Page 1

High school spring sports get

PANCAKE FEED

underway.

At Molson Grange Sunday, March 24, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

See Pages A10-11

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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Specifics of ATV ordinance debated

Oroville Assisted Living Forum

A MAGICAL SMILE

City planner asserts no conflict between spray park project, swimming pool

park. It’ll be a much longer-term effort.” Both Danison (for the pool) TONASKET - Spray park or and Black (for the spray park) have applied for grants from the swimming pool? According to city planner Kurt Community Foundation of North Danison, that shouldn’t even be Central Washington. “The purpose of our grant is the question. The answer, he said, to get a small amount of money, is both, not either/or. “There seems to be some con- potentially matching with fusion about that, and I’m not some money from the Gordon sure what that confusion is,” Stangland bequeath to the city for the pool,” Danison said Danison said. at the Tuesday, “A swimming pool is a “We’d use it to March 12, up with Tonasket City whole lot more daunt- come a process that Council meeting and many, many would idening. and give “Linda Black times more expensive tify us a picture of has put togeththan a splash park. It’ll what we want er a great group build. How that is working be a much longer- to much it’s going to get a splash to cost, so we term effort.” park built this have a target for summer. .And City Planner Kurt Danison, fundraising and regardless of Highland Associates (larger) grant that, we’re still applications.” pursuing a pool He said the next cycle of grant if that is what the community applications begins in 2014. wants.” ‘A year from now, we have Danison stressed that there is a big difference in both the scale to be in a position of knowing and timetable of the two proj- what we’re going to build, where we’re going to build it and what ects. “One (the spray park) is a com- the estimated costs are going to munity effort to get something in be. Also, we’ll need to know by ASAP,” he said, adding that the then where the remainder of the cost of maintenance of the spray money is going to come from.” Danison said that a typipark will be nearly zero. “The other (the pool) is much longer cal grant would be a 50 percent term. In some ways to me it is matching grant. “There could also be federal still amorphous as to who is actually pushing for the swimming dollars we could get (for the pool), pool. It would be lovely if a com- but some of that depends on their munity organization stepped up budget issues,” Danison said. “It that has the same kind of energy seems unlikely, but the pool could that Linda does to put something qualify for both state and federal together like that. But a swim- grants that could cover potenming pool is a whole lot more tially 90 percent of it. “A couple years ago I said that daunting and many, many times more expensive than a splash SEE COUNCIL | PG A2 BY BRENT BAKER

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Breaking News

NVH recall withdrawn, injuction denied OKANOGAN - A petition brought by Rosa Snider and Danny Gratrix asking North Valley Hospital Commissioners be subject to a recall election was withdrawn at a hearing in Okanogan Superior Court Tuesday, March 19. “The deputy prosecutor was laughing and kidding with the hospital’s attorney saying it didn’t meet the statute,” said Snider. “We decided to withdraw it otherwise if the ruling went against us we wouldn’t be able to bring it again.” Furthermore a separate action asking the court for a temporary injunction seeking to prevent the North Valley Hospital District from closing the assisted living facility was denied. That injunction was sought by the Concerned Citizens for Tonasket Assisted Living. NVH attorney Mick Howe then asked the court for attorney’s fees and expenses for administrators’ and commissioners’ time for attending the hearing, according to Snider. More in next week’s G-T.

Group questions NVH Board’s decisions on A/L BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

Brent Baker/staff photo

Equal parts magician and showman, Michael Oaks (center) captivated the crowd with his magic act at Friday’s Oroville Scholarship Foundation Variety Show. For more pictures, see page A4.

County receives $500,000 energy grant from state Money will help replace Courthouse’s 100-year-old boiler BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OKANOGAN - The state Department of Commerce awarded a $300,000 grant to Okanogan County to assist in various energy and operational cost improvement projects for the courthouse, jail and administration building. A total of $18 million in grants were awarded to 12 higher education institutes and 37 local governments. The immediate goal of Department of Commerce grant program is to stimulate local economy by creating jobs; the long term goal is to reduce energy costs for public agencies. An estimated 543 jobs will be created by this construction spending. The total cost for all the projects is more than $66 million, including more than $48 million in non-state funding. “This is precisely the sort of program we need as we work to rebuild our economy,” said Gov. Jay Inslee when announcing the grants last week. “These grants will reduce energy costs, provide training opportunities to students and create jobs in the clean energy sector.”

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 12

The project Okanogan County submitted for grant funding includes several significant energy efficiency components, according to the Department of Commerce. The most critical is the replacement of the original diesel-fueled boiler that has been heating the courthouse for the last 100 years. There are real concerns the antiquated system will soon fail. This would be catastrophic to the operation of the courthouse and the safety of the employees. With the help of grant funds, the expensive and inefficient boiler system will be replaced with modern geothermal heat pump technology that will not only provide heating and cooling for the courthouse, but will be integrated into a system providing efficient heating and cooling in the jail as well. Other conservation measures include replacing the singlepaned wood windows in the courthouse with energy efficient architectural windows, installing energy management control systems, adding water conservation devices, and upgrading interior and exterior lighting including light and motion sensors. Last summer, the county contracted with Ameresco, an Engergy Services Company, to perform the initial energy audit, document baseline energy consumption and identify cost effective energy conservation measures eligible for grant funding. A grant application was then submitted to the Department of Commerce in early January and awarded last week. Ameresco will work on behalf of the county as the general contractor and construction manager for

the project design and construction meetings will begin immediately and when the project design is complete and approved by the county, bids will be solicited and subcontractors selected. The project is expected to be complete within two years. The grant was awarded through a highly competitive process based on the county’s ability to contribute funding for the project, the deep energy efficiency savings, and the ability to start the project immediately. The county will receive an approximate $128,500 energy incentive from Okanogan County PUD to help offset the project cost. The project is expected to pay for itself through energy and operational cost savings over a period of 15 years, adding value to public facilities and to the community. “The upgrades provided by these grants, such as new lighting, boilers and watersaving plumbing, put people to work right away, and the energy efficiencies will save money for Washington taxpayers well into the future,” said Commerce Director Brian Bonlender. “The program stretches grant dollars by leveraging funding from nonstate sources.” The 2012 Legislature appropriated $20 million to higher education and $18 million to local governments, including a specific set aside of at least 10 percent for small cities or towns (populations of 5,000 or less). There have been two rounds of awards. The first recipients were announced in August 2012.

SEE FORUM | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE – Up until now most of the meetings on the fate of North Valley Hospital’s Assisted Living facility have taken place in Tonasket, but last week many of those opposing its closure met in Oroville to say why they’re fighting the hospital district’s closure plan. About two dozen were in attendance at the Oroville High School Commons on Tuesday, March 17 to hear what Rosa Snider, Lisa Andrews, Danny Gratrix and Connie Maden had to say. The four presented a Power Point presentation which followed the timeline of the hospital board’s decision to close the facility at the end of Match. The presentation had several charts, including one outlining the raises for the top nine paid positions over the past two years. “We’ve gotten factual info through public records requests. It took several months to accumulate,” said Andrews, who has worked 13 years in the healthcare field, 11 of them for the North Valley Hospital District, mostly in administration and marketing. Snider said she had spent 17 years in the medical field in billing, management and program development. “Having grown up in this community it is important to get the facts in front of you,” Snider said. “We’ve been challenged since November trying to get information and find a solution to keeping senior healthcare local,” said Andrews. “If it wasn’t for us stepping up as taxpayers in the past, the hospital district wouldn’t have survived.” They want to know why it doesn’t appear any of the money from the levy shows up as revenue for the Assisted Living, saying it has all been allocated toward the hospital’s other divisions. The hospital board passed a resolution in 2002 refinancing the 1991, 1995 and 1997 Assisted Living Bonds into one Limited General Tax Obligation Bond. Payments for the Bond refinance come out of the Hospital’s General Fund at $18,000 a month, they say. The bond is paid twice a year at $108,000 per payment and will not be paid off until 2022, according to the group. “In the State Auditor’s Report for 2010 and 2011.... it states the Limited Tax Obligation Bond’s principal and interest ‘shall be paid by levying each year a maintenance and operation tax upon taxable property in the district,” said a chart about the Assisted Living Bonds. “The district shows a 7-year loss of $821,308. If the M & O taxes were collected, the interest and principal should have been paid with these funds. This would result in a 7-year $18,270 loss for the assisted living,” the chart claims. The group asked why since

Outdoors Valley Life Letters/Opinion

A3 A4 A5

Community A6 Valley Life A7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9

Real Estate Sports Police Stats

A9 A10-11 A12


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 21, 2013

Meeting | FROM A1

Patrick Plumb/submitted photo

Tonasket police officer Darren Curtis was pinned with his Sergeant’s stripes at the Tuesday, March 12, Tonasket City Council meeting. Curtis passed with high scores oral and written exams administered by the city’s civil service commission to earn the promotion.

COUNCIL | FROM A1 getting the pool declared obsolete hadn’t been done and was unlikely, but it did,” he said. “So I’m not going to say that there’s no way we can’t get that sort of grant.” Of course, even once a proposed swimming pool is built, there is the cost of maintenance that will have to be accounted for. Such costs can vary widely depending on the type of pool, be it chlorinated or salt water, or indoor our outdoor. Indoor pools throughout the state have been shut down because of operating costs that often exceed $500,000 a year, primarily due to heating and ventilation. Danison also reported that the comprehensive plan was in the process of being updated, as per instructions given by the council at a previous meeting. Some of that was to be discussed at a public workshop scheduled for March 19. “We got a letter out to every property owner of record (in areas where property use designations were in question,” he said. “We’re trying to make sure we have an accurate map to work from. It’s important we review these critical areas regulations, so that when (city engineer) Varela and Associates prepares funding requests (for construction projects), they don’t lose points because we’re not in compliance.”

ATVs debated The city council approved in principle the drafting of an ordinance to allow ATVs within the city limits. What shape that ordinance will take, however, may take some time to agree on. That much was clear after the first draft of the proposed ordinance was discussed at length. Though cautioned by city clerk Alice Attwood that there were still revisions to be made, that didn’t prevent a lively debate from taking place over some of the particulars. Most at issue: whether or not to close off some streets or areas of the city to ATV access, and what sorts of non-traditional vehicles should be allowed to roam the city streets. As far as council member Lee Hale was concerned, such limitations needn’t be built into the ordinance unless a problem develops first. “We can make changes or take it (ATV access) away at any time,” Hale said. “I haven’t heard one argument to convince me that this is going to be a problem. Most of this comes from people who haven’t been around ATVs at all.” Council member Scott Olson said that there had been concerns expressed by some residents in the area of Little Learners Park and wondered if that was an area that should be closed off. Council member Jill Vugteveen was concerned about potential noise issue, but noted that the city’s noise ordinance needs to

be reworked anyway. Olson and Vugteveen wanted to insure that fines for violations were stiff enough -- $500 or more -- to deter such issues as reckless use, or helmet-less or underage driving. Council members Dennis Brown and Jean Ramsey, to the agreement of all, were concerned about the inclusion of vehicles such as dune buggies. “I’d much rather deal with golf carts than dune buggies,” Vugteveen said. No motions were made concerning the draft the ordinance, which will be further revised before voted on.

Bids come in high The council rejected opted not to accept bids for the Third/Fifth/ Sixth Street project or for contracting out summer lawn maintenance, as both came in significantly higher than budgeted. In the case of the streets project, two bids were received, the lowest of with exceeded the projected $270,000 cost of the project by more than $30,000. “(City engineering firm) Varela is in contact with the Department of Transportation to determine our next step,” Attwood said. “We need to talk about our next step, whether we can find more funding or take some of the project out, or if we’re going to have to re-bid.” Mayor Patrick Plumb asked why there still seems to be no interest from local contractors on these kinds of projects. “They did pick up bids,” Attwood said. “I think some of the local people are intimidated by some of the requirements these government grant-funded projects have,” Vugteveen said. “Government grants are very difficult to work with. I’m sure they look at this and think, ‘I’ve got to do what?’” Attwood said that the expense of being sufficiently bonded for these projects could be a roadblock, though a necessary one. The council also had hoped to save money on the city’s summer lawn care by contracting it out, but found that the bids were nearly four times higher than it would cost to do it internally. The council voted unanimously to advertise for a part-time summer position for the work. The council also set a Tuesday, April 16, date for a town hall meeting to discuss street and parking issues, such as those that have been discussed in previous council sessions regarding situations on Locust St, Western Ave. and Tonasket Ave., as well as Mill Dr., which was recently annexed into the city. Discussion will not, however, be limited to those areas of the city. The next regular session of the Tonasket City Council is scheduled for Tuesday, March 26, at 7:00 p.m. in the council chambers at City Hall.

2010 the top nine salaried positions had seen raises from the hospital board totaling an additional $280,000 a year, while administration claims the shortfall for the Assisted Living Facility is about $100,000 annually. As far as the raises go, they said CEO Linda Michel got a raise from $130,000 a year to $160,000 a year, while warrants, money owed to the county, still hovers around $2 million. They went on to talk about unfilled Assisted Living rooms, despite people wanting to get into the facility, use of rooms for other hospital purposes, spending money on construction on the second floor of the hospital and the Drip Line Coffee shop. They also discussed layoff and cuts and asked where the money went. There were two hearings scheduled in Okanogan County Superior Court for last Tuesday. One asked for an injunction against the board’s move to close the facility and the other asked for

Source: Citizens for Tonasket Assisted Living

approval of a recall petition for the board’s five commissioners. Both were denied by the court on Tuesday afternoon (see separate article on Page A1).

Rosa Snider said they were two separate issues and not everyone that opposes the facility’s shut down supported both measures. The group asked those in atten-

Wolf-management bill headed to House Sen. John Smith says Wolf attack on dog shows urgent need for passage Submitted by Amanda Webb Public Information Officer

OLYMPIA - Sen. John Smith is two-for-three when it comes to persuading the state Senate to support his wolf-related legislation. Senate Bill 5193 passed late Wednesday with a bipartisan 28-21 vote, which Smith says is encouraging as the bill now moves to the House of Representatives for consideration. “This bill has strong promise in the House, despite skepticism from many people in the media and around the state,” said Smith, R-Colville. “We have a strong team in support of this bill and are in a stronger position now because other legislators are finally starting to understand the severity of this issue. “The House minority just succeeded in stopping a gun-control bill that was widely expected to pass -- if a minority of legislators can do that despite all the head-

lines, then I’m optimistic about the future of SB 5193.” The senator said a report of a dog being attacked by a wolf in Okanogan County earlier this month reinforces the need for the changes he has proposed to address the ongoing wolf-conflict issue in Washington. Smith said in a statement released in response to the attack: “I am glad to know that although the dog is still recovering from puncture wounds and lacerations of its head, the wolf did not succeed in killing it. As a dog-lover myself, I hated to hear that this happened. “However, this situation, while currently an isolated event, should be a wake-up call for our state. Wolves are territorial predators that are clearly bold enough to grab a 60-pound dog off of a porch. What if that had been a child? “Our state needs to promptly take action so residents feel protected against the threat of wolves as they continue to multiply rapidly and relocate across the state. The state’s wolf conservation and management plan did not adequately plan for the extent or quantity of

attacks on other animals.” The reported wolf attack on the dog took place March 10 in Twisp, which is in the vicinity of the Lookout Wolf Pack’s territory. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife was alerted about the attack, and a WDFW officer and biologist responded to document and investigate the incident. Based on the tracks and an eyewitness account, Smith said, investigators are highly confident that a wolf is to blame. The two bills that Smith has sponsored that address wolfconflict management are both scheduled for public hearings before the House Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee this week. The House measure deals with gray-wolf conflict management, which has been a significant issue for many of the residents in Smith’s 7th District since the re-integration of wolves several years ago. Now that SB 5193 has cleared one hurdle, Smith charges citizens with a plea to reach out to the 7th District’s two representatives, Reps. Shelly Short and Joel Kretz, and give them ammunition they can use to advocate for

NORTH COUNTY - T h e Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District will begin loading reservoirs and mainlines on Monday, March 25, for the 2013 water season. Barring any unforeseen problems the district should have irrigation water to all users by the end of the first full week of April.

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the Senate bill. “The wolf bills introduced in the House didn’t advance, so now more than ever before, we need your help. It’s a powerful thing for lawmakers to be able to stand up and tell their colleagues about the 500 emails and 200 phone calls that have come in urging them to support a particular bill. The more that other members of the House from around the state realize what a concern this is to our part of Washington, the more likely they are to consider the bill -- so flooding inboxes, mailboxes and voicemails with your stories and encouragement can only help. “I am proud of the progress and the team effort to address this growing problem. We are halfway through this year’s legislative session and we can still keep our guns and protect our property - I’d say things are going well here in Olympia.” Smith’s wolf bill that passed the Senate earlier in the month, Senate Bill 5187, is scheduled for a public hearing this week before the House Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee. SB 5193 has yet to be scheduled for a public hearing in the House.

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MARCH 21, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

OUTDOORS OHA staff monitors beaver ponds and water storage in the Lost Lake wetland.

Methow and Chewuch rivers closed for steelhead and whitefish Okanogan and Similkameen open through March 31

Submitted photo

Actions: Close the Methow and Chewuch Rivers one hour after sunset on March 17, 2013 to fishing for steelhead and whitefish. Species affected: Steelhead and whitefish. Locations and effective dates: One hour after sunset on March 17, 2013. Methow River: From the mouth (Hwy 97 Bridge in Pateros) to the falls above Brush Creek. Chewuch River: From the mouth (Winthrop) to Pasayten wilderness boundary. Reason for action: Recent analysis of the current whitefish and steelhead fisheries within the Methow and Chewuch river systems indicates that the maximum take limits on natural origin steelhead have been met. In addition, take limits for the Chewuch and upper Methow River whitefish fisheries have been reached as well, necessitating a closure on whitefish as well as steelhead angling. Areas that will continue to be OPEN for steelhead angling until one hour after sunset on March 31, 2013 will include: Mainstem Columbia River: From Rock Island Dam to boundary markers below Wells Dam and from Hwy 173 Bridge at Brewster to 400 feet below Chief Joseph Dam. Wenatchee River: From the mouth to 400 feet below Tumwater Dam, including the Icicle River from the mouth to 500 feet downstream of the Leavenworth Fish Hatchery Barrier Dam. Okanogan River: From the

mouth to the Highway 97 Bridge in Oroville, except closed one hour after sunset on March 17th from the first powerline crossing downstream of the Hwy 155 Bridge in Omak (Coulee Dam Credit Union Building) to the mouth of Omak Creek, and from the Tonasket Lagoons Park boat launch to the Tonasket Bridge (4th Street). Similkameen River: From the mouth to 400 feet below Enloe Dam GENERAL RULES for all locations open to steelhead fishing: Mandatory retention of adipose fin-clipped steelhead, daily limit two (2) hatchery steelhead, 20 inch minimum size. Hatchery steelhead are identified by a clipped adipose fin with a healed scar in its location. Adhering to the mandatory retention of adipose clipped steelhead is vital in allowing the fishery to continue and to provide the maximum benefit to natural origin fish. Adipose present steelhead must be released unharmed and cannot be removed from the water prior to release. Night closure and selective gear rules are in effect, except bait is allowed in mainstem Columbia River. Whitefish anglers must follow selective gear rules in areas open to steelhead fishing, no bait is allowed. Daily whitefish limit is fifteen (15) fish. Other information:Anglers are required to possess a Columbia River Salmon/Steelhead Endorsement as part of their valid fishing license. Information contacts:Jeff Korth, Region 2 Fish Program Manager (Ephrata), (509) 754-4624; Bob Jateff, District 6 Fish Biologist (Methow, Okanogan), (509) 9970316; Travis Maitland, District 7 Fish Biologist (Wenatchee, Entiat), (509) 665-3337.

Mountain in the Hanford Reach National Monument for educational, recreational, historical, scientific, cultural, and other purposes. “As I’ve said many times, people are permitted to scale the top of Mount Rainier and they should have the opportunity to take in the sights from the summit of Rattlesnake Mountain,” said Hastings. “Since the public owns

these lands, everyone should be permitted safe, regular and carefully managed access to the summit of Rattlesnake Mountain.” Under Hastings’ bill, public access would include motor vehicles, pedestrians and other nonmotorized transportation methods such as bicycles. The bill does not dictate how and when public access occurs, but does mandate that public access be permitted.

WDFW Release

OHA presents ‘The Best of All Things: Clean Water’ Highland Wonders – First Friday of the Month Submitted by Julie Ashmore Okanogan Highlands Alliance

TONASKET - On Friday, April 5, John Crandall will come to Highland Wonders to discuss water quality and its importance in our lives. He will be presenting at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket’s “First Fridays” presentation in conjunction with the Okanogan Highlands Alliance. Crandall will share the story of water quality protection in the United States, including the role of the Clean Water Act – what it does and what it means for our water. Drawing on his extensive experience in monitoring water quality, John will provide an overview of the characteristics of water that are most commonly analyzed, and why. He will discuss important

local issues such the relationship between water temperature and fish survival, and the impact of pesticide use in our waterways. The effects of beavers, as well as wetlands, on water quality will also be discussed. “Water quality is important to us all,” Crandall says. “Whether for drinking, swimming or irrigation, we all benefit from having high quality water in our streams and groundwater. But clean water is not just important to humans, all plants and animals – especially aquatic related species – depend on it and suffer when the quality of water deteriorates.” John Crandall is an ecologist who has been monitoring the effects of stream restoration on water quality for the past 10 years. He has worked on fisheries conservation across the Northwest, with a particular interest in monitoring fish and habitat response to restoration activities. This involves studying water quality with the end goal of restoring healthy fish

populations. During eight years with The Nature Conservancy (TNC), John worked as a fisheries ecologist in the Klamath Basin in southern Oregon, the on-site preserve manger at the TNC McCloud River Preserve near Mount Shasta, and as a fisheries ecologist in North-Central Washington. Currently he coordinates monitoring activities through the Methow Restoration Council. He lives in the Methow Valley, growing dry beans, making salsa, and chasing after his eight-year old son. The Highland Wonders indoor educational series brings the natural history of the Okanogan Highlands and surrounding areas to Tonasket on the first Friday of the month, from November through May (skipping December). After April’s presentation about water, one more indoor Highland Wonders event will be offered this season, a presentation on Trumpeter Swans on the first Friday of May,

with Martha Jordan. The summer will bring some exciting outdoor interpretive events for smaller groups. OHA’s Education Program is designed to build the capacity of the community to steward natural habitats and resources, by helping to develop an informed and empowered population. Okanogan Highlands Alliance is a non-profit that works to educate the public on watershed issues. The educational series is offered by OHA, free of charge, at the Community Cultural Center (the “CCC”) of Tonasket, 411 S. Western Avenue. The presentation begins at 6:30 p.m. with desserts, tea and coffee; the dinner benefiting the CCC begins at 5:00 p.m. (the meal is $6 for CCC members or $7 for nonmembers). Details are provided on OHA’s website: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw. For more information, email julie@okanoganhighlands.org or call 509-433-7893.

Hastings reintroduces three bills concerning region Bills advance public access, fishing opportunities

Submitted by Neal Kirby Press Secretary

Washington, D.C. - U.S. Congressman Doc Hastings (4th District) has introduced three pieces of legislation important to Washington State that provide recreational access, tourism and fishing opportunities. The bills will be referred to the House Committee on Natural Resources, where Hastings serves as Chairman. All three of Hastings’ bills passed the House of Representatives with broad, bipartisan support in the 112th Congress (2011-2012), but the Senate failed to take a vote on the bills. H.R. 1156 renews efforts that would allow the National Parks Service to relocate and rebuild the Upper Stehekin Valley Road in the North Cascades National Park. Over time, floods and the changing path of the Stehekin River have critically damaged significant sections of Stehekin Road. The road occupies a narrow corridor within the borders of the Stephen Mather Wilderness Area. Congressional approval is required to modify the corridor prior to the National Park Service rebuilding the road. “Stehekin Road was specifically protected when the Park and Wilderness areas were created, because of its value to local residents and tourists,” said Hastings. “For many years, Stehekin Road has been maintained and run by park officials, but following extreme flooding and subsequent changes in the course of the river, much of it is now under water. My bill simply gives the Park Service the ability to restore the damaged sections of the road, while maintaining the integrity of the wilderness area surrounding the only route through the park for residents and visitors alike. A promise was made and it must be kept.” Hastings’ bill would adjust the wilderness boundary for the sole purpose of rebuilding the closed

section of road away from the Stehekin River, provided there is no net loss of wilderness acreage. Hastingsí second bill, the North Cascades National Park Service Complex Fish Stocking Act(H.R. 1158), would allow the practice of fish stocking in North Cascades lakes to continue, a tradition that has been in place for more than a century, and which long predates the establishment of the National Parks Service. Without this legislative authority, the National Park Service has stopped and will not continue fish stocking. “After years of consultation with local leaders on this issue, it is clear to me that communities in and around the North Cascades National Park Complex want fish stocking to continue,” said Hastings. “Fish stocking has encouraged tourism, recreation and the economy in these communities for over a century. Although I believe the National Park Service already has the authority to do this under the act that established the park in 1968, the Park Service is requiring further clarification

from Congress.” Hastings’ bill would permit the stocking of up to 42 of the lakes that have historically been stocked with fish located in the North Cascades National Park Complex. The Complex includes the North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake National Recreation Area, and Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. The lakes in question are home to many recreational activities and draw Park visitors from around the state, region and beyond. In addition to the 112th Congress, both the Upper Stehekin Valley Road Access bill and the North Cascades National Park Service Complex Fish Stocking Act passed the House of Representatives in the 111th Congress (2009-2010), but again were not voted upon by the Senate. Hastings’ third bill, the Rattlesnake Mountain Public Access Act (H.R. 1157), would allow public access to the summit of Rattlesnake Mountain located on the Hanford Reach National Monument in Benton

County. Currently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of the Interior responsible for managing the Hanford Reach National Monument, has refused even limited public access to the summit of Rattlesnake Mountain. Hastingsí legislation would require the Secretary of the Interior to provide reasonable public access to the summit of Rattlesnake

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 21, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life OROVILLE SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION VARIETY SHOW

Brent Baker/staff photo

Nathan Rise concentrates as he performs “Toccata Brilliante” by Dennis Alexander at Friday’s variety show.

Variety show fills evening with fun and talent By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - The Oroville Scholarship Foundation may no longer be “Dollars for Scholars,” but dollars will still go to scholars after its eighth annual variety show on Friday, March 14. Co-presented by the foundation and the Oroville School District’s music department, the variety show featured 20 acts that first had to pass muster with music teacher Eric Stiles. As a full house in the Oroville High School commons took part in a silent auction, as well as munching on a free selection of desserts, the crowd was entertained by everything from classical piano and violin to ballet and dance to renditions of more recent popular tunes. Performances included: Aya Cruspero singing “When I Was Your Man,” by Bruno Mars; Sarah Stiles on the piano, performing “Ode to Joy” and “Jesu Joy of Man’s Desiring;” Mackenzie Fogg sining “’Til the World Ends,” by Brittany Spears; Grace Stiles singing “Anything Goes” by Cole Porter, to Liz Grunst’s accompaniment; Leo Chen and Trace Scott performing a TaeKwon-Do pattern to “Kung Fu Fighting;” Nathan Rise performing “Toccata Brilliante” by Dennis Alexander on the piano; Bonnie Roley singing All Time Low’s “Theraphy;” Michael Oaks performing magic tricks and otherwise entertaining the audience; Jeff Gee singing and playing Elvis’ “I Can’t Help Falling in Love with You” on the piano; Narya Naillon singing Adele’s “Someone Like You;” Max Turner playing a violin solo of “Bird Song” and “Orange Blossom Special;” Kaylee Clough dancing to “Just Fishin’;” Aramis Serrano singing “Take Care” by Drake; Sienna Guzman performing “A Particularly Pleasing Piano Piece;” Lillie Gronlund singing Maroon 5’s “Loved;” Sami Turner playing “Sonatina on Five Notes” and “Sweet Hour of Prayer” on piano; Alexis Allenby singing “Beautiful,” by Christina Aguilera; Kaytie Miller and Kaylee Clough performing a tap duet; and Debra Donahue closing with The Eagles’ “Desperado.” Scholarships funded though the admission price and silent auction included the Yulah and Philip Schleif Memorial, the Daniel Christenson Memorial, the Robert Drummond scholarship, the Glen and Kathryn Tracy scholarship; the Rayh and Eula Forney Kuntz scholarship, the Sara Hulphers Memorial Scholarship and the Oroville Scholarship Foundation Scholarships.

Top left, Aya Cruspero proved to be a tough act to follow as she knocked off Bruno Mars’ “When I Was Your Man” to lead off the Oroville Scholarship Foundation’s variety show on Friday, March 15; top right, Max Turner’s violin solos were a big highlight of the Oroville Scholarship Foundation Variety Show; above right, Meladie Young performed ballet to John Lennon’s “Imagine” at Friday’s variety show; above left, Kaytie Miller (left) and Kaylee Clough finish off their tap duet with a little attitude; and at left, A pleased and proud Mackenzie Fogg rushes to her family after performing Brittany Spears’ “’Til the World Ends.”

Brent Baker/staff photos

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Adults: $8.00 Adults: $9.00 Student (7-12): $6.00 Student (7-12): $7.00 Children (K-6): $4.00 Children (K-6): $ 5.00 Advance Tickets Available at: Oroville Schools, Hometown Pizza, Oroville Pharmacy, Prince’s Customer Service Presented by Donkey Sports, Inc. of Entiat, Washington


MARCH 21, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER More questions LETTERS than answers TO THE EDITOR The community meeting on the closure of the Assisted Living in Tonasket probably resulted in more questions than answers. It certainly gave those in attendance in the Oroville High School Commons something to think about. Tuesday there were hearings on whether a petition brought by Danny Gratrix and Rosa Snider for a recall and a request for a temporary injunction stopping the hospital from closing at the end of the month. While the injunction was apparently denied, the petition to hold a recall of all the hospital commissioners was withdrawn, according to Snider. She said it was hard going up against the hospital which had its own publicly-funded lawyer. She said the deputy prosecutor didn’t help matters by joking with the hospital’s attorney and saying that the Out of petition didn’t meet the statute. Fearing that the proceeding would ruin their chances at rewritMy Mind the petition to meet the statute, Gratrix and Gary A. DeVon ing Snider withdrew it, she says. Pouring salt on the wounds of the Concerned Citizens for Tonasket Assisted Living, Mick Howe, attorney for the hospital district, requested and was awarded attorney’s fees and reimbursement for the cost of all the hospital administrators and the three commissioners that attended the hearing, according to Snider. She thinks that this is a form of “corporate welfare” because the public pays for the attorney fees and for the administrators’ time anyway. However, if the group that requested the injunction doesn’t pay, who does? The taxpayers do. We’re not sure of all the facts on why an Okanogan County Superior Court Judge denied the injunction, but plan on following up next week when it isn’t on top of our deadline. We inserted the little article on page one, but we realize there’s more to the story and hope to have something online soon. One of the biggest takeaways from the Oroville meeting is the claim that the top nine salaried employees have received a combined $288,018 worth of pay increases in the last two years. That’s a lot while the hospital district is still struggling to pay off in the neighborhood of $2 million in warrants to the county. The CEO/Administrator saw her salary increase from $130,208 to $160,160 dollars, an increase of nearly $30,000 a year. And while the median household income, according to the 2010 census was $47,000, many people in the county would be happy to just be earning an annual income of what the CEO got in raises in the last two years. Snider said that attorney Howe disputed those figures. Snider wonders how they can be when she says opponents of the assisted living’s closure got the figures from the hospital district through Public Records requests. Another question that was raised concerned whether Maintenance and Operation’s Bond Levy money is going toward making payments on the combined Assisted Living Bonds. The group fighting the closure says that’s what the State Auditor says it should be going toward. They claim that if that was being done, a seven-year loss of $821,000 would have actually been only $18,270 over seven years – that’s about $2,600 a year or a few bake sales. The question is, whose figures are right: those fighting the closure or those who say they’re protecting the hospital district from completely going under? It looks like round one went to the commissioners and administrators. Are the opponents of the closure going to fight on? We think they might have public sentiment behind them.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

How willing are we to save the Assisted Living? Dear Editor, Concerning the closing of the Tonasket Assisted Living Facility- One question comes to mind, “How willing are we?” Sounds like we as a community are pretty willing. We have people voicing strong emotions, people picketing in Tonasket, people offering letters to the editor, prayers, concerns, and people putting energy into finding alternatives in light of the impending closure. This all translates to a community that is willing, a community that has passion, drive and a vested and eager interest in keeping the facility open and serving our community. So naturally the next question is, “What does it take?” (To keep this facility open). Some would simply resolve to the answer, “A huge sum of money that we don’t have and can’t get”. Really? Is that how you got your first car, horse, college education or whatever your life’s dream and heart’s desire was? So really, what does it take? 200 hours of volunteer labor per month, a monthly fundraiser, large contributions from large companies, donations of supplies, restructuring or rescheduling of personnel, moving the facility to a different building, improved buying power, a special levy- all of these things and more? Are we as a community willing to do what it takes? We as North County residents are a strong group of people with a wide variety of resources. Perhaps there is a way to keep the Assisted Living Facility open to serve our community. We support skate parks, water parks, veteran memorials, athletics, the environment, schools, animal rescues and many other important causes. Again, are we willing to do what it takes? Kim Renner Oroville

So you want to replace Obamacare, with what? Dear Editor, Everyone needs access to good, affordable healthcare. This year we will see more of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) come into effect and start to address this need. An interesting story for a local newspaper might be to illuminate how people in our area get access to healthcare: Who has what kind of insurance, how much it costs and who is actually paying for it. I often wonder when I hear someone adamantly opposing

Obamacare how they are getting their healthcare. There’s Medicaid for the poor, there’s Medicare for older Americans who reach the magic age, there’s healthcare for veterans and there’s healthcare for anyone working for any of the various governments- municipal, state and federal. Then there’s healthcare provided by many employers some private and some public (like the PUD and the hospitals). Some plans are good and some are not so good. Obamacare looks to provide healthcare to tens of millions of Americans who don’t happen to fit into one of these “in” groups. This includes substitute teachers in our schools, woods workers, small business owners, retail clerks, students, laid off workers, construction workers, workers in probationary periods of work, farmers and farm workers. There are going to be problems with Obamacare. However, it does provide a framework for hard-working Americans to get access to affordable healthcare, and it requires them to pay at least something for this benefit. Obamacare addresses the need for fairness in the system, something Americans have fought for throughout our nation’s history. Parts of the new law that don’t work or need to be changed should be changed, but we as a people ought to try to make it work. Everyone needs access to affordable healthcare. The mantra of the Republican Party has been “repeal and replace.” Well, replace with what? I contacted my congresswoman for months and was told that the replacement legislation was being worked on. I never saw anything, and I wondered if they were really working on something at all. I am all for improvements, but you gotta have something; you can’t just wish you had something. Rob Thompson Tonasket

K-2 Students upset about dog waste Dear Editor, We are K-2 students in the Tonasket Outreach Program. There is dog waste on our schoolyard. We are upset! We researched and thought of reasons why this is not good.

• If your town has a lot of waste no one would want to be around. • You could get dog waste on your feet!! • Dog waste can get washed into street drains and go into our rivers or creeks. It can spread to fish and humans. • Bacteria and worms can get humans sick! • If a puppy eats other dogs’ waste and gets sick it can die. • It may not decompose until 4 years. Then it will be bad. We have some ideas for clean up. Maybe there could be a Clean Up Day for dog waste. In your own yard, you could use pooper scoopers—there are different kinds. On a walk, dog owners could carry plastic bags. You can stick your hand in a clean bag, then use it like a glove to pick up the waste. Turn it inside out to carry it and then throw it away or flush it down the toilet. Sincerely, Mrs. Olson’s K-2 Students Tonasket Outreach Program

Appreciate the letter reader’s compliment Dear Gary, I would like to thank Jessica McNamara for the nice comments that she made in last week’s paper about “my” letter on grocery store etiquette, even if the wrong person was named. I’m used to it. Seems my little/ big brother has been getting credit for things I’ve done all my life. Just the good things of course, and just kidding. I call Bill my little/ big brother because he got bigger than me in our teens and boy the fights got nasty then. I wasn’t about to let my little brother whoop me. Before that it was just thump thump and it was over. Little brothers/sisters hate it when we call them that, eh? Gotta irritate `em some how. I definitely couldn’t pass up the opportunity, especially in the paper. Thanks again Jessica. You must not be from the “Me” self-centered little brat generation to actually compliment someone. Bob Nicholson Oroville

Resetting the Housing Sector: Time for new leadership at FHFA BY JEAN-MARIE CATERINA AND JOSE GONZALEZ

Business groups with an axe to grind against the Obama Administration, like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Federation of Independent Business, like to push the idea that “uncertainty” over government actions is the monkey on the economy’s back. As small business owners who work in the housing sector, we don’t buy that analysis. The source of our continuing economic problems is not some vague cloud of “uncertainty.” It is, quite the opposite, the very real certainty that if we don’t do more – and soon – to hit the reset button for the housing sector, the economic recovery will continue to fall short of what we need to put millions of unemployed Americans back to work. Almost five years after the financial crisis rocked our economy, we still haven’t done any-

thing to address one of the key drivers of the crisis: the divorced-from-reality overpricing of homes and mortgages during the housing bubble. Since the bubble burst, nothing has been done to correct the pricing distortions that were written into mortgage contracts. The result? Fourteen million Americans are underwater in their homes. This isn’t just holding back the housing sector. A weak housing sector drags the whole economy down, and when consumers are stuck shipping inflated mortgage payments off to Wall Street accounts every month, that drains consumer purchasing power and weakens local economies. A scientific survey of small business owners nationwide commissioned last year by three business networks bears this out. In that survey, 73 percent of small business owners said the drop in consumer demand as a result of the housing and mortgage crisis has hurt their businesses (and 28 percent said it has

hurt a great deal). There is, of course, a solution: reset underwater mortgages to fair market value. That will boost the housing sector, bolster consumer spending, and restore the dream of home ownership for millions of Americans who’ve been living an underwater nightmare for the last five years. Why haven’t we implemented this simple solution? There’s a simple answer. In two words or less: Edward DeMarco. As acting director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, Mr. DeMarco oversees Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. And in that capacity, Mr. DeMarco has blocked all efforts at resetting underwater mortgages. Indeed, despite clear evidence that writing down underwater mortgages to fair market value would be good not only for homeowners but also for Fannie, Freddie, and U.S. taxpayers, DeMarco has rejected all efforts to move this solution forward. Remember how, on the campaign trail, President Obama often used the metaphor of driving a car to make his case for why he (and Democrats) should be re-elected? “Why would we give the keys back to the same people who drove the economy into the ditch in the first place?” was the gist of his appeal. Well, now he’s got a guy driving his administration’s housing policy who, instead of turning the key and stepping on the gas to get the car out of the ditch, seems more intent on slashing the tires. Especially with the gridlock in the U.S. House and Senate over economic issues, we need President Obama to do what’s in his power to get the economy back on track. As small business owners and real estate agents, we’d suggest he start by asking Mr. DeMarco to hand over the keys to his office. It’s time to appoint a new FHFA director who will do what’s right for homeowners, small businesses, and the economy by resetting mortgages to fair market value. Caterina is a real estate broker at the Caterina MacLean Group in Scarborough, Maine and a member of the Maine Small Business Coalition. Gonzalez is principal broker at Tu Casa Real Estate in Salem, Oregon and a member of the Main Street Alliance of Oregon small business network.


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 21, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Easter Services are not far off Ten days from today, those that believe in the Easter Bunny, he will be “hoppin down the bunny trail” scattering brightly colored eggs for the little folks. And of course that is a fable, and the traditional day will be celebrated with faith among the different denominations of churches. It is said by some, when they attend the Sunday church services, that the parting words THIS & THAT are, “I’ll see you Joyce Emry at Christmas.” Perhaps more truth than fiction. Ed Craig has had his hip surgery and is home, recuperating. Yeah! He is the bell ringer at the United Methodist Church and has been missed during his absence. Ed was able to drive himself

Nearing the last of ‘Mud Season’ By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

The weather forecast for the first day of Spring was to be a bit cool. How was yours? I believe the first day was suppose to be yesterday. We should be getting down to the last of “Mud Season.” I know it will be a while for some side roads and drive ways. Drive Careful! Another “Pancake Breakfast?” Yes! on Sunday, March 24th at the Molson Grange Hall. It’s $8 per person will get you some Ham, your choice of eggs (Scrambled or Fried), your choice of pancakes (buttermilk or buckwheat) and applesauce, coffee or tea. Bring the family and your friends for a great breakfast. Don’t forget to purchase your Raffle Tickets for the great “Basket” Drawing” from the Ladies Auxiliary to benefit the Hall. On Saturday, March 16, 2013 at 5 p.m. in the evening we were

HILLTOP COMMENTS invited to the wedding of Hannah Marie McDaniel and Eric Eugene McKinney at the “Shed Shop” in Tonasket. Being from the Seattle area where most weddings are held in a church with the reception there or at a local hall or club, so to arrive at the “Shed Shop” in Tonasket was an experience. This wedding was “Awesome” from the time you entered. The decor was simple, but elegant, with small lights entwined in tooling, round tables all set for dinner following the ceremony, and a round of a tree with flowers in a mason jar and candle lit insulators for the centerpieces on each table. Along one side of the room was a “Family Tree” of pictures of both families. The guests were having a good time finding their branch. Over head were two chandeliers made from mason jars with candle lights inside (battery operated).

Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck

Household Soldier Shrines common A framed certificate of completion, promotion, or achievement; a flight or battalion 8x10” grouping leaning against a blue-starred triangle of an American flag folded 13 times ceremoniously waiting for that display case that is so expensive. Perhaps a cap, chevrons, a name tape, souvenirs brought back from a foreign land, job pins, yellow ribbons, and dog tags all staged around the photo of slim soldier and the family at graduation. Smiles stiffly placed on faces that wrestle with the assault of immense concern on immense pride. This is a shrine, dedicated to a hero. Military families invariably

BLUE STAR MOTHERS have some sort of Soldier Shrine in their home. They serve many purposes: to aid in the comprehension of where their child is; in understanding the military and the soldier; and as a constant reminder of why they and their children are making these sacrifices. The shrine will place their soldier visually in his/her new surroundings. The son or daughter who looked so at home on a horse, basketball court, or on the living room couch now must be mentally transported to being a part of the greatest fighting force the world has ever known. These children must now have the respect deserving that of a man/woman warrior.

Time to get the seedlings going Submitted by Sue Wisener Tonasket Eagles 3002

Spring is upon us as we all enjoy the warmer temperatures and those good ol’ blustery winds. It is time to start getting those seedlings going for your garden. Coming soon our Tuesday cribbage games at lpm will be starting, we will get the exact date in the paper as soon as possible, so start getting those 15 2’s ready. Do not forget our annual scholarship raffle for $400 in Gas or Groceries, tickets are $5 each or three for 10. We also have the

to pinochle last Saturday night and to church Sunday. A welcome home from Wenatchee hospital is in order for Willie Penner. Also, welcome back to Oroville to Bev Storm. Soon, our other snow birds should be arriving. But, it’s off to Spokane hospital for “Bud” Gerken with stroke/heart related problems. Updated news should come soon, from the many tests and procedures to get to the bottom of the problem. Randy McCallister, local pastor, is home again, but still no positive reasons for his health issues, with stroke like symptoms. And sadly we must say goodbye to Verle and Norene Harnasch who are moving to Kennewick to be near family and doctors. When they get an address we’ll have further notification. I started to write “on a happier note” but when you get to the “nitty gritty” of it, it isn’t a happy note. It is happy

TONASKET EAGLES drawing for the Afghan raffle this Saturday, so come get those tickets while you can, ticket prices are one dollar each, or six for five dollars, hurry while you can. This Friday do not forget our Bingo night starting at 7 p.m. The kitchen will open at 5:30 p.m., so come enjoy a tasty one-thrid of a pound hamburger, or another item off the menu. This Saturday there is a benefit dinner and dessert auction for Peggy Burton from 5 to 7 p.m., with Karaoke to follow by Linda Wood. Make sure and bring your dancing shoes.

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that someone is trying to make a better life for the poor children that are abused, neglected, left behind etc., but it is a sad note that so many folks continue to have babies and aren’t responsible enough to care for them. Doris Hughes, a well known lady and former employee of the G-T is asking for good Teddy bears to be given to her niece, in Spokane, who after several years working for the Child Protective Services, went on her own and started “Spokane’s Abused Children.” First time visitors are given a Teddy bear, to keep for their own. She goes through forty to fifty bears a month. Her family helps recruit bears from Goodwill, etc. and Doris is asking those that have bears, sitting around collecting dust, to get them to her and she will in turn, get them to her niece, Carol Thomas. Doris’s phone number is (509) 476-3738 or the bears could be left at the Senior Center. Every time a child is born, so is a grandma. I have been a grandma seven times and I love ‘em all! Thanks to Joan (Thorndike) Jensen, Soap Lake, Wash. for the kudo’s to Clayton and I for our contributions to the G-T. Most people do enjoy “old news” and have fun remembering “back when” and then trying to think of other names associated with the items. Brains are funny things. They seem to come up with the answers, about midnight when there is no one to tell... and by morning

The Bride and Groom exchanged their vows in front of the large room in front of a French Door with more tooling and lights for a frosted effect. Needless to say it was beautiful. While they were having their pictures taken the bar was opened and appetizers were served. The chairs were all moved around the tables and it was time for the wonderful prime rib, salad and baked potato dinner with all of the trimmings. It was wonderful. Thank you for asking us to share your day. The Chesaw Tavern is now open under new ownership at noon Tuesday through Thursday. They will be serving a limited menu on Saturday and Sunday for breakfast from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. On March ll, with 28 pinochle players, the High winners were: Darrel Bunch and Loni Thompson, the Low Winners were: Harold Harper and Sally Eder with Vivian Emry taking the Traveling. Special notice went to Beverly Holden for her first ever - Double Run. Yahoo! Until next week To many families, military service is so very unfamiliar. Being in the company of a uniform, a banner, ribbons, and other military memorabilia daily makes the family more at ease and comfortable with the service, its environment, and traditions. The shrine will also be the conversation starter. Telling a soldier’s story is a way for the family to process it all. The soldier will be away for two, four, eight years or more. You may have seen that shrine the last time you were over, but check it for updates and additions. The military life is never static! It may be old news to you that John joined the Navy two years ago, but I guarantee you, it is not old news to the family. This is a memorial. Take notice and remember, too. We would love to post pictures of your Soldier Shrines! Please post them on facebook.com/ncw. blue.star.mothers.

you’ve forgotten again. A lot of folks, including me, like the different dollar stores. While recently in Seattle, I learned of a similar store, named Daiso. All things in it are $1.50 and it is Japanese imports. The former “Dollars for Scholars” variety show and silent auction was well attended last Friday night. There was lots of entertaining talent on the program, but in my opinion, “Michael’s Magic” performed by young Michael Oaks, stole the show, again. The young violinist, Max Turner, doing the Orange Blossom is coming right along, too. Be sure and watch for the Mt. Hull waterfalls. They were roaring last Thursday and some added ones besides the regular ones. Jason and Stephanie Haney have returned from a visit to one of my favorite places, Hawaii. Palm trees, sunshine, beautiful sandy beaches. Great place! With warmer temperatures, locally, soon the forsythia will be sporting color and early bulbs are bursting through the soil and soon the tulips, hyacinths, daffodils and crocus will be peeking their heads in a rainbow of color, where just a short time ago was snow. Welcome to the new owners at Linda’s bakery. Going across the border doesn’t happen for me, nearly as often as it used to, but last Saturday my daughter and I went

to a Spring Crafts Fair. Kinda’ fun to see what they have that differs from our local. Did you ever see soap made from wine? They got it. I received my usual bouquet of flowers, as I have for 68 years, on March 17, as that is the anniversary of friend husband and me going out together for the first time. Pancake Time Again: Sunday March 24 is a scheduled pancake breakfast at Molson from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Plenty of time for going to church then head for the hills for a relaxing meal, lotsa’ visiting and no dishes to wash. Ya’ can’t beat a deal like that!!! We watched a Mariner’s game last Sunday, from Arizona and they won! Another problem for Carnival Lines Cruise Ships. I believe the “Gods” are out to get them, as that makes four mishaps in a month. And then there was the lady that went on a cruise, didn’t disembark when she got home, and went again and again. Finally she was questioned as to why she kept going on the same trip. “It’s a heck’ of a lot cheaper than the nursing home I was in and much better food and you don’t see the same old people, day after day,” she replied. Now that is my kind of lady! Great article in last week’s paper of Heidi Hylton and her riding adventures. She’s truly a lover of horses and she is our niece.

Community Bulletin Board Rally for Buckhorn at CCC The Okanogan Highlands Alliance benefit event “Rally for Buckhorn” will be hosted by the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket on Friday, March 22. It will feature a show of fashion made from recycled materials as well as other skits, a dessert auction, drawings and dinner sponsored by the CCC. Meal begins at 5:30 p.m. and the “Trashion Show” starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance at Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op or $25 at the door.

Best for Women Fair OKANOGAN - The Okanogan Valley Soroptimist and Omak Clinic present the Best for Women Fair on Saturday, March 23, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. at the Okanogan High School Cafetorium. Admission is free. A salad lunch is $7 with drinks and extras included. Join us for a day of pampering products, door prizes, a silent auction and so much more!

Molson Grange Pancake Feed MOLSON - There will be a pancake feed at the Molson Grange on Sunday, March 24 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come and enjoy all you can eat ham, eggs, hashbrowns, pancakes and applesauce.

Joint Palm Sunday Service TONASKET - Pray for the evangelization of our community, worship in music and prayer and help yourself to some coffee, cookies, fellowship and music by Solid Rock. Joint Palm Sunday service with Tonasket Four Square Church and Tonasket Free Methodist Church at TFMC, 1 Stanton Loop Rd., Tonasket, on Sunday, March 24, 4:30 p.m.

Our Sunday pinochle score are the following: first place was Neil Fifer, second place was Ken Cook. Jerry Cooksey took low score and last pinochle was Gib McDougal and Jo Porter. We are hoping Richard Mulvihill is doing better, and all that are ill we wish a speedy recovery to good health. God not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the BlessWhy you all. The Biggest Little OMAK - The next regutime of year that you help save for a child’s college Eagles in the state. lar Okanogan County Transit

Authority board meeting will be Monday, March 25, 2013 at Rockwall Cellars, 110 Nichols Road, Omak from 6 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. followed by a Stakeholders “Meet and Greet” from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. If you have any questions or concerns please contact Jeff Wilkens at jeff@wvtc.org or (509) 663-9059.

Donkey Basketball OROVILLE - The Oroville Booster Club is sponsoring Donkey Basketball on Wednesday, March 27 at the Oroville High School gym. Teams from the Molson-Chesaw Fire Department, Oroville Fire Department, The Mechanics and Blue Thunder will compete for the coveted trophy. Advance tickets at a reduced price are available at Oroville Schools, Princes, Oroville Pharmacy and Hometown Pasta and Pizza.

School Retirees’ Meeting OMAK - Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association meets 11 a.m., Friday, March 29, at Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala Ave., Omak. Julia O’Connor, director of the Family Empowerment Project, will discuss the project’s efforts to help homeless and disadvantaged students in Okanogan County schools. Information: (509) 4223393.

Community Easter Egg Hunt TONASKET - The Tonasket Community Easter Egg Hunt will be on Saturday, March 30 at 10 a.m. Kids first grade and under will meet at the High School Tennis Courts. Kids from second through fifth grade meet at behind the bus garage. There is a

limit of two prize eggs per child. The egg hunt is sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary with donations from the community.

Breast Cancer Poker Tournament

OMAK - Bouncin’ for Boobies “You’ve Gotta Know When to Hold ‘Em” poker tournament is Saturday, March 30, at the Elks in Omak. Check-in is 6 p.m. with the tournament starting at 6:30 p.m. Tourney will pay out first, second and third prizes with other games upstairs, also for cash prizes. Raffle tickets also to be sold. Initial buy-in for chips is $30, re-buy is $15, otherwise no charge to attend. Must be age 18 or older to participate. Tickets are available by contacting Lynn Hoover at (509) 322-0261 or through the Bouncin’ for Boobies Facebook page.

Easter Church Services LOOMIS - Loomis Community Church invites the public to attend its special Easter events on Sunday, March 31, 2013, beginning with a sunrise service at the cross, located two mile up the Horse Spring Coulee Road, at the west end of Spectacle Lake, at 7 a.m. The service will be followed at 8 a.m. by a breakfast for all in the church fellowship room. An Easter Worship service at 11 a.m. will be held in the sanctuary.

Best of All Things: Clean Water TONASKET - On Friday, April 5, John Crandall will come to Highland Wonders to discuss water quality and its importance in our lives. Crandall will share the story of water quality protection in the U.S., including the role of the Clean Water Act – what it does and what it means for our water.

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MARCH 21, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Oroville Chamber approves officers Guest speaker discusses safe haven for pregnant teens By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE – The Oroville Chamber of Commerce approved a familiar slate of officers to finish out 2013, with the addition of one new member to the board. Topping the list, Clyde Andrews returns as president, Peggy Shaw is treasurer and Leah Colbert is secretary. The organization is still seeking a vice president. The board includes Gary DeVon, Ardi Fitzhum, Joan Cool and new for this year, Marylou Kriner. An advisory board is made up of Robin Stice, Patti Garrett and Kay Sibley. Included in the budget, also approved at the Thursday, March 14 meeting, is income from dues and the May Festival Barbecue (with most barbecue profits going

toward paying for insurance for May Festival and other activities). Expenses were listed as administrative, advertising, Christmas Lighting, the Circus down payment, Ice Fishing Festival, internet, phone and scholarships. Money from the Ice Fishing Festival goes to help with operating costs at the Visitor Information Center and the Circus is expected to bring in money to help cover other operating costs. As guest speaker, Kelly Willard discussed her plan to start a home for unwed mothers, probably in the Omak/Okanogan area for its central location. “We want to offer a safe haven for pregnant teens to come to,” said Willard, who adds that sometimes parents, especially fathers, are unwilling to let their daughters stay with them if they get pregnant. She and her husband will operate the home as house parents and will finance the project, with hopes of not becoming a burden

on the community. They will take in teens from all over the county who have no where else to go, but while there the teens must abide by the rules. “We will be doing fundraisers and we will also connect with adoption services for mothers who chose to put their baby up for adoption,” said Willard. She said there are 12 girls in Omak, including one as young as the seventh-grade, who are pregnant right now. “As soon as we let people know what we wanted to do we started to get calls from DSHS and Okanogan County Behavioral Health with inquiries,” she said. The home will be known as “Heaven’s Cradle” and it’s goal is to have room for six pregnant teens, according to Willard. “We are looking at homes now,” she said. They will ask the parents to pay one hundred to two hundred dollars a month to help support their daughters. “A lot of mom’s want to keep

their child at home, but the dads don’t,” said Willard. “The county has the highest teen pregnancy and highest foster care rate in the state.” Those in the home will get “lifestyle training,” including lessons on cooking, how to find a roommate and on continuing their education. While in residence they will also have to attend school, either in public school or online. “We want to break the cycle of teen pregnancy,” said Willard, who was a teen mom at 15. Heaven’s Cradle will present a Christian Women’s conference on May 4 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Riverside Lighthouse Church. They are also offering sponsorship packages to help offset the cost of the event. For more information on this event or supporting the Heaven’s Cradle Home contact (509) 322-2125 or go online at www.heavenslovingcradle.webs. com. “Our goal is to become selfsustaining,” said Willard.

Forest Service plans prescribed burning in Okanogan County Burns could begin near Tunk Mountain, east of Tonasket, in April by Shannon O’Brien Public Affairs Specialist

TONASKET - Spring burning conditions for National Forest Lands in Okanogan County are being evaluated. Specialists anticipate beginning burning as early as April on some of the lower elevation National Forest sites around Tunk Mountain and Mt. Annie, east of Tonasket, as well as Little Bridge, McFarland and Squaw Creeks near Twisp Washington. “Depending on weather and fuel moisture, crews could begin burning in April,” said Shawn Plank, Fuels Specialist on the Tonasket Ranger District. “The season could extend to June if conditions permit.” There are eleven areas described in the 2013 Burn Plan, a brochure produced by the Forest Service that describes the areas planned for either spring or fall treatment and the reasons for those treatments. This season, prescribed burning treatments on the Methow Valley Ranger District are planned northwest of Winthrop Washington near Eightmile Creek, Cub Creek and Fawn Creek; west of Winthrop near Wolf Creek; West of Twisp near Little Bridge Creek; east of Twisp near the Loop Loop Summit; east of Carlton in the Leecher Mountain area; and west of Methow in the McFarland Creek and Squaw Creek Drainages. Tonasket Ranger District has prescribed burning treatments planned this spring in the Mt Annie and the Tunk Mountain areas; both are southeast of Tonasket, Washington. In some areas, the prescribed

treatment is underburning to ested habitats. Additional beneaddress accumulations of slash fits of prescribed burning include and natural fuels. Fuels Specialists habitat restoration, maintenance intend to use these treatments to of species diversity, stimulation of reintroduce fire effects on the forage for browsing species, and landscape and reduce the wildfire return of nutrients to the soil. The program emphasizes treatrisk to nearby homes and forested lands.  In other areas, the treat- ment in areas of the National ment planned involves burning Forest that are nearest private piles of slash from thinning treat- lands and those lands managed by other agencies. Lower to midments. Each element that affects the valley elevations are of highest success of a prescribed fire plan is concern. The prescribed burning evaluated prior to ignition. Smoke program is part of the compredispersal and minimization of hensive Okanogan-Wenatchee smoke impacts to public health National Forest Restoration Strategy. Forest are of primary concern. “Depending on weath- Service managbegan impleMo n i t o r i n g er and moisture, crews ers menting the weather concould begin burning in strategy in 1999 ditions, long April” to reduce the term forethreat of uncharcasts, forest Shawn Plank, acteristically fuel moistures, USFS Fuels Specialist severe fires and and neighborbring resiliency ing prescribed to unhealthy forfire activity are all part of the evaluation process.  est ecosystems. To get involved with prescribed Before submitting a prescribed burn for approval, specialists on fire planning efforts, please conthe Methow Valley and Tonasket tact Meg Trebon at the Methow Ranger Districts monitor the Valley Ranger District or Jen Croft moisture of accumulated forest at the Tonasket Ranger District. debris and assess weather condi- To speak with a prescribed fire specialist or obtain updates durtions. “Timing is important and we ing the burn season, please call try to plan our ignitions to coin- the Districts’ Prescribed burncide with favorable winds that ing information lines.  Methow will help disperse smoke away Valley’s 24 hour prescribed burnfrom residential areas,” said Meg ing information line is (509) 996Trebon, Assistant Fire Manager 4032 and Tonasket’s is  509-486for Fuels.  Then, on the day of 5158.  Ignition updates are also the burn, we do not begin ignition until smoke dispersal and weather conditions are favorable, and burn plan objectives can be accomplished.” Prescribed burning is one of the tools used to reduce existing forest fuel accumulations in an effort to reduce wildfire potential and improve forest health. The prescribed fire program is intended to improve the safety of the public and wildland firefighters, minimize the size and intensity of wildfires, and create healthy for-

Gold Digger Inc. Ag scholarship Submitted by Roni DeVon

Gold Digger Inc.

OROVILLE - Recognizing the importance of keeping youth in agriculture, and that the best candidates have rural roots and understand the industry on a personal level, Gold Digger Apples, Inc. is offering up to four scholarships totaling $2,000 to qualifying students. Who can apply? High school seniors attending Oroville, Tonasket, Omak or Okanogan School Districts who are planning to attend a college, university or trade school. Preference will be given to: • Students who plan to serve their communities in the agriculture field • Students who have family affiliated with Gold Digger Apples

• Students from a family working in agricultural • Students who can deliver information in concise, easy-tounderstand writing The deadline is May 1, 2013 – Contact your local school district or Gold Digger Apples for more information.

HUMUH potluck The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a vegetarian potluck dinner and spiritual movie on Saturday, March 23. The potluck starts at 6pm and the movie at 7pm, Bring a vegetarian dish and a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call (509) 4760200.

It’s a Surprise

Submitted photo

A surprise birthday celebration is planned for Ina “Faye” Cole who will be turning 75-years-old. The celebration will take place on Saturday, March 23 at 2:30 p.m. at the Oroville United Methodist Church, 908 Fir St. The family request no gift, but asks that friends stop by and visit.

posted on twitter at www.twitter. com/OkaWenNF. The Washington State Department of Natural Resources regulates smoke management and must approve all controlled burns on national forests within the state. Okanogan-Wenatchee N.F. fire specialists closely coordinate with the state’s air quality managers, after they receive burn approval.

DENTISTRY

Spring Means Do your part to keep our Fresh Air air clean. Mulch, compost, Let’s keep It that way.

or chip leaves and branches instead of burning them. Follow burn bans and never burn garbage. Everyone deserves clean air.

Breathe the Difference

EYECARE

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Your Complete Eyecare Centre

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

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Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

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916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 21, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • March 21, 2013

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale Tonasket 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, heat pump, single car garage with shop and storage shed. RV parking with dump site and AC power. Covered patio. $105,000. Bill: (509)486-1952 Tonasket Small one bedroom cottage with a garage on a large lot one block from grocery store. Only $79,000. Call 509 322 4732 Tonasket Three bedroom, two bath, 1248 sq. ft, vacant all new carpet and fresh paint, convenient location in Old Orchard Estates subdivision, ½ miles north of Tonasket. Only $145,000. Call 509-322-4732

Lots & Acreage FOUR ACRES INDUSTRIAL LAND on the Canada to Oroville Heavy Haul Corridor with railroad frontage and truck access off of Jennings Loop Rd. Only $60,000. Call 509 322 4732 Tonasket ½ ACRE BUILDING LOT with power, water, phone and cable TV only $35,000. No mobile homes. Call 509 322 4732

Commercial Rentals

For Rent Hillside Park Senior Apartments 515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA AVAILABLE NOW! 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled Rent from $530 Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

FOR RENT: Business/Office unit(s) Main Street Orovilleoptional sizes & prices. (509)486-1682 or (509)4290873. Tonasket LARGE INDUSTRIAL storage warehouse. On 10+ acres with city water and OT irrigation water. Call for Details 509-322-4732

IN TOWN 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, Garage, Family Rm, $875 LAKEFRONT 2 Bdrm Apt, a bargain! $525 p/m IN TOWN nice studio apartment, $450 p/m Call Sun Lakes Realty ****** 509-476-2121******

www.gazette-tribune.com

Announcements Happy Birthday

OROVILLE

1 BR, 1 BA WELL KEPT HOME

~ Justin ~

Large fully fenced back yard. Walking distance to downtown Oroville. Avail April 1st. $625 per mo. No pets. No smoking. 214 Main St, Oroville.

425-949-7992

207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION:

LOW INCOME HOUSING “PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

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Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

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email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

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Now you‛re a teenager! from Grandpa & Grandma Peterson

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Found

Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Crosswords

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

25. Dolly ___ of “Hello, Dolly!�

7. Bloodstream masses causing obstructions

26. Vixen

8. Formerly known as

27. Devices used to secure women’s head coverings

9. “___ be a cold day in hell ...� (2 wd)

29. Afflict

10. Grave robber

30. Twists together

11. Cloak

32. Adjust

12. Resident of Anjou, France

34. Sonata, e.g.

13. Stalkless (leaves, e.g.)

35. Length x width, for a rectangle

14. Wine decanter

23. Female sweetheart (pl.)

36. 100 centimos

20. “The Sound of Music� backdrop

39. More dirty due to smudges

23. First month

43. Increase, with “up�

24. Trappers using noose devices

44. Area where fruit trees grow

27. Informed about latest trends (2 wd)

46. Chain letters? 47. Bean ___ 49. Complimentary close 50. Busiest 51. “Four Quartets� poet 53. Absorbed, as a cost 54. Heartthrob 55. More shrewd, esp. in business 57. Play ground?

ANSWERS

Across 1. Flattens on impact 7. Mysteries

59. Familiarizes 60. Underground passages 61. Change the look of 62. Haunt

16. Perceptively 17. Fits in 18. Lyres 19. ___-tzu 21. Pear-shaped stringed instruments 22. Prayer ending

31. Anguish 33. Toni Morrison’s “___ Baby� 35. Alabama slammer ingredient 36. Lead auto on first race lap (2 wd) 37. Imitate 38. Short races at top speed 39. Close 40. Thinks 41. Paints with a hard, glossy finish 42. Autumn leaf gatherers

Down 1. Son of David and Bathsheba 2. Fictitious reason 3. “Two Women� Oscar winner 4. Aardvark fare 5. ___ el Amarna, Egypt 6. Early Christian ascetics who lived on top of high pillars

48. Coffee break snack 50. 747, e.g. 52. Very small 54. Sloughs 56. Moray, e.g. 58. Airline’s home base

Business Opportunities 1950’s DINER - BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY This is an exciting business opportunity at an established resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington! Veranda Beach Resort seeks an experienced and successful food and beverage operator for the 2013 season. This fully equipped 1950’s themed Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Rhonda Hinkley for further details at: rhonda@verandabeach.com.

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Check out our website at: www.verandabeach.com

Oroville School District has the following positions available

Miscellaneous

Please send letter of interest and applications to: Oroville School District 816 Juniper Street Oroville, WA 98844 Position closes March 22, 2013 at 2:00 PM P-T maintenance must pass screening. Wage TBD. 617 Hwy. 97, Oroville, WA. 509-476-3059 Seasonal site personnel must pass screening, bilingual preferred. Resume preferred. Job description at 617 Hwy. 97, Oroville, WA. 509476-3059

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

The City of Oroville is now accepting applications of employment for the following positions: Seasonal Park Aid Level II, Office/Reservation Supervisor This position consists of up to 40 hours per week, depending upon the time of the park season; starts in April and ends in October. Other park maintenance duties may also be assigned, as needed. Applicants must be 18 years of age or older, have a valid Washington State Driver’s License and be physically able to perform required tasks. Applications may be secured at the Oroville City Hall, 7:30 am to 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday, and must be received by 12:00 noon, Friday, March 22, 2013. The City of Oroville is an equal opportunity employer.

28. Lieu

45. Lacking refinement

14. Small crown 15. Odorless, colorless, flammable gas

Okanogan County Department of Public Works is accepting applications until Friday, March 29, 2013 for the position of Temporary Solid Waste Operator/ Mechanic. For more information go to: www.okanogancounty.org/HR or call 509-422-7300.

School Bus driver Regular Route

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

Payroll Clerk/Office Help Duties to include payroll as well as other office work. Must be comfortable with a computer and proficient in excel. E-mail resume to: rdevon@golddiggerapples.com or mail to Gold Digger Apples PO Box 2550 Oroville, WA 98844

High School Assistant Baseball Coach

Oroville NEW and NICE! One Bedroom house with Walk in closet, eat in kitchen, laundry and lots of storage. Patio with valley view. Call: 509-476-0199

St. Charles Place Apartments

Help Wanted

Tonasket Pizza Co. Now Hiring. Applicants must be 18 or over. Previous experience a plus. Interested applicants can pick up an application or submit resume in person. 15 W. 4th Street, Tonasket. WANTED: Part-time housekeeping for resort on Spectacle Lake. Call 509-223-4141 after 6 p.m. Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is currently recruiting for Seasonal Firefighter and NRW2 Engine Leader positions. Positions are open until filled. For more information, or to apply please visit our website, www.dnr.wa.gov. If you have further questions (after reviewing our website) contact Heidi Seitters at (509) 684-7474. DNR is an equal opportunity employer.

Buying your pop cans, brass & copper. Will take your unwanted metal and appliances. No refrigerators or freezers. For sale: Apple bin full of conola crushed seed for pigs or cattle. 509-476-3862 WE BUY Estates. We buy Gold and Silver. We clean yards and properties. We haul junk and scrap. Free quote. Call Aussie Antiques, 509-322-3400.

Garage & Yard Sale Oroville

YARD SALE for the Historical Society. Saturday 8am - 2pm on deck of Depot.

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF MARCH 18, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPT: A Beautiful Home, Laughter Love Art Music, Many Opportunities waits for 1st baby. Expenses paid. Astrid 1-800-844-1670 ADOPT -- Adoring couple, Architect & Internet Exec. year for precious baby to love forever! Expenses paid. 1-800-990-7667 ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTER TO WIN a $1,000 prepaid Visa card! Take our survey at www.pulsepoll.com and tell us about your media usage and shopping plans. Your input will help this paper help local businesses. Thank you! EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified.. Call 866-483-4429. www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com

Statewides CASH NOW for Good Notes, Top Dollar from Private investor. Yes, Bajillions Available for quality Contracts, Mortgages, Annuities, Inheritance. Receiving Payments? Call Skip Foss 1-800-637-3677 FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N HEALTH/BEAUTY IF YOU USED the Mirena IUD between 2001-present and suffered perforation or embedment in the uterus requiring surgical removal, or had a child born with birth defects you may be entitled to compensation. Call Johnson Law and speak with female staff members. 800-250-8975 HELP WANTED LIVE-WORK-Party-Play. Play in Vegas, Hang in L.A., Jet to New York. Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400 to $800 wkly. Paid expenses. Are you energetic & fun call 866-574-7454 HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS DRIVER --Daily or Weekly Pay., $0.01 increase per mile after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com LOOKING for Job Security? Haney Truck Line, seeks CDL-A, hazmat/doubles required. Paid Dock bump/Benefits, Bonus program, Paid Vacation! Call Now. 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com DRIVERS -- Inexperienced/Experienced. Unbeatable career Opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 www.centraldrivingjobs.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com REAL ESTATE COLFAX -- RIVERFRONT. 9 acres was $75,000 now only $39,500. Lender Repo sale. Beautiful valley views, quiet country road with electric. Excellent financing provided. Call UTR 1-888-326-9048.

Public Notices BEFORE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON Notice of Application for new water right. TAKE NOTICE: That on November 7, 1986, City of Oroville (City) of Oroville, WA filed application number G4-29150 with the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) to withdraw water for municipal purposes from four existing wells owned by the City of Oroville. On September 18, 2012, the City proposed to voluntarily relinquish its existing Water Right Permit G427565 in exchange for processing of an equal quantity of water under Application G4-29150. Because Application G4-29150 is larger than Permit G4-27565, the City requested this application be split into two. Application G4-29150(A) would be for the same quantities as Permit G427565, while Application G429150(B) would be for the remainder of the original application and would remain on file with Ecology. Application G4-29150(A), under priority date of August 17, 1981, requests withdrawal of 340 gallons per minute (gpm) and 425 acre-feet per year (ac-ft/yr) from the City’s four existing wells, located within Section 28 and 21, T.40N., R.27 EWM. The applicant proposes water to be used for continuous municipal supply within the City’s service area. Any protests or objections to the approval of this application may be filed with the Department of Ecology and must include a detailed statement of the basis for objections; protests must be accompanied by a fifty dollar ($50.00) recording fee and filed with the Cashiering Section, State of Washington, Department of Ecology, P.O. Box 47611, Lacey, Washington 98509-7611 within thirty (30) days from March 21, 2013. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 14, 21, 2013. #464817 DISTRICT COURT FOR THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN DOUGLAS D. MORRISON, an individual, Plaintiff, v. KEITH ROYLANCE, an individual, Defendant. NO. 22354 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

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- 24 Hour Service To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

Insulation

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Installed Insulation &

Garage Doors  Installed

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

Licensed & Bonded

509-486-2692 P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

RYAN W. GUNN

Oroville Building Supply

Attorney at Law

Civil Criminal Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

We Work Saturdays!

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Pumps

Storage

Storage

Well Drilling

Got Water?

Lakeside

OROVILLE

“The Water Professionals”

— Fred Cook — Over 25 Years experience!

Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

STORAGE Boat, RV & More! Weatherization with lease Rent unit for project  Contractors store tools / product  Additional Business space available  

Located at: 124 Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-421-7168 lakesidestoreit@gmail.com

Mini Storage & U-Haul

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power n Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

www.orovilleministorage.com

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store  Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Zimmatic Pivots  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com

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irectory

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

Midway Building Supply

OSOYOOS READI-MIX

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Business & Service

Rick Edwards

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Concrete

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Check out the

Quality Supplies Since 1957

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Edwards Refrigeration

Building Supplies

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Looking for something?

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Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Just Reduced! Rustic charm and country living! This three bed, one and 3/4 bath home sits on two separate tax parcels. Enjoy an expansive master suite that will serve as a wonderful retreat. The large bedrooms feature big closets and lots of natural light. Authentic wood beams accent this home throughout. The exterior of the home features mature landscape, log siding, and a backyard great for entertaining. Nuzzled away in the pine trees of the Crumbacher Estate, this home is waiting for your personal touch. MLS#443705 $139,900

Attorney

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1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Advertise

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Wannacut Lake Lodge 5800 sq. ft. Ideal swimming/boating. 12 fenced private acres. Vaulted ceilings w/ trestle beams, expansive waterside deck, Pella windows, 4 bedrooms, library & family room. Daylight Basement has full apartment. Additional barn/garage. 1st rate tennis court. $419,900

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www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

Lake and Country

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5 B Rose St. –Lake Osoyoos View Property— Enjoy the spectacular views of Lake Osoyoos and the surrounding mountains from the deck of this well maintained house and separate deck and hot tub off the master bedroom. NWML #395920 $224,900

Premium Sandy Beach Lakefront –

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Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

509-476-2121

Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

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Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA

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Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

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www.gazette-tribune.com

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If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you.

509/476-3378

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The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

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ANSWERS

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In re the Estate of: ARTHUR R. THOMAS, Deceased. Probate No. 13-4-00017-1 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) publication - Okanogan County The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the man-

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In Re the Estate of RALPH W. PATTERSON, Deceased Probate No. 13-4-00008-2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the

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Temporary/Seasonal Maintenance Worker City of Tonasket The City of Tonasket is advertising for a temporary/seasonal maintenance worker position. Applications are available at Tonasket City Hall, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. For information please contact City Hall, 509486-2132. Closing date 4-15-2013. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 22, 28, 2013. #466047

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 12 (Easy, rating 0.36) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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ner provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney, at the address stated below, a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: March 14, 2013 Personal Representative: Lisa D. Michno Attorney for Personal Representative: Peg R. Callaway Address for Mailing or Service: 700-A Okoma Drive, Omak, WA 98841 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Okanogan County Superior Court, Cause No. 13-4-00017-1 Dated this 5th day of March, 2013. CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC By: /S/ Peg R. Callaway; WSBA #13786 Attorney for Estate Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 14, 21, 28, 2013. #463642

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claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: March 21, 2013 Personal Representative: LeaAnn Hairston Attorney for Personal Representative: W. Scott DeTro Address for Mailing or Service: 700-A Okoma Drive, Omak, WA 98841 Court of Probate Proceedings and Cause No: Okanogan County Superior Court Cause No. 13-4-00008-2 CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC W. Scott DeTro, WSBA #19601 Attorney for Estate Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 21, 28, April 3, 2013 #465664

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PUBLIC AUCTION March 28, 2013 THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 509-476-3948 Viewing time : 10:00 AM Auction: 11:00 AM 1983 Datsun PU License # WA B33798S Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 21, 2013. #465236

Sudoku

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PUBLIC AUCTION March 28, 2013 THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 509-476-3948 Viewing time : 10:00 AM Auction: 11:00 AM 1979 Dodge 16Mini License # WA AIM0186 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 21, 2013. #465238

Public Notices

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THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO: KEITH ROYLANCE AND JOHN DOE ROYLANCE You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after the 14th day of February, 2013, and defend the above-entitled action in the above-entitled court, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison at their office below stated; and in case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The complaint arises from default under a Promissory Note dated September 5, 2006. Shawn K. Harju, WSBA No. 29942 CARNEY BADLEY SPELLMAN, P.S. 701 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3600 Seattle, WA 98104-7010 Attorneys for Plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 14, 21, 28, March 7, 14, 21, 2013. #457807

Public Notices

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March 21, 2013 |• O KANOGAN VVALLEY ALLEY G AZETTE-TRIBUNE MARCH OKANOGAN GAZETTE-TRIBUNE


Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 21, 2013

SPORTS

Reality check

SPRING SPORTS STANDINGS

Oroville tennis falls to Cougars

Through games of March 16

Boys Soccer Pts: 3=win in regulation or OT; 2=win in PK shootout; 1=loss in PK shootout; 0=loss in regulation or OT.

By Brent Baker

Caribou Trail League

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

League Overall Pts W-L W-L-T Cascade 6 2-0 3-0-0 Chelan 3 1-0 1-0-0 Brewster 3 1-0 3-0-0 Quincy 3 1-0 2-1-0 Okanogan 3 1-1 1-1-0 Omak 0 0-1 0-2-0 Cashmere 0 0-2 0-3-0 Tonasket 0 0-2 0-2-0

Central Washington League League Overall Pts W-L W-L-T Liberty Bell 0 0-0 1-0-0 Oroville 0 0-0 1-0-0 Manson 0 0-0 2-1-0 Bridgeport 0 0-0 0-1-0

Baseball Brent Baker/staff photo

Caribou Trail League League Overall Brewster 0-0 1-0 Cascade 0-0 0-2 Cashmere 0-0 2-0 Chelan 0-0 0-2 Okanogan 0-0 2-0 Omak 0-0 0-2 Quincy 0-0 1-0 Tonasket 0-0 3-0

CWL North Division League Overall Bridgeport 0-0 1-2 Lk Roosevelt 0-0 0-2 Liberty Bell 0-0 1-1 Manson 0-0 0-3 Oroville 0-0 0-1 Pateros (1B) 0-0 1-0

Softball Caribou Trail League League Overall Brewster 0-0 1-2 Cascade 0-0 1-0 Cashmere 0-0 2-0 Chelan 0-0 1-0 Okanogan 0-0 0-0 Omak 0-0 0-2 Quincy 0-0 3-1 Tonasket 0-0 1-1

CWL North Division League Overall Bridgeport 0-0 2-1 Lk Roosevelt 0-0 0-2 Liberty Bell 0-0 0-1 Manson 0-0 0-0 Oroville 0-0 0-0 Pateros (1B) 0-0 0-0

Girls Tennis Caribou Trail League League Overall Omak 2-0 3-0 Cashmere 1-0 1-1 Tonasket 1-1 1-1 Chelan 0-0 0-0 Okanogan 0-0 0-1 Cascade 0-2 0-2 Quincy 0-2 0-2

Central Washington League League Overall Pateros 2-0 2-0 White Swan 1-1 1-1 Entiat 0-0 0-1 Lk Roosevelt 0-0 0-0 Oroville 0-1 0-1 Liberty Bell 0-1 0-1

Boys Tennis Caribou Trail League League Overall Tonasket 2-0 2-0 Omak 2-0 3-0 Cashmere 1-0 2-0 Okanogan 0-0 0-1 Chelan 0-0 0-0 Cascade 0-2 0-2 Quincy 0-2 0-2

Central Washington League League Overall White Swan 2-0 3-0 Liberty Bell 1-0 1-0 Entiat 0-0 0-1 Lk Roosevelt 0-0 0-0 Oroville 0-1 0-1 Pateros 0-2 0-2

Tonasket’s Marcelino Ruiz-Martell makes a leaping save against Quincy on Saturday. The Tigers lost to the Jackrabbits 10-0 while being outshot in the game 34-3.

Quincy overwhelms Tonasket as Tigers drop to 0-2 in CTL By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - It only took a few minutes to erase what had been a promising start to Tonasket’s boys soccer season. The Tigers, coming off a 2-1 loss to Cascade to start the year, were dealt a harsh reality check by Caribou Trail League newcomer Quincy, which ripped the Tigers for eight first half goals on the way to a 10-0 victory. The Jackrabbits, who dropped down to 1A this season but still have numbers more akin to a 2A school, had nearly 100 boys turn out for soccer this year and field four teams. Still, Tonasket coach Jack Goyette was searching for answers beyond the size of the program his team was up against. “Very tough game,” he said. “They’re an excellent team (but) made me feel like I had not prepared my team well. It’s making me reassess and look at ways to improve in a hurry.” The Jacks outshot the Tigers 34-3 in a game that got a bit chippy at the end, with several Quincy players being carried off the field with injuries (though all were on their feet after the game) and Michael Orozco getting red carded in the final minutes. Goyette was pleased, though,

that his team continued to play hard despite the score. “They have an excellent attitude and will work hard to improve,” he said. “I’m a very fortunate coach to have the players I have and we look forward to playing better soccer as the season moves forward.” The Tigers were scheduled to play at Brewster on Tuesday, then host Oroville on Thursday, March 21, and are at Cashmere on Saturday.

Cascade 2, Tonasket 1 TONASKET - The Tigers opened the season Tuesday, March 12, with a 2-1 loss to defending league champion Cascade. “Cascade has a very good team - well coached, with a lot of experience,” Goyette said. “I thought we held up well against them.” Michael Orozco scored the Tigers’ goal coming off an assist by Cristian Diaz. “Cascade’s first goal was beautiful,” Goyette said. “It was an 18-yard rocket off the volley; other than that we played them pretty even.” He added that while the team played well for a first game, there were definite areas of improvement to target. “We’ll continue to work on possessing the ball and playing smarter as a team,” Goyette said. “Working toward more flow and better movement. “I absolutely love the effort and attitude of our team. We will keep working hard and get better. It’s a great group of young men.”

Tiger track teams open at Papa Wells By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

Despite the score, Saturday’s contest with Quincy featured plenty of physical play, as Wyatt O’Brien experienced on this collision with a Quincy player late in the game.

Tiger tennis splits with Quincy, sweeps Cascade By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s tennis teams won a few and lost a few against Quincy on Saturday, March 16, with the boys defeating the Jackrabbits 3-2 and the girls falling by the same score. The Tiger boys improved to 2-0 in Caribou Trail League play while the girls are 1-1. “We’re not up to our potential yet,” said Tonasket coach Dave Buchheim. “We’re definitely a work in progress. We’ll play a couple of good sets and then play some that aren’t so good. So as a team, we haven’t quite put it all together yet.” Earning victories were Trevor Terris (6-0, 1-6, 6-0), Brian Hendrick (6-0, 6-1) and Morgan O’Brien (4-6, 6-3, 6-2) in singles. Falling in doubles play were Colton Leep and Walker Marks (6-4, 6-4) and Levi Schell and Jesse Holan (6-2, 6-0). Megan Beyers (7-5, 6-4) and Grace Maldonado (6-4, 6-4) were winners for the girls. Losing their matches were Claire Thornton (7-5, 6-4) in singles and Abby Gschiel and Ye Jee (7-6 (7-5), 6-4) and Brisa Leep and Baillie Hirst (7-5 (7-6), 6-4) in doubles. The Tigers host Oroville on Thursday and travel to Cashmere on Saturday, March 23.

Tonasket boys 3, Cascade 2 Tonasket girls 3, Cascade 2 TONASKET - The Tigers opened the season with a pair of 3-2 victories over Cascade on Tuesday, March 12. Winners for the boys against Cascade were Terris (6-1, 6-2) and Hendrick (6-0, 6-2) in singles and Leep and Marks (4-6, 6-2, 6-0) in doubles. Losing their matches were O’Brien (6-0, 6-0) in singles and Holan and Dmytro Golubovych (6-2, 6-2) in doubles. For the girls, winners were Beyer and Thornton in singles, both in straight sets; and Maldonado and Michaela Newton, also in straight sets. Losing were Brisa Leep in singles and Abby Gschiel and Ye Jee in doubles.

EAST WENATCHEE Oroville’s tennis teams traveled to Eastmont High School to face White Swan in the Hornets’ season opener, with the girls losing 3-2 and the boys falling 5-0. “Overall the result was what I expected,” said Billy Monroe of his head coaching debut. “Being the first match of the season there were some jitters that showed in a couple of players. I was happy with the effort they put into their matches.” For the girls, Ali Miller won in #2 singles 6-1, 6-0 and Angela Miller won at #3. Menze Pickering lost in #1 singles 7-5, 6-2, while Lily Hilderbrand and Aya Cruspero lost 6-1, 3-6 6-4 in #1 doubles. The Hornets forfeited their #2 doubles match. For the boys, Joe Sarmiento lost 6-2, 6-1; Ronel Kee fell 6-3, 6-1; and Conner Bocook lost 6-0, 6-0. The Hornets forfeited both doubles matches, but Sarmiento and Kee played back in a doubles match that they won in a pro-set tiebreaker. “Every single person played hard and came away with something to work on this next week at practice whether it was conditioning or strokes or strategy,” Monroe said. “They are a fun group of kids and are going to keep getting better.” The Hornets were set to host Pateros on Wednesday, play at Tonasket on Thursday, March 21 and play at home against Lake Roosevelt on March 26.

YAKIMA - Tonasket’s track team opened its season at the Papa Wells Invitational at East Valley (Yakima), jostling with 33 other teams from all size classifications, including several from Oregon. The Tiger girls turned in the more successful day of the two Tonasket squads, at least from a placing perspective. Emily Mills was the top Tonasket finisher of the day, taking 12th (out of 77 competitors) in the 100 (13.81), fifth of 42 in the 200 (28.33) and second of 40 in the 400 (1:04.60). Others who finished in the top 20 in their events included Cassie Spear in the 200 (8th, 28.57) and 400 (5th, 1:07.22); Devan Utt in the 800 (15th, 2:54.64) and high jump (10th, 4-6); Rose Walts in the 100 hurdles (6th, 17.89) and triple jump (10th, 30-2); and Kathryn Cleman in the pole vault (11th, 6-6). Top finishers for the boys included Dallas Tyus in the high jump (13th, 5-2) and triple jump (12th, 37-4); Joaquin Polito in the javelin (21st, 124-2). Several Tigers also finished well in freshman/sophomore-only heats, including Alissa Young in the discus (2nd, 75-3); Allison Glanzer in the javelin (5th, 60-2); Polito in the discus (4th, 89-3); and Dalton Smith in the 400 (7th, 1:01.22). Tonasket travels to Ephrata on Saturday, March 23.

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Top, Megan Beyers rips a backhand during Saturday’s match against Quincy. Above, Walker Marks follows through on a hit during his doubles match with Colton Leep against the Jackrabbits.

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Page A11

SPORTS CAUGHT IN THE ACT

Submitted photo

The weather dried out a bit for the first games of the spring sports season last week, but in the days prior the Tonasket softball team found that baserunning drills involved a full mud bath on their home field.

Tonasket softball splits opening doubleheader By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Kjeld Williams picks off a Bridgeport baserunner at third base during Saturday’s doubleheader sweep of the Mustangs. The Tigers started off their season with three wins in non-league games, including an opening day win over Oroville on Thursday, March 14.

Tigers trounce Hornets in season-opener By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket may have a young baseball team. But Oroville’s is even younger - in fact, it can’t even be refuted that the Hornets are fielding the youngest high school team in any sport in the school’s history. That’s because it’s the first year that eighth graders have been allowed to play on high school squads at the school, and with six of them on the baseball team alone and a general lack of upperclassmen, no one comes close to that standard for youth. So while Tonasket has seven freshman on a roster of 18, the Hornets’ AVERAGE grade level is just a shade over 9.5. Hence, the Tigers 22-2 victory over the Hornets in last Thursday’s season-opener wasn’t much of a surprise as Oroville just gets used to playing the high school game a year early. That said, the Hornets did briefly lead the game. Dustin Nigg led off with a single up the middle, took second and third on a pair of wild pitches and scored on Boone McKinney’s sacrifice fly. The lead didn’t last long as the Tigers scored four runs in the bottom of the first and never looked back. Tonasket took advantage of four Hornet errors in the inning and didn’t get its first hit until Ian Young’s bunt single in the middle of the Tigers’ 13-run third inning that broke the game open. John Rawley added a two-run

single, Young drove in two runs with his second hit of the third inning and Chris Elliot had an RBI single to lead the Tiger hitting attack. Tonasket also drew eight walks and had three batters hit by pitches in the game. Tonasket spread out its pitching duties for the game, with Jake Cory starting and going an inning, while Rawley pitched two shutout innings in relief while Jimmy Coleman and Jeremiah Yaussey-Albright mopped up in the fourth and fifth innings of the abbreviated game. Nigg also delivered an RBI single in the fourth for the Hornets, bringing home Trevor Shearer, who had walked and stolen second base. Oroville hosts Tonasket on Thursday, March 21.

Tonasket 11-11, Bridgeport 1-1 TONASKET - In a pair of carbon-copy games, the Tigers twice defeated Bridgeport 11-1 in non-league action on Saturday, March 16. In the opener, John Rawley tossed a one-hit, five-inning complete game, walking six and striking out nine. The Tigers broke open a scoreless tie with five runs in the third inning and six more in the fifth to enact the 10-run mercy rule and end the game early. Jacob Cory had three hits, Jesse Manring had two hits, Rawley hit a double and Kjeld Williams walked four times to lead the Tigers, who drew a total of 12 walks in the game. Ian Young and

BRIDGEPORT - Tonasket’s fastpitch softball team split its opening doubleheader with Bridgeport on Saturday, March 16, defeating the Fillies 16-4 in the opener and dropping the nightcap 15-11. Tonasket coach Emily Rimestad said, though, that in her mind both games were “victories” as the second contest basically served as a JV contest. “In the second game I let the ladies who have never played, or who had little experience play, to see how they would do in live play,” Rimestad said. “Honestly the did a good job. It’s a learning experience and I think the more these girls get experience, the bet-

Monroe-Sellers wins conference honor William Peace University

Athletics Department

Brent Baker/staff photo

Dustin Nigg led off the game - and the season - with a single up the middle and scored Oroville’s first run of the year at Tonasket. That was the high point of the game for the youthful Hornets, who lost to the Tigers 22-2. Pete Valentine also had hits. In the second game, Jimmy Coleman allowed five hits, walked one and struck out 11 in a six inning complete game. Offensively, the Tigers drew 11 walks and racked up nine hits. Leading 1-0 in the fourth, Rade Pilkinton ripped a run-scoring single and Manring followed with a two-run double to break the game open.

Tonasket added two more in the fifth and five in the sixth to end it an inning early. Williams and Manring each had two hits, with Coleman, Pilkinton, Boyd Lorz, Cade Hockett and Chris Elliot each adding one. The Tigers (3-0) play at Oroville on Thursday and start Caribou Trail League play at home against Okanogan on Tuesday, March 26.

RALEIGH, N.C. - The USA South announced that Cayla Monroe-Sellers (Tonasket), a freshman at William Peace University, earned Rookie of the Week honors in women’s tennis. Monroe-Sellers helped lead the Pacers to a perfect 2-0 record last week, with wins over conference foes Averett and Mary Baldwin. In the match against Averett, Monroe-Sellers won 6-0, 6-0 while playing fourth-flight singles. She also teamed with Elledeia Ijames in second-flight doubles to post an 8-2 win as the Pacers recorded a 7-2 win over the Cougars. Sunday versus Mary Baldwin

By Brent Baker

MOSES LAKE - Oroville’s boys soccer team matched its 2012 win total on opening night, holding on for a 2-1 victory on the road against Moses Lake’s C squad. Considering the number of freshmen on eighth graders playing for the Hornets, Oroville was likely the younger team despite playing the 4A school’s freshman level team. “It was a well-played game by both teams,” said Oroville coach Mike Pitts. “The defense and center midfielders played an incredible defensive game, suffocating Moses Lake’s many offensive strikes.” Moses Lake brought the offen-

sive pressure in the first half and further stepped it up throgh most of the second half. The Hornets took a 1-0 halftime lead when Brian Wise tucked Austin Holcomb’s pass into the upper left corner of the net. Goalkeeper Connelly Quick made a number of big saves early in the second half as Moses Lake sought the equalizer, but midway through the half Jesus Churape’s score gave the Hornets some breathing room. That turned out to be key as Moses Lake scored off a corner kick with seven minutes remaining. The Hornets return to action Thursday at Oroville and play their first home game Saturday, March 23, against Newport.

Thursday, March 21 BB - Tonasket at Oroville, 4:00 pm Soc - Oroville at Tonasket, 4:00 pm Tennis - Oroville at Tonasket, 4:30 pm Saturday, March 23 BB - Oroville at Lake Roosevelt (2), 11:00 am SB - Tonasket at Oroville (2), 11:00 am Soc - Newport at Oroville, 11:00 am Soc - Tonasket at Cashmere, 11:00 am (JV to follow) Tennis - Tonasket at Cashmere, 11:00 am

Track - Oroville at Colville Invite, 11:00 am Track - Tonasket at Ephrata Invite, 11:00 am Tuesday, March 26 BB - Bridgeport at Oroville, 4:00 pm BB - Okanogan at Tonasket 4:30 pm SB - Tonasket at Okanogan, 4:30 pm Soc - Oroville at Bridgeport, 4:00 pm Soc - Okanogan at Tonasket, 4:00 pm (JV to follow) Tonasket - Okanogan at Tonasket 4:30 pm Tennis - Lake Roosevelt at Oroville,

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GLOWING PERFORMANCE Concern TonasketSubscribe/Renew council Today! expressed updates on projects

over coaches resignation

City’s engineers seek to clarify priorities regarding upcoming street improvement projects The council authorized Councilwoman Jill Vugteveen and Danison to make a final decision to move forward, with TONASKET - The Tonasket City a priority on creating a “straight shot” from one end of town to the other along Council provided updates on a number of civic projects that are progress- at least one side of the road with ADAing through their planning stages at the approved curb access ramps. The airport runway seal project’s tarTuesday, March 13, council meeting. Tonasket city planner Kurt Danison get schedule is for completion before the said he met with three property owners Father’s Day Fly-in. Meanwhile, the council granted public affected by the need for an easement to complete the Mill Drive/Bonaparte works director Bill Pilkinton a leave of Creek sewer project and said that they absence of indefinite length and appointseemed to be willing to provide the ease- ed Hugh Jensen as acting public services director. ment access. “They’re willing to provide easement through their property so we can connect up the sewer through there,” Danison said. “They were under the impression that water was included in this... I don’t Police Chief Robert Burks said that know how it came about... I don’t think we said we were going to put in a water he is working on a policy governing the department’s handling of data collected system there. “I think they walked away with a better during video surveillance. Burks also announced that officer understanding.” The council planned an open house Audra Fuller passed her civil service for March 20 for residents to interact exam and has been hired as a full-time with the engineers and councilmembers officer. Burks said he is finalizing a “wish on the sewer project committee. The council also responded to a memo list” to be submitted for Stonegarden Varela and Associates seeking to clar- describing how potential grant money ify priorities on the upcoming street would be used. Stonegarden grants proimprovement projects that had been dis- vide money for local law enforcement cussed at a previous council meeting. entities to use while assisting in U.S. The project was facing a delay without Border Patrol operations, although any such a prioritization as funding for the equipment purchased is not limited to those operations. project may not be enough to complete In County, home delivery “Oroville was able to get an SUV the entire “wish list.” “We want the (hospital parking cross- through Stonegarden grant money,” ing) beacon as the base project,” said Burks said. “This is the initial part of the Mayor Patrick Plumb. “The rest we will process that we do every year. We don’t have done as we have the funding to SEE COUNCIL | PG A3 complete.” BY BRENT BAKER

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TONASKET - Teresa Hawkins expressed her concern over the resignation of varsity basketball coach Glenn Braman during the public comment portion of the Tonasket School Board meeting on Monday, March 12. Hawkins, wife of longtime varsity football coach Jay Hawkins, said she was concerned that the direction of the school district concerning its coaches was taking an ugly turn. “I’m concerned with the resignation of coach Braman,” she said. “I’m concerned because my husband is also a coach. I’m not comfortable with how that came about.” Hawkins said she had heard secondhand remarks attributed to a school board member that fed into her concern. “I’m hoping the school board acts as a board, and not on individual agendas,” she said. “I hope we’ve learned from the process that went down. “I think it’s sad if we let a group of parents who are upset or who have a vengeance with a coach from a long time ago to come in and rally people up to make a decision to not reinstate a coach. I think it would be really sad if we have to go around the community to bring in support to show that a coach has just as many people, and more, (supporting him) as those who complained 50 about him.” Citing her experience as a coach’s wife and as a mother of an athlete coached by others, Hawkins said that athletics teaches kids to deal with adversity, but that parents encourage that growth. “We want the situation to be perfect for our kids,” she said. “But what do we teach them when we run to every need they have? “(Coaches) love the game, they’re competitors, and they want to teach kids to work together, to go out in life and be successful. Kids can’t be successful if their parents don’t let them grow as individuals. That’s a part of athletics. Nothing is going to be perfect.” Hawkins said she was concerned that situations that contributed to Braman’s resignation, as well as rumors about her husband’s position, could damage the reputation of the district. “People want to come to this district,” she said. “It’s because of you guys (the school board) up here. You have done a great job of keeping this school district as one of the elite. “Don’t ruin that. Don’t let that happen, you guys.” In other business, superintendent Paul Turner read a proclamation from Governor Christine Gregoire honoring classified school employees. Board member Catherine Stangland read off the list of all TSD classified employees’ names. Principals from each of the schools presented their mid-year student data to the board The board also reviewed information about switching over to a Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) phone system as presented by Jive Communications, which answered questions via a video conference call. They later approved switching to a VOIP system at a meeting last Thursday. Jive is currently serving the education market in 23 states, offered lifetime pricing and, significantly, qualified, for e-rate discounting that is calculated through the district’s free and reduced meal rate. The board requested a few days to think about the information presented, and at a special meeting on Thursday, March 15. The school board next meets on Monday, March 26.

BUY 1 YEAR & GET 1 MONTH FREE! BUY 2 YEARS & GET 2 MONTHS FREE! Fuller passes exam, video policy progress

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Oroville’s soccer team celebrates its victory at Moses Lake last week to open the season. With the victory, the Hornets matched their 2012 win total.

SPRING SPORTS SCHEDULE, MARCH 21-30 Note: All schedules subject to change.

was a rain-shortened affair. The coaches agreed before the match to play singles first. When William Peace clinched the victory, they decided not to play any doubles matches. Again playing fourth-flight, Monroe-Sellers cruised to an 8-0 win. Monroe-Sellers is a two-sport star with the Pacers, as she also plays soccer, where she doubles as a defenseman and as a goalie. She is the first William Peace tennis player to win weekly honors from the conference this year and the first since Kristen Edwards won rookie honors last year. The Pacers (2-2, 2-0 USA South) return to action Wednesday when they host inter-city rival Meredith.

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Oroville soccer wins at Moses Lake bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

ter they will be.” Starting catcher Baylie Tyus came out of the second game with an injury, with rookie catcher Jenny Bello filling in. “She did a good job for being put in there (under those circumstances),” Rimestad said. “Amber Monroe pitched for half the game and hadn’t pitched for two years.” In the opening game, Sadie Long pitched and earned the win, as well as hitting a double to lead the Tonasket hitting attack. “It was a good game,” Rimestad said. “The girls played hard and we had girls stealing bases.” The Tigers returned to play on Tuesday against Lake Roosevelt, travel to Oroville on Saturday, March 23, and open Caribou Trail League play at Okanogan on March 26.

4:00 pm Track - Tonasket at Chelan quad, 4:00 pm Golf - Oroville vs. Lake Roosevelt at Desert Canyon Golf Course, 2:30 pm

2:30 pm Friday, March 29 BB - Manson at Oroville (2), 3:30 pm Tennis - Tonasket at Chelan, 4:30 pm

Thursday, March 28 SB - Oroville at Republic, 4:00 pm SB - Liberty Bell at Tonasket, 4:30 pm Soc - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 4:00 pm Soc - Tonasket at Manson, 4:30 pm Tennis - Oroville at Entiat, 4:00 pm Tennis - Liberty Bell at Tonasket, 4:30 pm Golf - Oroville vs. Omak at Okanogan Valley Golf Club,

Saturday, March 30 BB - Tonasket at Chelan (2), 11:00 am SB - Tonasket at Chelan (2), 11:00 am Soc - Moses Lake C at Oroville, 12:00 pm Soc - Tonasket at Chelan, 11:00 am (JV to follow) Track - Oroville Eagle Home Mortgage Invite (incl. Tonasket), 11:30 am

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Kaylee Clough performs Glow”90 at the Variety Show andmonths Auction presented(56 by Dollars 26 months (112 issues) only“The $54 13 issues) only $30 for Scholars and the Oroville High School Music Department on Wednesday, March 14 in the high school commons. The eight-year-old has been taking ballet for five years and recently performed at the Seattle Dance Workshop Competition and took a silver medal. The annual talent show is used to raise funds for the Oroville Dollars for Scholars Continuing Education awards. For more from the event see page B2.

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Former Oroville killed Check or Money Order CreditPrincipal Card Card #for TeenCredit may be charged second degree murder

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Crimes Detectives. He was booked into the Spokane County Jail on the charge of felony assault. Motta, who was in critical condition at Sacred Heart Hospital, died of his injuries on March 15. Information Officer Chamberlain speculated that the charges against Lewis would be upgraded to Mail to: second degree murder by the Spokane County Prosecutor’s office, but as of Monday they were still listed as first degree assault. When Motta came to Oroville in 1981 to take his first principal’s job he was just 34-years-old and stayed here for four years, according to his good friend Don DeVon, who served under Motta as a high school councilor in Oroville, as well as in Palm Desert, Calif. DeVon described Motta as a “highly innovative” educator who always had an open door policy to students, staff, parents and the community in general. “When Frank first came to Oroville to take his first principal’s job he hit the ground running. His enthusiasm was a positive motivators for students and staff,” DeVon said. Motta went on to be the youngest president of the Washington State Principal’s Association, according to his friend, who added that he had also been a well-respected football coach in several high schools in Washington State before becoming a principal. “He played college football at the University of California at Irvine,” said DeVon, “and he was a highly decorated combat veteran who won the bronze star.” After retiring as a teacher and principal for schools in Washington and California, Motta settled in Spokane with his wife and family. He was working as a volunteer at the Spokane Veterans Administration Hospital. The 65-year-old was a combat Air Force Veteran who served in Vietnam. He had recently been hired as a patient advocate at the VA Hospital.

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SPOKANE – Former Oroville High School Principal Frank Motta died from injuries sustained while trying to help a neighbor whose Spokane area home had been overrunWWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM by a teenage | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE party. GLOWING PERFORMANCE Apparently Motta was asked to keep Concern an eye on the house by his neighbor expressed and on Saturday, March 10 when he saw there was a party going on he over coaches City’s engineerswho seek to was clarify priorities called the neighbor out ofregarding upcoming street improvement projects resignation town. The council authorized Councilwoman BY BRENT BAKER BY BRENT BAKER Jill Vugteveen and Danison to make a She gave him the security code to the final decision to move forward, with a priority on creating a “straight shot” TONASKET - The Tonasket TONASKET - Teresa Hawkins garage door Council and called 911.CityMotta then provided updates on a num- from one end of town to the other along expressed her concern over the resignaber of civic projects that are progress- at least one side of the road with ADAtion of varsity basketball coach Glenn went to try and break up approved curb access ramps. ing through their planning stagesthe at the party. Braman during the public comment porThe airport runway seal project’s tarTuesday, March 13, council meeting. tion of the Tonasket School Board meetschedule is for completion before the Tonasket city planner Kurt Danison ing on Monday, March 12. Spokane County Sheriff ’s getDeputies said he met with three property owners Father’s Day Fly-in. Hawkins, wife of longtime varsity Meanwhile, the council granted public affected by the need for an easement football coach Jay Hawkins, said she responded to an theassault call works in North director Bill Pilkinton a leave of to complete Mill Drive/Bonaparte was concerned that the direction of the Creek sewer project and said that they absence of indefinite length and appointschool district concerning its coaches seemed to be willing to provide the ease- ed Hugh Jensen as acting public services Spokane County. was taking an ugly turn. director. ment access. “I’m concerned with the resignation of “They’re willing to provide easement coach Braman,” she said. When deputies arrived on scene they through their property so we can connect “I’m concerned because my husband Fuller passes exam, up the sewer through there,” Danison is also a coach. I’m not comfortable with said. “They were under the impression found a male subject in the residence video policy progress how that came about.” that water was included in this... I don’t Hawkins said she had heard secondChief Robert Burks said that know how it came about... I don’t think hand remarks attributed to a school had been assaulted, according Police to Craig we said we were going to put in a water he is working on a policy governing the board member that fed into her condepartment’s handling of data collected system there. cern. video surveillance. Chamberlain, a spokesman with the “I think they walked away with a better during “I’m hoping the school board acts as Burks also announced that officer understanding.” a board, and not on individual agendas,” Audra Fuller passed her civil service The council planned an open she said. “I hope we’ve learned from the Spokane County Sheriff ’s house office. for March 20 for residents to interact exam and has been hired as a full-time process that went down. with the engineers and councilmembers officer. “I think it’s sad if we let a group of Burks at said he is finalizing a “wish “There were over 100 people the on the sewer project committee. parents who are upset or who have a venThe council also responded to a memo list” to be submitted for Stonegarden geance with a coach from a long time ago describing how potential grant money Varela and there Associates seeking to come in and rally people up to make a residence where hadto clarbeen a large ify priorities on the upcoming street would be used. Stonegarden grants prodecision to not reinstate a coach. vide money for local law enforcement improvement projects that had been disI think it would be really sad if we have party throughout the council evening. cussed at a previous meeting. entities to use while assisting in U.S. to go around the community to bring The project was facing a delay without Border Patrol operations, although any in support to show that a coach has just equipment purchased is not limited to Oroville High suchimmediately a prioritization as funding for the requested Deputies project as many people, and more,School (supporting Annual may not be enough to complete those operations. him) as those who complained about “Oroville was able to get an SUV Kaylee Clough performs “The Glow” at the Variety Show and Auction presented by Dollars the entire “wish list.” him. ” medics when“Wethey located thethrough victim. Stonegarden grant money,” Motta Frank inthe Oroville his first job a principal at 14Oroville High School. for Scholars and High School Musicas Department on Wednesday, March want the (hospital parking crossCiting her experience as a coach’s wife ing) beacon as the base project,” said Burks said. “This is the initial part of the in the high school commons. The eight-year-old has been taking ballet for five years and and as a mother of an athlete coached we do every Mayor Patrick Plumb.transported “The rest we will process thatto The victim was a year. We don’t recently performed at the Seattle Dance Workshop Competition and took a silver medal. by others, Hawkins said that athletics have done as we have the funding to SEE COUNCIL | PG A3 The annual talent show is used to raise funds for the Oroville Dollars for Scholars teaches kids to deal with adversity, but complete.” several at the party. that parents encourage that growth. Continuing Education awards. For morewitnesses from the event see page B2. local medical facility where he is listed “We want the situation to be perfect for our kids,Gang ” she said. “ButEnforcement what do we The Spokane Violent Crime in critical condition,” said a Spokane Sheriff ’s office teach them when we run to every need they have? Team was requested to assist locating and “(Coaches) love the game, Lewis they’re press release. competitors, and they want to teach kids to work together, to go out in life and be Investigators identified the suspect as Treven located him at his residence.successful. Kids can’t be successful if their parents Crimes Detectives. Teen may be charged They arrested himCounty andJailtransported to the Spokane That’s Lewis, an 18-year-old whoforis accused of knocking He was booked into the Spokane on don’t let them grow as individuals. a part of athletics. Nothing is going to be the charge of felony assault. second degree murder ” Jailwas inwhere heat Sacred wasperfect. interviewed by Major Motta, who critical condition Motta to the ground and beating him in front of County Hawkins said she was concerned that

Tonasket council updates on projects

312 S. Whitcomb

PO Box 657 Kirkland, WA 98083

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Stainless Steel Jewelry

Former Oroville Principal killed BY GARY A. DEVON

SPOKANE – Former Oroville High School Principal Frank Motta died from injuries sustained while trying to help a neighbor whose Spokane area home had been overrun by a teenage party. Apparently Motta was asked to keep an eye on the house by his neighbor and on Saturday, March 10 when he saw there was a party going on he called the neighbor who was out of town. She gave him the security code to the garage door and called 911. Motta then went to try and break up the party. Spokane County Sheriff ’s Deputies responded to an assault call in North Spokane County. When deputies arrived on scene they found a male subject in the residence had been assaulted, according to Craig Chamberlain, a spokesman with the Spokane County Sheriff ’s office. “There were over 100 people at the residence where there had been a large party throughout the evening. Deputies immediately requested medics when they located the victim. Frank Motta in his first job as a principal at Oroville High School. The victim was transported to a several witnesses at the party. local medical facility where he is listed The Spokane Violent Crime Gang Enforcement in critical condition,” said a Spokane Sheriff ’s office Team was requested to assist locating Lewis and press release. Investigators identified the suspect as Treven located him at his residence. They arrested him and transported to the Spokane Lewis, an 18-year-old who is accused of knocking Motta to the ground and beating him in front of County Jail where he was interviewed by Major

Heart Hospital, died of his injuries on March 15. Information Officer Chamberlain speculated that the charges against Lewis would be upgraded to second degree murder by the Spokane County Prosecutor’s office, but as of Monday they were still listed as first degree assault. When Motta came to Oroville in 1981 to take his first principal’s job he was just 34-years-old and stayed here for four years, according to his good friend Don DeVon, who served under Motta as a high school councilor in Oroville, as well as in Palm Desert, Calif. DeVon described Motta as a “highly innovative” educator who always had an open door policy to students, staff, parents and the community in general. “When Frank first came to Oroville to take his first principal’s job he hit the ground running. His enthusiasm was a positive motivators for students and staff,” DeVon said. Motta went on to be the youngest president of the Washington State Principal’s Association, according to his friend, who added that he had also been a well-respected football coach in several high schools in Washington State before becoming a principal. “He played college football at the University of California at Irvine,” said DeVon, “and he was a highly decorated combat veteran who won the bronze star.” After retiring as a teacher and principal for schools in Washington and California, Motta settled in Spokane with his wife and family. He was working as a volunteer at the Spokane Veterans Administration Hospital. The 65-year-old was a combat Air Force Veteran who served in Vietnam. He had recently been hired as a patient advocate at the VA Hospital.

situations that contributed to Braman’s resignation, as well as rumors about her husband’s position, could damage the reputation of the district. “People want to come to this district,” she said. “It’s because of you guys (the school board) up here. You have done a great job of keeping this school district as one of the elite. “Don’t ruin that. Don’t let that happen, you guys.” In other business, superintendent Paul Turner read a proclamation from Governor Christine Gregoire honoring classified school employees. Board member Catherine Stangland read off the list of all TSD classified employees’ names. Principals from each of the schools presented their mid-year student data to the board The board also reviewed information about switching over to a Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) phone system as presented by Jive Communications, which answered questions via a video conference call. They later approved switching to a VOIP system at a meeting last Thursday. Jive is currently serving the education market in 23 states, offered lifetime pricing and, significantly, qualified, for e-rate discounting that is calculated through the district’s free and reduced meal rate. The board requested a few days to think about the information presented, and at a special meeting on Thursday, March 15. The school board next meets on Monday, March 26.

Rings, Earrings, Necklaces & Bracelets OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 106 No. 12

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in Strong, Shiny, Shimmering Stainless Steel! OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 106 No. 12

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Community A2-3 Letters & Opinions A4 Movies A5

Valley Life A5-6 Local Sports B1 School News B2-B3

Classified/Legals B4-B5 Obits B5 Outdoors B6


Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 21, 2013

Court, 911 Calls, Jail Bookings District Court Criminal The court found probable cause to charge Audrey Huckins, 50, with harassment first and threats to kill. She was found guilty and received one year and three months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Jose Chacon, 18, with burglary second and theft third. He was found guilty and received one year and two months confinement.

Juvenile A 15-year-old Omak juvenile was charged with MIP. The juvenile was found guilty and received one week confinement.

Superior Court Jacob Atkinson, 17, of Okanogan was charged with two counts of DWLS third. He was found guilty and received an $818 fine. Michael Bowling, 23, of Omak was charged with use of drug paraphernalia. He was found guilty and received a $400 fine. Gustavo Camacho, 19, of Oroville was charged with two counts of use/delivery of drug paraphernalia. Kevin Clark, 32, of Omak was charged with assault fourth. He was found guilty and received five days confinement and a $990 fine. Regina Cook, 51, of Oroville was charged with DWLS third. She was found guilty and received a $568 fine. Sandra Cooper, 43, of Omak was charged with DWLS

third. Bryan Dove, 31, of Tonasket was charged with assault fourth. He was found guilty and received seven days confinement and a $1,033 fine. Stephanie George, 19, of Omak was charged with no valid operator’s license. She was found guilty and received a $400 fine. Kristina Gipson, 30, of Okanogan was charged with DWLS third and theft third. She was found guilty and received 12 days confinement and a $1,666 fine. Robert Haydon, 25, of Tonasket was charged with DWLS third. He was found guilty and received a $618 fine. Harvey Heath, 40, of Omak was charged with two counts of operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock. Corey Jensen, 31, of Tonasket was charged with two counts of DWLS third. Kevin Lacourse, 38, of Omak was charged with assault fourth and no contact/ protection order violation. He was found guilty and received 35 days confinement and a $2,191 fine. Joseph Lazard, 28, of Omak was charged with DWLS third. He was found guilty and received a $618 fine. Anthony McFarlane, 44, of Tonasket was charged with five counts of DWLS third. He was found guilty and received a $3490 fine. Isaac Parker, 53, of Tonasket was charged with DUI and DWLS third. He was found guilty and received 30 days confinement and a $2,436 fine. Dwayne Paul, 55, of Omak was charged with DUI. He was found guilty and received 20 days confinement and a $3,636 fine. Tyler Peasley, 26, of Omak was charged with deposit of an

unwholesome substance. He was found guilty and received a $500 fine. Steven St Peter, 21, of Omak was charged with two counts of use/delivery of drug paraphernalia and marijuana possession less than or equal to 40 grams. He was found guilty and received two days confinement and a $658 fine. Ray Tachell, 49, of Omak was charged with assault fourth. He was found guilty and received five days confinement and a $1,033 fine. Amorita Trevino, 25, of Omak was charged two counts of DWLS third and obstructing a law enforcement officer. She was found guilty and received nine days confinement and a $2,224 fine. Amanda Vanslyke, 27, of Omak was charged with DWLS third.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, March 11, 2013 Shane Wehmeyer, 44, was booked for DUI and DWLS second. Billy Rosenkilde, 34, was booked for possession of meth, vehicle prowling second, theft third, malicious mischief third, possession of drug paraphernalia, FTA and DWLS third. Douglas Schrum, 48, was booked for failure to appear and DUI. Angelo Lopez, 31, was booked for a detainer. Gary Owens, 45, was booked for child molestation third.

Tuesday, March 12, 2013 In Okanogan, on Third Avenue South, an inmate broke

windows out of the jail. In Okanogan, on Second Avenue South, a male subject threatened to stab a man where he stood. He was carrying a knife in his back pocket. Jesus Casteneda, 18, was booked for assault third and MIP. Samantha Harding, 42, was booked for possession of a controlled substance. Johnathon Hart, 29, was booked for a detainer, DWLS third and possession of drug paraphernalia. Mark Combs, 40, was booked for failure to appear, and failure to pay child support. Sophia Stewart, 32, was booked for burglary first, two counts of theft of a firearm, two counts of unlawful possession of a firearm and theft third. Kimili Eagle, 48, was booked for failure to appear, theft first and probation violation. Christopher Monohan, 35, was booked for five counts of failure to appear and five counts of possession. Bruce Wisner, 49, was booked for detainer, failure to appear and DWLS third.

a photo ID was taken from a residence. Timothy Burt, 59, was booked for theft third and trespassing second. Martin Lawson, 50, was booked for detainer, failure to appear and possession of a controlled substance. Joseph Lee, 22, was booked for forgery, possession of stolen property and DWLS second.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Robert Hankins, 40, was booked for assault fourth. Alfonso Cardenes, 55, was booked for assault fourth.

In Okanogan, on Seattle Street,

Rusty Sturgill, 25, was booked for probation violation. Leaysha Louis, 18, was booked for MIP. Levi Ortiz, 23, was booked for failure to appear. Marcus Adams, 21, was booked for harassment.

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Friday, March 15, 2013 Lorinda Sanders, 46, was booked for failure to appear and meth possession. Brandy Lee, 36, was booked for failure to appear. Mathew Bowers, 19, was booked for reckless driving. Saturday, March 16, 2013

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Easter Service

Loomis Community Church invites the public to attend its Special Easter events on March 31, 2013, beginning with a sunrise service at the cross, located two mile up the Horse Spring Coulee Road, at the west end of Spectacle Lake, at 7:00 a.m. The service will be followed at 8:00 a.m. by a breakfast for all in the church fellowship room. An Easter Worship service at 11:00 a.m. will be held in the sanctuary.

Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

Join us for Lenten Fellowship / Wednesdays with soup & bread 6 p.m. Service at 7 p.m. 11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Historic Buildings Walk planned for downtown Auction to raise BORDERLANDS HISTORICAL funds to buy SOCIETY signage April 6 Submitted by Kay Sibley OBHS President

OROVILLE - An upcoming auction will support additional signage for the downtown historical area. The Borderlands Historical Society is planning on creating 10 additional signs for buildings and historical sites. The additionally signs will create a historical downtown walk for locals and tourists to enjoy as well as learn a little about our area. The auction on April 6, at the American Legion, is focusing on raising funds for this purpose. Each of the smaller signs cost between $300 and $400 to be made. The town not only has many original Subscribe to the... Okanogan Valley

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buildings prior to 1925 but homes as well, nearby the downtown walking tour. The ten additional signs will still not cover all the buildings and historical sites but will greatly increase visibility of the history of our area. Where would you like to see the signs placed? At the auction a list of possible locations will be on display and you may vote for your top choices. This annual auction is dedicated to funding the historical signs an monies that remains will be used to complete a better handicap access to the depot, ADA bathroom and upgrade the kitchen area. The American Legion ladies will be making hamburgers and fries for their fundrais-

ing beginning at 5:30 p.m., a variety of desserts will be available for a small donation towards the sign project, and a silent and live auction will be held as well. Thanks to many donors we have many interesting items to help raise the dollars for the signage. Look on our Facebook page, OkanoganB orderl ands-Histor ic a lSociety, for more information.

Memorial SerVice Donald Glen Cook A memorial service for Donald Glen Cook will be held at noon on April 6, 2013 at the Eagles Hall in Tonasket, Wash.

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Janice Woda, 61, was booked for DUI. Clarisa Fonseca, 18, was booked for failure to appear and DWLS third.

Key:

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship

Pat Garrett and helper putting up the large Peerless Block sign last spring.

Sunday, March 17, 2013

Thursday, March 14, 2013

OROVILLE

OBHS/submitted photo

Dean Tonner, 45, was booked for FTA and DWLS third. Carlo Mendoza, 26, was booked for no contact order violation.

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 21, 2013  

March 21, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 21, 2013  

March 21, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune