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Variety Show Friday, March 15, at Oroville High School

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Oroville approves trailhead permit

SHOWING HIS STRIPES

Issue back on agenda for March 25 meeting

BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – The Oroville City Council approved a Conditional Use Permit for miscellaneous improvements to the Similkameen Trailhead, including the construction of restrooms and a parking lot. The decision came following a closed testimony hearing at the council’s Tuesday, March 5 meeting. Public testimony had already taken place at a previous meeting of the city’s planning commission. The CUP was applied for by Okanogan County, which owns the trailhead property at the end of Kernan Road. The Similkameen Trailhead was originally purchased by the city, but acquired by the county when the opportunity came up to get a grant to enhance the county’s trail system, according to Chris Branch, director of Community Development. “The property wasn’t big enough, then the county made a trade with an adjacent property owner,” said Branch. “The parking lot and restroom facilities are the primary improvements they are going to do, with maybe some fencing in the future.” After the council approved the permit, based on planning commission and staff recommendations, Joseph Enzensperger gave an update on what the local chapter of the Pacific Northwest Trail (PNT) Club

Passions high over Vo-Ag changes BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - A proposed change to the Tonasket School District’s vocational program brought out a full house to the Monday, March 11, school board meeting. Defenders of the current program - family consumer science - asked the school board not to approve a proposal by superintendent Paul Turner and high school principal Jeff Hardesty to make a switch to agricultural science. The administrators say the switch would provide more offerings that students wish to take, meet new state standards for biology and provide additional flexibility in scheduling as the district tries to return to a full school day. Turner and Hardesty presented data that showed both a low number of students participating in the family consumer science program as well as students being turned away from the current, highly-successful agricultural science/FFA program. They also said that the newer program would more adequately address STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) needs in the district. Supporters of the program, including a number of students, offered a passionate

Tonasket High School celebrated its Winterfest last week, culminating with Friday nights Talent and Awards Show. Above, the only award not bestowed upon a current student or staff member went to Mike Mills, honored as Most Supportive Community Member. Ever-present at THS events of all sorts, Mills was perfectly dressed for the occasion as he received his award from Elizabeth Jackson. Right, David Williams was crowned Winterfest King and was escorted by “Ms T” Kelly Cruz.

Brent Baker/staff photos

SEE PERMIT | PG A2

SEE SWITCH | PG A2

Endurance rider plans return to competition So much depends on your horse BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Oroville’s Heidi Hylton has been competing for two years in horse endurance riding and for a relative newcomer has racked up some impressive results. “I got into it indirectly through Kim Black, but more directly through John Newton, who is our farrier,” said Hylton. “Kim, from Tonasket, has competed for several years. John doesn’t compete, but he is the one who encouraged me to try it.” Hylton says she has a lot to thank Newton for and that there are five endurance riders in Okanogan County and they all use his horseshoeing services. “The sport is super hard on horses, if your horse doesn’t have a good footing under you, you can’t compete,” Hylton said. The competitor says endurance riding takes lots of time conditioning your horse and riding at least three times a week, five to 25 miles, to practice. Hylton and her husband Tony have nine horses on 40 acres outside of Oroville. Her husband also competed for the first time last year. He rides a full brother to her horse. “As a stallion he can be more difficult to deal with,” she said. In 2011 Hylton and her mare ‘Crazy Horse’ completed fourteen 50-mile competitions and one 75- mile distance. Of the 15 rides she placed first seven times, receiving three Best Condition awards. Crazy Horse was never out of top ten placing other than one ride where multiple riders got lost and rode 10 extra miles. Heidi and Crazy finished 2011 as

the first place Featherweight rider and the second place in overall points. With 775 miles they were second in regional mileage, as well. Races vary in length from 50 to 100 miles. A veterinarian checks out each competitor’s horse prior to the event and they have to pass the exam to compete. There are from one to four stations where the horse and rider must “hold,” take a rest break, on a typical 50-mile course depending on the terrain, she said. “There are more on 75 and 100 mile courses depending on the difficulty and the weather. If the weather is very cold you don’t want to hold there long because the horse can cramp up from the cold,” she said. Horses are also given physical exams by veterinarians at these holds - checking metabolic rate, pulse, digestion and dehydration. If the horse doesn’t pass any of these exams the rider cannot continue in the competition. She said she was disqualified at one of the 16 races she was competing in. “It was the very last race I completed the time to the finish line and at the completion my horse had a muscle cramp I didn’t get to complete the race,” she said. “The sport is very big on the health of the animal.” There is a lot of time committed to your horse, which has to be in top shape, according to Hylton. She took the state championship in 2011 in the Featherweight Division. “Last year we didn’t have enough money to do a whole lot of races, so we didn’t take the championship. Kim did excellent and took a state championship,” she said. The Pacific Northwest region includes competition in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Western Montana, Alaska and B.C. The closest race is held in the Vantage, Wash. area. The 75-mile competition in the Yakima area is considered by many to be one of the most challenging in the Pacific

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 11

Northwest, according to Hylton. That was Hylton’s first 75-miler and she won it and also got the Best Condition award, she says. The races are gender neutral and men and women compete equally in the same race. Some races are multi-day events, where there might be five 50-mile races each day. So much depends on the rider’s horse, although Hylton doesn’t ride a typical endurance mount. Hylton said Crazy Horse is a big and heavy paint quarter horse/thoroughbred cross in a sport where Arabs dominate. “Endurance horses need to have extremely high metabolism with a muscle type that burns energy efficiently. They also have to have the ability to keep their pulse low and to cool down quickly after a race. Hylton said, “My horse likes to race, she’s extremely competitive. She likes when we are actually doing the race, but doesn’t like work… she thinks if there’s no competition ‘why do this?’ She’s extremely smart; she likes to race too much. I spend a lot of time trying to hold her back.” Hylton’s says she’s learned a lot about taking care of her horse since she started racing her. “There’s a lot too do, lots of time learning your horse and what to feed her. You spend so much time just trying to keep your weight on the horse. They burn a huge amount of energy.” To do that Hylton says she feeds her horse a diet that includes vitamins and minerals and fat additives. Even though she says her horse has changed a lot as it get’s older, she still pulses down quickly and cools quickly. “She’ll be nine this year, I am so lucky to have a her, she’s like no other animal. She has a reliable spirit,” she said. The next riding season starts in April and Hylton and Crazy Horse plan to participate in more of the events this year.

Steve Bradley/submitted photo

Heidi Hylton competing in an endurance competition on her horse “Crazy Horse.”

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Valley Life A3-4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6

Sports A7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Police Stats A10 Obituaries A10 Sports Previews B1-8


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 14, 2013

‘False Alarm’ ordinance gains approval from City of Oroville By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE – After fine tuning over the last two meetings, Oroville set an ordinance setting fees for “false alarm” calls in an effort to try and curtail unnecessary emergency responses. The ordinance was approved at the council’s Tuesday, March 5 meeting pending a review by city attorney Mick Howe. It sets the charge for emergency response to a false alarm at $100 for the first incidence, $200, for the second, $300 for third and $400 for the fourth in a one year period. Calls out to a false alarm triggered by a company doing maintenance or repair to fire sprinkler or alarm systems where the company did not inform the city, will be an automatic $250 for the first incidence. “Our intent is not to penalize businesses, but our hope is to educate them if they have alarm issues,” said Rod Noel, Oroville’s fire chief. The new ordinance will include a Memorandum of Understanding between the city and rural fire departments. “It’s a recovery, not a penalty, even though the first few fees won’t recover your full costs,” said Chris Branch, director of community development.

“It’s enough to send a message,” said Councilwoman Neysa Roley. “I agree with Rod, if you do it once you’re probably not going to do it again,” added Branch.

Senior Project Ronel Kee, a senior at Oroville High School, approached the council for permission to refurbish the lettering on the Oroville Welcome Gates. “I’d like to redo the Oroville Welcome Sign, right now it is kind of run down,” he said. “I’d like to redo the lettering and any funds that are available would be appreciated, but I will be going to raise funds myself.” Councilman Walt Hart III told Kee that he and Ken Mathews had been maintaining the Welcome Gates for the past 10 years and that they have all the letters and paint to help him with his project and to keep the costs down. Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth said he would donate $50 to the project and Councilman Tony Koepke added another $20. “And Ronel will do a good job,” added Councilman Ed Naillon, a teacher at OHS. The senior student plans to finish his project by the end of March or early April.

Ambulance

Engine

Oroville Ambulance Coordinator Debra Donoghue gave an update on efforts to replace a motor in ambulance unit 264. She said that Hart and Koepke, members of the Ambulance Committee, had given approval for Thompson Bees to install a rebuilt engine from NAPA. The engine and installation will run about $5000 total. “After discussing it with Rod, if we decide to get rid of an ambulance when the new one is purchased, then we will get rid of it. That’s why we are just going for a rebuilt. Unit 263 is newer and doesn’t have the electrical problems, Donoghue said, indicating she’d like to keep Unit 264 giving the district three ambulances.

Industrial Park Lease Veranda Beach Partnership, which took a five-year lease on the city’s industrial park building, then renewed for one year, is asked for approval of a new five-year lease at the same terms as their original lease. Koepke made a motion to approve the lease renewal and it was seconded by Councilman Jon Neal and approved.

Switch | FROM A1 defense of the value of the current program and discussed how it had had a positive impact on their lives. Vocational teacher Liz Moore described the various facets of the program and said that it easily meet STEM guidelines. Though the proposed program change was an action item on the agenda, the board unanimously voted to table to table the topic until the March 25 meeting in order to study information provided by the program’s backers and garner more public opinion. Board member Catherine Stangland said that the board had received more letters about the possible shift than any single topic she could remember. The March 25 meeting will begin at 7 p.m. (a half hour earlier than the usual Daylight Saving Time schedule of 7:30 p.m.) and lead off with a public hearing.

Bill Munson/submitted photo

Board doesn’t extend Turner’s contract TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board, at a special meeting on Monday March 4, voted not to extend Superintendent Paul Turner’s contract for another year following an executive session where is evaluation was completed. Turner still has until the end of the 203-14 school year remaining on his current contract. The board voted 4-1 against extending his contract, with board chair Jerry Asmussen casting the dissenting vote. “We went through my evaluation, and it’s obvious they want some things to change,” Turner said. “Sometimes when you’re going down the road you end

up having to take a detour, and that’s OK.” He said, when asked, that the delay in his proposal to extend the school day back to a normallength day for the first time in more than 15 years likely didn’t help matters. “I’m sure that had some effect,” Turner said. “They’re passionate about getting it done, but it needs money that we don’t have right now. But that certainly didn’t help.” Turner said he didn’t expect it to hurt his working relationship with the board. “I’ve been in this business long enough to know that when the wind is blowing, sometimes it shifts direction,” he said. “We’ll still move forward on everything we’re working on.”

Permit | FROM A1 has been doing. The Similkameen Trail, as well as the newly developed Whistler Canyon Trail, are part of the PNT system. “There are lots of really exciting things happening. Nationally we (PNT) are one of the top four national scenic trail systems in the country, as well as the newest,” said Enzensperger. “Oroville is almost smack dab in the center of the trail. We are on the map, Oroville is a place to come to,” he said. There are lots of opportunities for small, entrepreneurial businesses and jobs… like a bike shop.” Enzensperger said over 20 students from Oroville High School participated in the SKY program working on the Similkameen and Whistler Canyon Trails. PNT club members and other volunteers have also done a lot of work on the trails. “The Backcountry Horsemen have really done a lot of work on the Whistler Canyon Trail,” added

Tonasket men injured in car accident

Enzensperger. “The view from the picnic table on Whistler’s Canyon is one of the best on the trail.” He also said that now we are no longer represented by U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rogers, Oroville needs to work to designate the city as a gateway to the PNT, because McMorris Rogers is supporting Metaline Falls for that distinction. “We know in Oroville we’d be a better gateway,” said Enzensperger, adding that U.S. Rep. Doc Hastings, whose district now includes Oroville, has been contacted. “Doc Hastings thinks we can give Cathy McMorris a run for her money, according to the President of the PNT,” said Enzensperger. He went on to say he’d like to see the PNT meetings of the local chapter become more integrated into the community and asked if they could be moved from the high school to the library’s meeting room.

“We don’t schedule the meeting room,” said Mayor Chuck Spieth. “But the city can let them know we support your efforts,” said City Clerk Kathy Jones. Enzensperger asked that the city put aside a small part of the city budget each year for support of the trail. “If the city could consider a little seed money as a gesture. The PNT Club is also going to do fundraisers,” he said. “We’re just asking for a couple hundred dollars to start.” Clerk Jones suggested the club apply for some of the city’s Hotel/ Motel Tax tourist funds. The trail supporter said that his group would like to see footbridges to Driscoll Island near the confluence of the Similkameen and Okanogan Rivers. He said the Island could be integrated into the rest of the trail system and help connect the Whistler Canyon and Similkameen Trails.

Smoke follows beauty…..

Tonasket resident Bud McSpadden helped remove a derelict gillnet from the Okanogan River just below the confluence of the Okanogan and Similkameen Rivers.

Senate approves wolf bill By Kylee Zabel, Reporter WNPA Olympia News Bureau

OLYMPIA - Senate Democrats attempted to limit the scope of a bill that would allow Washington State property owners to kill a wolf threatening owners’ livestock or pets by offering amendments during floor debate March 8. The legislation passed 25 to 23 without those amendments and now moves onto the House for further consideration. Four amendments were offered that, in sum, would have required livestock owners to have a permit and a cooperative wolf management action plan in place prior to seeking lethal management methods. The amendments would also authorize the killing of wolves only on private lands and would have sent the measure, if passed by the Legislature, to a vote of the people. Sponsor of the legislation Seventh District Sen. John Smith (R-Colville) and other Republican Senate members said that the amendments would effectively defeat the bill’s purpose: to restore the constitutional right to protect one’s livelihood and property. “Why should you have to wait for the bureaucracy to process a permit and to prove that it was a wolf or wolves that caused the damage? Common sense tells you that if your pets or livestock are in danger, you should be able to protect them,” said Sen. Mark Schoesler (R-Ritzville). Smith also expressed concern about allowing the measure to require a referendum vote. Because the Legislature’s constitutionally mandated paramount

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count has increased from 27 to 51 over the past year according to the DNR. Ranker argued that Senate Republicans were ignoring the desire of Washingtonians to reintroduce wolf populations to the state to implement the management plan’s non-lethal methods of wolf-containment. According to a 2011 survey, “Understanding People in Places,” conducted by DFW, 75 percent of Washington residents support wolf re-colonization; 66 percent support lethal methods of wolf removal when threatening livestock. Sen. Adam Kline (D-Seattle) and others charged that this legislation creates a divide between Western and Eastern Washington that should not exist in crafting public policy. “We are one state,” said Kline. “Sometimes I wonder in the way we make laws if they are only for our own regions and not for the whole state.” While the concern may be localized for now as wolf populations are still contained within their present regions, Sen. Mike Carrell (R-Lakewood) said that those opposed to the bill may start to feel differently once wolf packs expand and migrate closer to urban areas. Since 2007, nine domestic animals and livestock were recorded killed and 15 injured by wolves. Most of these, according to the DNR, were a result of a pack in northwestern Stevens County. Only two wolves in that pack are believed to have survived after 2012 efforts by DNR to remove the pack. A companion bill was introduced in the House this session, but was not awarded a hearing.

your guide to

Dining & Entertainment

By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

RIVERSIDE – A Tonasket man drifted off SR97 about five miles north of Riverside and he and a passenger sustained injuries that required transport by ambulanced to Mid-Valley Hospital Angel J. Morales-Salazar, 27, was driving a 1994 Ford Mustang northbound on SR97 when the vehicle drifted off to the right shoulder, he overcorrected and left the roadway and with the car coming to a rest in the southbound ditch, according to Washington State Patrol Trooper Bruner’s accident report. Also transported to Mid-Valley Hospital was Jose M. CastroLopez, 27, Tonasket, a passenger in the car. According to Trooper Bruner’s report “drugs or alcohol” were involved in the accident and the cause and charges are pending.

duty is K-12 funding, Smith said that the costs of putting a referendum on the ballot would take money away from fulfilling that legislative priority. “Referendums are not cheap,” he said. “Every dollar that we waste on a political game is a dollar that we take away from the essential, fundamental services that we have a fiduciary responsibility to provide to the citizens of the state of Washington.” Current law states that, in order to kill a wolf, a permit must be issued by the Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) and nonlethal methods must have been attempted prior to killing a wolf. The bill at issue, SB 5187, was largely opposed by conservation groups and Democrat senators during a public hearing on the bill Jan. 29. Many of the arguments made against the legislation related to the belief the current wolf-management plan by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) would deteriorate as a result of its passage. Some believe that this bill would declare open season on wolves, an accusation Smith rejects. Conservation groups signed up in opposition to the bill include the Center for Biological Diversity and Conservation Northwest as well as several private citizens. During floor debate Friday, Smith stated that comments made by senators opposing the bill demonstrated a drastic lack of knowledge as to how wolf predation adversely affects citizens in his district and others where known wolf packs roam. There are eight known wolf packs throughout the state, six of which are located in northeastern Washington. The estimated wolf

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MARCH 14, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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Okanogan Valley Life

New restaurant to open in Oroville Submitted by Sandy Lorentzen

OROVILLE - One of Oroville’s oldest buildings is being brought back to life as the Pastime Bar and Grill with re-opening planned for late spring. The building is located on the town’s Main Street along Highway 97 between Wenatchee and the Canadian border at Osoyoos. Major renovations have been underway for the past year, including restoration of the interior to its original condition, the addition of a commercial kitchen, the installation of updated systems and refurbishment of the former tavern’s pool and shuffleboard tables. The new establishment will serve lunch and dinner, accommodating approximately 130 in the restaurant and bar with seasonal outdoor seating, front and back. The structure dates back to the 1930s when Prince’s Thrifty department store opened in one half and a pool hall operated next door, becoming one space after the departure of Prince’s to new quarters. As a tavern, the business closed in 2009 and was purchased by the Hinze family in 2010. ‘’We are thrilled to be restoring this great Oroville landmark,” owner Victoria Hinze said. “Oroville is a great little town in the scenic Okanogan. “We hope our seasonally inspired menu prepared with local ingredients and a wine list featuring Washington’s great wines will be well-received by both our local citizens and visitors alike. “We are located in a prime agricultural region, most famous for garlic cultivation. In addition, more and more tourists are being attracted here for adventure sports, birding and wine tasting. We are a growing wine region and are located right across the border from Canada’s prime wine appellations,” Hinze added. To view progress of the renovations and to be added to the Pastime’s emailing list, go to www.pastimebarandgrill.com.

Submitted photo

Tara Weaver will be playing the violin at “A Day with the Steinway” at the Omak Performing Arts Center.

A Day with ‘The Steinway’ at PAC Submitted by Elizabeth Grunst

Okanogan Co. Music Teachers Assoc.

Submitted photos

Top, the entrance of the Pastime; middle, the rosewood back bar; bottom, the old Prince’s side.

CORRECTION In the Tonasket High School honor roll, Jenna Valentine (fresh-

OMAK - A “Day With The Steinway,” Saturday, March 16, will be an opportunity to get “up close and personal” with the stunning Steinway Grand Piano owned by the Omak Performing Arts Foundation. The Okanogan County Music Teachers Association (OKMTA) with support for the PAC Foundation is coordinating a full day of activities including private hands-on playing time, public performances, and the movie “The Making of Steinway L1037” that follows the detailed construction of one piano in New York’s Steinway Factory. The event will be a fund-raiser for 1) the PAC Foundation Piano Maintenance Fund and 2) the OKMTA Scholarship Fund, which includes funds for The Elma Curry Memorial Scholarship awarded to its graduating seniors and the Blessing Scholarships awarded as financial help to deserving young music students. The non-profit 501(3)(c) chapter is part of the Washington State and National Music Teachers Association. Teachers are: Elizabeth Grunst, Nora Ridenour, Roz Nau, Mariliz Romano, Jim Kalberer, Sandy Sheets, Lois Rhoads, and Kathleen Christensen. The morning will allow pre-registered piano players to play privately for a fee. Also planned is a public Sing-A-Long of vocal standards accompanied by Christensen from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. and from 11:30 a.m. to noon a public piano performance by Dave McClure, Nespelem rancher, cowboy poet and musician. An Open House from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. will feature student performers who have gathered donations for their performance times. The public is invited to listen anytime by donation.

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At 4:30 p.m. the Steinway movie will be of interest to anyone who enjoys how things are made, listening to the heart of the workers in the Steinway factory. One reviewer said, “This documentary was riveting! It takes 12 months to create a concert grand piano, with a huge cast of craftspeople. The Steinway people are…like a mini-United Nations. This gives you a real appreciation for ordinary-looking people creating something extraordinary.” The Association Teachers and Friends from all parts of Okanogan County will give a Concert at 7 p.m. with a wide variety of music. Scheduled to perform are: Mariliz Romano and Doug Wilson—piano Gail Ridenour and Nora Ridenour—oboe/piano Leslie Clough and Elizabeth Grunst—vocal/ piano Brass ensemble—Christensen, Chris Warren, Sealja Durkee, Curtis Manthey, John Oelund, Leslie Plum, BessieWright Westphalia Trio—Jim Kalberer, Norm Delwiche, Jack Burchard Howard Zosel and Elizabeth Grunst—vocal/ piano Kathleen Christensen—piano Don Pearce jazz trio—Pearce, piano; A.J. Jensen, bass; Jake Pearce, drums Tara Weaver—violin The History of the PAC Steinway will be shared. A Silent Auction and refreshments will be served. All activities will require a donation. The event is being promoted by North Cascades Broadcasting and PAC Foundation. Please contact OKMTA President Kathleen Christensen, for more info and to reserve private time at the piano. Kathleen Christensen (509) 4224660, mnkchris@ncidata.com, 312 Canyon Court, Omak WA 98841

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Kaylee Clough performs Glow”90 at the Variety Show andmonths Auction presented(56 by Dollars 26 months (112 issues) only“The $54 13 issues) only $30 for Scholars and the Oroville High School Music Department on Wednesday, March 14 in the high school commons. The eight-year-old has been taking ballet for five years and recently performed at the Seattle Dance Workshop Competition and took a silver medal. The annual talent show is used to raise funds for the Oroville Dollars for Scholars Continuing Education awards. For more from the event see page B2.

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Crimes Detectives. He was booked into the Spokane County Jail on the charge of felony assault. Motta, who was in critical condition at Sacred Heart Hospital, died of his injuries on March 15. Information Officer Chamberlain speculated that the charges against Lewis would be upgraded to Mail to: second degree murder by the Spokane County Prosecutor’s office, but as of Monday they were still listed as first degree assault. When Motta came to Oroville in 1981 to take his first principal’s job he was just 34-years-old and stayed here for four years, according to his good friend Don DeVon, who served under Motta as a high school councilor in Oroville, as well as in Palm Desert, Calif. DeVon described Motta as a “highly innovative” educator who always had an open door policy to students, staff, parents and the community in general. “When Frank first came to Oroville to take his first principal’s job he hit the ground running. His enthusiasm was a positive motivators for students and staff,” DeVon said. Motta went on to be the youngest president of the Washington State Principal’s Association, according to his friend, who added that he had also been a well-respected football coach in several high schools in Washington State before becoming a principal. “He played college football at the University of California at Irvine,” said DeVon, “and he was a highly decorated combat veteran who won the bronze star.” After retiring as a teacher and principal for schools in Washington and California, Motta settled in Spokane with his wife and family. He was working as a volunteer at the Spokane Veterans Administration Hospital. The 65-year-old was a combat Air Force Veteran who served in Vietnam. He had recently been hired as a patient advocate at the VA Hospital.

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Watch Donkey Basketball at the OHS Commons March 28 See page B3

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SPOKANE – Former Oroville High School Principal Frank Motta died from injuries sustained while trying to help a neighbor whose Spokane area home had been overrunWWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM by a teenage | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE party. GLOWING PERFORMANCE Apparently Motta was asked to keep Concern an eye on the house by his neighbor expressed and on Saturday, March 10 when he saw there was a party going on he over coaches City’s engineerswho seek to was clarify priorities called the neighbor out ofregarding upcoming street improvement projects resignation town. The council authorized Councilwoman BY BRENT BAKER BY BRENT BAKER Jill Vugteveen and Danison to make a She gave him the security code to the final decision to move forward, with a priority on creating a “straight shot” TONASKET - The Tonasket TONASKET - Teresa Hawkins garage door Council and called 911.CityMotta then provided updates on a num- from one end of town to the other along expressed her concern over the resignaber of civic projects that are progress- at least one side of the road with ADAtion of varsity basketball coach Glenn went to try and break up approved curb access ramps. ing through their planning stagesthe at the party. Braman during the public comment porThe airport runway seal project’s tarTuesday, March 13, council meeting. tion of the Tonasket School Board meetget schedule is for completion before the Tonasket city planner Kurt Danison ing on Monday, March 12. Spokane County Sheriff ’s Deputies said he met with three property owners Father’s Day Fly-in. Hawkins, wife of longtime varsity Meanwhile, the council granted public affected by the need for an easement football coach Jay Hawkins, said she responded to an assault call in North to complete the Mill Drive/Bonaparte works director Bill Pilkinton a leave of was concerned that the direction of the Creek sewer project and said that they absence of indefinite length and appointschool district concerning its coaches seemed to be willing to provide the ease- ed Hugh Jensen as acting public services Spokane County. was taking an ugly turn. director. ment access. “I’m concerned with the resignation of “They’re willing to provide easement coach Braman,” she said. When deputies arrived on scene they through their property so we can connect “I’m concerned because my husband Fuller passes exam, up the sewer through there,” Danison is also a coach. I’m not comfortable with said. “They were under the found a male subject inimpression the residence video policy progress how that came about.” that water was included in this... I don’t Hawkins said she had heard secondChief Robert Burks said that know how it came about... I don’t think hand remarks attributed to a school had been assaulted, according Police to Craig we said we were going to put in a water he is working on a policy governing the board member that fed into her condepartment’s handling of data collected system there. cern. video surveillance. Chamberlain, a theyspokesman with the “I think walked away with a better during “I’m hoping the school board acts as Burks also announced that officer understanding.” a board, and not on individual agendas,” Audra Fuller passed her civil service The council planned an open she said. “I hope we’ve learned from the Spokane County Sheriff ’s house office. for March 20 for residents to interact exam and has been hired as a full-time process that went down. with the engineers and councilmembers officer. “I think it’s sad if we let a group of Burks at said he is finalizing a “wish “There were over 100 people the on the sewer project committee. parents who are upset or who have a venThe council also responded to a memo list” to be submitted for Stonegarden geance with a coach from a long time ago describing how potential grant money Varela and Associates seeking to clarto come in and rally people up to make a residence where there had been a large ify priorities on the upcoming street would be used. Stonegarden grants prodecision to not reinstate a coach. improvement projects that had been dis- vide money for local law enforcement I think it would be really sad if we have entities to use while assisting in U.S. party throughout the evening. cussed at a previous council meeting. to go around the community to bring The project was facing a delay without Border Patrol operations, although any in support to show that a coach has just equipment purchased is not limited to Oroville High a prioritization as funding for the requested Deputies such immediately as many people, and more,School (supporting Annual project may not be enough to complete those operations. him) as those who complained about “Oroville was able to get an SUV Kaylee Clough performs “The Glow” at the Variety Show and Auction presented by Dollars “wish list.” him.” medics whenthe“Weentire they located thethrough victim. Stonegarden grant money,” Motta Frank inthe Oroville his first job a principal at 14Oroville High School. for Scholars and High School Musicas Department on Wednesday, March want the (hospital parking crossCiting her experience as a coach’s wife ing) beacon as the base project,” said Burks said. “This is the initial part of the in the high school commons. The eight-year-old has been taking ballet for five years and and as a mother of an athlete coached we do every Mayor Patrick Plumb.transported “The rest we will process thatto The victim was a year. We don’t recently performed at the Seattle Dance Workshop Competition and took a silver medal. by others, Hawkins said that athletics have done as we have the funding to SEE COUNCIL | PG A3 The annual talent show is used to raise funds for the Oroville Dollars for Scholars teaches kids to deal with adversity, but complete.” several at the party. that parents encourage that growth. Continuing Education awards. For morewitnesses from the event see page B2. local medical facility where he is listed “We want the situation to be perfect for our kids,Gang ” she said. “ButEnforcement what do we The Spokane Violent Crime in critical condition,” said a Spokane Sheriff ’s office teach them when we run to every need they have? Team was requested to assist locating and “(Coaches) love the game, Lewis they’re press release. competitors, and they want to teach kids work together, to go out in life and be Investigators identified the suspect as Treven located him at his residence.tosuccessful. Kids can’t be successful if their parents Crimes Detectives. Teen may be charged They arrested himCounty andJailtransported to the Spokane That’s Lewis, an 18-year-old whoforis accused of knocking He was booked into the Spokane on don’t let them grow as individuals. a part of athletics. Nothing is going to be the charge of felony assault. second degree murder perfect. ” County Jail where he was interviewed by Major Motta, who was in critical condition at Sacred Motta to the ground and beating him in front of Hawkins said she was concerned that Heart Hospital, died of his injuries on March 15.

Tonasket council updates on projects

k Thin ! n Gree

TONASKET - Teresa Hawkins expressed her concern over the resignation of varsity basketball coach Glenn Braman during the public comment portion of the Tonasket School Board meeting on Monday, March 12. Hawkins, wife of longtime varsity football coach Jay Hawkins, said she was concerned that the direction of the school district concerning its coaches was taking an ugly turn. “I’m concerned with the resignation of coach Braman,” she said. “I’m concerned because my husband is also a coach. I’m not comfortable with how that came about.” Hawkins said she had heard secondhand remarks attributed to a school board member that fed into her concern. “I’m hoping the school board acts as a board, and not on individual agendas,” she said. “I hope we’ve learned from the process that went down. “I think it’s sad if we let a group of parents who are upset or who have a vengeance with a coach from a long time ago to come in and rally people up to make a decision to not reinstate a coach. I think it would be really sad if we have to go around the community to bring in support to show that a coach has just as many people, and more, (supporting him) as those who complained 50 about him.” Citing her experience as a coach’s wife and as a mother of an athlete coached by others, Hawkins said that athletics teaches kids to deal with adversity, but that parents encourage that growth. “We want the situation to be perfect for our kids,” she said. “But what do we teach them when we run to every need they have? “(Coaches) love the game, they’re competitors, and they want to teach kids to work together, to go out in life and be successful. Kids can’t be successful if their parents don’t let them grow as individuals. That’s a part of athletics. Nothing is going to be perfect.” Hawkins said she was concerned that situations that contributed to Braman’s resignation, as well as rumors about her husband’s position, could damage the reputation of the district. “People want to come to this district,” she said. “It’s because of you guys (the school board) up here. You have done a great job of keeping this school district as one of the elite. “Don’t ruin that. Don’t let that happen, you guys.” In other business, superintendent Paul Turner read a proclamation from Governor Christine Gregoire honoring classified school employees. Board member Catherine Stangland read off the list of all TSD classified employees’ names. Principals from each of the schools presented their mid-year student data to the board The board also reviewed information about switching over to a Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) phone system as presented by Jive Communications, which answered questions via a video conference call. They later approved switching to a VOIP system at a meeting last Thursday. Jive is currently serving the education market in 23 states, offered lifetime pricing and, significantly, qualified, for e-rate discounting that is calculated through the district’s free and reduced meal rate. The board requested a few days to think about the information presented, and at a special meeting on Thursday, March 15. The school board next meets on Monday, March 26.

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The council authorized Councilwoman BY BRENT BAKER Jill Vugteveen and Danison to make a BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM final decision to move forward, with TONASKET - The Tonasket City a priority on creating a “straight shot” Council provided updates on a num- from one end of town to the other along ber of civic projects that are progress- at least one side of the road with ADAing through their planning stages at the approved curb access ramps. The airport runway seal project’s tarTuesday, March 13, council meeting. Tonasket city planner Kurt Danison get schedule is for completion before the said he met with three property owners Father’s Day Fly-in. Meanwhile, the council granted public affected by the need for an easement to complete the Mill Drive/Bonaparte works director Bill Pilkinton a leave of Creek sewer project and said that they absence of indefinite length and appointseemed to be willing to provide the ease- ed Hugh Jensen as acting public services director. ment access. “They’re willing to provide easement through their property so we can connect up the sewer through there,” Danison said. “They were under the impression that water was included in this... I don’t Police Chief Robert Burks said that know how it came about... I don’t think we said we were going to put in a water he is working on a policy governing the department’s handling of data collected system there. “I think they walked away with a better during video surveillance. Burks also announced that officer understanding.” The council planned an open house Audra Fuller passed her civil service for March 20 for residents to interact exam and has been hired as a full-time with the engineers and councilmembers officer. Burks said he is finalizing a “wish on the sewer project committee. The council also responded to a memo list” to be submitted for Stonegarden Varela and Associates seeking to clar- describing how potential grant money ify priorities on the upcoming street would be used. Stonegarden grants proimprovement projects that had been dis- vide money for local law enforcement cussed at a previous council meeting. entities to use while assisting in U.S. The project was facing a delay without Border Patrol operations, although any such a prioritization as funding for the equipment purchased is not limited to those operations. project may not be enough to complete In County, home delivery “Oroville was able to get an SUV the entire “wish list.” “We want the (hospital parking cross- through Stonegarden grant money,” ing) beacon as the base project,” said Burks said. “This is the initial part of the Mayor Patrick Plumb. “The rest we will process that we do every year. We don’t have done as we have the funding to SEE COUNCIL | PG A3 complete.”

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Former Oroville Principal killed BY GARY A. DEVON

SPOKANE – Former Oroville High School Principal Frank Motta died from injuries sustained while trying to help a neighbor whose Spokane area home had been overrun by a teenage party. Apparently Motta was asked to keep an eye on the house by his neighbor and on Saturday, March 10 when he saw there was a party going on he called the neighbor who was out of town. She gave him the security code to the garage door and called 911. Motta then went to try and break up the party. Spokane County Sheriff ’s Deputies responded to an assault call in North Spokane County. When deputies arrived on scene they found a male subject in the residence had been assaulted, according to Craig Chamberlain, a spokesman with the Spokane County Sheriff ’s office. “There were over 100 people at the residence where there had been a large party throughout the evening. Deputies immediately requested medics when they located the victim. Frank Motta in his first job as a principal at Oroville High School. The victim was transported to a several witnesses at the party. local medical facility where he is listed The Spokane Violent Crime Gang Enforcement in critical condition,” said a Spokane Sheriff ’s office Team was requested to assist locating Lewis and press release. Investigators identified the suspect as Treven located him at his residence. They arrested him and transported to the Spokane Lewis, an 18-year-old who is accused of knocking Motta to the ground and beating him in front of County Jail where he was interviewed by Major

Information Officer Chamberlain speculated that the charges against Lewis would be upgraded to second degree murder by the Spokane County Prosecutor’s office, but as of Monday they were still listed as first degree assault. When Motta came to Oroville in 1981 to take his first principal’s job he was just 34-years-old and stayed here for four years, according to his good friend Don DeVon, who served under Motta as a high school councilor in Oroville, as well as in Palm Desert, Calif. DeVon described Motta as a “highly innovative” educator who always had an open door policy to students, staff, parents and the community in general. “When Frank first came to Oroville to take his first principal’s job he hit the ground running. His enthusiasm was a positive motivators for students and staff,” DeVon said. Motta went on to be the youngest president of the Washington State Principal’s Association, according to his friend, who added that he had also been a well-respected football coach in several high schools in Washington State before becoming a principal. “He played college football at the University of California at Irvine,” said DeVon, “and he was a highly decorated combat veteran who won the bronze star.” After retiring as a teacher and principal for schools in Washington and California, Motta settled in Spokane with his wife and family. He was working as a volunteer at the Spokane Veterans Administration Hospital. The 65-year-old was a combat Air Force Veteran who served in Vietnam. He had recently been hired as a patient advocate at the VA Hospital.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 106 No. 12

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situations that contributed to Braman’s resignation, as well as rumors about her husband’s position, could damage the reputation of the district. “People want to come to this district,” she said. “It’s because of you guys (the school board) up here. You have done a great job of keeping this school district as one of the elite. “Don’t ruin that. Don’t let that happen, you guys.” In other business, superintendent Paul Turner read a proclamation from Governor Christine Gregoire honoring classified school employees. Board member Catherine Stangland read off the list of all TSD classified employees’ names. Principals from each of the schools presented their mid-year student data to the board The board also reviewed information about switching over to a Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) phone system as presented by Jive Communications, which answered questions via a video conference call. They later approved switching to a VOIP system at a meeting last Thursday. Jive is currently serving the education market in 23 states, offered lifetime pricing and, significantly, qualified, for e-rate discounting that is calculated through the district’s free and reduced meal rate. The board requested a few days to think about the information presented, and at a special meeting on Thursday, March 15. The school board next meets on Monday, March 26.

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Friday, March 22, 7 p.m. - the Omak PAC TICKETS: $15/Adults, $10/Students Rawson’s, Okanogan - Oroville Pharmacy, Oroville - The Corner Shelf, Omak - Tonasket Interiors, Tonasket - North Cascades Broadcasting, Omak

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 14, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Rally for Buckhorn ‘Trashion Show’ Food, Fun, Entertainment, Prizes Submitted by Julie Ashmore Okanogan Highlands Alliance

TONASKET - The Okanogan Highlands Alliance (OHA) benefit event, “Rally for Buckhorn,” will be presented to the community on Friday, March 22, a night of fun and entertainment. This community effort will feature a show of fashions made from recycled materials and other skits, and will include a dessert auction and drawings, as well as dinner sponsored by the CCC. The meal begins at 5:30 pm and the “Trashion Show” begins at 7:00 pm, at the Community Cultural Center (the CCC) of Tonasket (411 S. Western Avenue). Tickets are $20 in advance, available at Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op, or $25 at the door. “Volunteers have put together a show that is guaranteed to make you laugh,” says David Kliegman, OHA Director. “Community businesses and individuals have donated incredible prizes and art-

The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket is hosting a “Trashion Show” and auction to support the Okanogan Highlands Alliance’s work to increase protection of water quality on Buckhorn Mountain. work to support this effort.” Some of the raffle items include back country skiing and yurt lodging; original art by Andy Eccleshall, Rusty Haydon, Ephraim Brown, and Linda Petchnick; a pine needle basket by Lisa Eversgerd; a handmade quilt by Sandy Vaughn; and a silk scarf by Gabriele Beyer. The “Trashion Show” will help raise funds that OHA needs to

continue its work to increase protection of water quality on Buckhorn Mountain. For more information, contact Tory (shook.tory@gmail.com / 485-2168) or Lisa (awakone@hotmail.com / 485-2196). Okanogan Highlands Alliance is a non-profit that works to educate the public on watershed issues. Details are provided on OHA’s website: www. okanoganhighlands.org.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Parker Kenyon and Jenavonne Glover performed Led Zeppelin’s “Good Times, Bad Times” at the Tonasket Winterfest Talent Show on Friday, March 15.

Cimarron to perform at PAC THS celebrates Winterfest By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Submitted by Vera Zachow Omak Performing Arts Center

OMAK - The group Cimarron will perform at the Omak PAC, Friday, March 22 at 7:00 p.m. Cimarron was the winner of the 2011 Independent Music Award for Best Latin Album and nominated for a Grammy in 2005. Led by harpist and composer, Carlos Rojas, their powerful, moody and unbridled sound lives up to the meaning of their name, Cimarron ñ “wild bull.” Harps, guitars of different varieties (bandola, bandolina, bandolon, six-stringed guitar), violin, maracas, friction drums (zambomba or furruco) and rasps (chacharo and carraca) point to Spanish and perhaps indigenous sources. They are presented by the Omak Performing Arts Center Foundation in conjunction with

Submitted photo

TONASKET - The Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center is looking for art to sell for their 2013 Gallery Season. We are looking for artists in the following categories: wood-

Omak Meeting Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck NCW Blue Star Mothers President

This month we are taking our meeting to Omak! Our membership is growing and spreading southward. At the beginning of this year we decided it was time to facilitate this growing demographic by including these families in our meeting rotation. Our meetings continue to be held on the third Wednesday of every month, rotating between Oroville and Tonasket. And now, Omak will be a part of it, follow-

Methow Arts. They will perform at the Winthrop Barn on Saturday, March 23, at 7:00 p.m. Tickets for the Omak PAC performance are $15.00 for adults and $10.00 for students and can be found at Rawson’s in Okanogan,

the Corner Shelf and North Cascades Broadcasting in Omak, Tonasket Interiors and Oroville Pharmacy or at the door. Tickets can also be purchased on line at www.brownpapertickets.com.

workers, fiber artists, ceramicists, potters, glassworkers, metalworkers, found object mixed media artists and those working with stone, antlers or bones. Please contact (509) 429-9971 for further information.

BLUE STAR MOTHERS ing Tonasket. The North Central Washington Blue Star Mothers group is the only active Blue Star Mothers chapter in Washington State; therefore we field questions and encourage moms from all over. However, our monetary funds are shared only with military families from North Central Washington, primarily the North Valley and Republic. If you are in need of a com-

The Tonasket Water Ranch is also seeking metal artists to create outdoor installation pieces for the Water Ranch Park. Please see the web site for information. www.tonasketwaterranch.org or contact Linda Black at (509) 486-4144. peer, someone who’s walked your path before or are walking it now, contact us at 485-2906; facebook.com/ncw.blue.star.mothers and join us at The Breadline Restaurant in Omak March 20th. All are welcome to the business portion of our meeting where we discuss our ongoing and upcoming projects at 5:30 p.m. which is followed by our support meeting at 6:30 p.m. where we are free to eat and just sip coffee or soft drink and share what’s going on with our Armed Forces children. Not every soldier has a spouse or children, but every soldier has a mother. Hope to see you there.

Investors Can Learn From Earth Day’s Lessons FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

Next week, we observe Earth Day. First celebrated in 1970, Earth Day has grown into an international movement whose goal is to raise awareness of the need to take action to sustain a healthy, sustainable environment. You can do your part through recycling and other measures, but you can also apply some of the lessons of Earth Day to your financial situation — and, in particular, to your approach to investing. Give these ideas some thought: • Make the most of your existing resources. One of the most valuable lessons of Earth Day deals with the need to be responsible managers of the natural resources we have available. As an investor, it’s important to maximize the benefits of the resources to which you have access. For example, are you contributing as much as you can afford to your 401(k)? At the very least, you should

piano; Lynn Hendrix singing “My Immortal” by Evanescence; Melanie Christiansen singins “A Thousand Miles” to Baillie Hirst’s piano accompaniment; Allison Glanzer performing “Lord Millenium” from D. Grayman; Jonalynn Glover performing a solo with guitar of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “Simple Man;” and Glover singing Led Zeppelin’s “Good Times, Bad Times” to Parker Kenyon’s guitar riffs. Students and others also received a number of mostlylighthearted awards. Winning the “Most Supportive Community Member” trophy was Mike Mills.

Cimarron is scheduled to perform at the Omak Performing Arts Center on Friday, March 22.

TVBRC makes request for artists Submitted by Linda Black

TONASKET - Tonasket High School completed its Winterfest week with selection of royalty and a Friday night talent show. After a Friday afternoon assembly, David Williams was selected as Winterfest King and was escorted by Ms T, Kelly Cruz. Other royalty: Senior Prince - Wyatt O’Brian, escorted by Courtney Jones Junior Prince - Dyllan Walton, escorted by Jamie Wilson Sophomore Prince - Manuel Puente, escorted by Kallie Mirick

Freshman Prince - Jordan Hughes, escorted by Baillie Hirst The talent show was highlighted by seven performances by student talent. It was presented by Anita Asmussen’s high school leadership class, including Alicia Edwards, Sierra Hughes, Dustee Sapp, Karlie Henneman, Sarina McBride, Brisa Leep, Cassie Blaney, Haley Montowski and Jesse Holan. Taking the stage were Conner Williams, Kahlil Butler, Devyn Hamilton and Zion Butler performing “Superman” by The Hats; Mary Naylor performing Billy Joel’s “My Life” on the

put in enough to earn your employer’s match, • Avoid “toxic” investment moves. The motivation to create Earth Day developed, in if one is offered. part, by the growing awareness that industrial • Take advantage of a favorable environment. toxins were affecting our air and water. And Underlying all Earth Day activities is the goal you can find many toxic investment moves, of creating a healthy environment in which too. To illustrate: Many people chase after to live. You may also benefit from a positive “hot” stocks after hearing about them from investment environment — and that’s what friends or relatives, or seeing them touted we appear to be experiencing, at least in by so-called experts in the media. But by the terms of low interest rates, low inflation and time these people acquire the hot stocks, the financial market. So in this favorable the stocks may already have cooled off. atmosphere, look for those investment Furthermore, these stocks may not have been opportunities that are appropriate for your appropriate for these investors in the first situation. place. Another potentially “toxic” investment move is to try to time the market — that is, • Don’t over-consume. Excess consumption try to buy investments when prices are low has played a big role in causing some of the and sell when they’re high. In theory, this is environmental issues we face. Consequently, a good way to invest; in practice, it’s almost many Earth Day programs teach us to get by impossible to predict market highs and lows with less, or at least to avoid acquiring more Instead, consider buying quality investments than we need. To translate this philosophy and holding them for the long term, or at least into your investment habits, take a close look until your needs change. at the number of trades you make. Are you constantly selling old investments and buying By following these Earth Day-related new ones in the hopes of capturing higher suggestions, you can help yourself make returns? This type of trading can result in progress toward a healthier — and possibly significant fees and transaction costs — and more productive — investment environment. possibly higher taxes, too. Perhaps just as And that’s worth celebrating more than once importantly, this constant activity, with all its a year. starts and stops, may detract from your ability to follow a long-term, consistent investment This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial strategy. Advisor.

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THE TOWN CRIER

Now is the time to LETTERS build the Keystone TO THE EDITOR XL Pipeline After four and a half years of applications, extensive environmental studies, and hearings by the Administration, the proposed Keystone XL pipeline is still waiting for President Obama’s approval. With energy costs on the rise and American families continuing to feel the pain at the pump, it’s past time for President Obama to approve the Keystone pipeline. Most recently, the pipeline, which would transfer North American oil from Canada through six states and to the Gulf Coast, received yet another green light from the government. The U.S. State Department’s review found that the project would have no significant impact on the environment. It will, however, create 20,000 new shovel-ready American jobs and spur economic growth. It will also reduce our nation’s dependence on sources of energy from foreign counthat quite frankly don’t like us very much. Opinion by tries Most importantly, it won’t cost hardworking U.S. Rep. taxpayers a dime and will create additional tax Doc Hastings revenue. It’s been over 1,630 days since the project’s application was first submitted. Since then, Keystone XL has become one of the most closely examined infrastructure projects in our nation’s history. It continues to pass hurdles, despite President Obama’s continued attempts to block the pipeline for over four years. Regardless if Keystone is built here, Canada will continue to move forward and put the economic well-being of its people first by producing and selling its natural resources to customers overseas. The question is, does President Obama want to pass up this opportunity to create new American jobs and lower energy costs for hardworking, middle-class families? Or does he want America to continue to stand still, while this North American energy flows west to China? The fact is, the White House is running out of excuses for continuing to delay approval of a $5.3 billion private investment that has received strong bipartisan support in Congress and has the support of 70 percent of Americans. It’s time to get serious about America’s energy security and our national security. It’s in our best interest to get this project off the ground without further delay. Mr. President, now is the time to approve the Keystone XL pipeline. Doc Hastings represents the 4th Congressional District which includes includes Okanogan, Douglas, Grant, Adams, Franklin, Benton, Walla Walla, and Yakima counties.

What do you think?

Should we allow a pipeline be built that will stretch from the northern border of the U.S. all the way to our southern border? Is the need for energy and jobs more important than potential environmental impacts? Or are these potential impacts negligible? We’ll be coming up with a new online poll at www.gazette-tribune.com asking our readers what they think of the Keystone XL Pipeline and bring you the results of the poll right here in an upcoming edition of the Gazette-Tribune.

G.A.D.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Would like more of his humorous musings Dear Editor, I’ve had many a chuckle out of Bill Nicholson’s “Grocery Store Etiquette” letter. I’ve even made copies for some friends with a sense of humor. Let’s hope we will have more of his humorous musings on small town life! And yes, let’s be thankful for those cheerful and friendly grocery store clerks...those at Grants in Tonasket especially so! Jessica McNamara Tonasket

Shame on you NVH Board For the past three months, I have been one of many attending the Board of Commissioners meetings for Okanogan County Public Hospital District #4, also known as North Valley Hospital, in Tonasket. The first two meetings the boardroom was able to accommodate all of those in attendance, everyone was able to sit in a chair and hear the board members at these public meetings. As interest and concern about the closure of the Assisted Living facility grew so did attendance at these meetings. Now there is no longer enough seating or space for the majority of the citizens/voters attending these public meetings. We have now been sitting/standing in an outer office where we cannot see the various presentations nor hear what is being discussed, but we continue to attend. At the regular Board meeting on Feb. 28, early into the meeting the Board held an Executive Session, this scheduled session was known in advance by the Board, CEO and Senior Management, we the citizens/voters did not know in advance. This action required the audience in the Boardroom to exit and join those of us in the outer office space. To say it was crowded is an understatement. People were leaning against the walls, sitting on the desk and taking turns on the few chairs made available. There were young and old (20’s to 80’s) waiting for at least 45 minutes for the meeting to resume. I know there must be an appropriate location within the Hospital Facility to accommodate (a place where young and old would be able to sit and hear) everyone who is interested in attending these public meetings. The Boards’ total disregard for the citizens/voters of Public Hospital District #4 has been clearly demonstrated. We are not welcome COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

75 YEARS AGO: March 4 -11 1938: A deal was consummated the first of this week whereby Clarence Finsen purchased the interest of Floyd Corporon in Economy Motors. Mr. Corporon and Mr. Finsen have been partners in the business since its start several years ago. Mr. Corporon first started in business at the Economy Service Station. He and Mr. Finsen then went into partnership and built the Economy Motors Garage on Stevens Street on the opposite corner from the station. Expansion of the Oroville Cannery is planned this year according to information from the office of the County Agent. This expansion is planned in the central portion of the county, where planting is being planned and cooperative transportation will be used in getting the produce to Oroville where it will be canned. The Oroville Cannery is well known throughout the Northwest for the quality of their canned tomatoes. The post office, at mail time, is quite a place to congregate while waiting for the delivery window to open. Here friends and acquaintances meet and discuss politics, crops, the weather and town affairs. Friday, cattle were dehorned at the Austin Lenton ranch. Assisting Mr. Lenton were: Harry Carsten, Charlie Thorpe, Teddy Cohen, Wm. Briley, Claude Cutchie and Carl

at your meetings; you have made this abundantly clear. In addition, there is a rumor going around that the hospital employees have been strongly requested to attend these meetings to keep the citizens out of the Boardroom. Somewhere along the way, the Board members and Hospital employees have deemed the Concerned Citizens of County Public Hospital District #4 the enemy. Everyone stop, reflect, and think, no one wants to lose any part of the facilities we have which included the Assisted Living facility. This all began with the citizens committee acting on a request in the Gazette-Tribune at the end of November asking for help to save the Assisted Living facility. Out of genuine concern to help, a citizens group came together in mid December. This group of responsible interested people needed information about our public hospital to help them learn what could, if anything, be done to help. Within days of forming a group, it was all over. At the first meeting of the year on Jan. 10 the last order of business CEO Linda Michel and her Senior Management Team made a recommendation to the Board of Commissioners to close the Assisted Living Facility, and the Board unanimously accepted it. To say this action was a shock is an understatement, this made people who truly wanted to help, feel ridiculous for meeting, making calls, researching information and hoping to help. Why did you ask for help in the first place when you had obviously already made your decision to close the AL? Linda Michel, that was your decision as CEO selected by this sitting board, but it was a mistake on your part for thinking that no one would respond to your request for help. Didn’t you know, that is what small towns do, they genuinely try to help and take at face value a request for help, it’s why we live here. We all know how fortunate we are to have this facility in our community. My father is alive today because of the outstanding care he received last summer at NV Hospital. I have seen firsthand the outstanding work the

employees at NVH do and I have great respect for the work they perform. Board members, you have a fiduciary responsibility to this public hospital district and the many citizens/voters who have supported your decisions in the past and I know you want our continuing support in the future. I am truly saddened by your treatment of this community, your community who has supported you. We should all ask ourselves what and why did this get to where it is today and remember why we all live here in beautiful rural Okanogan County. Rural America only works when a community works together to keep the valuable amenities they have! Sincerely, Shannon McLean Tonasket

Going to sell the hospital too? Dear Editor, Have you read some of the info from the hospital? I still can’t wrap my mind around some of it - probably because I just don’t want to believe it. Aside from the $220,000.00 in tax money the hospital is syphoning from the Long Term Care, the administration salaries are way beyond the average wage for other districts our size. It’s inconceivable. CEO is making $160,000 a year. That’s $60,000 over what is average for that position, especially in the first year and this doesn’t include benefits! Who in our area makes $13,000.00 a month esp. if they’re not doing their job? Patient Financial Services is making $91,000 a year, $7,500 a month! Twice what that position pays in other districts and most of us know how well that jobs done, right? The Ancillary Services director makes the same which is $35,000 over other districts. The Long term Care Director also makes the same which is $30,000 over other districts. In fact if you look at Ferry County and Omak the top ten salaries are doctors, physicians assists, nurse practitioners and

ITEMS FROM THE PAST Allemandi. Saturday, the herd of Claude Cutchie was worked. Groceries at Meyer Prince Store, cash prices only: 10 # high grad macaroni, $.49; 4# pkg raisins, $.23; large grade A eggs, 2 doz. $.39; 2# box crackers, $.19; 9# bag of cornmeal, $.29. Last week, the Oroville Rifle Club, shot a postal match with the Union Pacific Club in Spokane. Scores for the Oroville Team were higher than any turned in this winter. The recent four position match shot against the New Salem, N. D. club resulted in a win for Oroville by more than a hundred points. The Oroville Grange Athletic Club will give their third annual Patrick Day Dance at the Liberty Hall in Oroville on Thursday night, March 17. The profits from the dance are used to defray the expenses of the Grange ball team during the summer and the basketball team in the winter.

50 YEARS AGO: MARCH 7 – 14, 1963: Designated as too dangerous to remain standing, was the Poland China mine buildings between Molson and Chesaw. A photo shows Raymond Dart carrying fuel oil to the building prior to its intentional burning a couple of weeks ago. The Omak Elks Lodge in Okanogan, have completed the contest for Elks Scholarship awards. The contest had separate divisions for boys

and girls and the winners have been sent to the State contest for judging. Winning first place for girls was Miss Marsha Harnasch, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Verle Harnasch. The winner in the boys division was, Greg Ledgerwood of Okanogan. Members of the Omak-Okanogan Toastmasters International will host the four member clubs in this area for a speak-off on March 22 as announced this week by Area Governor, Verne Ritter, who is presently president of the OmakOkanogan club. Representing the Oroville will be Jerry Forney. Friday of last week, Lawrence and Gloria Doerr opened the Kozy Kitchen Kafe’ on Main Street, which had been closed for a year or more. The couple had previously operated FAO’s Café (now The Plaza) for the past two years. Weather readings in Oroville for the past week are: March 6, Maximum of 57 and Minimum of 20; March 7, 57 and 20; March 8, 57 and 21; March 9, 61 and 20; March 10, 57 and 38; March 11, 55 and 27 and March 12, 54 and 34, with no precipitation during the week.

25 YEARS AGO: March 3 – 10, 1988: If approved on March 15, 1963, the Tonasket levy would provide a two-year $415,000 for long overdue facilities repair and maintenance. The levy would provide funds to stop

nurses, the only administration that makes their list are the CEOs and CFO’s. Not so in Tonasket, where the CEO makes $77 an hour and medical providers make $54 an hour, any wonder why they can’t keep anybody good around? Management makes $44 an hour and nurses make $45, where’s the justice in that? The hospital has been holding an average of six rooms in the assisted living, costing the assisted living $130,000 (using their numbers). Then the coffee place $130,000 on the long term budget. Do the math, that’s $430,000, not including the $220,000 syphoned. Just the amount the management is being overpaid is more than what they say the AL is losing. If you put all the numbers together you will see that just correcting the “errors” with the space, coffee shop, tax syphoning and overpaid salaries the AL should have made $530,000 plus in profits, respective to ‘cost sharing.’ If the Assisted Living closes where are they going to take the money from, the taxpayers? Or are they just going to end up selling the hospital too? Howard Romana Tonasket

Sheriff affirms our 2nd Amendment right to Bear Arms Dear Editor, Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers was recently asked how he would respond to Federal Officials wanting to initiate warrantless searches, and possible confiscation of firearms from homes within the county. Thankfully, Rogers stands firmly with hundreds of County Sheriffs across the nation who would not permit Federal officials to conduct such searches and confiscations within their county. Sheriff Rogers said that he takes his Oath to support the United States and the Washington State Constitutions seriously, and that he affirms the peoples right to keep and bear arms. TL Davis Oroville

water damage at its source, the roof. The roof has been patched several times and could use total reproofing. Water damaged ceiling tiles line the Tonasket High School hallways. Two sisters, both natives of the Tonasket area, have decided to go into the video business. Linda Walker and Jackie Lind, opened on Friday, Feb. 28. The name of the new business is “II Sisters Home Videos” and is located in the Old Pantry building at 215 Whitcomb in Tonasket. It’s no secret that rural hospitals are having a difficult time making ends meet, but Rep. Tom Bristow, D-Incheleum, hopes that will change under legislation that has been approved by the state legislature. “We have a number of rural hospitals and health facilities in the 7th District and they’re all having financial problems,” Bristow said. A little Oroville History, by Sanda Hilderbrand in “Talk About Town.” Oroville was incorporated by a vote of 82 to 8 on July 28, 1905. The officials of the new city government were Mayor, E. A. McMahan, Treasurer, Ira W. Follis, Councilmen, J. F. Samson, Bert Mills, Dr. W. T. Schwabland, H. J. Desmond and W. M Savage. Oro’s first newspaper was born in a tent and first issue printed Aug. 27, 1892. Robert Allison built the first log building here in 1891. Okanogan Smith was the first representative from Okanogan County to the Washington State Territorial Legislature in 1857 and 1880. (Versions vary). The first name the to-be Oroville area was Rag Town, then Oro.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 14, 2013

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

The snow is gone, we hope anyway The middle of March already! Even the BIG piles of snow are gone now, but more is still coming down on the east coast. We live in a good place, don’t ya’ think? Kids are a good thing to have, especially when you are 90 and fall down and need someone to help pick you up, brush you off and tell you you’re loved. That has been the case the past week for Vivian Emry, when she took a tumble, in the house. Didn’t break any bones but has lotsa sore spots and Joanie (Raymond) came to help see to her needs as she has done in the past. Could anyone share a few limbs from

their pussy willow bush? They are so nice to have in spring bouquets, with daffodils and we could use some for table d e c o r at i o n s at the Senior Center. My THIS & THAT phone num- Joyce Emry ber is (509) 476-3353 Information from Jim Prince says that

his brother, Ben, is enjoying some better days at home, with a decrease in some of the medication making it somewhat easier to communicate with him, as of last week. It seems to be authentic that Fat Boy’s restaurant has new ownership. Heard from an overweight person, “I’m not fat! I’m just easy to see.” Wow! The maple bars at Harvest Foods are huge and good. It’s like eating a whole loaf of bread. Of course to cut one in half just wouldn’t work, because the other person would be sure to get the biggest half. Do you always get the grocery cart with the crooked wheel? That wants to go in the opposite direction you do? And when you go to the store for just “milk and bread” does it usually cost about 50 dollars? Are you getting anxious to put away the warm sweaters and bring out the brighter, lighter weight sweaters, just in case?

A phone call from Mrs. Gail Sanborn tells me she has moved Gail to a convalescent center, 203 W. Naches Av. Selah, WA 98942, where he is receiving more one on one care and is doing very nicely. They appreciate the care and concern of former friends and continue to take the G-T. I wonder how many were late to church last Sunday because they forgot to set their clocks ahead. I thought it a clever idea from one man that changes his time pieces at noon instead of waiting until night, giving him the half day to get sorta adjusted, the day before. The Red Cross blood draw at the United Methodist Church last week was very successful, getting more than the quota. Jim Chittenden is undergoing chemotherapy and associated treatments and it was good to see him and Sandra out at church last Sunday. Also, Evelyn (Naggy) Frazier is having treatments. It was announced that Verle and

Norene Harnasch will be moving and I’ll try and get further particulars by next issue of the paper. They are a long established family here and will be truly missed, but when age and health problems creep up on us, “we have to do what we have to do”. We don’t all live on the corner of healthy and happy street! Willie Penner was a patient in Central Washington Hospital last week with heart issues. Hopefully she is improving and will be home by this writing. Beverly Storm is on her way back to Oroville, after taking the scenic route home. She spent the colder months in Calif. Gonzaga college basketball team was named (best in the country) and won their first game in the playoffs… now they have to win from St. Mary’s, after they finally won in overtime, not an easy task, but they’ve done it before.

COMMENTS COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD BenefitHILLTOP for Pauline Japanese meal prep OROVILLE - Have you been to one of those Japanese restaurants where the chefs throw knives above their heads, catch them deftly as they come down and expertly twirl them around? There’s a tendency to duck. Then they chop so fast you wonder how they keep their fingers. No, that won’t happen in this class. What you will do is learn about the flavorful, healthy foods used in Japanese cooking and prepare and share a traditional Japanese meal. It’s a one evening class on Wednesday, March 13, from 5:308:00 p.m. Call Ellen at Community Schools,509-476-2011, to register. Enjoy!

15. Application forms are available from Eric.Styles@oroville. wednet.edu or call (661) 3133448. To donate auction items please contact Glenna Hauenstein at (509) 476-2416.

Spring Craft Fair OSOYOOS - The Kiwanis Club of Osoyoos is holding a Spring Craft Fair Saturday, March 16, at the Osoyoos Royal Canadian Legion located at Veterans Way and 78th Street. The hours are from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There are a few tables available. For information, contact Wayne at (250) 4492191. Admission is by a donation to the Osoyoos Food Bank. There will be a 50/50 draw and some door prizes. We will have some food available. See you there!

Women’s Ministry St. Pat’s Day Music begins at the Winery OROVILLE - Is there someone in your life, office place, social gathering or family that ruffles your feathers or loves to ruin your day? And you do not know what to say or do, so you simply keep quiet or simply walk away … Well, here is your chance! The Oroville SDA Women’s Ministry invites you to join us for our weekly dissuasion about “Dealing with People You Can’t Stand: How to Bring Out the Best In People At their Worst.” We meet in the fellowship hall of the Oroville SDA Church, Thursdays at 6 p.m. beginning on March 14.

Winery Features Cheatgrass Performance OROVILLE – Esther Bricques Winery’s tasting room will host a performance by Cheatgrass on Thursday, March 14, featuring the Hydes and Steve Pollard. Doors open at 6 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Bridges Out of Poverty OMAK - The Okanogan Community Action Council will be sponsoring “Bridges out of Poverty: Strategies for Professionals and Communities” on Friday, March 15, 9 a.m.to 5 p.m. The free seminar is designed for employers, managers, staff and volunteers who work with individuals from underresourced backgrounds or entrylevel employees. The session will take place at the Cornerstone Christian Fellowship, 328 N. Riverside Drive, Omak. For more information, contact Faith Wakefield-Mills at (509) 4224041, FaithWM@occac.com, or register online at https://bookwhen.com/bridges.

Assisted Living citizens’ forum TONASKET - Citizens’ forum discussing the NVH Assisted Living concerns, pending legal action and fund will be held at the Tonasket High School Commons on Friday, March 15 starting at 7:00 p.m.

Dollars for Scholars Variety Show OROVILLE - The Oroville Dollars for Scholars has scheduled this year’s Variety Show/ Silent Auction for Friday, March

OROVILLE - Esther Bricques will share the music of the Irish live on Saturday, March 16 at the Tasting Room located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. Wine and light nibbles will be available. Doors open at 6 pm. Call (509) 476-2861 for more information.

St. Patrick’s Day Dinner OROVILLE - The American Legion will be hosting a corn beef and cabbage dinner in honor of St. Patrick’s day on Saturday, March 16, 5:30-8:00 p.m., 314 14th Avenue in Oroville. Cost is $6.50 per person. Everyone is welcome, so come have some fun and be sure to wear green.

Oroville Grange Flea Market OROVILLE - The Oroville Grange Flea Market will be Saturday, March 16, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. at 622 Fir. Watch for the sign on Highway 97 south of town. A lot of new vendors and bargains. We rent tables to sell yours. Lunch will be available at 11:30, with coffee the whole time. For more information call Betty at (509) 476-3878.

Auditions for ‘Cat Ballou’ TONASKET - Tonasket Community theater is presenting “Cat Ballou” at the Community Cultural Center June 23,26,28,29. Auditions will be Sunday, March 17, at 4 p.m. at the CCC. Rehearsals will start mid-April or mid-May depending on the role. Sarah Kaiser is directing, and she needs one young woman, (leading role) and three other women (any age). She also needs one young man and one older man (leading roles) and eight other men (varying roles, any age). No singing, but must be willing to ride stick horses, act tipsy, fire cap guns, rob trains, etc... This IS a Western, classic comedy. Contact Sarah for more information about the play, auditions, rehearsals. 312 S. Whitcomb

Sarahdrama@ncidata.com.

St. Patrick’s Day Breakfast OROVILLE _ There will be a St. Patrick’s Day Pancake Breakfast for Boy Scout Troop 26. Green eggs on request, but otherwise just a good breakfast with eggs, pancakes, sausage, juice and coffee. From 7 – 10 a.m. on Sunday, March 17 at the Oroville American Legion. Prices are $6 for individuals and $15 for families. Please come and support the Boy Scouts of Troop 26.

Ballers vs. Brawlers OROVILLE - The Oroville Wrestling Team is challenging the basketball team to determine who is the best. The wrestlers will wrestle the basketball players and then meet on the court. The activity is a fundraiser organized by Gil Ildelfonso as part of his senior project to get a motivational speaker for the Be the Change/KISS Club, a continuation of the Challenge Day held earlier this year. The event starts with a Spaghetti Feed at 6 p.m. in the high school commons, afterwards the wrestling matches will take place, followed by the basketball game. Cost is $5 for the spaghetti feed and get into games for free, or $3 for just the games.

Hunter’s Ed Safety Course OROVILLE - A free Hunter’s Education Safety Course will be held Monday, March 18 through Saturday, March 23 at the Oroville Gun Club on Hwy. 7. The course starts at 6 p.m. Monday to Friday and the Saturday start time will be announced. For more information call Rich at (509) 4762280 or Mike at (509) 669-6088.

Family Caregivers Meeting OROVILLE - Individuals who provide care for a loved-one who is chronically ill, disabled or frail are called family caregivers. North Valley Extended Care is extending an invitation to local family caregivers to share experiences, best practices, and receive support for the hard work we all do for those we love. If you are interested call 509-486-3110 and ask for Bill or Diane.

Making Seed Tapes OROVILLE – Learn how to use inexpensive and easy every day materials to make your own garden seeds tapes. The tapes last a long time and can be planted inside or out. You’ll be amazed at how much back breaking work they save. No thinning required and all materials are included. One session on Tuesday, March 19, 6-8 p.m. Call Ellen to register at (509) 476-2011 or community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu.

Waits was very successful

Antique Appraisals Bring your antiques to the Tonasket Senior Center on S. Tonasket Ave, behind the Community Church on Wednesday, March 20. Find out what they are and what they are worth. Fee of $1.00 per item, three item limit. No furniture or large stuff. Sign in begins at 10:00 a.m, appraising starts at 12:30 p.m.

Rally for Buckhorn at CCC The Okanogan Highlands Alliance benefit event “Rally for Buckhorn” will be hosted by the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket on Friday, March 22. It will feature a show of fashion made from recycled materials as well as other skits, a dessert auction, drawings and dinner sponsored by the CCC. Meal begins at 5:30 p.m. and the “Trashion Show” starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance at Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op or $25 at the door.

Best for Women Fair OKANOGAN - The Okanogan Valley Soroptimist and Omak Clinic presents the Best for Women Fair on Saturday, March 23, 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. at the Okanogan High School Cafetorium. Admission is free. A salad lunch is $7 with drinks and extras included. Join us for a day of pampering products, door prizes, a silent auction and so much more!

Donkey Basketball OROVILLE - The Oroville Booster Club is sponsoring Donkey Basketball on Wednesday, March 27 at the Oroville High School gym. Teams from the Molson-Chesaw Fire Department, Oroville Fire Department, The Mechanics and Blue Thunder will compete for the coveted trophy. Advance tickets at a reduced price are available at Oroville Schools, Princes, Oroville Pharmacy and Hometown Pasta and Pizza.

Food Banks TONASKET- The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480. OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Here we are at the beginning of March. We are in hope that spring is soon to be upon us. Our days are warming up some, with the nights still cool and sometimes cold enough to freeze. Some days and nights have a variety of weather changes - sun, rain, hail and snow. It all melts down to Ice, and then we have a problem. Oh, no! Not now! Can we skip it this year? Please, not the most hated season of all. The dreaded Mud Season. That is the Season that no one tells you about. Yes, it is here. With any kind of luck it will be a short one. The benefit dinner for Pauline Waits was very successful. The food was wonderful, thanks to Linda Darrow and Millie Leslie and their helpers, Mary Lynn, Lee and Susie. Pauline and Tony want to say thank you for the benefit last Saturday. She has never been so surprised in all her life, and her heart is over-flowing with gratitude. She also thanks everyone for their prayers, she wants us all to know they are working! She is doing exceptionally well. Her blood test is down to 18, which is normal and her surgeon could not find any tumors. She will be having the surgery on March 13 and as soon as she heals up she will be back to this wonderful life in Chesaw.

Again, “Thank You” to all that worked in organizing, to doing the clean up, Our Hilltop folk know how to help. The best to you, Pauline. Who are all of the people who park in the middle of the road and jump out of their cars when they spot one of our feathered friends in someone’s driveway or yard? Well, they are the “Bird Watchers” who travel from all over the country. We do have a large variety of birds, some that you can not see just anywhere. This year some of the “watchers” even brought a supply of bird food with them. They are always welcome. There is a new artist in town. His name is Peter Everly. Several of his favorites are displayed at the Chesaw Mercantile. Peter is now showing also at the Little Shop Of Yoga in Tonasket, 306 S. Whitcomb (next to NAPA) Come in before or after a Yoga Class or call Laura Greenwood at ( for an appointment. Scheduled yoga classes: Monday 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 pm; Tuesday and Thursday 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.; also on Thursday 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. The Feb. 25 pinochle winners were: Ladies, High - Mary Louise Loe, Low Jan Harper. Men’s High - Ray Visser , Low, Harold Harper. The Traveling went to Larry Smith. This was for the week of February 25, 2013 with 35 in attendance. The pinochle winners from March 4, 2013 at the Molson Grange. High - Len Firpo and Judy Ripley. The Low went to Doug Knight and Jan Harper with the Traveling going to Ken Chaplin. There were 32 players. Until next week.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Lawsons and friends to play music at Center on March 15

Score went to yours truly. More next time.

At the

MOVIES

SUBMITTED BY DOLLY ENGELBRETSON OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

I just talked to Ed Craig who had major surgery on Tuesday and came home on Friday. He is feeling fairly good, but tires easily. He hopes to be back playing pool and pinochle soon. After visiting with Joy Lawson about the music with John and their friends, she let me know that they would be playing on Friday, March. 15. March birthdays will also be celebrated that day. So many do enjoy the music. You can tell by the toe tapping and humming along. We have an older upright piano for sale. Come play it and take it away. Pinochle Scores: Jim Fry won the door prize; Most Pinochles went to Mary Lou Barnett; High Scoring man for the evening went to Larry Smith and High Ladies

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MARCH 14, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

MVP! MVP!

SPORTS ALUMNI TAKE DOWN THE VARSITY

Hughes, Hilderbrand give Hornets league honor sweep BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Sweeping a league’s Most Valuable Player awards isn’t easy. Picking up those two awards with teams that went through two vastly contrasting seasons makes Connor Hughes and Lily Hilderbrand’s accomplishment that much more unusual. Both were tabbed as the Central Washington 2B League’s North Division MVPs. Hilderbrand led the Hornet girls to the divisional title, which they shared with Lake Roosevelt, while Hughes endured a season in which his team finished last in the league as he was the only returning player from last season. Their seasons also ended in opposite fashion, as well: the Hornet girls were eliminated from the playoffs one game shy of making their first-ever appearance in the state round of 16. The Oroville boys, despite missing the playoffs, ended on a high note as they ruined Lake Roosevelt’s playoff chances and upset league champion Liberty Bell in their final two games. “It’s kind of cool,” Hilderbrand said of both winning the MVP awards in an interview with the two Hornet standouts. “I didn’t really expect it, being on the last place team and everything,” Hughes said. “It was pretty cool; I was surprised. After beating the top teams right at the end, I wish we could have played like that th whole year.” “You messed it up for everyone else though,” Hilderbrand offered. Both were the focus of intense pressure from opposing defenses all season and had to adjust on the fly. “We worked a lot on doing stuff without the ball,” Hilderbrand said. “Everyone kind of collapses on you, so you need to be able to pass to someone else.” “Lily is a fun kid to be around and to coach,” said girls coach Mike Bourn. “She has all the tools: left hand, right hand. If she gets more aggressive and stronger, she could go on and play four-year college ball. She’s been doing her workouts. If she keeps doing that, she’ll keep getting better.” Hilderbrand averaged nearly 14 points a game and had 13 double doubles over the course of the season. “She’s one of the best talents I’ve been around,” Bourn said. “And I’ve had some pretty good, talented girls over the last 21 years of coaching girls high school ball.” Hilderbrand said that the Hornets’ late-season victory at Lake Roosevelt that allowed them to tie the Raiders for the league title was the season’s highlight. “Being co-champs was cool, and beating LR was great,” she said. “Mike said beating LR, especially there, is pretty hard. It was pretty intense with Mike and everyone jumping up and down.” Hilderbrand, a sophomore, faces a different kind of challenge next year as her team graduates most of the rest of its starting lineup. “Hopefully the younger girls get into it,” she said. “Hopefully I can get them committed to summer ball.” For Hughes, staying the course as opposing defenses focused almost solely on him, especially during a late-season, seven-game losing streak that ended his team’s playoff chances, presented some challenges. “It was frustrating, but we kept playing and had some fun at it,” he said. “I had to adjust as I went. I had a couple of big games at the beginning, but then (other teams) started to pressure me all the time. So it was an adjustment. So (coach Allen Allie) and I worked on moving without the ball and shooting more under pressure.” Hughes averaged 18.8 points for the season, but finished with 36 against the Raiders and 27 more against Liberty Bell. “This year he wasn’t all about scoring,” Allie said. “He had to step up and do so much more. Connor improved in every aspect of the game: rebounding, assists, block shots and post play.” Allie said that he hated to single at Hughes, because basketball is such a team sport. Still, he said that all that he had to deal with during the season made the award well-deserved.

Guile and experience beat out youth last Wednesday at Tonasket’s Alumni vs. Varsity co-ed basketball game, which raised funds for the Tigers’ baseball and softball programs. The older finished the game on a 30-8 run to win 96-75, with head baseball coach Tim Cork (left) hitting the go-ahead 3-pointer with about 10 minutes to play. John Stedtfeld was believed to have been the leading scorer in the game.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Area athletic programs invited to apply for grant

Brent Baker/staff photos

Top, Connor Hughes’ complete skill set - not just his scoring - won him the boys CWL North Division MVP. Below, like Hughes, girls MVP Lily Hilderbrand drew plenty of defensive attention from opponents. “Connor did a great job this year with having a new team to get used to, not having any players returning that played a lot of varsity and having players that couldn’t play due to eligibility,” Allie said. “Our whole team dealt with those issues, but Connor as the only senior needed to provide the glue. “The entire team, played unselfishly throughout the season. Itís amazing Connor did what he did do because he doesnít play with an ego and the team didnít rely on him to do everything. What he did in a game is what the game allowed. “I love Connor as a player and person because he thinks of the team first and making others part of that team.” Allie added that he liked the award because it came from the other league coaches. “Everyone else could see what kind of player he is and how much of an impact he could have in a game,” he said. Hughes, a senior, hopes to play someplace next year. “Allen’s been sending out tapes to community colleges,” he said. “I’d like to keep playing, so hopefully something works out.”

YOUTH WRESTLING Oroville Killer Bees

Tonasket Little League SUBMITTED BY DAVE MITCHELL With 290 kindergarten through sixth grade kids, Tonasket’s annual Little League wrestling tournament was a lot bigger than usual. The tournament ran smoothly thanks to the high school wrestlers and the many volunteers who pitched in and helped out. A huge “thank you” for all of your help. Here are the Tonasket participants and placers. Kindergarten: 2nd place - Austin Bell and Walker Bell; 3rd place - Tyge Plank, Colton

Wilson, Zion Tillman, and Kase Denison. Also wrestling were Kayson Clark, Tommy Deebach, Tage Plank and Gabe Ray. Grades 1-2: 1st place - Lyle Sandoval, Aaron Polito, Reese Vassar and Ameron Bretz; 2nd place - Evan Vanatta; 3rd place - Walker Ayers and Everett Peterson; 4th place - Tice Hirst. Also wrestling were Keenan Denison, Mica Gleason, Dakota Clough, Caleb Williams, Kenny Thompson, Deakon Taylor, Gus Ray, Aiden Smith, and Owen West. Grades 3-4: 1st place - Conner Hardesty, Tyler Wirth, Riley Vanatta, Jeremy Wirth, Collin Silverthorn, Troy Wood, Carson Sasse; 2nd place - Ben Good, Ryden Zabreznik, Clay Buchert, Waylon Wilson, Lane Bolich, and Tyson Knapp; 3rd place - Josh Bello. Also wrestling were Blake Peterson and Owen Pershing. Grades 5-6: 1st place - Issac Chaska; 2nd place - Garrett Wilson and Isaac Gomez; 3rd place - Ian Vanatta, Trenton Knapp, Chris Rivera and Brandon Wirth; 4th place - Carson Walton and Devan Ward. Also wrestling were Derek Hollister, Enrique Sandoval, Rieland Bretz, and Kenyon Miller.

In recent years, funds have been provided to the Oroville stadium press box construction project, Cashmere stadium renovation, Bridgeport running track rebuild, Tonasket Tiger Youth Athletics Camp, Cashmere soccer field lighting, Okanogan Youth Football, Brewster field lighting, and Manson’s STAR Program. Sports Awards Outlying Grants are typically for $1,000. Easy to fill out application forms for this year are available by writing Wenatchee North Rotary, Sports Awards Outlying Grant Committee, P.O. Box 2722, Wenatchee, WA 98807, or by emailing gbrownie@nwi.net and

indicating “Rotary Outlying Grant Request” as the subject line. Be sure to include the organization that is making the request and the name and phone number of a contact person. The form will then be emailed, so please include an email address. The completed form must be received by May 15 for consideration with the donation occurring at the 43rd North Central Washington Sports Awards banquet on June 25. For additional information, contact Greg Brown, Sports Awards Grants chairman ñ gbrownie@nwi.net

Ballers vs. Brawlers March 18 BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE - The Oroville wrestling team is challenging the basketball team to determine who is the best and to raise money for a senior project to bring a motivational speaker to the school. On Monday, March 18, the

wrestlers will wrestle the basketball players and then the grapplers will meet the hoopsters on the court. The activity is a fundraiser organized by Gil Ildelfonso as part of his senior project to get a motivational speaker for the Be the Change/ KISS Club. This is a continuation to try and reinforce what students learned during the Challenge Day

d n a l n o ti 2013 a e r c e R

held earlier this year. The event starts with a Spaghetti Feed at 6 p.m. in the high school commons, afterwards the wrestling matches will take place, followed by the basketball game. The cost is $5 for the spaghetti feed and gets participants into games for free, or $3 for just the games.

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SUBMITTED BY CHUCK RICEVUTO TONASKET - The Oroville Killer Bees wrestling club competed at its second tournament of the season at Tonasket on Saturday, March 10. Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell announced that he had about 90 kids more than usual. This looks like a very positive trend so far this season. Oroville, Tonasket, Okanogan, Omak, Liberty Bell, Brewster, Chelan, and Pateros K-6 Wrestlers made for a a larger than usual tournament for the second week in a row. The Killer Bees finished as follows: Kindergarten: 3rd place - Lance Fox. Also wrestling were Ryker Harris, Kane Booker, Shawn Marringer, and Ivan Morales. Grades 1-2: 1st place - Travis Darrow and Alex Delrasario; 2nd place - Koda Hirst. Also wrestling were Sarah Mathis, Riley McCoy, Nathaniel Smith, Evan Farrer, and Reanna Hunter. Grades 3-4: 1st place - Serio Ocampo; 3rd place - Julian Lopez; 4th place - Kolo Moser Kael Harris, and Victor Ocampo. Also wrestling were Katie

Maynard, Daegan Harris, Shane Marques, Oscar Cervantes, Cody Field, Taylor McCoy, and Thomas Verellen. Grades 5-6: 1st place - Seth Baugher; 2nd place - Ronnie Glover; 3rd place - Colby Guzman, Sam Allenby, and Brayden Thompson; 4th place - Chris Worrell and Taralyn Fox. Also wrestling was Trevor Marques. Tournament number three will be in Chelan with weigh-in from 7:30 - 9:00 a.m.

SUBMITTED BY WENATCHEE NORTH ROTARY NORTH CENTRAL WASHINGTON - Through proceeds from the North Central Washington Sports Awards, Wenatchee North Rotary provides at least one monetary grant to a school or community youth athletic program outside of Wenatchee-East Wenatchee. These “Outlying Grants” can be for worthwhile projects such as field or facility improvements, financial aid for student-athletes, or essential equipment that otherwise wouldn’t be provided and is beneficial to the athletic program as a whole.

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Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 14, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • March 14, 2013

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Commercial Rentals

Lots & Acreage

Help Wanted

Tonasket LARGE INDUSTRIAL storage warehouse. On 10+ acres with city water and OT LPN irrigation water. Call for De- The Oroville office of North tails 509-322-4732 Valley Family Medicine is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient-oriented LPN. Applicant must be a Tonasket team player, comfortable with ½ ACRE BUILDING LOT with power, water, phone and A SPECIAL Thank You to computers and able to multiMon-Fri (approx 36 cable TV only $35,000. No everyone who helped make task. Medical/Dental/401K. mobile homes. Call 509 322 the Indian Taco Feed for De- hour). nise Edwards a success. The Current Washington State Li4732 turnout was amazing and we cense required. Must sucthank each and every one of cessfully pass a background you for your support, the do- check and urine drug screen. nations for the auction were Visit our website, wvmedivery much appreciated. cal.com for more information Thanks to the Eagles for let- and to apply online. Hillside Park Senior ting us use the hall and for NOW SEEKING Apartments Mary Marchand, Renee HilAPPLICANTS 515 Tonasket Ave stad, Shelby White and the Oroville’s new Pastime Bar Tonasket, WA other girls who did the servand Grill is looking to fill the ing of the meal. A BIG Thank AVAILABLE NOW! following positions: You to Ken Neal for doing an 62 Years of Age or bartender, bar-back, server, amazing job. Oroville is truly Older or Disabled cocktail server, dishwasher, a great place to live! Thanks Rent from $530 Tonasket again, Jacqueline, Kathy, prep & line cook, and kitchen Income Limits Apply lead. Email resume to: Small one bedroom cottage Shelby and everyone from Call Geneva info@pastimebarandgrill.com with a garage on a large lot the Ark Animal Clinic. 509-486-4966 with desired position in one block from grocery store. TDD# 711 subject line or mail to Only $79,000. Call 509 322 Say it in the classifieds! P.O Box 2043, 4732 *Special deal* Oroville, WA 98844. *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY LONG TERM SUBSTITUTE *CONGRATULATIONS!! www.gazette-tribune.com – Oroville, Omak, Tonasket. *WILL YOU MARRY ME? Position includes teaching www.gazette-tribune.com MUST BE PREPAID LAKEFRONT house, 3 bedand home visiting for Head Tonasket $6.00 for the first 15 words room, 2 bath, garage, $950. Start Programs. Must have Three bedroom, two bath, IN TOWN 2 bedroom, 2 bath, additional words $1.00 CDA or can be provisionally 1248 sq. ft, vacant all new garage, family room, $875. each. Bold words, special hired to complete requirecarpet and fresh paint, con- LAKEFRONT apartment, a font or borders extra. ments; experience working venient location in Old Or- bargain at $500. Add a picture with children. AA degree in chard Estates subdivision, ½ IN TOWN, nice 1 bedroom for only $1.50 more. ECE preferred; GED/High miles north of Tonasket. Only apartment, $400. Call to place ad School required. Salary 11.80 $145,000. Call 509-322-4732 Okanogan Valley CALL Sun Lakes Realty, – 16.22 hr. DOE. 40 hrs per Gazette-Tribune 509-476-2121 wk. Bilingual/Spanish strong509-476-3602 ly encouraged to apply. St. Charles Place Oroville Pick up applications at: Apartments NEW and NICE! One BedOCCDA - 101 4th Ave. W. – 207 Main St., Oroville, WA room house with Walk in Omak, WA 98841. closet, eat in kitchen, laundry Equal Opportunity Employer. ATTENTION: and lots of storage. Patio with DID YOU FIND AN ITEM LOW INCOME HOUSING valley view. AND WANT TO FIND Call: 509-476-0199 Seasonal site personnel “PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR THE OWNER? must pass screening, bilinINCOME FOR RENTâ€? Found items can be placed gual preferred. Resume preCommercial in the newspaper for one – Family & Singles – ferred. Job description at 617 week for FREE. Limit 15 Rentals Now accepting applications Hwy. 97, Oroville, WA. 509words, or prepay for words for Low Income Housing. 476-3059 over the 15 word limit. Call FOR RENT: Business/Office “A place to call homeâ€? 509-476-3602 before noon unit(s) Main Street Oroville509-476-4057 optional sizes & prices. on Tuesdays. The City of Oroville is now email: stcharles@gdicom.net (509)486-1682 or (509)429accepting applications Equal Housing Opportunity 0873. of employment for the Help following positions: Wanted Seasonal Park Aid Level II, Okanogan County Office/Reservation Department of Public Works Supervisor is accepting applications until This position consists of up to Friday, March 29, 2013 for 40 hours per week, dependthe position of Temporary ing upon the time of the park 126 S. Main St., Omak Solid Waste Operator/ season; starts in April and 509-826-7310 Mechanic. ends in October. Other park For more information go to: maintenance duties may also Updated list of employment at www.okanogancounty.org/HR be assigned, as needed. or call 509-422-7300. Applicants must be 18 years of age or older, have a valid P-T maintenance Washington State Driver’s LiWorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. must pass screening. cense and be physically able Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Wage TBD. 617 Hwy. 97, Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune. to perform required tasks. Oroville, WA. 509-476-3059 Applications may be secured 4. Calendar abbr. 23. Eye affliction at the Oroville City Hall, 7:30 am to 4:00 pm, Monday 5. Ancient Andean 25. Object that shoots paintballs through Friday, and must be 6. School 27. Columbus Day mo. received by 12:00 noon, Fri7. Infected 28. Jeer day, March 22, 2013. 8. “Don’t give up!â€? 30. “Absolutely!â€? The City of Oroville is an 9. Flipper? 31. Municipal magistrate equal opportunity employer. (Scotland) 10. About 1% of the atmosphere FOUR ACRES INDUSTRIAL LAND on the Canada to Oroville Heavy Haul Corridor with railroad frontage and truck access off of Jennings Loop Rd. Only $60,000. Call 509 322 4732

Announcements

For Rent

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Crosswords

34. Cross this to score a touchdown (2 wd)

11. Barbarian

36. One year’s record

13. Reserve

37. “Give it ___!� (2 wd) 38. “Smart� ones 39. Sharp 41. Entertains 42. Warm, so to speak 43. Courtroom conference between lawyers and judge 45. Blueprint 46. Stripped the skin off 47. Apiece 51. In the style of (French) 52. Amscrayed 53. Pistol, slangily 55. Bygone bird 56. It might be cut by a politician

ANSWERS

Across

58. Record of employee’s start and finish

1. Most squalid

60. Region away from a sea

9. “The English Patient� setting

61. Lifts

15. Disburser

62. Gets rid of

16. Cut back

63. One who explains the universe in terms of energy

17. Gain control again by conquest 18. Paternal relative 19. Machine used to send electronic copies

Down

20. Appear

1. Drudges

21. “Am ___ believe ...?� (2 wd)

2. Leave of absence

22. End

3. Adhesive

12. Plant or animal structures 14. Great skill 21. Block house? 24. Cream puff 26. ___ Ann and Andy 29. Afflicts 30. Attraction 31. Similar to double boiler (2 wd) 32. Hardening by heat treatment

Tonasket Pizza Co. Now Hiring. Applicants must be 18 or over. Previous experience a plus. Interested applicants can pick up an application or submit resume in person. 15 W. 4th Street, Tonasket.

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33. Lacking ability 35. Dalai ___ 37. Birdlike 40. Hawaiian ___ 41. Belly 44. In a spooky manner 46. Attack locale 48. Cremona artisan 49. Centers 50. Verb with thou 54. Hindu divine being 57. ___-relief 58. “First Blood� director Kotcheff 59. Video maker, for short

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

WANTED: Part-time housekeeping for resort on Spectacle Lake. Call 509-223-4141 after 6 p.m. Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is currently recruiting for Seasonal Firefighter and NRW2 Engine Leader positions. Positions are open until filled. For more information, or to apply please visit our website, www.dnr.wa.gov. If you have further questions (after reviewing our website) contact Heidi Seitters at (509) 684-7474. DNR is an equal opportunity employer.

Business Opportunities 1950’s DINER - BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY This is an exciting business opportunity at an established resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington! Veranda Beach Resort seeks an experienced and successful food and beverage operator for the 2013 season. This fully equipped 1950’s themed Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Rhonda Hinkley for further details at: rhonda@verandabeach.com. Check out our website at: www.verandabeach.com

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF MARCH 11, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPT -- Adoring couple, Architect & Internet Exec. year for precious baby to love forever! Expenses paid. 1-800-990-7667 ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTER TO WIN a $1,000 prepaid Visa card! Take our survey at www.pulsepoll.com and tell us about your media usage and shopping plans. Your input will help this paper help local businesses. Thank you! EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified.. Call 866-483-4429. www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com CASH NOW for Good Notes, Top Dollar from Private investor. Yes, Bajillions Available for quality Contracts, Mortgages, Annuities, Inheritance. Receiving Payments? Call Skip Foss 1-800-637-3677 FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS LOCAL MIXED hay $4.00 per bale. Second cutting $7.00 per bale. No spray or commercial fertilizer/feed. Chehalis area, (360) 262-3250. (360) 269-2404 or (360) 262-0177 SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS GORDON TRUCKING Inc. CDL-A Drivers Needed. Dedicated & OTR Positions Available! Consistent Miles, Benefits, 401k & EOE. Sign On Bonus! Recruiters available 7 days/wk! Call: 866-725-9669 DRIVERS -- Inexperienced/Experienced. Unbeatable career Opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 www.centraldrivingjobs.com

Statewides GET ON the road fast! Immediate Openings! Top Pay, Full Benefits, CDL-A, Doubles Required. Haney Truck Line, Call Now. 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com DRIVER --Qualify for any portion of $0.03 quarterly bonus: $0.01 Safety, $0.01 Production, $0.01 MPG. Two raises in first year. 3 months recent OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com REAL ESTATE COLFAX -- RIVERFRONT. 9 acres was $75,000 now only $39,500. Lender Repo sale. Beautiful valley views, quiet country road with electric. Excellent financing provided. Call UTR 1-888-326-9048.

Public Notices BEFORE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON Notice of Application for new water right. TAKE NOTICE: That on November 7, 1986, City of Oroville (City) of Oroville, WA filed application number G4-29150 with the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) to withdraw water for municipal purposes from four existing wells owned by the City of Oroville. On September 18, 2012, the City proposed to voluntarily relinquish its existing Water Right Permit G427565 in exchange for processing of an equal quantity of water under Application G4-29150. Because Application G4-29150 is larger than Permit G4-27565, the City requested this application be split into two. Application G4-29150(A) would be for the same quantities as Permit G427565, while Application G429150(B) would be for the remainder of the original application and would remain on file with Ecology. Application G4-29150(A), under priority date of August 17, 1981, requests withdrawal of 340 gallons per minute (gpm) and 425 acre-feet per year (ac-ft/yr) from the City’s four existing wells, located within Section 28 and 21, T.40N., R.27 EWM. The applicant proposes water to be used for continuous municipal supply within the City’s service area. Any protests or objections to the approval of this application may be filed with the Department of Ecology and must include a detailed statement of the basis for objections; protests must be accompanied by a fifty dollar ($50.00) recording fee and filed with the Cashiering Section, State of Washington, Department of Ecology, P.O. Box 47611, Lacey, Washington 98509-7611 within thirty (30) days from March 21, 2013. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 14, 21, 2013. #464817 DISTRICT COURT FOR THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN DOUGLAS D. MORRISON, an individual, Plaintiff, v. KEITH ROYLANCE, an individual, Defendant. NO. 22354 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO: KEITH ROYLANCE AND JOHN DOE ROYLANCE You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after the 14th day of February, 2013, and defend the above-entitled action in the above-entitled court, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison at their office below stated; and in case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The complaint arises from default under a Promissory Note dated September 5, 2006. Shawn K. Harju, WSBA No. 29942 CARNEY BADLEY SPELLMAN, P.S. 701 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3600 Seattle, WA 98104-7010 Attorneys for Plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 14, 21, 28, March 7, 14, 21, 2013. #457807 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In re the Estate of: ARTHUR R. THOMAS, Deceased. Probate No. 13-4-00017-1 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) publication - Okanogan County

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP NOTICE IS HEREBY that the City of Tonasket Planning Commission will hold a public workshop at 3:00 pm on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at the Tonasket City Hall at 209 S. Whitcomb Avenue. The purpose of the workshop is to provide information and initiate a discussion with landowners in the area between Locust Avenue and the Okanogan River about the potential to change the Comprehensive Plan Land Use Designation and thus the zoning for much of this area. All persons requiring assistance in accessing City Hall or need other assistance are requested to contact City Hall at 4862132, 24 hours prior to the workshop. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 14, 2013 #464806

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

PUBLIC NOTICE POSTED CONFIRMATION OF OWNERSHIP HOMESTEAD -- FARMLAND NON-ABANDONMENT ALL TAXES PAID IN FULL CONCERNING THESE CONJOINING PARCELS. STATUTORY WARRENTED DEED JULY 2, 1996 CORRECTED SURVEY, IMPROVED, MAINTAINED, TO DATE. ANY CLAIMS OF LIENS OR CLOUDED TITLE HAVE SIX WEEKS FROM DATE OF PUBLICATION TO RESPOND WITH CERTIFIED DOCUMENTS AND OR RECEIPTS. INCLUDES ALL RECORDED PERMITS. ALL PARCELS TAXED IN OKANOGAN COUNTY, STATE OF WASTHINGTON. PARCEL NO. 3727264005 3727260002-3727260053727260006-3723260017 /s/ ROGER RYLANDER ROGER RYLANDER 288 HOWARD END RD. TONASKET, WA 98855 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 7, 14, 2013 #455374

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 11 (Easy, rating 0.32) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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Public Notice Radio Jingle Meter 4/4 30 sec. Bread Basket The Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op store, food for thought and a whole lot more. Vitamins, minerals, sandwiches too, fresh organic produce and friendly service for you. The Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op store in Tonasket, Washington, fill up your basket in Tonasket, Washington. Reff: Same terms as It Mutters My Mind. Published=Other Legal. O.V.G.T. Dec. 2, 2010 #43764 Roger Rylander 288 Howard End Rd. Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1834 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 14, 2013. #464457

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Public Auction There will be a Public Auction at Budget Towing, 32156 Hwy 97, Tonasket 509-560-1056, on Monday, March 18th, 2013. Viewing time starts at 10 a.m. with the auction at 12 p.m. Up for auction will be: ‘76 Chev P.U. Lic B59438R ‘04 Chev P.U. Lic B462304 ‘02 Hallmark Trailer 7809-XP Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on Mar. 14, 2013.

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Superior Court, Cause No. 13-4-00017-1 Dated this 5th day of March, 2013. CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC By: /S/ Peg R. Callaway; WSBA #13786 Attorney for Estate Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on March 14, 21, 28, 2013. #463642

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Public Notices

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The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney, at the address stated below, a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: March 14, 2013 Personal Representative: Lisa D. Michno Attorney for Personal Representative: Peg R. Callaway Address for Mailing or Service: 700-A Okoma Drive, Omak, WA 98841 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Okanogan County

Sudoku

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MARCH 14, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE March 14, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE

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Well maintained 1995 double wide plus a stick built dwelling, barn and outbuildings all on 18+ acres. Creek runs along eastern border .4 Ac OTID,nice garden area, fruit trees and 1350’ of river frontage off River Loop road, MLS# 455833 $140,000

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Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA

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1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Chesaw home with newer updates throughout. This home has an open floor plan and great natural light. New paint and flooring throughout. The kitchen is large and has been updated too. Large covered deck and spacious back yard that extends to the creek. MLS#438170 $129,900

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Advertise

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 14, 2013

Court, 911 Calls, Jail Bookings Superior Court Criminal The court found probable cause to charged Byron Lukes, 21, with three counts of possession of a controlled substance. He was found guilty and received three years and seven months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Jeb Carpenter, 45, with burglary second and malicious mischief third. He was found guilty and received one year and six months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge James Grant, 31, with burglary second and malicious mischief third. He was found guilty and received one year six months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Charles Ellis Jr. with assault. He was found guilty and received one year confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Donavan Nysti, 19, with assault third. He was found guilty and received 55 days confinement. District Court Anthony Baker, 25, of Malott was charged with DWLS third. She was found guilty and received one day confinement and a $658 fine. Charles Ellis, 43, of Malott was charged with DUI and two counts of DWLS first. He was found guilty and received 71 days confinement and a $2,181 fine. Marco Figueroa, 41, of Malott was charged with no valid operator license. Scott Hughes, 52, of Riverside was charged with DWLS third. Ashley Huner, 24, of Okanogan was charged with DWLS third. She was found guilty and received one day confinement and an $818 fine. Brent Jacobson, 21, of Okanogan was charged with two counts of use/delivery of drug paraphernalia and marijuana possession less than or equal to 40 grams. He was found guilty and received a $400 fine. Raymond John, 20, of Omak was charged with DWLS third, marijuana possession less than or equal to 40 grams and two counts of use/delivery of drug paraphernalia. He was found guilty and received two days confinement and an $858 fine. Anthony Rhodes, 28, of Omak was charged with two counts of use/delivery of drug paraphernalia and marijuana possession less than or equal to 40 grams. He was found guilty and received a $400 fine. Alicia Wilson, 18, of Omak was charged with criminal tres-

passing second. 911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, March 4, 2013 In Tonasket, on Hwy. 97, a male subject took numerous items from a residence including approximately $300 worth of tools, a TV, a DVD player and a stereo. It is unknown when this occurred. In Okanogan, on Carriker Dr., there was a theft of an antique sewing box within the last week. The resident believes it was her estranged daughter. Rachel Bainard, 33, was booked for possession of a stolen vehicle. Alberto Flores, 32, was booked for possession of a stolen vehicle. Richard Hancock, 40, was booked for violation of a no contact order. Robert Burnichon, 18, was booked for warrant. Bryan Dove, 33, was booked for assault fourth. Armando Lopez, 28, was booked on a USBP hold. Elvis Sherman, 47, was booked for no contact order violation. Sebastian Martinez, 21, was booked for three counts of failure to appear, three counts of MIP, obstructing and malicious mischief third. Tony Trombini, 44, was booked on a warrant. Ricky Shively, 33, was booked for DWLS third, failure to appear and reckless endangerment. Derin Darlington, 43, was booked for harassment with threats to kill and assault fourth. Tuesday, March 5, 2013 In Okanogan, on Dun Horse Rd., a suspect struck the victim with what appeared to be a bat. In Tonasket, on Hwy. 7, a former tenant has been asked previously to discontinue using the residence to send his mail to, but mail is still coming. Sandra Moses, 26, was booked for two counts of failure to appear, DUI and DWLS second. Amorita Trevino, 25, was booked for possession of meth, introduction of contraband, four counts of failure to appear, obstructing, telephone harassment and two counts of DWLS third. Cecilia Barton, 56, was booked for obstructing and resisting arrest. Jorge Cardenas, 22, was booked for possession of a stolen vehicle, trafficking first, failure to appear and DWLS first. Dean Reeves, 46, was booked for theft third, failure to cooperate, failure to provide

information and failure to appear. Justin Nanpuya, 37, was booked for nine counts of failure to appear, telephone harassment, hit- and-run attended, malicious mischief third, resisting arrest, violation of a protection order, DUI and DWLS third. Jeremy Wilkinson, 27, was booked for assault fourth and DWLS third. Martin Johnson, 48, was booked for possession of heroin. Amanda Louie, 29, was booked for failure to appear and DWLS first. Wednesday, March 6, 2013 In Okanogan, on Second Ave. S., numerous 13- to 15-year-olds are constantly coming and going from the residence. Neighbors are concerned about truancies and gangs. In Omak, on North Main St., a man is refusing to allow his friend to leave the room, and appears to have a knife. Ishna Mason, 32, was booked for failure to appear and theft third. Juan Guzman, 26, was booked for DWLS first. Freddy Cortes, 19, was booked for possession of drug paraphernalia and border patrol hold. Stacy Rodriguez, 47, was booked for truancy. Alana Vanbrunt, 27, was booked for theft second. Joshua Chapa, 21, was booked for residential burglary, possession of stolen property and possession of drug paraphernalia. Carrie Leslie, 37, booked for failure to appear and theft third. Joseph Martinez, 34, was booked for a hold. Thursday, March 7, 2013 Shawna Adolph, 35, booked for failure to appear and DWLS third. Jacob Wilson, 35, was booked for failure to appear and DWLS third. Barrie Malencore, 67, was booked for assault fourth. Carlo Perez, 27, was booked for assault second, interfering with a report and violation of a no contact order. Cyrus Bustard, 36, was booked for failure to appear and DUI. Corina Keith, 55, was booked for hit-and-run attended. Joshua White, 26, was booked for DUI. Roger Barry, 44, was booked for contact violation. Zackariah Campbell, 32, was booked for DUI. Casey Kolberg, 30, was booked for physical control. Andrew Heffron, 35, was booked for DUI. Friday, March 8, 2013 Daniel Edwards, 52, was booked for possession of

James Rodney Silverthorn

James Rodney Silverthorn James Rodney Silverthorn was born September 30, 1939 to James F. and Vera Margaret (Betty) Silverthorn in Okanogan, Wash. He passed away March 10, 2013 of complications due to a stroke. Rod grew up on an orchard outside Tonasket, Wash. with his parents, one brother Tom and one sister Kathryn. Rod attended and graduated from Tonasket High School. After graduation Rodney attended Cal-State Fullerton in Anaheim, Calif. where he graduated with a degree in drafting. He returned to Seattle where he was employed by Boeing for four

years. Upon leaving Boeing, Rod was drafted and served four years in the military, stationed at Fort Sill, Okla. Rod returned from the service in 1966 to work with his father in the orchard and he also worked at the Chevrolet Garage in Tonasket. He built a Water Well Drilling rig and became a licensed well driller. Rod moved to Kelowna B.C. Canada in 1967 to work for SAE Drilling. While there he met and married Colleen Burke on Aug. 25, 1968. Rod worked for Effective Machine Works in Penticton B.C. and Gibbs Concrete Service of Summerland, B.C. before returning to Tonasket where he was a warehouse mechanic for Tonoro Fruit Company of Ellisforde, Wash. until it closed in 1981. Rod ran his own business as a Well Driller, Irrigation Specialist, and Heavy Duty Mechanic until his retirement. Rod continued to be a consultant in these fields until his death. Rodney was a brilliant fabricator and as his sons would tell anyone who would listen “My Dad can fix anything.” Rodney was preceded in death by his father, mother, and youngest son Jason. Survivors include his wife of 43 years Colleen: son: Burke (Christina), their children Rachel, Zeke and Levi of Tonasket; daughter: Frances (Al) and her daughter Holly and grandson Wyatt of North Bend, Wash. and daughter-in-law Wendy (Robert) and her children Kenworth, T.J.,

Zachary Arther, 23, booked for three counts of DWLS third. Juan Diaz, 19, was booked for DWLS third.

Saturday, March 9, 2013

Ashley Huner, age 24 of Okanogan will wed Jose Gonzales, age 24 of Okanogan. Celia Ortega, age 24 of Oroville will wed Gustavo Castillo, age 23 of Oroville. Charmaine Lafond, age 73 of Omak, will wed Kenneth West, age 77 of Omak.

DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – POCS MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – FTA (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Marriages

Kyle Nicholson, 27, was booked for three counts of failure to appear and three counts of DWLS first. Curtis Cargile, 41, booked for assault. Sunday, March 10, 2013

No Decrees of Dissolution

Jaime Galindo, 27, was booked for assault fourth and on a USBP patrol hold.

No Juvenile

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON

Faith Lutheran Church

Join us for Lenten Fellowship / Wednesdays with soup & bread 6 p.m. Service at 7 p.m. 11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

ObituarIES

Key

drug paraphernalia. Martha Serrano, 41, was booked for failure to appear and welfare fraud. Charles Hess, 32, was booked for warrant.

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

and Kasey of Tonasket; brother Tom (Casey, Bart and Becky) of Tonasket and sister Kathryn (Craig and Andra) of Bremerton, Wash. Graveside services will be held Friday, March 15, 2013, 2:00 P.M. at the Tonasket Cemetery. Please share your thoughts and memories of Rod by signing his online guestbook at www.berghfuneralservice.com Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Glenn Cook There will be a Memorial Dinner for Glen Cook on Saturday, April 6, at the Tonasket Eagles at noon. Internment following at the Loomis Cemetery.

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church? To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

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~ 62 years of serving you ~ Where pride in craftsmanship still exist today!

Sales Representative Joy Lawson

1-509-476-2279 OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

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march 14, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 14, 2013

Tonasket baseball seeks to build on last year Senior

Cork sees “commitment to new kind of excellence” BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The road to excellence in the Caribou Trail League can be a difficult one, but Tonasket baseball coach Tim Cork believes his team is heading in the right direction. The Tigers didn’t win a league game on the field last year - they did pick up a forfeit win over Okanogan early in the season - but were competitive against all but Cashmere, which went unbeaten on the way to a state championship. There’s not a lot of experience on the roster despite eight returning players as just three of those were full-time starters a year ago. But with only one senior (Ian Young) on the roster, there is time to mold the squad into what Cork envisions. John Rawley is the team’s top returning pitcher, while Jake Cory and Kjeld Williams started regularly. Transfer student Jimmy Coleman also brings playing experience to the table. “Our goal is to work hard and get better every day,” Cork says. “We expect to be competitive in the CTL this season.” Cork, in his second year, says he is seeing progress. “Things are better in every aspect of our program,” he says. “Last year was a stepping stone for us and we are excited to see

Ian Young

Name

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tonasket baseball team includes (front row, l-r) bat boy Quincy Vassar, ball boy Reese Vassar, Ian Young, Jeremiah Yaussey-Albright, Dallin Good, Nicholas Crandall, Boyd Lorz-Vanatta, Makalapua Goodness, Kjeld Williams, Jesse Manring, bat boy Braden Cork, manager Amanda Johnson, (back) assistant coach Dan Vassar, Derek Sund, John Rawley, Pete Valentine, Jake Cory, Chris Elliott, Cade Hockett, Adrian McCarthy, Jimmy Coleman and head coach Tim Cork. Not pictured are Rade Pilkinton and Parker Kenyon. the guys play some good baseball this season.” Cork’s optimism comes from the work he’s seen his team put in during the pre-season. “I am really proud of how hard

our guys are working,” he says. “There is a commitment to a new kind of excellence within the team. They want success and it’s fun to see that in a young man’s eyes.”

TONASKET BASEBALL SCHEDULE 3/14 3/16 3/21

Oroville 4:00 pm Bridgeport (2) 11:00 am at Oroville 4:00 pm

3/26 3/30 4/9 4/11 4/13 4/16 4/20

* Okanogan * at Chelan (2) * Omak Lk Roosevelt * Cashmere (2) * at Okanogan * Cascade (2)

4:30 pm 11:00 am 4:30 pm 4:00 pm 11:00 am 4:30 pm 11:00 am

TONASKET BASEBALL ROSTER

Ian Young Jake Cory Chris Elliott Makalapua Goodness Parker Kenyon John Rawley Derek Sund Pete Valentine Kjeld Williams Jessie Manring Jimmy Coleman Nicholas Crandall Dallin Good Boyd Lorz-Vanatta Cade Hockett Adrian McCarthy Rade Pilkinton Jeremiah Yaussey-Albright

Gr

12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 10 10 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

Head coach: Tim Cork Assistant coach: Dan Vassar

4/23 * at Omak 4:30 pm 4/25 Liberty Bell 4:30 pm 4/27 * at Quincy (2) 11:00 am 5/4 * Brewster (2) 11:00 am 5/7 # Districts begin * League Contest # If Qualify

Hornet baseball reboots with very young squad BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - To say last year was a rough one for the Oroville baseball team might be an understatement. The Hornets had hoped to improve on a winless 2011 season last year. Instead, they not only failed to win a game, but by the end of the season had two few eligible players to field a team and had to forfeit their final six contests. It probably won’t help much this season, but the Oroville School Board’s decision to allow eighth graders to participate in non-contact high school sports where a middle school program hasn’t been offered should help the Hornet baseball program regain some traction. Only five of the 16 players on

“The impact of having six eighth graders will be felt in the years to come... The last year we had players who played at the age 13-15 level on the big diamond, we went to the state playoffs.” Tam Hutchinson, Oroville Baseball Coach

Oroville’s pre-season roster have high school playing experience, and only two of those have played for more than one year. But with an infusion of six eighth graders getting a chance to cut their teeth now, coach Tam Hutchinson sees a chance to get the foundation rebuilt.

Seniors

Angel Camacho

Scotty Frazier

OROVILLE BASEBALL ROSTER

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Oroville baseball team includes (front row, l-r) Angel Camacho, Scotty Frazier, Andrew Mieirs, (back) head coach Tam Hutchinson, Brandon Watkins, Casey Martin, Ryan Marcolin, Jaxon Blackler, Trevor Shearer, Steven Maupin, Jake Scott, Dustin Nigg, Eddie Ocampo and assistant coach Josh Marchand. Not pictured are Ricky Mathis, Boone McKinney and Brentt Kallstrom. “The impact of having six eighth graders will be felt in the years to come,” Hutchinson says. “Youth baseball at the junior high level has ceased to exist in the last five years. As a result (of that, there are) fewer players with experience on the ‘big’ diamond. “The last year we had players who played at the age 13-15 level on the big diamond, we went to the state playoffs. Years prior to that we had successful teams. The key is having that experience.” Of the five upperclassmen, two are new to the team. Outfielder Scotty Frazier, a senior, is the only four-year player on the team, while catcher Boone McKinney, a

junior is a third-year player. Other returners include junior infielder Jake Scott and sophomore infielders Ricky Mathis and Steven Maupin. All were starters last year. For the most part, positions haven’t been solidified, but

OROVILLE BASEBALL SCHEDULE 3/14 3/18 3/21 3/23 3/26 3/29

at Tonasket 4:00 pm * at Pateros 3:30 pm Tonasket 4:00 pm * at Lk Roos. (2)11:00 am * Bridgeport 4:00 pm * Manson (2) 3:30 pm

Your Full Service Mini-Marts! OROVILLE

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509-476-9999  Cold Drinks

¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496

 Convenience Store  Fresh Sandwiches  Hot Food / Pizza  Ice Cream

Quik - Mart 1501 Main St., Oroville 509-476-2161

FAST & FRIENDLY

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Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

4/9 4/13 4/16 4/20 4/23 4/27 5/7

* at Liberty Bell 4:00 pm * Pateros (2) 11:00 am * at Manson 4:00 pm * at B’port (2) 11:00 am * Lk Roosevelt 4:00 pm * Liberty Bell (2)11:00 am # Districts begin

* League Contest # If Qualify

Something for Everyone!

2208 Juniper St., Oroville

 Fuel / Snacks

Hutchinson expects McKinney, Dustin Nigg, and eighth graders Brentt Kallstrom and Casey Martin to handle most of the pitching. The reconfigured Central Washington League North Division includes defending state

 Books  Children’s Gifts  Western & Garden Decor  Yarn / Quilts  Antiques & Collectibles  Wedding Registry

We are proud of our North County Teams!

ROY’S PHARMACY Known for its friendly service & unique gift items!

Photo Frames  Ambassador Cards by Hallmark  Much More! 

318 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2149

Good Luck Tiger Athletes!

playoff qualifier Lake Roosevelt, district qualifier Liberty Bell, Manson, Bridgeport and Pateros, which is playing 1B for the next two years. But for Hutchinson, the opponents are going to be a lot less important than the Hornets’ progress through the year. “As a team we may struggle as we learn the game,” he says. “But we will improve as the season

Name Angel Camacho Scotty Frazier Boone McKinney Eddie Ocampo Jake Scott Dustin Nigg Ricky Mathis Steven Maupin Trevor Shearer Brandon Watkins Andrew Miers Brentt Kallstrom Casey Martin Jaxon Blackler Ryan Marcolin Will Shearer

Gr 12 12 11 11 11 10 10 10 10 9 8 8 8 8 8 8

Head coach: Tam Hutchinson Assistant coach: Josh Marchand

goes on. “Our goal: to improve with each practice and each game, and to enjoy playing the game.”

We wish our North County athletes the best of luck with their upcoming season!

Have Fun!

Lee Frank Mercantile SCHOLZ Sporting Goods 509-486-2105

316 South Whitcomb, Tonasket

Smile...have fun and enjoy the Sports Season!

Oroville Dental Center Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

H T


MARCH 14, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

Better times ahead for Hornet softball

Seniors

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Dane Forrester will be the first to admit it’s been a long couple of seasons for Oroville softball. The Hornets won just two games two seasons ago and none last year, but Forrester says that should change with an influx of players that have been through the youth softball program that a few years ago didn’t exist. “When I first took the position I went to one person in town, Shelly Martin, and I talked to her about doing the lower grade levels league,” he says. “She started it up at the fourth and fifth grade level and built them to the seventh and eighth, and I’m seeing those girls for the first time this year. “The past couple of years we’ve had to teach some pretty basic things, like how to hold onto a bat. We’re not having to do that now.” The biggest difference should be in the pitching circle, where for the first time in a couple of seasons Forrester has two pitchers who are familiar with the mechanics of the fastpitch. “Having two of them is big,” Forrester says. “That in itself will make us a bit more successful.” With four eighth graders and a freshman, it will be a young group, but not entirely so. A lot will rest on shortstop Marissa Garcia, who transferred back to Oroville from Spokane after having come up through middle school here. “She’s a really strong player,” Forrester says. “When you watch here, you can just see it. “Faith Martin, it’s her first year at the varsity level, but her mom worked with her for the past four years and she’s shown some strength. Pie Todd is a go-

OROVILLE FASTPITCH SOFTBALL SCHEDULE 3/23 3/28 4/9 4/13 4/16 4/18

Tonasket (2) at Republic * at Bridgeport * at Pateros (2) * Manson at Curlew (2)

11:00 am 4:00 pm 4:00 pm 11:00 am 4:00 pm 3:00 pm

Celene Cisneros

Jasmine Nutt

Tosca Pickering

OROVILLE FASTPITCH SOFTBALL ROSTER

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Oroville softball team includes (front row, l-r) Faith Martin, Cruz Ortega, Shiyan King, Tosca Pickering, Celene Cisneros, Shelby Scott, Kendal Miller, Stephany Cisneros, (back) assistant coach Kelsey Cleveland, Pie Todd, Nadia Maldonado, Marissa Garcia, Serina Finley, Rachelle Nutt, Kylee Davis, Courtnee Kallstrom, Rosa Rivera and head coach Dane Forrester. Not pictured are Jasmine Nutt, Alyssa Mieirs getter, we almost have to slow here down a little bit.” 4/20 Lk Roosevelt (2) 4/23 * Pateros 4/27 * at Liberty Bell (2) 4/30 at Lk Roosevelt 5/4 * Bridgeport (2) 5/7 * Liberty Bell 5/9 * at Manson (2) 5/14 # Districts begin * League Contest # If Qualify

11:00 am 4:00 pm 11:00 am 4:00 pm 11:00 am 4:00 pm 4:00 pm

Of the returning players, sophomore Rachelle Nutt has made a big impression. “She’s improved so much, it’s almost unbelievable,” Forrester says. He’s also been enjoying the team’s attitude through early-season practices, despite many of them being indoors or outdoors in the cold. “This group really likes the sport,” he says. “They’re putting out 110 percent. The other day we were doing some of our

situational drills for the first time, and it was just a huge positive. “Also having the larger numbers brings out a little bit more competition between the girls. I think that will help them play at a higher level. And we have some really good athletes this year. It’s a very athletic group.” Forrester says its hard to predict how the team will finish due to its youth. But he expects by next year, with more varsity experience under their belts, the

Name

Gr

Celene Cisneros Jasmine Nutt Tosca Pickering Gabby Capote Stephany Cisneros Marissa Garcia Nadia Maldonado Shiyan King Cruz Ortega Rose Rivera Shelby Scott Kylee Davis Serina Finley Rachelle Nutt Faith Martin Kendal Miller Courtnee Kallstrom Alyssa Mieirs Pie Todd

12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 10 10 10 9 8 8 8 8

Head coach: Dane Forrester Assistant coach: Kelsey Cleveland

Hornets will be a force to reckon with. “The (feeder program) is so important to a program,” he says. “That’s where the turnaround is. I won’t predict districts or state yet. But I think the next few years, we should be a progressively better team each year. And this year we should have a dramatically more successful season than we the last couple of years.”

Tonasket softball seeking that elusive CTL victory Close calls last year have Rimestad optimistic that team is on the upswing BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - None of the current Tonasket softball players have experienced a Caribou Trail League victory. The Tigers came close last season on several occasions, most notably an extra-innings loss to Cashmere. That close-but-no-cigar feeling has the current team pushing hard in pre-season practices to do what it takes to reach that goal.

TONASKET FASTPITCH SOFTBALL ROSTER Name Courtney Jones Sadie Long Jenny Bello Selena Cosino Carrisa Frazier Joni Glover Tori King Ann-Christin Rolschewski Amber Monroe Baylie Tyus Shyane Lewis Vanessa Pershing Rachel Silverthorn Head coach: Emily Rimestad Assistant coach: Gene Jones

Gr 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 9 9 9

Seniors

Courtney Jones

Sadie Long

“They really want a league win this year,” says coach Emily Rimestad. “It’s what I keep hearing during practice. The ladies got a taste of it last year by some of the close games we had. They really want it. “Our goal this year is to win some games, of course...to be competitive in all our games. It is possible if the girls keep showing me what they have in practice.” With just five returning players, the Tigers will be a young squad overall. But in both softball and baseball, it pays to be strong up the middle, and that is where Tonasket’s experience lies. Senior Sadie Long returns at pitcher, along with junior catcher Baylie Tyus, junior shortstop (and backup pitcher) Amber Monroe

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tonasket softball team includes (front row, l-r) Baylie Tyus, Ann-Christin Rolschewski, Amber Monroe, Rachel Silverthorn, (back) assistant coach Gene Jones, Carrisa Frazier, Tori King, Vanessa Pershing, Courtney Jones, Sadie Long, Selena Cosino and head coach Emily Rimestad. Not pictured are Joni Glover, Jenny Bello and Shyane Lewis. and junior outfielder Carrisa Frazier. The team’s only other senior, Cortney Jones, returns at third base. “We have a young team with a few new freshman and some juniors who have not played before,” Rimestad says. “We also have a couple of players

who have played but not with Tonasket. For such a young team and not playing together (before), they are playing very well together now.” Rimestad says that assistant coach Gene Jones and her brother-in-law, Jeff, have been working with the team to improve their batting. “Last year we had issues that kept us out of being more competitive,” she says. “This year I hope to rectify this. With their help, I have really seen an improvement with the ladies.” Rimestad said it has been a bit easier to get underway in her

second season. “The pre-jitters seem to be gone,” she says. “I feel a little more grounded, I know what is lacking where I need to improve in my coaching skills. I know where I need to take the team and what works to push the girls to get to that next step of competition.” She added that the team’s vibe has her encouraged as well. “Everyone gets along real well and encourages each other,” Rimestad says. “It’s a good feeling to see it and coach a group like this. This is what makes coaching softball or any sport such a pleasure.”

TONASKET FASTPITCH SOFTBALL SCHEDULE 3/16 3/19 3/23 3/26 3/28 3/30 4/9 4/13 4/16 4/20 4/23 4/27 5/4 5/7

at B’port (2) 11:00 pm Lk Roosevelt 4:30 pm at Oroville (2) 11:00 am * at Okanogan 4:30 pm Liberty Bell 4:30 pm * at Chelan (2) 11:00 am * Omak 4:30 pm * Cashmere (2) 11:00 am * Okanogan 4:30 pm * at Cascade (2) 11:00 am * at Omak 4:30 pm * Quincy (2) 11:00 am * Brewster (2) 11:00 am # Districts begin

* League Contest # If Qualify

We would like to take this opportunity to wish our North County athletes the best of luck with their upcoming

SPRING SPORTS SEASON!


PAGE B4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 14, 2013

Tonasket track looks to rely on young talent Seniors

Kelly Cruz

Ryan DeJong

Jose Hernandez

Emily Mills

Jessica Puente

Shea L. Smith

Devan Utt

David Williams

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tonasket track and field teams include (front row) Chad Edwards, Ryan DeJong, (2nd row) Jessica Puente, Daisy Alcauter, Yazmin Cervantes, Allison Jo Glanzer, Janelle Catone, Jaden Vugteveen, Mary Naylor, Emily Mills, (3rd row) Ivan Morales, Jose Hernandez, Ryan Rylie, Jenna Valentine, Kendra Davisson, Joaquin Polito, Kallie Mirick, Kelly Cruz, Cassie Spear, Devan Utt, (back) Luis Casarrobias, Jevonti Haney-Williamson, Zach Collins, Johnathan Tellez, Devyn Catone, Rose Walts, Dallas Tyus, Dalton Smith, Shea L. Smith, David Williams, Smith Condon, Abe Podkranic and Jenna Davisson. Not pictured are Kathryn Cleman, Adam Halvorsen, Kylie Dellinger, Alissa Young, Ethan Bensing, Corrina Karrer and Adrian Palomares.

Girls team looks poised to make big jump in CTL BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket had nearly 50 athletes turn out for track and field this year, giving the Tigers the ability to cover all of their events. That probably won’t be enough for the Tigers to be able to challenge Cashmere for Caribou Trail League supremacy for either the boys or the girls titles. The boys were the league runner-up last season and will be hard-pressed to repeat that feat, but the girls finished fourth in a tight battle with Chelan and Okanogan and

look primed to improve that finish, even with the league expanding by two teams this year. “As the ones that are new to track this year get experience,” says coach Bob Thornton, “we hope to be able to have people place in all the events. We have a lot of new and talented athletes this year so we have a lot of potential as the season goes on to do well as a team.” Lending a big boost to the girls team is senior Emily Mills, who last year was caught in transfer student no-man’s land, able to run on her own in regular-season meets but ineligible to compete in the post-season. “She should do very well in the 100, 200 and 400,” Thornton says. “She had some of the fastest 1A times last year in the 200 and 400 and is looking even stronger this year.” Discus Javelin Long Jump Triple Jump High Jump Pole Vault

1A Standards Last year, 3 athletes in each event at the Distrct 6/7 regional qualified for state. This year’s qualification allocations have not yet been determined. However, any athlete may qualify regardless of placing if they meet the qualifying standards listed below (which are updated for 2013).

1A BOYS Event FAT 100 11.30 200 22.91 400 50.78 800 1:59.37 1600 4:27.02 3200 9:47.12 110H 15.60 300H 39.84 4x100 Rel. 44.01 4x400 Rel. 3:31.76 Shot Put

158-11 179-5 21-11.5 43-7.25 6-3 13-6

1A GIRLS Event FAT Hand 100 13.10 12.9 200 26.51 26.3 400 59.29 59.1 800 2:23.92 2:23.7 1600 5:17.17 5:17.0 3200 11:28.06 11:27.9 100H 16.08 15.9 300H 46.94 46.7 4x100 Rel. 50.98 50.8 4x200 Rel. 1:47.14 1:46.9 4x400 Rel. 4:07.98 4:07.8 Shot Put 38-5.5 Discus 119-10 Javelin 119-10 Long Jump 16-11.25 Triple Jump 36-0.5 High Jump 5-2 Pole Vault 9-9

Hand 11.1 22.7 50.6 1:59.2 4:26.8 9:46.9 15.4 39.6 43.8 3:31.6 51-9

GIRLS Name Kelly Cruz Emily Mills Jessica Puente Shea Smith Devan Utt Yazmin Cervantes Kathryn Cleman Kylie Dellinger Jenna Davisson Cassie Spear Janelle Catone Allison Jo Glanzer Kallie Mirick Mary Naylor Alissa Young Daisy Alcauter Kendra Davisson Jenna Valentine Jaden Vugteveen Rose Walts

Smith Condon (left) is the only remaining member of last season’s state qualifying 4x100 team and the only Tiger with state meet experience on the 2013 roster. Several other girls look likely to push for state finals spots, including Kathryn Cleman (300 hurdles and pole vault), Cassie Spear (400), Kylie Dellinger (1600) and Devan Utt (800 and jump events). “Kathryn is looking good,” Thornton says. “Cassie ran this winter and is looking strong, and

Kylie finished last year running very well. “Devan is looking stron in the jumps, and I’m excited to see what she can do in the 800.” Senior girls include Mills, Utt, Kelly Cruz, Jessica Puente and Shea Smith. The boys team lost nearly all of its state-level talent from last

TONASKET TRACK & FIELD SCHEDULE 3/16 3/19 3/23 3/26 3/30 4/9 4/16 4/23 4/27 4/30 5/3 5/10 5/18 5/24-5

at E. Valley (Yakima) Papa Wells Invite at Cascade at Ephrata Ray Cross Invite 11:00 am at Chelan at Oroville Eagle Home Mortgage Invite at Bridgeport/Brewster Co-ed at Okanogan Home Meet at Riverside Invite at Bridgeport Invite at CTL Finals (Cashmere) District 6 (Home) # at Regionals (Riverside) # at State (EWU)

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Gr 12 12 12 11 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 9

Luis Casarrobias Ivan Morales Adrian Palomares Ryan Rylie Head coach: Bob Thornton Assistant coaches: Dewie Edwards and Chad Portwood.

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year; only Smith Condon remains from the 4x100 state-qualifying relay team. Seniors include Ryan DeJong, Jose Hernandez and David Williams. “We always emphasize personal records with the goal of having everyone set new PRs at the end of the season,” Thornton says. “If they can do that we should do well as a team as well. “We have good leadership this year so as we combine hard work with having fun, it should be another great season. Our goal is always to end the season at the state meet in Cheney. Everyone from the newcomers to the ‘old timers’ are working hard and are focused on getting better.”

Gr 12 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 10 10 10 10 10 9 9 9 9 9

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Good Luck to the North County Sports Teams! 126 S. Whitcomb • Tonasket • 509.486.2151 www.nvhospital.org


MARCH 14, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Hornet track squad filled with headliners

PAGE B5

Seniors

Callie Barker

Breanna Ervin

Alexa Werner

OROVILLE TRACK AND FIELD ROSTER GIRLS

Name Callie Barker Breanna Ervin Alexa Werner Kaitlyn Grunst Brittany Jewett Sierra Speiker Andrea Perez Kayla Mathis Sami Walimaki

Gr 12 12 12 11 11 11 10 9 9

BOYS

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Oroville track teams include (front row, l-r) Kaitlyn Grunst, Sierra Speiker, Sammie Walimaki, Kayla Mathis, Brittany Jewett, Andrea Perez, Callie Barker, Breanna Ervin, Alexa Werner, (back) Nahum Garfias, Dakota Haney, Logan Mills, Taylor Robinson, Lukas Mieirs, Charlie Arrigoni, Luke Kindred, Tanner Smith, Diego Santana, (rear) head coach Harold Jensen and assistant coach Tony Kindred.

State finals veterans key to goal of landing top five finish BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Harold Jensen expects a lot out of his Oroville track team this spring, particularly on the girls’ side. And that mainly is because they have already accomplished quite a lot. “The girls should be dynamite,” Jensen says. “It will take a bad day to keep us out of the top five at state. There may be just a 1-2 point differential from eighth to

2B Standards Last year, the top 4 boys and top 3 girls in each event at District 5/6 regional meet qualified for state. This year’s qualification allocations have not yet been determined. However, any athlete may qualify regardless of placing if they meet the qualifying standards listed below (which are updated for 2013).

fourth, so I have no doubt that we’ll be in the top 10.” With a deep squad featuring five returning state qualifiers, the Hornet girls are definitely set up for a solid season. Callie Barker, a two-time state runner-up in the pole vault, will try to break through against her nemesis from Willapa Valley after losing out on the state title by tiebreak criteria last year. “Callie has beaten her once, just not at state,” Jensen says. “She should be able to get back there and hopefully things will be a little different this time.” Sierra Speiker, who as won the state cross country title in two of her three years, will try to

better last year’s state performance in which she took fourth in the 1600 and sixth in the 3200. She also qualified in the 800. “I’d call her the favorite in the mile and 3200,” Jensen says, “and she should place in the 800 as well.” Kaitlyn Grunst had a number of close calls late last season that has Jensen expecting big things. She nearly qualified for state in four events (and would have with the previous year’s state allocations), but instead broke through in just one, the high jump. At state, she fin-

2B BOYS Event FAT Hand 100 11.62 11.4 200 23.36 23.2 400 51.36 51.2 800 2:00.70 2:00.5 1600 4:35.84 4:35.6 3200 10:02.15 10:02.0 110H 15.71 15.5 300H 41.21 41.0 4x100 Rel. 45.03 44.8 4x400 Rel. 3:33.35 3:33.2 Shot Put 48-2

Discus 145-8 Javelin 176-2 Long Jump 21-9.25 Triple Jump 42-10.75 High Jump 6-2 Pole Vault 12-4 2B GIRLS Event FAT Hand 100 13.16 13.0 200 26.61 26.4 400 1:00.69 1:00.5 800 2:55.22 2:25.0 1600 5:21.11 5:20.9

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ished just one spot shy of the medal stand. “She should be able to get to state in the high jump, triple jump and long jump,” Jensen says. “And she should be able to place in all of those once she gets there.”

Breanna Ervin also qualified for state in the pole vault and while she didn’t medal, was one jump away from cracking the top five. Jensen 3200 11:41.62 11:41.4 100H 16.54 16.3 300H 47.27 47.1 4x100 Rel. 52.27 52.1 4x200 Rel. 1:48.94 1:48.8 4x400 Rel. 4:15.61 4:15.4 Shot Put 35-3.25 Discus 112-6 Javelin 119-2 Long Jump 16-8 Triple Jump 33-9.25 High Jump 5-1 Pole Vault 9-0

expects Brittany Jewett to return to state in the javelin and perhaps get there on a sprint relay. He also has hopes that Andrea Perez (shot put), Alexa Werner (shot put and discus) as well as freshman Kayla Mathis (pole vault) could get to Cheney as well. The boys team brings back far less experience. Tanner Smith, who qualified for state in the 200, will try to get to the medal stand this year, while Luke Kindred missed state by one spot in both the javelin and discus. Kindred and Smith were also on a 4x100 relay team that finished one place shy of the state finals.

Name Luke Kindred Josh Janczyk Lukas Mieirs Connelly Quick Taylor Robinson Diego Santana Tanner Smith Jose Barbosa Nahum Garfias Charlie Arrigoni Dakota Haney Logan Mills

Gr 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 10 10 9 9 9

Head coach: Harold Jensen Assistant coach: Tony Kindred

“Beyond those two guys and a relay, it may be tough,” Jensen said. “I think we have some talent, but not the experience.” The Hornets will once again be hosting the CWL north sectional, which this year will consist of just four teams: Oroville, Lake Roosevelt, Bridgeport and Manson. Pateros dropped down to 1B and Brewster moved up to 1A for this year and next. The road to state will get significantly tougher against the south section at regionals, which feature powerful squads from Riverside Christian and Kittitas.

OROVILLE TRACK & FIELD SCHEDULE 3/23 at Colville Inv. 3/30 Oroville Invite 4/9 at Bridgeport/Brewster Co-ed 4/13 at Cashmere Invite 4/20 at Quincy Invite 4/23 at Mansfield Invite 4/26 at Cascade Invite 4/30 at Bridgeport Invite 5/3 at Liberty Bell Invite 5/9 North Div. Sub-district (home) 5/18 # at District 5/6 Regional (Ephrata) 5/24-5 # at State (EWU) # Qualifiers

11:00 am 11:30 am 4:00 pm 12:00 pm 10:30 am 4:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:00 pm 10:00 am TBA

This High School Sports Special Section is made possible by the advertisers who have placed ads in this special pre-season edition. They have advertised here because they care about the youth in our valley and want to encourage them in their dedication and hard work. By placing an ad here they are saying “Good job...we’re proud of you and we care that you succeed, not just in sports, but in life.” You can return that support by patronizing their businesses. Together we can build a strong and healthy community — a community that our kids will be proud to represent in whatever sport or activity they participate in.


h

PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 14, 2013

Tiger soccer looks to take next step

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Jack Goyette’s first year back coaching the Tonasket boys soccer team produced significant signs of progress in the program. The Tigers improved from 2-13-1 (winless in Caribou Trail League play) in 2011 to 6-9-1 last year and earning a seasonopening tie (versus Manson) and a season-ending victory (over Okanogan) against state tournament qualifying teams. Goyette is hoping for even fur-

Seniors

“After players are accustomed to the coach it’s much easier to focus on coaching and playing well.” Jack Goyette, Tonasket Boys Soccer Coach

ther gains in the upcoming season. “My experience is that the first year is always the toughest (when taking over a new program),” Goyette says. “There’s a lot of changes. After players are accustomed to the coach it’s much easier to focus on coaching and playing well.” The Tigers will again have enough players to easily field a JV team. The squad will be led by seniors Jesus “Chewie” Alvarez, Oscar Avilez, Joel Cosino, Brayson Hires, Wyatt O’Brien and Ivan Rios. “They’re all solid guys, good

TONASKET BOYS SOCCER ROSTER Name Jesus Alvarez Oscar Avilez Joel Cosino Brayson Hires

Gr 12 12 12 12

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tonasket boys soccer team includes (front row, l-r) Tyler Farver, Tilly Garcia, Bryden Hires, Cristian Diaz, Marcelino Ruiz-Martell, Michael Orozco, Elias Ramos, Timothy Jackson, Omar Calderon, Lawrence Wambugu, (middle) Cesar Reynoso, Abran Alvarez, Christian Garcia Herrera, Noe Vazquez, Jose Andres Ortega, Camron Baller, Hugo Sanchez, Azael Herrera, Anthony Luna, (back) assistant coach Todd Mathews, Cristian Garcia, Lucas Vugteveen, Wyatt O’Brien, Ivan Rios, Brayson Hires, Joel Cosino, Oscar Avilez, Antonio Sanchez, Isaiah Yaussey-Albright, head coach Jack Goyette. Not pictured are Jesus Alvarez, Antonioin Sanchez and Blake Ash. teammates and hard workers,” Goyette says. “With 29 or 30 kids, we had a great turnout, and they’re great kids.”

The addition of Quincy and Brewster will only make the league tougher. Last year all three league district qualifiers survived

Wyatt O’Brien Ivan Rios Camron Baller Tyler Farver Timothy Jackson Michael Orozco Elias Ramos Marcelino Ruiz-Martell Abran Alvarez Blake Ash

Cristian Diaz Christian Garcia Jose Ortega Cesar Reynoso Antonio Sanchez Noe Vazquez Lawrence Wambugu Isaiah Yaussey-Albright Omar Calderon Jesus Garcia

12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 10 10

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 9 9

into the state tournament, with league runner-up Chelan advancing to the state title game before losing 1-0 in the final. Christian Garcia Herrera Azael Herrera Bryden Hires Anthony Luna Hugo Sanchez Lucas Vugteveen

9 9 9 9 9 9

Head coach: Jack Goyette Assistant coach: Todd Mathews

So as Goyette looks to the season ahead, catching those teams doesn’t come up.

TONASKET BOYS SOCCER SCHEDULE 3/12 3/16 3/19 3/21 3/23 3/26 3/28 3/30

* Cascade 4:00 pm * Quincy 11:00 am * at Brewster 4:00 pm Oroville 4:00 pm * at Cashmere 11:00 am * Okanogan 4:30 pm at Manson 4:30 pm * at Chelan 11:00 am

Jesus Alvarez

Oscar Avilez

Joel Cosino

Brayson Hires

Wyatt O’Brien

Ivan Rios

“We want to improve our overall possession game, as well as defensively,” he says. “Our goal is to be competitive and to get better as the season progresses.” And if the Tigers are able to do that, the wins should take care of themselves. 4/9 * Omak 4:30 pm 4/13 * Cashmere 11:00 am 4/16 * at Okanogan 4:30 pm 4/20 * at Cascade 11:00 am 4/23 * at Omak 4:30 pm 4/27 * at Quincy 11:00 am 4/30 * Brewster 4:30 pm 5/2 * Chelan 4:30 pm 5/7 # Districts begin * League Contest # If Qualify

Oroville soccer building for the future BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Just keeping a team on the field proved to be a challenge for Mike Pitts last year in his first season as Oroville’s head soccer coach. Fortunately, in Class B soccer, teams often are willing to play shorthanded, thus a number of 7-on-7 and 8-on-8 games kept the Hornets from having to scrap the end of last season.

OROVILLE BOYS SOCCER ROSTER

Name EZ Layata Michael Riple Abraham Capote Connelly Quick Jessey Tizapa Leonardo Curiel Ezequiel Delgado Cesar Lozano Brian Wise Javier Castillo Daniel Castrejon Emmanuel Castrejon Jesus Churape Austin Holcomb Luis Reyes Moises Capote Robbie Dudley Aldo Perez

Gr 12 12 11 11 11 10 10 10 10 9 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8

Head coach: MIke Pitts Assistant coach: Tony Flores

Seniors Brent Baker/staff photo

EZ Layata

Michael Ripley

This year that shouldn’t be a problem with 18 players on the squad. With an extremely youthful bunch - there are just two seniors and three juniors on the roster - wins against more established teams may be hard to come by, but Pitts is looking forward to building a lasting foundation. “We have an awesome opportunity to establish a foundation for the next 3-5 seasons,” Pitts says. “These young players will see a lot of playing time which will benefit them in the long run.” The team would have been young anyway with six freshmen

The Oroville boys soccer team includes (front row, l-r) Jesus Churape, Ezequiel Delgado, Aldo Perez, Jaurer Castillo, Daniel Castrejon, Emmanuel Castrejon, Robbie Dudley, EZ Layata, Jessey Tizapa, (back) assistant coach Tony Flores, Cesar Lozano, Leonardo Curiel, Connelly Quick, Brian Wise, Abraham Capote, Michael Ripley, Austin Holcomb and head coach Mike Pitts. Not pictured is Moises Capote. in the mix. But it also includes three eighth graders who will get thrown into the fray right away as several other players will start the year on the bench due to eligibility issues.

OROVILLE BOYS SOCCER SCHEDULE 3/12 3/21 3/23 3/26 3/28 3/30 4/6

at Moses Lk fr. 5:00 pm at Tonasket 4:00 pm Newport 11:00 am * at Bridgeport 4:00 pm * Liberty Bell 4:00 pm Moses Lk fr 12:00 pm at Quincy JV

“The eighth graders are in a unique situation where they’re being asked to contribute in major way at a younger age,” Pitts says. “So far ... they have shown a lot of maturity and have taken the 4/9 * Manson 4:00 pm 4/13 * Bridgeport 11:00 am 4/16 * at Liberty Bell 5:00 pm 4/20 * at Manson 11:00 am 4/23 * at Bridgeport 4:00 pm 4/27 * at Liberty Bell 11:00 am 4/30 * Manson 4:00 pm 5/4 # Districts begin * League Contest # If Qualify

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to the combined 2B/1A district tournament. “Our team goals are to compete for the league title and advance to district play,” he says. “We want to improve each player’s academic GPA over the course of the season, and we want to compete with class.”

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MARCH 14, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B7

Tonasket tennis features mix of youth and experience BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket’s tennis teams feature an interesting blend of youth and experience, a combination of knowns and unknowns. The girls team features one of the league’s best players, while the boys overall may have a better chance to contend in the Caribou Trail League. Tonasket coach Dave Buchheim is looking for big things from senior Megan Beyers, who finished second in the state singles tournament two years ago but last season, playing doubles with Amber Monroe, fell one match short of state after being eliminated by the eventual state fourthplace medalists from Cashmere. Beyers, in a bid to get back to state, played indoor tennis all winter. “I really expect Megan to well,” Buchheim says. “She should come out of districts (number) one or two and go from there. She’ll be one of the top players in the league. It’s a great place for us to start as a team, but of course, you have to win three out of five matches.” The Tigers do have five other returners, including seniors Claire Thornton and Michaela Newton, as well as juniors Brisa Leep, Abby Gschiel, Maddie Villalva and sophomores Cassie

Seniors

Megan Beyers

Grace Maldonado

Michaela Newton Claire Thornton Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tonasket tennis teams include (front row, l-r) Baillie Hirst, Ye Jee, Abby Gschiel, Grace Maldonado, Claire Thornton, Michaela Newton, Megan Beyers, Cassie Blaney, Shoshanna Thomas-McCue, Anna St. Martin, (back) head coach Dave Buchheim, Levi Schell, Morgan O’Brien, Brian Hendrick, Walker Marks, Trevor Terris, Jesse Holan, Dmytro Golubovych and assitant coach Kevin Terris. Not pictured are Colton Leep, Conner Williams, Brisa Leep and Maddie Villalva. Blaney and Anna St. Martin. “I always have high hopes,” Buchheim says. “But realistically

TONASKET BOYS AND GIRLS TENNIS ROSTERS BOYS

Name Brian Hendrick Walker Marks Levi Schell Trevor Terris Dmytro Golubovych

Gr 11 11 11 11 10

I think we’ll finish in the middle somewhere.” The boys may not have an Jesse Holan Colton Leep Morgan O’Brien Conner Williams

GIRLS

Name Megan Beyers Grace Maldonado Michaela Newton Claire Thornton

10 10 10 10 Gr 12 12 12 12

established state medal contender like Beyers, but are solid with juniors Trevor Terris and Brian Abby Gschiel Brisa Leep Cassie Blaney Ye Jee Anna St. Martin Shoshanna Thomas-McCue Maddie Villalva Baillie Hirst

11 11 10 10 10 10 10 9

Head coach: Dave Buchheim Assistant coach: Anitra Atcheson

Hendrick in singles, with sophomores Walker Marks and Colton Leep looking solid in doubles. With no seniors on the squad, other returners include junior Levi Schell and sophomores Morgan O’Brien and Conner Williams. “It’s kind of a mixed team,” Buccheim says. “We have a lot of returning players, but a lot of young ones too. But I still expect the boys to finish in the top half of the league.”

TONASKET BOYS AND GIRLS TENNIS SCHEDULE

3/12 3/16 3/21 3/23 3/26 3/28 3/29 4/9 4/13 4/16 4/18 4/20 4/23 4/27 5/2 5/4 5/11

* Cascade 4:00 pm * Quincy 11:00 am Oroville 4:30 pm * at Cashmere 11:00 am * Okanogan 4:30 pm Liberty Bell 4:30 pm * at Chelan 4:30 pm * Omak 4:30 pm * Cashmere 11:00 am * at Okanogan 4:30 pm * Omak 4:30 pm *at Cascade 11:00 am * at Omak 4:30 pm * at Quincy 11:00 am * at Lk Roosevelt4:00 pm * Chelan 11:00 am Districts begin

* League Match

Hornet tennis under new leadership

Hornets to field full teams for first time in several seasons BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Billy Monroe takes over coaching the Oroville tennis teams, and for the first time in several years the Hornets will start the season able to field full squads on both the boys and girls side. Six girls and four boys return, giving Monroe, an assistant at Tonasket last year, a relatively experienced crew to start with. “Every single athlete who turned out this season is key,” Monroe says. “It gives us the opportunity to have full teams. “On the boys side, I’m looking for veteran leadership from Ronel Kee, Joe Sarmiento and Donny Wise. On the girls side, from Menze Pickering, Lily Hilderbrand and Aya Cruspero.” Also returning are Eric Herrera, Ali Miller, Angela Nelson and Maddy Richardson. As when any new coach takes over, there will be changes in approach, and Monroe says it may take awhile for the team to hit its stride. “The main goal for this season is to get better every week and stay positive,” he says. “Fundamentally, I am making a lot of changes to the players’ games and there will be struggles early in the season. The plan is to stay the course and

OROVILLE BOYS AND GIRLS TENNIS ROSTERS GIRLS

Name Ali Miller Maddy Coffelt-Richardson Aya Cruspero Kaylee Foster Angela Nelson Menze Pickering Lily Hilderbrand

Gr 12 11 11 11 11 11 10

Seniors

Eric Herrera

Ronel Kee

Ali Miller

Donny Wise

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Oroville tennis teams include (front row, l-r) Angela Nelson, Menze Pickering, Ali Miller, Lily Hilderbrand, Maddy Coffelt-Richardson, Aya Cruspero, Kaylee Foster, (back) head coach Billy Monroe, Nathan Hugus, Conner Bocook, Joseph Sarmiento, Donald Wise, Eric Herrera and Michael Ortiz. Not pictured are Lillie Gronlund and Ronel Kee. improve as tennis players.” Filling out this year’s lineups will be a pair of eighth graders, on each on the boys and girls teams. “Without either of them, we would not have a full team so their impact already is huge,” Lillie Gronlund

8

BOYS

Name Eric Herrera Ronel Kee Donny Wise Michael Ortiz Joe Sarmiento Connor Bocook Nathan Hugus

Head Coach: Billy Monroe

Monroe says. The Hornets didn’t have anyone survive for long at the district tournament last year, which

OROVILLE BOYS AND GIRLS TENNIS SCHEDULE 3/16

Gr 12 12 12 11 10 9 8

3/19 3/20 3/21 3/26

vs White Swan (at Eastmont) 1:00 pm at Wilson Creek 4:00 pm Pateros 4:00 pm at Tonasket 4:30 pm Lk Roosevelt 4:00 pm

is a combined tourney with 1A schools. But that hasn’t lowered his expectations for where he wants the team to be at the end 3/28 4/9 4/13 4/16 4/18 4/23 4/25 4/27 5/11

at Entiat 4:00 pm Liberty Bell 4:00 pm vs. White Swan (at Eastmont) 1:00 pm Wilson Creek 4:00 pm at Pateros 4:00 pm at Lk Roosevelt 4:00 pm Entiat 4:00 pm at Liberty Bell 11:00 am Districts begin

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of the year. “Overall, there are some good athletes and hard workers in the group I have this season,” Monroe says. “It’ss fair to expect Oroville tennis to have a couple players making noise at the district tournament either as a doubles team or in the singles bracket.”

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V


PAGE B8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 14, 2013

Underclassmen dominate Oroville golf team State qualifier Connor Hughes is lone senior while five eighth graders take to the links

BOYS Name Connor Hughes Kyle Scott Lane Tietje Mick Fulmer Cayden Field (Tonasket) Blake Rise Blaine Weaver Bryce Glover Austin Hughes William Shearer

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - It seems to be a recurring theme this year that Oroville’s spring sports teams are on the young side. That is particularly true for the Hornet golf squad, which boasts all of one single upperclassman on its 12-athlete roster. Senior Connor Hughes brings far and away the most experience to the team. He qualified for the state finals each of the past two years, and last season survived the Day One cut and cracked the top 40 for the weekend. “We are young, so our golfers just need to play and develop their golf skills this year,” says Oroville coach DeHaven Hill.The only other returners on either

Senior

OROVILLE GOLF ROSTERS

Gr 12 10 10 10 9 9 9 8 8 8

GIRLS

Name Heidi Gronlund Jordyn Smith

Connor Hughes OROVILLE BOYS AND GIRLS GOLF SCHEDULE 3/26

Gr 8 8

4/9 4/16

Head coach: DeHaven Hill Assistant coach: Ed Booker

4/22

Brent Baker/staff photo

squad are sophomores Kyle Scott, Mick Fulmer and Lane Tietje. The rest of the teams include two freshmen, five eighth graders, and Tonasket freshman Cayden Field as part of a co-op arrangement. Two of the Hornet eighth graders, Bryce Glover and Jordyn

The Oroville golf team includes (l-r) William Shearer, Jordyn Smith, Austin Hughes and Lane Tietje. Not pictured are Connor Hughes, Kyle Scott, Mick Fulmer, Blake Rise, Blaine Weaver, Bryce Glover, Heidi Gronlund , Cayden Field (Tonasket) and assistant coach Ed Booker. Smith, have played golf for several years. “They bring a little more experience than our other eighth graders,” Hill says. “We have a great group of eighth graders par-

ticipating this year.” Smith and fellow eighth grader Heidi Gronlund are the only girls playing, with 10 boys turning out. “Our goals will be to continue

4/30 5/2 5/7

to develop and lower our team score as we play throughout the year,” Hill says. “Our team goal will be to win districts, and every player’s individual goal is to qualify for the state tournament.”

5/14 5/20

vs Lake Roosevelt @ Desert Canyon 2:30 pm Lake Roosevelt/Manson @ Oroville GC 2:30 pm vs. Manson/RCS @ Alta Lks GC 2:30 pm vs. Manson @ Lake Chelan GC 2:30 pm Okanogan @ Oroville GC 2:30 pm vs. Lake Roosevelt/RCS at Banks Lk GC 2:30 pm vs. Lake Roosevelt @ Bear Creek GC 2:30 pm Districts @ Lake Chelan GC 2:30 pm # State @ Oakbrook CC

# Qualifiers

2012 SEASON IN REVIEW BASEBALL STANDINGS CARIBOU TRAIL LEAGUE (1A) Team W L RS RA * Cashmere 15 0 213 2 * Cascade 11 4 116 72 * Okanogan 7 8 63 83 Chelan 6 9 65 117 Omak 5 10 78 119 Tonasket 1 14 34 172 * Post-season qualifier State qualifiers: Cashmere (state champion)

W 26 14 8 8 6 2

CENTRAL WASHINGTON LEAGUE NORTH DIVISION (2B) Team W L RS RA * Lk. Roosevelt 12 3 120 39 * Liberty Bell 12 3 126 31 * Brewster 12 3 185 45 Pateros 5 10 82 154 Waterville 4 11 74 134 Oroville 0 15 24 216 Bridgeport (all games non-league) * Post-season qualifier State qualifiers: Brewster, Lake Roosevelt

W 21 14 15 5 6 0 2

CENTRAL WASHINGTON LEAGUE (B) L 0 7 12 11 10 18

RS 275 159 108 83 92 58

RA 19 124 118 142 119 227

CARIBOU TRAIL LEAGUE (1A)

L 4 7 7 12 11 19 17

RS 198 196 213 93 105 56 54

W 22 17 12 12 6 5

CENTRAL WASHINGTON LEAGUE NORTH DIVISION (2B) Team W L RS RA * Brewster 17 0 349 53 * Pateros 15 2 303 47 * Waterville 10 8 252 220 * Liberty Bell 10 8 220 189 Lk Roosevelt 6 12 195 402 Bridgeport 4 14 105 278 Oroville 0 18 97 336 * Post-season qualifier State qualifiers: Brewster, Pateros

W 19 20 11 11 6 4 0

Team Cashmere Chelan Omak Tonasket Cascade Okanogan

RA 70 69 85 186 150 289 286

FASTPITCH SOFTBALL STANDINGS CARIBOU TRAIL LEAGUE (1A)

Team W L RS RA * Cascade 14 1 174 40 * Okanogan 10 5 141 97 * Chelan 8 7 112 81 * Omak 8 7 86 86 Cashmere 5 10 69 81 Tonasket 0 15 24 227 * Post-season qualifier State qualifiers: Cascade, Okanogan

Team Pts. W L * Manson 28 9 1 * Brewster 26 9 1 * Warden 18 6 4 Bridgeport 9 3 7 Liberty Bell 6 2 8 Oroville 3 1 9 * Post-season qualifier State Qualifiers: Manson

L 7 10 12 10 12 15

RS 292 246 168 153 82 103

RA 127 201 157 127 111 253

L 5 5 9 10 15 16 20

RS 385 386 252 267 201 106 118

RA 120 97 220 222 486 315 368

W 10 7 4 4 2 2

GF 48 64 28 32 10 18

GA 7 6 15 26 48 99

W 11 14 8 6 2 1

L 5 2 7 10 14 14

T 3 0 0 0 0 0

GF GA 69 32 87 14 42 27 51 45 14 87 25 126

BOYS TENNIS

L 0 2 5 6 8 8

W L 13 1 10 4 8 6 7 8 4 10 5 10

Tonasket State Qualifier: Anthony Verhasselt Oroville State Qualifiers: None

Team Cashmere Chelan Cascade Omak Tonasket Okanogan

W 9 8 5 4 2 1

Team Pts. W L GF GA W L T * Cascade 27 9 1 34 15 15 3 2 * Chelan 24 8 2 38 13 17 6 0 * Okanogan 18 6 4 32 16 12 8 0 Omak 12 4 6 29 33 9 7 0 Tonasket 6 2 8 13 38 6 9 1 Cashmere 3 1 9 18 49 3 13 0 * Post-season qualifier State Qualifiers: Cascade, Chelan (2nd place), Okanogan

GF 59 81 72 54 38 28

W L 13 1 11 2 8 5 9 5 5 10 4 11

Tonasket State Qualifiers: None. Oroville State Qualifiers: None. CTL and CWL North B/1A Medalists: Shaylyn Goodall, Omak (2nd place) Maghara DePaoli/Megan Robinson, Chelan (3rd place) Mikeala Kowatsch/Tasaha Kowatsch, Chelan (4th place) Olivia Plew/Clancy Courtney, Chelan (7th place)

GA 32 31 51 42 50 72

GIRLS TRACK STANDINGS / STATE QUALIFIERS

Tonasket 1A State Qualifiers: None

BOYS TRACK STANDINGS / STATE QUALIFIERS

BOYS SOCCER STANDINGS CARIBOU TRAIL LEAGUE (1A)

CWL 2B North Medalists C.J. Mathews, Oroville, Triple Jump (2nd) Michael Frisk, Entiat, 300 Hurdles (5th) Marcus Vanderholm, Manson, 1600 (3rd), 3200 (4th) Casey Sorensen, Manson, Shot Put (6th) Alex Vanderholm, Manson, Discus (6th) Jesse Adkins, Lake Roosevelt, 300 Hurdles (3rd) Kip Craig, Bridgeport, 300 Hurdles (4th)

CWL North Sub-District Track Finals: Oroville 153, Liberty Bell 103, Lake Roosevelt 90, Bridgeport 83, Pateros 60, Brewster 47, Waterville 2.

GIRLS TENNIS

L 1 1 5 5 8 9

Oroville 2B State Qualifiers: Caleb Haney (Discus) C.J. Mathews (Triple Jump, Long Jump) Tanner Smith (200) Zack Speiker (3200)

CTL Track Finals: Cashmere 240, Chelan 75, Okanogan 74, Tonasket 70, Omak 57, Cascade 34.

CTL and CWL North B/1A Medalists: Matt Robinson, Chelan (5rd place) Warren Robertson, Cashmere (8th place) Nathan Stiles/Adam Ross, Cashmere (2nd place)

CARIBOU TRAIL LEAGUE (1A)

CWL North Sub-District Track Finals: Liberty Bell 150, Oroville 144, Bridgeport 77.5, Lake Roosevelt 60, Brewster 37, Waterville 30.5, Pateros 15.

CTL Track Finals: Cashmere 174, Tonasket 104, Omak 81, Chelan 67, Cascade 57, Okanogan 29. Tonasket 1A State Qualifiers: Damon Halvorsen, 1600 Jake Hickman, John Stedtfeld, Zach Villalva, Smith Condon, 4x100 Relay CTL 1A Medalists Moe Roberts, Cashmere, 100 (5th) Joey Michael, Cashmere, 110 Hurdles (4th), 300 Hurdles (8th) Brad Wood, Cashmere, pole vault (2nd) Joseph LaGrou, Omak, High Jump (8th)

Oroville 2B State Qualifiers: Sierra Speiker (800, 1600, 3200) Callie Barker (Pole Vault) Brittany Jewett (Javelin) Breanna Ervin (Pole Vault) Kaitlyn Grunst (High Jump) CTL 1A Medalists Karle Pittsinger, Chelan, shot (6th) Jesica Bauer, Cashmere, 100 (7th) Angela Knishka, Cashmere, 400 (8th); 800 (5th) Jozie Kimes, Cashmere, 100 Hurdles (6th), 300 Hurdles (5th) Cashmere 4x200 Girls (Bauer, Helm, B Knishka, A Knishka) (3rd) Cashmere 4x400 Girls (B Knishka, Weddle, Kimes, A Knishka) (4th) Monique Blanchard, Cashmere, Pole vault (6th) Ashlee Barker, Omak, long jump (8th) Maddie Timm, Okanogan, high jump (1st, 5-5) CWL 2B North Medalists Callie Barker, Oroville, Pole Vault (2nd) Sierra Speiker, Oroville, 1600 (6th), 3200 (4th) Emily Wooldridge, Entiat, 800 (7th), 1600 (7th), 3200 (5th) Heather Segle, Entiat, 300 Hurdles (6th) Entiat 4x400 (Wooldridge, Rock, Parks, Segle) (3rd) Jamie Bruno, Pateros, 200 (6th), 100 Hurdles (5th), 300 Hurdles (7th), Kim Barry, Lake Roosevelt, 400 (2nd), 800 (1st), 1600 (4th), 3200 (3rd) Brette Boesel, Brewster, High Jump (2nd) Yvonne Kilgour, Bridgeport, Shot Put (8th)

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Good Luck to Our Outstanding Athletes! 2 mi. W. of Oroville on Nighthawk Rd. Ph. 476-2390

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 14, 2013  

March 14, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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