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Wrestling and hoops

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tournaments come to an end.

Community debate about Assisted Living closing continues. See Page A5.

See Pages A4 and A7.

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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Tonasket schools to delay full day plan

Wolf bills pass out of Senate

FIT FOR A QUEEN

School board, administrators look to craft alternate plan that is sustainable, affordable revealed to districts until months after they are required to have their budgets completed. Superintendent Paul Turner also TONASKET - No one was happy about it, but most all agreed it was noted that he was mistaken sharing that the LEA shortfall figure necessary. Despite a two-year plan that is as being $72,000 at the previous already one year into implementa- meeting. The board and administrators tion, the Tonasket School Board voted after a lengthy work session spent several hours discussing on Monday, Feb. 11, to delay put- potential options for finding ways ting the second year of a plan in to get the school day back to its place that would have returned 45 intended length without spendminutes to the district school day. ing the anticipated additional $350,000 it will Those minutes to get there. were cut from “It’s a case of slowing take And while there the schedule in down and realizing the were a number the 1990s due to realities we’ve encoun- of ideas shared budget shortfalls the at the time. tered as we go along.” during brainstorming Getting that Jerry Asmussen, session, with the time back on Tonasket School Board Chair necessity of prethe schedule paring for next has been longyear looming discussed but problematic for years, and recent just weeks away, the possibility of budgetary issues are making that coming up with a creative plan in that time that was also sustainable goal once again difficult to reach. Some of those issues not was unlikely. “I think we can be innovative,” accounted for when the plan was considered last spring included said high school principal Jeff (but weren’t limited to) higher Hardesty. “But we can’t be innovathan anticipated expenses for both tive if we have two weeks to put regular and long-term substitute something together.” After the work session, the teachers; going slightly over budget with the new technology position; board re-opened the meeting to higher insurance (over $7,000) and determine what to do about the utility ($28,000) costs; higher than two-year plan. Catherine Stangland, who has anticipated special education costs due to the specific needs of stu- advocated for the return of the dents; and significantly, a $50,000 full-length day for years, moved to postpone full implementation for cut to LEA funding. Rises in insurance and util- another year, while expressing her ity costs had been anticipated frustration at having to do so. “I’ll second it with, like Cathy and worked into the budget, the shortfall was over and above those said, severe reservations,” said anticipated increases. The meth- board member Ty Olson. “I’m od of putting together the budget frustrated that we got to this point was also discussed, including the fact that state funding levels aren’t SEE DELAY | PG A2

Would allow trapping, killing gray wolves without permit under certain circumstances

BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

BY KYLEE ZABEL, REPORTER WNPA OLYMPIA NEWS BUREAU

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Shelby Scott (right) was crowned the 2013 May Festival Queen at the Royalty Selection Night held last Monday evening in the Oroville High School Commons. Angela Nelson (left) is this year’s May Festival Princess. The girls, both juniors at OHS, gave speeches and participated in a modeling and poise competition on the runway. They each also answered an impromptu question from the judges, before the votes were counted from the judges and community. Queen Shelby is the daughter of Kim and Brad Scott and Princess Angela is the daughter of Marcie and Alan Nelson. The new royalty will reign over the upcoming May Festival which takes place the second weekend in May, as well as representing Oroville at various parades, functions and events around the region.

Bonaparte Creek/Mill Drive annexation completed BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - “It’s been a long time coming,” Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb said of the Bonaparte Creek/Mill Drive annexation that was approved by the city council at its Tuesday, Feb. 12 meeting. The annexation, which finally brought the area on the south end of the city into the city limits, came about in order to give residents in the area the ability to hook up to the city sewer and water system. “This has been a long time coming,” said city planner Kurt Danison. “There was an issue with water quality in Bonaparte Creek, and the city stepped up to the plate and decided to look for funding to put in a sewer system to replace the existing septic systems in place.” The city was able to apply for grants funding to help construct the addition to the system, but it was contingent upon the area becoming part of the city. The residents petitioned the city to annex their neighborhood; the annexation was contingent up on the city receiving the funding to put the sewer system in, which has only come about recently.

“The city has received the grant funds,” Danison said. “The sewer project made significant headway this past fall and will start back up again March 1, if they’re able to. Those of you who live in the unincorporated area, by the end of 2013 will have a connection to the Tonasket sewer system.” “I just think it’s a win-win,” said council member Scott Olson just prior to the council’s unanimous approval of the annexation ordinance. “It just makes sense for Mill Drive ... they are part of the community and it makes sense for them to have benefits of the infrastructure ... welcome aboard; it’s great.” The council also approved a partial alley vacation to allow a resident to add onto his home in the additional five feet of property made available to him. It also reviewed the updated comprehensive plan, but Olson raised concerns that a number of areas were not zoned for the uses that were already taking place in various parts of the city. The council voted to sent the comprehensive plan back to the planning commission to be reconsidered and possibly amended. In other business, the council approved putting the Third/

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 08

Fifth/Sixth Street project out for bid. They also approved a kennel permit within town, though council member Jill Vugteveen voted against the approval since she felt the requester was trying to get approval for an already existent kennel, as opposed to going through the process first. Karen Monnin delivered petitions to the council with 354 petitions requesting the council approve an ordinance to allow ATV use within the city limits. Plumb accepted the petitions on behalf of the city and said that the issue would be discussed at the next council meeting, which he said Okanogan County commissioner Jim DeTro was expected to attend. The council also heard a presentation from Jennifer Korfiatis of the North Central Washington Economic Development District, highlighted by information that the EDD’s Canadian counterpart in the Okanagan was interested in finding ways to help their larger base of tourists discover the U.S. side of the border. Danison was appointed by the council to represent Tonasket on the EDD board. The city council’s next meeting is Tuesday, Feb. 26, at 7 p.m. in the council chambers at City Hall in Tonasket.

Senate Natural Resources and Parks Committee last week approved two bills that would reduce the restraints on landowners and county legislative authorities from lethally removing a wolf posing an immediate threat to livestock and/or domestic animals. Both bills have been sent to the Rules Committee for floor-vote consideration. Substitute Senate Bill (SSB) 5187 would allow livestock-owners, their family members and employees to trap or kill Sheilah Kennedy gray wolves without a permit from the Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) if their livestock or domestic animals were being attacked. The wolf must be an immediate threat to livestock and other animals and if a wolf is killed and is not found to have been an immediate threat, the taking of that wolf would violate DFW rules. However, conservation groups and some lawmakers are con-

“We should have the authority to make those tough decisions when they are before us and they are devastating the people of our county,.” Sheilah Kennedy, Okanogan County Commissioner

Brent Baker/staff photo

Lee Hale is sworn onto the Tonasket City Council by City Clerk Alice Attwood at the council’s Tuesday, Feb. 11 meeting. He’ll join council members Jill Vugteveen (rear), Scott Olson, Jean Ramsey and Dennis Brown by filling a seat that has been vacant since December.

Hale takes council seat BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET – The Tonasket City Council had a full agenda for its Tuesday, Feb. 11, meeting, but before launching into most of it filled a seat that had been empty since Selena Hines resigned in December. Lee Hale was appointed to the vacant seat. The council had received applications from Hale and Sue Edick. After interviewing Edick at the Jan. 22 meeting and Hale on Tuesday, the council met in a brief executive session to review and

discuss their submitted letters and qualifications. Mayor Patrick Plumb cast the deciding vote after the council split 2-2 on Ramsey’s motion to confirm Hale, with council members Ramsey and Dennis Brown voting for while Jill Vugteveen and Scott Olson voted against. Plumb said that, considering Edick’s qualifications, he was planning on offering her the opportunity to fill an empty seat on the planning commission. Hale took his seat immediately and participated in the remainder of the meeting.

SEE WOLVES | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

cerned about the effect the legislation could have on present wolf management programs if passed into law. Mitch Friedman of Conservation Northwest would prefer the legislature to take a look at improving non-lethal management techniques in order to deter wolves from attacking livestock and domestic animals. “Wolves aren’t angels or devils; they can respond favorably to management techniques,” he said. Senator Adam Kline, (D-37th District, Seattle) said he was uncomfortable with the language of SB 5187 and says the bill’s enforcement specifics are unclear. A second proposal, Senate Bill (SB) 5188, would permit county legislative authority to lethally remove wolves attacking livestock based on three conditions: the wolf or wolves had attacked livestock on private property on at least two occasions; the attacks present a pattern that pose an imminent threat to private property or commercial livestock operations, and DFW has yet to take action to prevent these

Sports A4 & A7 Letters/Opinion A5 Valley Life A3 & A6

Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Police Stats Obituaries

A9-10 A10


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 21, 2013

FIRST BUTTERCUP Noni Alley found this buttercup in bud on Sunday, Feb. 10, in the Havillah Road area. She hiked back to check on it a week later and found it, and may others, in bloom. She is the daughter of Tim and Julie Alley of Tonasket and has found these first signs of spring many times before.

Julie Ashmore/submitted photo

At least 110 people attended the Highland Wonders Grouse presentation on Friday, Feb. 1, with Dr. Michael Schroeder. Dr. Schroeder noted during his presentation that, with seven different species of grouse, Okanogan County has the greatest variety of the birds of any county in the nation. The March 1 presentation by Dr. Bob Gillespie will cover native plant pollinators.

OHA Presents: Native Plant Pollinators of NCW SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE

OKANOGAN HIGHLANDS ALLIANCE

Submitted photo

DELAY | FROM A1 in the year to have this be the outcome.” “I just don’t see how we can do it well given the time we have left in the year, and the lack of money we have to do it,” Stangland said. “It’s going to take a different approach, and I’m going to trust that (the adminstrators) are innovative enough, if we can keep working on it, that we can get there.” Board member Lloyd Caton wasn’t ready to give up on getting the longer school day implemented sooner rather than later. “There’s been some good alternative ideas,” he said. “Between getting more work done without making the day longer... we could make the day longer with the staff we have to give you more time with the students. That appeals to me somewhat, but it’s not what I want. What I want is more time with the students for them to get their essentials, electives, more educational opportunities. But I

don’t have a sack full of money I can pull out of my pocket. “Some of the meetings I’ve sat in on, all I hear is about contact time with the students. Can we go a longer time and give you more contact time without it costing a lot of money? I don’t know. There’s been some good ideas ... I’m not ready to give up.” “I think it’s a case of slowing down and realizing the realities we’ve encountered as we go along,” said board chairman Jerry Asmussen. Stangland added that part of the process needed to involve a clearer picture of all the needs in each building, in terms of time and money, than what had been available. The board voted 3-1 in favor of delaying implementation, with Stangland, Olson and Ernesto Cerillo voting for and Caton voting against. “It’s a major disappointment,” Stangland said.

Olson made a point of thanking the administrators for the work session, saying it went a long way toward helping him, in his first year on the board, understanding more of the issues that they face. “I appreciate your guys’ imput,” he said. “I only hope that when we have these kinds of work sessions, that there’s no need for them to be contentious. We’re here for the common good of our kids, so thank you guys. I look forward to the next one and I believe we’ll sort this out.” The school board also offered its condolences to the Omak School District in recognition of the recent death of superintendent Dr. Arthur Himmler, who was killed in a car accident while on the way to an education training conference in Wenatchee two weeks ago. The board next meets Monday, Feb. 25, in the administrative office board room.

Sen. John Smith (7th District, Colville), claimed that these bills, if enacted into law, would bolster the rights set out by the founders’ in the Second Amendment. “When our founders gave us the right to protect our property with the Second Amendment,” said Smith, “I don’t think they had in mind that we should hide inside of our houses as predators destroy our property.

“These bills would not declare open-season on wolves,” he added. According to DFW, the statewide minimum count for resident wolves in the state of Washington is 51. Last year, that count was only 27. The House companion bill to SB 5187, HB 1991, is scheduled for an executive session Thursday (Feb. 21) in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee.

Tom Munson/submitted photo

Factors that impact honeybees and some of our native bumblebee populations will also be discussed at the OHA Highland Wonders presentation on March 1. oped bright colors, nectar, scented flowers, and alluring patterns and shapes to attract insects, and how these adaptations benefit both the plants and the insects. Factors that impact honeybees and some of our native bumblebee populations will also be discussed, along with the successes and challenges of native plant pollination in our area. Gillespie is a faculty member at Wenatchee Valley College in the Agriculture and Natural

Resources Department. He has a Masters degree in entomology from the University of Idaho and a Doctorate in biology from Montana State University. His areas of professional interest are native plants and native plant pollinators, as well as native plant restoration. Gillespie has provided field assistance to a variety of pollinator surveys, and as a result, has gleaned a unique knowledge of pollinating insects in our region.

The Coats to perform at Omak PAC SUBMITTED BY VERA ZACHOW OMAK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

WOLVES | FROM A1 threats. Okanogan C ounty Commissioner Sheilah Kennedy believes county officials should have the authority outlined in the bill without fear of interference from DFW. “We should have the authority to make those tough decisions when they are before us and they are devastating the people of our county,” she said. Prime sponsor of both bills,

TONASKET - Dr. Bob Gillespie will be discussing native plant pollinators as part of the Okanogan Highlands Associations’ Highland Wonders series at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center on Friday, March 1. Pollinating insects have a big job, helping plants produce fruit not only in gardens and orchards, but also among many native species like wild strawberries, huckleberries, thimbleberries, wax currants, and others that require pollination to reproduce. Dr. Gillespie is helping keep track of our native pollinators, making observations and assessing how well they are functioning. On Friday, March 1, starting at 6:30 p.m. he will come to Highland Wonders to share about the surprising diversity of species pollinating the native plants in our region. “Studying the varied associations and interactions of pollinators and plants is always fascinating and awe inspiring,” Gillespie said. “I am amazed by the intricate ways in which a plant and an insect are adapted to each other like a hand and glove.” The presentation will help participants learn to identify pollinators of native plants and provide insight into their unique and diverse natural histories. Bob will explain how plants have devel-

OMAK - Back by popular demand, The Coats will perform at the Omak Performing Arts Center Saturday, Feb. 23 at 7 p.m. This well-loved Seattle-based male a capella quartet will also conduct a free vocal workshop at 4:30 p.m. that day at the PAC for interested

members of the community. Since their beginnings on the streets of Seattle, the Coats have sung for presidents and shared the stage with Trisha Yearwood, Crystal Gayle, Colin Ray and more. This concert is sponsored by Community Medical Center, Community Foundation of NCW, WESTAF, Grillo Family Dentistry and Eagle Homes.

Adult tickets are $15. Student tickets are $10. Tickets can be purchased at Rawson’s in Okanogan, The Corner Shelf in Omak, Tonasket Interiors, Oroville Pharmacy and at North Cascades Broadcasting as well as at the door. Visit us on facebook, at www. omakpac.org or call (509) 4222456 for additional information.

Out On The Town your guide to

Oroville Chamber wishes to THANK all of our SPONSORS & DONORS and Fishing CONTESTANTS for the...

THANK YOU 9th Annual 2013 NW Ice Fishing Festival

MAJOR SPONSORS: Gold Level – Kinross Gold - $500 Gold Level – Prince’s Dept. - $500 Fishing Grand Prize Silver Sponsor – Beyers Center Place Market - $250 Silver Sponsor – Akins Harvest Foods (Prince’s) - $250 Silver Sponsor – Veranda Beach Resort 2 Night Stay - Raffle Grand Prize

FISHING PRIZES: Grand Prize - $500 Gift Certificate - Prince’s Dept. Store Adult 1st :. Duffle - Midway Bldg / Fishing Rod - Big R Adult 2nd : Sled - Big R Adult 3rd : 2-Nite Certificate – Camaray Motel Adult Smallest Fish: $25 Certificate - Oroville Pharmacy Adult Mystery Weight 16 ounces: Fishing Rod - Big R Eldest Fisherman: Fishing Rod - Big R

RAFFLE PRIZES: Youth 1 – Fish camping package - MaryLou’s Gifts Booster Club - Calendar, lighter, sign Youth 2 – Gift basket - Sterling Bank Borderland Hist. Society - Auto Emergency Bag Youth 3 – Fishing Rod - Big R Community Auto - Oil Change Cert (2). Youth Smallest Fish – Fun Pole (Big R) Davmichaeljin Ranch - 5# beef Youth Mystery Weight 16 ounces: Eden Valley Guest Ranch - Mountain trail ride for 2 Explorer Toys - Lee Frank Mercantile Gazette - Tribune - 1 year subscription Youngest Fisherman: Home Town Pizza - Large Pizza Explorer Toys - Lee Frank Mercantile Hornets Nest - Basket Meal OTHER CONTRIBUTORS: It’s Still Good - $15 Gift certificate Leah Cathryn Day Spa - pedicure & hand paraffin dip Robin Stice – Ice Festival Director Molson Grange – Hosts & Breakfast Lee Franks Ace - Explorer toys for kids Sitzmark Ski Area – Dinner Len Firpo – 2 Sitzmark tickets Mary Lou’s Gift - Lotion Gift Basket, Coasters & Knife Mike Tibbs – Sani-cans Oroville EMTs – Paul & Jackie Mary Lou’s Gift - Children’s Puzzles Bobbie Lepley – Judge & lake registrations Midway Bldg Supply - Duffle bag Clyde Andrews – RV for Lakeside Office NAPA - Oroville Auto Parts - Toolbox Ray Ellington – Gourmet to Go at the lake Oroville Pharmacy - (3) $25 gift certificates Jeanette Lamont – Arts & Crafts Fair coordinator Oroville Senior Center - Lunch for 2 Vicki Hart – Registrations & Awards Oroville Subway - (3) 2 sandwiches packet Betta’s Services – Financial donation Princes Bakery - Fishing cake Eric Granstrom – Fishin’ Magician Rancho Chico - $25 certificate Sandy Andrews & Larry Smith – Raffle donations The Junction - Gift basket Clyde Andrews – Advertising and awards MC The Plaza - $25 Certificate Tiim Roberts & Linda McDaniel - Grange fire & heat Thompson Bees - free alignment Everett Turner & Maurice Reichel – Sidewalks & Building Thompson Bees - free tire Pat Stice – Molson & Sidley Lake Aerators Tonasket Subway - (3) 2 sandwiches & cookies North OK Co Public Works Road Crew – Road clearing Trino’s Mexican Dining - Dinner for 2 Dave Hilstad – Parking Lot plowing Veranda Beach - 2 nights lodging Molson Grange and Helpers - Clean-up Vicki’s Unique Boutique - Gift basket Bud McSpadden - Musical meanderings World of Gaia - Fish rock The Chamber of Commerce of Oroville wants to especially thank Robin Stice, founder and coordinator of the NW Fishing Festival, for all her time, efforts and passion for this event.

All proceeds go towards promoting tourism in North Okanogan County.

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FEBRUARY 21, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

Okanogan Valley Life

No fish, but most enjoyed annual Ice Fishing Fest

Gary DeVon/staff photos

The annual ice fishing festival is like a family reunion of sorts as many of the anglers gather every year to try their luck and catch up with family and friends. Sixty-nine adults and 17 youth participated in this year’s Northwest Ice Fishing Festival on Molson and Sidley lakes.

Several anglers try their luck in annual contest By Gary A. DeVon

Managing Editor

MOLSON – Even a two-time previous winner of the Northwest Ice Fishing Festival couldn’t land a fish last Saturday, although she had one on that threw the hook. But that didn’t mean the 86 participants, including 17 kids, didn’t have a lot of fun trying. Just because this was the third fish-less year for the festival also didn’t mean there weren’t fish, there were many reports of fish on angler’s fish finders, just none willing to leave the icy waters of Sidley and Molson lakes to be claimed for a prize. “The first fish caught wins this thing,” was the comment from most of the participants. That elusive first fish and all his fellows weren’t cooperative, but all the prizes were awarded by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, which sponsors the event at an awards ceremony at the Molson Grange, event hosts. The prizes were the names of the anglers drawn from a coffee can. And the winners were: Grand Prize: Dan Robinson, Oroville - $500 Gift Certificate (Prince’s Dept. store) Adult 1st :. Dave Granstrom, E. Wenatchee – Duffle (Midway Bldg) & Rod (Big R) Adult 2nd : Craig Broadhead, Wauconda – Sled (Big R) Adult 3rd : Harrel Rounds, Oroville – Camaray Certificate Adult Smallest Fish: Frank Grunert, Oroville - $25 Certificate (Oroville Pharmacy) Adult Mystery Weight 16 ounces: Jason Llewellyn, Chesaw

– Rod (Big R) Eldest Fisherman: Walt Jennings, Oroville – Rod (Big R) Youth 1 – Seth Miller, Oroville - $75 Fish camping package (MaryLou’s Gifts) Youth 2 – Karsyn Thrasher, Oroville – Gift basket (Sterling Bank)

“Ice Fishing in the Okanogan Highlands has been a historic treasure for generations of local people.” Robin Stice Event Volunteer

Youth 3 – Joel Nesper, Oroville – Rod (Big R) Youth Smallest Fish – Machara Richter, Oroville – Fun Pole (Big R) Youth Mystery Weight 16 ounces: James Sutton, Oroville – Explorer Toys (Lee Frank)

“Ice Fishing in the Okanogan Highlands has been a historic treasure for generations of local people. This event provides the social aspects of a fishing tournament, yet preserves the culture and history for visitors in a living tradition,” said volunteer Robin Stice who helps to organize the event. Money raised goes towards helping to support Oroville’s Visitor Information Center and the Grange breakfast, which attracted 227, will go towards repairs to the Grange roof. “Chamber President, Clyde Andrews and wife Sandy of the Camaray Motel were invaluable along with Vickie Hart of Vickie’s Unique Boutique of Oroville for many aspects of preparation and registration. Jeanette Lamont of Molson coordinated the Arts and Crafts show. It takes many volunteers to pull off an event of this magnitude and all were appreciated,” said Stice, who operates the nearby Eden Valley Guest Ranch with her husband Pat.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Grand Prize winner Dan Robinson of Oroville got a $500 gift certificate to Prince’s Department Store. Chamber President Clyde Andrews awards the prize after volunteer Robin Stice pulled his name from a can.

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Rev. Gary Forgey gives a demonstration ride to Jessica Ashley from Deer Park, Wash. The dog sledding demonstration was free, educational and fun with rides until the dogs tired. Riders ranged in age from two-years-old to mid-seventies. This was the best track yet put in by Matt Beecher with a large snowmobile, according to Robin Stice, a volunteer who helps organize the festival. The track was larger and worked better going with the topography, added Stice.

Back by popular demand, this well-loved Seattle based male acapella quartet is well known for their incredibly tight harmonies and refreshing humor.

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Saturday, February • 7pm Broadcasting, Omak Performing • North23 Omak Arts Center GetCascades your Get Your Tickets! Adulttickets! - $15 Student - $10 Tickets available at the following businesses: • Rawson’s, Okanogan Free music/vocal workshop with The Coats • Oroville Pharmacy, Oroville • The Corner Shelf, Omak •Tonasket Interiors, Saturday, Feb. 23Broadcasting, • 4:30 p.m. Tonasket • North Cascades Omak. Tickets available at the following businesses:

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Page A 4

SPORTS

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 21, 2013

Smith picks up state win Oroville soph one win short of medal By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TACOMA - Jordan Smith picked up a victory in his first Mat Classic experience, extending his visit to the state wrestling finals into its second day before being eliminated from the tournament. Smith, the Oroville 106-pound sophomore who rode a late-season surge to State, earned a pin of South Bend’s Austin Boyes in the second of his three state 1B/2B matches last weekend at the Tacoma Dome. “There is no doubt that Jordan gained valuable ‘big show’ experience,” said Oroville coach Chuck Ricevuto. “Hopefully he will translate this experience into future trips to the Dome.” Smith opened the tournament with a 15-1 loss to Josh Nocis of Adna, going the distance in his first match while avoiding a technical fall that would have ended it early. A more familiar foe, Tristan Chantry ended Smith’s tournament run on Saturday with a first period pin. Chantry, a Selkirk eighth grader, finished third in the state tourney. Ricevuto, in looking back on

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Catie Arrigoni (far right) has taken her cross country career to a new level during her two years at Everett Community College.

Arrigoni’s growing passion for running paves way to EWU By Brent Baker Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Jordan Smith grapples with Austin Boyes of South Bend at the Class 1B/2B state finals in the Tacoma Dome on Friday, Feb. 15. Smith defeated Boyes to get himself into the second day of competition. the season, said that it had gone about as expected - and that wasn’t necessarily a good thing. “The loss of the last senior class will bear its mark on all male sports at Oroville, with no real ‘group’ of athletes in sight,” he said. “More and more kids find sports ‘not fun’ and ‘too hard,’ with record numbers quitting throughout the state and country.

Some schools are bringing up eighth graders, even in basketball, just to salvage programs.” That said, the Central Washington League teams (which don’t compete as a standalone league in wrestling) seem to have fared better than most in the B leagues. Liberty Bell and Lake Roosevelt took the top two spots in the team scoring. The

Mountain Lions, with six wrestlers advancing to championship matches, had the team title wrapped up before the first day of action was complete. Liberty Bell boasted state champions Trent Skelton and Justin McMillan, while Orrin Gross was a champ for LR. South end CWL squad Kittitas finished fifth.

Late Hornet bid falls short By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

WENATCHEE - Oroville’s inability to get off to a strong start cost the Hornets in a number of games this season. In Thursday, Feb. 14’s loserout, winner-to-regionals game against Lake Roosevelt, it proved fatal to their season as the Raiders held on for a 40-36 victory that knocked Oroville from post-season play. “It’s been like this all year,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn of his team’s slow start. “In the past I could get people ready to play, but this year it seems like I can’t do it any more. I had people ready to go from the start for years, but very seldom were we ready to go from the start, at least against the better teams.” It was the third straight year Oroville was left one game away from making the state regional round for the first time in school history. “It seems like the same thing every year,” Bourn said. “Last year we only scored 15 in this game, so we did better, but 36 isn’t going to win very often either.” The Raiders took a 22-9 lead midway through the second quarter and still held a 35-24 margin going to the fourth quarter of the Class 2B District 5/6 third place game. Callie Barker kept the Hornets within striking range with nine of her team-high 15 points in the first 10 minutes of the second half.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Oroville’s Lily Hilderbrand shoots through some physical Lake Roosevelt defense during the Hornets’ season-ending playoff loss to the Raiders. But after her free throw with 5:22 left cut Lake Roosevelt’s lead to eight, the Raiders stole back the momentum as Hailey Chaney hit an improbable left-handed running hook from about 10 feet out, and moments later hit a free throw to make it 38-27. “They sure got some breaks with the ball,” Bourn said. “That running left-handed hook, and a couple of bounces that went their way.” Lily Hilderbrand, held in check for most of the game, came alive late with three offensive rebounds that she turned into two buckets and a free throw. Kali Peters came off the bench to hit a critical 15-foot jumper and Barker rebounded a missed free throw and banked it in with 2:30 left to

TONASKET GUN CLUB Results, Feb. 17

Lloyd Temby

6

cut the LR lead to 38-34. “We talked before the game about how much better it was to be in these kinds of games,” said LR coach PeeWee Pleasants. “When you go up against someone that you know can coach - when I go up against Coach Bourn, I’m still learning, but he really makes you bring out the best in you. You’ve got to be on your game to beat one of his teams.” But from there, the turnovers, missed opportunities and a couple of calls that had Bourn stomping his foot in frustration accumulated to keep the Hornets from getting any closer. Hilderbrand’s bucket with 15 seconds left after two Chaney free throws accounted for the final margin. “I told the girls, when they wanted to talk about what happened at the end of the game, that we should never have been in that position,” Bourn said. “If we played the whole game the way we finished we’d have been up

10 points, and then if bad things happen, it’s still OK.” Katelyn Schilling gave the Hornets fits with her play in the paint, scoring 20 points in the first three quarters to lead all scorers. “We just couldn’t move her out of there,” Bourn said. Pleasants said the physical nature of the game would help his team as it moves on to the regional round. “We have to learn to play through contact and no-calls,” he said. “That’s what it takes for you to move along at this time of year.” Barker led Oroville (13-10) with 15 points, including 11 in the second half, and Hilderbrand added 10. Lake Roosevelt (15-7), which shared the Central Washington League North Division title with the Hornets, advances to regionals.

White Swan 68, Oroville 31 WENATCHEE - Oroville’s girls basketball took a 2-0 lead over White Swan in Tuesday’s 2B Bi-District 5/6 semifinal, but it went downhill from there for the Hornets as the Cougars rolled off 21 straight points on the way to a 68-31 victory. “Their big girls just came out and kicked us around,” Bourn said. “And their perimeter players were shooting a lot better than they were earlier in the year. We just couldn’t stay with them.” Oroville trailed 34-11 at the half and could never get back in the game after White Swan’s early run. Lily Hilderbrand scored 15 points for the Hornets, who had a five-game winning streak snapped with the loss.

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EVERETT - NCAA Division I scholarships are hard to come by, so whenever someone from a small town like Oroville earns one, it’s something special. Catie Arrigoni, who always thought of herself as a basketball player until she was introduced to cross country during her senior year of high school, recently accepted a full scholarship for her final two years of college to Eastern Washington University after turning in two highly successful seasons at Everett Community College. Arrigoni, who was being recruited by a number of fouryear schools, said EWU’s team atmosphere and education program were the deciding factors. “I felt everyone was super positive and we will have a good team next year,” Arrigoni said. “I believe we can make an impact next year in our conference. They also have a great early education program and that being my major made it a very easy choice.” She didn’t run competitively until her senior year and said she never saw herself as a runner. “I loved basketball and always thought my future was with it,” she said. “After joining cross because I told my friend on the team I’d run if she would play soccer - I ran my first race in Omak and from then on knew I wanted to run. Not during the race, of course - I felt like I was dying but after, when I could see the finish line and knew I was going to make it, and crossed the finish line second to my good buddy and teammate (Sierra Speiker). “I will never forget that day.” The one-two combination of Speiker and Arrigoni led Oroville to a fourth place finish at the state meet. Speiker won her first state title as a freshman, while Arrigoni took fourth as a first-year runner. She drew enough attention with that and basketball that she signed with Everett to play both, and averaged 3.2 points per game in 22 games for the Everett women’s basketball team in 2011-12. The greater intensity of college training and competition forced the inexperienced Arrigoni to grow as a runner, and her times have accordingly dropped during her two-year career at EVCC.

Submitted photo

Catie Arrigoni of Oroville signs her scholarship papers to continue her running career at Eastern Washington University. Even as a freshman, she was consistently in the team’s top five, but with her focus solely on running this year, Arrigoni improved even more as part of Everett’s NWAACC champion cross country team, which set a conference record with its score in the championship meet with five of the top seven finishers. Arrigoni was one of five Trojan women to receive all-America honors. The improvement in her performance over her EVCC career can be seen by comparing her runs at the Sundodger Invitational in West Seattle, where Everett competed against a number of four-year colleges as well as other two-year schools. As a freshman in one of her first races, Arrigoni finished 57th in the 6k race with a time of 23:41, but this past fall as a sophomore moved up to ninth in 22:37. “It changed my life; I would have never gone to college or be getting my college paid for without running,” she said. “It is definitely a sport where you get what you put in and I love that! I have learned so much from running the last two years for EVCC and met the most amazing people.” She didn’t see the running career coming, but is glad she accepted the challenge. “I am so happy the turn my life took that race day in Omak,” Arrigoni said. “Running opened so many opportunities for me and I am so proud and thankful for everyone who got me where I am today.”

Each February, the American Dental Association sponsors National Children’s Dental Health Month to raise awareness about the importance of oral health. The following dental professional would like to share with you information regarding dental health for your child.

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FEBRUARY 21, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A5

the town crier

Protecting your 2nd Amendment rights

Our Founding Fathers recognized that certain rights are inherent to all Americans, which is why they had the wisdom and foresight to draft the Constitution and the Bill of Rights – documents that were forged by life experiences in the fight for freedom and democracy against tyranny and oppression. The Bill of Rights, composed of the first ten amendments to the Constitution, serves to protect the natural rights of liberty and property. Specifically, it guarantees our freedom of speech, freedom of religion, the right to due process, and a commitment to states’ rights that we all depend on and hold dear to this day. It also guarantees “the right of the people to keep and bear Arms.” Since the Bill of Rights was ratified in 1791, U.S. Rep. Doc our country has grown from 16 states with a total population of 3.8 million to 50 states with Hastings a total population of over 308 million. While the interpretation of these basic rights by the courts has changed over time, the fundamental rights guaranteed by our country’s first leaders remain just as strong. In the wake of tragic and senseless acts of gun violence, attempts are often made to enact additional gun restrictions. The White House is currently leading the charge by taking executive actions and urging Congress to take legislative action to further restrict access to firearms. There are currently thousands of federal, state, and local gun laws in place to prevent criminals from obtaining firearms. I do not believe in placing further restrictions on law-abiding citizens who legally own guns or who want to obtain them through legal means. The right to bear arms is no less sacred of a Constitutional right than freedom of speech, religion, or of the press. We all want our communities to be safe places to live, work, learn, and play. As we work to prevent all tragic acts of violence from occurring in our communities, I believe we must better understand the role that mental illness plays in these senseless acts, and look at ways to help and support individuals suffering from mental illness and their families. It will take everyone working together to find a solution that puts an end to senseless acts of violence. As a nation, our focus should be on preventing criminals from obtaining firearms by enforcing our existing gun laws, helping those who suffer from mental illness, and preserving the Constitutional rights of all Americans. The results of our latest online reader poll asked “What can we do to help stop gun violence?” The overwhelming response was to put no restrictions on our Second Amendment rights, followed by increased spending on the treatment of mental illness and better enforcement of the laws we already have in place. We might let the poll run for a little while longer while we think up something new to get your opinion on. Thanks to everyone who participated.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 Classified Advertising Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Closing of Assisted Living still major cause for concern among readers More at stake than assisted living Dear Editor, To the North Okanogan Community: As I looked around at the faces of the community members present at the Hospital Board meeting on Thursday night, Feb., 14, I saw many folks I know. I could see in my memories many of their relatives that I have taken care of at Extended Care, still fondly called the “Nursing Home.” I feel so connected here in this community. All of us in this community are so upset by the pending closing of the Assisted Living facility. I remember its construction and how proud everyone was. In this town there is such a wonderful arrangement for health care, from birth to the care of our elders with everything in between, all in a two block area. A continuum like ours is difficult to find in most small towns and something that many community members, including myself, have worked very hard to build and to protect. It is undeniably sad and painful for this community to have to watch the packing up and relocation of the residents of the Assisted Living facility. It feels and seems like a betrayal of our elders and we all want to do better by and for them. There will be a huge hole in this fine care network we have built. With this in mind we as a community need to consider what is at stake. We live in an economy that is fragile and has been squeezing us for a long time. It will most likely not improve fast enough, if it does at all, for us to have what we want most. Priorities must be set or we risk even more than what we are giving up now. I have been here as a working member of this community since 1974. To some that is a long time and to others it is not. I have seen health care here evolve from a user friendly, simple and not very regulated system where you could pay as you could afford it, to the present system which is so over regulated that the cost of health care is suffocating our nation. At this time Long Term care is the most over regulated system in the U. S. except for our nuclear energy system. The system for reimbursement is extremely cumbersome and difficult to understand, even by those who work with it. It also changes and multiplies frequently. I was one of those who worked with it and watched it evolve with consternation and even with rage when the nursing assessments that I did were changed to include reimbursement as part of their function. I always thought that nursing meant taking care of people. Now it is much more and we need at least three nurses to do what one used to do. Just that change has cost our hospital a huge amount of money. I graduated as an RN in 1970 and have seen many changes over the years. When I started here one chart for a long term resident of the nursing home was one half to one inch thick. Now a chart can be three inches thick containing only the last six months worth of hard copy record. Now we have computers and send assessments out to the state and federal windows which use these assessments to run our surveys for risk and reimbursement, to make sure that we are not only taking care of our folks, but also that we are not overcharging them and committing fraud. These are the assessments that run reimbursement. All of this is very complex and costs us lots of money. We are paying more now because of HIPPA (the Privacy Act), building and safety codes and materials. With the rise of disposables we have had to change more and pay more. I could go on and on, but this letter would never end and eyes would roll in boredom and with utter weariness. Mine have been. I was so glad to retire and did so just in time for the system to become even more cumbersome and expensive. My poor successors. It has become so apparent to me that if we as a community are not careful, we could lose our hospital. Warrants have been held for the hospital by the county for far longer than they were intend-

ed to be and now we, meaning this community and our hospital, are being asked to get them under control now. There is not much time. This hospital is part of ”us.” It is a hospital district and we vote for it. It is “us” no matter how imperfect it is and the team that manages it is. I do not know anything or anyone that is perfect. Mistakes have been made in the past and will continue to be made, no matter how hard we work to avoid them. That is part of the human condition and who we are. We, the community that our hospital is part of, need to imagine this town and the northern part of this huge county without this important part of ”us.” I have. You may think that things are bad now, but imagine what it would be like without the hospital, which includes the “nursing home” and clinics. It is a large employer here. It brings people into the community that would not come without it’s presence. This brings money into our community and allows businesses to exist and even thrive. Doctors would have to leave. Our citizens need good health care and right now enjoy and benefit from having the hospital district. If we are careful, and this includes those who manage the hospital, we will continue to benefit in spite of the closing of the assisted living facility. Over the years we have had to adjust how we do things and now we must do so again. We need to work on this together for “us,” the community. Yes, for some of us it means relocating our elders to other places, a very sad and life-changing ordeal for older folks who cannot adjust as easily to change. With difficulty and work these family members will be taken care of with or without the assisted living facility because that is what we do as a community. We must work together now. Sincerely and with great love for this community, Karen Schimpf, retired RN and Resident Care Manager of North Valley Extended Care Tonasket

What are we paying NVH CEO for? Dear Gary, There has been a lot discussion lately, regarding the hospital administration and commissioners’ behavior toward the community. Though, I can’t say I’m not among the many a little more than irritated by the recent hostility coming from that side There is also something terrifying that stood out in the CEO’s contradictory report. “We want the community to have healthcare services far into the future. We do not know what we are going to look like in the end, and what services we will or will not be able to provide for this community, but through it all our number one goal will be to work together for the betterment of North Valley Hospital, Public District No. 4, and provide jobs and healthcare for our community.” This the statement made after stating, “...knowing that no one lives this business like we do. No one from the outside can understand this business like we do.” Why doesn’t she know? What are we paying $160,000 for? What happened to strategic planning and continuing education? Previous administrations didn’t seem to have a problem knowing. Other hospital administration we have talked to don’t have the same doomsday attitude where

healthcare is concerned. In fact, looking into it, the changes have not been so extreme nor are they anticipated to be so extreme. And there are a lot of districts we have talked to who expressed their admiration at the amount of community support and involvement we have evidenced. Talking to Medicare, Medicaid, independent insurances and organizations like AARP, we have heard the same things; the changes are not so extreme. In fact, historically deadlines are extended due to the government’s (Medicaid and Medicare) own challenges in implementing changes, so it doesn’t really seem that eminent. At least not so eminent that we need to slash services to the degree we have. Contrary to her insistence of our ignorance there are many of us knowledgeable whether through self-education or experience in that particular field. I have confidence in the intelligence of our community, with our collective knowledge, if only we were allowed to participate, we can once again come up with viable solutions. And consider this, sometimes it takes someone from the “outside” to identify what others are too close to see. Christa McCoy Oroville

What’s really going on at North Valley? Dear Gary, Can someone explain to the hospital administrator that when the public gets blindsided by something as serious as evicting our seniors, its going to get our attention. Contrary to the administrator’s belief there are several people in our district that know that business, some of these people we have been leaning on to help us understand things like the massive billing issues, the poor customer service at check-in, problems with records being sent to our other doctors and many other issues senior management refuses to address. A lot of the information that has been requested, should have been compiled, gone through, dog eared, coffee stained and readily available months ago, if solutions were wholeheartedly being sought. She keeps saying there is a seven year history of loss but this still has not been proven, even by some of the very information she keeps shoving at us. The 2007 article with Bartleson (former administrator) does not prove a seven year stretch, it actually talks about the hospital charge error costing the Extended Care $400,000 that should have been a hospital debt. Which reminds me, Ms. Michel still hasn’t answered the question: Why is $220,000 dollars of our tax money specifically for the assisted living maintenance and operation going into the hospital account? Do we see a pattern here? Why weren’t the bonds being paid down with the cost reimbursement, as promised to the community, instead of used to fund the continued construction for clinic space that was going to be closed anyway? Why do we need to spend money... out of an already challenged budget (Long Term Care) to take over a deli? Why hasn’t the sale of hospital assets to Wenatchee Valley Clinic been openly discussed? As a “supervisor” one hopes she or at least the commissioners would understand why red flags

start popping up when employees can not legitimately justify these types of disastrous results and distasteful behavior. And whether she realizes it or not, she is our community employee. It’s simple logic, when you are unable or unwilling to answer honest questions with anything other than false information, evasiveness and aggression, the community (your boss) is left asking why are we being shut out? That’s when the hard questions start being asked, like: What’s really going on? John McCoy Oroville

Why choose coffee over our elders?

Dear Gary, Did we seriously kick grandma out for a cup of coffee? The attached accounting for the hospital coffee shop/deli, taken out of the hospital district’s Assisted Living and Extended Care Budget, shows a $65,000 loss in the last nine months of 2012, but was never considered to be cut. Cutting short a six-year lease, our administration added the lobby coffee shop to the Long Term Care Budget and christened it the “Drip Line.” As of April 15, 2012,The Drip Line is open approximately 98 hours a week and employs one full time employee and two part time employees. It was expanded to offer deli style food and meal specials. Please see the asterisked start up costs of roughly $9,970 determined by the hospital. After getting over the initial sticker shock, I enlisted some help from professionals in the industry. Research shows that the employees staffing the Drip Line are paid above and beyond industry standards; baristas usually make minimum wage and tips, they do not get paid benefits like the Drip Line employees. The $68,000 revenue barely covers the employee wages and benefits let alone the $133,551 it costs to operate. We still at this point, do not have a clear understanding through disclosure requests, of what is included in the $50,000 “supplies” and those in the industry were a little more than stumped at what kind of supplies would cost so much. After talking to many of the employees and community members, to their credit, they were genuinely confused and almost guilt ridden. “This came out of the Assisted Living and Nursing Home Budget?” , “It’s great to have the services there but not at the expense of our seniors housing”, It’s nothing you couldn’t walk a couple of blocks and get from the other coffee shops and businesses”, “why didn’t they just lease the spot out again?” etc. seem to be the general consensus. In essence why would we uproot 28 of our seniors and six employees in favor of a service that supports three positions. Services that could have been provided by someone knowledgeable in the industry, absorbed those three positions and generated an income from leasing the spot. Why attach it to an already “stressed” budget? And Why chose this service over our elders needs? John Snider Oroville

Editor’s Note: We ran out of space, but there will be more letters on the assisted living next week. You’ll be able to read them online now though at www. gazette-tribune.com. G.A.D.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 21, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Just one week until March One more week and we’ll be into March. Surely no more snow will come. But, we’ll see. A good sized crowd was on hand at the Episcopal Church last Tuesday evening for the annual Shrove Tuesday pancake supper and the sausage was so good! Some changes have been made at our local m e d i cal clinic, both in the THIS & THAT p hy s i c a l appearJoyce Emry ance and the personnel. The original staff, plus Wendy Schell and Mary Ann Williams will be on hand. Doug Wilson is there on specified days and PA Nancy Thompson will continue on as before, with one clinic using the entire building. Most all grandmothers are very proud of their grandchildren, but Doris Hughes is just beaming, due to the accomplishments of one of hers, and rightly so. Connor, a senior has had a fantastic year in basketball and he went out in a blaze of glory, scoring 65 points in his final two games. And, he’s a great kid, too. Congratulations to

him and to all his family for their support. Higher up in the basketball circle, Gonzaga College went on to a win from their rival school, St. Mary’s, by winning, big time, last Thursday. I think I’m getting too old to watch these close games. It must surely make my blood pressure rise. Sincere condolences go out to the many friends and family members of Lyndy (Syring) Hemry. Although Lyndy spent a lot of her adult years in Alaska, she is remembered by many from our area. Now that the snow is melting it is leaving mud that tracks in, so we have something different to complain about. I don’t like the mud but ya’ don’t hear of too many folks slipping and breaking a hip from mud as we do from ice. And there are places close by that the green grass is showing up. What a beautiful sight! It is said Valentine’s Day is second, only to Christmas for cards and flower sales. Roses are a popular choice for the event… now if someone would just perfect them to last longer then just a few days. No matter how old I get, I still like getting an unexpected gift and the latest was another beautiful scarf. Daughters are a good thing to have! I wonder if others find time

moving at a faster speed these days…or is it that this old body of mine is moving in the slow lane? The snow is really melting but some of those big piles are gonna be around for a while Nice to have to streets swept but it wasn’t nice to see snowflakes falling last Thursday, but thank goodness the flurry didn’t last long. And the sun kept right on shining. It was nice to chat with Mary Kernan, still residing in the Tonasket Assisted Living, but expecting to be able to return to her home, with help, when she has to leave the facility, in March. One of the Seattle news stations was in Oroville, interviewing Helen Casey, who is chairman of the hospital board, as they are putting together a story about the closure of not only the Tonasket Assisted Living, but some others that have to close, for financial reasons. Most of the residents have been placed in new facilities, but of course it won’t be as convenient as before, for family to visit. There is so much involved, and of course we like to point at someone to blame. It is a real emotional situation and many harsh words are being said, without knowing the facts. Reminder: Red Cross Blood Drive, March 6, from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the United Methodist Church.

Hilltop Comments

is $8. at the Molson Grange Hall. The Ladies Auxiliary have made up Raffle Baskets again this year and will be selling tickets $1 each or six for $5. Mark your calendar for Saturday, March 2. That is the date of the Benefit Dinner for Pauline Waits. The time is 4-7pm and the place is the Chesaw Community Building. The Dinner Committee is asking for a $10 Donation. The menu will be ham and scalloped potatoes, Green beans, salad, a roll and apple crisp. Their is a bank account set up at the Wells Fargo Bank in Oroville in Pauline’s name, (Pauline Waits) for your donations. Come and join your friends in this good will evening. The next meeting of the Knob Hill Home Economics Club will be on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at noon. It is a potluck and all are welcome.

Still no fish for fest by Marianne Knight Highlands Reporter

The Big day has come and gone, the pancake breakfast was the biggest success of the day, as there was not one fish caught all day. This is the third year in a row for the festival with no fish. All of the preparations were made ahead for a good day. The lakes were frozen, the fishermen were registered, the pancake breakfast was being served (with 220 sold). The vendors had their tables set up, ready for the lookers or the buyers. What, oh, what? are we to do now? I’m sure something will be worked out. The Festival committee worked very hard to get all of the donations for the prizes. The stage in the Grange Hall was covered with a big variety of prizes.

The winners were divided into three groups (adults, juniors, and raffle tickets). Tickets were drawn in each category and the winner was able to choose a prize from their group. This was the best way to give out the prizes. The Sitzmark Lasagna Dinner was very tasty and included salad,bread and cookies. On Feb. 11, with 31 people in attendance, the winners for the Monday night Pinochle games were, Low’s - Harold Harper, and Sally Eder, High’s went to Lani Thompson and Ken Ripley. No one took the Traveling. The next Pancake Breakfast will be held on Sunday, Feb. 24 at 11 a.m. Bring your friends, relatives and neighbors. The cost

March classes at NVCS coming soon

The Learning Tree

By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

One class remains in February and there’s still time to sign up! This class should be revealing; who knows, maybe a bit disconcerting. Discover the truth about who you are and how to make decisions for living up to your full potential. Your Human Design chart is like a blueprint for your life that is based on your date and time of birth. Just one session, it’s on Thursday, the 28th, from 6:30

p.m. to 8:30 p.m. March begins with Superbib! This was such fun last quarter we’re doing it again. Babies aren’t the only ones who need bibs. Sometimes adults should use them too. Why get splatters from the frypan on your nice shirt? This bib (and it’s an apron, too) can be thrown in the wash hundreds of times. This class is on Monday, March 4, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Sewing machines pro-

vided; you bring the fabric. Next in line on Tuesday, March 5, is Make Your Own Laundry Soap. You’ll leave this class with a container full and the knowledge to make it at home. On Wednesday, March 6, Email Essentials will help those who just can’t get their email to work right much of the time. It’s often annoying to deal with technological devices. This class is from 6-8:00 p.m. For all classes register with Ellen at (509) 476-2011 or email her at community.schools@ oroville.wednet.edu. The website is frustratingly down and we’ll let you know when it’s back up and running.

Magical night of dancing planned in Tonasket Submitted By Jinnie Bartholomew

Event Organizer

TONASKET - This was Jinnie Bartholomew’s description of March 2, 2013. She’s “putting on the glitz” and an elegant evening of fine dining, dancing and even a local photographer just so women can dress in fabulous evening gowns. The men are welcome to dress up but, “it’s really all about us girls.” The first annual “Have a Ball” will be held at the Tonasket Cultural Community Center on March 2 from 6-10 p.m. “This is not a fund raiser or an auction,” Bartholomew said. “It’s just so women can dress pretty and be admired for their beauty. Men have admitted to missing

seeing us women dressed up in elegant, fancy dresses. We don’t have much occasion for this attire in Tonasket, so this is a very big moment.” Formal attire is requested and men should at the least wear clean clothes. The men must remember they will be surrounded by gorgeous women, so they should look their best. Bartholomew who owns “It’s Still Good” a pre-loved items store at 313 Whitcomb Ave. in†Tonasket was inspired to plan the Ball after having high school girls rent dresses from her store for the Tolo. Her idea carried through to “us ‘real women’ getting a chance to show our beauty too.” The guest comedian speaker “Dr. Chocolate Bittersweet”,

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(a.k.a. Jinnie Bartholomew) will start the evening off with her lecture, followed by shrimp cocktail, salad and the entre’ of gouda chicken, malibu blend veggies, au gratin potatoes and dessert at around 10:00. Local photographer Patty Spade will be on site to take photos to be purchased to remember the beautiful evening. Jenny and Alisha at “The Split End” hair styling salon have volunteered to design women’s hair for free if a donation is made to the swimming pool fund (please call for your appointment at 486-4729.) Only 60 tickets are available at $20 each pre-purchase or $30 each at the door, if available. For more info or ticket purchases please call Jinnie at (509) 486-0231 or (509) 485-2039.

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Community Bulletin Board Tonasket Preschool Story Times

The upcoming Preschool Story Times are Thursday, Feb. 21 and Thursday, March 7th at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Public Library. Call (509) 486-2366 with any questions.

Ballroom Dance Lessons

Ballroom Dance Lessons each Thursday, this week it will be Thursday, Feb. 21 at the Tonasket Cultural Center from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Cost $5 per guest. Get ready for the Tonasket “Have a Ball” on March 2 at 6 p.m. to ? Fine dining, free danced lesson, photographer. Contact Jinnie Bartholomew at (509) 485-2039.

Landlord & Tenant Law

TONASKET – North Valley Community Schools is having a class on Landlord and Tenant Law. This class will take place in Tonasket on Thursday, Feb. 21. It’s one session with Roger Castelda. Call Ellen at (509) 476-2011, email community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu or register online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

Neighborhood Band

OROVILLE – The Neighborhood Band will be performing at Esther Bricques Winery’s tasting room tonight, Thursday, Feb. 21. Doors opening at 6 p.m. Light refreshments available. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oro-

May luncheon planned for building fund by Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center President

OROVILLE - Plans are underway to hold another fund raising luncheon around May Day festivities. We are going to achieve our goal for the Building Fund yet. John and Joy Lawson and their Canadian friends entertained the Seniors who stayed to enjoy the

DENTISTRY

ville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

TES PTO Winter Carnival

TONASKET - The Tonasket Elementary PTO is hosting their third annual Winter Carnival on Friday, Feb. 22 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Tonasket Elementary School. This year’s theme is Rock n Roll Carnival. There will be Karaoke, dancing, games, food, prizes and more.

Fabulous Fondue!

OROVILLE – OROVILLE - This “fun fondue affair” will take place at Esther Bricques Winery on Sunday afternoon, Feb. 24, from 4 p.m. Guests can expect several fabulous fondues and dippers, appetizers, and music by Steve Pollard. Wine and soft drinks will be available, and children are welcome. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. This is a fund-raising event for North Valley Community Schools. Tickets $10 adult/$5 child sold at the door.

Pollard will be featured at Esther Bricques Winery’s tasting room on Thursday, Feb. 28 with doors opening at 6 p.m. Light refreshments are available. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Miss Omak Stampede Fundraiser OKANOGAN – There will be a Miss Omak Stampede dinner and auction fundraiser for travel expenses on Saturday, March 2 at the Okanogan Eagles at 1820 2nd Ave. N. Dinner at 6 p.m., live auction at 7 p.m. Baron of Beef and BBQ Chicken $12/adults, $10/kids 10 and under. Come enjoy an “Enchanted Country Evening.”

Dollars for Scholars Variety Show

Molson Grange Potluck

OROVILLE - The Oroville Dollars for Scholars has scheduled this year’s Variety Show/Silent Auction for Friday, March 15. Application forms are available from Eric.Styles@oroville. wednet.edu or call (661) 313-3448. To donate auction items please contact Glenna Hauenstein at (509) 476-2416.

Classical guitar

TONASKET and OROVILLE Food Banks are running on their usual Thursday schedules. Contact Jack Gavin, (509) 486-2480 in Tonasket or Jeff Austin, (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana (509) 476-2386.

MOLSON - Come to the Molson Grange on Feb. 28 at 6:30 p.m. for a potluck and a great program to follow. Lisa Lindsay and friends from the Okanogan Wildlife League will be presenting the program. The public is invited.

OROVILLE – Classical guitar performances by John Phillips and Steve

Oroville Senior News music, including Tillie Porter who had a birthday in January. We just started setting a special table for birthday people so I joined Tillie at the table. Elva Helm and Barbie Freimuth actually had February birthdays but were both unable to make it. We all sang happy birthday anyway. We plan to have a Special Birthday Table set-up each month, to coincide with the

EYECARE

Food Banks

music. Many of our Seniors are on the sick or waiting for surgery or have just returned home after surgery. Including Ed Craig, Cleta Adams, and Tillie Porter. Pinochle Scores for February 16; This was evidently Jim Fry’s night as he took all the awards available except for high woman. He started with the door prize, then advanced to five pinochles and high point man for the evening. His last game totaled 1800 points. Beverly Holden had high points for the ladies. More next week

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FEBRUARY 21, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

SPORTS

Mat Mettle

Brent Baker/staff photo

Above, Tonasket’s Austin Booker takes on Levi Godinho of Castle Rock for the Class 1A state 160 lb. championship at Mat Classic XXV in the Tacoma Dome on Saturday, Feb. 16. Godinho’s late pin denied Booker the state title. Top (l-r) Collin Aitcheson placed fifth at the state finals; Jeff Stedtfeld earned a fourth place finish; Booker accepts his second place medal; John Rawley got his first taste of state tournament competition; Stedtfeld is consoled by coaches Dave Mitchell and Cole Denison after the final match of his career; and freshman Jorge Juarez made a big impression in his Tacoma Dome debut.

Booker is state runner-up, four Tonasket wrestlers medal as team finishes 10th at Mat Classic XXV By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TACOMA - The most painful place of all to finish at the state tournament is second, no matter how deserved the accolades for doing so might be. Tonasket’s Austin Booker was close enough to a state championship to taste it, leading 4-3 heading into the third and final period of his state title match against Levi Godinho at 160 pounds. But in the final two minutes Godinho (of Castle Rock) scored an escape to tie and a takedown to take a 6-4 lead. With the final seconds winding down and Booker having to take chances to tie it, Godinho pinned him and thereby clinched the state title. Booker’s performance, along with medal-winning efforts by Jorge Juarez, Jeff Stedtfeld and Collin Aitcheson, boosted the Tigers to a 10th place finish as a team. It was the Tigers’ best team finish since taking eighth in 2010 and a far cry from last year’s 25th place performance. “The Tonasket wrestlers ‘came to wrestle,’” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell. “(We) had a great following of supporters in Tacoma and it was a very emotional and good time for our community. Thanks to all who went to Tacoma and supported our wrestlers.” Booker (160 pounds) was not viewed as a favorite for the championship coming into the tournament. Though he’d made State as a sophomore, he missed most of last season with an injury and entered this year’s tournament with only a pair of state losses two years ago to lean on for experience. By taking second at regionals, a medal seemed a probability, but four regional champs were slotted to have an edge, at least by their seeding. Booker opened with a tough 8-3 decision over Tom Odneal of Ilwaco and held off Royal’s Emilio Bustos 9-4 in the quarterfinals to get to a semifinal showdown with Gabe Bunker of LaCenter, who had been dominant in his opening two matches (a pin and a 20-3 technical fall). Booker, who had admitted to being nervous prior to the tournament, realized he had a shot at the title after defeating Bustos. “After my first match, I became a lot less nervous and slowly started getting more comfortable,” he said. “By the finals I barely noticed all the attention. “After my second match, I knew that guy was a real contender and I pretty much worked him over. I realized that it didn’t matter who I had; I was going to win it.” Booker may have been confident, but had his family and friends gripping the Tacoma Dome’s upper deck railing as he

Preview 2013

battled Bunker to a 2-2 tie through two periods, and led 4-3 before getting two near-fall points as the match ended. With a seven hour wait between the semifinals and championship, there was plenty of time for nerves to return, but Booker said the confidence built up by winning his early matches kept him calm. “I realized I had accomplished what a lot of people haven’t,” he said. “Oddly enough, when I was warming up on the mat for the finals, I wasn’t nervous. It felt like every other match I’ve had.” Booker drew first blood on Godinho with an early takedown but allowed an escape to lead 2-1 after the first period. A Booker takedown followed by a Godinho reversal left it 4-3 heading to the third, but with about 20 seconds left and trailing by two points, with Booker on his knees, it was decision time, and it didn’t go the way he’d hoped. “Instead of taking the chance and trying to throw him - which ended horribly - I wish I woulda stood up and taken my chances on my feet,” Booker said. “Maybe that would have had a better outcome.” As it was, Godinho got Booker on his back and ended the match seven seconds early. And though Booker cracked only the briefest shadow of a smile while on the medal stand, he still managed to stand tall, head and shoulders above all but one other in the state.

wins, defeating Ramses Rodelo of Warden 13-6 in the opener and Anthony Frey of Blaine 15-5 in the quarterfinals. If there was one thing that went against the Tigers this weekend, though, it was the luck of the draw as Stedtfeld joined teammate Collin Aitcheson in facing a two-time state champion in his semifinal match. For Stedtfeld, that was Cascade Christian’s Josh Crager, who controlled most of the match before winning with a pin at 4:57. That set Stedtfeld up for an intriguing final two matches of his high school career. The first came against teammate Jorge Juarez, who thanks to an overtime loss in his previous match dropped into Stedtfeld’s consolation bracket. At the end of the 10-3 decision, Stedtfeld’s hand was raised in victory even as the two embraced at center mat. Stedtfeld faced off in the third place match against Klint Brown of Lakeside, to whom he’d lost 14-4 in the regional final a week earlier. This one went much differently; though Stedtfeld trailed 3-0 heading into the final two minutes, he cut Brown’s lead to one point before time ran out. “I gave it my hardest; that’s all I can ask for,” Stedtfeld said, acknowledging that those were words his grandfather would have said to him. “He would have told me, ‘Good job,’ and as long as I tried my hardest, that’s all that matters.”

The comeback kid There’s no doubt that Jeff Stedtfeld, for all his success, has had the roughest of seasons. The 126-pounder entered the year with high expectations after qualifying for state last year, but when his grandfather, Dennis Lorz, passed away under tragic circumstances early in the season, the difficulties of real life became a bigger obstacle than anything on the mat. But with his tight-knit family surrounding him - often literally, in emotional post-meet group hugs - Stedtfeld fought his way back to the Tacoma Dome, where his fourth-place finish was tempered mainly by not topping his brother’s performance from a year ago. As could be expected, that was a family thing; Jared finished fourth last season, and the two will have to settle for the tie. “I knew it was a tough, competitive weight class going into the tournament,” said Stedtfeld, who also celebrated his 18th birthday with a few thousand of his friends in the Tacoma Dome on Saturday. “So my goal was to win, but walking away with fourth place is not too bad... It would have been nice to have bragging rights (over Jared), but oh, well. We both finished fourth, so it’s OK.” Stedtfeld opened with a pair of solid

Hitting the wall Usually “running into a brick wall” refers to an athlete running out of energy. In Collin Aitcheson’s case, there was nothing wrong with his own performance. But the brick wall, in the person of Joshua Salcedo, proved impregnable. Salcedo (120), a defending two-time state champ (and now three-time titlist) ended Aitcheson’s state title dream with a quick pin 1:26 into the state quarterfinal match. Aitcheson is experienced enough to know what he was getting into. Not only did he win a state tournament match a year ago, he wrestled freestyle last spring rather than run track, and qualified for the USAW Junior Greco Nationals last summer. So when Aitcheson said, as he did about Salcedo, that they don’t come any tougher than the Granger champ, it carries some weight. “He’s probably one of the toughest guys I ever wrestled,” Aitcheson said. “He’s strong, fast and kept moving. Definitely one of the best I’ve ever wrestled.” Aitcheson usually is the quicker wrestler in his matches, but not against Salcedo, whose combination of speed and technical proficiency put him on another level entirely. He would likely

have been a state title challenger in any of the larger school divisions. Salcedo finished his career 15-1 in state tournaments with just a championship loss as a freshman keeping him from the pantheon of four-time winners honored at this year’s Mat Classic. He finished his senior title run with three pins and a major decision victory in the title match. After the Salcedo match, there was still business to be done for the Tonasket junior. Aitcheson bounced back with an 8-1 victory over Blaine’s Gage Lott to assure himself of a medal, and got past Carson Horton of Castle Rock 3-0 to avoid the seventh place match. That pitted him against Hootie Judd, a 14-4 victor over Aitcheson in the regional title match. The rematch played out much differently, ending deadlocked at 3-3 before Judd scored a takedown in overtime to advance to the third place match. “I felt like I outlasted him,” Aitcheson said. “I knew in the third period he was more tired than I was. But it just didn’t go my way.” Aitcheson finished with a 10-1 victory over Rochester’s Bobby Brien to claim fifth place. “I feel pretty good about it,” he said. “My goal was to finish at least fifth, and I got fifth. “As the season got longer I started setting goals: getting to the tournament, winning the tournament. But I really just wanted to do my best here, and it was definitely better than last year.”

The freshman If Tonasket’s Jorge Juarez (126) and Granger’s Adrian Morales stay in the same weight class as they move through high school, the 2013 state tournament could be the beginning of quite the highlevel rivalry. The two freshmen provided some of the most compelling drama of the weekend in a pair of white-knuckle, downto-the-wire finishes. Morales won both matches, keeping Juarez from finishing significantly higher than the sixth place he did earn. It was an impressive feat by a pair of freshmen on the biggest stage for the first time. “He had a great tournament,” Mitchell said. “I wasn’t expecting to get sixth,” Juarez said. “I thought State would be a lot more difficult than the regular season. It turns out it really was. It was a lot more of a challenge.” Juarez and Morales locked horns in their first match of the weekend. After wrestling to a 7-7 deadlock through the first two rounds, the lead changed hands several times in the final two minutes and twice in the final 15 seconds. Morales

pulled off a reversal at the final whistle for a 14-13 victory. That left Juarez in a deep hole as far as earning a medal, needing two wins just to get to the second day of action. But he fought back with an 8-2 win over Javier Contreras (Forks), a second round pin of Ilwaco’s Corbin Sutherland to advance into the medals, and an injury default victory over Ramses Rodelo which ended with Juarez up 9-0. Juarez still had a chance to finish as high as third, but had to get through teammate Jeff Stedtfeld for that to happen. His 10-3 loss to Stedtfeld set up a rematch with Morales. And that seemed to be firmly in Juarez’s favor as he led 7-2 late in the third period. But in the final seconds, Morales turned Juarez’s aggressiveness against him, pulling off a reversal and three point near-fall to force overtime. Moralez quickly ended the match with a takedown in the sudden death extra session. “It was good to get the experience,” Juarez said. “I’m happy. I just need to work on the little mistakes, because you can’t do them here.”

Getting his feet wet John Rawley (195) had dreamed of attending the Mat Classic as a participant since he started attending at age seven. His first taste of state competition lasted just two matches, undoubtedly leaving him wanting more. “John ended the season with 26 wins,” Mitchell said. “It was a great improvement from last year.” Rawley was pinned in the second round at 3:03 of his first match by Zach Wardle of Woodland. His tournament came to an end when he was pinned in the second round of his consolation match by Ruvim Tyutyunnik of Riverview. Big day for CTL The Caribou Trail League had a banner day overall, nabbing three of the top 10 spots in Class 1A. Quincy finished second to state champ Granger, with Chelan fifth and the Tigers tied for 10th. State champions included Gabe Alejandrez and Gabe Martinez of Quincy, as well as Chelan’s Erick Garcia and Asa Schwartz, while Brewster’s Nykia Mariscal was a runner-up in the girls tourney. Brewster’s girls were also honored for their team academic state championship. Also, Tonasket alum Martin Mitchell (coach Dave Mitchell’s son) was among the nine former Mat Classic legends honored as four-time state champions. North Kitsap’s Jake Velarde became the 10th to join the elite group on Saturday. Check out our website at www.gazettetribune.com for more photos and results of familiar wrestling friends and foes from around North Central Washington.

SPRING SPORTS

Our Spring Sports Section will be coming out in March! Don’t miss out... reserve your OKANOGAN VALLEY space now!

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Contact Charlene at 476-3602 or 509-322-5712


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 21, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • February 21, 2013

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent LAKEFRONT HOUSE, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, garage, $950; 2 bedroom, 2 bath, garage, family room, $875; Lakefront apartment, a Bargain at $500; Nice 1 bedroom apartment, $400. Call Sun Lakes Realty: 509-476-2121

Commercial Rentals FOR RENT: Office/Business unit. 806 Central, Oroville. New tile & paint. Excellent location. $395/mo. (509)4861682 or (509)429-0873.

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Help Wanted Maintenance Supervisor The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Maintenance Supervisor. Applicants must have computer knowledge and working knowledge of operation and maintenance of HVAC systems; electrical and plumbing knowledge; general building maintenance; staff supervisory skills; and able to respond to emergencies at any time. Position closes February 28. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 509-486-2126. An Equal Opportunity Employer

Oroville School District has the following coaching positions available: High School Boy’s Basketball Coach

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High School Boy’s Assistant Soccer Coach Junior High Volleyball Coach

Oroville CHARMING NEW Country Cottage with a Serene Valley View. 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath with Laundry, Living Room, Eat-in Kitchen and Lots of Storage Packed in this Efficient Space. $700/ month. Call: 509-476-0199

St. Charles Place Apartments 207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION:

LOW INCOME HOUSING “PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Please send letter of intent and an application from the district website: www.oroville.wednet.edu.

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

– Family & Singles –

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

509-476-4057

email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

Junior High Boy’s Basketball Coach

www.gazette-tribune.com

www.gazette-tribune.com

WorkSource Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310 Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Crosswords

Positions open until filled. OSD is an equal opportunity employer Applications can be sent to: Erin McKinney Oroville School District 816 Juniper Street Oroville, WA 98844 Payroll/Personnel Clerk The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Payroll/Personnel Clerk. Applicants must be proficient in Excel, Word, and FileMaker Pro and must have a thorough understanding of payroll processes, FMLA, FLSA, Family Care Leave and Labor and Industries laws. AA degree or higher preferred. Position closes March 1. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Please use the application specific to this position. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 509-486-2126 An Equal Opportunity Employer

degenerative diseases of the nervous system 24. ___ and Hardy

ANSWERS

10. Egg-shaped instrument

27. Amalgam

11. Object valued for evoking a historical time (2 wds)

28. Buenos ___

12. About 1% of the atmosphere

29. Small tart tree fruit

13. Laugh-a-minute folks

33. “I had no ___!�

14. Makes lace

34. Be bombastic

21. Cousin of a loon

35. Hip bones

22. Hansel and Gretel’s trail marks (2 wds)

36. Discuss an issue from a different point of view

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9. Cousin of -trix

23. Braids

38. Considers

24. Animal house

39. Daughter of Saturn

25. Assistant

40. Take back

26. Carbamide

41. Vascular inner layer of skin

27. Chutzpah

43. Supergarb

29. Algonquin Indians

44. Pranksters

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45. Kill, in a way

31. Describe

46. Long-jawed fish

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34. Gold braid

50. Condiment on lamb (2 wds)

37. 1919 world heavyweight champion

52. Lure

38. Sediment

53. Person who attacks another

40. Wicker material

54. Flip, in a way

41. Egyptian corn

55. Came in again

42. Small ornamental ladies’ bags 43. Perfume

1. Emergency vehicle 10. Eyeball benders (2 wds)

44. Street fleet Down

45. Workbench attachment

16. Optician’s rouge

1. Bone-dry

46. ___ gum, used as thickening agent in food

17. Those who are confined in wartime

2. Restaurant options

47. Bad marks

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48. Abbr. after many a general’s name

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Schools & Training

Statewides

School Bus Driver Training Class The Tonasket School District will be providing a School Bus Driver Training Class. Persons interested in becoming school bus drivers, should contact Jeff Yeckel at 4862665 or 486-2126, for additional information.

enced. Unbeatable career Opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 www.centraldrivingjobs.com

An Equal Opportunity Employer

LEGAL SERVICES

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF FEB. 18, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPT -- Adoring couple,TV Exec and Lawyer, Love, Laughter, Art and Outdoor Adventures await miracle baby. Expenses paid. 1-800-562-8287. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ATTN: COMUPUTER Work. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1.500 Part Time to $7.500 Full Time. Training Provided. www.WorkServices8.com START NOW! Open Red Hot Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox, Discount Party, $10 Clothing Store. Teen Store. Fitness Center from $53,900 Worldwide! www.DRSS31.com. 1-800-518-3064. ANNOUNCING THE New Global Opportunity. If you missed out on the Dot Com Boom, Don’t Miss Out on the Current Global Boom. www.GlobalBoom.biz.1-800-865-2192. EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified.. Call 866-483-4429. www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (800) 563-3005. www.fossmortgage.com CASH NOW for Good Notes, Top Dollar from Private investor. Yes, Bajillions Available for quality Contracts, Mortgages, Annuities, Inheritance. Receiving Payments? Call Skip Foss 1-800-637-3677 FOR SALE ANGEL MADE Pies -- Jenny Hoff & Jeff Swartz 509-893-3773. In support of A.L.S. Gifts-Valentine, Easter & Holidays. Delivered free in Spokane/ or shipped w/charge. Baked goods, pies -- Call for seasonal menu. Candy-Truffles, 3x10 gift box, $10. Home made by angels for angels with A.L.S. On Facebook friend us. FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N ATTRACT MONEY and Success Like a Magnet! To get your free “Money Making Secrets Revealed� CD, please call 425-296-4459. HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS DRIVERS -- Looking for Job Security? Haney Truck Line, seeks CDL-A, hazmat, doubles required. Offering Paid Dock bumps, Benefits and Paid Vacation! 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com DRIVERS

--

Inexperienced/Experi-

DRIVER --Qualify for any portion of $0.03 quarterly bonus: $0.01 Safety, $0.01 Production, $0.01 MPG. Two raises in first years. 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com

DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com REAL ESTATE COLFAX -- RIVERFRONT. 9 acres was $75,000 now only $39,500. Lender Repo sale. Beautiful valley views, quiet country road with electric. Excellent financing provided. Call UTR 1-888-326-9048.

Public Notices CITY OF TONASKET, WASHINGTON ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 3RD ST., 5TH ST., AND 6TH ST., SIDEWALK AND STREET PROJECT Sealed bids will be received by the City of Tonasket, Washington, at City Hall located at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket, WA 98855 until 11:00 a.m. on Thursday March 7, 2013, and will then and there be opened and publicly read aloud. The improvements for which bids will be received are generally described below: Removal of sidewalk and curb and gutter Installation of sidewalk and curb and gutter Installation of driveways and ADA curb ramps Removal and replacement of asphalt Grind and HMA overlay Removal and replacement of portions of an existing storm drain system Plans and specifications may be viewed at the following locations: 1. City Hall, City of Tonasket, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket, WA 98855 2. Varela & Associates, Inc., 601 W. Mallon Ave., Spokane, WA 99201 (509) 328-6066 3. Various Plan Centers - call Varela & Associates or go to www.varelaengr.com for a list. All bid proposals shall be accompanied by a bid proposal deposit in cash, certified check, cashier’s check, or surety bond in the amount equal to five percent (5%) of the amount of such bid proposal. Should the successful bidder fail to enter into such contract and furnish satisfactory performance bond within the time stated in the specifications, the bid proposal deposit shall be forfeited to the City of Tonasket. Contract documents may be obtained from Varela and Associates, Inc., located at 601 W. Mallon, Suite A, Spokane, Washington 99201 upon payment of $30.00. Contract documents are on file for inspection at the Tonasket City Hall. For additional information regarding this project, contact Daniel Cowger, P.E. or Kurt Holland at Varela & Associates, Inc., by phone at (509) 328-6066, or email at danielc@varela-engr.com. The project is being funded by the Transportation Improvement Board funds 6-E-885 (003)-1. The City of Tonasket in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color or national origin in consideration for an award. The City of Tonasket is an equal opportunity employer and encourages women and minority-owned businesses to submit bids. The City of Tonasket has the right to reject any or all bids. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 21, 28, 2013 #459209

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 509-476-3948 Viewing time : 10:00 AM Auction: 11:00 AM February 27, 2013 1990 Mercury Topaz License # WA 146UMA Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 21, 2013 #457848

Public Notices DISTRICT COURT FOR THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN DOUGLAS D. MORRISON, an individual, Plaintiff, v. KEITH ROYLANCE, an individual, Defendant. NO. 22354 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO: KEITH ROYLANCE AND JOHN DOE ROYLANCE You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after the 14th day of February, 2013, and defend the above-entitled action in the above-entitled court, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison at their office below stated; and in case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The complaint arises from default under a Promissory Note dated September 5, 2006. Shawn K. Harju, WSBA No. 29942 CARNEY BADLEY SPELLMAN, P.S. 701 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3600 Seattle, WA 98104-7010 Attorneys for Plaintiff Douglas D. Morrison Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 14, 21, 28, March 7, 14, 21, 2013. #457807 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: ROBERT DAVIS UNDERWOOD, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00014-7 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: February 11, 2013 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: February 21, 2013 /s/Wayne Pretts WAYNE PRETTS Personal Representative s/Anthony Castelda Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Underwood Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 21, 28, March 7, 2013 #457855 Summary of Ordinance #722 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, amending the 2013 Budget/Salaries adding the category of a temporary police clerk wage. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact City Hall, Tonasket, WA 509486-2132. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 21, 2013. #458453 Summary of Ordinance #723 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, providing for the annexation of certain territory to the City of Tonasket, Washington, and incorporating the same within the corporate limits thereof, providing for the assumption of existing indebtedness, and assigning zoning classifications, conditions and specifying an effective date. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-486-2132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 21, 2013. #458445 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: DONNA JUNE PARKER, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00003-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS

continued on next page


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Puzzle 11 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.32)

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509-476-3602

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Sponsored by

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Tuesday, February 12, 2013 In Oroville, on Westlake Rd., a woman have received 49 messages from male and female subjects stating that her boyfriend stole items and broke their door. In Tonasket, on Rope And Saddle Lane, a week ago a male subject pointed a rifle at a man and cocked it and threatened to kill him. The male subject felt scared for himself and his life. It was not reported, because he did not want the male subject to get arrested. However, he then heard dogs barking in the area and is concerned that the male subject may come back. He also got a strange phone call from a male 9

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Monday, February 11, 2013 In Omak, on Engh Rd., there was a male on foot who was reaching into a white car and beating the driver. The elderly female driver exited the car across from McDonald’s. In Okanogan, on Second Ave. S., a man was yelling that he is going to stab a woman with a knife. In Omak, on Hubbert Rd., a husband has taken $100 from his wife’s debit card. Randolph Couch, 57, was booked for DUI. Ruben Garcia- Ramirez, 19, was booked for possession of marijuana less than or equal to 40 grams. William Smith, 60, was booked for theft first.

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911 Calls and Jail Bookings

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Joseph Calus, 35, Tonasket, was charged with assault fourth, DWLS second and two counts of operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock. He was found guilty and received a $1058 fine. Joseph Dagnon, 47, Tonasket, was charged with assault fourth. He was found guilty and received one day confinement and a $1,283 fine.

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guilty and received one day confinement and a $1,876 fine. Sarah Ohmer, 40, Oroville, was charged with hit-and-run unattended. Javier Orozco, 45, Omak, was charged with two counts of DWLS third and three counts of reckless endangerment. He was found guilty and received one day confinement and a $1,558 fine. Shane Rich, 33, Omak was charged with no contact/protection order violation. Dustin Smith, 26, Omak, was charged with no contact/protection order violation attempt.

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Russell Gardner, 20, Omak, was charged with DWLS third and theft third. He received a $1,695 fine. Jody Hegener, 33, Omak, was charged with five counts of reckless endangerment and DUI. He was found guilty and received a $1,207 fine. Corina Keith, 55, Omak, was charged with hit-and-run with an unattended vehicle and two counts of DWLS third. She was found guilty and received two days confinement and a $1,108 fine. Jesse Lightley, 18, Omak, was charged with two counts of use/ delivery of drug paraphernalia, marijuana possession less than or equal to 40 grams and DWLS second. Lightley was found

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The court found probable cause to charge Patrick Gess, 22, with burglary second. He was found guilty and received one year and two months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Lyle Haukaas, 29, with assault third. He was found guilty and received 56 days confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Alisa Rice, 38, with two counts of possession of a controlled substance, DWLS third, use of drug paraphernalia and DUI. She was found guilty and received five months confinement. The court found probable cause to

charge Jimmie Styer, 57, with attempted child molestation second. He was found guilty and received 11 months confinement.

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Court, 911 Calls, Jail Bookings Superior Court

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of EDWARD T. JEFFKO, Deceased. Case No.: 13-4-00011-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Claire A. Jeffko as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the

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Public Notice Radio Jingle Tempo = 1965 Coffeehouse - Jazz poetry readingpercussion finger snaps. 30 sec. Chewy The Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op, food store. I don’t need any help, I can find the kelp. I can feel my pulse and right beside it sat the Dulse. The Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op, food store. Bulk foods - tofu - always something good to chew. The Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op food store. 4th and Western in Tonasket, Washingturn Effective 30 days from publication. This corporate advertising logo will be for sale. This song and it’s characters are my thought process prop-

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Summary of Ordinance #724 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, vacating the remaining portions of the alley in Block 10, Riverview Addition to Tonasket, subject to conditions and setting an effective date. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-4862132, P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 21, 2013. #458449

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The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: January 28, 2013 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: February 7, 2013 SUSAN J. BRANDT, Executrix Personal Representative Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Parker Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 8 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39)

9

address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: February 14, 2013 /s/Dale L. Crandall, Attorney for Claire A. Jeffko, Personal Representative PO Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 14, 21, 28, 2013. #456988

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erty. Animated wording and characters, as well as variable melodies and rhythm patterns are all in the process of copyright. I did not borrow this idea from anyone. If claims are made all signatures must be notarized with some kind of hard truth or evidence. 30 days from publicaton I will relsease this 30 second spot, or 3 minute blues song via contract. you may be in for a commission. If you know how to contact someone, then do so. Natures redeeming qualities basically my work is done but do retain revision. Roger Rylander 288 Howard End Rd. Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1834 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 21, 2013. #457411

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continued from previous page

Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 7, 14, 21, 2013. #454150

Sudoku

7

Public Notices

6

Public Notices

4

Public Notices

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Public Notices

Page A9 9

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FEBRUARY 21, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune February 21, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

See STATS | PG A10

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

www.windermere.com

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

SUN LAKES REALTY

509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

High In The Saddle-In The Vicinity Of Tranquility. Striking Classic Log Home overlooks a grand nature stage from its hilltop setting & shows works of love, thoughtfulness & creativity w/custom railings/banisters/ kitchen & more accents thru-out. 20 private acres in desirable community. Grand recreational deck to watch all below, private master deck to enjoy the stars. Hardwoods & tile. 2 Master Suites. - $314,900

4 Lakeshore Dr., Oroville - Amazing lake access with nearly new multi-level home with lake/mountain views. Slate, tile, oak floors. Stone gas fireplace. Granite counters, pantry. Master suite has walk-in closet, double sink vanity, separate tub/ shower. Daylight basement has gas fireplace in rec room, two bedrooms, full bath. Half bath, laundry room on entry level. Oversized two car garage with cabinets/sink. Wonderful home. NWMLS # 377262 $399,000

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Wannacut Lake View Home! 3 bd/3 ba, 1462 sq ft, situated on

just shy of 5 acres. This home is finished with tile, carpet and laminate flooring, earth tones throughout. The open concept floor plan leads into a warm living room that has fantastic views of the lake framed by tall pine trees. Feels like a mountain retreat! Modern kitchen has a rustic appeal, a large breakfast bar, tiled counter tops, wood cabinetry and pantry. Each bedroom has it’s own master bath. Public boat launch close by. MLS#398972 $212,000

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Advertise

Air Conditioning

Looking for something?

Edwards Refrigeration

D

Check out the Business & Service

irectory

Rick Edwards

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

- 24 Hour Service To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

Insulation

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Installed Insulation &

Garage Doors  Installed

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

Licensed & Bonded

509-486-2692 P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

Attorney

Building Supplies Quality Supplies Since 1957

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Midway Building Supply

RYAN W. GUNN

Oroville Building Supply

Attorney at Law

Civil Criminal Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

Concrete

OSOYOOS READI-MIX

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

We Work Saturdays!

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Pumps

Storage

Storage

Well Drilling

Got Water?

Lakeside

OROVILLE

“The Water Professionals”

— Fred Cook — Over 25 Years experience!

Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

STORAGE Boat, RV & More! Weatherization with lease Rent unit for project  Contractors store tools / product  Additional Business space available  

Located at: 124 Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-421-7168 lakesidestoreit@gmail.com

Mini Storage & U-Haul

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power n Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

www.orovilleministorage.com

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store  Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Zimmatic Pivots  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com


Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 21, 2013

STATS | FROM A9 subject this morning. He told police he would defend himself if necessary. Seth Hoit, 27, was booked for contract furnishing. William Shawl, 28, was booked for a department of corrections warrant. Tyson Heath, 24, was booked for a detainer. Kenneth Sweowat, 26, was booked for DWLS third and failure to appear. Marc Jefferson, 21, was booked for assault fourth, malicious mischief third, two counts of failure to appear and two counts of MIP. Ashley Picard, 29, was booked for DWLS second. Wednesday, February 13, 2013 In Oroville, on Main St., there was an assault in the parking lot. The people involved tried to bring conflict inside a store, but were barred from entering. Gerael Gardee, 18, was booked for MIP and criminal trespassing second. Casey Nations, 23, was booked for a

detainer. Arturo Mendoza, 21, was booked for DWLS first. Richard Mullin, 38, was booked for DWLS third. Kristena Park, 37, was booked for unlawful possession of a controlled substance. Thursday, February 14, 2013 Suzanna Marchand, 30, was booked for three counts of failure to appear, two counts of DWLS first and DWLS second. Jesus Cazares, 30, was booked for theft of a motor vehicle, trafficking stolen property first and felon in possession of a firearm. Caleb Regan, 21, was booked for possession of less than or equal to 40 grams marijuana. James Edwards, 41, was booked for possession of a controlled substance, possession of less than or equal to 40 grams of marijuana and use of drug paraphernalia. Anthony Freeze, 27, was booked for a warrant. Harvey Heath, 40, was booked for DWLS first.

Military Speak NCW Blue by Daralyn Hollenbeck Star Mothers NCW Blue Star MoTHERS

At our meetings a certain amount of time always goes to helping each other figure out things military where procedures are exact, the time system has no colons, an entire word can be capitalized, and the alphabet is similar to the placards posted around the top of kindergarten rooms. But instead of A - Apple and O - Octopus, they use more adult tags in the Phonetic Alphabet (Foxtrot, Golf, Whiskey). Here is a Go-To list of militarese for those struggling to keep current with your son or daughter as they serve. AAFES: Army and Air Force Exchange System (Military department store, also known as PX by the Army, BX by the Airforce, or Exchange) ACS: Army Community Services - provides support services to soldiers and their families and survivors. Allotment: Deduction from a service member’s pay designated by the soldier for specific purpose such as a mortgage or savings account. A Rations: Hot meals (real food) BAH: Basic Allowance for Housing BDUs: Battle Dress Uniform Benefits: Provided by the Military, such as medical, retirement, commissary and exchange privileges CADRE: Personnel permanently assigned to a Training or Provisional unit or to a unit being newly organized. CDC: Child Development Center CDR: Commander Class 6 Store: Army & Air Force term for liquor store (Package store: Navy term for liquor store.) CO: Commanding Officers COLORS: National and unit

flags Commissary: Grocery store, often located on base COLA: Not soda, but Cost Of Living Allowance CONUS: Continental United States. Refers to the 48 states on the North American continent. OCONUS: A duty assignment outside the Continental U.S., I.e. Korea, Germany, Alaska, Hawaii. Cover: Hat Dependent: Family member (“Family member” is preferred term) DITY: Do It Yourself move Detail: A duty assigned to one or more persons DoD: Department of Defense Duty Roster: Duty Schedule Family Members: Spouse and children of Soldier, only FRG: Family Readiness Group (also known as Family Support Group) GI Party: Soldiers get together to clean and scrub their Barracks HC: Headquarters HOR: Home of Record ID Card: Identification Card, all Family members 10 yrs. & older must have to enter certain post facilities & to receive dental and medical care. JUMPS: Joint Uniform Military Pay System Leave: Approved time away from duty MOS: Military Occupational

ObituarY

James Greene, 46, was booked for two counts of failure to appear, manufacturing methamphetamine and residential burglary. Cory Johnson, 43, was booked for failure to appear and DUI. Patrick Gess, 21, was booked for burglary second. Lawrence Sellars, 33, was booked for violation of a protection order. Friday, February 15, 2013 Jacob Lagrange, 33, was booked for two counts of failure to appear and litter greater than one cubic yard.

Marriage Licenses Gicela Avedano, age 20 of Tonasket, will wed Gilberto Vargas, age 24 of Okanogan. Jeanne White, age 56 of Tonasket will wed Raymond Guse, age 51 of Tonasket. Juanita Garnica, age 20 of Tonasket, will wed Gustavo Caballero, age 19 of Tonasket.

Specialty (job) Motor Pool: Military maintenance area MRE: Meal ready to eat (Dehydrated food) Pay Grade: Enlisted personnel - E-1 through E-9, Warrant Officers W1-W5, Officer personnel 0-1 through 0-9 POV: Privately Owned Vehicle Quarters: Place of residence of military personnel and their Family members. Re-up: Reenlist Short timer: A Soldier who has only minimum time left in the military or at a duty station SOP: Standard Operational Procedure SSN: Social Security Number. They’re not asking for yours, they’re asking for your sponsor’s Space A: Space Available (airplane, hotel, etc.) Sponsor: Your Service Member Subsistence: A small pay allotment given for food TBA/TBO: To be Announced / To be Determined TDY: Temporary Duty, a longer assignment often to another unit Title 10: Federal orders to deploy Title 32: State orders to mobilize Track: An armored personnel carrier which transports Soldiers XO: Executive Officer in a unit (not hugs and kisses) If you are in need of a compeer (someone who’s walked your path before or is walking it now) contact us at (509) 485-2906; facebook.com/ncw.blue.star.mothers.

LAURA BELL (BOHANNAN) GARRISON Laura Bell Garrison passed away Friday, February 8, 2013 after a brief illness surrounded by her family. Laura was born May 26, 1928 in Brunswick, Missouri to Edna and Timothy Bohannan. Her education was brief as well, even though her favorite subject was mathematics. Laura had to quit school to take care of her mother, because her mother had been burned in a house fire. Her favorite pastimes included music and dancing, word searches, cards and puzzles and pets, but

the outdoors and going on picnics, camping, visiting with her family and friends she truly lived for and loved. Gatherings always included a lot of laughter and many many stories. Laura met Floyd (Johnnie) Garrison and later they married in November 1945 and since Floyd was in the military they both traveled the United States. They moved from Missouri to Oroville, Wash. where they lived for several years until the family settled in Wenatchee, Wash. in 1979. Together they had six girls. She worked as a short order cook for a brief time but wanted and decided to be a stay at home mom. Laura loved searching and finding lucky four leaf clovers. These were her way of expressing her love and gave her spark in life. Discovering four leaf clovers took endless time and she wrapped each one with care because “they would bring you luck.” She was preceded in death by her husband Floyd (Johnny) Garrison; two daughters Frankie and Linda; sisters Bessie, Elsie and Jenny and brother Luther and other siblings and family members. Laura is survived by one sister Mary Gunn and her daughters Delores Palmer, Beverly Hart, Rosetta Garrison and Debra Garrison; grandsons Jim Palmer (Amy),

OROVILLE Oroville Community Bible Fellowship

Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

ington l Wash Centra North C B to , e n a id ree Gu outh Okanag Your F and S

for 2013~ Book Now!

Recreationland

2013 2013 Recreationland Vacation Planner and Mobile Web Application. Recreationland 2012 Recreationland Vacation Planner and Mobile Web Application.

All Ads Are In FULL COLOR

The mobile web site will provide tourists the ability to search, contact and map their trips and stops on smart phones, tablets and computers.

to the lement A supp ette-Tribune lley Gaz online: gan Va Visit us ne.com Okano ribu azette-t www.g

The most important advertisement you will buy for 2012 Recreationland is the most effective visitor guide in Okanogan, Ferry and Douglas Counties, and Super Natural British Columbia. It promotes the natural beauty and recreation that has made this area a year-round tourist destination. It’s a competitive world. Recreationland strives to make your advertisement seen by those most important to your business – our tourists.

DISTRIBUTION 25,000 DISTRIBUTION This year Recreationland will distribute 25,000, 25,000 color glossy print copies fullfull color glossy print copies FREE listing in our

NEW Mobile Tourism With an ad, you get a FREE listing in our NEW Application All advertisers that purchase an ad in Mobile Tourism Application the 2012 Recreationland also receive

of Recreationland across Okanogan County and selected of Recreationland across Okanogan County and Washington State and British Columbia visitors centers. selected Washington State and British Columbia Advertising Deadline: March 9, 2012 visitorsPaycenters. by April 2, 2012 and receive 5% discount off regular pricing.

All advertisers that purchase an ad in the 2013 Recreationland also receive editorial support and a FREE listing in our new Mobile Tourism Application which will go live in March 2013. Recreationland and RecreationLand.mobi give visitors from around the US and Canada valuable information about attractions, Gold activities tourist Member -and $300/yr Basic listing plus… hospitality across the Okanogan and User administration Link to Website surrounding regions. Top of search (alphabetical)      Upload Video or Pictures  Badge link to Facebook/Twitter pages  Prominence on “nearby” map searched

*All listings include basic listings on the Recreation-Land mobile Site that Silver Member $200/yr. includes directory listing, phone number and- map link. Basic listing plus...   User administration  Link to Website  Top of search (alphabetical)  Upload Video or Pictures

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

editorial support and a FREE listing in our new Mobile Tourism Application which will go live in March 2012. Recreationland and Recreation-Land. mobi give visitors from around the US and Canada valuable information about attractions, activities and tourist hospitality across the Okanogan and surrounding regions. *All listings include basic listings on the Recreation-Land mobile Site that includes directory listing, phone number and map link.

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Full Page............................ $900.00 1/2 page..............................$525.00 1/4 page............................. $300.00 1/8 page..............................$187.50 Inside Front Cover.............$1125.00 Back Inside Cover.............$1125.00 Back Cover........................$1350.00 $75 Directory Listing

ADVERTISING DEADLINE March 9, 2013

Full page: Half page: 1/4 page: 1/8 page:

7.5” wide x 9.875” 7.5” wide x 4.75” 3.625” wide x 4.75” 3.625” wide x 2.25”

All advertising pricing includes full process color!

or Pay by April 2, 2013 and receive 5% discount off regular pricing. CONTACT: Charlene at 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712 / Fax: 509-476-3054 CONTACT Charlene: charlene@gazette-tribune.com 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712 Fax: 509-476-3054

Okanogan Valley

www.gazette-tribune.com

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

CHURCH GUIDE

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 a.m. Men’s Meeting 9:45 Sunday School (2-17 yrs) • Life Skills (18+) 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Bible Study (13+) Pastor Claude Roberts

The most important advertisement you will buy

Subscribe to the... GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Okanogan Valley

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

d n a l n o ti 2013 a e r c e R

Dennis Palmer (Sheari) Walter A Hart IV, Tameron Hart, and Jonathan Garrison; granddaughters Betty Palmer and Mystie Overbay; great grandsons Caleb Ohrazda, Jayden Palmer, Jason Smith, Derek Palmer, Mathew Vaughn and Alexander Hart; great granddaughters Kristen Vaughn, and Emily Johnson great great grandchild Trinity Johnson and many many friends. A special thanks to the Central Washington nursing staff for all of there compassion and care and for the mobile meals. In Lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Alheimers Association. A private family graveside service will be held at a later date at the Oroville Riverside Cemetery, Oroville. Arrangements are by Telford’s Chapel of the Valley, East Wenatchee, Wash.

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10:30 a.m., Worship & Youth Sun. School Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church? To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 21, 2013  

February 21, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 21, 2013  

February 21, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune