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World War II veteran

FATHER - SON HOOPS

Floyd Kennedy tells his story.

Oroville High School basketball team takes on their dads, Feb. 28, 7:30 p.m. in the OHS gym.

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WINTER CARNIVAL FUN AT TONASKET ELEMENTARY

Petition filed to recall NVH commissioners Statement alleges malfeasance, misfeasance, violation of oaths of office by board members BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Two area residents - Rosa Snider of Oroville and Danny Gratix of Tonasket - filed a statement on Monday, Feb. 25, with the Okanogan County auditor’s office seeking the recall of the entire North Valley Hospital Board of Commissioners. The statements allege malfeasance (wrongful or illegal conduct), misfeasance (performance of duty in an improper manner) and violation of the oath of office (knowingly failing to perform faithfully duties imposed by law. “This is our absolute last resort,” Snider said. “No one wanted to do this, but the false information and their aggressiveness left us feeling we had no other option.” The specifics of alleged improprieties range from financial to managerial to legal, including violations of the Open Meetings Act, as well as creating conditions that have eroded the patient base and undermined provider recruitment and retention. The statement also asks the court to direct the board to “resend (sic) or suspend its decision” the Assisted Living facility; prevent the Board from engag-

ing in negotiations involving the closure or suspension of any hospital district services for 120 days; prevent the Board from appointing to any open positions, leaving that decision to the Okanogan County Board of Commissioners; and direct the Board from making changes to its charity care policy without “community review and approval.” Snider’s background of 17 years in hospital administration, management, billing and advocacy helped her with the process of compiling her statement. “I feel like a lint collector in a yarn factory, there’s so much there,” she said. NVH Board of Commissioners Chairwoman Helen Casey said she had no comment Monday afternoon, as she had not yet been served with the statement and didn’t know its contents. The auditor’s office will serve each of the commissioners - Casey, Lael Duncan, Dick Larson, Clarice Nelson and Herb Wandler - with the statement within three days of the filing, as well as provide a copy to the Okanogan County Prosecutor’s office. The prosecutor’s office will provide a ballot synopsis within 15 days of receipt. The ballot synopsis will then be submitted to the Okanogan County Superior

SEE PETITION | PG A2

Oroville Elementary experiences lockdown BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – The chairman of the Oroville School Board had some harsh words for those who would spread false rumors about a lockdown that took place at Oroville Elementary at the end of January. “I’m going to address this a little, but I’m not going to take public comments at this time,” said Rocky DeVon at the board’s meeting last Monday, Feb. 25. “We had an incident where a staff member and a parent asked a person in the hallway what he was doing there. He said he was there to check the water and the parent aid went to the office and asked if he had checked in. Finding no record that he had checked in and nothing about a water issue, Principal Joan Hoehn called a lockdown,” said DeVon. “The police were called, did a thorough

Tonasket’s Parent Teacher Organization held its third annual Winter Carnival fundraiser at the elementary school on Friday, Feb. 22, featuring games and activities from one end of the school to another. More than 8,000 game tickets were sold, and it took 70 volunteers to pull off the event. Some of what went on included (top) jumping in the inflatable “bouncy castle,” (above left) first grade teacher Todd Mathews about to face his fate in the immensely popular dunk tank; (above right), a squirt gun-powered rubber ducky race track; and plenty of hair-coloring and face painting to go around. Brent Baker/staff photos

search and could not locate the man.” The board member said he found the rumors on Facebook that Hoehn had not treated the incident with the seriousness it deserved as “disturbing.” He said “the rumor mongers” were also saying the police had not been called. DeVon said they should have gotten their facts straight before spreading false rumors about the safety of the school. “Our principals take our school safety extremely seriously,” added Superintendent Steve Quick. In addition to the search by officers from the Oroville Police Department, the school used their system to send out an “all call” alert about the lockdown. “Some people did not get the message because they had not filled out the form saying they wanted to be included in the system, while others didn’t get the message they should have and we are work-

SEE BOARD | PG A2

Oroville to charge for responding to false alarms BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – In an effort to push businesses and agencies with fire and burglar alarms to keep them in repair, Oroville will be charging a fee for responding to false alarms. The council looked at a draft Alarm Ordinance and discussed the problem with the fire and police chiefs at their Tuesday, Feb. 19 meeting. The draft ordinance had set a rising fee of $25 for the first false alarm, $50 for the second and $75 for the third. “I wasn’t here at the last meeting when this was discussed, but I don’t think those fees are nearly enough to take care of the problem,” said Fire Chief Rod Noel when asked his opinion. Noel explained that a particular problem was with calls to buildings where someone was working on the alarm or sprinkler system and neglected to inform the proper emergency agency. A simple call would

have saved the cost of his department having to roll out on a false alarm, he said. “There have been at least three false alarm calls to the Port of Entry in the last 12 months,” said Noel. The fire chief added that some businesses have neglected fixing their alarm systems because of their costs of the repairs and there is no financial incentive to get them fixed. “In the case of the shopping center we’ve gotten three or four calls a year where it costs a lot to repair and it costs nothing to them for us to respond to a false alarm. There has to be some incentive to make them fix it,” said Noel, adding that a change from a pressure switch to a flow switch could have stopped some of the false alarms. “I think when there are deliberate issues like this where people deliberately don’t repair their systems or have a planned test and don’t inform us we need to have a fine,” said Noel. “Any time a professional sprinkler

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 09

company goes to an establishment and doesn’t notify the alarm company that’s negligent. What we are looking at as a fine now doesn’t even cover the expenses of getting there.” The fire chief said most counties in the state have fire marshals that go out and inspect systems and write up businesses that have faulty systems and order them repaired. “Are you okay with $25, $50, $75?” City Clerk Kathy Jones asked Noel. “No I’m not; $25 doesn’t even cover the clerk’s time to file the report. I think the first incident should be no less than $100,” said Noel, adding that the agencies should be left some discretion on the fee for incidents like a child pulling an alarm at the school. “So you’re saying, $100 for the first incident, then $200, $300 and $400?” asked Jones. “I think you’re going to have to,” said Noel. The ordinance will be redrafted to reflect the higher fines.

State approves permit for boat ramp repair BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – After years of making the city wait, the state finally granted Oroville a permit to repair the crumbling boat ramp at one of its two parks on Lake Osoyoos. “We finally have our hydraulic permit to repair the boat ramp at Deep Bay Park,” announced City Clerk Kathy Jones at the Oroville City Council’s Tuesday, Feb. 19 meeting. Rod Noel, the head of public works and the parks department, said he had been talking with Tom Scott, director of the OrovilleTonasket Irrigation District, about when the lake levels were going to be raised. The OTID controls the levels through Zosel Dam under contract to the state Department of Ecology using International Joint Commission guidelines. “Under the new order from the IJC they

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INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

actually start raising the lake in January so our window for repair is shrinking,” Noel said. “And we have to use native rock under the permit. Also we have to notify them ahead of time.” The permit does not include installation of another boat ramp as requested by boaters at previous council meetings. A second ramp would most likely take an even longer permitting process, according to Noel. In other business, the council discussed the need to replace or repair the engine in one of the two ambulances. The engine, which is in the GM-cabbed ambulance, blew a week ago. Although the city plans on replacing an ambulance later this year, most likely the newer Ford, Jones said it was too long to wait without a backup ambulance. “With 77,000 miles on it one way or another it would need to be replaced,” said Councilman Tony Koepke. Councilman Walt Hart III said he preferred

Valley Life Schools Letters/Opinion

A3 A4 A5

Community A6-A7 Classifieds/Legals A8 Real Estate A9

Sports A10-A11 Police Stats A12 Obituaries A12


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 28, 2013

GMA legislation would allow small counties to ‘opt out’ By Kylee Zabel, Reporter WNPA Olympia News Bureau

OLYMPIA - Among a slew of legislative proposals introduced this session focusing on Washington’s Growth Management Act (GMA), two, which would allow counties with smaller populations to opt out of full planning under the act, were approved by committees and advance in their respective chambers for further consideration. Senate Bill 5636, sponsored by Sen. John Smith (R-7th District, Colville) and HB 1224, sponsored by Rep. Joel Kretz (R-7th District, Wauconda), would allow counties with less than 20,000 residents to remove themselves from the GMA requirements. Four counties would qualify under population limit provisions in the two bills: Ferry, Pend Oreille, Columbia and Garfield. Both bills were introduced in order to address the alleged burdens the GMA places on rural areas throughout the state that experience little fluctuation in population and economic growth from year to year. Proponents of both measures believe that local government officials should have greater control over their planning and land use policies rather than leaving oversight to the seven-person, governor-appointed state Growth Management Hearings Board (GMHB). “This measure is important because it’s about preserving and protecting local community viability and giving small counties the right and flexibility to save money and make decisions that would produce the best economic and environmental outcomes for their community,” said Smith. “It is time to unleash the strength of character and innovation that has been sequestered in our rural counties for far too long.” The GMA is a land-use planning measure that outlines 14 goals that attempt to employ environmentally friendly means to managing population growth. Requirements include identifying urban growth areas, protecting natural resource lands and composing critical area plans, among others. Counties planning under the GMA that violate its requirements are subject to appeals often brought either by conservation groups, other organizations or individuals. Appeals, called petitions of review, are brought to the GMHB, at which time the board decides if a county is in or out of compliance with GMA standards. Thirty petitions of review

against counties were filed with the GMHB in 2012. Only two cases found counties in non-compliance, according to the board’s data. Several appeals made in 2012 remain under review. From 2005 to 2012, nearly 40 percent of the petitions of review filed found counties non-compliant. While the bill is intended to help counties and cities that claim they have suffered economically as a result of complying with the GMA, conservation groups say that the act is necessary to assure land-planning reflects the interests of both economic development and environmental preservation. “The Growth Management Act asks our communities to think holistically about the future, to think about housing, job opportunities, economic development, the environment,” said April Putney of FutureWise, a conservation-interest group. “All of these things, in conjunction with each other, is strong policy whether you are a really large community, small community or how fast you’re growing,” she said. Proponents of the bills observed, however, that regulation required by the GMA thwarts economic development and reforms must be made to make the law more business-friendly. Pend Oreille County Commissioner Karen Skoog argued that small border counties such as hers, in the northeast corner adjacent to Idaho and with only about 13,000 residents, risk businesses bleeding into other states, thus adversely affecting the counties’ economies. Allowing these counties to remove themselves from the GMA would lessen some of the regulations that drive businesses out of Washington, said Skoog. “The mandates and requirements of the GMA create a crippling and cumbersome bureaucratic process for smaller counties,” Smith said. Rep. David Taylor (R-15th District, Moxee), who is responsible for crafting several House bills that would have significantly limited the scope of the GMA, predicts that within 18 months of the removal of the law, Washington would experience a significant increase in economic development. While some fear that allowing these counties to back away from GMA requirements would stall conservation efforts, Taylor maintained that because of the many overlapping environmental policies in the state, it would be excessive to think that local governments do not have the capac-

Pickett tabbed at Omak Submitted by Eldene Wall NCESD Public Relations

OMAK - The Omak Board of Directors announced Feb. 19 that, in partnership with North Central ESD, a selection has been made to fill the Interim Superintendent position to succeed Art Himmler who was killed in an accident

Feb. 7. Dr. Rich McBride indicated veteran superintendent Tom Pickett has been selected to serve in this capacity and provide guidance and leadership to the board, staff and district for the balance of this school year. A search will be conducted with a goal of having the position filled by July 1.

ity to responsibly plan for their counties and cities. “It’s a duplicative law that serves no purpose other than to provide nongovernmental organizations the opportunity to cost local taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars,” he said. Washington has six other landplanning and management laws on the books, including the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), the Shoreline Management Act and the Planning Enabling Act, which authorizes counties to manage land development under the given guidelines in the law. The Planning Enabling Act was enacted in 1959. Several county officials, including Ferry County Commissioner Brad Miller, have said that even if they chose to opt out of the GMA as provided by the proposed measures, they would continue to plan with the same basic principles of economic and environmental viability. Ferry County’s population is about 7,600 and hasn’t changed in more than 100 years, said Miller. So, the question has been raised by lawmakers and county officials as to why communities with such low growth as that in Ferry County should be subjected to the same rules dictated by the GMA as apply to the larger, more urban counties. “I have a hard time believing that all of growth management’s requirements and issues are really necessary in some of the smaller counties that aren’t urban at all,” said Rep. Dean Takko (D-19th District, Longview), one of the sponsor’s of the House bill. “I’m not anti-growth-management,” he said. “I just think there are places where it makes sense and places where it doesn’t.” Some, however, would like to do away with the GMA entirely. Taylor, for example, said that the law fails to give due deference to local leaders and has grown so large in scope from its original intent that it has turned into a financial bane for counties, cities, businesses and taxpayers. “What was supposed to be a bottom-up planning process driven by citizens and with substantial deference given to local decision makers turned into a bottom-down, state-mandated, one-size-fits-all program that just simply doesn’t work,” said Taylor. The Moxee representative is disappointed with, among other GMA-related issues, the cost the appeals process places on counties and the bureaucratic makeup of the GMHB, which he said has very little accountability to the people the law affects. Though Taylor has signed

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onto several GMA-related bills, he says legislation that isolates only part of the problem won’t address what he expressed as the myriad onerous regulations the act imposes. “The piecemeal fix just isn’t going to work,” he said. Taylor sponsored a bill that would have eliminated the GMA but it failed to receive the nod from Chairman Takko of the House Local Government Committee before policy legislation cut-off Feb 22. On Jan. 18, private citizens and interest groups testified against the GMA during a work session hosted by members of the House Local Government Committee. While their grievances with the law varied, most agreed that the law has outgrown its original scope. Glen Morgan, property-rights director with the Freedom Foundation said, “If the road to hell is paved with good intentions then the GMA has become a freeway.” Still others would simply like the GMA process to be audited. Since its 1991 passage into law, the GMA has never been officially reviewed for its effect on local economies and its success in meeting the 14 goals outlined in the act. While testimony on the GMA was overwhelmingly in opposition to it, representatives from conservation groups maintained that the law as it stands now is an efficient means to protect the environment without treading on private-property rights. Both Putney and Darcy Nonemacher of the Washington Environmental Council have testified against numerous bills this session that would, if passed, limit the GMA. The two agree that the bills introduces unduly restrict the intention of the law. “[SB 5636 and HB 1224] undermines the existing purpose of the law to provide clear and consistent objectives that everybody is trying to reach,” said Nonemacher. Putney agreed and said that limiting the law would actually defy the will of Washingtonians as they supported the formation of the GMA. “[The GMA was created] because Washingtonians refused to believe that the natural legacy had to be sacrificed for economic prosperity,” she said. SB 5636 was approved Feb. 18 by the Senate Government Operations Committee on a party-line 4-3 vote. HB 1224 was approved by a 5-3 bipartisan vote in the House Local Government Committee Friday (Feb. 22).

Court, which will hold a hearing to determine sufficiency of the charges (in other words, do the charges fit the definition of “malfeasance, misfeasance and violation of the oath of office”) as presented. Both the petitioners and the subjects of the recall may appear at the hearing, with counsel if desired. If the court determines in their favor, the petitioners will have a maximum of 180 days to submit enough signatures to force a recall election, which would be 35 percent of the total votes cast for all candidates for each commissioner’s position. Mila Jury, Okanogan County Chief Deputy/Certified Election Administrator with the auditor’s office, said that if the process reaches that stage, that would likely necessitate five separate recall petitions. “There probably will have to be a separate one for each board member,” Jury said. “There were different numbers of votes cast for each, so the number of signatures required will differ for each one.”

Votes cast in each commissioner’s last election varied from 677 to 825. The threshold to be put on a ballot to be recalled will fall between 237 and 289 depending on the position. A recall election would have to occur between 45 and 60 days of the certification of the signatures on the petitions, should the threshold be reached, and could include any combination of or all of the commissioners. Due to the timing, that would likely mean a special election specifically for the recall. Jury said it was an unprecedented situation. “Most recalls involve just one person,” she said. “And we haven’t had many in Okanogan County at all.” She said the last recall petition filed in the county was against Conconully mayor Leland Church in 2006, which was ruled by the court not to meet the requirements for sufficiency of charges. The last such successful recall effort was against Okanogan County Prosecuting Attorney Jeremiah McCormick in 1977.

PERMIT | FROM A1 a new factory crate motor over having the old engine rebuilt. “Ya, when you do that you’re just slapping old parts on a new motor,” agreed Koepke. The council agreed to allow the Ambulance Committee, which includes Councilmen Koepke and Hart, review bids for replacement of the engine. The councils’ thinking was it was better to get the work started right away giving less down time, rather than wait for the next council meeting to make the decision on bids. The Oroville Youth Soccer Association has approached the city about use of the city soccer fields, replacing the goal posts and placement of sponsorship signs, including one that allows a major

sponsor to name the park for the season. “I don’t think I have a problem other than the sign part of this, up to this point the park doesn’t even have a name. “I recommend they put in a plan for construction of the goal posts. The city’s insurance likes the permanent ones better,” said Noel. “I’m in favor of sports activities for kids and whatever we can do for them,” he added. Councilman Koepke recommended putting a major sponsorship sign on the fence or on the existing structure at the park. “They could put it on their shed... let’s let them get back to us with a proposal,” said Noel.

BOARD | FROM A1 ing on fixing that,” DeVon said. He went on to say that Oroville School District had been doing upgrades to its security and is continuing to install more security cameras and other measures. He said Oroville had one of the safest schools around and pointed out he had been in one area school where no one asked who he was or what he was doing there. Under Good News and Announcements, School Director Amy Wise said that spring sports have started and most of the snow was gone (from playing fields). Supt. Quick said the roof project for the elementary school had been fully funded and 13 firms had put in bids on the project. Architects West of Couer d’ Alene, Idaho won the bid to design the roof project, which is expected to cost upwards of $1 million. “They were one of our main

d n a l n o ti 2013 a e r c e R

contractors for our high school so we’ve had experience working with them before,” said Quick. “We should have their initial proposal within two weeks.” One concern is about the many add-ons that were placed in and around the old roof which did not have a crawl space to run things like conduit for electricity and computer network cables. “There’s been a lot of add-ons over the years, conduit for electrical and technology that have been part of the problems with leaks,” said Quick. “We’re probably going to have to call in an electrical engineer and decide whether to replace or overbuild to allow for these and future upgrades.” Quick aid that the middle section of the roof was better than it was thought to be and that the north wing section should be the easiest repair. “We’re super excited,” he said.

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FEBRUARY 28, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

Okanogan Valley Life

Floyd Kennedy tells of POW liberation, Bronze Star By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

The pre-dawn gloaming over Luzon, the largest island of the Philippines, didn’t reveal the activity that had been weeks in the planning, and long hours of preparation under cover of night. But as the sun rose on Feb. 21, 1945, over the Los Baños POW camp, miserable home to more than 2,000 Allied civilian and military internees, a coordinated attack involving the United States Army and a group of Filipino guerillas launched what would become one of the most storied liberations of a POW camp in the annals of modern warfare. A young army medic with the 11th Airborne Division, Floyd Kennedy, now a longtime Tonasket-area resident, had a front-row seat for the historic World War II operation that was at once heroic and horrific. Using information obtained from a number of camp escapees, the attack was launched as the Japanese guards were in their parade ground going through their morning exercises. “(The Japanese) were going to kill the 2,000-some prisoners of war,” Kennedy says. “We figured the only way we could save them was by parachute. “So the guerillas hit the gates at the same time the paratroopers jumped inside the compound. We slaughtered hundreds of them.” Kennedy arrived by boat with the medical team to help treat and escort the freed POWs to freedom. “They were so excited,” he says. “They said,’Look, there’s the angels coming to save us!’ It was the white parachutes.” Some had been in captivity for as many as four years. Survivors

“All us medics carried rifles and .45s... (The Japanese) would wound the man in the trail, and when the medic came up to help them, they’d shoot the medics. ” Floyd Kennedy, World War II Veteran

often weighed in at just 70-90 lbs. “They were dying every day,” he says. “These people were so thin they could hardly walk and we carried out a lot of them. “But some of them wouldn’t move. We had to set fire to all the barracks so they’d move out. One guy came out carrying his mattress. I’ll never forget that.” Former Secretary of State and Army Chief of Staff Colin Powell once said of the raid, “I doubt that any airborne unit in the world will ever be able to rival the Los Baños prison raid. It is the textbook airborne operation for all ages and all armies.” Kennedy survived more than three months of combat in the Pacific, earned the Bronze Star and Purple Heart, continued his service (including a stint in Korea) for more than 20 years and when back in the U.S. worked for Nobel Prize-winning biochemist Dr. Eugene Krebs at the University of Washington.

11th Airborne Kennedy actually quit high school early to pursue his dream career: professional hockey. “My parents went to Canada to homestead,” he says. “Five girls were born here in the States and four boys were born in Canada. “I was in the 10th grade and the station agent got a telegram for me to go to Regina to try out for the professional team up there. I went up, made the team, come back and quit school. Oh, boy, you should have heard my dad. I’m gonna be a big hockey player, you know?” Ten days before his 18th birthday, as his hockey team was in the playoffs, his father informed Floyd that they were moving back to the U.S. “I said, ‘But Dad, I’m in the playoffs, I can’t leave!’ And he put his finger right on my nose and said ‘Son, get in the car NOW.’ And I got in the car.” Kennedy ended up working as an electrician at the Tacoma Todd Pacific shipyards, then was drafted into the 11th Airborne and shipped to Camp Mackall, North Carolina for his basic training, and started out training in gliders.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Above, Tonasket’s Floyd Kennedy, with his medals and souvenirs from battles with the Japanese during World War II, and pictures of his late wife, Betty. Top right, Kennedy in 1943; bottom right, Kennedy in 1953. “On maneuvers, gliders were break a seal where the needle ping in on our airstrip there. A lot crashing into the trees,” Kennedy would then be attached to the of guys were still in bed and they says. “One that I was in took off tube. killed a lot of the guys. Asked if he carried bandages, the wing, so after that a lot of “Anyway, we went in to kick us went into the paratroopers. Kennedy says, “We made our them off,” he added. When we went to New Guinea own little band-aids. We’d stretch Kennedy, the medic, went after they started a paratroop school the thing out and put tape along it two wounded men that were still and cut it to make our own. there, so that’s where I qualified. exposed, under a banana tree. “We never used “I went divgliders over the ing out there Pacific ... We were and got one not going to be of them and riding in no glidpulled him ers. They were in,” he says. just paper.” “Of course The 11th the machine Airborne was guns the transferred to Japanese had the Pacific in weren’t low mid-1944 and enough eleafter training for vation to get several months me. I dragged was judged comhim on out bat ready by and went November. back in to From there, get the other Kennedy says, he guy. (The saw 96 consecusecond man) tive days of comwas over 200 bat, primarily in pounds and I Leyti and Luzon only weighed in the Philippines, 145 pounds. I then served in yelled at this the United States’ guy to come occuaption force out and help in Okinawa. me. “They origi“He was nally were going yelling ‘They to parachute us were shootin (to Okinawa),” ing at me!’ Kennedy says. and I yelled “But they figured ‘Get out and we could fly in help me.’ So and occupy. he came out “We had 8,000 and we drug men in the 11th this other one Airborne. We in. One of his were (General eyes were D o u g l a s ) popped out. M a c A r t h u r ’s “A n y w a y, ‘secret weapon’ all years later the way through ... I was in the war. In Japan, Japan when I we were the was coming honor guard; just home sitting one group was the at breakfast, honor guard.” and this fella Twenty years was sitting later, Kennedy across from met MacArthur me looking while Kennedy at me. I said, was serving as ‘What are you Brent Baker/staff photo head of nursing looking at me service at Walter Floyd Kennedy (left) shows his World War II era medical kit to Michael for?’ Reed Army Stewart. “So we Medical Center. started talk“General ing about “It was primitive.” MacArthur was (a patient),” where we’d been, and he said, That one kit may have been ‘You little son of a gun. I was the he says. “I used to go make my rounds twice a day through the small, but Army medics carried guy that you called out under whole hospital. I’d go in to see a heavy load, as well as the same the machine gun to get this guy him and ask how things were risks as infantry in combat. out,’ he says. ‘You almost got me “”We were loaded,” Kennedy killed!’ going. I was always in whites. “This one weekend I was on says. “I was a combat medic. I had Kennedy’s Purple Heart came extra duty and I had a Class A two bandoliers of ammunition. from a shrapnel wound during a uniform on with the ribbons Four hand grenades. Two medi- mortar attack. and everything. I walked into his cal bags ... I’m telling you, I could “You know, we learned,” he room and he looked up at me hardly walk. says. “They would wound a guy “All us medics carried rifles somewhere and when the medic and, I says, ‘How are you this and .45s... (The Japanese) would went out to get them, they’d shoot morning General?’ “He looked at me and saw the wound the man in the trail, and the medic. (So) we’d dive out, 11th Airborne patch. ‘Sergeant,’ when the medic came up to help grab the guy and roll him.” he says, ‘You were one of my them, they’d shoot the medics. We lost two medics that way.” men.’ The flag and pistol A combination of being con“He died a couple of days later. Kennedy’s display of medals stantly in the line of fire, hap- is most impressive, but he takes I’ll never forget it.” penstance and courage brought obvious pride in the Japanese flag Kennedy face to face with the and pistol that adorn the wall of Life of an Army medic Kennedy still has a medical kit, situation that ended with him his entryway, along with pictures stained with sweat, that includes being awarded the Bronze Star, of his late wife, Betty. 1940s-era suture clamps, needles for acts of heroism in combat. “One early morning they “We were at the edge of a lake,” pulled a Banzai (a Japanese suiand other tools of the trade. “We had (drugs such as) diaz- Kennedy says. Early one morn- cide attack) on us. We set up our ine and syrettes of morphine,” ing, C47s came flying over the 75 howitzers and machine guns Kennedy says. A syrette was top of us down the line. The to fire over top. We must have similar to modern-day Superglue paratroopers dropped out. They killed 200 or more of them. tubes, with a wire loop pin to were Japanese paratroopers drop“Me being a medic, (I) went

out to make sure everybody was dead. I ran across this officer, and there was a little tag on his helmet. I took his helmet off and he had this battle scrag in his helmet. I got his sword, I got his pistol, but I didn’t get the holster.” He pointed out a nasty feature of the pistol that proved deadly to Allied soldiers even while Japanese soldiers were supposedly surrendering. “See this little bar?” he asks. “They can fire the pistol with that (without squeezing the trigger). They would hand it over, and could press that.” “I’ve had it for years, but no one could translate the writing on the flag. A friend of mine in Seattle happened to run across a person who could translate stuff. So I have some of the translation

“General MacArthur looked at me and saw the 11th Airborne patch. ‘Sergeant,’ he says, ‘You were one of my men.’ ” Floyd Kennedy, World War II Veteran

in there. They wanted me to put it in a museum, but I’m going to pass it down to my family.”

After the War Though he originally intended to be done with the Army after coming back from the war, Kennedy eventually re-enlisted and spent a total of 20 years in the service. “I had some friends out at Madigan (Army Medical Center in Tacoma) and I went out to see them. And this Chinese guy told me, ‘You know you should go back in the service. Look at all these guys walking around here in their whites doing nothing.’ “I went down to headquarters and told them what’s going on and re-enlisted. Stayed at Madigan for a few years, then went to Hawaii for a couple of years.” It also allowed Kennedy to continue playing hockey with a U.S. Army team, leading his league in scoring for two years. Most memorable was a playoff series against an Air Force team from Alaska. “I picked an all star team out of the whole league and we played (the first game) in Portland,” he says. “They beat us 1-0. I wasn’t playing because I had an injured shoulder. So I watched every player and their goalie all the way through to find their weaknesses. “We played them in Tacoma the next night and beat them 13-1.”

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He went on to work at the University of Washington in biochemistry research for Dr. Eugene Krebs, who went on to win a Nobel Prize in medicine in 1992. Kennedy worked for Krebs for a total of 22 years, including a stint at the University of California at Davis. “I had retired,” Kennedy says. “(One morning) at 5:00 the phone rang. I picked it up and his secretary (identified herself). And I said ‘He won the Nobel Prize.’ And she said, ‘He sure did.’ What a party we had.” Floyd and Betty Kennedy boosted their income by buying, improving and reselling homes. “We’d go into the best neighborhood and buy the worst house,” he says. “We’d fix it up, sell it and make money on it. Buy another one, sell it. Sixteen houses, somewhere around there. “Anyway, I needed a tax writeoff. My brother in law Ray Corey, he was at the ranch over here. He says, why don’t you come on over and buy an orchard?” The property for sale was on the northeast flank of Whitestone Mountain, where he still lives today. “I’d never walked through it,” Kennedy says. “We bought this acreage (anyway), but that wasn’t enough. So I opened a restaurant, the Country Fair restaurant, back of the Gull Station. I had that for 10 years.” He actually ran the restaurant while still working in Seattle. “Betty would pick me up Friday afternoon and drive all the way over here, then Sunday afternoon we’d drive all the way back,” Kennedy says. “That diesel Cadillac out there has 300,000 miles on it after 10 years of driving back and forth.” Kennedy was also the first to purchase a plaque at Tonasket’s U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Project site. “I was in New Guinea, Leyti, Luzon, Okinawa, Japan and Korea,” says Floyd Kennedy, who turns 90 in April. “And I’m still here.” The author would like to thank Michael Stewart for arranging and facilitating the interview upon which this story is based. Advertisement

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Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Schools

Oroville pair among spelling bee regional qualifiers By Jennifer Witherbee Washington Apple Education Foundation

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket ag instructor Matt Deebach and senior Grace Maldonado, along with recent alumni Haley Bayless and KB Kochsmeier, recently received their national certification for parliamentarians from the Society for Agriculture Education Parliamentarians.

Tonasket FFA gears up for stretch run Six alumni receive American FFA Degrees By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The Tonasket FFA has spent a busy winter competing in a number of local events, preparing for district and state-level competitions on tap for this spring, completing applications for various state degrees and proficiency awards and, of course, reaping the rewards that have come from some recent past performances. The most significant awards were received by six alumni, who received the 2012 American FFA Degree. Less than one half of one percent of FFA members were awarded the degree, which goes to FFA members who have been out of high school for at least a year. Shelby Olma, Corbin Moser, Jessica Spear, Haley Bayless, Flor Maldonado and Elizabeth Cleman were Tonasket’s six recipients. The state of Washington had 40 American FFA Degree recipients, giving Tonasket 15 percent of the statewide total.

“That’s a pretty good percentage, especially when you think about the total FFA membership,” said Tonasket ag instructor Matt Deebach. “There’s 8-900 kid in the northern part of our district and 1,500-2,000 that attend the state convention alone.” Deebach, Grace Maldonado, Bayless and KB Kochsmeier received their national certification for parliamentarians from the Society for Agriculture Education Parliamentarians (SAEP). “We were inducted and the kids are registered under that society and are certificated,” Deebach said. “It’s pretty neat, especially with Grace still being a senior.” Deebach said that certification required a test score of at least 80 percent, which was partly a multiple choice exam and partly a research exam using the voluminous Robert’s Rules of Order. “You really had to know that book,” he said. Deebach said that 12 of his students have submitted applications for state degrees and proficiency awards, about double that of last year, as well as eight proficiency award winners for their individual categories.

“We won’t know until the state convention which awards they get,” he said. “They did pass the district approval, so now they’re to the final state approval, which I anticipate they should all get.” Meanwhile, his students have competed at shop contests in Brewster, Bridgeport and Manson (though they have not yet received results) and a number of trap shoot competitions. “We’ve been getting fourth place as a team for every shoot we’ve been to,” said Wyatt O’Brien. “Just by a bird or two every time. “It’s been the same three above us every time. Omak has been winning, and Colville and Kettle Falls have been going back and forth between second and third. The top three is what we’re shooting for.” The highlight of the season thus far has been Tonasket’s eight shooters winning eight individual trophies at the Kettle Falls shoot. “We’ve got a lot of new shooters; it’s been a good run so far,” Deebach said. “It’s been a real busy winter. Sub-districts are coming up and things are really going to be heating up for us soon.”

WENATCHEE - Fifty-six students from Chelan, Douglas, Grant and Okanogan counties have advanced to the North Central Washington (NCW) Regional Spelling Bee.  Fourth- through eighthgrade students competed in local spelling bees with the top two students from each school building advancing to the regional event.  The NCW Regional Collaborative Spelling Bee will occur at 6 pm on Thursday, March 21st at Eastmont Junior High School in East Wenatchee.  The regional spelling bee is open to the public at no charge.  The NCW Regional Collaborative Spelling Bee feeds into the Scripps National Spelling Bee.  The first place finisher in the NCW Regional Collaborative Spelling Bee will advance to the national round in Washington DC later this spring.  The Washington Apple Education Foundation (WAEF) is the sponsor of the North Central Washington Regional Collaborative Spelling Bee. Okanogan County qualifiers include: Fourth grade students: Kiaya Natrall & Hannah Schneider, East Omak Elementary School; Lindsay Worrell, Methow Valley Elementary School, Winthrop; Mykensie Hugus, Oroville Elementary

School; and Blake Richter, Virginia Grainger Elementary School, Okanogan. Fifth grade students: Sheridan Blasey, Oroville Elementary School; and Anthony Olson, Virginia Grainger Elementary School, Okanogan. Sixth grade students: Cailin Chandler, Methow Valley Elementary School, Winthrop; and Ashley Blakemore, Omak Middle School. Seventh grade student: Teresita Aragon, Okanogan Middle School; and Roniah Freidland, Paschal Sherman Indian School, Omak. Eighth grade students: Mason Duke, Okanogan Middle School; Nathaniel Bigwolf, Paschal Sherman Indian School, Omak; and Brandon Cate, Omak Middle School. The Washington Apple Education Foundation (WAEF) is the charity of the tree fruit industry. Founded in 1994, WAEF coordinates, promotes and develops charitable activities reflecting tree fruit industry member priorities. The organization is best known for its scholarship program. In 2012 WAEF awarded over $450,000 in scholarship aid to students raised in tree fruit industry communities. For more information on WAEF or the NCW Regional Spelling Bee, contact the WAEF office at (509) 663-7713 or visit www.waef.org.

NO HOLDS BARRED

Brent Baker/staff photo

It was just for fun, but it was awfully competitive, too. Tonya Nelson, for her senior project, organized a 3-on-3 basketball tournament on Monday, Feb. 18 that brought in 14 teams for a day of action at Tonasket High School. The Okanogan 3/4 and T-Town Ballers teams emerged victorious, as did Nelson, who was able to attract a small army of volunteers to help out.

HONOR ROLLS Tonasket High School Seniors

Honor Rebecca Biernacki, 4.000; Claire Thornton, 4.000; Wyatt O’Brien, 3.950; Megan Beyers, 3.940; Sierra Hughes, 3.883; Tashia West, 3.833; Jesus Alvarez, 3.783; Karlie Henneman, 3.783; Derek Rimestad, 3.783; Dustee Sapp, 3.783; Kelly Cruz, 3.733; Sadie Long, 3.733; Lynn Hendrix, 3.717; Dalton Wahl, 3.617; Jessica Puente Arroyo, 3.600; Alicia Edwards, 3.550; Jessica Christopherson, 3.500; Devin Hamilton, 3.500; Breanna Howell, 3.500; Grace Maldonado, 3.500. Merit David Williams, 3.450; Ameerah Cholmondeley, 3.391; Sarina McBride, 3.350; Zachary Zanoni, 3.317; Quinn Mirick, 3.283; Raven Goudeau, 3.267; Ivan Rios, 3.133; Courtney Jones, 3.125; Tonya Nelson, 3.067; Emily Mills, 3.060.

Juniors

Honor Savannah Clinedinst, 4.000; Sara Holan, 4.000; Leslie Iniguez, 4.000; Norma Ramos, 4.000; Jamie Wilson, 4.000; Brisa Leep, 3.950; Lupita Ornelas, 3.950; Cassandra Spear, 3.900; Elizabeth Jackson, 3.833; Daniela Capote, 3.783; Makalapua Goodness, 3.783; Anna Chavez, 3.767; Kjeld Williams, 3.767; Kaitlyn Gildroy-MacGregor, 3.733; Sarah Green, 3.733; Amber Monroe, 3.733; Kathryn Cleman, 3.717; Diante Haney Williamson, 3.667; Marcelino Ruiz-Martell, 3.667; Yazmin Cervantes Orozco, 3.633; Amanda Johnson, 3.617; Norma Ornelas, 3.600; Selena Cosino, 3.567; Christa McCormick, 3.500; Chance Stucker, 3.500.

Merit Trevor Terris, 3.400; Kaleb Cholmondeley, 3.350; Tucker Pardue, 3.320; Parker Kenyon, 3.283; Abigail Gschiel, 3.267; Lindsay Rhodes, 3.167; Pete Valentine, 3.167; Madison Villalva, 3.167; Baylie Tyus, 3.133; Kenneth Freese, 3.117; Lawrence Njoroge, 3.117; Leslie Peralta-Moreno, 3.050; Jair Chavez, 3.000; Tyler Farver, 3.000; Michael Goudeau 3.000.

Sophomores

Honor Jesse Holan, 4.000; Colton Leep, 4.000; Alexander Mershon, 4.000; Kallie Mirick, 4.000; Mary Naylor, 4.000; Abraham Podkranic, 4.000; Aspen Verhasselt, 4.000; Conner Williams, 4.000; Antonio Sanchez Jimenez, 3.950; Abran Alvarez, 3.860; Yejee Jeong, 3.833; Hilda Celestino, 3.783; Anna St. Martin, 3.767; Devyn Catone, 3.740; Dalton Smith, 3.740; Yessica Gomez Chavez, 3.733; Alissa Young, 3.717; Brooke Nelson, 3.667; Cheyenne Rainey, 3.667; Lucas Vugteveen, 3.667; Tallulah Rietveld, 3.660; Elvira Alvarez, 3.567; Dimitriy Holubovych, 3.567; Jesse Manring, 3.567; Allison Glanzer, 3.520; Smith Condon, 3.500. Merit Daniela Bravo, 3.450; Travis Deggeller, 3.433; Tiffany Ferdon, 3.400; Charlie Sanchez, 3.400; Chad Edwards, 3.383; Austin Knowlton, 3.383; Shoshanna Thomas-McCue, 3.383; James Coleman, 3.367; Amber Burton, 3.360; Timmarica Spellman, 3.320; Rosemary Luna, 3.283; Haley Montkowski, 3.260; Carlos Moreno, 3.233; Brock Henneman, 3.217; Frank Holfeltz, 3.200; Blake Ash, 3.183; Esmeralda Cano, 3.080;

Preview 2013

Darbee Sapp, 3.067; Michael Timm, 3.067; Maria Salas Ramirez, 3.060; Sydney Nielsen, 3.050; Esgar Mendez, 3.017; Jensen Sackman, 3.017; Timothy FrazierLeslie, 3.000; Cesar Reynoso, 3.000.

Freshmen

Honor Madeleine Graham, 4.000; Rade Pilkinton, 4.000; Rachel Silverthorn, 4.000; Omar Calderon, 3.950; Pablo Chavez, 3.950; Jordan Hughes, 3.950; Kasey Nelson, 3.950; Treven Nielsen, 3.850; Baillie Hirst, 3.833; Leighanne Barnes, 3.783; Janelle Catone, 3.783; Cayden Field, 3.667; Bryden Hires, 3.617; Ulyses Morales, 3.617; Alexee Howell, 3.600; Hugo Sanchez Jimenez, 3.567; Rosared Walts, 3.550; Vanessa Pershing, 3.500. Merit Daisy Alcauter, 3.450; Micala Arnesen, 3.400; Ashley King, 3.400; Esmeralda Flores, 3.333; Jonathan Freese, 3.333; Cade Hockett, 3.333; Corrina Karrer, 3.333; Sarah Quinlan, 3.317; Dallin Good, 3.217; Jevonti Haney Williamson, 3.183; Nancy Ramirez Medina, 3.100; Madison Bayless, 3.083; Kyra Whiting, 3.050; Christian Garcia Herrera, 3.017.

Tonasket Middle School Eighth Grade

Top Honors (4.0) Elijah Antonelli and Tawan Murray. Honor Roll with Distinction (3.703.99) Lorena Cervantes, Irey Hamilton, Thomas Kennedy, Seth Smith, and Hunter Swanson. Honor Roll (3.00-3.69)

Brenden Asmussen, Zion Butler, Taundra Chaska-Webber, Beau Cork, Samantha Ehrhard, Victor Flores, Vance Frazier-Leslie, Timothy Freese, Brianna Hollister, Cheyan KinKade, Adrian Mendoza, Ally Mershon, Amanda Padilla, Wyatt Pershing, Salvador Ramos, Teran Rollins, Lucas Scott, Bonnie Siegfried, Conner Timm, Gustavo Valdez, Jewel Vanderwaal, Jacob Villalva, Katlen Wagner, Lexie Wahl, and Devin Walton.

Seventh Grade Top Honors (4.0) Nicole Juarez Zelaya and Chyna Kinkade. Honor Roll with Distinction (3.703.99) Megan Bolich, Zachary Clark, Rycki Cruz, Mikah Haney Williamson, Katie Henneman, Elsbeth Hjaltason, Kyle Holborn, Justin McDonald, Riley Morris, Taylon Pilkinton, Jesus Ramirez, Jesse Ramon, Morgan Tyus, and Camille Wilson. Honor Roll (3.00-3.69) Griselda Alvarez-Torres, Darren Bowers, Sydney Breshears, Chadwick Bretz, Cinthya Calderon, Madyson Clark, Madeliene Close, Elijah Harris, Meri Hirst, Maya Holmes, Hayley Larson, Rodrigo Ornelas, Maria Polito-Vazquez, Erin Quinlan, Sergy Salas Ramirez, Joseph Schell, James Silverthorn, Logan Thompson, Alina Vlahovich, Brooklynn Ward, Ruby White, Myhe Williams, and Jacob Wilson.

Sixth Grade

Top Honors (4.0) Ellie Alberts, Tianna Alley, Ethan Castrejon, Eric Owsley and Garrett Wilson.

Diehl, Teigan Field, Mitchell Fitzthum, Aerolynn Geddes, Christopher Goddard, Israel Gomez, Natalie Gomez, Vanessa Gronlund, Evan Harris, Elizabeth Hylton, Eyleen Jimenez-Garcia, Madilynn Larson, Missy Martinez Zelaya, Shiann McCallum, Melissa Morales-Legaspi, Anahi Ortiz, Alexandria Perez, Esmeralda Pineda, Juan Puente, Rene Ramirez, Sarah Rhoads, James Rothrock, Axel Salas Ramirez, Jared Savage, Levi Silverthorn, Ethan Smith, Anthony Starkey, Adam Steinshouer, Ian Vanatta, Keann Wilson, and Brandon Wirth.

Honor Roll with Distinction (3.703.99) Kaylee Bobadilla, Dawson Bretz, Cassidy Caddy, Abigail Duchow, Christopher Freese, Brianna Gutierrez-Carbajal, Caeleb Hardesty, Riley Haug, Maya Johann, Jordan Thrasher, Quincy Vassar, Megan West, and Austin Wood. Honor Roll (3.00-3.69) Marlene Aparicio Pena, Ryker Ayers, Julianna Bello Moreno, Aniya Brown, Jovany Calderon, Bautista Chavez, Carla CorralesRubio, Cheyenne Davey, Cora

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FEBRUARY 28, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

School safety means changing some old habits

If there’s one thing the short lockdown at Oroville Elementary last week hammers home is it’s that our schools are no longer places community members can just drop in on and wander the halls. They really haven’t been for a long time, but recent school shootings have resulted in more safeguards at all our schools. Remember when school safety meant “no running in the halls” or being a student crossing guard? And in the old days people visiting or picking up their kids after school would just go in any of the unlocked side doors that was closest to their student’s classroom. It was that way growing up in Oroville and stayed that way, albeit to a much lesser extent, until recently. Parents and visitors have been required to check into the buildings office for a dozen years or more, but enforcement, was somewhat lax in the past. Now, and rightly so, you must check in first. It makes sense, but again reinforces a loss of innocence due to a few bad actors who have made most everyone hyper-vigilant when it comes to the safety of our schools. The lockdown was triggered at the end of Out of January when someone in the hallway at the My Mind Oroville Elementary wouldn’t say whether he Gary A. DeVon had checked in at the office. The principal informed the Oroville Police Department and a lockdown took place while she, staff and the police did a thorough search of the building. Meanwhile an “all call” alert went out to all those parents who had filled out the forms saying they wanted to be informed in such situations. There are many legitimate reasons for being in a school building – besides the obvious parents and guardians, there are people like members of the HOSTS mentor program – and many others who have cause to visit our schools. It really shouldn’t be that much to go through proper procedure and check in at the office. It’s little to ask so that the kids and staff can feel safe and not have to be disrupted by things like lockdowns when someone, who probably had no ill intent, breaks the rules. It also saves parents and loved ones the anxiety of an “All Call” alert because someone couldn’t be bothered to check in. The chairman of the school board was right to be upset when, without getting the facts first, some people had posted on Facebook that the principal wasn’t concerned about the incident and that the police had not been called in. It seems, from what was reported at last Monday’s school board meeting, that proper procedure was followed and the principal was concerned about her students’ safety. Knowing Joan Hoehn, it would be hard to believe otherwise. And we’re sure that the Oroville Police Department treated the incident with all the seriousness it deserved. Why people would use social media to spread malicious rumors, especially when it concerns our children’s safety, still escapes us. However, while Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and all the other social media have a legitimate purpose, often times they are used for grudges, rather than good. Let’s hope this was just the case of some bad information getting out of hand and next time the facts will be checked before the criticisms leveled.

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE, TONASKET & OKANOGAN COUNTY

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Cut back on the foreign aid Dear Gary, I have been thinking about all of this hullabaloo about sequestration. I checked on the internet to find that our United States Government send annually to some 25 foreign countries, a total of $745,950,000,000. This is $745,950 Billion. The last country listed is Lesotho. Where in the world is Lesotho and why do we send them $4,400,000 every year? The number 1 foreign country to receive our help is the United Kingdom to the tune of $12,460,000,000; Canada $3,900,000,000; Ireland $1,022,000,000 and so on. It seems to me that we could give them a 10 percent cut and have some $74,595,000,000.00 to be kept in our treasury to bring some aid to our our citizens and let these other countries try to cover this loss on their own. Something is wrong with our leaders, in my opinion, that they can’t try this to help solve our failing economy. Can someone give me an intelligent answer? Thank you, Clayton Emry Oroville

We’re the bosses, not outsiders Dear Editor, I am writing to address hospital CEO Ms. Michels’ most recent unprofessional, not so subtle, complaint regarding the community asking questions of district management, as well as her reference to us as outsiders in the 1/4/13 CEO written report stating “No one from the outside can understand this business like we do.” Aside from Civics 101 realities that public employees and elected official are ultimately accountable to the community they serve, we are the governing body that has, or should have, ultimate decision making authority. We have generations long history of being actively involved in our community hospital district, as is our right. Throughout these generations our families

COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

75 YEARS AGO: February 18-25, 1938: Winter set in in earnest at Oroville during the past couple weeks, with the heaviest snows in years for several days past. The Molson-Chesaw country has been snowed in with several feet of snow and all roads blocked. No mail going through either way since the first of the week. The Ellemeham Mountain roads and Similkameen are also reported blocked with snow. The roads up and down the valley have been kept open and at present there is around 16 inched of snow on the level in the valley. During the month of January, 17 regular hunters paid from Federal and State funds, along with five cooperative state game protectors, took some 300 coyotes, seven bobcats and two badgers, a total of 309. The coyote population in most sections has been reduced to the wise old breeders and although the catch for the next months will not be large, every coyote taken will materially affect the next year’s crop. The new De Luxe Ford V-8 is delivered to Oroville, including equipment, for $876.43. The price is for the De Luxe 85 H.P. Tudor Sedan and includes transportation, taxes, (except state sales tax) and all of the following: 2 bumpers, 4 bumper guards, 2 taillights, 2 windshield wipers, 2 sun visors, 2 electric air horns, 1 cigar lighter, 3 ash trays, spare wheel, tire tube and lock, glove compartment, lock and clock, headlight beam indicator, De Luxe steering wheel, and rustless wheelbands, heat indicator and built in luggage compartment. Nighthawk News: All good things come to those who wait and that is just what happened Tuesday when the children celebrated Valentine’s Day a week late. From a pretty box, decorated appropriately for the occasion, Joe Allemandi and Glee Sullivan found valentines for each child. A large cake with

have been and continue to be born there, healed there, work there, volunteer there, many have passed there and all financially support it in one way or another. This is and always has been our community hospital system. While I understand she’s not from around here, if Ms. Michel did some homework she would see that when administration and the commissioners did their job and accurately reported to the community they serve, we have stepped up and done our job. Likewise, it is our job to step in and hold them accountable for not doing their jobs. Some examples: The inability to produce a detailed accounting; info that should have been readily available if it had been being closely scrutinized to avoid the damages done. Blatantly withholding information that is detrimental to our decision making rights. Deciding to cut services needed in our community without involving the governing community. Lying about activities that are or are not being performed, i.e. construction Creating atmosphere that is adversarial to the very community they serve and report to. This seriously violates the trust of those who employ you.And though she maybe oblivious to the fact, there are many, many people in our community that have decades of working knowledge of the healthcare system in several different areas, including administration. In conclusion, if more time was spent involving and working with the community they serve, instead of shoving us “outside,”

working against us or throwing mud at us, we could have avoided the community losses and found solutions as we have in the past. Jarred Naclerio Oroville

Just want to find viable solutions

Dear Editor, Statement on Scope of Concerned Citizens for Tonasket Assisted Living (CCTAL): It has come to the urgent attention of the community group, The Concerned Citizens for Tonasket Assisted Living, that there have been statements made by hospital management that this citizens’ group wants to shut down North Valley Hospital. That statement is absolutely untrue! On Tuesday morning Feb. 5, two members of the community group met with Board Chair Helen Casey to receive the Board’s response letter to the community’s request to rescind the decision to close the AL made at the previous board meeting. At this February 5th meeting, it was specifically stated directly to Helen Casey by both community members present that the group was not asking the Board to keep the Assisted Living open and close the hospital - rather we want them both to stay open. It has taken several generations of community families to build up the local healthcare system to the services it provides today. The Assisted Living facility is a vital piece of that healthcare system, as well as to the viability of the nursing home, clinics, and ultimately the hospital.

ITEMS FROM THE PAST eight candles, honoring Patrick Sullivan, was cut and served with dessert. Because the basketball season is over for Molson this year, a special assembly was held to honor the boys and their coach. Several yells were given by the entire high school. Mr. Chiotti gave a talk on the possibilities of the team next year. Although Molson didn’t come out with any high scores, this season has been good practice. Watch out for Molson next year.

50 YEARS AGO: February 21-28, 1963: Northwest Wholesale Incorporated, will celebrate the completion of a quarter of a century of serving the fruit growers of the Pacific Northwest, at their annual meeting in Wenatchee Tuesday, February 26, said L. B. Wooton, the organization’s president. “We have come a long way,” Wooton continued, “since our three charter members put up five hundred hard earned dollars and all of our business records were filed in one wooden apple box.” Chamber of Commerce members at their regular meeting Tuesday took action on two items which involve citizens of this area. Their first action was taken when they voted not to sponsor a float to be entered in the Wenatchee Festival this year. It was felt by the members that the money and time that would have to be spent on a float could be used to more advantage on other projects in the city. The Oroville Hornets will end their basketball season tonight against the league-leading Omak Pioneers. Seniors Larry Kusler, Dennis Short and Ted Landreth will play their final games for Oroville as the Hornets go on the maples tonight to upset the Pioneers. This was a disappointing weekend for the Hornets losing two games by a total of three points. In Friday night’s game

with Okanogan, two free throws by Greg Ledgerwood, with eight seconds remaining, sent the Bulldogs into a 53-50 lead. Wayne Scott tipped in the final bucket as the buzzer sounded to narrow the score to 53-53. The Old Poland China Mine mill will be burned Friday at 4 p.m. because of the dangerous condition. It was built in 1907. The roof is caving in and is dangerous for sightseers as well as cattle, since it is located in a pasture. Cascade Market (now Frontier Market) grocery ads: Ground Beef, $39 per #; Bacon, 2# for $.98; Tall tins pineapple, 4 for $1.00; Carrots, 2# for $.15; Bananas, 2# for $.25. Prince’s IGA: 10# sugar, $.88; Tomatoes, 3 pack tubes, $.19 each; Radishes or green onions, 2 for $.05. Tuesday evening, Feb. 26, the local P.T.A celebrated its 38th year of service to American youth and to the local community. Local Weather for the week of February 20-26: Feb. 20, 53 degrees maximum and 30 degrees minimum; Feb. 21, 42 and 27; Feb. 22, 37 and 32; Feb, 23, 40 and 32; Feb. 24, 50 and 22; Feb. 25, 49 and 25 and Feb. 26, 57 and 40. Precipitation of .09 moisture recorded on Feb. 26.

25 YEARS AGO: February 18 - 25, 1988: Words of surprise issued from the lips of two North County couples last week when they were informed they had been chosen the “Valentines Couples” of the Year for Oroville and Tonasket. Paul And Agnes Fedderson of Tonasket and Cecil and Annie Holmes of Oroville, received the news of their selection. Judges from Oroville, selected the Tonasket couple and Tonasket judges made the selection for Oroville. The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District’s proposed water storage in Palmer Lake, continues to draw concerns from area residents such as the mem-

The Concerned Citizens of the Tonasket Assisted Living group believes that the Board’s decision to close the Assisted Living has already negatively affected North Valley Hospital and the local healthcare system. The closure has caused great stress and family grief to move their loved ones out of the area and has broken the trust of the taxpayers who supported this hospital district. The closure of the Assisted Living will have a very significant impact on the current and future economy of our entire serving area. It has always been the expressed desire of this group to come to the table with our elected board to find viable solutions to keep all of our healthcare services local for now and the future; whether it be a change in management and/or operations, or to have it operated by other means. This Community needs to be heard. Our elderly population and their families have invested a great deal into the hospital district and they deserve to keep their care “Close to Home.” which is becoming even more apparent with the closure of other Assisted Living Facilities across the state. The Concerned Citizens for Tonasket Assisted Living is very aware of the importance of all our healthcare services and we are thankful for it every day. We are also grateful for and highly value the many employees who live and work in the hospital district who provide the care to our patients and residents and the lives they save every day. Concerned Citizens for Tonasket Assisted Living Tonasket ber of PLARA. (Palmer Lake Area Residents Association). This organization raised several questions at the Tonasket Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday. They will be meeting again next Tuesday night at the special Oroville Chamber of Commerce meeting at the Old Depot at 7:30 p.m. lt was announced at last Tuesday, Feb. 9, school board meeting, that the Oroville District had gotten approval for a Student Retention and Retrieval Program. The program gives the district $16,524.00 in state funds to study why students drop out, to help prevent drop outs and try to get drop outs back into the education system. At the Feb. 16 meeting of the Tonasket Chamber of Commerce, more than 33 people attended to see the passing of the Okanogan County Centennial flag. This was done in conjunction with Okanogan County celebrating the 100th anniversary. The passing of the flag came when Viola McLeish unfolded it and presented it to Tonasket Mayor Pro-Tem, Chet Williams, who thanked the Centennial Committee on behalf of the Town of Tonasket. Nineteen students at Oroville High School, are learning the German language and familiarizing themselves with Germanic customs before they travel to Germany in August. After the Oroville students come back from their trip to Germany, a group of German students will come to Oroville to attend O.H.S. The Oroville students will stay with host families in Uelzen and the German students will stay with host families while here in Oroville. Real Estate for sale: Immaculate 2 story home on 2/3 acre, including some apple trees. 1 1/2 miles east of Oroville. 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, office, kitchen with appliances and wood stove. 3 car garage with shop including 220 power. Nicely landscaped with new irrigation system. $55,000.


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Basketball ending, ready for Mariners We’ve finished off two months of the 2013 calendar, with very little accomplished, at our house. To set the record straight: Mary K. Moran has not changed her name back to Kernan. I did that for her. Sorry, Mary. Sometimes old brains get stuck in the past. And she is still in the care center but does have a couple of ladies lined up to help her when she returns to her own home The long holiday weekend was one filled with new experiences. Yes, you can still have them, even at our age. We had dinner with our youngest daughter, her husband, their three daughters and their companions, at the Crab Pot, on the waterfront in Seattle. All kinds of seafood dumped on the table with a wooden board for a plate and a wooden hammer to crack shells. It was kinda messy, but very good and a lot of fun. Afterward we attended the 5th Avenue Theatre and spent a delightful evening seeing “The Music Man.” On a sad note is that aunt Ellen Roberts took a tumble ending up with sore spots, but no broken bones. Hopefully time will take care of things with the aid of a few pain pills. Unlike some, she doesn’t whine and complain, just goes along with

the flow. Perhaps that is why she has had such a good LONG life of 102 and threequarter years. Also, our Brazilian boy, Marco Louback, emailed that his had passed THIS & THAT father away. He was such Joyce Emry a vibrant, seemingly healthy fellow that it came as a real surprise. Live each day to the fullest...it just might be your last one. Our motto at the Senior Citizens is, “Eat dessert first. Life is uncertain”. Another reminder that the Red Cross blood draw is to be held at the United Methodist Church, March 6, 2013. Time: 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. First buttercups of the season have been found, and of course the pansies, primroses and other early flowering varieties were prevalent in Seattle. Also, some trees are just waiting to burst forth with green. Remember Dick and Marilyn Smith that had the Cascade Market during the

1970’s? It was their son Kevin, who had his life snuffed out by a drunken driver (editor’s note: police reports say the driver of the car that hit Kevin’s truck was under the influence of meth) in Spokane, recently. Kevin leaves a wife and family, and a promising career behind. The driver will probably have a few months without a license and a few dollars fine and then go on with his life, while Kevin is gone forever. What a shame! While we’re reminiscing… remember “Rinky” Fritz? He called to say that his cousin, Gail Sanborn, had a stroke and is hospitalized in Good Samaritan Health Center, 702 N. 16th Ave., Yakima, WA 98902. Afflictions that are slow in improving are his speech. A card to let him know “you care” would be most appropriate. It is amazing how far the G-T reaches and a card from a friend or classmate can have good healing qualities, just when you thought no one remembers. (As for Rinky…I’m sure he has another name, but like me and my “Boots’ nickname, most people would not know who was being referred to.) On March 15, the annual talent and silent auction, sponsored by the Dollars for Scholars group, will be held at the high school commons. Items for auction are being welcomed. (See Glenna Hauenstien). Also see a related article in the paper explaining the reason for the name change of the association. It is now being called the Oroville Scholarship Foundation. Funds from this group have assisted a goodly number of students to help further their education. Recently, while having dinner in

Wenatchee, we met up with and had a good visit with Marilyn Jo (Parker) Imhoff, Allen and I forget her present name. Oh! now I remember, it is McClelland. Her brother Dale and sister Marjorie still live in the state, not too far away. Al Robinson was to have surgery (or some sort of treatment) for his foot last week. He told me he’d been through three battles in World War II and not in as much discomfort as he’d had with this foot/leg, so we hope he has been helped by this time. Did you know that Daylight Savings Time begins March 10? And that Easter Sunday is the 31st of March? Twenty-first St. was thoroughly swept with the big machine the city has acquired. They went backward and forward, multiple times, making a clean sweep. I’m sure the crew has their work cut out for them, for a while, as there are many “chug holes” on many of the streets. A phone call to Glen and Juanita Waggy finds them anxious for more signs of spring and perhaps by then Juanita will be able to be out and about, as she does seem to be improving. It has been a long winter for them, health wise. There are a goodly number of folks in our community that are facing surgeries, procedures and treatments in the next ten days or so. Among them are Evelyn Frazier, Ed Craig, Bob and Margaret Hirst, Shirley Moser, Jim Chittenden and others that slip my mind just now. Also Peggy Wall is still having uncomfortable days (from dizziness) and some

Sunday potlucks start at Center in March

WHOSE HOUSE?

By Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

Beverly Holden let me know that the Sunday potlucks would start again on the second Sunday of March, which is the 10th. Only one potluck per month to start with. Other Sundays it will be

days doesn’t feel like company but a card would be nice. Keep these folks in your thoughts and prayers, with wishes for speedy recoveries. A drive to Penticton took us to another production at the “Many Hats Theatre.” Not one of our favorite performances but still a nice afternoon with friends. On our return we saw the horned sheep along the highway with their white behinds shining. Lance and Vicki Haney returned from Snohomish, where they stayed with three little grandsons while Justin and Becky, the parents, enjoyed some sunshine in Mexico, during the recent Presidential holidays. Have you ever been so busy that you didn’t know if you’d found a rope or lost your horse? I think that is the position that Pastor Leon Alden found himself in this week, keeping up with two churches, memorials and the many other duties that go along with being a minister. Isn’t he supposed to be retired? Another wedding is coming up in the Chris and Doreen (Ripley) Clemans household, when the “other twin,” Elizabeth, gets married. Basketball season is coming to a close, with Gonzaga University having had a fantastic year. Now what will I watch to keep my adrenaline flowing? Oh! yes, Mariner’s baseball. If they ever win a game, I’ll let you know. Congratulations to the two lovely girls that were chosen to represent May Day festivities.

OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZEN NEWS cards and snacks. It was certainly good to see Glen and Juanita Waggy at the card games this Sunday. Juanita is feeling much better and said it was good to get out of the house for a change.

The new chairs have arrived and as soon as they have been inventoried they will be put to use. Juanita Waggy told me of a scene behind Zosel Mill last week in which 18 eagles were lined up on the bank of the river and each took turns diving to get a fish. It must have been quite a sight . Pinochle scores for Feb. 23 are: The door prize was won by Larry Smith who was also high male scorer; Sally Eder won the most pinochles and Eunice Godwin was high score for the ladies. More next week.

WHAT COMES AROUND...

OBHS/submitted photo

The photograph above was taken up in Loomis in the early 1900s by HG Gregg. The big question being asked by the Okanogan Borderlands Historical Society is who owned the house? Do any of the readers know? Send answers by email to bdpetry@nvinet.com, the Borderland’ historian. The society also needs, just for the summer, a leather chair for use in an exhibit.

Denise Edwards EAGLEDOM benefit March 2 AT WORK By Gai Wisdom Eagles Auxiliary

Last Sunday the brothers and sisters got together to enjoy a Chili/Cornbread Cook-off and Broom-stick Pool. A very good time was had by all. Kevin Mathis cooked the very best chili and Wes Edwards brought the first place corn bread. All the food was very tasty and went well with a cold beverage and pool. Jackie Jameson took first place in our little tourney and Steve Mathis came in second. The general consensus was, It wasn’t easy but is sure was fun.

On Saturday, March 2nd, we will gather at the Oroville Aerie at 6 p.m. for an Indian Taco dinner and auction to benefit Denise Edwards. It looks like the valley got very well canvased and the auction items are many and varied. The love really shows. The ladies of the Auxilary will do the pies and cakes. Friends and family of Denise will be turning out the Indian Tacos in the kitchen. It doesn’t get better than that. All proceeds will go to help with her medical expenses while she takes cancer treatments in Wenatchee. Our men’s meetings are the

HILLTOP Pauline Waits COMMENTS benefit this Saturday By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

The Molson Grange Hall was buzzin’ last Sunday as one hundred pancake breakfast’s were served between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. not as many as the week before at the Ice Fishing Festival. Old friends were visiting with Old friends, and perhaps some were making new ones. Four lucky people went home with a Door Prize Basket from the Ladies Auxiliary Raffle. Those lucky winners were: Wanda Zacher, Lisa Chaplin, Janet Leslie and Bobbie Kosier. Congratulations, The next Pancake Feed will be on March 24th at 11am. The Highland Hooters (red hats) were active last week with a luncheon at Trino’s Mexican Restaurant in Oroville on Monday with 23

present, and on Saturday there were twenty seven at the Bingo Casino. They all had a good time. The next Casino date will be on Saturday, March 16. Now for the weekly Pinochle winners. The Low’s went to Len Firpo and Jan Harper, The High’s went to Jim Fry and Lani Thompson. The Traveling went to Boots Emry and the 5 week went to Ray Visser. There were 31 in attendance on Monday, Feb.

first and third Tuesdays of the month and the ladies meet on the second and fourth Tuesdays. Mondays are Taco Night, Wednesdays Pool Burgers Night, and Thursdays we play bingo and eat burgers and more. Friday is Steak Night, Meat Draw and Karaoke. Saturdays are when we do an Open Mike Night, excepting special events. Meat Draw will be every other Friday in February and March. This is temporary and we’ll be back on schedule soon. The dates for Meat Draw are Feb. 15th and March 1st, 15th and 29th. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what’s happening at your club and join in. As always, We Are People Helping People. 18. Don’t forget the Benefit Dinner for Pauline Waits on Saturday, March 2, from 4 p.m. – 7 p.m. This Dinner will be held in the Chesaw Community Building. Come and share some ham and scalloped potatoes, salad, green beans, a roll and apple crisp. The dinner committee is asking for a $10 donation. Mark your calendar and come be a part of this good will evening. There is also a bank account set up for Pauline Waits at the Wells Fargo Bank in Oroville. Donations may be made at any branch. See you there. Until next week.

509-476-3602

Submitted by Bertha Wandler

Each year the Tonasket Kiwanis Club gives to many youth projects including the Apple Hill Art Camp, and each year they receive a nice thank you card. But last year they had the pleasure of receiving a beautiful painting done by one of the students. Secretary Bertha Wandler and President Susannah Perry paid to have it professionally framed so it could be raffled off among the members to raise money for the Club Administrative Fund. While admiring the painting one of the members recognized the artist’s name and notified her about what the Kiwanis Club was doing. Surprised and delighted, Marsie Brazil paid a visit and viewed the painting she had done as a 10 year old.

Take Advantage of Higher IRA Contribution Limits FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

For the first time since 2008, contribution limits have risen for one of the most popular retirement savings vehicles available: the IRA. This means you’ve got a greater opportunity to put more money away for your “golden years.” Effective earlier this year, you can now put in up to $5,500 (up from $5,000 in 2012) to a traditional or Roth IRA when you make your 2013 contribution. And if you’re 50 or older, you can put in an additional $1,000 above the new contribution limit. Over time, the extra sums from the higher contribution limits can add up. Consider this example: If you put in $5,000 per year to an IRA for 30 years, and you earned a hypothetical 7% per year, you’d wind up with slightly over $505,000. But if you contributed $5,500 per year for those same 30 years, and earned that same 7% per year, you’d

accumulate almost $556,000 — about $51,000 IRA withdrawals, but by the time you do, you might be in a lower tax bracket. Furthermore, more than with the lower contribution limit. depending on your income level, some of your Keep in mind that if you have invested the contributions to a traditional IRA may be taxabove amounts in a traditional, tax-deferred deductible. (Roth IRA contributions are not IRA, you’ll be taxed on your withdrawals at deductible.) your ordinary income tax rate. With a Roth IRA, your contributions are made with after-tax Variety of investment options — You can invest funds, but your withdrawals have the potential your funds within your IRA in many types of to be tax-free — provided you’ve had your investments — stocks, bonds, certificates of account at least five years and don’t start taking deposit (CDs), U.S. Treasury securities and so withdrawals until you’re 59½. (Not everyone is on. In fact, within your IRA, you can create a eligible to contribute to a Roth IRA, as income mix of investments that are suitable for your risk tolerance, time horizon and long-term goals. Of limits apply.) course, investing always carries some risks, If you have an IRA, you already know its including loss of principal — but the risk of not advantages. If you aren’t investing in an IRA, investing may be greater, in terms of not having you should be aware of these key benefits: enough assets for retirement. Tax-deferred growth — A traditional IRA can provide tax-deferred growth while a Roth Here’s one more point to keep in mind: IRA can potentially grow tax-free, provided The earlier in the year you “max out” on your you meet the conditions described above. To IRA contributions, the more time you’ll give get a sense of just how valuable these tax your account to potentially grow. By reaching advantages are, consider this example: If you the new, higher contribution limits, and by put in $5,500 per year (the new IRA maximum) fully funding your IRA as early in each year for 30 years to a hypothetical investment that as possible, you can help yourself take full earned 7% a year, but on which you paid taxes advantage of this powerful retirement savings every year (at the 25% tax bracket), you’d end tool. up with slightly more than $401,000 — about This article was written by Edward Jones for use $155,000 less than what you’d accumulate by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. in an IRA. As mentioned above, you will This article was written by Edward Jones for use by eventually have to pay taxes on your traditional your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.


FEBRUARY 28, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480.

Alliance and Career Path Services. Meet with employers, apply for multiple jobs, submit resumes, network, funding may be available for on-the-job training to reduce hiring costs. There will also be three breakout sessions. For more information call (509) 826-7310, TTY (509) 826-7335. Auxiliary aids and services available upon request.

Oroville Food Bank

Father vs. Son Basketball

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

OROVILLE – There will be a Father vs. Son Basketball Game at the OHS Gym/Coulton Auditorium on Thursday, Feb. 28 starting at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $3 for adults and $2 for those under 12-years-old. Those who pay to attend will get an automatic ticket for the raffle basket. All proceeds go to the Oroville Booster Club.

Okanogan County Job Fair Benefit for Denise OMAK – On Thursday, Feb. 28, Okanogan County Job Fair Edwards 2013 will be held at the Omak Community Center, 601 Benton St., Omak from 10. a.m. to 4 p.m. The Job Fair is free and open to the public and presented by Worksource Okanogan County in partnership with the Colville Confederated Tribes, Economic

OROVILLE – There will be an Indian Taco Feed an auction to benefit Denise Edwards on Saturday, March 2 at the Oroville Eagles starting at 6 p.m. Donated items for the auction include gift certificates, gift baskets, wine baskets, a Seahawks quilt, a private

Missoula Children’s Theatre performs Show White in Tonasket Saturday TONASKET – The Missoula Children’s Theatre will present Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Saturday, March 2 at Tonasket High School. There will be two performances, they are scheduled for 3 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Cost is $5 for those 12 and older. gig donated by the Company Band and lots of other nice things, say organizers. Cost is $6 per person or $20 per family. Proceeds will go to offset travel and medical expenses for Edwards as she takes treatments in Wenatchee.

Thursday, Feb. 2=8 at the Tonasket Cultural Center from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Cost $5 per guest. Get ready for the Tonasket “Have a Ball” on March 2 at 6 p.m. to ? Fine dining, free danced lesson, photographer. Contact Jinnie Bartholomew at (509) 485-2039.

Tonasket Preschool Classical guitar at Story Time winery The upcoming Preschool Story Time is Thursday, March 7th at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Public Library. Call (509) 486-2366 with any questions.

Ballroom Dance Lessons Ballroom Dance Lessons each Thursday, this week it will be

OROVILLE – Classical guitar performances by John Phillips and Steve Pollard will be featured at Esther Bricques Winery’s tasting room on Thursday, Feb. 28 with doors opening at 6 p.m. Light refreshments are available. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Molson Grange Potluck MOLSON - Come to the Molson Grange on Thursday, Feb. 28 at 6:30 p.m. for a potluck and a great program to follow. Lisa Lindsay and friends from the Okanogan Wildlife League will be presenting the program. The public is invited.

Fundraiser OKANOGAN – There will be a Miss Omak Stampede dinner and auction fundraiser for Tonasket’s Breanna Howell’s travel expenses on Saturday, March 2 at the Okanogan Eagles at 1820 2nd Ave. N. Dinner at 6 p.m., live auction at 7 p.m. Baron of Beef and BBQ Chicken $12/adults, $10/ kids 10 and under. Come enjoy an “Enchanted Country Evening.”

Native Plant Tonasket Preschool Pollinators of NCW Story Time TONASKET – The Okanogan Highlands Alliance will be presenting: “Native Plant Pollinators of North Central Washington” as part of their Highlands Wonders Series on Friday, March 1. Dr. Bob Gillespie is helping keep track of our native pollinators, making observations and assessing how well they are functioning. Dr. Gillespie will share about the surprising diversity of species pollinating the native plants in this region. The presentation begins at 6:30 p.m. with desserts, tea and coffee; the dinner benefiting the CCC begins at 5 p.m.

Miss Omak Stampede

The upcoming Preschool Story Time is Thursday, March 7th at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Public Library. Call (509) 486-2366 with any questions.

Dollars for Scholars Variety Show OROVILLE - The Oroville Dollars for Scholars has scheduled this year’s Variety Show/ Silent Auction for Friday, March 15. Application forms are available from Eric.Styles@oroville. wednet.edu or call (661) 3133448. To donate auction items please contact Glenna Hauenstein at (509) 476-2416.

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE BEEMANS CELEBRATE 50TH ANNIVERSARY Jack and Karmen Beeman will be celebrating their 50th Anniversary with a surprise party held by two of their daughters, Shauna Beeman and Jackie Richter. The event will take place on Saturday, March 2 at the Riverside Grange in Riverside, starting at 2 p.m. Karmen Berg married Jack Beeman on March 1, 1963. They have resided in the Loomis area throughout their married life – he’s a retired rancher and she is a nurse at North Valley Nursing Home. Together they had four children, Shauna Beeman, Omak; Jackie Richter, Omak, Sarah Grooms, Okanogan and the late Jon “Hoot” Beeman.

Okanogan River in Tonasket to close for steelheading Closure affects area between boat launch and Fourth Street bridge WDFW RELEASE

Actions: Open the Methow River on March 1, 2013 to fishing for steelhead and whitefish. Close two sections of the Okanogan River to fishing for steelhead on March 17, 2013. Species affected: Steelhead and whitefish. Fishing area locations and effective dates: Area that will close to fishing for steelhead one hour after sunset on March 17, 2013: Okanogan River: From the first powerline crossing downstream of the Hwy 155 Bridge in Omak (Coulee Dam Credit Union Building) to the mouth of Omak Creek, and from the Tonasket Lagoons Park boat launch to the Tonasket Bridge (4th Street). Reason for action: Recent analysis of the steelhead fishery in the upper Columbia River revealed additional natural origin steelhead impacts remain under current NOAA permit. Re-opening steelhead fisheries in the Methow River will help to reduce the proportion of hatchery fish on the spawning grounds and further reduce competition between natural origin and hatchery juvenile production. Sections of

LAWNMOWER MAN

the Okanogan River around the mouth of Omak and Tonasket Creeks will be closed to protect natural origin steelhead staging prior to spawning within those tributaries. Areas that will open to fishing for steelhead and whitefish one hour before sunrise on March 1, 2013 until further notice: Methow River: From the mouth (Hwy 97 Bridge) to the confluence with the Chewuch River in Winthrop. Fishing from a floating device is prohibited from the second powerline crossing (1 mile upstream from the mouth) to the first Hwy 153 bridge (4 miles upstream from the mouth). Areas that will continue to be OPEN for steelhead angling until further notice include: Mainstem Columbia River: From Rock Island Dam to boundary markers below Wells Dam and from Hwy 173 Bridge at Brewster to 400 feet below Chief Joseph Dam. Wenatchee River: From the mouth to 400 feet below Tumwater Dam, including the Icicle River from the mouth to 500 feet downstream of the Leavenworth Fish Hatchery Barrier Dam. Okanogan River: From the mouth to the Highway 97 Bridge in Oroville, except for the two closure sections listed above. Similkameen River: From the mouth to 400 feet below Enloe Dam. Areas that will continue to be CLOSED for steelhead and/or whitefish angling until further

notice include: Mainstem Columbia River: From Wells Dam to the highway 173 Bridge in Brewster. Entiat River: From the alternate Highway 97 Bridge near the mouth of the Entiat River, to Entiat Falls. GENERAL RULES for all locations open to steelhead fishing: Mandatory retention of adipose fin clipped steelhead, daily limit two (2) hatchery steelhead, 20 inch minimum size. Hatchery steelhead are identified by a clipped adipose fin with a healed scar in its location. Adhering to the mandatory retention of adipose clipped steelhead is vital in allowing the fishery to continue and to provide the maximum benefit to natural origin fish. Adipose present steelhead must be released unharmed and cannot be removed from the water prior to release. Night closure and selective gear rules are in effect, except bait is allowed in mainstem Columbia River. Whitefish anglers must follow selective gear rules in areas open to steelhead fishing, no bait is allowed. Daily whitefish limit fifteen (15) fish.

At the

MOVIES

Oliver Theatre

Oliver, B.C.

Reg. Showtimes: Sun.-Mon.-Tue.Thur. 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7&9pm

250-498-2277

LES MISÉRABLES

PG

WINNER OF 3 ACADEMY AWARDS - BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS, ANNE HATHAWAY. PLAYS FEB. 25, 26, 28, & MAR. 1.

SILVER LINING PLAYBOOK ACADEMY AWARD WINNER BEST ACTRESS JENNIFER LAWRENCE. BRADLEY COOPER.

Sat.-Sun.-Mon.-Tues. March 2-3-4-5

14

ZERO DARK THIRTY Thurs. & Fri. March 7-8 ONE SHOW NIGHTLY AT 7:30PM

IDENTITY THIEF

COMEDY STARRING JASON BATEMAN, MELISSA MCCARTHY, JON FAVREAU, AMANDA PEET. 14 SAT.-SUN.-MON. - TUES., THURS.-FRI.

MARCH 9-10-11-12,14-15

SHOWTIMES FRI. & SAT. 7&9:10PM

OMAK THEATER 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

Gary DeVon/staff photo

While most people travel around here by car or pickup, Dennis Ward is taking the slow and indirect path on his lawn tractor. The 67-year-old rolled into town on Feb. 11 when it was still pretty cold outside. Ward said he had started his journey in Sandpoint, Idaho. That day he had just made his way from Wenatchee after someone offered him, his tractor and two trailers, a ride to Tonasket, a town he says he remembers from his apple picking days. From there he took “the old highway” to Oroville and was looking for a place to spend the night. Ward said it’s the only way he can drive as his eyesight isn’t what it was and his license is expired. He was planning on heading “east” to do some camping. “I’ve got nothing better to do,” Ward said.

IDENTITY THIEF

COMEDY STARRING JASON BATEMAN, R MELISSA MCCARTHY, JON FAVREAU, 111 min AMANDA PEET.

Fri. 6:45 & 9:30 Sat. *3:45, 6:45 & 9:30 Sun. 3:45 & 6:45 Wkdys: 7:00

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

THE LAST EXORCISM PART 2 HORROR/THRILLER STARRING ASHLEY BELL, JULIA GARNER, SPENCER TREAT CLARK

Fri. 7:00 & 9:15 Sat. *4:45, 7:00 & 9:15 Sun. 5:00 & 7:15 Wkdys: 7:15 PG13 88 min

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

Subscribe to the... OKANOGAN VALLEY

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Purses, handbags, clutches, wallets...

BIG SELECTION For Spring!

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

www.gazette-tribune.com 509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

JACK THE GIANT SLAYER ADVENTURE/DRAMA/FANTASY STARRING NICHOLAS HOULT, EWAN MCGREGOR, STANLEY TUCCI

Fri. 6:45 & 9:45 Sat. *3:45, 6:45 & 9:45 Sun. 3:45 & 6:45 Wkdys: 6:45 114 min PG13

FILM FESTIVAL WEEK 2 (3/1-3/7)

ANNA KARENINA

130 min

R

DRAMA STARRING KEIRA KNIGHTLEY, JUDE LAW, AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON

Fri.6:30 Sat. *1:00, 6:30 Sun. *1:00, 6:30 Wkdys: 6:30pm

Adults $7.50 Kids 11-under & *Discount Matinee-kids/adults $5 ea

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 28, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • February 28, 2013

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent St. Charles Place Apartments 207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION:

LOW INCOME HOUSING “PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

– Family & Singles –

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

509-476-4057

email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

For Rent LAKEFRONT HOUSE, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, garage, $950; 2 bedroom, 2 bath, garage, family room, $875; Lakefront apartment, a Bargain at $500; Nice 1 bedroom apartment, $400. Call Sun Lakes Realty: 509-476-2121 Oroville CHARMING NEW Country Cottage with a Serene Valley View. 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath with Laundry, Living Room, Eat-in Kitchen and Lots of Storage Packed in this Efficient Space. $700/ month. Call: 509-476-0199

Commercial Rentals

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

FOR RENT: Office/Business unit. 806 Central, Oroville. New tile & paint. Excellent location. $395/mo. (509)4861682 or (509)429-0873.

Announcements ADOPT: Adoring couple, Architect & Internet Executive yearn for precious baby to LOVE FOREVER! Expenses paid. 1-800990-7667

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602 Thank you from Vivian Taylor I would like to thank everyone that helped and attended the benefit and auction on my behalf at the Oroville Eagles on February 9th. It was wonderful to see so many friends that evening since I have been too ill to get out much. Special thanks to Rick Barthol, Oroville Eagles, Oroville Fire Department, Becky and John Desjardins, Ken Neal, Robin Range, Tina Sleeth and to my son Patrick Thorson for all that he has done to keep Appleway Video and Oroville Fitness running. I cannot thank him enough. And all the wonderful folks of our community that donated items for the auction! GOOD NEWS: Chemo is over!

Help Wanted

MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITY Veranda Beach Resort has an employment opportunity for “Front Desk Manager Vacation Rentals�. This is a full time position w/ opportunity for advancement in a dynamic and growing company. Applicants require excellent computer and communication skills, the ability to multi-task and work as a team. Preference will be given to candidates with hospitality industry and or management exp. Apply with resume in writing to: Patty Lawrence General Manager Veranda Beach Resort P.O. Box 3000 Oroville Wa 98844 Oroville School District has the following coaching positions available: High School Boy’s Basketball Coach High School Boy’s Assistant Soccer Coach Junior High Volleyball Coach

Found

Junior High Boy’s Basketball Coach

Found Dog – Boxer type dog, brown and white. No collar. Please send letter of intent Please call 509-476-4509 to and an application from the claim. district website: www.oroville.wednet.edu.

WorkSource Okanogan County

Positions open until filled. OSD is an equal opportunity employer Applications can be sent to:

126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

Erin McKinney Oroville School District 816 Juniper Street Oroville, WA 98844

Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Crosswords

P-T maintenance must pass screening. Wage TBD. 617 Hwy. 97, Oroville, WA. 509-476-3059

28. Formulation of plans and important details

9. Toni Morrison’s “___ Baby�

31. Setting for TV’s “Newhart�

11. “Blue� or “White� river

32. Gossip

12. Covered with gold

34. ___ Mix

13. Kipling’s “Gunga ___�

36. Lever operated with the foot

14. Slump

38. E-mail

19. Sail close to the wind

40. Blow off steam?

22. Decorated, as a cake

41. Superficially stylish

24. Brinks

43. Campaigner, for short

25. Core

44. Prayer book

26. Tear open

46. Sign up

27. Deceptive statements (2 wds)

48. Plagiarist

29. Native of Naples, Italy

50. Newspaper div.

30. “Taras Bulba� author

51. “___ Ng� (They Might Be Giants song)

33. Some legal papers

54. Bivalve mollusks

37. “By yesterday!� (acronym)

56. Vermin 59. Opponent of technological progress 61. House agent 63. Removes rough surface 64. Interlace threads into a design 65. Haunt 66. Forever, poetically

ANSWERS

Across 1. Landlord

10. “Pumping ___�

35. Healthy 39. Harmony 42. Crumbs 45. Restricts 47. ___ skates 49. Like “The X-Files� 51. “Not to mention ...� 52. Deaden 53. Bothers

Help Wanted

Statewides

Seasonal site personnel must pass screening, bilingual preferred. Resume preferred. Job description at 617 Hwy. 97, Oroville, WA. 509476-3059

ATTN: COMPUTER Work. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1.500 Part Time to $7.500 Full Time. Training Provided. www.WorkServices8.com

LPN

The Tonasket office of North Valley Family Medicine is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient-oriented LPN. Applicant must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Mon-Fri w/occasional Saturday mornings (approx 36 hour). Medical/Dental/401K. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online.

Business Opportunities 1950’s DINER - BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY This is an exciting business opportunity at an established resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington! Veranda Beach Resort seeks an experienced and successful food and beverage operator for the 2013 season. This fully equipped 1950’s themed Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Rhonda Hinkley for further details at: rhonda@verandabeach.com. Check out our website at: www.verandabeach.com

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF FEB. 25, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

Down

13. Between sunrise and sunset

1. Put on board, as cargo

14. Ancient Roman silver coins 15. Thinks

2. One who gives first-hand evidence

16. Hot, in Vegas (3 wds)

3. Balance

17. Intelligence

4. Be in session

18. Was unwilling

5. Black cat, maybe

20. After expenses

6. Gum

21. “Rocky ___� 23. One who pushes gently

7. Native of W African country whose capital is Dakar

25. Coup d’etat

8. Wreath for the head

57. Bay 58. “... ___ he drove out of sight�

ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified.. Call 866-483-4429. www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (800) 563-3005. www.fossmortgage.com CASH NOW for Good Notes, Top Dollar from Private investor. Yes, Bajillions Available for quality Contracts, Mortgages, Annuities, Inheritance. Receiving Payments? Call Skip Foss 1-800-637-3677 FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N ATTRACT MONEY and Success Like a Magnet! To get your free “Money Making Secrets Revealed� CD, please call 425-296-4459. HEALTH/BEAUTY IF YOU Used the Mirena IUD between 2001-present and suffered perforation or embedment in the uterus requiring surgical removal, or had a child born with birth defects you may be entitled to compensation. Call Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727 HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS WE VALUE our drivers as our most Important Assett! You make us successful. Top Pay/Benefits Package! CDL-A Required. Join our team Now! Haney Truck Line 1-888-414-4467. DRIVERS -- Inexperienced/Experienced. Unbeatable career Opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 www.centraldrivingjobs.com DRIVER --$0.01 increase per mile after 6 and 12 months. $0.03/mile quarterly bonus. Daily or Weekly pay. CDL-A,. 3 months current exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com REAL ESTATE COLFAX -- RIVERFRONT. 9 acres was $75,000 now only $39,500. Lender Repo sale. Beautiful valley views, quiet country road with electric. Excellent financing provided. Call UTR 1-888-326-9048. WANTED NATIONAL BUYER in Washington -Paying cash for your collectibles. We want your old sports cards, toys, and comic books. Cash Paid! Call Today: 716-940-2833

Public Notices

ADOPTION ADOPT -- Adoring couple,TV Exec and Lawyer, Love, Laughter, Art and Outdoor Adventures await miracle baby. Expenses paid. 1-800-562-8287. ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTER TO WIN a $1,000 prepaid Visa card! Take our survey at www.pulsepoll.com and tell us about your media usage and shopping plans. Your input will help this paper help local businesses. Thank you! BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

55. Advanced

7. Fully satisfying an appetite

EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING

CITY OF TONASKET, WASHINGTON ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 3RD ST., 5TH ST., AND 6TH ST., SIDEWALK AND STREET PROJECT Sealed bids will be received by the City of Tonasket, Washington, at City Hall located at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket, WA 98855 until 11:00 a.m. on Thursday March 7, 2013, and will then and there be opened and publicly read aloud. The improvements for which bids will be received are generally described below:

Subscribe to the...

60. ___-eyed 62. Overwhelming wonder

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

www.gazette-tribune.com

Public Notices Removal of sidewalk and curb and gutter Installation of sidewalk and curb and gutter Installation of driveways and ADA curb ramps Removal and replacement of asphalt Grind and HMA overlay Removal and replacement of portions of an existing storm drain system Plans and specifications may be viewed at the following locations: 1. City Hall, City of Tonasket, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket, WA 98855 2. Varela & Associates, Inc., 601 W. Mallon Ave., Spokane, WA 99201 (509) 328-6066 3. Various Plan Centers - call Varela & Associates or go to www.varelaengr.com for a list. All bid proposals shall be accompanied by a bid proposal deposit in cash, certified check, cashier’s check, or surety bond in the amount equal to five percent (5%) of the amount of such bid proposal. Should the successful bidder fail to enter into such contract and furnish satisfactory performance bond within the time stated in the specifications, the bid proposal deposit shall be forfeited to the City of Tonasket. Contract documents may be obtained from Varela and Associates, Inc., located at 601 W. Mallon, Suite A, Spokane, Washington 99201 upon payment of $30.00. Contract documents are on file for inspection at the Tonasket City Hall. For additional information regarding this project, contact Daniel Cowger, P.E. or Kurt Holland at Varela & Associates, Inc., by phone at (509) 328-6066, or email at danielc@varela-engr.com. The project is being funded by the Transportation Improvement Board funds 6-E-885 (003)-1. The City of Tonasket in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color or national origin in consideration for an award. The City of Tonasket is an equal opportunity employer and encourages women and minority-owned businesses to submit bids. The City of Tonasket has the right to reject any or all bids. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 21, 28, 2013 #459209

DISTRICT COURT FOR THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN DOUGLAS D. MORRISON, an individual, Plaintiff, v. KEITH ROYLANCE, an individual, Defendant. NO. 22354 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO: KEITH ROYLANCE AND JOHN DOE ROYLANCE You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after the 14th day of February, 2013, and defend the above-entitled action in the above-entitled court, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison at their office below stated; and in case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The complaint arises from default under a Promissory Note dated September 5, 2006. Shawn K. Harju, WSBA No. 29942 CARNEY BADLEY SPELLMAN, P.S. 701 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3600 Seattle, WA 98104-7010 Attorneys for Plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 14, 21, 28, March 7, 14, 21, 2013. #457807

Public Notice City of Tonasket Retreat The City of Tonasket Mayor and Councilmembers will be holding a mini-retreat at the Kuhler from 7 pm to 9 pm on Tuesday, March 5th, 2013. The purpose of the retreat is to plan for the year, set goals and priorities and have general discussions regarding the betterment of Tonasket. This meeting is open to the public. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 28, 2013 #461038

continued on next page


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To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

Insulation

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Installed Insulation &

Garage Doors  Installed

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

Licensed & Bonded

509-486-2692 P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

Oroville Building Supply

Attorney at Law

Civil Criminal Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

We Work Saturdays!

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Pumps

Storage

Storage

Well Drilling

Got Water?

Lakeside

OROVILLE

“The Water Professionals”

— Fred Cook — Over 25 Years experience!

Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

STORAGE Boat, RV & More! Weatherization with lease Rent unit for project  Contractors store tools / product  Additional Business space available  

Located at: 124 Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-421-7168 lakesidestoreit@gmail.com

Mini Storage & U-Haul

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power n Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

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140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store  Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Zimmatic Pivots  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic

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www.foglepump.com

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- 24 Hour Service -

RYAN W. GUNN

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

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irectory

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Midway Building Supply

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Business & Service

Rick Edwards

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Concrete

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Building Supplies

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Puzzle 5 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

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Find out what property is for sale and lease in your area and much, much more in our real estate listings in the Classifieds.

Quality Supplies Since 1957

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Edwards Refrigeration

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Attorney

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You wouldn’t have if you had read the real estate guide listings in the Classifieds.

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Advertise

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High In The Saddle-In The Vicinity Of Tranquility. Striking Classic Log Home overlooks a grand nature stage from its hilltop setting & shows works of love, thoughtfulness & creativity w/custom railings/banisters/ kitchen & more accents thru-out. 20 private acres in desirable community. Grand recreational deck to watch all below, private master deck to enjoy the stars. Hardwoods & tile. 2 Master Suites. - $314,900

Beautiful Similkameen Riverfrontage! This property is within walking distance of town and sits on a premier fishing river! Features 150 feet of waterfront, irrigation and domestic water and gorgeous mountain views. This property is a must-see! MLS#446897 $62,900

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Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

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1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

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www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

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Missed out on that dream home?

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

SUN LAKES REALTY

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Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee 597 Swanson Mill Road - 2 bed, 2 bath: Watch the wildlife from the covered deck of this well maintained home. Open floor plan features spacious rooms. Nice mixture of trees and level area for your garden or animals. 480 square foot shop and detached carport. Easy access from the county maintained road. NWMLS # 373955 $149,500

509-486-2295

LAKE AND COUNTRY

509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Designated Broker: Dennis Brothers Broker: Jerry Bradley www.uppervalleyrealty.net email: dbrothers@ncidata.com Very nice four plex with two bedrooms and 1.75 baths in each unit. Includes paved parking and well maintained grounds. Hookups for washer and dryer in each unit. Located only a few blocks from shopping in downtown Oroville. Built in 1994 these apartments have had excellent care. Owner financing available $310,000. MLS #429230 415B S. Whitcomb, Tonasket

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Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home! www.windermere.com

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Puzzle 11 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.32)

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of EDWARD T. JEFFKO, Deceased. Case No.: 13-4-00011-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Claire A. Jeffko as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 9 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

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barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: February 14, 2013 /s/Dale L. Crandall, Attorney for Claire A. Jeffko, Personal Representative PO Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 14, 21, 28, 2013. #456988

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/s/Wayne Pretts WAYNE PRETTS Personal Representative s/Anthony Castelda Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Underwood Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 21, 28, March 7, 2013 #457855

Sudoku

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Public Notices

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Public Notice Radio Jingle Lee Frank Mercantile 30 sec. 4/4 time-March Lee Frank in Tonasket, Tonasket Washington. Lee Frank in Tonasket, when you gotta get the job done. Hardware, irrigation, general mercantile. Lee Frank in Tonasket, friendly service with a smile. Effective 30 days from publication. This corporate advertising logo will be for sale. This song and it’s characters are my thought process property. Animated wording and characters, as well as variable melodies and rhythm patterns are all in the process of copyright. I did not borrow this idea from anyone. If claims are made all signatures must be notarized with some kind of hard truth or evidence. 30 days from publicaton I will relsease this 30 second spot, or 3 minute blues song via contract. you may be in for a commission. If you know how to contact someone, then do so. Natures redeeming qualities basically my work is done but do retain revision. Roger Rylander 288 Howard End Rd. Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1834 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 28, 2013. #460532

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: ROBERT DAVIS UNDERWOOD, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00014-7 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: February 11, 2013 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: February 21, 2013

Public Notices

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FEBRUARY 28, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune February 28, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 28, 2013

SPORTS Girls Basketball: CWL North Champs, Bi-District Qualifier Girls Basketball League MVP: Lily Hilderbrand Boys Basketball League MVP: Connor Hughes Wrestling State Qualifier: Jordan Smith

Tonasket and Oroville

Jorge Juarez - 6th at State

Lily Hilderbrand - CWL North Division MVP

Austin Booker - 2nd at State

Callie Barker

Connor Hughes - CWL North Division MVP

John Rawley - State Qualifier

Dyllan Gage

These Fine Businesses Wish to Say Congratulations! Good Job Hornet Athletes! DISCOUNT FIREWORKS

Good Luck To all The Athletes!

Wash & Wax Your Car...

2 BAY SELF SERVER WAND SYSTEM

Community

DEPARTMENT STORE

OPEN: 8 A.M. - 9 P.M. Everyday 1000 23rd AVE. • OROVILLE, WA

DOUBLE “A” LOGGING

476-2907 P.O. Box 2207 Oroville, WA.

CAR WASH

723 Appleway, Oroville

1 Block off Main St. (next to the Eagles)

OROVILLE Quick

Stop

2208 Juniper St., Oroville (Across from Prince’s)

509-476-9999

Quik - Mart

1501 Main St., Oroville 509-476-2161

476-3893

HORNET’S NEST BURGERS Great Hamburgers, Milkshakes & More

1102 Main St., Oroville • 476-4545

ALLEN’S

COMMUNITY

AUTO REPAIR 4D 723 Appleway, Oroville 509-476-2874 509-560-1011

Good Job Tiger Athletes!

• Friendly Service • One Stop Grocery Shopping • Cold Pop & Beer • Chips & Snacks OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 • Groceries, Meats & Produce TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917

Good Luck Tiger Athletes! 308 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2921

OMAK:th 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 18BREWSTER: W. 4 , Tonasket 538 W. Main,486-2127 689-0904

Oroville Tire Center 476-3902

North Valley

Something For Everyone

Family Medicine A family warehouse for our growers! Appleway & Ironwood Oroville,476-3023 WA. 98844 OROVILLE: 814 Central, TONASKET: 323 S. ce:476-3646 Whitcomb, 486-2917 General Offi OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156

www.golddiggerapples.com BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904

www.nvhospital.org

2306 N. Hwy 97, Oroville

North Valley Hospital District 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Oroville Auto Parts Center 476-3679 Hwy. 97, Oroville

NVFM: Oroville (509) 476-3631 1617 Main Street, Oroville, WA

NVFM: Tonasket (509) 486-2174 17 South Western Ave., Tonasket, WA

¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97. Ph. 509-486-4496


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 28, 2013

PAGE A11

SPORTS

Post-season and Honors

Boys Basketball: District Qualifier Wrestling Team: 10th in State Wrestling State Qualifiers: Austin Booker (2nd), Jeff Stedtfeld (4th), Collin Aitcheson (5th), Jorge Juarez (6th), John Rawley

Jeff Stedtfeld - 4th at State

Briana Moralez

Katie Tietje

Trevor Terris

Becky Arrigoni

Michael Orozco

Jordan Smith - State Qualifier

Brent Baker/staff photos

Tonasket Wrestling - 10th at State

Collin Aitcheson - 5th at State

These Fine Businesses Wish to Say Congratulations! P.T. WORKS

INC.

PHYSICAL THERAPY Diane MacFarland, P.T. 39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

509-486-1616

Oroville

BOOSTER CLUB

Supporting Hornet Athletes!

Independent Franchise of Pacific Pride

615 11th Ave., Oroville www.rominefuel.com

509-476-3610 Oroville Dental Center Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

Paul’s Service

Your one stop for complete auto repairs!

Hwy. 97, South, Oroville Phone: 476-2241

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Tel: 509-826-1930

Lee Frank Mercantile SCHOLZ

Sporting Goods

509-486-2105

316 South Whitcomb, Tonasket

for all your prescription needs!

Roy’s Pharmacy

RX Billing for Numerous Insurances 318 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket

(509) 486-2149 Fax: 486-2196

15 West 4 St., Tonasket 509-486-4808 th

FLORAL DESIGN

210 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket, WA 98844 509-486-8000 Supplies  Lots of Fun!

Ph. 486-0708

Sheila’s Shoppe 83 B Eastlake Rd., Oroville

476-2051

Oroville GOLF CLUB "Come visit our World Famous Groundhogs"

Phone: 509-476-2390

422 ½ S. Whitcomb Ave.,Tonasket

2 mi. W. of Oroville on Nighthawk Rd.

Oroville Pharmacy

Pizza, Subs, Salad Bar, Calzones, Lasagna, Wraps & More!

TONASKET PIZZA COMPANY

Wild Rose

OROVILLE: 815 Central, 476-3023 TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917 OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904

509-476-3411

1416 Main St., Oroville

212 N. Hwy. 97, Tonasket 486-2183 7 Days A Week: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.

Smith & Nelson, Inc. Tonasket, Washington

"CHECKED FOR QUALITY" By applying the most up-to-date technology, our experienced, dedicated and hard working crew continues to provide the best possible service to both growers and consumers.

302 S. Western, Tonasket • 486-2104

Tonasket

Athletic Booster Club Supporting Tiger Athletes!


Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Court, 911 Calls, Jail Bookings Superior Court The Court found probable cause to charge Robert Richardson, 32, with bail jumping. He received eight months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Melquisedec Evangelista-Tamayo, 23, with forgery. He was sentenced to 30 days.

Juvenile An Omak juvenile, 17, was charged with theft third and MIP. He received three days confinement. An Omak juvenile, 12, was charged with an MIP. She received seven days confinement. An Omak juvenile, 15, was charged with assault fourth. He received two days confinement. An Omak juvenile, 14, was charged with taking a motor vehicle without permission second. He received 30 days confinement.

District Court Alfonso Cardenas, 55, Omak, was charged with assault fourth. Seth Clements, 22, Omak, was charged with two counts of marijuana possession less than or equal to 40 grams and MIP/C. He received a $500 fine. Jenniffer Herriman, 21, Omak, was charged with DWLS third. She received a $618 fine. Charles Hess, 31, Omak, was charged with DWLS first and two counts of reckless driving. He received 280 days confinement. David Knowles, 40, Okanogan, was charged with two counts of negligent driving first. He received an $818 fine. Enrique Martinez, 18, Oroville, was charged with minor intoxicated in a public place. He received a $568 fine. Jaime Smith, 37, Omak, was charged with supplying liquor/ premises to a minor.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, February 18, 2013 Near Tonasket, on Hwy. 7, a tenant was intoxicated and yelling at a resident. It is unknown if there are weapons involved. Near Tonasket, on Cayuse Mountain Rd., a brother is living with his mother. He sold her a hay baler and a .25 caliber pistol that is now missing. Mother believes that the son stole it back. In Omak, on Hanford Street, three people are causing problems and drinking. They are trying to fight. They attempted to get into a vehicle and drive away but failed. In Tonasket, on Nelson Rd., a male subject assaulted subjects at their residence. He used a broom to attack a 14-year-old boy. William Spann, 28, was booked for FTA and DUI. Elvis Sherman, 46, was booked for three counts of FTA, possession of drug paraphernalia and DWLS third.

Donald Searcy, 56, was booked for assault fourth. Marty Dobson, 59, was booked for three counts of FTA, taking a motor vehicle without permission, theft third and DUI. Casey Peone, 19, was booked for two counts of FTA, DWLS second and theft third. Tuesday, February 19, 2013 In Omak, on Miller Rd., a paper was signed for a male subject to purchase a vehicle. He quit making payments in May, 2012, and car owner has been making the payments on the vehicle. They are unable to locate the male subject. Near Oroville, On Swanson Mill Rd., four wheels and tires were taken from Skyline Telecom company. A generator was also stolen. Brian Boyd, 32, was booked for FTA and DUI. Natasha West, 18, was booked for assault fourth. Ruben Wilson, 36, was booked for failure to register and DWLS third. Joshua Howell, 24, was booked for a detainer. Roxanne Boyer, 65, was booked for a detainer and DWLS third. Wednesday, February 20, 2013 Near Oroville, on Hwy. 7, a man struck his niece and then tried to hit her with a handgun. He returned to his residence and hid the gun before police arrived. In Tonasket, on Hwy. 20, a long flatbed trailer was taken from the location sometime in the past two days. The owner is in Spokane. In Tonasket, on Hwy. 7, a 14-yearold male juvenile went missing from the location since sometime early that morning. Cheryl Rasberry, 46, was booked for DUI. Jesse Lightly, 19, was booked for POCS. Robert Belser, 43, was booked for possession of methamphetamine. William Copper, 25, was booked for POSC. Keir Wallan, 28,was booked for DWLS third. Miguel Garduno- Jimenez, 35, was booked for USBP detainer. Falina Storm, 26, was booked for two counts of FTA and two counts of DWLS third. Luis Orosco, 28, was booked for four counts of FTA, two counts of assault fourth, DWLS third and assault second. David Clark, 43, was booked for parole violation. Damon Whaley, 18, was booked for burglary. John Woodward, 55, was booked for two counts of FTA and residential burglary. Anjelina Neff, 27, was booked for two counts of FTA and two counts of DWLS third. Tammy Davidson, 50, was booked for arson first and assault fourth. Thomas Curtis, 54, was booked for two counts of FTA, possession of meth and use of drug paraphernalia. Thursday, February 21, 2013 Near Tonasket, on Clarkston Mill

Rd., someone is trying to get inside the house that a woman was guarding. In Omak, on Omak Riverside Eastside Drive, a TV and Xbox were stolen from a home and the door was left wide open. In Okanogan, on Fifth Ave. S., yelling and screaming could be heard from a residence until late that night. A neighbor called to complain. Justin Friedlander, 25, was booked for a state Dept. of Corrections hold. Lisa Mumm, 48, was booked for three counts of POCS. Dustin Hayes, 24, was booked for four counts of DWLS third, DUI, four counts of FTA and assault fourth. Patrick Winslow, 31, was booked for DUI. Kasey Stutsman, 28, was booked for DWLS second. Michael Irwin, 43, was booked for DUI. Matthew Webster, 20, was booked for hit-and-run injury. Seth Harris, 27, was booked for DWLS third. Friday, February 22, 2013 Audrey Leach, 28, was booked for assault third. Christopher Behrle, 23, was booked for protection order violation. Jim McBride, 48, was booked for DWLS third, assault fourth and reckless driving. Martin Hoffman, 29, was booked for three counts of FTA, possession of stolen property and three counts of DWLS third. Charles Hess, 31, was booked for reckless driving. Cannon Kuneki, 32, was booked for two counts of FTA, theft third and possession of less than or equal to 40 grams of marijuana. Aja Seymour, 30, was booked for DUI and DWLS third. Zane Grissom, 25, was booked for violation of a no contact order. Charles Wynecoop, 24, was booked for three counts of DWLS third, six counts of FTA, felon in possession of a firearm, two counts of assault fourth and possession of drug paraphernalia. Joshua Fink was booked for two counts of violation of a no contact order and assault fourth. Michael Stensgar, 26, was booked for FTA, DWLS third, theft third, criminal trespassing second, assault fourth, two counts of telephone harassment, violation of an anti- harassment order, felon in possession of a firearm, resisting arrest and making false statements to police. Saturday, February 23, 2013 Jose Reynage- Montel, 38, was booked on a U.S.B.P. hold. Trudie Mapes, 25, was booked for endangerment with a controlled substance. Jordan Monohan, 22, was booked for DUI. Christopher Petek, 30, was booked for two counts of possession of Oxycodone, possession of marijuana, possession of heroin and unlawful possession of a firearm. Robert Parisien, 19, was booked

ObituarIES

James Fray

James Jordan Fray James Jordan Fray was born in Chewelah, Wash. on July 24, 1936 to James and Vivian (Hull) Fray. His early years were spent on Spokane’s South Hill, attending Hutton Elementary and Lewis and Clark High (Class of ’55). After a two year stint at Washington State College, he joined the Navy in 1958 and was discharged in 1960 settling in San Francisco. After breaking his leg in a skiing accident in Lake Tahoe, he was x-rayed by Kathryn Corrigan, who would become his wife on June 15, 1968. They would eventually move to Oroville, Wash. and raise their three children. He applied his trade as an electrician at the lumber mill in Omak, Wash., retiring in 1997. His retirement years were spent summering in Oroville where he would get his money’s worth of at minimum four rounds of golf per week and the world-renowned

Oroville Golf Club (Augusta National of the Northwest) and wintering in Houston, Texas, where he joined his sister Charlotte in exploration of the Gulf Coast. He was graced with a happy death and graduated into eternal life at 9:45 on Monday, February 18, 2013, after saying goodbye to his loved ones. His family is eternally grateful to the Kekic Family and the outstanding staff at the Spokane Veteran’s Home for their loving care over the last four years, as his health deteriorated. He was preceded in death by his parents, and is survived by his sister Charlotte of Columbia Falls, Mont., son Cory (Molly) of Spokane, son Kevin of Oroville, daughter Brigid, also of Columbia Falls, and eight grandchildren Jacob, Sofia, Addison, Maya, Calista, John Paul, Dominic, and Gianna. A Funeral Mass was celebrated at 11 a.m. on Saturday Feb. 23, 2013 at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, 5021 N. Nelson. Private interment was at Queen of Peace Cemetery immediately following. In lieu of flowers, the family requests your time and talent be shared with the warriors at the Spokane Veteran’s Home or wherever they may reside in your community.

Carl W. Cook Carl Cook passed away on February 19, 2013. He was born in Loomis, Wash. on May 5, 1925. Preceded in death by his wife, Creta, of 46 years in 1993; daughter Betty in 1949 and Shayrn in 2012. Carl is survived by his loving companion Dorothy at the home

and her family. Son and daughterin-law, Tom and Claudia Cook; daughter, Diane Olson and her companion Mike Cumber and son-in-law Jim Smith; seven grandchildren; seven great grandchildren; one brother, Howard and his wife Eva of Okanogan, Wash. He was also preceded in death by five brothers and one sister. Carl served three years in the U.S. Navy Amphibious Forces; 30 months of his time overseas in the Pacific during WWII; where he took part in numerous landings on enemy shores. Carl operated Cook’s Automotive for 23 years in Spokane; as well as other business around the state and in California, retiring in May 1990. Carl’s wishes were for cremation and no funeral service. A “thank you” to North Central Care Center for their never ending compassion and determination in accepting a “challenge.”

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

Monuments & Bronze

for DWLS second and possession of less than or equal to 40 grams of marijuana. Jeremiah Sweat, 37, was booked for escape second.

40, of Omak. Delia Everisto, age 21 of Omak, will wed Luis Perez, age 23 of Omak.

Robert Watts, 44, was booked for POCS-meth with intent to sell. Andy Hernandez, 41, was booked for four counts of FTA, malicious mischief third, assault fourth, POCS-meth and use of drug paraphernalia. Martin Lawson, 44, was booked for four counts of FTA and four counts of DWLS third. Raymond John, 19, was booked for DWLS third, POCS, possession of drug paraphernalia, two counts of FTA, DUI and possession of drug paraphernalia. David Gorr, 54, was booked for a detainer. Gordon Harry, 47, was booked for criminal trespassing second. Billy Rosenkilde, 34, was booked for FTA and DWLS third.

Sunday, February 24, 2013 David Priest, 44, was booked for four counts of possession of a stolen motor vehicle and trafficking in stolen property first. Chelsie Martuscelli, 22, was booked for DUI. Cory Michels, 21, was booked for DUI. Carley Wildermuth, 20, was booked for MIP. Kalli Thomas, 23, was booked for DUI. Gerald Mckinney, 50, was booked for malicious mischief third. Gregory May, 39, was booked for POCS-meth, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of burglary tools. Bruce Wisner, 49, was booked on a warrant.

Key DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – POCS MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – FTA (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Marriages Alia Edmonds, age 38 of Omak, will wed Zachary Schaller, age

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

Oroville Community Bible Fellowship Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON

Faith Lutheran Church

Join us for Lenten Fellowship / Wednesdays with soup & bread 6 p.m. Service at 7 p.m. 11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10:30 a.m., Worship & Youth Sun. School Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 a.m. Men’s Meeting 9:45 Sunday School (2-17 yrs) • Life Skills (18+) 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Bible Study (13+) Pastor Claude Roberts

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church? To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

CEMETERY MARKERS

See Us First for Greater Savings BUILD A LASTING TRIBUTE TO YOUR LOVED ONE

~ 62 years of serving you ~ Where pride in craftsmanship still exist today!

Sales Representative Joy Lawson

1-509-476-2279 OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 28, 2013  

February 28, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 28, 2013  

February 28, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune