is Lt. Col. Clay Shepherd, Northeast Area Commander for Civil Air Patrol’s Washington Wing. for his leadership as squadron Commander. In addition to the actual change of command, three youngsters were promoted and received awards that night. Haley Little was promoted to the rank of Cadet Master Sergeant and receivedthe Charles Lindbergh Ribbon. Nathan Rawson was promoted to Cadet Senior Airman and received the Mary Feik Ribbon. Also, Ruth Ingram was promoted to Cadet Airman First Class and received the General “Hap” Arnold Achievement Ribbon. All these cadet awards are named after distinguished people in the aerospace indus-

short notice. No motion to make a change was made, and it’s likely that any final decision won’t be made in time to make any changes for the 2013-14 school year. Each of the board members expressed their unwillingness to make the decision at this time. “People have come up with some very good ideas that maybe we need to explore before we decide to cut the program,” said Lloyd Caton. “I’m not sure that we’ve done enough work on our end to be able to make a decision. Some of these schedule changes and alternative routes need to be examined. “I have not made up my mind. It’s important to the students, but the dollars and cents I understand as well.... But if we don’t have this program, where are the students going to get what they need?” “I’m nowhere near ready to vote,” said Ty Olson. “I have lots of questions. Budget questions. Cause and effect questions. A lot to be asked.” “I’m not ready either,” said Ernesto Cerillo. “I was excited that so many people expressed their opinions,” said Catherine Stangland. “Usually getting a couple of letters is significant, but we got about 40 or so.... I’m also not ready to vote. And if that means we take our time to go over this over the next year, then I think we need to do that.” Turner asked for direction. “I’m not willing to be forced into a decision just to get it done,” Stangland said. “I think the board will be more comfortable with it depending on the alternatives that are explored,” said board chairman

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MARCH 28, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Rodeo queens seeking help with grounds project BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Steffi Fuchs/Submitted photo

Oroville Elementary School students celebrated winning their Principal’s Challenge with a Jam in the Gym, as well as other rewards for having read more than 6,000 books during February.

Oroville Elementary students raise the roof SUBMITTED BY JOAN HOEHN

OROVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL

OROVILLE - It is said that March comes in like a lion, but at Oroville Elementary School it was February that went out with a roar - a roar of reading that is. Students at the elementary school have just completed the 13th annual Principal’s Reading Challenge. Every February since 2001, students have been asked to work together to achieve a reading goal set by the teachers and the principal. The goal has usually been a specific number of books, but we don’t stop there. Oroville students have to utilize their reading time to help make an impact on their reading ability. We ask them to read “just right” books, those that are neither too hard nor too easy. For our students in grades 2 - 6, their scores on standardized reading tests determine this. Every student has a reading range assigned to them, and they need to choose books within that range (or above it) to read for the Principal’s Challenge. We’re rather picky about our Principal’s Challenge, you see, and we ask that students not only read books that are just right for them, but that they also understand what they read, so students must take and pass an Accelerated Reader quiz with 80% correct for each book to count for the challenge. That’s why it’s a challenge! This year, we asked students to read 6,000 books in February. In keeping with our yearlong school theme “Raise the Roof!” Principal Joan Hoehn offered to spend a day on the school roof if students could meet the challenge. Mrs. Hoehn, who is not a big fan of heights, will have a desk set up on the roof one day this spring and work from the roof using a laptop computer and a cell phone to help her keep up with the work of a principal. For some time this month, it looked like she wouldn’t have to go up on the roof, but our students finally got into a good reading routine the final two weeks of the month. Kindergarteners and first graders were allowed to have books and quizzes read to them, so there

Steffi Fuchs/Submitted photo

OES students enjoy their “Jam in the Gym” last week. was a lot of cooperation between the lower grades and the upper grades. Along the way to the goal of 6,000 books, there were some mini-goals for students. At 1,500 books, Mrs. Hoehn sat atop a dog house in the foyer of the elementary school and read “The Principal’s on the Roof,” an early chapter book by Elizabeth Levy about a principal who promised to read to students from the roof of the school if they met their reading goal. Meanwhile, 5th grade teacher John Ragsdale, who is a wonderful craftsman, built a small roof that we could raise as students read more and more books. A book went under each corner of the roof for every 400 books read. The roof rose from tabletop height past the base of the window in the office as students’ reading raised the roof 16 times. On the very last day of the Challenge, students finally surpassed the goal, reading a grand total of 6,496 books! Students also earned Tin Roof

Sundae ice cream when they had completed 2,500 books. They will have the opportunity to “Raise the Roof ” with sound on March 12 when the five students from each grade level who read the most words on the way to 3,500 books get to choose songs (with teacher approval of lyrics) for a mini-music jam. As a reward for 4,500 books, students built and decorated graham cracker houses. This and their regular classwork, will help them get ready for state testing and complete classroombased assessments. Thursday, March 21, Mrs. Hoehn spent the day on the roof. The teachers and staff of the elementary school want to thank all the parents who encouraged their children to read during February, the many volunteers who came in for testing and special reading days, and especially all the wonderful community members who voted to approve our special levy. You have literally helped to “raise the roof ” and we are so grateful.

TONASKET - Two Tonasketbased rodeo queens are asking area rodeo fans for help in completing their combined senior project on Tuesday, April 2, beginning at 9:00 a.m. Karlie Henneman (Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo Queen) and Breanna Howell (Omak Stampede Rodeo Queen) will be pulling nails, drilling screws and painting the grandstands at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds. “We are in need of a lot of help,” Henneman said. “Anyone is welcome. There will be lunch (burgers and hot dogs) provided for everyone that helps.” She added that hammers, sanders and safety glasses would be helpful as well. “We’re planning on getting all we need done in one day,” Henneman said.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Omak Stampede Queen Breanna Howell (left) and Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo Queen Karlie Henneman, both Tonasket High School seniors, are joining forces for their senior project to spiff up the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds on April 2. For more information, contact Karlie Henneman at (509) 8464776 or khenneman13@yahoo.

Tonasket Library holds volunteer luncheon SUBMITTED BY MIRIAM CADDY

TONASKET - The Tonasket Library Board held their annual volunteer appreciation† luncheon on Wednesday, March 13 at the Kuhler in Tonasket. The board members present were President Gretchen Harris, Secretary Diane Allstot, Treasurer Evie Duncalf, Publicity Chair Miriam Caddy, and Leanne Peterson. Tonasket Librarian Meg Lange was also present. The invitations go to those volunteers who help with the twice yearly book sales put on by the Tonasket Library Board. Proceeds from the winter book sale funded the purchase of a new copier that is used by both staff and library patrons. The next book sale will be held during Founders Day weekend in June. Donations of books can be accepted until the last week in May. The library provides guide-

Submitted photo

Those attending the Tonasket Library volunteer appreciation luncheon included (l-r) Jane Thompson, Meg Lane, Linda Parker, Loreen Felstet, Cathy Mantello, Janet Askew, and Diane Allstot. Other guests not pictured were Norm Dahlquist, Suzanne Dailey Howard, Gloria Jones, Bob Thompson, Claire Jeffko, and John Williams. lines for donations. Their number is (509) 486-2366. Librarian Meg Lange also presented framed certificates of

TONASKET - The Tonasket Community Scholarship Fund is seeking contributions from businesses, organizations and individuals interested in supporting the program. The community-based program has been providing scholarships to graduating seniors from Tonasket High School for more than 50 years. It provides an incentive to students to continue their education and reach their goals. Historically, over 70 percent of Tonasket High School’s graduates have moved on to continue their

education. The scholarship program provided more than $10,000 in scholarships last year, ranging from $350 to $1,600 for individual students. “We realize with the rising costs of education it is even more important to raise funds for our seniors,” said Tonasket Community Scholarship Fund secretary/treasurer Susan Williams in a letter to local businesses. There are about 60 seniors in Tonasket’s Class of 2013 and the scholarship committee is hoping

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TONASKET - Teresa Hawkins expressed her concern over the resignation of varsity basketball coach Glenn Braman during the public comment portion of the Tonasket School Board meeting on Monday, March 12. Hawkins, wife of longtime varsity football coach Jay Hawkins, said she was concerned that the direction of the school district concerning its coaches was taking an ugly turn. “I’m concerned with the resignation of coach Braman,” she said. “I’m concerned because my husband is also a coach. I’m not comfortable with how that came about.” Hawkins said she had heard secondhand remarks attributed to a school board member that fed into her concern. “I’m hoping the school board acts as a board, and not on individual agendas,” she said. “I hope we’ve learned from the process that went down. “I think it’s sad if we let a group of parents who are upset or who have a vengeance with a coach from a long time ago to come in and rally people up to make a decision to not reinstate a coach. I think it would be really sad if we have to go around the community to bring in support to show that a coach has just as many people, and more, (supporting him) as those who complained 50 about him.” Citing her experience as a coach’s wife and as a mother of an athlete coached by others, Hawkins said that athletics teaches kids to deal with adversity, but that parents encourage that growth. “We want the situation to be perfect for our kids,” she said. “But what do we teach them when we run to every need they have? “(Coaches) love the game, they’re competitors, and they want to teach kids to work together, to go out in life and be successful. Kids can’t be successful if their parents don’t let them grow as individuals. That’s a part of athletics. Nothing is going to be perfect.” Hawkins said she was concerned that situations that contributed to Braman’s resignation, as well as rumors about her husband’s position, could damage the reputation of the district. “People want to come to this district,” she said. “It’s because of you guys (the school board) up here. You have done a great job of keeping this school district as one of the elite. “Don’t ruin that. Don’t let that happen, you guys.” In other business, superintendent Paul Turner read a proclamation from Governor Christine Gregoire honoring classified school employees.

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Kaylee Clough performs Glow”90 at the Variety Show andmonths Auction presented(56 by Dollars 26 months (112 issues) only“The $54 13 issues) only $30 for Scholars and the Oroville High School Music Department on Wednesday, March 14 in the high school commons. The eight-year-old has been taking ballet for five years and recently performed at the Seattle Dance Workshop Competition and took a silver medal. The annual talent show is used to raise funds for the Oroville Dollars for Scholars Continuing Education awards. For more from the event see page B2.

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The council authorized Councilwoman Jill Vugteveen and Danison to make a final decision to move forward, with TONASKET - The Tonasket City a priority on creating a “straight shot” Council provided updates on a num- from one end of town to the other along ber of civic projects that are progress- at least one side of the road with ADAing through their planning stages at the approved curb access ramps. The airport runway seal project’s tarTuesday, March 13, council meeting. Tonasket city planner Kurt Danison get schedule is for completion before the said he met with three property owners Father’s Day Fly-in. Meanwhile, the council granted public affected by the need for an easement to complete the Mill Drive/Bonaparte works director Bill Pilkinton a leave of Creek sewer project and said that they absence of indefinite length and appointseemed to be willing to provide the ease- ed Hugh Jensen as acting public services director. ment access. “They’re willing to provide easement through their property so we can connect up the sewer through there,” Danison said. “They were under the impression that water was included in this... I don’t Police Chief Robert Burks said that know how it came about... I don’t think we said we were going to put in a water he is working on a policy governing the department’s handling of data collected system there. “I think they walked away with a better during video surveillance. Burks also announced that officer understanding.” The council planned an open house Audra Fuller passed her civil service for March 20 for residents to interact exam and has been hired as a full-time with the engineers and councilmembers officer. Burks said he is finalizing a “wish on the sewer project committee. The council also responded to a memo list” to be submitted for Stonegarden Varela and Associates seeking to clar- describing how potential grant money ify priorities on the upcoming street would be used. Stonegarden grants proimprovement projects that had been dis- vide money for local law enforcement cussed at a previous council meeting. entities to use while assisting in U.S. The project was facing a delay without Border Patrol operations, although any such a prioritization as funding for the equipment purchased is not limited to those operations. project may not be enough to complete In County, home delivery “Oroville was able to get an SUV the entire “wish list.” “We want the (hospital parking cross- through Stonegarden grant money,” ing) beacon as the base project,” said Burks said. “This is the initial part of the Mayor Patrick Plumb. “The rest we will process that we do every year. We don’t have done as we have the funding to SEE COUNCIL | PG A3 complete.”

Concern expressed over coaches resignation

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City’s engineers seek to clarify priorities regarding upcoming street improvement projects

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appreciation to recently retired board presidents John Williams and Claire Jeffko for their years of service.

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Crimes Detectives. He was booked into the Spokane County Jail on the charge of felony assault. Motta, who was in critical condition at Sacred Heart Hospital, died of his injuries on March 15. Information Officer Chamberlain speculated that the charges against Lewis would be upgraded to Mail to: second degree murder by the Spokane County Prosecutor’s office, but as of Monday they were still listed as first degree assault. When Motta came to Oroville in 1981 to take his first principal’s job he was just 34-years-old and stayed here for four years, according to his good friend Don DeVon, who served under Motta as a high school councilor in Oroville, as well as in Palm Desert, Calif. DeVon described Motta as a “highly innovative” educator who always had an open door policy to students, staff, parents and the community in gen-

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 28, 2013

SCHOOLS / SPORTS Youth wrestling set for final tournament this weekend at Liberty Bell Oroville Killer Bees Submitted by Chuck Ricevuto

Submitted photo

Tonasket Elementary School’s fifth grade Math is Cool team celebrates its fifth-place trophy (raised in background) after regional competition in Wenatchee on March 15. Additionally, Cheyenne Stirik (front, with ribbon and trophy) finished fourth out of 124 students in individual competition and advances to the state finals in May.

Tonasket 5th graders earn math trophy By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket Elementary’s School’s first foray into Math is Cool competition earned a group of 20 fifth graders a fifth place trophy at regional competition on March 15. Additionally, Cheyenne Stirek earned a fourth place finish individually to earn a spot at state competition later this spring. Principal Jeremy Clark and Kari Alexander took the group to regional competition in Wenatchee, where they competed against 31 teams overall, including 10 in their own size classification. “This was the first time we’ve done a competition like this,” Clark said. “And it’s the first academic trophy in this arena that I’m aware of. It was awesome. The kids were pretty pumped up.” The team also included Emma Alexander, Rielan Bretz, Cody Clark, Joseph Coleman, Heidi Cruz, Maria Garcia, Erica Good, Benjamin Johnson, Sheyann Labelle, Kyle Martin, Tiler Morris, Makayla Ramsey, Trenton Sams-Knapp, Lyndzi Scott, Alexis Swanson, Hunter Thomas, Kason Tibbs, Raegan Timm, Angelina Wilson and Steven Zandell. Competing in groups of four, the kids demonstrated their aptitude through an individual writ-

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Tonasket results Submitted by Dave Mitchell

Tonasket had a good tournament at Okanogan last weekend. Participants and placers: Kindergarten: Colton Wilson (2nd place); Austin Bell (2nd); Logan Stucker (2nd); Caysen Clark (3rd); Walker Bell (4th); Tyge Plank (4th); Kase Denison (4th). Also wrestling were Gabe Ray, Zion Tillman. First and Second Grade: Everett Peterson (1st place); Deakon Taylor (2nd); Lyle Long (2nd); 3rd- Walker Ayers (3rd); Keenan Denison (3rd); Kenny Thompson (3rd); Tyce Hirst (4th); Aaron Polito (4th); Dylan Bebee(4th). Also wrestling were Gus Ray, Aiden Smith, Dakota Clough, and Evan Vanatta. Third and Fourth Grade: 1stCarson Sasse (1st place); Tyson Knapp (1st); Tyler Wirth (1st); Collin Silverthorn (1st); Clay Buchert (2nd); Josh Bello (2nd); Lane Bolich (2nd); Waylon Thomas (2nd); Waylon Wilson (2nd); Riley Vanatta (3rd); Ryden Harden (3rd); Brandon Wirth (4th). Also wrestling were Jeremy Wirth, Ben Good, and Blake Peterson.

Fifth and Sixth Grade: Chris Rivera (1st place); Isaac Chaska (1st); Trenton Knapp (2nd); Carson Walton (3rd); Garrett Wilson (3rd); Enrique Sandoval (3rd); Ian Vanatta (3rd). Also wrestling was Derek Hollister.

Killer Bees at Chelan CHELAN - It was good to see the southern teams from Cashmere, Eastmont, Wenatchee, Cascade, and a whole slew of kids from Chelan. This is the one tournament where Oroville, Tonasket, Liberty Bell, Okanogan, Omak, Brewster, and Pateros get to rumble with the southern grapplers. Killer Bees finished as follows: Pre School and Kindergarten: Kane Booker (1st place). Also wrestling - Oscar Morales First and Second Grade: Travis Darrow (1st place); Riley McCoy (4th place). Also wrestling -Tommy Spikes and Sarah Mathis. Third and Fourth Grade: Shane Marques (1st place); Victor Ocampo (2nd place); Julian Lopez (3rd place); Oscar Cervantes (4th place), Taylor McCoy (4th place), Kael Harris (4th place). Also Wrestling Thomas Verellen, Kolo Moser, Sergio Ocampo, Cody Field. Fifth and Sixth Grade: Colby Guzman (2nd place). Seth Baugher (3rd place), Trevor Marquese (3rd place), Chris Worrell (3rd place), and Jaxon Rise (3rd place).

Submitted/staff photo

Tonasket Elementary School students competed at the Math is Cool regionals in Wenatchee on March 15. ten test of 40 questions, a “mental math” round, team relay, and a Knowledge Bowl-type competition where teams go head to head with a problem presented and the first to answer correctly earning team points. “It’s pretty complex advanced stuff,” Clark said. “A lot of it, the kids haven’t been exposed to yet in the classroom. It’s a great advanced math opportunity.” Clark said that the team prepared with about six nights of after-school practices. “Mrs. Alexander and myself went through practicing each event,” Clark said. “We really had

to work on advanced math strategies. “The kids represented the district extremely well, both in terms of their academics and their behavior, which was top notch. They were great representatives for Tonasket and the school district. I was very proud of them.” Stirek earned her state finals spot by taking fourth place out of 124 individual competitors. She’ll travel to Moses Lake on May 18 for state competition. Meanwhile, a group of fourth graders, led by Scott Olson, will travel to their own regional competition in April.

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OKANOGAN - Andy Knutson and his Okanogan crew run a smooth tournament that was done around 2:00. Mostly northern teams and a handful of wrestlers from Chelan made for some good grapplin’. Killer Bees wrestlers finshed as follows: Pre-school and kindergarten: Lance Fox (2nd place); Ivan Morales (3rd); Kane Booker (4th). Also wrestling was Isaiah Ocampo. First and Second Grade: Travis Darrow (1st place); Alex Delrosario (2nd). Also wrestling were Tommy Spikes, Koda Hirst, and Sarah Mathis. Third and Fourth Grade: Kolo Moser (2nd place); Shane Marcques (3rd); Oscar Cervantes (3rd); Victor Ocampo (4th); Kael Harris (4th); Julian Lopez (4th). Also wrestling were Thomas Verellen and Daegan Harris. Fifth and Sixth Grade: Seth Baugher (1st place); Brigido Ocampo (1st); Colby Guzman (2nd); Sam Allenby (2nd); Jaxon Rise (2nd); Ronnie Glover (3rd); Taralin Fox (3rd); and Bradon Thompson (3rd); Trevor Marques (4th). Next Saturday the Killer Bees travel to Liberty Bell High School for the final tournament of the season. Trophies will be awarded to the best wrestlers in their respec-

YOUTH WRESTLING

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Many succession plans include a buysell agreement. Upon your death, such an agreement could allow a business partner or a key employee to buy the business from your surviving spouse or whoever inherits your business interests. To provide the funds needed for the partner or employee (or even one of your children) to purchase the business, an insurance policy could be purchased.

If you have employees, you might want to investigate a SIMPLE IRA or even a 401(k) plan. Your financial advisor, working with plan design professionals and your tax advisor, can help you analyze the options and choose the plan that fits with your combined personal and business Your estate plan — including your will and any living trust — should address what happens with goals. the business, in case you still own part or all of Now, let’s turn to business succession plans. it at your death. The best-laid succession plans Ultimately, your choice of a succession plan may go awry if the unexpected occurs. strategy will depend on many factors, such as the value of your business, your need for the All these business succession options can be proceeds from the sale of the business for your complex, so before choosing any of them, you retirement, your successor, and how well your will need to consult with your legal and financial business can continue without you. If your goal advisors. is to keep the business within the family, you’ll need to consider how much control you wish to Whether it’s selecting a retirement plan or a retain (and for how long), whether you wish to succession strategy, you’ll want to take your time gift or sell, how you balance your estate among and make the choices that are appropriate for your heirs, and who can reasonably succeed your individual situation. you in running the business. You work extremely hard to run your business Many succession planning techniques are — so do whatever it takes to help maximize your available, including an outright sale to a third benefits from it. party, a sale to your employees or management (at once or over time), or the transfer of your This article was written by Edward Jones for use business within your family through sales or gifts by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. during your life, at your death or any combination thereof.

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MARCH 28, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

THE TOWN CRIER

Senior Projects giving back to the our communities

Look around your communities and you’re bound to see a program, that although somewhat controversial at first, has grown into a real positive for our towns. We’re talking about the senior project programs at Tonasket and Oroville. Through the efforts of our schools there have been many great community improvements led by our senior high school students. Although we might not always see them, some of these projects really stand out like the scoreboards at the Bud Clark Ballfields in Oroville, a project taken on by a couple different seniors over the years. Now we have a senior student who wants to refurbish the “Welcome to Oroville” lettering on the Welcome Gate as you enter downtown. Another Oroville senior is putting her efforts into a new, larger veterans memorial at the city’s aptly named Osoyoos Out of Lake Veterans Memorial Park. There are benchMy Mind es at city hall, a sign fabricated from metal by Gary A. DeVon another senior at Centennial Park, as well as the directional sign there. An Oroville student also arranged for the Challenge Day and another added her name to those have who have put on the high school career fair at the school each year. Other projects maybe aren’t as visible as, say, the new paint on the Oroville Police Station and Fire Hall, but are just as important. These projects, although still hands on, are more organizational. A Tonasket senior student helped with the Green Okanogan eWaste collection last year. That project helped to round up 10 full-size pallets of old computers and computer monitors. The valuable metals in this electronic waste will be recycled and some of the more toxic metals, like lead, won’t be reintroduced to the environment. A couple of other Tonasket senior students will be tackling a project at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds. They plan on having a work day where volunteers will be pulling nails at the grandstands and replacing them with screws. Along with the projects, seniors need a certain number of volunteer hours as well. That might include setting up chairs for a meeting or helping a non-profit group with one of their own projects. We say that at first the senior projects with their “volunteer” hours were considered controversial by some. But where a few schools like Tonasket and Oroville were early adopters of these types of programs, many states have also made them part of the graduation requirements. So, if these things are requirements for graduation, “how can they be considered volunteer hours?” some people asked. Maybe they aren’t strictly volunteer when they need these hours must be completed to graduate, but they are improving our communities and they are exposing our students to what it means to be a volunteer. With our busy lives many people still find time for things like the Tonasket Kiwanis, American Legion, Royal Neighbors, Rodeo Clubs, Booster Clubs and other church, fraternal and volunteer organizations that strive to do good in our communities. Perhaps by giving our soon-to-be graduating students a taste of what it’s like to volunteer and to give back to the communities that have so generously supported them through tax dollars and encouragement, we are teaching them a valuable lesson that will make them better citizens. Whether you call it “do unto others” or karma, maybe in turn they will play it forward and become the next council or school board member, firefighter or Kiwanian or Royal Neighbor, and give back wherever their lives take them.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Hastings out of touch Dear Editor, Reading the column “Now is the time to build the Keystone XL Pipeline” (March 14, 2013) by U.S. Representative Hastings two weeks ago in your paper reminds me how out of touch he is with our community. His column lectures us on the need for the Keystone pipeline project. A few weeks ago your paper ran an article about the Tonasket School District not having enough funds to return to a full student day. Rep. Hastings writes about the jobs Keystone will create. I have heard that the sequester will cost at least one position in each of the school districts in our valley. For many weeks we have been reading about the economic problems of our Hospital District to the point they are closing the extended care facility. Instead of writing in the paper what he thinks we should support I wish our representative would read the paper and know that we are struggling. I’m sure big oil is able to give more money for reelection than struggling members of our community. We need elected leaders who care about citizens not just big business. Thank you, Scott Olson Tonasket

Accident waiting to happen Dear Editor, Ten seconds (or less) is all it takes a vehicle to come around the curve from the south to the fancy new (Whistler Canyon) trailhead entry to Highway 97. A loaded horse trailer behind a pickup takes how long to go from stop to the proper lane on the highway? I don’t like the thought of more bodies on the highway to pull out of the oncoming traffic! People coming from the south especially have no warning or way to avoid this problem as it stands. The very law of physics shows it a real disaster waiting to happen. This I know and I cringe as traffic flies by for me to be a witness to the very set up in which an innocent driver took out my husband under these same circumstances 17 years ago. It seems logical there should be some serious warning signs and speed slowede for this otherwise death trap! I’ve been there. In God we trust, Betty Roberts Oroville

Can’t name savings Dear Editor, Okanogan County Court Judge Rawson ruled against the Citizens Group of Tonasket Washington, and denied our petition for a Permanent or Temporary Injunction to keep the Assisted Living in Tonasket open. It was stated that the Hospital Board and Hospital CEO and the Senior Management Team of Hospital District #4 had not committed any

illegal acts. The Judge could not rule in our favor on the high emotions of the residents and the families involved. At the last Hospital Board Meeting the CEO, the Commissioners, and the Senior Managers were asked what their projected savings would be by closing the Assisted Living. This question was asked several times and we received no reply. After March 31st, when North Valley Hospital turns the homes of the 28 residents into office space, (oh, but they don’t really know what they are using the building for) I hope all the Senior Managers, get an office with a view. My Mom’s room (305) only had a view of the parking lot but the sun shines nicely through the window in the afternoon. These leaders of North Valley Hospital were not found to have done anything illegal, but they most certainly have done something morally wrong. As I am moving my Mother out of town I will try to keep my emotions in check. Kathy Rawley Tax Payer Citizen of Public Hospital District #4

A study in contrasts Dear Editors, I don’t know if you guys were at the hearings for Hospital District #4 but the audience was a study in contrast. One side of the room was the defense with their smug smiles and dressed to kill happy to be there on the taxpayers dime, including their attorney. The other, mostly elderly with the run of the mill community members that have to work for a living in obvious distress trying to regain control of a their insubordinates and keep their elders home. Regardless of what the hospital commissioners have be trying to shove down the public’s gullet there is some obvious mismanagement, neglect and what a perfect example of waste, Just what were the managers doing there?! But lets not forget the abuse. The abuse of public funds the abuse of public trust and now the abuse of the public system. I commend the petitioners for not falling for the trap and taking the financial hit for not doing so. And for heaven sake Administration, go to work or get out! Maybe if your look less days off, cut down on your management retreats and “training’s” you could get some work done! Or if your need that much “training” move over and let some-

one competent get the job done! You know there’s another public system you can live off and get free training that wouldn’t cost the tax payers quite so much money and so many services. There seems to be more than one kind of wolf we have to worry about in this county and they obviously run it packs too. Lyle Massey Tonasket

Raises unconscionable Dear Editor, I can no longer remain quiet on the issue of the Assisted Living closing in Tonasket. After sitting back and observing and reading about what is taking place at the hospital, I feel compelled to address the hospital board and all the high paid administrative staff. To all of you I have only one question: How do you sleep at night? It has been no secret that finances are not adding up at this facility for some time. The warrants continue to drag out, and yet the top nine paid positions have received over $288,000 in raises in the past two years? What ever happened to the old mantra that those at the top bear the ultimate responsibility? Everyone demands this of our country’s president, why not CEO’s, and other top officials in publicly financed institutions? I think all of you are responsible for this mess, and to take pay raises to already high salaries in a time of fiscal crisis is unconscionable, and a disgrace. You should all be very ashamed of yourselves, and if you had any class or honor at all, you would submit your resignations immediately. You owe the taxpayers of this county nothing less. Another thing that defies understanding is the creation of a new position that draws a $91,500.00/year salary, the Ancillary Director. What on earth is that position, and why did it get created and funded, again during a time of fiscal crisis? At a time when most people in your county are struggling to just make ends meet, taking huge salary increases, then claiming there was no alternative to closing the Assisted Living facility, just makes me sick. Again, you are all a disgrace to our community. If you wish to respond to me in person, my number is in the phone book, and I would welcome your response. Rick Braman Oroville

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

75 YEARS AGO March 18-25, 1938: Mrs. Effie Coulton, sixth grade teacher in the Oroville Schools, has asked for a temporary leave of absence from her duties to be with her mother, Mrs. J. P. Brinnon of Hillyard. Mrs. Coulton was called to Hillyard by the sudden illness and death of her father. The home talent play, “Patsy Strings Along,” which was to have been given some time ago by the Adult Dramatic Club of the Oroville PTA, for the benefit of the soup fund, sponsored by the organization, is to be given Friday night. The 1937 real and personal property taxes of the Washington Water Power Company in Okanogan County, amounting to $18,179.59 were paid this week. Checks totaling $42,608.07 in payment of the property taxes of The Great Northern Railroad were distributed to the Okanogan County Treasurer. The movie “Heidi” will be shown, starring Shirley Temple and Jean Hersholt, at the Osoyoos Theater. (The writer recalls seeing that movie as a member or the sixth grade class). An advertisement for the 1938 Hudson 112 states that “it is the new lowest priced car through and through”. This vehicle is delivered here for $836.00 and is fully equipped and includes transportation cost and federal taxes paid. Grocery items at Ike’s Grocery include Spuds, US#1 100# for $95; 5# pail of syrup, $.39; Meyer Prince’s Store, 2 cans of oysters, $.25; Corn Flakes, $.07 per pkg; heavy duty work shoes, $1.75 per pair; sanforized overalls, $.98; Ben Prince’s Store, Pink salmon, #.11 per can; large can Tuna, $.16; large Grade A eggs, 2 doz, $39. Tonight, at the grade school auditorium, the Adult Dramatic Club of the PTA will do their stuff in the home talent play, “Patsy Strings Along”. The play is being given to abolish the debts incurred by the PTA in serving hot lunches to the school children for the past winter. An advertisement for a 1938 Ford V/8 coupe states a price of $794.02 with a 60HP engine delivering 22 o 27 miles to the gallon. This price includes transportation charges and federal taxes. This car also include 2 bumpers, 4 bumper guards, spare wheel with tire, 2 matched electric horns, cigar lighter and ash tray, heat indicator, foot

control for headlights with beam indicator, built in luggage compartment with lock, silent helical gears and two windshields as required by Washington State Law.

50 YEARS AGO March 21 - 28, 1963: The “Highlands Hist-orical Sites Committee” met at the “HEE_HEE STONE March 13. Plans were made to make the shrine of Indian worship accessible to visitors. As it is now, entrance is gained by crawling through a barbed wire fence. This fence will be moved back to create a small park site with some sort of decorative fence along the road with an entrance sign. Ellivoro Rebekah and Oddfellows honored Kathleen Anderson, Jacquie Watson and Elizabeth Newcomb on March 18. Kathleen gave her talk to the 75 present. Her speech won for her the alternate position in the final contest held in Tonasket last March 16. A group of business men and interestED parties of the community met at the high school last Thursday evening to form a corporation to be called the Oroville Community Development, Inc. Purpose of the organization, as stated by Robert Drummond, chairman for the meeting, is to promote the economic development of the Oroville area, which has bee declared as a distressed area. Having this organization would enable local new businesses to gain access to low cost economic loans. A meeting of the Board of Education of Oroville was held to organize the new board. Two new members, Ted Thorndike and Wes Rogers, will be attending their first meeting. The remaining members, Kem Smith, Clayton Emry and H. Ben Holden are experienced school directors. A board chairman and clerk will be elected on April 2. Bill Ecklor is the new May Day Chairman along with new secretary-treasurer, Novelyn Claiborne. Oddfellows recommended that a new bar-bque pit be constructed with schools permission. All organizations were asked to continue with their past participation. Weather Wise: Marge Frazier, official observer, reports the following for the past week; March 20, 60 degrees maximum and 45 minimum; March 21 - 67 and 37; March 22 - 66 and 45; March 23 - 61 and 42; March 24 - 68 and 35; March 25 - 58 and 35 and March 26 - 61 and March 29. A total of .26 inches of rain was recorded

on March 23 and .08 inches on the March 24. Congressman Walt Horan has introduced a bill authorizing the construction and reclamation of the Whitestone-Coulee Unit of the Chief Joseph Project.

25 YEARS AGO March 17 – 24, 1988: Oroville Chamber of Commerce President, Mark Donoghue, presents the prospective May Day Royalty. This year’s hopefuls are; Stacey Sawyer, Bernadine Wildermuth, Dana Kernan, Alicia Pickering and Jacki Montgomery. The “Third Time’s the Charm!” Tonasket’s School District voters have passed a special two-year levy after two previous attempts. As of late Tuesday night, the levy had gathered 888 “yes” votes for a 65.4% of those voting. “No” votes totaled 467. Scott Taylor, Stacey Sawyer, Kim Lyonais and Shana Allen prepare a few of the 682 pizzas sold for the German-American Parntership Program to raise money to go to Germany in August for one month. The Oroville Kiwanis Club is celebrating its 40th year of serving the community of Oroville. The club was chartered on March 12, 1948 with 25 members, some of whom are still active in the club at this time. Tom Dull is one of the original charter members with perfect attendance for that entire time THAT IS DEDICATION! Florence Kelly was named Citizen of the Year at the Oroville Chamber of Commerce awards banquet held on March 21. “Spring into Action” was the theme of the banquet and Kelly, who is the chamber treasurer, has been known to do just that whenever it come to chamber or any of the many committees she quietly serve on. Stacy Sawyer will reign supreme as Oroville’s May Day Queen for all of the May Festival’s festivities. Queen Stacey and her court, which is made up of two princesses, Dana Kernan and Bernadine Wildermuth, were chosen at a Selection Night last Thursday, March 17. The Tonasket Tennis Teams look to be in fine shape for the ‘88 season. With nearly thirty young men and women turning out, the Tigers will go into the upcoming season in excellent condition. “We’ve only lost three players from last year” Coach Gary Garner stated, “and still have 30 kids turning out.


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 28, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Are you ready for Easter Services? Tomorrow is Good Friday and in two days it’s Easter. Are you getting up for Sunrise services? Faith is how you know where you’re going; Hope is what keeps you going, Love is how you get there. So, the smoke has cleared and a new Pope, Francis, has been selected. Signs of Spring: Baby calves lying around in pastures, while some are real frisky and not thinking even about lying down. Colorful flowers trying their best to bloom, even tho the temperatures still remain sorta cool. High school kids out running, getting in shape for track, tennis and other summer sports. And the many spirals of smoke coming from the bonfires, from folks who are anxious to get things ship shape…is it legal to burn? So many rules these days, some okay and some not. Kinda seems like there are too many people out there lookin’ after us, but then what do I know?

Seen all kinds of weather this week by Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

It has been quite calm on the Hilltop this past week. The biggest happening has been the weather. We have had snow, rain and wind. Sometimes it was all three at the same time. On the feel better or get well list this week are: Pauline, Holly, Vivian, and Barbie. Willie Penner is doing well. After all the tests they could give her, the results were - they could not find any-

How are you getting ready…? by Audrey Holmes Club Correspondent

On March 11 at 1:30 p.m. members meet at the Hillside Apartments for their meeting. There were three guests attending from Tonasket - Lenise Brauer, Debbie Hackett and Anita Alumbaugh. The Roll Call was “How are you getting ready for your spring plantings?” A Thinking of You card was signed and sent to former mem-

We are all looking forward to spring By Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day to you all! Now that is behind us. We are looking forward to spring. I noticed that the plants are coming into the stores, so it must be almost here. However, I hear they are still getting a smattering of snow in the Highlands. Potlucks will be on the second Sunday of the month.. While there are people here playing cards every Sunday, you are more than welcome to get acquainted and share some fellowship and

Spring Quarter begins at NVCS By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

We’re back in business for Spring Quarter, starting with First Aid/CPR on April 8. There are 41 classes from which to choose, and you’ll see some new and different offerings. Six classes will be held in Tonasket. Catalogs are in stores now, and you can’t miss the bright green color. You’ll see a newly

Comancheros Dinner Auction

Submitted by Sue Wisener

Tonasket Eagles 3002

Warmer weather is getting here. Hope that you have started those seedlings in the house; it is almost time to plant soon. The fishing season is almost upon us also, so get those fishing poles and tackle boxes dusted off and ready. Our annual scholarship raffle drawing is approaching soon so make sure to get in and buy a raffle ticket. The drawing is for $400 for either gas or groceries. We would like to thank you to

I know that it took the greater part of a day to defrost, clean and replace things in our freezer. And once again I promise to not fill it with “stuff ” that seems important at the time, and then in a few months throw it out. And now, I THIS & THAT have a long handled duster to Joyce Emry clean the blades on the ceiling fan. Does it work? I’ll let you know later, but it sure looked good in the magazine. You’d be surprised how the dirt collects on those blades. I made my tall, great grandson promise not to tell anyone how much dirt had accumulated, after he cleaned ours.

HILLTOP COMMENTS thing. What will happen now with the Pinochle Season coming to an end? There is only one more week for those faithful players on Monday night in Molson. The winners this past week on March 18th with 36 players were: Low Cleta Adams and Doug Knight, High - Wayne Adams and Vivian Emery and Everett Turner took the Traveling award. Another event on our Hilltop that will be ending for sever-

TONASKET GARDEN CLUB ber Ivetta Howell whose husband Gene passed away on March 1. Ivetta was a past president and a very active member for many years. Vice President Lola Burton called a Work Party at her home for 9 a.m. on Tuesday, March 26 to work on crafts and bring new ideas for Founder’s Day and the Spring District Meeting on June

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS snacks with them. Regulars are: Delores Hogue, Larry Smith, Lani Thompson, Beverly Holden, Ed Craig, and Betty Steg. The following is a recipe from Betty Roberts via Betty Steg: it is called 3 2 1 Cake.These individual little cakes are amazing and ready to eat in one minute! They are perfect for whenever you feel like a treat without all the fat and calories. A great idea! 1 box Angel Food Cake Mix and 1 box Cake

LEARNING TREE designed cover and inside format. Take one, it’s free! There are new businesses in Oroville and Tonasket and both are advertised in the catalog. Look for the Great Northern Market in Oroville and Hidden Talents in Tonasket. Both are unique, exciting additions to our community. The Market offers organic produce, international

TONASKET EAGLES all that showed up Saturday for Peggy Burton’s benefit dinner and auction. The money raised will help her greatly. Bingo will be happening this Friday at 7 p.m., so break out those daubers and come and play. The kitchen will also be open at 5:30 p.m. for hamburgers and more, so come and get one. This Saturday is the annual Comancheros Steak dinner and auction, it will be a good time so come and eat and check out the

Do you always think you have enough clothes hangers but still don’t? Maybe we just have too many clothes. Yes, I am in a cleaning mode…sorta. Warmer weather always does that to me. I have not seen the new menu at “Back to the Basics” but understand there are several new items…like breakfast. Like me, do you feel too much publicity is given on TV to accused murderers? There must be better things to report. There are. It just doesn’t get done. Both of my sewing machines are in the “hospital.” I broke a needle on one and it disappeared and the machine is locked up. Probably cost me 50 bucks to get that fixed. Saw Dolly Christensen in Wenatchee, as she’d been to a doctor’s appointment. She’s “lookin’ good” after the long ordeal she had in the hospital, last summer. Like about a three months stay. A long chat with “Bud” Forthun, tells us Leona is continuing with therapy and doing very well, after she had a stroke, some months ago. Determination and will power are big items in recovery and she has lots of both. Bud Gerken had surgery, in Spokane, to correct a pinched nerve that was causing a lot of pain, causing him to fall and the injury seemed like a stroke. His sister reported on Friday that he was sitting in

al months will be the Pancake Breakfast. There will be one more. That’s in April 28. The March breakfast served 170. The winners of the Basket Raffle were - Evelyn Dull, Ciara Field, Mary Dawn Wyatt and Bobbie Kosier. Willie Penner won the super Easter Basket, Thank you Auxiliary Ladies for your hard work. Coming events: April - Pancake Breakfast, May – Memorial weekend Garage Sale, June - Mid Summer Festival and July - The Fourth of July Rodeo. Hee Haw Chesaw. Until next week 11. It was decided that numbers for drawing the door prizes will be on the Formica name tags. Freda Holmes will donate gourds from her garden for decoration and also packets of wild bird seeds will be put together for the District Meeting to go along with the bird houses. Also, we gave ideas for a speaker and predinner snacks and food for the luncheon. A thank you note was read from the Farmers’ Market for Triangle Park improvements and upkeep. The next meeting will be at the Hillside Apartments at 1:30 p.m. on Monday, April 8. mix — any flavor. In a Ziploc bag, combine.the two cake mixes and mix well.For each individual cake serving, take out 3 tablespoons of the cake mix combination and mix it with 2 tablespoons of water in a small microwave — safe container and microwave it on high for 1 minute and you can have your own instant little cake! Keep remaining cake mixture in the Ziploc bag and use whenever you feel like a treat! You can top each cake with a dollop of fat free whipped topping and/or some fresh fruit. • Pinochle Scores for March 16: Door prize was won by Danny Weitrick; most pinochles by Ted Thorndike; High Scores for women was Eunice Godwin and H. foods and artistic items; Hidden Talents brings arts and crafts, and classes for all ages. We appreciate their support and the patronage of all our advertisers. Let’s show them we appreciate them, too. Shop locally! Our new website is under construction and it takes time to put it together. Once it’s ready we’ll let you know. In the meantime, check the cover of the catalog for four other ways to contact the NVCS office and register for classes. Ellen is in the office to help you – (509) 476-2011

items up for auction. Dinner will be from 5 pm to 7:30 pm, with the auction starting around 7 pm. There will be karaoke to follow. Don’t forget that Sunday is Easter, so have a very happy holiday. Our Sunday pinochle scores are as follows, 1st place went to Ken Cook, and 2nd place to Neil Fifer. Low score was taken by Leonard Paulsen, while Betty Paul and Gladys Fifer to the last pinochle. We are hoping Dick Wisener is doing better and is in our thoughts, and all that are ill we wish a speedy recovery. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

a chair and would soon be going into rehab, if he kept progressing as he was. Very good news! Lee Turner, long time resident of Molson and Oroville, passed away in Federal Way, Wash. in a care center. It has been reported that no services will be held here. His wife Marian still survives. I would imagine there will be a full obituary in the paper, sometime soon. Life is but a guided tour, not a guided tour. Gerald Oakes is once again home after two months in the hospital in Spokane. Jim Chamberlain had a pacemaker implanted recently, in Wenatchee. I wonder why we use the term, “healthy as a horse.” They get sick too, don’t they? It was good to have Bill Dugan and Linda back at the Senior Center for lunch, last Friday. Bill has had a lot of health issues and still has a surgery to have done, then hopefully will feel much better. Just a few short weeks ago the grassy knoll across the street from our place was covered with snow. Now, it is buttercups. I prefer the latter. Each little flower looks as if it had been dipped in wax. So beautiful! The Gonzaga/Southern game was much too close for comfort, but Gonzaga won. Yeah!!

Shame on the young man, who sang the “rap song” at the recent talent show at the school, sponsored by the Oroville Scholarship Foundation and Music Department. He has caused embarrassment to numerous people and I’m told by one in authority he did not sing what he did when auditioning. Apologizing, which I’m told he did, is kinda like putting toothpaste back in the tube. Can’t really be done, effectively. Another successful breakfast at the Molson Grange last Sunday. I’m still not sure if the folks come for the food or the fellowship…perhaps both. Lots of folks from Oroville go, after church, and since church ends at different times, it spreads the crowd out over a lengthy period. There is still a bit of snow, in places “on the hill” but the nice sunshine is taking it away, slowly. I finally saw the end of the Gonzaga basketball games for this season. Too bad they lost their last game but they made a valiant try and are a lot nicer than the team that took them down. There is something wrong when a player tries to fight one of their own teammates and they have to be parted by one of their coaches…or so it seems to me. Also, when a Gonzaga player lost his shoe, no whistle was blown which seems dangerous to me.

Community Bulletin Board School Retirees’ Meeting OMAK - Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association meets 11 a.m., Friday, March 29, at Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala Ave., Omak. Julia O’Connor, director of the Family Empowerment Project, will discuss the project’s efforts to help homeless and disadvantaged students in Okanogan County schools. Information: (509) 422-3393.

CCC Friday Nite Friday night coffee house on March 29 at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket featuring “Ruby Rust”--Denny Richardson and Mike Bowling with Steve Pollard and Mike Bell will be performing rock, country, rhythm and blues. Come join in the fun; bring an instrument to join the jam. Dinner served at 5 p.m. for $6, refreshments by donation. Call (509) 486-1328 for more information.

Breast Cancer Poker Tournament OMAK - Bouncin’ for Boobies “You’ve Gotta Know When to Hold ‘Em” poker tournament is Saturday, March 30, at the Elks in Omak. Check-in is 6 p.m. with the tournament starting at 6:30 p.m. Tourney will pay out first, second and third prizes with other games upstairs, also for cash prizes. Raffle tickets also to be sold. Initial buy-in for chips is $30, re-buy is $15, otherwise no charge to attend. Must be age 18 or older to participate. Tickets are available by contacting Lynn Hoover at (509) 3220261 or through the Bouncin’ for Boobies Facebook page www. facebook.com/pages/Bouncinfor-Boobies/133212816722266.

Oroville Easter Egg Hunt OROVILLE - The Oroville Eagles Auxiliary Easter Egg Hunt will take place at Oroville’s Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park (former State Park) at 10 a.m. sharp. Any child up to age 12 may participate.

Tonasket Easter Egg Hunt TONASKET - The Tonasket Community Easter Egg Hunt will be on Saturday, March 30 at 10 a.m. Kids first grade and under will meet at the High School Tennis Courts. Kids from second through fifth grade meet at behind the bus garage. There is a limit of two prize eggs per child. The egg hunt is sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary with donations from the community.

Easter Church Services LOOMIS - Loomis Community Church invites the public to attend its special Easter events on Sunday, March 31, 2013, begin-

ning with a sunrise service at the cross, located two mile up the Horse Spring Coulee Road, at the west end of Spectacle Lake, at 7 a.m. The service will be followed at 8 a.m. by a breakfast for all in the church fellowship room. An Easter Worship service at 11 a.m. will be held in the sanctuary.

Easter at Ellisforde Church of the Brethren ELLISFORDE - There will be a Maundy Thursday-Love Feast to commemorate the Last Supper of Jesus Christ with the apostles on Thursday, March 28 and Good Friday-Communion available all day. Easter-Sunrise service are at 6:30 a.m.; follow signs on Airport Road Tonasket. Worship service at the church 11 a.m. (Sunday School at 10 a.m.). Easter egg hunt following the service. All are welcome

The Best of All Things: Clean Water TONASKET - On Friday, April 5, John Crandall will come to Highland Wonders to discuss water quality and its importance in our lives. Crandall will share the story of water quality protection in the U.S., including the role of the Clean Water Act – what it does and what it means for our water. Drawing on his extensive experience in monitoring water quality, Crandall will provide an overview of the characteristics of water that are most commonly analyzed, and why. He will discuss important local issues such the relationship between water temperature and fish survival, and the impact of pesticide use in our waterways. The effects of beavers, as well as wetlands, on water quality will also be discussed.

First Aid/CPR TONASKET – It’s the first Community Schools offering of Spring Quarter. This comprehensive class covers the basics of first aid including medical, injury and environmental emergencies and adult, child and infant CPR. Students will receive a Dept. of Labor & Industries card, valid for two years upon completion. There are three sessions, in Tonasket, beginning Monday, April 8. Call Ellen at (509) 476-2011 or email community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu for information and to register.

Blossom Spring Bazaar

annual Blossom Spring Bazaar will be Saturday, April 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Oroville High School Commons. Admission is free (please bring a Food Drive Donation). Door Prizes, from the participating vendors, throughout the day. Come and enjoy a variety of booths, including: hand crafted items, health and fitness information, various community services information, beauty and skin care, jewelry, home interior, workshops and demonstrations and much more. Sponsored by Blossom Ministries - Potential Vendors may contact Melisa Turner at (509)-733-1941.

Flood Meeting OKANOGAN - There will be an Okanogan County Flood Season Coordination Meeting on Thursday, April 25 from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Okanogan County Commissioner’s Conference Room, 123 5th Avenue N., Okanogan. The meeting is open to the public. Anyone with comments or concerns is encouraged to attend.

Weather Spotter Training OKANOGAN - There will be a Weather Spotter Training session at the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Office Conference Room, 123 5th Ave. N., Okanogan, on Thursday, May from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The course is free. To register, contact Glenda Beauregard at the Emergency Management Department by calling (509) 4227206 or register online at: www. okangandem.org.

Food Banks TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480. OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

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MARCH 28, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Sports

Hornets bounce back from big loss to split with Tigers

OROVILLE ALL-STARS

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Tony Kindred/submitted photo

Alexa Werner opened the season with a personal best in the shot put.

Oroville track opens at Colville invitational By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

COLVILLE - Oroville’s track and field teams opened up at the 21-team Ezra Gordon Invitational in Colville on Saturday, March 23, with the girls beating out a number of larger schools to finish fourth overall. The host school won the girls meet with 113.5 points, followed by Deer Park with 107 and Freman with 75. The Hornets’ 68 was the most for a 2B school and earned them a first place trophy for winning the small school division.. On the boys’ side, Deer Park won with 127 points to beet Freeman (93). The Hornets (27) were 12th, with Republic (5th overall, 45.5) leading the way amongst 2B squads. Sierra Speiker and Kaitlyn Grunst each won events for the girls. Speiker cruised to a 12-second win in the 1600 (5:32) and added a second-place finish in the 800 (2:36) and ran a leg of the 4x200 relay (4th, 2:01.94) with Brittany Jewett, Breanna Ervin and Sammi Walimaki. Grunst won the high jump with a leap of 5-0 and added sixth place finishes in the long jump (1410.75), triple jump (30-7) and the 4x100 relay (57.94) with Walimaki, Jewett and Callie Barker. Other top finishers included Alexa Werner in the shot put (2nd, 32-0, a personal best by more than two feet); Barker in the 300 hurdles (4th, 57.58), 100 hurdles (8th, 20.08) and pole vault (6th, 7-0); Jewett in the javelin (5th, 91-10); Walimaki in the 100 (11th, 14.54); ; Andrea Perez in the shot put (9th, 29-3 and javelin (15th, 66-9); and Ervin in the pole vault (4th, 7-6). Luke Kindred was a winner in the javelin, throwing 157-07 to win by 31 inches to beat his personal best by more than 14 feet. Kindred also had PRs in both the discus (5th, 118-3) and the 100. Tanner Smith had the next best day for the boys, taking second in the 100 (11.60). He also took fourth in the 200 (24.36). The Hornets host the Eagle Home Mortgage Invitational on Saturday, March 30, host 17 schools, most of which are 1B/2B squads but also includes four CTL teams, including Tonasket.

Tigers at CTL quad By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

PESHASTIN - Tonasket took on Cascade, Cashmere and Okanogan at a four-way meet on Tuesday, March 29. Winning events for the girls were Emily Mills in the 200 (28.04); Walts in the 100 hurdles (17.65); Utt in the high jump (4-8); and Kathryn Cleman in the long jump (13-9.5). Other top finishers included Walts in the 100 (2nd, 13.87) and discus (3rd, 80-6); Cassie Spear in the 200 (2nd, 28.63); Jenna Valentine in the 1600 (2nd, 7:09.31); Spear, Mills, Walts and Cruz in the 4x100 relay (2nd, 57.41); Cleman, Spear, Mills and Jaden Vugteveen in the 4x200 relay (2nd, 2:01.48); Shea Smith in the shot put (4th, 24-8.75); Yasmin Cervantes in the discus (4th, 80-0) and javelin (4th, 74-11); and Cleman in the pole vault (2nd, 7-6). Ethan Bensing was a winner for the boys in the triple jump at 39-1.25.

OROVILLE - Two five-run innings proved to be the difference for Oroville’s softball team as the Hornets earned their first victory in two years on their opening day with a 13-3 win over Tonasket. The Tigers had opened Saturday, March 23, doubleheader with a 27-5 victory. Tonasket already had played three games in the early season, including a 10-0 win over Lake Roosevelt two days earlier. “(Oroville) got on top of their game by making less errors, and started doing better at batting and stealing bases,” said Oroville coach Dane Forrester. “I was proud of how the girls pulled together.” The Hornets actually led 2-0 after the first inning of the opening game as Rachelle Nutt and Faith Martin each scored on wild pitches. But Tonasket responded with seven runs in the second, seven more in the third and capped it with a 13-run fifth. Sadie Long earned the win for the Tigers, with Courtnee Kallstrom and Kendal Miller both eighth graders throwing in their first high school game pitching for Oroville. Vanessa Pershing, Tori King, Amber Monroe and courtesy runner Jenny Bello (for Long) each scored four runs for the Tigers. In the second game, Kallstrom limited the Tigers to three runs to earn the victory. Marissa Garcia ripped a two-

Kathy Arrigoni/submitted photo

Five Oroville seniors basketball players were invited to participate in the Wenatchee Central Lions’ 16th Annual All-Star Basketball Tournament in Wenatchee on March 16. Pictured are (l-r) Katie Tietje, Briana Moralez, Connor Hughes, Becky Arrigoni and Callie Barker. Nineteen girls from 11 schools competed in their game, with Barker winning the 3-point contest associated with the event. For the boys, 21 from 13 schools played, with Hughes hitting one of two 4-point shots unique to the all-star game.

Tonasket earns season sweep of Hornets By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Faith Martin slides safely home as Tonasket’s Amber Monroe awaits the throw during Saturday’s doubleheader. Tonasket won the first game 27-5 while the Hornets bounced back to win the nightcap 13-3. run double in the first inning to give Oroville a 3-0 lead, added another double in the fourth and scored four runs to lead the Hornet offense. Garcia’s final run gave Oroville a 10-run lead to end the game in the fifth. Forrester said that Garcia and

Faith Martin each had seven stolen bases, with Nutt adding six. The Hornets (1-1) travel to Republic on Thursday. Tonasket (3-2) hosted Okanogan in its league opener on Tuesday, hosts Liberty Bell on Thursday and travels to Chelan on Saturday, March 30.

OROVILLE - Tonasket’s baseball team rolled to a 15-2 victory at Oroville on Thursday, March 21, to improve to 4-0 in its early-season non-league schedule, including two wins over the Hornets. “We pitched the ball well, made some defensive plays, and our hitting is starting to come around,” said Tonasket coach Tim Cork. “I thought Oroville looked better from the first time we played them. They are a young team with a good coach; they’ll continue to improve.” “The team is improving,” said Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson. He said eighth graders Casey Martin and Brentt Kallstrom pitched well in hurling two innings apiece, with Boone McKinney tossing an inning. Lk. Roosevelt 11-13, Oroville 0-3

COULEE DAM - Hutchinson knew heading into the season there would come the lumps and bruises that came with a young team learning the ropes. While

there have been plenty of those, on Saturday there were also the signs of improvement that he’s been hoping for as the Hornets lost at Lake Roosevelt 11-0 and 13-3. “The boys are improving with each game,” he said. “They should do well this week against Bridgeport (Tuesday) and Manson (Friday).” In the opener, Kallstrom allowed four runs while pitching the first two innings, with Martin pitching the third and fourth. In the nightcap, senior Boone McKinney drew the start and held a 3-2 lead heading to the fourth. “I tried to get one more inning out of him,” Hutchinson said. “But a combination of walks, errors and a ‘foul ball’ double (made it) 10-3 going into the fifth.” Kallstrom pitched the fifth, but LR ended the game early with a bloop double over a drawnin infield to make it a 10-run margin, automatically ending the game. The Hornets (0-4, 0-2 CWL North) started the week with an 18-0 loss at Pateros.

QUITE A RACKET

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Michael Orozco punches one past diving Oroville goalkeeper Connelly Quick during the Tigers’ 8-1 victory over the Hornets last Thursday.

Hat trick paces Tigers

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s boys soccer team broke into the win column Thursday, March 21, at home, handing rival Oroville an 8-1 defeat. Michael Orozco scored three goals to lead the Tigers, with Antonio Sanchez, Tyler Farver, Elias Ramos, Cesar Reynoso and Abran Alvarez each scoring once. “It was good for our team to have a game in which we did not get pushed back on our heels right away,” said Tonasket coach Jack Goyette. “We could work on playing as a team against a hardworking and energetic opponent. We were able to score early and stay focused.” Goyette said his seniors, “Chewy” Alvarez, Wyatt O’Brien, Brayson Hires, Joel Cosino, Oscar Avilez and Ivan Rios provided the leadership that led to the Tigers’ first win of the year. Daniel Castrejon scored Oroville’s goal late in the game. “Tonasket outplayed us in almost every aspect of the game,” said Oroville coach Mike Pitts. “I felt like we didn’t show up ready to play, and that’s on me as a coach. “We started to move the ball a little better in the second half but it was clearly not good enough. If Tonasket continues to play the way they did against us they’ll do very well.” It was a much-needed win for the Tigers, coming off an 0-3 start, including an 8-0 loss at Brewster two days earlier. “We will continue to work at possessing the ball more effectively, and moving without the ball.”

Tonasket 2, Cashmere 0 CASHMERE - Tonasket earned its first Caribou Trail League victory of the season on Saturday, March 23, blanking Cashmere on the road 2-0. Hugo Sanchez scored the opening goal off an assist from Orozco, and Antonio Sanchez drilled home a long direct kick for the insurance goal. “It was a good, hard-fought game against a physical and wellcoached team,” Goyette said. “The defense worked incredibly hard, and in particular Chewy Alvarez had an excellent game at sweeper.” Tonasket (2-3, 1-3 CTL) faces a challenging week that includes games against Okanogan on Tuesday, at Manson on Thursday and at defending state runner-up Chelan on Saturday, March 30. “They will challenge us in many ways,” Goyette said. “We hope to continue to improve at defending and possessing the ball. “I love this team and these guys. They’re really fun to work with and (help) get better at a game we all love.” Newport 6, Oroville 2 OROVILLE - The Hornets lost to their home opener on Saturday,

March 23, to Newport, which was coming off a loss at Bridgeport the night before. “I could tell Newport was hungry for a win,” Pitts said. “They played with a lot of intensity and communicated very well.” Newport scored in the first minute of the game for an immediate advantage. The Hornets pulled to within 2-1 when EZ Delgado scored off a corner kick late in the first half, but Newport was able to add its third score before the half. “I was hoping to go into the second half own only 2-1,” Pitts said. “We made some adjustments and moved the ball a lot better in the second half, but couldn’t capitalize on some golden opportunities.” Newport added three more goals in the second half before Jesus Churape added the Hornets’ final goal on a penalty kick in the 80th minute. “As a coach I have to be cognizant that we have a very young team,” Pitts said. “I need to focus on the positive things we do in each game, knowing these boys have many more years to play.” Oroville (1-2) hosts Liberty Bell in its Central Washington League opener on Thursday, and plays again at home on March 30.

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Oroville visited Tonasket for some high school tennis action on Thursday, March 23. The Tigers won both the boys and girls matches by scores of 4-1. Above, Tonasket’s Michaela Newton rips a serve over the net. Left, Oroville’s Ali Miller gets into position for a forehand. Brent Baker/staff photos

Don’t Be Fuelish!

Save money, fuel, AND keep the air clean:  avoid rapid starts and stops  keep tires properly inflated  check air filters often  go idle-free  walk, bike, or carpool


Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 28, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • March 28, 2013

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale Tonasket 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, heat pump, single car garage with shop and storage shed. RV parking with dump site and AC power. Covered patio. $105,000. Bill: (509)486-1952 Tonasket Small one bedroom cottage with a garage on a large lot one block from grocery store. Only $79,000. Call 509 322 4732 Tonasket Three bedroom, two bath, 1248 sq. ft, vacant all new carpet and fresh paint, convenient location in Old Orchard Estates subdivision, ½ miles north of Tonasket. Only $145,000. Call 509-322-4732

Lots & Acreage

For Rent

Found

Tonasket ½ ACRE BUILDING LOT with power, water, phone and cable TV only $35,000. No mobile homes. Call 509 322 4732

OROVILLE Newly remodeled 3 bedroom house for rent / option to buy. Central air and heat. Large yard. Close to schools. $750 a month. Call 509-322-0347 or 509-476-2234

Commercial Property

TONASKET 2 bedroom apartment in town. $500 a month. Call 509-322-0347 or 509-4762234

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Tonasket LARGE INDUSTRIAL storage warehouse. On 10+ acres with city water and OT irrigation water. Call for Details 509-322-4732

For Rent

207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION:

LOW INCOME HOUSING “PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

By River - 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage, $1,100 p/m Near Town - 1 Bdrm, Adorable Cottage w/ furnishings, $525 p/m In Town 1 or 2 Bdrm, Deluxe Condo Units w/ carports, $625 + p/m Call Sun Lakes Realty ******509-476-2121*******

– Family & Singles –

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA AVAILABLE NOW! 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled Rent from $530 Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

1 BR, 1 BA WELL KEPT HOME

Large fully fenced back yard. Walking

distance to downtown Oroville. Avail FOUR ACRES INDUSTRIAL April 1st. $625 per mo. No pets. No smoking. 214 Main St, Oroville. LAND on the Canada to Oroville Heavy Haul Corridor 425-949-7992 with railroad frontage and truck access off of Jennings Oroville Loop Rd. Only $60,000. Call NEW and NICE! One Bed509 322 4732 room house with Walk in closet, eat in kitchen, laundry and lots of storage. Patio with valley view. www.gazette-tribune.com Call: 509-476-0199

WorkSource Okanogan County

Equal Housing Opportunity

Commercial Rentals

Diner Staff

Oroville School District has the following positions available

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

School Board Director #2

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

23. Betelgeuse’s constellation

6. Climb

25. “Farewell, mon ami�

7. Orangutan

27. Abject

8. “A jealous mistress�: Emerson

31. “Don’t ___!�

9. Solid portion between two crenels in a battlement (pl.)

33. Flower commemorating Remembrance Sunday

11. Been in bed

36. Domestic

12. Hokkaido native

38. Notations to ignore corrections

13. Original matter prior to Big Bang

40. Acclaim

16. Brown shade

41. Moorehead of “Bewitched�

20. Bread spreads

43. Buddhist who has attained Nirvana

24. Beat

45. “For shame!�

28. Human skull symbol (2 wd)

46. Narrow ridge of hills

29. Assortment

48. Biblical gift

30. Battering wind

50. “A Lesson From ___�

31. Asian nurse

52. Reason to close up shop

32. Kind of palm

55. Begins

34. The “p� in m.p.g.

58. Place where stolen cars are disassembled (2 wd)

37. Excluded

60. Geographic region

42. Soup cracker

64. Carry away, in a way

1. Breakfast sizzler

66. Casual attire

6. Marienbad, for one

67. Wiccan advice (pl.)

9. ___ Peninsula, where Kuala Lumpur is located

Junior High Volleyball Coaches (2) High School Boys’ Basketball Coaches (2) High School Volleyball Assistant Coach Positions open until filled. Please send letter of interest/application to: Oroville School District 816 Juniper Street, Oroville, WA 98844. Oroville School District is an equal opportunity Employer. Part Time Merchandiser to service magazines. Apply online at: www.apply2jobs/ selectmerchandisingservices Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is currently recruiting for Seasonal Firefighter and NRW2 Engine Leader positions. Positions are open until filled. For more information, or to apply please visit our website, www.dnr.wa.gov. If you have further questions (after reviewing our website) contact Heidi Seitters at (509) 684-7474. DNR is an equal opportunity employer.

10. Eventually (2 wd)

35. Stanley Kowalski’s famous yell

65. Cutting edge of a weapon

26. Understanding

39. Approval (2 wd) 44. One hallucinating on drugs 47. ___ del Sol 49. Resume original shape

LPN

On-call position to share with both the Oroville and Tonasket offices of North Valley Family Medicine. We are seeking a caring, compassionate, patient-oriented LPN. Applicant must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, www.wvmedical.com for more info and to apply online. We’re more than just print!

Visit our website.

Down

17. Femme fatale

1. More mean

18. Place stiffened material inside a collar

2. Breathing

19. Sixth canonical hour

3. Assuming responsibility for needs of another

21. Legislative body with all members present

4. Portended 5. ___ surface prevents falls

This fully equipped 1950’s themed Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Rhonda Hinkley for further details at: rhonda@verandabeach.com.

Buying your pop cans, brass & copper. Will take your unwanted metal and appliances. No refrigerators or freezers. For sale: Apple bin full of conola crushed seed for pigs or cattle. 509-476-3862 WE BUY Estates. We buy Gold and Silver. We clean yards and properties. We haul junk and scrap. Free quote. Call Aussie Antiques, 509-322-3400.

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF MARCH 25, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPT: A Beautiful Home, Laughter Love Art Music, Many Opportunities waits for 1st baby. Expenses paid. Astrid 1-800-844-1670 EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-483-4429. www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com CASH NOW for Good Notes, Top Dollar from Private investor. Yes, Bajillions Available for quality Contracts, Mortgages, Annuities, Inheritance. Receiving Payments? Call Skip Foss 1-800-637-3677

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57. “Mi chiamano Mimi,� e.g. 59. Jekyll’s alter ego

HEALTH/BEAUTY

61. His “4� was retired (baseball)

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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members.

HELP WANTED

GORDON TRUCKING Inc. CDL-A Drivers Needed. Dedicated & OTR Positions Available! Consistent Miles, Benefits, 401k & EOE. Sign On Bonus! Recruiters available 7 days/wk! Call: 866-725-9669

FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS

56. Be a snitch

staff

Veranda Beach Resort seeks an experienced and successful food and beverage operator for the 2013 season.

53. Bakery offering 54. Church recesses

with female 800-250-8975

CALIFORNIA BOUND! Hiring 10 sharp girls and guys. Must be 18+ to apply. Lodging and transportation provided. 2 weeks paid training. For more information call 800-250-8975

51. Loose rock debris on a slope

55. Attempt

15. Plants of the genus Equisetum

22. State again

RESORT STAFF

Front Desk Services Housekeeping Housemen

ADOPTION: Active Executive & Future Stay-Home mom, Unconditional LOVE awaits miracle 1st baby. Expenses paid. 1-888-919-1604. Steve & Norma

63. Estranged

14. “Remember the ___!�

Positions in the following departments will be offered

Announcements

62. Mooring sites

ANSWERS

Invites you to our annual job fair

April 12th - 10am to 1pm.

Statewides

This is an exciting business opportunity at an established resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington!

Miscellaneous

Veranda Beach Resort 299 Eastlake Road, Oroville, WA 98844. Phone 509-476-4000

Subscribe to the...

1950’s DINER - BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

Check out our website at: www.verandabeach.com

Bartenders Dishwashers Line Cooks Servers Baristas Front of House Manager

WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Across

or mail to Gold Digger Apples PO Box 2550 Oroville, WA 98844

FOR RENT: Business/Office unit(s) Main Street Orovilleoptional sizes & prices. (509)486-1682 or (509)4290873.

Updated list of employment at

Crosswords

rdevon@golddiggerapples.com

509-476-4057

email: stcharles@gdicom.net

126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

www.go2worksource.com

Payroll Clerk/Office Help Duties to include payroll as well as other office work. Must be comfortable with a computer and proficient in excel. E-mail resume to:

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

OROVILLE

Lots & Acreage

St. Charles Place Apartments

Help Wanted

Business Opportunities

IF YOU USED the Mirena IUD between 2001-present and suffered perforation or embedment in the uterus requiring surgical removal, or had a child born with birth defects you may be entitled to compensation. Call Johnson Law and speak

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Public Notices Civil Service Exam The City of Tonasket Civil Service Commission will be testing for an entry level patrolman eligibility list on Friday, May 3rd, 2013. Call 509-486-2132 for an application packet or write to City of Tonasket, P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Applications will be accepted until 4:30 pm April 25th, 2013. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Civil Service Secretary Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 2013. #468199 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: DOLLY MAE BRAZLE, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00022-8 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: March 18, 2013 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 28, 2013 JULIE A. McCORKLE Personal Representative Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Brazle P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 11, 2013 #466559

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MARCH 28, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE March 28, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Sponsored by

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Puzzle 15 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

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SPRING IS HERE AND I HAVE BUYERS FOR THE FOLLOWING PROPERTIES: • 2-3 Bdrm Tonasket Home, in town. One Level. Garage. Fenced Yard. Local Buyer. Up to $150,000.00 No Fixers. • Have 2 Buyers for : 40 acres m/l. 2-4 bedrm Home. Fenced. Tonasket area. Up to $225,000.00. Will pay more with Barn & Corrals. Call Today!

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Temporary/Seasonal Maintenance Worker City of Tonasket The City of Tonasket is advertising for a temporary/seasonal maintenance worker position. Applications are available at Tonasket City Hall, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. For information please contact City Hall, 509486-2132. Closing date 4-15-2013. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 22, 28, 2013. #466047

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HAROLD FLYNN, Deceased. Case No. 13-4-00026-1 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets.

4

Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 822 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington, amending Chapter 8.32 of the Oroville Municipal Code to charge fees for Police and/or Fire Department services provided in response to false alarms. The above summary is of an ordinance adopted by the Oroville City Council during the March 19, 2013 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, 2013. #467090

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ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: Davitt Law Group, PLLC 1630 N. Wenatchee Ave., Ste. 18 Wenatchee, WA 98801 (509) 888-2925 tel. (509) 888-2926 fax Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 11, 2013 #467321

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DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 28, 2013 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: YOLONDA J. PETERSEN ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Christina M. Davitt, Esq., WSBA No. 41272 7

Find The Right

Public Notice The City of Oroville will be accepting proposals for leasing the Concession Stand at Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial Park for the 2013 Season. Copies of the proposed lease, which outlines requirements and certain equipment that the lessee shall supply, and other information may be obtained from the City Hall, 1308 Ironwood Street, Oroville, WA 98844 (509-476-2926) or may be downloaded from the city’s website at oroville-wa.com Proposals should be submitted to the City Clerks Office no later 4:00, Monday, April 15, 2013. Publish March 28, April 4, and 11, 2013 Attest: Kathy M. Jones Clerk Oroville is an Equal Opportunity Employer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 11, 2013. #463718

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In re the Estate of: ARTHUR R. THOMAS, Deceased. Probate No. 13-4-00017-1

NOTICE OF PETITION FOR CHANGE IN BOUNDARIES OF THE OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT Notice is hereby given that petition exclusion of land have been filed with the Board of Directors of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, praying that the Board of Directors of said District enter an order changing the boundaries of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District to include or exclude the tracts of land described below from the boundaries of the

Public Notices

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In Re the Estate of RALPH W. PATTERSON, Deceased Probate No. 13-4-00008-2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: March 21, 2013 Personal Representative: LeaAnn Hairston Attorney for Personal Representative: W. Scott DeTro Address for Mailing or Service: 700-A Okoma Drive, Omak, WA 98841 Court of Probate Proceedings and Cause No: Okanogan County Superior Court Cause No. 13-4-00008-2 CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC W. Scott DeTro, WSBA #19601 Attorney for Estate Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 21, 28, April 3, 2013 #465664

Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District. The name of the petitioners, together with the descriptions to be excluded from the boundaries of the OrovilleTonasket Irrigation District in Okanogan County, State of Washington, is as follows: EXCLUSIONS: Linda Gann, 247017004; 16-37-27, .14 acres. Notice is also given that Thursday, April 11, 2013, at the hour of 1:30 p.m. at the main office of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, is the time and place that all persons interested in or that may be affected by such change in the boundaries of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation district must appear and show cause in writing, if they have any, why the change in the boundaries of said district as proposed in said petition should not be made. Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, Tom W. Scott, Secretary. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 28, April 4, 2013. #468200

Public Notices

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PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) publication - Okanogan County The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney, at the address stated below, a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: March 14, 2013 Personal Representative: Lisa D. Michno Attorney for Personal Representative: Peg R. Callaway Address for Mailing or Service: 700-A Okoma Drive, Omak, WA 98841 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Okanogan County Superior Court, Cause No. 13-4-00017-1 Dated this 5th day of March, 2013. CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC By: /S/ Peg R. Callaway; WSBA #13786 Attorney for Estate Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 14, 21, 28, 2013. #463642

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 28, 2013

Page A10

Court, 911 Calls, Jail Bookings Superior Court Criminal The court found probable cause to charge Gordon Lester Dick Jr., 38, with possession of a controlled substance and possession of 40 grams or less of marijuana. He was found guilty and received one year three months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Jesus Cazares, 27, with theft of a motor vehicle and trafficking first. He was found guilty and received two years seven months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Jacob Jackson, 20, with taking a motor vehicle without permission second. He was found guilty and received one month confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Aiko Mariscal, 36, with assault third, reckless endangerment and malicious mischief third. He was found guilty and received one year three months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Monte Jane, 51, with possession of a controlled substance. They was found guilty and received two months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Casey Brender, 24, with residential burglary, harassment and assault fourth. He was found guilty and received two years four months confinement.

Juvenile A 17-year-old Omak juvenile was charged with possession. He received two days confinement.

District Court Genevieve Adams, 68, of Okanogan was charged with assault fourth. She was found guilty and received one day confinement and a $683 fine. Joshua Allenby, 24, of Okanogan was charged with marijuana possession less than or equal to 40 grams. Robert Bradshaw, 26, of Okanogan was charged with use/ delivery of drug paraphernalia. Jesus Martinez, 29, of Omak was charged with malicious mischief third. He received a $768 fine. Garret Elsberg, 24, of Okanogan was charged with DWLS third. Carrie Leslie, 37, of Tonasket was charged with theft third. He was found guilty and received two days confinement and an $808 fine.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, March 18, 2013 In Omak, on North Country

View Rd., a woman’s nephew came into his aunt’s residence and stole money from her. His mother had thrown him out and he was staying with the aunt. In Okanogan, on First Ave. S., two cell phones were stolen the night before. The roommate is suspected. In Oroville, on Hwy. 7, a man was hit in the face by a male subject with a closed fist. He does not want to press charges. Brittany Vanatta, 22, was booked for assault fourth. Dawn Walters, 53, was booked for criminal trespassing first.

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 In Okanogan, on Chiliwist Rd., a girlfriend had a verbal dispute with her boyfriend. The girlfriend flagged down a passing police car and asked for assistance as she felt threatened. Patrick Watt, 38, was booked for DUI and DWLS third. Raymond Hobbs, 30, was booked for DWLS third. Shannon Graves, 36, was booked for bail jumping and FTA. Jason Perez, 39, was booked for FTA, DUI and DWLS third.

stashed it somewhere else in his residence. Johnny Morgan, 58, was booked for FTS, assault third, DWLS second, DUI and theft second. Natalie Rocker, 20, was booked for DUI. Amy Tatshama, 29, was booked for FTA and assault third. Maria Sanchez, 28, was booked for FTA, assault third, DWLS second, theft third, DUI, MIP and hit and run attended. Richard Geotz, 57, was booked for violation of a protection order. Kevin Lacourse, 38, was booked for assault fourth. David Carr, 35, was booked for contract violation. Danika Williams, 23, was booked for reckless driving.

Jose Cabello, 52, was booked for assault fourth and interfering with a report. Brenda Moore, 40, was booked on a detainer. Robert Long, 27, was booked for residential burglary and theft third. Jacob Sommers, 31, was booked for DWLS second and FTA. Daniel Andritz, 39, was booked for reckless driving.

Saturday, March 23, 2013 Kyle Blanchard, 32, was booked for DUI and DWLS third. Leslie Bebee, 43, was booked for assault fourth.

Sunday, March 24, 2013

Alysha George, 23, was booked for assault fourth.

Anthony Parnell, 31, was booked for DUI and DWLS third. Emily Stokes, 26, was booked for introduction of contraband second. Ronald Friedlander, 43, was booked for DUI.

In Okanogan, on Second Ave. S., a man purchased a couch from a male subject via Craigslist. The male subject’s mother called to inform him that the couch did not belong to the male subject but in fact belonged to rental center. In Okanogan, on Pine St., a woman is trying to retrieve the title to her vehicle from a bond company. When she went to the business it appeared that they had gone out of business. The woman called police to find out her options. In Oroville, on Westlake Rd., two rings were stolen from the residence. In Okanogan, on East Dry Coulee Rd., an intoxicated son stole a .22 semi automatic pistol. He currently does not have possession of the firearm. He may have

Key:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

OBITUARIES

Nadine Watkins

Nadine Watkins Nadine Watkins, age 78, of Oroville, died March 21, 2013 at her home Oroville. She was born January 9, 1935 in Tulsa, Okla. to John and Margaret Hoffman. In March 1950 she married Joe W. Watkins in Farmersville, Calif. Nadine lived in Washington, California and Arizona. In 1976, she moved to Oroville where she worked as a bartender at the Maverick Tavern, a cook for the preschool in Tonasket and as a

prep cook/dishwasher for several years. She is survived by her children: Roger W. (Sue) Watkins of Oroville, Mike (Sharon) Watkins of Oroville, Bobby Watkins of Arkansas, Terry (Elain) Watkins of Lewiston, Idaho, Kennith (Cindy) Watkins of Omak, James Watkins of Oroville, Dorothy (Roger) Goodwater of Texas, Diana (Grant) Courneya of Spokane, Dennis (Michele) Watkins of Arizona, Larry Watkins of Spokane and Susan Watkins of Oroville and 41 grandchildren, 61 great grandchildren and four great great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband of 37 years, Joe, one daughter Mary Goodwater and two granddaughters, Debra Watkins and Nancy Watkins Funeral services will be held Friday, March 29, 2013 at 10 a.m. at the Bergh Chapel in Oroville, with the Reverend Marilyn Wilder officiating. Interment will follow at the Oroville Riverview Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the American Cancer Society. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville in Care of Arrangements.

CHURCH GUIDE

~ Easter Services ~ LOOMIS

TONASKET

OROVILLE

Loomis Community Church Invites the public to attend its Special Easter events on March 31, 2013, beginning with a sunrise service at the cross, located two mile up the Horse Spring Coulee Road, at the west end of Spectacle Lake, at 7:00 a.m. The service will be followed at 8:00 a.m. by a breakfast for all in the church fellowship room. An Easter Worship service at 11:00 a.m. will be held in the sanctuary.

Tonasket Community Church, UCC Holy Week Activities: Holy Thursday (Shared with Oroville United Methodist Church) 5:30 p.m. Potluck, Tenebrae Service, Holy Communion at Tonasket Community Church. Good Friday - March 29 (Shared with Oroville United Methodist Church) Noon to 1:30 p.m. Oroville United Methodist Church Sanctuary. Observance of the Seven Words of Christ from the Cross. Easter Sunday - March 31 Worship at 6:30 a.m. on the ridge at Tom & Linda Black’s property - 11 a.m. at the Church Sanctuary

Oroville United Methodist Church Holy Week Activities: Maundy Thursday (Shared with Tonasket Community Church) 5:30 p.m. Potluck, Tenebrae Service, Holy Communion at Tonasket Community Church. Good Friday - March 29 (Shared with Tonasket Community Church) Noon to 1:30 p.m. OUMC Sanctuary. Observance of the Seven Words of Christ from the Cross. Easter Sunday - March 31 Worship at 9 a.m. Easter Brunch (potluck) follwing worship.

Friday, March 22, 2013

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Okanogan Valley

OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

Join us for Lenten Fellowship / Wednesdays with soup & bread 6 p.m. Service at 7 p.m. 11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

Albert H. Libby

Albert H. Libby 100, passed away on March 21, 2013. He was born on October 10, 1912 and lived in Tonasket since 1973. Survivors include Jeanette Mooney (Gordon) Tonasket, David Libby (Roberta) Chico, Calif. and Linda Cook (Lawsondeceased), Tonasket A memorial service will be on Saturday, March 30, 2013 at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witnesses; followed by a reception.

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

Monuments & Bronze

CEMETERY MARKERS

See Us First for Greater Savings BUILD A LASTING TRIBUTE TO YOUR LOVED ONE

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person

~ 62 years of serving you ~

you want to honor

Sales Representative Joy Lawson

at your church?

Where pride in craftsmanship still exist today!

1-509-476-2279 OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 28, 2013  

March 28, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 28, 2013  

March 28, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune