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JANUARY 4–10, 2012 I VOLUME 37 I NUMBER 1

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM I FREE

ANGELINA JOLIE GOES TO BOSNIA PAGE 19 | MOMIJI'S MAYO-MANIA PAGE 23

seattle weekly • January 4 – 10, 2012

REVERB MONTHLY: From behind the curtain, two Tacoma songwriters are topping the charts. 2012 looks like it’ll be the year they finally get the credit(s) they deserve.

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inside » Jan. 4–10, 2012 volume 37

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up front 7 NEWS

THE DAILY WEEKLY | A“road diet”

controversy; how the 520 bridge will get your money; McGinn’s paltry war chest; and charitable giving in the food biz.

»23 19 FILM THIS WEEK’S ATTRACTIONS

Angelina Jolie goes back to Bosnia, and young lesbians escape the closet in Paris and New York.

23 FOOD

23 | MOMIJI | Complicated sushi,

lemon-jalapeño sauce, and gallons of mayo.

11 THE WEEKLY WIRE Sharks versus Jets at the Paramount, François Truffaut at SAM, and Stephen Tobolowsky at the Neptune.

15 ARTS

15 | EAR SUPPLY | John Adams’ big bang.

» cover credit

PHOTO BY GL WOOD/UNIVERSAL COPYRIGHT © 2012 BY SEATTLE WEEKLY, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. ISSN 0898 0845 • SEATTLE WEEKLY IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY SEATTLE WEEKLY, LLC. SEATTLE WEEKLY® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK. • FOUNDED 1976. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT SEATTLE, WA POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO SEATTLE WEEKLY, 10 08 WESTERN AVE., #30 0, SEATTLE, WA 98104 MAIN SWITCHBOARD: 623-050 0 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: 623-6231 RETAIL AND ONLINE ADVERTISING: 467-4341

of a neighborhood watering hole.

reverb monthly

Seattle Weekly’s music magazine includes reviews of every local release; a report on two Tacoma songwriters on the way up; career and life advice from John Roderick; and much more. Find it following page 16.

also 14 16 20 24 27 28

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JANUARY 4 – 10, 2012

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news»The Daily Weekly

Road Kill McGinn’s road diets have been assailed as a sop to pedal-pushers. But a South Seattle group says they threaten public safety as well.

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seattle weekly • January 4 – 10, 2012

ince Mayor Mike McGinn started pushing “road diets,” they have generated controversy, especially among people who see them as an anti-car sop to the Spandex crowd. Now a South Seattle group has a new complaint: It fears a planned road diet will endanger public safety. This road diet will remove a car lane and add bike lanes for some seven blocks along Othello and South Myrtle Streets, including right in front of the Seattle Police Department’s South Precinct. Seattle Department of Transportation’s Therese Casper says the restructuring is intended to improve safety. Documented speeds on that stretch of roadway average 10 miles per hour above the 30 mph limit, and there were 112 collisions between 2008 and 2010, according to SDOT figures. But Pat Murakami, president of the But is there a way to beat the state’s Southeast Crime Prevention Council, worcutting-edge toll technology? ries that the road diet “will slow down police On an average weekday, the bridge carries response time, which is already slow.” Not 30,000 cars per lane. That’s a whole lot of only might the South Precinct’s officers get license plates to track, and the state had to stuck on their own block, Murakami says, but delay the start of tolling for more than a year they will have a harder time reaching other to figure out how to do it. The “Good to Go” parts of their territory. Very few arterials run scanners will account for the majority of east-west, as does Othello/South Myrtle (one vehicles, while cameras mounted above the road turns into the other a few blocks west of east end of the bridge will capture two phoMartin Luther King Way), Murakami points tos of each car—one of the front license plate out. And she says the problem is compounded and one of the back. by light rail, which bisects the few existing The cameras are similar to those used to east-west routes. The concern is heightened nab red-light runners by a recent crime spurt in at Seattle intersecSouth Seattle, which has tions, but with a few seen a spate of muggings print is great. key differences. One and assaults, including But if you want to see is that at night, a one leading to the death phoenix Jones dodging “near-infrared” flash of gay Filipino hairdresser bullets in Belltown, system will be used Danny Vega. for the benefit of South Precinct Captain you’ll have to check it out on The Daily Weekly. Lake Washington’s Mike Nolan says he also SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM/DAILYWEEKLY salmon. According expressed initial concern to Patty Rubstello, about the road diet. But the DOT’s director of that was before SDOT toll-system developofficials showed him ment and engineering, the lights are purple, their maps. He says he saw that although a color that will allow workers to distinguish there will only be one car lane in each the red writing on Washington license plates direction, there will be a center turn lane but not illuminate the water below, which that he believes will allow his cars some could put salmon in harm’s way by making wiggle room. There will not, however, be a them more identifiable to predators. The turn lane on the precinct’s own, narrower system’s software also uses “optical charblock. But Nolan says the block is not that acter recognition” to automatically read busy, and on the rare occasions it is, his Washington plates. Out-of-state plates will officers can use a bike lane to pass. be read manually, via the photographs. “I gave it my blessing,” Nolan says of the Several people already have dreamed project. “If it is problematic, know this: I up schemes to obscure their license plates will be going back to SDOT and requesting from the red-light cameras, such as using a that something be done.” NINA SHAPIRO clear plastic coating to reflect the light from the flash. But supposedly that won’t work with the 520 toll. “If the system itself can’t Most drivers crossing the newly tolled accurately determine what the license plate 520 bridge will pay up to $3.50 at peak numbers are, it goes to manual review,” hours from a windshield-mounted “Good Rubstello says. “You’ve got human eyes lookto Go” pass, which basically works like a ing at it, and they can see through tactics debit card. Those without passes will have people use to cover it up. Even if there’s mud their license plates photographed and covering it, they can usually determine what eventually receive a bill for the toll, plus a license plate numbers are there.” » Continued on page 9 $1.50 surcharge (hence the $5 maximum).

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news» The Daily Weekly » from page 7 The only loophole, it seems, is for drivers to stick their license plates somewhere other than their front and back bumpers. Rubstello says strict privacy laws prohibit the state from photographing motorists through their windows, so they can’t capture license plates placed in a rear window, for example. But Rubstello notes that state troopers will be on the lookout for people with improperly mounted plates. She also cautions that speeding through the tolling scanners won’t do any good either. “They can actually take good pictures even at really high speeds,” she says. For the truly tightfisted, the best option probably will be to fight technology with technology. A company called SeaBalt Solutions has released a “Toll Avoider” app, which maps alternate routes that avoid 520 altogether. KEEGAN HAMILTON

Mayor McGimp

When only a meager 23 percent of the city’s electorate approves of the job Mayor Mike McGinn is doing, it is understandable that money for a possible bid for re-election might be hard to come by. As of November 30, Seattle’s bike-loving, tunnel-hating chief executive had raised a total of $31,709 and his cash on hand sat at $2,258, according to campaign financial reports filed with the Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission. By contrast, ex-Mayor Greg Nickels, at this point in his first term (December 2003) and nearly two years removed from seeking re-election in 2005, had raised $103,555 and had more than $70,000 in his war chest. In 2009, Nickels raised nearly $600,000 in his bid for a third term, almost three times as much as McGinn, but finished third in the August primary. It is interesting to recall just how close that election was: McGinn collected 27.71 percent of the vote to Joe Mallahan’s 26.88 percent and Nickels’ 25.36 percent. It’s anyone’s guess as to how many candidates will seek to bring down McGinn in 2013. The most frequently named potential contenders include Seattle Councilmember Tim Burgess and state Sen. Ed Murray, who considered a write-in candidacy after voters rejected Nickels. ELLIS E. CONKLIN

news@seattleweekly.com

on » news the daily weekly xblog

seattleweekly.com/dailyweekly

Find a little something for them— two little somethings for you. Shoes. Clothes. Beauty. New shops at Crossroads mean more choices for you. And no matter how many “somethings” you find, we promise not to tell.

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Participation would certainly require a degree of customer confidence, and I imagine servers might worry that customers would lop off their tips to compensate for any money spent on charity. But those are the only problems I can envision. I love eating out, and don’t think anyone should have to live frugally if they can afford to do otherwise. But as we nitpick about whether our duck was overcooked, we should take a moment to remember how few people ever have the chance to fret about such things. HANNA RASKIN E

TO SHOP

156th

Whole Foods is again running its “Bag Hunger” campaign, urging customers to tack a few extra dollars to their grocery bills so the supermarket chain can purchase tuna fish, peanut butter, soup, and other commodities for neighbors in need. Last year, the drive netted $43,000 in the Seattle metro area. “We purchased roughly 21,000 pounds of food and delivered it in nice pallets,” recalls spokesman David Hulbert. While $43,000 is surely a tiny fraction of Whole Foods’ total holiday revenue, it’s a significant sum for food banks, which are grappling with supply shortages and increasing demand. According to the USDA, more than one in seven U.S. households last year experienced “food insecurity,” defined as a lack of access to enough food for a healthy, active life.

It’s hard to defend withholding $2 for a can of tuna when ringing up a $100 tab for wine and artisan cheese.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JANUARY 4 – 10, 2012

Hunger on the Line

Since Whole Foods’ suggested donation levels top out at $10, it’s likely that thousands of people contributed to the store’s campaign. That’s not entirely surprising: It’s hard to defend withholding $2 for a can of tuna when ringing up a $100 tab for wine and artisan cheese. Guilt is a powerful motivator for generosity. Even for Whole Foods customers who routinely ignore the nation’s hunger crisis, it’s a short leap from “I’m really going to enjoy this food I’m buying” to “Not everyone can afford the food I���m buying.” That makes a grocery store an ideal setting in which to broach the ugly topic of hunger. And it occurred to me when I last checked out at Whole Foods that a restaurant is another arena in which patrons should be primed to give. Many restaurants already participate in charitable events in which they pledge a certain portion of the day’s profits to hunger relief, or offer specific menu items benefiting food banks. The Cheesecake Factory sends a quarter to Feeding America every time it sells a slice of Hershey chocolate cheesecake. And “Buy a Meal, Give a Meal,” an Australian nonprofit now looking to establish a U.S. presence, partners with restaurants to promote food or beverage items by designating them as charitable choices. Yet I wonder if there’s a better way for restaurantgoers to fight hunger than donating a quarter at a time. Specifically, I’d love to see an added line on credit slips for hunger-relief contributions. Since I’m not an expert on restaurant payment systems, I ran the idea past the folks at NPC, a Kentuckybased “provider of payment processing systems.” The question bopped around the office, but the IT crew finally decided it could be easily done, although the money couldn’t go directly to a charity. Like a server tip, it would be paid out by the restaurant.

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s e at t l e w e e k ly • J a n u a ry 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2


the»weekly»wire wed/1/4

fourth outing at 14/48, actor/playwright

MJ Sieber says “You’re definitely setting up

a chance to fail—usually on the first night [Friday], which then informs the second night’s performance.” Themes are assigned at random, and the writers’ response is usually to aim for laughs. “That’s what I’ve always shot for,” says Sieber. “Having sat through thousands of 14/48 performances, it seems like SNL-style sketch comedy works best.” Also, it’s wise to maintain a characterfirst approach to writing. “I don’t think about the plot beforehand,” he adds. More advice: Hew to realism or go completely beyond it (into the zany), and keep the stagecraft simple: “If you’re gonna have any props, it’s best to be minimal—a stapler and a cell phone.” (Seven new shows are created next Fri. & Sat.) ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, acttheatre.org. $20–$25 ($40 pass). 8 & 10:30 p.m. Repeats Sat. BRIAN MILLER

COM E DY

Growing Haynes

Andy Haynes lives in New York City now,

FI LM

Small Crimes

PHOTOGR A PH Y

Faces of Conflict

After nine years, nearly 4,500 military fatalities, and thousands more seriously wounded, the Iraq War is finally over. Soon after the U.S. invasion, New York photographer Suzanne Opton began to make portraits of the men and women who serve, posing them near-identically in her series

Serious and Twisted Ron Smith and Jaret Hughes dance for

Soldier, with heads resting on the ground.

Eyes open and closed, some looking relaxed, others just tired, their faces were compared to those in a morgue back in 2008, when Opton bought billboard space to display them in Minneapolis–St. Paul during the Republican National Convention. Naturally the billboard company canceled the contract for fear of offending attendees. Said Opton of her subjects, “They may look troubled, but it’s not easy to be a soldier. Why should that be hidden from us?” In a second series on view, Many Wars , she drapes veterans—some going back to WWII—in robes and places them in almost classical poses, as if they’d stepped out of a painting. In a real sense, they have. Art history is full of nobly posed warriors with raised swords, flapping banners, and valiant steeds. Opton does away with all that, dispensing with medals and uniforms, notions of bravery and patriotism. You just

*

get a name, no rank, and maybe the length of service. Their sacrifice and our respect is implicit, but it’s the gulf between us that may be the real subject of Opton’s lens. (Through early February; also note closing reception with the artist on Thurs., Feb. 4.) Platform Gallery, 114 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 323-2808, platformgallery. com. Free. Opening reception 6–8 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

fri/1/6 STAGE

Rush Jobs

The whole point of the annual 14/48 Theater Festival, in which 14 new 10-minute plays are created over two weekends, is to accept the format’s hasty limitations. Facing his

the past and the present. Hughes’ group, Twisted Elegance, pays homage to the hip-hop music and style of the ’90s, while Smith’s Throne Level ensemble stays true to more current styles like vogueing and street jazz. Together these two have created an upbeat, lighthearted, and fullout urban dance show called Live in the Drum 3: A Night of Twisted Elegance . It’s impossible not to bounce in your seat when you see Smith’s gritty moves or Hughes hitting each “boom-kack” of the music with the precision of Janet and the flair of Michael. Smith has a knack for humorous vulgarity: In Throne Level, his dancers pull down their pants to reveal superhero-patterned underwear, only to start doing the dougie. Hughes, the SuperSonics’ first male dancer, asks that his dancers sport serious “fierce” faces while performing. If anything, his lightning-fast, energetic choreography requires a serious mind to keep track of what move comes next. I should know, since (disclosure) I’m one of the performers. Bellevue College’s Carlson Theatre, 3000 Landerholm Cir. S.E., 425-564-1000, brownpapertickets.com. $15. 8 p.m. AARON GORDON

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 12 FRI: FILM

The Secret Agent Before the Artist

Director Michel Hazanavicius and his star, Jean Dujardin, scored a hit at SIFF ’06 with OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies , a hilarious French spy spoof set in the mid-’50s. They followed with a lesser sequel (OSS 117: Lost in Rio), but their first genuine American success is The Artist, which has been earning superlatives from Cannes to its current U.S. release (Oscar nominations are expected). In Cairo, Dujardin plays the sexist, chauvinist secret agent Hubert Bonisseur de la Bath (code name OSS 117), who doesn’t know the first thing about the world outside his Paris tailor’s shop. Nor does he care to learn. Upon arrival in Egypt, he’s yawningly incredulous that people speak Arabic—not French? Zut alors!—and worship a strange god. This whole Islam thing, he predicts, it’ll never last. Though assigned a chic local assistant (Bérénice Béjo, also in The Artist), and attracting notice from a sexy princess, our man in Cairo is mainly confounded by the chicken plant he must run as a cover for his covert operations. And he’s haunted by the memory of his dead WWII buddy Jack, with whom he played many a manly, joyous paddleball game on the beach, then wrestled ecstatically in the surf. Oh, how they laughed together, Hubert and Jack! Laughed! OSS 117 is deliciously and authentically textured with the cheesy rear-screen projection, tailored JFK suits, and trim Jackie dresses of the era, but Hubert’s retrograde ignorance of the world still resonates. As an incurious, self-assured, colonialist idiot barges through a foreign culture he doesn’t understand, making enemies and offending the natives at every turn, the film is as much foreign-policy critique as comedy. Egyptian, 801 E. Pine St., 781-5755, landmarktheatres.com. $8.25. Midnight. (Repeats Sat.) BRIAN MILLER

Béjo dances with OSS dunce Dujardin.

seattle weekly • January 4 – 10, 2012

Beginning a 10-film retrospective at SAM, François Truffaut ’s 1959 delinquency tale The 400 Blows still resonates through the isolation of essential details, which stand out with the focus of unblemished memory: that ancient, gouged, chalkcoated classroom that’s seen a thousand wiseasses sent to its corner; the horror of impending discipline as a teacher’s called into the hallway; the tactile, gasping chill from the milk that Antoine quaffs from a stolen bottle during a night on the street. It is the nature of the film for those who love it to recognize themselves in it, and so it never fully recedes into history. Fourteenyear-old Jean-Pierre Léaud appears for the first time as Antoine Doinel, who begins a cycle of punishment and retaliatory misbehavior that inexorably mounts, burying him under an accretion of lies, accidental arson, plagiarism, truancy, and petty larceny. Eventually the boy leaves the cramped apartment he shares with his hard, bottle-blonde mother and clownish, cuckolded stepfather for the more peaceful climes of the juvenile detention center. The film was Truffaut’s arrival, a triumph of publicity at Cannes, the loudest early success of the loose confederation of New Wave filmmakers, and a milestone in autobiographical cinema. His 1958 short Les Mistons (“The Brats”) precedes the feature. (Thursdays through March 1.) Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $59–$66 series, $7 individual. 7:30 p.m. NICK PINKERTON

DA NCE

MUSIC BOX FILMS

thurs/1/5

Haynes returns to his hometown.

PEOPLESREPUBLICOFKOMEDY.COM

but he remains the quintessential Seattle comedian. His subject matter, drawn from everyday life, is edgier and more sarcastic than that of the king of observational humor, Jerry Seinfeld. Haynes’ hair and clothing appear to be an afterthought (he looks faintly like early-SNL Seth Meyers), and his anecdotes are delivered as though he’s seated next to you at Linda’s, not standing onstage in front of hundreds of fans. He’s going places—Haynes recently performed on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon—but he remains emblematic of the scene that nurtured him. Never before has a man cracking wise about Nazis, homosexuality (“It gets sweater”), and the stench of homeless subway commuters seemed so darn cuddly. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8000, chopsuey.com. $10–$15. 9 p.m. MIKE SEELY

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STBPMOVIE.COM

Fun fact: Tobolowsky and Stevie Ray Vaughan performed together as Texas teenagers.

The Weekly Wire » FROM PAGE 11

s e at t l e w e e k ly • J a n u a ry 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2

*

12

FRI: FILM

The Secret Agent Before the Artist

Director Michel Hazanavicius and his star, Jean Dujardin, scored a hit at SIFF ’06 with OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies , a hilarious French spy spoof set in the mid-’50s. They followed with a lesser sequel (OSS 117: Lost in Rio), but their first genuine American success is The Artist, which has been earning superlatives from Cannes to its current U.S. release (Oscar nominations are expected). In Cairo, Dujardin plays the sexist, chauvinist secret agent Hubert Bonisseur de la Bath (code name OSS 117), who doesn’t know the first thing about the world outside his Paris tailor’s shop. Nor does he care to learn. Upon arrival in Egypt, he’s yawningly incredulous that people speak Arabic—not French? Zut alors!—and worship a strange god. This whole Islam thing, he predicts, it’ll never last. Though assigned a chic local assistant (Bérénice Béjo, also in The Artist), and attracting notice from a sexy princess, our man in Cairo is mainly confounded by the chicken plant he must run as a cover for his covert operations. And he’s haunted by the memory of his dead WWII buddy Jack, with whom he played many a manly, joyous paddleball game on the beach, then wrestled ecstatically in the surf. Oh, how they laughed together, Hubert and Jack! Laughed! OSS 117 is deliciously and authentically textured with the cheesy rear-screen projection, tailored JFK suits, and trim Jackie dresses of the era, but Hubert’s retrograde ignorance of the world still resonates. As an incurious, self-assured, colonialist idiot barges through a foreign culture he doesn’t understand, making enemies and offending the natives at every turn, the film is as much foreign-policy critique as comedy. Egyptian, 801 E. Pine St., 781-5755, landmarktheatres.com. $8.25. Midnight. (Repeats Sat.) BRIAN MILLER

sat/1/7 STAGE

Where Have I Heard This Guy?

Stephen Tobolowsky is not a name you’ll

immediately recognize, but his face is unmistakable. Turns out his voice is, too. The veteran actor has played memorable supporting roles in 100-plus films (recall

Ned “Bing” Ryerson, the cheerful bald guy Bill Murray slugs in Groundhog Day) and myriad TV shows (lately including Glee, as pervy teacher Sandy Ryerson). He’s even the subject of a 2006 documentary, Stephen Tobolowsky’s Birthday Party, which you can find on DVD. But it’s in telling stories on his weekly podcast and syndicated radio show, The Tobolowsky Files , that the artist has found his true calling. His fireside chats, heard Saturday afternoons on KUOW, are comforting and gripping. His earnest, conversational tales bounce between the personal and the professional; and despite his long showbiz resume, he always provides common ground with the listener and never name-drops. (One example: his droll account of how a polite, unknown Brad Pitt apologizes for sitting in his chair on the set of Thelma & Louise.) Tonight he’ll be telling stories and taking your questions. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org. $19–$24. 8 p.m. CHRIS KORNELIS BOOK S

The Recovering Debutante

Just as American expats who flocked to Paris in the ’20s often had to deal with a skeptical “Oh, like Hemingway?”, any young woman who moves to New York after college is now judged by the standard of Carrie Bradshaw. To her MORE incredulous relaONLINE tives back in North SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM Carolina, Jane Borden must continually insist that, no, her life is not just like Sex and the City. Struggling through the usual array of temp jobs and waitressing gigs in a post9/11 metropolis, Borden began to collect the vignettes related in her memoir I Totally Meant to Do That (Broadway, $14). Instead of tawdry tales of drunken hookups (assuming there were any), this young journalist and comedienne muses upon the disconnect between her friendly Southern upbringing and the don’t-lookat-me code of the street. Just because a stranger has the same R.E.M. Green concert tour T-shirt as you, she realizes, doesn’t mean you should strike up a conversation with him. There’s no Gawker snark to her travails, which often read like letters home from an exotic, foreign land where the delis are open all night, women aren’t expected to marry, and “proper” manners gradually erode with experience. She’s more Erma Bombeck than Candace Bushnell. Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com. Free. 7 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

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MOE’S FINAL WEEKEND

MOVING SALE NEW Stock Just Arrived

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JANUARY 4 – 10, 2012

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arts»Performance

The Fresh Connection

BY GAVIN BORCHERT

Stage

THR-SAT, 1/5-7

WINNER NATIONAL LAUGHING SKULL COMEDY COMPETITION

OPENINGS

BEING HUMAN Improv sketch comedy. JewelBox/

Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., 441-5823, jewelbox

JOE KLOCEK XUNG LAM SUN JAN 8

PROS DO NEW BITS

CULT-OF-EIGHT EVERYONE’S A COMEDIAN

By William Shakespeare | Directed by David Quicksall

THRS-SUN, 1/12-15

who am I without my sword?

OPEN MIC NIGHT RORY SCOVEL PLUS DEREK SHEEN

January 4–29

Center House Theatre, Seattle Center

(at Occidental)

206.628.0303

S E AT T L E W E E K LY • J A N U A RY 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2

WWW.COMEDYUNDERGROUND.COM

14

Opens Friday Tickets: 206-733-8222 www.seattleshakespeare.org

JOHN ULMAN

109 S. Washington St.

tragedy. Center House Theatre, Seattle Center, 733-8222. $15–$40. Previews Jan. 3–5, opens Jan. 6. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. plus other weekend performances; see seattleshakespeare.org for exact schedule. Ends Jan. 29. THE EDGE Bainbridge Island’s own improv troupe. Bainbridge Performing Arts, 200 Madison Ave. N.,

In ancient Rome, as today, the 1 percent called the shots; Seattle Shakes shows us how in Coriolanus.

PLUS A VERY SPECIAL GUEST HOSTING ALL JANUARY

MON JAN 9

theater.com. $10. 7 p.m. Sun., Jan. 8.

CORIOLANUS War and politics clash in Shakespeare’s


arts»Performance Bainbridge Island, 842-8569, bainbridgeperformingarts. comedienne” Barbara Holm, and plenty more. Annex org. $12–$16. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 7. Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre.org. 14/48 THEATER FESTIVAL SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 11. $5–$10. 11 p.m. Fri., Jan. 6. GODSPELL Village Theatre’s KIDSTAGE Institute presents SPRING AWAKENING Balagan Theatre presents the Stephen (Wicked) Schwartz’s musical regional premiere of the acclaimed rock setting of the Gospel of Matthew. First opera, an update of Frank Wedekind’s conStage Theatre, 120 Front St. N., Issaquah, troversial 1892 play. Erickson Theatre Off 425-392-2202, villagetheatre.org. $14–$16. Broadway, 1524 Harvard Ave., balagan Opens Jan. 7. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 theatre.org. $20 and up. Opens Jan. 6. 8 p.m. p.m. Sun., plus 7:30 p.m. Sun., Jan. 8. Thurs.–Sun. plus 11 p.m. Sat. Ends Jan. 15. Ends Jan. 22. STEPHEN TOBOLOWSKY SEE THE WIRE, ANDY HAYNES SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 11. PAGE 11. THE LOST FOLIO Wing-It Productions WEST SIDE STORY SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 11. folds your suggestions into a CURRENT RUNS Shakespearian spoof in this improv show. Wing-It Productions, 5510 PETER PAN The Fremont Players present University Way N.E., 781-3879, wingit a British panto-style version—i.e., audience T H I S CO D E presents.com. $10–$14. 8 p.m. Thurs.– participation and a dash of drag. Hale’s TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE Palladium, 4301 Leary Way N.W., 800-838Fri., Jan. 5–20 and Feb. 2–10. SEATTLE WEEKLY SAFEWORD Improv from this quintet. 3006, brownpapertickets.com. $6–$12. 4 & 7:30 IPHONE/ANDROID APP JewelBox/Rendezvous, 2322 Second p.m. Sat., 1 & 4 p.m. Sun. Ends Jan. 15. FOR MORE EVENTS OR VISIT Ave., 441-5823, safewordcomedy.com. TEATRO ZINZANNI: BONSOIR seattleweekly.com LILIANE! This cabaret homage (plus five$10. 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 7. SPIN THE BOTTLE Annex Theatre’s latecourse feast) to singer/actress/dancer night variety show, every first Friday. Liliane Montevecchi, who turned 79 last fall, could be TZZ’s sexiest production ever. At the January’s show includes “lurid rococo smut” from Kelleen Conway Blanchard, “impish elfin center of this three-and-a-half-hour spectacle, which recounts her long career, she may be its most alluring performer. Born in France, and subsequently a contract player at MGM alongside Brando, Elvis, and Astaire, Montevecchi remains a magnetic force. (Given that her legs still look flawless, she either has a pact with the devil or drinks the blood of virgins.) Playing the younger version of Montevecchi is former Pacific Northwest by gavin borchert Ballet star Ariana Lallone. The cast also includes Ukranian contortionist Vita Radionova, Swedish singer/ dancer/acrobat Tobias Larsson, and emcee Kevin Kent, unquestionably TZZ’s most popular performer, an improv master who provides plenty of laughs by poking fun at willing (or unwilling) audience members. The whole glittery shebang is directed by Tommy Tune, who helped Montevecchi dance her way to a Tony for Nine—29 years ago. Today, her legs would make most 29-year-old women envious. ERIKA HOBART Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015, zinzanni.org. $76 and up. 6:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat., 5:30 p.m Sun. Ends Jan. 29. A YEAR WITH FROG & TOAD A musical version of the classic tale. Seattle Children’s Theatre, Seattle Center, 441-3322. $20–$36. Runs Fri.–Sun.; see sct.org for exact schedule. Ends Jan. 15. Robertson leads a fusion

SCAN

EarSupply

DAN DREYFUS

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of opera and symphony.

The Big Bang

METROPOLITAN OPERA AT THE MOVIES On Jan. 4

at 6:30 p.m., Renée Fleming stars in Handel’s Rodelinda; on Jan. 11 at 6:30 p.m., an encore of Gounod’s fluffy and tuneful Faust. See fathomevents.com for participating theaters. $18–$22. SHERMAN CLAY CONCERTS Informal hour-long recitals each Thursday. This week, pianist Robert Swan plays Liszt and Mozart. Sherman Clay Studio, 1624 Fourth Ave., 267-7580, shermanclay.com. Free. 12:15 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. SEATTLE SYMPHONY SEE EAR SUPPLY. TUDOR CHOIR Just a little more Christmas music, from the renaissance. Northlake Unitarian Universalist Church, 315 Third Ave. S., Kirkland, 323-9415, tudor choir.org. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 6. O(PA)PERA In conjunction with SAM’s “Luminous” exhibit, inspired by Pacific Rim earthquakes and tsunamis, and scored for erhu, typewriters, and much more, Byron AuYong and Roger Benington’s half-hour song cycle/installation takes place inside a paper tent. Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., seattleartmuseum. org, 654-3121. $6–$12. 7 & 8 p.m. Fri., Jan. 6. CAPPELLA ROMANA Rachmaninoff’s All-Night Vigil and other Russian choral works. St. James Cathedral, 804 Ninth Ave., 800-494-8497, cappellaromana.org. $22–$27. 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 7. DUO AMADEUS From violinist Elizabeth Blumenstock and pianist Tamara Friedman, music from Bach to Schubert. Queen Anne Christian Church, 1316 Third Ave. W., 726-6088, galleryconcerts.org. $12–$28. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 7, 3 p.m. Sun., Jan. 8. WASHINGTON WIND SYMPHONY Performing one of Gustav Holst’s two suites for band—the Beethoven symphonies of the band repertory—and other classics. Kirkland Performance Center, 350 Kirkland Ave., Kirkland, 425-893-9900, washingtonwindsymphony.org. $5–$13. 3 p.m. Sun., Jan. 8. SEATTLE SYMPHONY Violinist Joshua Bell appears one night only, playing Bruch’s G minor concerto; Ludovic Morlot also conducts Mozart and Weber. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $45–$157. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Jan. 10. LADIES MUSICAL CLUB Chamber music by Czerny, Rachmaninoff, and others. Seattle Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave. Free. Noon, Wed., Jan. 11. MELIA WATRAS Music by Kurtag, Ligeti, and Xenakis, plus two commissioned works, from this new-musicfriendly violist. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, music.washington.edu. $12–$20. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 11. Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com

seattle weekly • January 4 – 10, 2012

It would have been a fool’s errand, composer John Adams knew, to try to represent orchestrally the sound of an atomic explosion. So the climax of his 2005 opera Doctor Atomic, which tells the story of the first nuclear bomb, is a distant, shimmering whoosh—a sonic analogue to the flash of the iconic fireball, from the perspective of observers taking cover miles away. Later, Adams extracted some of the opera’s more overtly dramatic passages to construct his 25-minute Doctor Atomic Symphony, which the Seattle Symphony will play at this weekend’s concerts. There’s foreboding in the ominous pounding and screaming of the brief first movement, “In the Laboratory,” and hurtling agitation in the second, “Panic.” Even lyrical interludes later in this movement don’t completely dispel the feeling of restlessness, almost always present in some jumpy background syncopation or other. The finale, “Trinity,” is based on an aria for the central character, scientist J. Robert Oppenheimer, with the voice replaced by an elegiac solo trumpet. It’s a setting of one of the Holy Sonnets by John Donne—the very sonnet that inspired the real-life Oppenheimer to code-name the project “Trinity” in the first place. For this aria, Adams wrote music with some of the flavor of the pioneering operas by Donne’s contemporary Claudio Monteverdi: stately, somber, yet crushingly emotive. David Robertson (who’s recorded the piece with his St. Louis Symphony on the Nonesuch label) guest-conducts it alongside music by Mozart, Stravinsky, and Weber. Benaroya Hall, Third Avenue and Union Street, 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $17–$110. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5, 7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 6, 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 8.

Classical, Etc.

15


arts»Visual Arts BY KAT CHOW

Openings & Events

s e at t l e w e e k ly • J a n u a ry 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2

LAUREN FRANCIS ADAMS Her painting and drawing

16

series Bear the Sway draws inspiration from the “Lost Colony” of English settlers in colonial Virginia. Note opening reception and artist talk 2–2:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 11. South Seattle Community College, 6000 16th Ave. S.W., 764–5308, southseattle.edu. Opens Jan. 9. Mon., Wed., 9–10:30 a.m. & noon–4 p.m. Tues., Thurs., noon– 4 p.m. Through Feb. 14. LARRY AHVAKANA The Inupiat carver shows work in wood, alabaster, marble, glass, and other materials. Note artist reception First Friday, 6–8 p.m. Fri., Jan. 6, and artist talk 12:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 7. Bainbridge Arts and Crafts, 151 Winslow Way E., Bainbridge Island, 842–3132, bacart.org. Opens Jan. 6. Mon.–Sat., 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Jan. 30. BAM’S FREE FIRST FRIDAY Strapped for cash? BAM offers free admission every first Friday of the month. Here’s your chance to check out the museum’s current exhibits, including George Nelson’s Travelers, and Cathy McClure’s Midway. Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., 425–519–0770, bellevuearts.org. Free. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Fri., Jan. 6. CHRISTOPHER BOFFOLI In the large photos of Big Appetites, he combines miniature hand-painted figurines from Germany with dioramas of food and drink. Note opening reception 6–8 p.m. Tues., Jan. 10. Winston Wachter Fine Art, 203 Dexter Ave. N., 652–5855, winstonwachter.com. Opens Jan. 10. Mon.–Sat., 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Feb. 23. RAYMOND BOISJOLY The French-Canadian artist addresses “Aboriginality, language and materiality” in The Spirit of Inconstancy. Note opening reception on First Thursday, 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. Call for regular ongoing hours. Lawrimore Project, 117 S. Main St., 501–1231, lawrimoreproject.com. Jan. 6–28. MICHAEL DAILEY His new show is Works on Paper. Note opening reception 2–4 p.m. Sun., Jan. 8. Francine Seders Gallery, 6701 Greenwood Ave. N., 782–0355, sedersgallery.com. Opens Jan. 6. Tues.–Sat., 11 a.m.– 5 p.m., Sun., 1–5 p.m. Through Feb. 5. THE DARKROOM SERIES Dan Cole, Mellow Longfellow, and others exhibit photos captured with iPhones and other mobile devices. Note opening reception 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. Zeitgeist Art and Coffee, 171 S. Jackson St., 583–0497, zeitgeistcoffee.com. Opens Jan. 5. Mon.– Fri., 6 a.m.–7 p.m.; Sat., 7 a.m.–7 p.m.; Sun., 8 a.m.–7 p.m. Through Feb. 1. FREMONT ART WALK Venues include Activspace, Fremont Brewing Co., 509 Winery and Tasting Room, Caffé Vita, and Fremont Abbey. (See fremontfirstfriday. com for participating artists.) Various locations, 6–9 p.m. Fri., Jan. 6. GIVE ME HEAD Was this group show curated by Beavis and Butt-head? Efrain Almeida, Sarah Awad, Tanya Batura, Travis Collinson, Evan Holloway, Shimon Minamikawa, Mark Mumford, Anders Oinonen, Marjorie Schwartz, Akio Takamori, and Jason Teraoka focus on the face. Note First Thursday opening reception, 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. James Harris Gallery, 312 Second Ave. S., 903–6220, jamesharrisgallery.com. Opens Jan. 5. Thurs.–Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Jan. 28. GROUP EXHIBITION Debuting smaller works are James Martin, Andre Petterson, Bratsa Bonifacho, John de Wit, Luce Pelletier, Louise Kikuchi, Cameron Anne Mason, Ben Darby, Casey McGlynn, Darlene Cole, Merrilee Moore, Will Robinson, David Schwarz, Guy Laramee, and Rachel Denny. Additionally, Evan Blackwell, George Rodriguez, Paul Vexler, and Eva Isaksen provide larger installation art. Note First Thursday opening reception, 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. Foster/White Gallery, 220 Third Ave. S., 622–2833, fosterwhite.com. Opens Jan. 5. Tues.– Sat., 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Through Jan. 26. TROY GUA His N/ICE features duct–taped teddy bears. He explains, “These bears are metaphors for the social bipolarity of the so–called ‘Seattle Freeze.’ ” Note First Thursday opening reception, 5–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. Soil Gallery, 112 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 264– 8061, soilart.org. Wed.–Sat., noon–5 p.m. Through Jan. 28. KIM EUGENE HOOD He shows black-and-white photos taken while trekking to Mount Kailash in Tibet. Also on view, paintings by J. E. Brivic (titled Hide & Seek, in the Subterranean Room). Note opening reception 7–10 p.m. Sat., Jan. 7. Call for ongoing hours. Art/Not Terminal Gallery, 2045 Westlake Ave., 233–0680, antgallery.org. Jan. 8–Feb. 1. KUKAI: SEA AND SKY Digital artist Robert Campbell and ceramic sculptor Yuki Nakamura collaborate again, drawing inspiration from the buildings and landscape of Puget Sound. Note First Thursday opening reception, 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. Soil Gallery, 112 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 264–8061, soilart.org. Opens Jan. 5. Wed.–Sat., noon–5 p.m. Through Jan. 28. EMILIYA LANE Fragments of Life collects her new still lifes and landscapes. Note First Friday opening reception, 6–9 p.m. Fri., Jan. 6. Frank and Dunya, 3418 Fremont Ave. N., 547–6760, frankanddunya.com. Mon.–Sun., noon–6 p.m. DALE LINDMAN In Between Places, Lindman plays with texture in large abstract works. Note opening reception 2–4 p.m. Sun., Jan. 8. Francine Seders Gallery, 6701 Greenwood Ave. N., 782–0355, sedersgallery.com. Opens Jan. 6. Sun., 1–5 p.m.; Tues.–Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Feb. 5.


arts»Visual Arts FRED LISAIUS He shows new landscapes. Note First

Thursday opening reception, 5–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. Linda Hodges Gallery, 316 First Ave. S., 624–3034, lindahodgesgallery.com. Opens Jan. 5. Tues.–Fri., 10:30 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Jan. 28.

A LITTLE LEVITY: COLOR, LIGHT, AND LAUGHTER

This group show features photographs and paintings of cheerful things, rendered in a variety of media. Note artist reception 1–4 p.m. Sun., Jan. 8. Gallery North, 508 Main St., Edmonds, 425–774–0946, gallery–north.com. Opens Jan. 8. Sun., noon–6 p.m.; Mon.–Fri., 11 a.m.– 7 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.–7 p.m. Through Jan. 30. HARRY LONGSTREET Only Human presents photos that “that speak to the human condition.” Note First Friday opening reception, 5–7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 6. Bainbridge Performing Arts, 200 Madison Ave. N., Bainbridge Island, 842–8569, bainbridgeperformingarts.org. Opens Jan. 6. Tues.–Fri., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Jan. 31. JUSTIN LEE MARTIN Martin drew on his youth in western Montana in Ten Feet Tall. Note First Thursday opening reception, 5–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. Punch Gallery, 119 Prefontaine Place S., 621–1945, punchgallery.org. Opens Jan. 5. Thurs.–Sat., noon–5 p.m. Through Jan. 28. SEAN MCFARLAND The San Francisco photographer is known for very dark, murky views of the city. Note First Thursday opening reception, 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5, and artist talk, noon, Sat., Jan. 7. Greg Kucera Gallery, 212 Third Ave. S., 624–0770, gregkucera.com. Opens Jan. 5. Tues.–Sat., 10:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Through Feb. 18. NEW YEAR GALA EXHIBITION In this group show, Diane Ainsworth, Brian Fisher, and others ring in the new year with paintings and other work. Note First Friday opening reception, 6–8 p.m. Fri., Jan. 6. Roby King Galleries, 176 Winslow Way E., Bainbridge Island, robykinggalleries.com. Tues.–Sat., 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m. SUZANNE OPTON SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 11. PAPER JEWELS Jewelry works by Alejandra Koreck (Argentina), Sabrina Meyns (Ireland), Sara Owens (Seattle), Cynthia Rohrer (Oakland), Midori Saito (Seattle), and Laura Wood (San Antonio) are on display. Note First Thursday opening reception, 5–7 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. Paper Hammer, 1400 Second Ave., 682–3820, paperhammer.com. Opens Jan. 5. Sat., 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Fri., 2–6 p.m. Through Feb. 25. ELLEN PICKEN Nothing offers her landscape paintings of the Okanogan Valley. Note opening reception 6 p.m. Wed., Jan. 4. Form/Space Atelier, 2407 First Ave., 349–2509, formspaceatelier.com. Wed.–Sat., Noon–4 p.m. Through Jan. 28.

JUNE SEKIGUCHI Within/Without is a site-specific

installation produced following a residency in Laos. It features scroll-cut wood and gilded bamboo with sound and light elements by Rob Millis and Spar Wilson. Note opening reception 5–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5 and artist talk 2 & 5–8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2. ArtXchange, 512 First Ave. S., 839–0377, artxchange.org. Opens Jan. 5. Mon.–Fri., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Feb. 25. SHIFT Member artists Sharon Birzer, Kamla Kakaria, Paula Stokes, Yun Hong Chang, Jo Moniz, Ellen Hochberg, Daya Bonnie Astor, Adele Eustis, Kerstin Graudins, Susan Gans, Cass Nevada, Romson Regarde Bustillo, Ted Hiebert, David Traylor, Patrice M. Donohue, and Eric Mead interpret the theme “shift” to honor the gallery’s name. Note First Thursday opening reception, 5–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. Shift Collaborative Studio, 306 S. Washington St. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 547–1215, shiftstudio.org. Opens Jan. 5. Fri.–Sat., noon–5 p.m. Through Jan. 28. ANDRZEJ SKORUT He shows traditional oil-on-canvas landscape paintings. Note opening reception 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 5. Patricia Rovzar Gallery, 1225 Second Ave., 223–0273, rovzargallery.com. Opens Jan. 5. Mon.–Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Jan. 31. SURFACE Among others in this group show, Daniel Carrillo uses traditional wet-plate photography to create largeformat portraits. Note opening reception 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 12. Photographic Center Northwest, 900 12th Ave., 720–7222, pcnw.org. Opens Jan. 5. Mon.–Thurs., 11 a.m.–10 p.m.; Sun., noon–8 p.m. Through Feb. 15. WALLINGFORD ART WALK Participating venues and galleries include Stu Stu Studios, Fuel Coffee, Julia’s Restaurant, and Oasis Art Gallery. See wallingford artwalk.org for full roster of attractions. Various locations, 6–9 p.m. Wed., Jan. 4. HIRO YOKOSE He shows new landscape paintings. Note opening reception 6–8 p.m. Tues., Jan. 10. Winston Wachter Fine Art, 203 Dexter Ave. N., 652–5855, winstonwachter.com. Opens Jan. 10. Mon.–Sat., 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Feb. 23.

Ongoing LUMINOUS: THE ART OF ASIA The challenge for the

handsomely mounted historical survey show “Luminous: The Art of Asia” is to pep up these selections from the vaults of SAAM, to blow off some of the dust of history and familiarity. Because what was new to SAM’s founder and chief benefactor, Richard E. Fuller (1897–1976), ain’t so new to us today. And boundary-hopping is the conceit

to “Luminous,” which organizes about 5,000 years of history from a dozen countries by, well, disorganizing it. SAM curator Catherine Roche says her structuring motif here is one of passageways and fluidity, and the show’s sole new commissioned work, by Korean-American artist Do-Ho Suh, makes the metaphor both concrete and ephemeral. In a doorway, Suh’s Gate is a ceiling-height sewn-silk replica of a stone gateway back in his Korean home village. The form is ancient and solid but the execution translucent and new. Videos and animation can be viewed from either side of the screen, which has a portal in its center that leads visitors to the 17th-century Japanese Edo-period Crows, an ink-and-gold series of 12 panel screens depicting 90 birds in raucous congress. It’s a contemplative scene suddenly interrupted. BRIAN MILLER Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654–3100, seattleartmuseum.org. $9–$15. Thurs.–Fri., 10 a.m.–9 p.m.; Wed., Sat., Sun., 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Ends Jan. 8.

GEORGE NELSON: ARCHITECT, WRITER, DESIGNER, TEACHER This show celebrates the furniture and

design of what we now call mid-century modernism. Yes, it’s the Mad Men era, but it’s also the postwar moment when the realigned U.S. economy began to boom, when Nelson (1908–1986) helped give form to America’s new industrial might. As design director for Herman Miller, the furniture- and office-design firm that employed Charles Eames, Isamu Noguchi, and Eliot Noyes, he helped invent the modern workplace. His modular approach included desks with tidy hidden compartments, flip-out typing stands, and finally the L-shape desktop configuration so ubiquitous today. In addition to all the vintage furniture on display (most of it scuffed and used, stained with ink and cigarettes), you can examine old Herman Miller brochures and catalogs; each new line, like the Action Office 2, was like an updated iPhone for its day. At a time when we were putting men on the moon, and the first bytes on silicon, the office also had to be smart and modern. Movie posters, corporate logos, ads, promotional videos, and home furnishings also show the breadth of Nelson’s influence. Still, unlike Pan Am and other echoes of JFK-era cool, it’s worth remembering that his intent wasn’t entertainment but commerce. Good design made for good business. In which sense, his modern analogue isn’t a fictional character like Don Draper but a packaging perfectionist like Steve Jobs. BRIAN MILLER Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., Bellevue, 425–519– 0770, bellevuearts.org. $7–$10. Tues.–Thurs., Sat.–Sun., 11 a.m.–5 p.m.; Fri., 11 a.m.–8 p.m. Through Feb. 12.

PAINTING SEATTLE Kamekichi Tokita and Kenjiro

Nomura ran a sign shop in Japantown, the neighborhood destroyed by WWII and the illegal internment of its residents. They were both hardworking Issei, first-generation immigrants with little free time to lug their easels around Seattle to paint street scenes. And many of those scenes on view at SAAM are immediately recognizable to anyone who walks the city today. Both depicted the intersection of Yesler and Fourth, for instance, from a grassy perch looking down at the overpass; and the museum presents the two views side by side—as, indeed, the two men often worked together in the open air. Their style was once called “American Scene,” a kind of Hopperesque realism. These oil paintings are mostly empty of people, though there are traces of the bustle and commercial activity of Japantown. The street grid is often canted, the sky sliced by telephone wires. Rooflines, fishing boats, staircases, and bridge support beams are massed into diagonals; there’s a calm yet slightly off-balance aspect here, the opposite of serene, horizontal nature scenes. It’s the everyday world Tokita and Nomura lived in, not the world as they might’ve wanted it to be. BRIAN MILLER. Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E. Prospect St. (Volunteer Park), 654–3100, seattleartmuseum.org. $5–$7. Wed., Sat.–Sun., 10 a.m.– 5 p.m.; Thurs.–Fri., 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Through Feb. 19. TÊTE–À–TÊTE Laminated menus, like in a point-to-eat sushi joint, are necessary to cope with the 19th-century buffet that is Tête-à-tête, 150 paintings from the Frye’s permanent collection. My advice is to grab the menu (one page per wall), narrow down your selection, and visit several times this year. Thus, for example, Hermann Corrodi (1844–1905) is a Swiss-born painter of no great reputation, but he has an eye for romantic landscapes and peasant scenes. His large, horizontal view of Venice dates to 1900, when newly unified Italy became a sightseeing destination––for the well-heeled––in the Baedeker guide. Instead of today’s cruise ships disgorging tourists, diagonal red sails at sunset welcome a fisherman’s humble family; a gondolier and the Piazza San Marco are more familiar sights, but rendered before they were cliché. Nearby, Corrodi’s coastal view of Corsica is oriented vertically, framed through a cleft ravine. An old tower or lighthouse stands on the shore, and a few white sails fleck the distant horizon. But this is a barren, sun-scoured, uncultured island––a place of leaving, not arrival. BRIAN MILLER Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave., 622–9250, fryemuseum.org. Free. Tues.–Wed., Fri.–Sun., 11 a.m.–5 p.m.; Thurs., 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Ends Jan. 8.

O(PA)PERA

Friday, January 6 Two performances at 7 & 8 pm

SEATTLE ART MUSEUM, DOWNTOWN

Byron Au Yong and Roger Benington present a theatrical experience that combines displaced musicians, handmade paper, flashing lights, seismic waves and a chaotic supermoon, performed from the heart of a gigantic paper tent.

Tickets may be purchased online, by phone (206.654.3121) or at the Ticketing Desk at any of SAM’s three sites.

Image: Byron Au Yong. Photo: Kevin Fry Print Sponsor:

1st Avenue & Union Street

TICKET PRICES

Members: $6 Adults: $12 Students & Seniors: $10

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JANUARY 4 – 10, 2012

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film»This Week’s Attractions Events

Oduye stands up to bullies in Pariah.

SAT. FEB. 11

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WIN 2 TICKETS TO JEFF DUNHAM CONTROLLED CHAOS TOUR, 3/24

OPENS AT VARSITY, FRI., JAN. 6. RATED R. 127 MINUTES.

P Pariah

OPENS AT HARVARD EXIT, FRI., JAN. 6. RATED R. 86 MINUTES.

The first 10 minutes of Dee Rees’ funny, moving, nuanced, and impeccably acted first feature, in which coming of age and coming out are inseparable, sharply reveal the conflicts that 17-year-old Alike (Adepero Oduye) faces. Riding the bus back to her Fort Greene, Brooklyn, home after a night out at a lesbian club, she takes off her oversize boy’s polo shirt, revealing a light-pink scoop-neck shirt with “angel” written in gold sequins underneath. After we see the large crucifix in her house and meet her mother, who reprimands her for her friendship with butch Laura (Pernell Walker), the reason for the quick change becomes obvious. Like the best films about adolescence, from Truffaut’s Antoine Doinel movies to So Yong Kim’s

P Tomboy

OPENS AT SIFF CINEMA AT THE UPTOWN, FRI., JAN. 6. NOT RATED. 82 MINUTES.

A sensitive portrait of childhood just before pubescence, Tomboy, the second film by writer/director Céline Sciamma, astutely explores the freedom of being untethered to the rule-bound world of gender codes. About 20 minutes elapse before we learn the real name and biological sex of Laure (a revelatory Zoé Héran), a gangly, short-haired kid about to enter fourth grade whom we first see getting driving lessons from her dad. Her family, which includes an extremely pregnant mother and a 6-year-old sister, has just moved to a suburban apartment complex a few weeks before the school year starts. The clan’s relocation provides Laure an opportunity for reinvention, introducing herself to her playmates as Mikael—an identity that gives her the liberty to go shirtless and rassle with the other boys, which attracts the attention of crushed-out Lisa (Jeanne Disson). Sciamma shows a real gift for capturing kids at play and films the August afternoons devoted to soccer and water fights as their own otherworldly time zone. But Sciamma doesn’t present an uncomplicated view of childhood: Laure/Mikael, beginning to reciprocate Lisa’s smitten feelings, lives in anxiety of being found out as much as she revels in being a boy. When Laure’s gender illusion is inevitably exposed, Sciamma handles it with a mostly light touch. Extremely empathic, Tomboy isn’t simply an earnest plea for tolerance, though. Childhood itself, the film intimates, is full of ambiguities (if not as extreme as Laure’s), of sorting out what you are drawn to and what repels you.

P Urbanized

MELISSA ANDERSON

RESOLUTION RUN, 1/1 @ MAGNUSON PARK

RUNS AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM, FRI., JAN. 6– THURS., JAN. 12. NOT RATED. 85 MINUTES.

A micro-to-macro expansion of, and logical conclusion to, Gary Hustwit’s elegantly compelling, design-in-the-everyday doc trilogy (which investigated the ubiquity of a font in 2007’s Helvetica and, if less quirkily, the undervalued thought processes behind manufactured goods in 2009’s Objectified), Urbanized stylishly dives into the issues and tactics of shaping entire cities. Settling into the aesthetic formula of his previous features, Hustwit gorgeously enhances the talking-head commentaries of architects, policy-makers, and other progressive thinkers with spatially clean, static-camera compositions—this time in God’s-eye panoramas of Earth’s ant farm. Globetrotting from the densely stacked favelas of Rio de Janeiro to bicycle-friendly Copenhagen (with stops in Bogotá, Beijing, Phoenix, and other idiosyncratically designed locales), the film efficiently zips among ideas not only of

206.324.9996 | www.siff.net PLAYING JANUARY 6–12 511 Queen Anne Avenue North

From the director of Water Lillies

Tomboy

“Quiet and naturalistic in the best way... an especially affecting delicacy about the thrills and pitfalls of exploring who one is.” –Robert Abele, Los Angeles Times

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Urbanized: In Mumbai, the Dharavi slum creates its own order.

why cities look and function the way they do, but also of how communities can be engaged and empowered to improve our shared living space. Creative urban planning transforms in ways pragmatic (NYC’s former railroadturned-park High Line), thought-provoking (interactive street art in New Orleans), or both (chalk-art activism as an energysaving experiment in Brighton, England). Most timely is the section on Stuttgart ecoprotesters and the city as an expression of assembly and struggle, which should’ve inspired the occupiers on Wall Street to build a better model. AARON HILLIS E film@seattleweekly.com

MORE ONLINE » aSEATTLEWEEKLY.COM See review of The Devil Inside.

Plus more features not announced at press time. Visit www.siff.net for updates and showtimes

National Theatre Live: The Collaborators Mikhail Bulgakov meets Stalin in this new play by John Hodge (screenwriter of Trainspotting) Monday 7:00

The Spirit of St Louis

Presented by Eric Lindbergh, Aeronautical Scientist and grandson of Charles Lindbergh Wednesday 7:00

The story of the 80s punk movement in Spokane. Seattle premiere! Filmmakers and cast in person. Thursday 9:00 Seattle Center Northwest Rooms

FRIDAY–SUNDAY

Award winning films from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Full schedule and film details at www.siff.net

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JANUARY 4 – 10, 2012

It’s 1992, and Ajla (Zana Marjanovic) and Danijel (Goran Kostic) are about to hook up in a Bosnian nightclub when they’re interrupted by a bomb blast. Later, Ajla is one of dozens of women rounded up and taken by bus to a detention camp where Muslim females are kept to satisfy Serbian male soldiers’ apparently endless appetite for rape. Danijel, a commander at the camp, “protects” Ajla by not letting anyone else rape her. After she lets him fuck her in laughably stylized soft-focus, he teaches her how to escape. Later, at a different camp, she allows herself to be kept as his “Muslim whore.” First-time director Angelina Jolie clearly aims to keep Ajla’s allegiances ambiguous and spends much screen time trying to humanize Danijel to the point that we might believe Ajla could love him or that he could change. The denouement that sorts it all out moves from predictable tragedy to ludicrous redemption; closing titles confirm that Jolie’s motivating intent in making In the Land of Blood and Honey was activist rather than artistic. Jolie has constructed a persona as the anti–movie star, but in making a United Nations extra-credit project about the Bosnian war that pointedly criticizes the U.S.’s role in a conflict now safely in history’s rear-view mirror, Jolie has produced a sanctimonious vanity commercial for her own good intentions. That’s about as Hollywood as it gets. KARINA LONGWORTH

In Between Days, Pariah—about one lowermiddle-class, African-American lesbian teen—is a profoundly specific film centering on universal themes: discovering who and what you are drawn to and fighting for autonomy against arbitrary parental rules, or in this case tyranny. Alike’s sexuality, blithely acknowledged at school, remains until its defiant articulation in the closing scenes an open, corrosive secret in her family; even her doting father speaks to her in veiled language. She will eventually throw her mother’s own sanctimonious words back in her face, demonstrating the truest spirit of gay pride: standing up to bullies, particularly those who gave birth to you. MELISSA ANDERSON

URBANIZEDFILM.COM/SWISS DOTS LTD.

In the Land of Blood and Honey

Photo of the Week

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Film»What’s Showing BY BRIAN MILLER

Arthouse & Rep THE BEAT IS THE LAW: FANFARE FOR THE COMMON PEOPLE The band Pulp is featured in per-

formance and backstage clips in this new documentary by Eve Wood. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, $6-$9, Jan. 6-8, 7 & 9 p.m. BLUEBEARD’S EIGHTH WIFE The GI continues its Ernst Lubitsch retrospective with his 1938 comedy about scoundrels and gold diggers on the Riviera. Gary Cooper and Claudette Colbert star. (NR) Grand Illusion, $5-$8, Jan. 6-12, 7 & 9 p.m.; Sat., Jan. 7, 5 p.m.; Sun., Jan. 8, 5 p.m. FOREVER YOUNG: THE FILMS OF FRANÇOIS TRUFFAUT SEE THE WIRE,

PAGE 11.

NORDIC LIGHTS FILM FESTIVAL Several

franchise eatery, Chotchkie’s, where she’s required to wear multiple pieces of flair. The film is endlessly quotable and resonant for those of us who endure the daily inanity of office life. Even if the exact nature and origin of those dreaded “TPS reports” is never explained, we’ve all had to file them. (R) BRIAN MILLER Central Cinema, $6-$8, Through Jan. 10, 9:30 p.m. OSS 117: CAIRO, NEST OF SPIES SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 11. PEE-WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE Underrated by other critics because they haven’t had as many bicycles stolen as I have, Tim Burton’s 1985 road-trip movie Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure brought Paul Reubens’ cable-TV man-boy character to the big screen in all his adenoidal glory. Resolutely pre-sexual, Pee-Wee lusts only after his tasseled onespeed cruiser, pursuing his bike across the Southwest. The whole thing is a kind of goof on De Sica’s The Bicycle Thief, but it’s more surrealist than neorealist—Burton makes America just as weird and plastic as his hero’s underdeveloped yet overgrown imagination. Call for showtimes. (PG) BRIAN MILLER Central Cinema, $6, Through Jan. 10.

Scandinavian titles will be screened during this weekend mini-fest, organized by the Nordic Heritage Museum. Directors Anna Wessman and Nilsmagnus Sköld T H I S CO D E will attend and introduce their openingSCI-FI SATURDAY SECRET MATINEES TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE night feature (following 7 p.m. reception), The Sprocket Society presents a secret SEATTLE WEEKLY the documentary When the Pepper program of futuristic shorts and serials (the IPHONE/ANDROID APP 1939 Buck Rogers included among the latter). Blossoms. See nordicmuseum.org for full FOR MORE FILMS OR VISIT schedule. (NR) SIFF Film Center, $7-$10 (NR) Grand Illusion, $15-56 (series), Opens Jan. seattleweekly.com individual, $40-$50 series, Jan. 6-8. 7, Saturdays, 2 p.m. Through March 24. OFFICE SPACE Before the BBC’s The Office, THE SILENT HOUSE From Uruguay, this or NBC’s version with Steve Carell, there single-take suspense flick sets a young was Office Space, Mike Judge’s 1999 exposé of Initech, woman and her father in an ominous old house full of creaks and groans portending possible terror. (NR) a generic edge-city software company rooted in his own Grand Illusion, $5-$8, Opens Jan. 6, Fri. & Sat., 11 p.m. pre–Beavis and Butt-head cubicle days. Ron Livingston, David Herman, and Ajay Naidu play the trio of malcontents Through Jan. 14. who gradually decide to revolt against their corporate JOE SWANBERG’S FULL MOON TRILOGY The visitoverlords (led by Gary Cole in all his suspendered glory). ing mumblecore director will introduce his three films, Jennifer Aniston hints at a better career path not taken screened in series over three days: Art History, Silver as Livingston’s crush at the degrading local TGIF-style Bullets, and The Zone. Swanberg’s apparently sincere grappling with his critics is one of the three themes in his triptych. After a prologue starring Jane Addams and Larry Fessenden as actors who appear to be ex-lovers, Send events to film@seattleweekly.com

SCAN

GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINEE

Silver Bullets (Tues.) settles into the story of Sam (played by Swanberg), a director of micro-budget art movies, and Claire (Kate Lyn Sheil), his long-suffering domestic partner/muse. She’s cast in a werewolf movie of a considerably higher budget and starts spending a lot of time with the film’s director (actual horror film director Ti West). Sam’s jealousy is both personal and professional. While his girlfriend is off at photo shoots and fittings, Sam, struggling with a crisis of artistic purpose, casts Claire’s best friend (Amy Seimetz) in his own new movie. Playing “himself” as he’s seen by his haters, Swanberg’s Sam is crazy-eyed and terrifying, even when just a specter on the margins of this frankly self-critical horror story about the predatory instinct that goes into filmmaking, and the madness it produces. His most aesthetically accomplished and ambitious feature, it’s not only the best movie-movie of Swanberg’s career, but also his most genuinely provocative. (NR) KARINA LONGWORTH Northwest Film Forum, $6-$9, Jan. 9-11, 8 p.m. VIEW & CHEW Place your dinner orders first at The Tin Table downstairs, then enjoy a free movie (screened on video). First in the series is Rob Reiner’s charming 1987 adaptation of the classic William Goldman children’s tale The Princess Bride. (PG) Century Ballroom & Cafe, 915 E. Pine St., 324-7263, centuryballroom.com, Free, Sun., Jan. 8, 8 p.m.; Sun., Jan. 22, 8 p.m.; Sun., Feb. 12, 8 p.m.; Sun., Feb. 26, 8 p.m. WORKING WITH PINTER Director Harry Burton will present his documentary on playwright Harold Pinter. (NR) ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, acttheatre.org, $8-$10, Mon., Jan. 9, 8 p.m.

Ongoing THE ARTIST An undeniably charming homage to old

Hollywood, The Artist might be the first silent film many of its viewers have ever seen. French writer-director Michel Hazanavicius’ film opens in 1927, when preening matinee idol George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) is still the top draw at Kinograph Studios. George acts as a mentor to Peppy Miller (Bérénice Bejo), a chorine with big ambitions. Borrowing heavily from A Star Is Born, The Artist tracks both Peppy’s ascent (through amusing montage)

and George’s decline as he refuses to acknowledge synchronized-sound as more than a passing fad. By 1932, Peppy’s attracting lines around the block for her latest, while George spends his afternoons passed out on a barroom floor, his Jack Russell terrier his sole remaining fan. Or so he thinks: Peppy has never forgotten him, and the film’s concluding act restores The Artist’s buoyancy. (PG-13) Melissa Anderson Harvard Exit, Lincoln Square A DANGEROUS METHOD David Cronenberg’s A Dangerous Method is at once a lucid movie of ideas, a compelling narrative, and a splendidly acted love story involving Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender), Sigmund Freud (Viggo Mortensen), and Sabina Spielrein (Keira Knightley), the near-forgotten patient-turned-disciple who confounded both men en route to her own tragic destiny. The movie opens like an electrified gothic novel with freaked-out, wild-eyed Spielrein being taken to the clinic where Jung is experimenting with Freud’s newfangled talking cure. Liberated by therapy, Spielrein eventually propositions her married doctor. Later, she contacts his mentor Freud to propose herself as a patient. Caught between two geniuses, Spielrein is the movie’s true and tragic subject. (R) J. Hoberman Egyptian THE DESCENDANTS George Clooney stars in this smart, affecting seriocomedy, directed by Alexander Payne. It’s a generous study in everyday catastrophes—death, infidelity, fractured families—that artfully acknowledges the obvious without wallowing in it. His wife in a coma (and about to be unplugged), attorney Matt King (Clooney) first cries in a long shot that Payne discreetly frames from behind. King’s two daughters, ages 10 and 17, are meanwhile acting out and talking trash; and his entire extended clan, which dates to colonial Hawaii, is greedily anticipating a huge windfall from the sale of ancestral property. This duly diligent lawyer prepares for the family vote to sell, until a prick not of conscience but of jealousy: Standing to profit from the deal is his wife’s lover, a petty real-estate broker. King wants to confront the guy, so he drags his daughters on an island-hopping road trip—searching for one thing, finding another. (R) Brian Miller Alderwood 16, Cinebarre, Guild 45th, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Meridian, Thornton Place, Woodinville Cinemas

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Film»What’s Showing THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO David Fincher’s

after all: Like every other sports movie ever, it’s the story of The Little Team That Could. Lewis’ account is simply inspiration; director Bennett Miller and writers Aaron Sorkin and Steve Zaillian boil down complex formulas to a single, simple thesis: Sign ballplayers who get on base more than anyone else. Then they hand over the movie to Brad Pitt as Beane, a former first-round draft pick exorcising his dashed-dream demons one trade, thrown chair, and turned-over watercooler at a time. Play ball. (PG-13) Robert Wilonsky Crest MY WEEK WITH MARILYN Marilyn Monroe (Michelle Williams) has arrived in 1956 London to star in The Prince and the Showgirl, directed by and co-starring Laurence Olivier (Kenneth Branagh). The pill-addled peroxide blonde soon brings production to an impasse. This bad behavior is seen through the hardly impartial eyes of third assistant director Colin (Eddie Redmayne), a role based on Colin Clark, who wrote two memoirs about his relationship with Monroe on the Showgirl set. My Week is an oddly chaste movie about a sex goddess to whom Williams brings study but not feeling. (R) Karina Longworth Alderwood 16, Varsity, Oak Tree, Big Picture Redmond, Meridian SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS On the eve of Dr. Watson’s much-protested-by-Holmes wedding, a wave of assassinations and bombings rock Europe, threatening spark world war. These acts of terror have been arranged by Professor Moriarty (Jared Harris), a calculating profiteer, whom our heroes must pursue across the Continent. Although Downey Jr. makes a radiant Holmes, the rapport between he and Law, who has never located a tone for his Watson, hasn’t improved since their last outing. The gamesmanship between Holmes and Moriarty is not handled much better, built around a metaphorical chess match as hackneyed as the film’s subtitle. (PG-13) Nick Pinkerton Alderwood 7, Big Picture, Metro, Factoria Cinemas, Woodinville Cinemas, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Majestic Bay Theatres, Bella Bottega Cinemas, Cinebarre, Pacific Place, Thornton Place TAKE SHELTER Standing outside his small-town Ohio home, Curtis LaForche (Michael Shannon) looks up at the ominous, slate-gray sky. The clouds open, raining down oily, piss-colored droplets. Curtis is haunted by one of the looming terrors of the 21st: financial ruin. This unarticulated fear triggers his mental illness, and despite a few missteps, Take Shelter powerfully lays bare our national anxiety disorder—a pervasive dread that Curtis can define only as “something that’s not right.” The devoted 35-year-old Rust Belt provider works at a sand-mining company; wife Samantha (Jessica Chastain) supplements her husband’s income by selling handmade notions, staying at home to look after their deaf 6-year-old daughter. Shannon has specialized in playing the brainsick for the past five years. He adroitly falls apart in Take Shelter, though a late-act freak-out almost undoes the actor’s subtle work earlier in the film. Chastain, with much less screen time, has just as strong an impact, making Take Shelter as much a portrait of a marriage as it as a portrayal of madness in crazy times. (R) Melissa Anderson Crest TINKER, TAILOR, SOLDIER, SPY John le Carre’s 1974 spy novel is predicated on a pair of enigmatic personalities: the colorless bureaucratic master-spook George Smiley (a taciturn Gary Oldman) and the double agent the Soviets have planted near the top of British intelligence whom he must unmask. Best known for the bleak tween vampire drama Let the Right One In, Swedish director Tomas Alfredson has made a brooding, fluidly crafted movie adaptation of the novel, strong on chilly atmospherics. The “circus”—le Carre’s term for MI6—is in disarray, and the discharged Smiley is metaphorically brought back from the dead to discover which one of his former colleagues is the mole. As Smiley goes about securing files and interviewing witnesses, Alfredson establishes a shabby universe of technologically primitive dial phones, teletype machines, and reelto-reel tape recorders. (R) J. Hoberman Lincoln Square, Pacific Place, Seven Gables YOUNG ADULT Described as a “psychotic prom-queen bitch,” the anti-heroine of Young Adult, directed by Jason Reitman from a Diablo Cody screenplay, is a prize part for Charlize Theron. She plays Mavis, a an alcoholic 37-year-old writer of YA fiction, a slovenly, spiteful, selfabsorbed case of arrested development. She’s plunged into an existential crisis—if not temporary insanity— with the receipt of an e-mail announcing her high-school boyfriend Buddy’s fatherhood. Seeking to break up the boyfriend’s marriage and maybe start anew, she drives back to Mercury, Minnesota. There she heads into a bar inhabited by an affable schlub (Patton Oswalt), with whom she begins a very lost weekend. Young Adult has the former prom queen waking each morning from a drunken stupor to spend the afternoon dolling herself up for the evening’s “date” with Buddy (Patrick Wilson). The film might be brushed off as curdled rom-com were it not for two things. The first is the depth of Theron’s performance. The second is the utter absence of the corny rehabilitation found in Reitman and Cody’s Juno. There’s no pot of small-town virtue at the end of this narrative rainbow, and Mavis’ bitchiness remains intact. (R) J. Hoberman Alderwood 16, Guild 45th, Lincoln Square, Meridian, Oak Tree THEATERS: Admiral, 2343 California Ave. SW, 938-3456;

Big Picture, 2505 First Ave., 256-0566; Big Picture Redmond, 7411 166th Ave. NE, 425-556-0566; Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684; Cinebarre, 6009 SW 244th St. (Mountlake Terrace)., 425-672-7501; Cinerama,

2100 Fourth Ave., 448-6680; Crest, 16505 Fifth Ave. NE, 781-5755; Egyptian, 801 E. Pine St., 781-5755; Grand Illusion, 1403 NE 50th St., 523-3935; Guild 45, 2115 N. 45th St., 781-5755; Harvard Exit, 807 E. Roy St., 781-5755; iPic Theaters, 16451 N.E. 74th St. (Redmond), 425-6365601; Kirkland Parkplace, 404 Park Place, 425-827-9000; Lincoln Square, 700 Bellevue Way N, 425-454-7400; Majestic Bay, 2044 NW Market St., 781-2229; Meridian, 1501 Seventh Ave., 223-9600; Metro, 4500 Ninth Ave. NE,

781-5755; Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 2675380; Oak Tree, 10006 Aurora Ave. N, 527-1748; Pacific Place, 600 Pine St., 888-262-4386; Seven Gables, 911 NE 50th St., 781-5755; SIFF Cinema at the Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996; SIFF Film Center, 305 Harrison St. (Seattle Center), 324-9996.; Thornton Place, 301 NE 103rd St., 517-9953; Varsity, 4329 University Way NE, 781-5755; Woodinville, 17640 Garden Way, 888-262-4386.

seattle weekly • January 4 – 10, 2012

malevolent remake follows a cold trail of ritually butchered women through rural Sweden. These previously unlinked crimes have been discovered by lefty reporter Mikael Blomkvist (Daniel Craig), who’s been hired by a Swedish oligarch (Christopher Plummer) to solve a supposed family murder. But, as millions of earthlings know, the movie’s real protagonist is Blomkvist’s ace research assistant, Lisbeth Salander (Rooney Mara), and it’s her pale flame that illuminates the movie. Mara’s Salander is funnier, as well as more plaintive, than Noomi Rapace in the Swedish original. Fincher’s version of the Stieg Larsson thriller is a leaner, meaner, more high-powered affair, though similarly hampered by a long narrative fuse. (R) J. Hoberman Cinerama, Bella Bottega, Cinebarre, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Lynwood Theatre, Metro, Pacific Place, Thornton Place, Woodinville Cinemas HUGO The hero of Martin Scorsese’s first foray into 3-D family filmmaking is a just-pre-pubescent orphan squatting in a train station circa 1930. When not dodging an orphan-hunting station constable (Sacha Baron Cohen), Hugo secretly maintains the station’s clocks and attempts to fix an automaton, the only keepsake the boy has from his late father. Hugo has become convinced that if he could get that automatonto work, it would write out a message from his dad. Hugo eventually discovers that the automaton was built by a silent filmmaker and specialeffects innovator named Georges Melies (Ben Kingsley), who runs the station’s toy shop. Perfunctorily mounted as a children’s adventure, the movie is far more successful as a barely veiled issue flick from Scorsese, the celebrity face of film preservation. (PG) Karina Longworth Alderwood 7, Meridian, Thornton Place J. EDGAR Clint Eastwood’s biopic is his richest, most ambitious movie since the Letters from Iwo Jima/Flags of Our Fathers duo, if not Unforgiven. Patriot, scoundrel, genius of self-promotion, gang-buster, red-baiter, blackmailer, proponent of the fingerprint, apostle of the wiretap and momma’s boy monster of sexual repression, J. Edgar Hoover (1895–1972), who more or less created the FBI and successfully ran the agency for nearly 50 years, was one of the great American personalities of the 20th century. Leonardo DiCaprio turns out to have been a quite canny casting move. He successfully promotes the movie’s idea of Hoover as a star, even as he makes convincing the sexual ambiguity crucial to the Hoover conceived by Eastwood and screenwriter Dustin Lance Black (Milk). (R) J. Hoberman Metro, Meridian MELANCHOLIA The first thing you see in Lars von Trier’s Melancholia is a close-up of Kirsten Dunst’s face. Behind her, slow as molasses, birds are dropping from the sky. These are the latter days. Generically a disaster film, Melancholia features two disasters. Von Trier devotes the movie’s first half to the disintegration of a storybook wedding between bride Justine (Dunst) and groom Michael (Alexander Skarsgard), who arrive late to their own reception, hosted by Justine’s sister Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg) and fabulously wealthy brotherin-law John (Kiefer Sutherland). In the movie’s second half, the mystery planet Melancholia bears down on Earth. Justine grows mystically attuned to the impending cataclysm, calmly telling her sister that, “I know we’re alone.” We are alone but Melancholia, a thrillingly sad and beautiful film, dares to imagine (and insist we do as well) the one event that might bring us together. (R) J. Hoberman Varsity MIDNIGHT IN PARIS Woody Allen’s deceptively light time-travel romance uses fairy-tale devices as a way to reach familiar themes. Nebbishy screenwriter Gil (Owen Wilson) is working on a book set in a nostalgia shop—much to the open frustration of Inez (Rachel McAdams), his rich-girl fiancee. One night in Paris, Gil drunkenly wanders off alone and accepts a ride to a party full of flappers dancing to Cole Porter. Transported to Paris in the ‘20s, Hemingway offers to show his novelin-progress to Gertrude Stein, so Gil runs out to grab his manuscript—and promptly gets lost in the present day. But the next night, Gil returns to his (and Woody’s) nostalgic paradise. Allen’s not terribly interested in interdimensional travel, but it’s a backdoor way to investigate the problem of time—our inability to slow it down, to make anything good last or prevent inevitable misery— within ordinary life. (PG-13) Karina Longworth Metro MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE—GHOST PROTOCOL The latest director to be called to service in the M:I series, Brad Bird, freely embraces the “impossible” rather than staking his action in a world of physical limitations. As Ghost Protocol begins, Tom Cruise’s Ethan Hunt, undercover in a Russian jail, is busted out by IMF operatives for another mission. When this, a Kremlin break-in, puts the team under suspicion of terrorism, the resulting international incident leads the government to disavow the IMF. Hunt & Co. are forced to go it alone, tracking a rogue “specialist in nuclear end-game theory.” The movie’s literal and figurative high point has Cruise scaling the stratospheric upper reaches of the a 163-story skyscraper in Dubai. There is no denying that this can be exhilarating, though when Ghost Protocol stoops to deal in emotional rather than physical expression, the movie goes flaccid, as if trapeze artists had paused in mid-air to emote. (PG-13) Nick Pinkerton Bainbridge Cinemas, Issaquah, Kirkland Parkplace, Metro, Pacific Place, Thornton Place MONEYBALL Michael Lewis’ 2003 book concerns Billy Beane, a former ballplayer-turned-scout-turned-GM, and Paul DePodesta, an Ivy League wonk, who transformed the Oakland Athletics. Turns out that adapting Moneyball for the cineplex was fairly straightforward

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food&drink»

Mayo Clinic

Don’t let the white stuff scare you at Momiji. BY HANNA RASKIN

W

JOSHUA HUSTON

hen frozen yogurt last had a Bloated rolls are usually moment, the aproned kids served side by side with behind the counter were the sake bombs and shrimp gatekeepers of the granola, tempura in badly lit sunflower seeds, raspberries, and other lounges that either offer goodies used to lure the ice-cream crowd into weekly karaoke nights buying a dessert that sounded suspiciously like or can’t afford the video what counted as the final course in fat-camp equipment. But Momiji’s cafeterias. Now, not so much as a sneeze guard stunning interior is a study comes between Americans and their yogurt in reticence and calm. toppings: A frozen-yogurt supplier in Arkansas, After buying the the home state of TCBY, recently told Nation’s old Dawson Plumbing Restaurant News that none of the new shops building for $1.5 million, he added to his client list in the past year dared Han put together a team to deny its customers the chance to heap their of craftsmen whose to-go bowls with gummi bears, Cocoa Pebbles, former clients included jelly beans, and rainbow sprinkles in previuniversities and art ously unsanctioned proportions. “People like to museums. Whidbey mix it up when it comes to creating their own Island woodworker Craig Yamamoto carved frozen-yogurt dishes,” Sugar Creek Foods’ Bud the front door—which opens onto a railGunter explained to the paper. car-shaped bar, where a woven light fixture Americans haven’t yet stepped behind the that resembles a mummified blimp hangs sushi bar, but if chefs ever did ape what’s overhead—and all of the tables in the dining worked for fro-yo joints by introducing DIY room beyond. The dining room is configured roll design, the results would likely look like like a horseshoe with a glassed-off Zen the gaudy pastiches produced by Momiji, the courtyard at its center. The restaurant will extraordinarily stylish Japanese restaurant fling open its full-length windows come which opened three months ago on Capitol summer so diners can sit outside, but the Hill. There are 40 rolls on Momiji’s specialty array of rocks and Japanese maple trees roll menu, and another dozen or two on the designed by Junji Miki now functions as an nightly specials menu. Restaurants often unspoiled diorama. achieve those kind of roll numbers through Everywhere there is wood. Sitting in the repetition, assigning different cutesy names leg of the dining room that houses the sushi to rolls made with crab and avocado; crab, bar feels very much like being ensconced in avocado, and cucumber; and crab, avocado, the world’s most bespoke pencil case. This is a cucumber, and salmon. beautiful setting for exploring the restaurant’s But Momiji has assembled a pantry so deep sake list, which I, not being a sake expert, ran that the only near-constants past Seattleite Bruce Ryan, are avocado and lots of who’s received his Advanced mayonnaise. There isn’t much Sake Professional certification » PRICE GUIDE FILET MIGNON ................$12 overlap between a Hotter than from the Sake Education TEMPURA UDON ..............$12 Hell (spicy tuna, yamagobo, Council. “It’s a really nice SOFT SHELL CRAB ...........$11 GARLIC SHORT RIBS ........$11 cilantro, seven-spice tuna, list,” he told me, citing the mix CRUNCHY CALI ROLL ........$9 habanero masago, citrus of styles, regions, and brands. SOUNDER ROLL ...............$16 truffle oil, and green onion) Momiji helps demystify and a Lucky Leprechaun sake selections by offering (seasoned pickled vegetables, cucumber, flights and appending tasting notes to cilantro, mango, avocado, and mango shiso every glass and bottle, but I wish Japanese sauce). Pop quiz: Which ingredient doesn’t restaurants—particularly ones that lean so show up in a Momiji roll? a) strawberry heavily on “crab-mayo mix”—would provide habanero sauce b) limes c) pico de gallo glossaries with their sake lists. It’s helpful d) lemon-jalapeño sauce. If you’re looking to remind customers that a sake identified for “None of the above,” you win. as a nama daiginjo is an unpasteurized sake Like the monstrosities that eager yogurt made with the most highly polished rice. It’s eaters concoct when they realize they can also worth ordering, Ryan says. “Tedorigawa is a highly respected Japanese sake maker have hot fudge, caramel, and mashmallow which consistently makes delicious sake,” sauce, the rolls at Momiji are immense. Even he explains, “and I’ve rarely seen it on U.S.A. when divided into eight to 10 pieces, each roll sake lists.” segment is nearly as big as a yo-yo. In Momiji, The cocktail list is lengthy, so I felt lucky Steven Han, the restaurateur responsible for to have landed upon a lovely Katana 12, made Umi Sake House and Kushibar, has created with 12-year-old Suntory scotch, plum wine, the Carnegie Deli of sushi bars. cranberry juice, and ginger. But if I have the What’s so strange about Momiji is how opportunity to keep exploring, I’ll probably thoroughly the menu clashes with the setting.

investigate the parade of shochu cocktails, featuring the distilled Japanese liquor that always seems to snag a spot on year-end lists of coming trends.

W

Still, it’s possible to get a good hot meal at Momiji.The udon isn’t revelatory, but it has all the requisite elements—a dashi-rich broth, chewy noodles, and a scattering of scallions— to become perfectly acceptable over the course of spirited conversation and a second cocktail. A fried soft-shell crab, wearing just the right amount of batter, is excellent, although ginger drowns out the wild greens with which it’s served. Garlicky grilled short ribs, dressed with soy sauce and tinged with smoke, shouldn’t be missed. Sashimi at Momiji isn’t pristine: The tuna and salmon I tried tasted fresh, but were a touch raggedy. It’s fascinating, though, eating unadorned fish at a restaurant that prides itself on eight-ingredient rolls, much like seeing a movie star before she goes through makeup. There’s no use hiding from the rolls, no matter how much you disdain putting cream cheese on eel and calling it a Bad Boy. I might advise wariness around fried rolls such as the Crunchy Cali—a classic Momiji preparation of crab mayo, avocado, and cream cheese—since hot rolls taste like misguided rice pudding (a sensation enhanced here by Momiji’s use of extra-sweet rice). But there’s nothing terribly objectionable about a Sounder Roll, made from spicy yellowtail, avocado, asparagus, seared crab, and wasabi aioli, among other things. It’s odd eating undignified rolls in such a gorgeous room, but the duality shouldn’t discourage a reconnaissance visit to Momiji. The sake list is smart, the service competent, and the short ribs terrific. Consider an extra dollop of mayo the cost of admission. E hraskin@seattleweekly.com MOMIJI 1522 12th Ave., 457-4068, momijiseattle.com. 4 p.m.–2 a.m. Mon.–Sun.

seattle weekly • January 4 – 10, 2012

hile the kitchen gamely tries to emulate the serenity that seeps from Momiji’s central garden and informs its sakes, well-intentioned stabs at culinary refinement come across as awkward and silly, like Walt Disney’s dancing hippo in a tutu. The menu’s first page is devoted to dishes appropriate for kaiseki, the multicourse Japanese meal service that emphasizes artistry and harmony. Balancing flavors and textures is so critical to the kaiseki concept that the interplay of individual dishes matters as much as what’s put—or more accurately, meticulously arranged—on each plate. Yet Momiji serves kaiseki a la carte, a term that ranks just below jumbo shrimp on the gourmet oxymoron list. Of those items, the housemade tofu wasn’t available when I dined there, but I sampled a braised pork belly that consisted of three lumbering hunks of sweaty swine meat, posed in a pyramid with a roasted shisito pepper, two limp green beans, and a smear of mayonnaise on top. The dish looked heavy, and overcooking didn’t help it. Mayonnaise foibles abound at Momiji, which has as many cooked small plates as sushi rolls on its menu. Sliced filet mignon anchors a plate bedecked with shredded lettuce, tomatoes, and generous swirls of horseradishspiked mayonnaise, all of which add up to a flavor doppelgänger for a roast-beef club sandwich. Mayonnaise is also the dominant flavor in a baked seafood dish, which I guess is what Japanese-Americans in Minnesota bring to potlucks. All four of the “bakes” Momiji offers appear to be the heated insides of sushi rolls: The Dynamite Bake I tried was a warm, creamy mess of clams, shrimp, and sweet crab mayonnaise, baked to a greasy golden finish and strewn with green onions.

This is as close as sushi gets to a frozen-yogurt mindset.

23


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located for the theatergoing crowd, this one-room Chinese restaurant serves two main dining constituencies (vegetarians and people who keep kosher) with a wide array of dishes featuring delicious fake meat. Yet carnivores who don’t know from kosher seem to enjoy it just as much. Though almost anything tastes great deepfried and glazed with sweet-and-sour sauce (e.g. sweetand-sour “pork”), favorites like kung pao “chicken” are tasty, too (but be emphatic if you want them spicy, since the Garden errs on the mild side). Speaking of which: Avoid the bland soups, the menu’s only real lowlight. $ BLUE WATER TACO GRILL 515 Queen Anne Ave. N., 352-2407. Unlike Taco Del Mar, Blue Water is more Mexican than surfer-dude, and the quality is always good (if a little salty). Ingredients are fresh, and it’s easy to customize. When you need a quick bite on your way to Seattle Center and aren’t in the mood for Dick’s, Blue Water fits the bill. $ CAFFÈ ZINGARO 127 Mercer St., 352-2861. Spelling its name Gypsy-style (Caffè Zingaro), this cute and convenient Lower Queen Anne coffee joint has quite the following among nearby artists. PNB, Seattle Rep, McCaw Hall, and Teatro ZinZanni are all steps away, which means you may share your table or couch with a clown, ballerina, or thespian. If you’re pressed for time before a show, Caffè Zingaro is a great quick stop for a

pastry with tea or coffee (the latter are also sold in bulk). It’s one of the few little spots in LQA that we wouldn’t mind increasing in size and menu. $ 5 SPOT 1502 Queen Anne Ave. N., 285-7768. The culinary focus of this Americana tribute restaurant changes every three months, so don’t get too hooked on the chicken-fried steak. But while the menu and decor sway with the season’s theme, the quality of the upscale diner fare at 5 Spot is remarkably consistent. While the burgers and ice cream sundaes make the most sense at lunchtime, Queen Anne residents’ adoration for the cheery restaurant is so intense that they queue for brunch, dinner and a seat at the circular bar. $$ OLYMPIA PIZZA AND SPAGHETTI HOUSE 1500 Queen Anne Ave. N., 285-5550. This cozy eatery comes complete with takeout counter, comfortable seating and a small outdoor dining area. Their pizzas are thick, cheesy, Greek-style, and made to order, though there are 39 recommended combos. If you are superhuman, try the desserts, made with Oreos, ice cream, and lots of sinful sauces. $ $ = $25 or less per person; $$ = $25–$40; $$$ = $40 and up. These capsule reviews are written by editorial staff and have nothing to do with advertising. For hundreds more reviews, searchable by neighborhood and type of cuisine, go to seattleweekly.com/food.

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seattleweekly.com/voracious

The Watering Hole: Canterbury Ale & Eats, 534 15th Ave. E., 322-3130, CAPITOL HILL The Atmosphere: Nestled atop Capitol Hill on the northern edge of the 15th Avenue business district, the Canterbury is an elder neighborhood mainstay, celebrating its 35th birthday in October. On weekends, the whole joint—from the table-service alcove to the bar to the cavernous southern room—is packed and rowdy, but weeknights usually see a different crowd. On this particular Sunday night, there’s a group seated at the bar, including a woman in her early 20s having a few drinks and a bearded man in his mid-50s having breakfast for dinner by the light of a Toy Story marathon on the muted television. One outspoken regular occasionally poses discussion questions like “What’s your favorite movie of all time?” The jukebox is scant but packed with quality, as only those few remaining manually filled jukeboxes are. The selections are as diverse as the crowd, jumping from “Gimme Shelter” to “My Boyfriend’s Back” to “Run to the Hills.” While chatting around the bar about the soundtrack— at that point, some Sonic Youth—a regular asks the bartender if they have My Bloody Valentine. “I’m glad My Bloody Valentine isn’t on the jukebox,” he says; “I would never wanna get sick of My Bloody Valentine.” The Barkeep: That My Bloody Valentine fan is Jeremy Read, who’s been working at the Canterbury for slightly less than 12 years. He sees regulars, weekend drunks (“We get attacked by jocks and bros”), and pool enthusiasts come in, but it’s really the people who come in multiple times each week who stand out. “Some people, if you don’t see them for two days, you get worried about them.” The Canterbury fits Jeremy like a glove, at least at this weeknight level. He’s obviously accustomed to remembering people, and I regularly witness him joking around with customers. The flock around the bar addresses him by his first name. “I like that I don’t have to wear a uniform,” he says. “It’s kind of a joke, but it’s true.” He describes the place as “family-esque” (at this point, the outspoken regular chimes in with “Pirate utopia!”). The owners are awesome, he says, plus, “I like the atmosphere a lot . . . I totally dig the mazey castle thing. I sometimes take that

SARAH ANNE LLOYD

DO YOU SHOCHU?

VORACIOUS

Simply Read

This bartender can’t wait to erase your mind.

for granted because I’ve been here too long. I forget what it looks like on the inside.” The Drink: Jeremy does not fuck around: Asked what he would be drinking right now were he not on the clock, he tells me that it’d have to be a Mind Eraser and a pint of Strongbow. For those unfamiliar, a Mind Eraser is equal parts vodka, Kahlua, and tonic water, downed quickly through a straw to get a layered effect. The cumulative taste is not unlike root beer, but the effect is . . . well, like chugging around four ounces of liquor in one go. Strongbow, by contrast, is a UK-manufactured hard cider now ubiquitous in Anglophile bars and pubs here. It’s crisp, moderately sweet, and accessible. The Verdict: While they seem an unlikely combination, pairing a Mind Eraser and a Strongbow makes sense on a practical level. Once your mind has been erased, an unobtrusive comfort drink like hard cider is certainly welcome. On a deeper level, though, the combination speaks perfectly to the Canterbury’s varied identities: the life of the party and a warm, boozy blanket of a neighborhood watering hole. Since Jeremy’s been here so long, one has to wonder: Has he evolved into this kind of drinker because of the Canterbury, or does the Canterbury fit both these choices so well because of his influence? The world may never know—because our minds have been erased. E food@seattleweekly.com


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food&drink» SPORT RESTAURANT AND BAR 140 Fourth Ave. N.,

404-7767. If you couldn’t guess from the name, Sport has more flat-screen TVs than strictly necessary and a menu limited to steaks, burgers, fries, and cracker-crust pizza. The juicy burgers feature Kobe-style beef from Idaho, and there’s almost as much meat in the bold, Texas-style chili. The bar is set up for serious drinking and gameviewing, but the restaurant proper is family-friendly. $ UPTOWN CHINA 200 Queen Anne Ave. N., 285-7710. Drop by this busy joint for perennial palate-stimulating favorites such as General Tso’s chicken, Mongolian beef, and mu shoo pork. Service is always efficient and deft, and the fare here is ideal for beer-drinking, so beware KeyArena pre- and post-event crowds. $

RAINIER VALLEY

mango-lemon sauce; the “Shami” drizzles yogurtcucumber sauce over lentil-beef patties; and the aloo tikki features potato patties and spices in raita. No two bites are alike. $-$$ WAYWARD CAFE 5253 University Way N.E., 524-0204. With a new U District location a few blocks from the old one, Wayward, which serves breakfast and lunch, isn’t just a vegan cafe, it’s one of Seattle’s only collectively run restaurants. Your cook may have a pierced septum, and your waitress may be heavily tattooed, but the food they deliver is pure Americana (albeit vegan, free of hydrogenated oils and refined sugars, and organic when possible). A Reuben made with fried tempeh, sauerkraut, and nondairy Russian dressing is a fixture on the eclectic lunch menu, which also includes a seitan Philly sandwich. $

WALLINGFORD

SILVER FORK 3800 Rainier Ave. S., 721-

5171. For more than 20 years, Estella Potts has been operating the Silver Fork. And while the place might’ve already been a classic a generation ago, today it is damn near venerable—a simple, no-nonsense joint with soul and gospel music melting from the air and breakfasts done the way you dream of them when off on some bacon-and-eggs-and-pancakes-andwaffles American idyll. The room certainly shows its age, and the morning crowds can be killer (there’s often a wait on the weekends), but the service is welcoming and sweet as honey, and the food makes any wait worthwhile. $

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CHOCOLATI CAFÉ 1716 N. 45th St.,

633-7765. Climb the creaky wood stairs and perch at a table overlooking Wallingford’s main drag—it’s easy to spend hours at this warm and funky spot even if you’re not a chocoholic. If you are, try the hyper-rich European drinking chocolate; even hardcore addicts may want to start with only a small cup. $

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OLD COUNTRY BAKERY 900 160th Ave.

N.E., Bellevue, 425-649-2171. Old Country’s breads and pastries are not just from Armenia, where the Marsikyan family is from, but from Georgia, Iran, and other neighboring countries. An Armenian sweet bread called gata has an enticing layer of vanilla in the middle. The flying saucers with holes in the center are called puri; from Georgia, the bread is warm and chewy, the perfect loaf to have with dinner or savory dips. Despite their large size, all the breads here are an incredible bargain. $

seattleweekly.com

Star Cafe and Pub serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and offers a daily happy hour from 4 to 6 p.m. Mornings mean waffles, including the housemade oatmeal buttermilk version, and a long list of egg dishes. The lunch menu kicks in at 11 when the focus shifts to oldfashioned sandwiches: a classic BLT, the “King of Club” sandwich, a French dip, and tuna salad made with albacore. Burgers are charbroiled and come with a choice of soup, baked beans, salad, fries, or fruit. For dinner, there’s pasta dishes and an eclectic lineup of entrées: Jamaican jerk chicken, bratwurst, fish tacos, a New York steak, and grilled pork tenderloin. This pub features 22 beers on tap, most with a local accent. $ NELL’S 6804 E. Green Lake Way N., 524-4044. Among Seattle’s venerated chef-owned restaurants, Nell’s hangs tough as one where the chef-owner really does circulate kindly and quietly. Phil Mihalski is, in fact, a lot like his food: humble, sophisticated, and very present. Expect wonderfully executed specials like garlic-crusted chicken with blue cheese mashed potatoes and lacinato kale, but please don’t start in on your main course without at least perusing the first-course options (the Dungeness crab salad with apples and red radishes is beautiful and delicious). Several wonderful qualities make Nell’s an all-ages place: You don’t have to don infrared goggles to read the menu or eat your food, you don’t have to shout at one another over the din of too many tables, and the waiters do white-tablecloth service properly. $$$

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PIG IRON BAR-B-Q 5602 First Ave. S., 768-1009. Pull up a

chair, order a plate, and don’t worry about bumping into a familiar mug,’which makes Pig Iron a perfect destination for an escape (if you don’t live in Georgetown, that is). This Southwestern-style barbecue joint is heavy on the sandwiches, and you should take that to mean that you ought to order one. The beef brisket is everything you want it to be, in a bun that is soft enough to absorb everything and thick enough not to break. $

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for a student budget, their combination dinners offer a generous plateful (soup, egg roll, BBQ pork, steamed rice, and any of a dozen or so entrees) for just $7.95. Not high cuisine, but solid diner fare when you’re in the mood for something quick on the Ave. $ CHIPOTLE MEXICAN GRILL 4231 University Way N.E., 547-4644. The appeal of this popular chain restaurant is that it uses fresh, high-quality ingredients. Really, how often can you say your burrito contains free-range chicken and organic beans? The limited menu, which focuses on tacos, fajitas, and burritos, attracts as many Mexican food junkies as it does health conscientious eaters. Of course, Chipotle doesn’t serve real Mexican food. But its devotees will tell you it doesn’t matter. $ COSTA’S 4559 University Way N.E., 633-2751. The closest thing to an honest, traditional diner in the U District (where there have been several ersatz imitators), Costa’s has held the same corner since 1975. The menu is Greek (duh), meaning tasty Baba Ganoush, salads, and hummus plates. Prices are within reach, and have stayed that way, for student budgets. While so many other businesses on the Ave have failed, Costa’s has made its modest formula work. And work well. $ SHALIMAR 4214 University Way N.E., 633-3854. Shalimar’s open-faced sandwiches could just be the most exciting midday meal this side of the Pacific. The chicken tikka sandwich—fluffy naan topped with tandoor-baked chicken breast, veggies, garbanzo beans, tomatoes, and rice in a spiced buttermilk sauce—is simply amazing. The fish tikka sandwich accents cod with a creamy

REDMOND

PREET’S CASUAL INDIAN DINING 8440 160th Ave. N.E.,

Redmond, 425-867-9400. Much of Preet’s food, which owner Manpreet Dha calls “homestyle Punjabi cuisine,” is chaat, the snacks you buy from street stalls and nosh on over cups of sweet, milky tea: samosas, papdi chaat, bhelpuri, otherwise known as Rice Krispie salad. Entrées like mulai kofta and spinach with paneer come with a few crimson-colored pickled radish spears, basmati rice speckled with whole spices, two tortilla-sized roti, and a bowl of tangy homemade yogurt. Even if the dining is casual, it’s wonderful . . . and all vegetarian. $ TYPHOON! 8936 161st Ave. N.E. (in the Bella Bottega Shopping Center), Redmond, 425-558-7666. Typhoon!’s exquisite dishes are on a different level than the fare at most Thai restaurants. Order something simple––the stir-fried eggplant dish known as Eggplant Lover, say–– and you’ll get a revelation: a complex blend of distinct flavors that makes the mouth come alive. That complexity also stands out in an array of showier dishes, like the Three-Flavor Fish, which pairs halibut with a fiery sweetand-sour sauce. A place of dark woods, slow-moving fans, and towering bamboo poles, Typhoon! has an intimate feel. It feels even better after you’ve tried its thick, coconut-y version of the piña colada. $

WOODINVILLE

PURPLE CAFÉ AND WINE BAR 14459 Woodinville-

Redmond Rd., Woodinville, 425-483-7129. The Woodinville version of this popular Kirkland establishment anchors a burgeoning upscale mini-mall next door to the planned “Woodinville Wine Village” complex. The wine menu is extensive, offering mostly domestic selections but also a decent variety of imported wines from Europe and Australia. The appetizers are Mediterranean-influenced (lots of spreads, olives, and cured meats), while the entrées are mostly Italian American in genre (there’s a pizza and pasta menu). $$

North of Town BOTHELL

ALEXA’S CAFE & CATERING 10115 Main St., Bothell,

425-402-1754. Alexa’s is the kind of down-home community cafe that can anchor a small downtown. Menu standouts: fluffy lemon poppy-seed pancakes and country-style breakfasts like Eggs Benedict, or the Calico Grub, a mess of salsa-topped potatoes, smoked ham, peppers, onions, and cheddar. Lunchtime brings great sandwiches on fresh Hillcrest Market bread. $

EDMONDS

T & T SEAFOOD 22511 Highway 99 #103, Edmonds,

425-776-3832. Go to this Cantonese seafood restaurant (in the same strip mall as a Ranch 99 market) on a busy night, and you’ll spot many a three-generation family out for supper; a table of six can dine luxuriously here for $10–$15 a person. Start with a soup, then choose from hot pots (pork with oysters is a classic), simply stir-fried greens, and all the seafood’just-plucked-fromthe-tank tilapia steamed with ginger and scallions, clams with spicy XO sauce, and sweet and spicy Szechuan shrimp’you can fit onto the table. $-$$


column»Toke Signals

Kief Urban

I

n last week’s Toke Signals, I mentioned that there are varying degrees of formality among medicalmarijuana collectives, with some seeming more like pharmacies and others having more of a communal vibe. On a recent Sunday, Urban Roots struck me as one of the latter. The reception area up front was bustling but informal, with patients running the gamut from hippies with waist-length dreads to middle-aged couples from the suburbs. Nobody seemed uncomfortable or unwelcome. After filling out a slightly more complicated set of paperwork than is the norm—apparently members of Urban Roots aren’t supposed to talk to press or even friends about their experiences there; so much for word-of-mouth advertising—I got to visit a small but well-stocked flower room with the friendly assistance of budtender Josh. As soon as I entered, I was impressed with Urban Roots’ donation board. Not only did it list close to 20 strains, it also gave the sativa/ indica genetic breakdown of each strain and, in most cases, the lab test results for THC, CBD, and three other cannabinoids. (These test results are available in even more detail by clicking on the strain names at mygreen now.org/mmj_strains.htm.) Very impressively, all strains are priced at $10 a gram across the board. This does not denote any reduced quality; these are top-shelf flowers, as is borne out by their lab results. I chose one sativa dominant, Chernobyl, at 17.5 percent THC; one strain, Afgoo, which Urban Roots regards as an indica dominant, at 17.0 percent; and Grand

x

BLOG ON » POT TOKEOFTHETOWN.COM

ALTERNATIVE HEALING

S BY STEVE ELLIOTT

Daddy Purp, a pure indica for which lab results weren’t yet available. This was my first experience with the Chernobyl strain from TGA Subcool, but it won’t be the last. These dense, heavily trichomed, lime-sherbet-scented flowers are clearly something special, light green and sporting a fuzzy-whitish coat of psychoactive goodness. The effects are a pleasant mix of Trainwreck’s mind-expanding sativa head rush and Jack the Ripper’s soothing medicinal effects, making Chernobyl an excellent choice for those who need relief from chronic pain. It would be very difficult to find better marijuana anywhere in Seattle for $10 a gram. Then there’s the Afgoo, which Urban Roots regards as a 70 percent indica dominant; it’s a mix of the indica Afghan with sativas Thai and Hawaiian, and, to my head, tokes more like a sativa. As I’ve said before, Afgoo is one of the best strains around for medicinal effects against nausea and pain, for anxiety and stress, and for feeling great. The pure indica, Grand Daddy Purp, solidly delivered its expected pain relief and a smooth, even buzz. Though more amenable to physical activity than most any other pure indica, GDP can still produce indica’s signature couchlock when more than a few tokes are taken. Urban Roots is just off University Way at 1406 N.E. 50th St., Suite B, 527-5154; e-mail contact@mygreennow.org; website mygreen now.org. They’re open from noon to 7 p.m. daily except Sundays, when they close at 6. E Steve Elliott edits Toke of the Town, Village Voice Media’s site of cannabis news, views, rumor, and humor. TOKE SIGNALS WANTS TO review your dispensary E-mail tokesignals@seattleweekly.com.

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Then there were the gifts my mom would buy me. Or rather, bought the daughter she wished she had spawned. Laura Ashley fabrics, lace collars . . . prayer aids. Sigh. Meanwhile, I had a double mohawk in various shades of blue and a pierced everything. Maybe she thought that if I slipped into that floral print I might quit dying my hair and howling along to Clash records in my room, and start dating altar boys instead of dropouts. I was also told I was an ungrateful little shit when I objected. These gifts we received weren’t dopey; they were designed to make us feel inadequate. What I would do is keep the bike—everyone should know how to ride, and you might actually like it. You can always sell it later if you don’t. As for the tickets, let him keep one ticket to every game and then sell (or better yet, give away) the other half to people he hates. His tyrannical boss? His teetotaling, proselytizing brother-in-law? That guy he always suspected you were crushing on? All perfect seatmates. Obviously, the teddy should be crumpled into a ball and shoved up the darkest, moistest corner of your boyfriend’s derriere. Whether or not his crap behavior is a deal-breaker is up to you, but disrespect, obnoxiousness, and stupidity aren’t qualities most of us look for in a mate. E

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JA N UA RY 2 01 2

S E A T T L E W E E K LY. C O M / R E V E R B M O N T H LY

S E AT T L E W E E K LY ’ S M U S I C R E V I E W

REVERB MONTHLY

From behind the curtain, two Tacoma songwriters are topping the charts. 2012 looks like it’ll be the year they finally get the credit(s) they deserve. PAGE 9

REVERB • sEattlE wEEkly • JanuaRy 4 – 10, 2012

THE GHOSTS H

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R E V E R B • s E at t l E w E E k ly • J a n u a Ry 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2


opening acts»

presents at DIMITRIOU’S

» EDITOR’S NOTE

False Impressions There’s a record store in Pioneer Square that doesn’t sell records. There’s a small stage for musicians and DJs to perform and racks of LPs for “customers” to peruse, with Michael Jackson’s Off the Wall and Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits among the selections. On a recent visit, soul music was booming, and I noticed some writing on the wall: “Mourn, Celebrate, and Revolt?” The Record Store, as it’s called, is a traveling installation put on by the Seattle Art Museum and Olson Kundig Architects. It’s “inspired” by Theaster Gates’ The Listening Room exhibit at SAM, which features a long row of records, available for the sampling, obtained from Chicago record store Dr. Wax after it closed in 2010. In a promotional flyer, OKA owner Alan Maskin says the firm was intrigued by SAM curator Sandra Jackson-Dumont’s idea that “vinyl records can be a catalyst and tool that people work with in order to understand other narratives and perspectives. We are also excited by the idea of bringing people together around the culture of vinyl record and record players.” It is not a subtle point The Record Store and The Listening Room are trying to make: Record stores are dying, and with them an experience that brings together community members for discussion and interaction. Unfortunately, both installations are painfully out of touch, overstating the misguided notion that people no longer buy CDs and LPs and ignorant of Seattle’s unique musical infrastructure of clubs, bands, shops, and labels.

SAM’s new installations are ignorant of Seattle’s unique musical infrastructure of clubs, bands, record shops, and labels.

»INSIDE: JANUARY 2012

Pearl Django with Special Guest Martin Taylor

Seattle’s Gypsy Jazz Favorites Joined by Jazz Guitar Innovator January 3 – 8

Grafitti with Special Guests Dennis Chambers and Gary Grainger

Reunion of Masters and 18 Year Celebration! January 10 - 11

Arturo Sandoval

Grammy-Winning Internationally Recognized Afro-Cuban Trumpeter January 12 - 15

But the experience that The Record Store eulogizes is not an anachronism. The larger area record stores, like Sonic Boom, Easy Street, and Silver Platters, host in-store performances and feature significant vinyl offerings. And many of the records on display at both exhibits can be found in the bargain bin at Capitol Hill’s Everyday Music. Nationally, vinyl sales have seen a resurgence in recent years, and Seattle’s Fleet Foxes is one of the medium’s bestselling artists. Independent retailers count on the sale of new and used LPs for a significant chunk of their bottom line. And chains like Best Buy, Target, Hot Topic, and Urban Outfitters have gotten in on the vinyl game, too. In his artist’s statement, Gates says “The Listening Room, Juke Joint, shebeen, shack, and lounge have been important spatial types in the fabric of our cities that allow us room to engage one another. It cannot be

ANSWERS & ADVICE BY JOHN RODERICK | Large men vs.

small, American bands vs. British, and more.

6

INDIE ANNA JONES

BY INDIE ANNA JONES | Just because

you can show up in a hoodie doesn’t mean you should. Also: Wu said it?

7

DIG MY MOOD

BY DAVID STOESZ | Glen Campbell,

role model.

9

THE WRITERS BLOCK BY TODD HAMM | “There’s no cool way

to say ‘Hey everybody, I wrote that!’ ”

ckornelis@seattleweekly.com

Chris Minh Doky & The Nomads with Dave Weckl

Innovative Master of the Upright Bass with Special Guest Drummer Extraordinaire January 17 – 18

Jeff Lorber Fusion w/ Special Guest Randy Brecker

Featuring Eric Marienthal, Lionel Cordew & Ron Jenkins January 19 - 22

Sugar Blue

Grammy-Award Winning Blues Musician and Harp Hero January 24 - 25

ON SALE NOW 11 REVIEWS

Our take on every local new release.

5

lost.” But while the experience isn’t thriving in Seattle as it once did, it’s far from lost, as the installations suggest. Mike Batt, owner of the local retail chain Silver Platters— which, by the way, is selling albums like Radiohead’s OK Computer ($8.99) and Velvet Underground’s Loaded ($6.99) for less than they retail for on iTunes— recently told me that he sees a “tabloid-like fascination with the struggles of the record industry and record stores. The more the press runs with it, the more it sets in people’s heads as being so, and is possibly causing the public not to look into shopping at record stores.” In other words, if you want the experience of discovering new music and ideas over a crate of LPs while a band plays in support of their latest record from a nearby stage, bring the $15 it takes to get into SAM to a local record store. They’ll be happy to sell you anything you like. CHRIS KORNELIS E

15 THE MONTH AHEAD Upcoming shows from Pictureplane, Princess, Varmint, Blouse, and much more.

19 DUFF MCKAGAN Life lessons from 2011.

19 NEIGHBORHOOD SALES REPORT

What they’re buying in Ballard and Missoula.

» reverb monthly EDITOR

Chris Kornelis

DESIGNER

Jane Sherman

SENIOR EDITOR COPY EDITOR

Erin K. Thompson

Gavin Borchert

Michael Mahoney Chris Estey, Indie Anna Jones, Duff McKagan, John Roderick, David Stoesz

PROOFREADER COLUMNISTS

Litsa Dremousis, Gwendolyn Elliott, Gregory Franklin, Julia Mullen Gordon, Eric Grandy, Todd Hamm, Dave Lake, Ma’Chell Duma LaVassar, Joe Williams

CONTRIBUTORS

LAYOUT EDITOR: Kim

MORE ONLINE » aSEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

» cover credit

Love

ILLUSTRATION BY JUNICHI TSUNEOKA

WAR

January 26 – 29

KIM WILSON’S BLUES ALL STARS

January 31 – February 1

BRIAN CULBERTSON February 14 – 19

Walk-ins Always Welcome! All Ages • Free Parking • Gift Certificates

Military, Senior and Student Discounts

REVERB • SEATTLE WEEKLY • JANUARY 4 – 10, 2012

As listeners have migrated to mp3s (legal and otherwise), music stores have indeed struggled, and some have closed, including Seattle’s legendary Bud’s Jazz Records; once a stone’s throw from The Record Store, it receives no mention in either exhibit.

2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 j a z z a l l e y. c o m

3


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WESTERN HAUNTS OTHER DESERT CITIES HOOVES AND BEAK

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MON, 1/9 7:30PM ~ $6

MONDAY SQUARE DANCE FEAT. MUSIC BY

THE TALLBOYS

HELLACIOUS SQUARE DANCING STARTS AT 8 PM!

TUES, 1/10 8PM ~ $15 JAZZ/WESTERN SWING TRIO FROM AUSTIN, TX

HOT CLUB OF COWTOWN

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LEVI FULLER GHOSTS I’VE MET

THE ROY KAY COMBO WITH GUESTS MARTI BROM, LEVI DEXTER, BILLY JOE HUELS OF THE DUSTY 45S, VINCE MIRA AND

DAVID DONDERO

TIMES LISTED ARE SHOW TIMES. DOORS OPEN 30-60 MINUTES BEFORE

R E V E R B • S E AT T L E W E E K LY • J A N U A RY 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2

&UCOPMING:

4

1/12 LARRY AND HIS FLASK, RATS IN THE GRASS 1/13 DICK DALE, DEAD MAN 1/14-early School Of Rock presents the songs of NEIL YOUNG 1/14 GOLD LEAVES, CUMULUS 1/15 TONY FURTADO BAND 1/18 FAINTLY, LOWLANDS, MOYA 1/19 THE MILK CARTON KIDS, THE BRENDAN HINES 1/20 THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME 1/21-early WYLIE AND THE WILD WEST cd release show 1/21 THE PACK A.D., HOBOSEXUAL 1/23 MONDAY SQUARE DANCE with THE TALLBOYS 1/24 BOBBY PREVITE vs. BANDALABRA TRIO 1/25 TOM EDDY, LEARNING TEAM 1/26 GRAVELROAD, VERY SPECIAL GUESTS, ANGELO SPENCER ET LES HAUTS SOMMETS 1/27 THE HORDE AND THE HAREM, ELK AND BOAR 2/1 GRAVEYARD, RADIO MOSCOW, SANDRIDER 2/2 NADA SURF, SAY HI (solo) 2/4 GRAND HALLWAY, LAURA GIBSON, THE DEVIL WHALE 2/9 BLVD PARK, NETTLE HONEY 2/10 Square Peg presents MATTHEW GOOD ~ solo acoustic tour, EMILY GREENE


talkingheads» » Answers & Advice

Carry the Weight Why would an adult male want to get smaller? By john roderick

Dear John: Do you have any pointers for how I can keep my New Year’s resolution to lose 57 pounds? Thanks! —Trevor

Roderick: Trevor, it’s funny you should bring this up because just tonight, on a lark, I weighed myself for the first time in several years, and I’m proud to say I’ve increased my total weight by over 20 percent! Now that I’ve attained a certain station in life, it’s my responsibility as the leader of my tribe to become fearsome and enormous. With my long grey beard and substantial bulk I shall dominate the council table, petrify brash young upstarts, and cause my rivals to tremble and pee themselves. Dare I say the fertile women will also not fail to notice my status, and the nubile slave girls will vie to have me as their master. Now . . . I understand you to be resolving to lose weight. If you have been bested in combat and pressed into servitude by a mightier king, rest assured the weight will come off quickly enough without you trying. Secure what calories you can while you still draw breath. If you are some kind of trickster or magician endeavoring to fit through tight places, I say, “Curse your dark magic!” Otherwise, I can think of no good reason why an adult male would seek to become smaller. Roderick! What is best in life? —Anonymous

John: As a British music lover, I have never really found much to love in a lot of American alternative music.

—Doug Burgess, Leicester, UK

To address this question we must first agree on the indisputable facts: Americans invented rock ’n’ roll, soul, country, R&B, psychedelia, disco, punk, grunge, and indie. However, the British produced all the best bands in rock music from 1964 to 1989. Of these facts all right-minded people must agree, and there can be no argument. The cultural differences you mention started in 1989, and I blame it all on drugs. You Brits were taking so much Ecstasy you thought the Happy Mondays were clever, while Americans were shooting enough heroin to make Courtney Love seem briefly interesting. Suddenly we couldn’t communicate anymore. I don’t blame you for not liking the fake angst of Limp Bizkit, Creed, The Offspring, and Blink-182, but how could you reasonably think Oasis, Manic Street Preachers, and Supergrass were anything but short-dick Kinks cover bands? Incomprehensible. Throughout the past decade, all British bands sounded like U2 in panties, while American bands lost even the remotest sense of melody until they collectively sounded like bees farting. The only hope I see for the future is for everyone in both countries to go back to smoking marijuana and listening to the blues, and just push the reset button on the whole thing.

Is there anything you can do to prohibit hippies from bringing dogs on tour this summer? It just seems cruel for Cheeseheads to treat their animals that way. —B. Weird

I don’t have any suggestions for you except the most obvious one, which is to point out that if you are attending shows, either as a fan or a performer, where there are enough incidences of hippie Cheeseheads touring with their dogs for you to notice it and become concerned, then you are already too deeply embedded in jam-band culture to make your escape. Stop pretending that you are normal and embrace your destiny. May I suggest that you get a Siberian Husky puppy named “Denali” and start wearing a sheepskin vest with no shirt and calling yourself “Bear Weird,” if you’re not doing that already? E John Roderick is the singer and songwriter responsible for Seattle’s The Long Winters. He tweets @johnroderick. Send your questions and conundrums to jroderick@seattleweekly.com.

REVERB • sEattlE wEEkly • JanuaRy 4 – 10, 2012

Oh, God. Something in the way you phrase this question tells me you’re European. This is the type of question I only get asked on a Spanish beach at 5 a.m. by a red-faced Danish guy who smells like raspberry beer. The Danish guy knows before he asks the question that he’s going to contradict my halfassed, spiritual-sounding attempt at profundity that stems from having recently read Milan Kundera, and explain to me condescendingly that the problem with Americans is that we’re too serious and also boring. We’re also too religious, and we have no sense of history. And I’ll sit there not really listening to his rap, because I’ll still be embarrassed about having bungled playing “Into the Mystic” 20 minutes earlier on some battered acoustic guitar, in an attempt to regain the attention of the dark-haired girl from Salzburg, who by that point will be over by the bonfire fascinated by the ethnic Hungarian from Bratislava who knows how to play “Enter Sandman,” of all ungodly things! This will cause me to reflect on the simple truth that what is best in life is to be born rich and beautiful, have no ambition or capacity for self-reflection, maintain trite opinions about culture and politics, and spend your life getting drunk on foreign beaches smugly asking and answering unanswerable questions.

The American bands I’ve loved most have been the ones most obviously influenced by British bands. I am prepared to accept that I am a music racist. But is there genuinely a cultural difference between British and American guitar music, and how do you see it? Cheers!

5


LUCKY

FRI/JANUARY 6 • 8PM

david lindley & jim lauderdale SAT/JANUARY 7 • 8PM

the randy oxford band w/ guests michael

shrieve and spellbinder

SUN/JANUARY 8 • 7:30PM A FAREWELL TO AUSTIN WHO IS MOVING TO NASHVILLE!

austin jenckes and mycle wastman

TUE/JANUARY 10 • 7:30PM

meshell ndegeocello FRI/JANUARY 13 • 8PM

zoe muth & the lost high rollers SAT/JANUARY 14 • 8PM

R E V E R B • S E AT T L E W E E K LY • J A N U A RY 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2

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Get Outta the Hoodie! Ladies of Seattle, we are blessed with so many awesome events to attend, it’s easy to take them for granted. The best way to show our scene some love is to make every show a special occasion. Just because it’s “Seattle acceptable” to show up in a sweatshirt doesn’t mean you have to. We want touring acts to leave town telling tales of how spectacular we are. My challenge to you in the new year, whether you are in a band or a spectator, is to step up your show game. Hunt the thrift shops and accessory stores to inexpensively build your own fashion backstory. My winter 2012 look will be an accountant at the firm of Neil, Mars, Sixx, and Lee—think 9 to 5 and Working Girl with heavy-metal accents. Countless songs have written about high heels, stockings, lipstick, and unforgettable frocks, but only a handful about your Converse and hoodies. You can see where I’m going with this. Come on, girls, let’s give ’em something to sing about. And maybe we can convince the guys to follow suit.

Saturday Morn ing Evils

LIVE MUSIC 6 NIGHTS A WEEK!

Karaoke on Mondays Open Mic Tuesdays (acoustic-only)

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Trivia/Open Mic Wednesdays Thurs-Sat Live Music 21+ Sun Live Music all ages/full bar with ID

Seattle’s The Young Evils ha ve gone Gorill on us. This ad az orable cartoo n take on the currently wor band, king on a new release for 20 makes me wan 12, t to change th eir name to th Sweetie Pies. e No news yet if their animated (as drawn by counterparts Portland artis t Emily Block) replace them will onst über-busy drum age, which would make mer Faustine Hudson’s life whole lot easi a er.

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Quote Quizzzz Wu said it? (Answers below.) 1. “With a suit, always wear big British shoes, the ones with large welts. There’s nothing worse than dainty little Italian jobs at the end of the leg line.” 2. “Live your eyeliner, breathe your lipstick, and kill for each other.” 3. “Earrings don’t make people look beautiful . . . Money makes people look beautiful.” 4. “Can’t wear skinny jeans ’cuz my knots don’t fit.” 5. “Just because we wear lipstick, it doesn’t mean we can’t kick your ass!”

In honor of the Wu-Tang show at the Showbox on Jan. 25, bestow upon yourself a Wu-Moniker. Try adding a “ZA” after the first letter of your name (I would be the IZA) or a three-word descriptor ending in “illah” (our music editor Chris Kornelis would be the Beardface Vanillah), and refer to yourself in the third person until the show—or until everyone you know defriends you, whichever comes first.

Smartypants

Want to drop some knowledge on your first-to-know-it-all friends? Start frequenting local indie entertainment blog The Color Awesome (www.thecolorawesome.com). E indieannajones@seattleweekly.com

Solution: 1) David Bowie 2) Lady Gaga 3) Madonna 4) Jay-Z 5) Nikki Sixx.

dinner & show

GREENHOUSE AND LIGHT

talkingheads»


talkingheads» » DIG MY MOOD

True Grit Don’t be ashamed to try to be like Glen Campbell. Just try harder. BY DAVID STOESZ

A

wise man once said that every indie rocker secretly wants to be Neil Young. And it’s true. Those guys (and it’s always guys) prize that stonery, soulful thing Neil has, that quavery-voiced sensitivity, that looseygoosey songwriting style, and above all those guitar heroics. Just listen to the extended jams of Stephen Malkmus and the interminable solos of whatshisface, that Built to Spill guy, who really the let the cat out of the bag with his faithful-to-the-point-of-pointless cover of “Cortez the Killer.” But now it seems that every indie rocker secretly wants to be Glen Campbell. Exhibit A: their hair. They’ve all got the longish but tidy and parted-on-the-side style Glen had in the late ’60s and early ’70s as he made the hippie-vagabond vibe more palatable to Middle America, and/or his neatly trimmed beard of the late ’70s. And, like Glen, they’re actively courting the mainstream with an adult-contemporary sound. The Head and the Heart? They’re basically AM radio circa 1976. Fleet Foxes? Successful because they’re such easy listening. None of this is intended as a diss. I myself tried for years to get my hair to look like Glen’s

does on the cover of Gentle on My Mind. So if I seem to mock, it’s pure jealousy. As for the music, brilliant things can happen in the middle of the road. One of the three albums I’ve listened to more than any other is Reunion, Glen’s 1974 collaboration with songwriter Jimmy Webb. (The other two are the “White Album” and The Marshall Mathers LP.) It’s a stone-cold ’70s soft-rock classic—redolent of denim jackets, dusty roads, and THCsoaked sunsets—but the songs are also intensely odd, in the way that only the man behind “MacArthur Park” and “Where’s the Playground Susie” could write them. No, the point is bands should be more like Glen. With Campbell, 75, currently battling Alzheimer’s and in the middle of his farewell tour, the time is right to take up his mantle. In place of trendy but musically threadbare Americana, the beards of the new generation could consider emulating the Rhinestone Cowboy’s symphonic pop, gorgeous, wide-open vocal tone, and Broadway-ready enunciation. Let us hear the words you mystical lumberjacks are dreaming up. The hair is a fabulous start. Now let’s take it the rest of the way, all the way to that star-spangled rodeo. E music@seattleweekly.com

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REVERB • SEATTLE WEEKLY • JANUARY 4 – 10, 2012

Hand picked selection of fine new, used and vintage instruments.

7


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profile»

they’ve been giving hits— now the Writers Block wants a slice of fame. Renee McMahon

The Ghosts

From behind the curtain, two Tacoma songwriters are topping the charts. 2012 could be the year they finally get the credit(s) they deserve. By Todd Hamm the world of the songwriter, though. That’s why they call us ghostwriters: We’re there, but we’re not there.” Under the moniker The Writers Block, Rishad and Jordan have seen their stock jump over the past year, first by placing “Fly,” followed by tracks on albums by pop artists Iyaz, Jason Derülo, and Travis McCoy. Their resume got another bump when Minaj’s Pink Friday (on which “Fly” appears) received a Best Rap Album Grammy nomination. And it’s looking more and “An artist who writes their own more as if “Fly” is only the start for the duo, which music and can write hits for outside has been hired to work on artists is at the top of the hierarchy. material that could find That’s what Will and Clemm are.” its way onto upcoming albums by Minaj, Christina dressing room. It was a funny moment, Aguilera, Drake, T.I., and Dr. Dre. considering that he and 22-year-old William “Placing” songs on high-profile projects Jordan wrote the song; Nicki Minaj and is how a songwriter makes a name. For Rihanna took it to the top of the charts. Rishad and Jordan, this entails either sendWith “Fly” soaking up a considerable ing a song they’ve written to their label, amount of national pop-radio airtime, it’s Los Angeles–based Beluga Heights, to shop a situation the two are getting used to. around to artists, or being asked to record Rishad says it makes him feel a bit like specifically for a project by the artists Santa. “People never see you, but you’re themselves. Both approaches have yielded giving gifts all the time,” he says. “That’s fruitful returns, and The Writers Block’s

situation could get a lot better very soon. Rishad says that at the moment they have 15 placements pending. “We knew that this was only the beginning,” Jordan says of “Fly.” “If this does happen, and things do go the way they’re saying it will go, it will just be a door. If you get drafted to the NBA, you’re not done; you haven’t accomplished anything you need to accomplish. That’s your entry, but you still have a lot more work to do.” As two aspiring musicians in Tacoma’s developing music scene, Rishad and Jordan were drawn together by necessity. With the help of his older brother, promoter/manager Richard Penton, Rishad had grabbed the ear of the Beluga Heights front office, and the label had expressed interest in his songwriting talents. A rapper by trade, Rishad saw this as an opportunity to get his foot in the music industry’s door, but he needed a producer to bring his work to life in the studio. Rishad contacted fellow Tacoma resident Jordan, a versatile producer and smooth-voiced vocalist, with whom he had worked on his first solo record. The two meshed on professional and personal levels immediately, and The Writers Block was formed.

T

he duo’s first placement, a song called “Pretty Girls,” was picked up by Iyaz and Travis McCoy, which led to more and more freelance work. But when the label heard “Fly” and landed a big placement with Minaj, they decided to sign The Writers Block to an official deal. Soon after, Beluga Heights brokered a deal with Universal’s publishing branch, Rondor, on behalf of The Writers Block, which put them on the conglomerate’s payroll to write music to be used by Universal artists—names like Lady Gaga, Eminem, the Black Eyed Peas, Mariah Carey, and U2—or be placed in films and on TV. Beluga Heights CEO Zach Katz says the duo is making moves in all the right directions and has the promise to do great things. “With the industry being super-competitive and saturated with up-and-comers, the key for an artist trying to break in is to have as many skill sets as possible, all of which lend to the artist’s ultimate identity,” he says. “An artist who is also a good writer is perceived much more favorably than an aspiring artist who doesn’t write their own music. And an artist who writes their own music and can

REVERB • sEattlE wEEkly • JanuaRy 4 – 10, 2012

“T

here’s no cool way to say ‘Hey, everybody, I wrote that!’ ” laughs Tacoma’s Clemm Rishad in a nowprivate recording studio called Platinum Reign that overlooks a piece of Commencement Bay. The 23-year-old is recounting a recent trip to the mall, where a song called “Fly” came on over the public-address system, and the store’s staff and customers started singing along while he was in the

» Continued on page 10 9


profile» The Ghosts » from paGe 9

R E V E R B • s E at t l E w E E k ly • J a n u a Ry 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2

GL Wood/UniversaL

write hits for outside artists is at the top of the hierarchy. That’s what Will and Clemm are.” Label co-founder J.R. Rotem, who produced “Fly”—not to mention hit tracks for everybody from 50 Cent and Snoop Dogg to Britney Spears and J.Lo—is also quick to praise the team’s talents: “As a producer, I’m always looking for singer/ songwriters that inspire my creativity and imagination,” he says. “I felt an instant connection with the unique quality of Will’s voice, as well as an honesty in their songwriting.” Now that their names are finding their way into a fair number of industry conversations, the duo will devote 2012 to brand development and marketing, meaning that they will put their songwriting momentum behind their solo careers and attempt to establish themselves as artists on the national scene. Both have multiple projects in the works and the backing of some heavyweight collaborators: Rishad’s new EP is being engineered by three-time Grammy winner Anthony Kilhoffer, who’s handled all of Kanye West’s albums, while Jordan is working on a project with Rotem. The two have also taken steps to create their own imprint, a label they named The Sky Movement, and have already signed a number of local artists: DJ Risk One, Tryfe and Luke of Doxology, and D Crews.

10

Nicki minaj has The Writers Block to thank for her hit “fly.”

“There are things going on that people have no idea about, that we can’t even talk about, but it’s stuff that is gonna change the world,” says Jordan. “It’s like being Superman, and you know that your costume’s underneath your clothes. You can’t always just break out, but if I need to . . . ” E music@seattleweekly.com

4

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reviews»Our Take on Every Local Release* It’s January 2012, and

Seattle Sounds Like . . .

recordings from KEXP, Winston’s Beach Club in San Diego, and Long Beach. The smooth grooves are a bass-heavy grab bag of experimental roots music with a warm, soulful message ingrained in each song. JW Dyme Def, Yuk the World (out now, Yuk Records, dymedef.com): A large collection of solid DD material that charts the progress the group has made as artists and, perhaps, people. TH GravelRoad, Psychedelta (1/26, Knick Knack Records, knickknackrecords): GravelRoad manages to put its own stamp on psychedelic blues, a clichéd genre defined by recitation. On this promising LP, the band insists the genre’s not worn out. CHRIS KORNELIS (Thurs., Jan. 26, Tractor Tavern)

Olympia fuzz-rockers the Maxines.

Groove for Thought, Inspired, (out now, self-released, grooveforthought.com): Featuring soulful, swinging a cappella harmonies, Inspired is a funky, bopping record that pays homage to pop classics like “How Sweet It Is.” The Seattle group, which appeared on NBC’s The Sing-Off, is incredibly cohesive and fun, and their voices explode on each track. JW (Sat., Jan. 7, Theatre at Meydenbauer, Bellevue)

SARAH CASS

Hi-Life Soundsystem, Langston Hugh Hefner: Love, Weed & Other Vices (out now, Members Only, membersonly206.bandcamp. com): Mixing their patented self-aware partyrap with some cooled-out later-night scenarios, this interlude-heavy follow-up to their selftitled debut can stand up to a front-to-back listen while you indulge your vices. TH

Blak Mic, “Hearts & Soul” (out now, selfreleased, blakmic.bandcamp.com): Beats and rhymes from Tacoma’s Blak Mic and his friends that roll off the playlist with a soulful ease. A fun free-time release that’s worth at least a quick spin. TODD HAMM

*

Havi Blaze, “I’m A Murderer” (out now, self-released, haviblazemusic. com): Somber storytelling from Tacoma over a lonely piano and bass rhythm. He treads on tired subject matter here, but his line is

Chris Mess, Chris Mess (out now, selfreleased, reverbnation.com/chrismess): Despite the name, this isn’t holiday music for dysfunctional families but rather guitardriven, glammy power pop from a quartet of Seattle scene veterans. It’s a bit predictable at times, but makes up for it by not taking itself too seriously. MA’CHELL DUMA LAVASSAR (Fri., Jan. 20, 2 Bit Saloon) Kaylee Cole, Into the Woods (out now, self-released, kayleecole.bandcamp.com): Cole has undergone a transformation of late. These older songs, staples of her live performances of the past few years, showcase only piano and her resonant, smoky voice. A full-length expected in 2012 will display the goth side of her newer work. JULIA MULLEN GORDON (Sat., Jan. 14, Columbia City Theater) Thaddeus David, “By Any Means” (out now, Members Only, membersonly206.

Yeah, every release *In each issue, we review every release from local bands and labels scheduled for the coming month. We fully expect a few releases to slip through the cracks. So each issue will also include anything we missed in previous issues, or that had been released in the interim. Send releases and reminders to reverbreviews@seattleweekly.com.

*

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

bandcamp.com): The beat is dark and echoey, and Grayskul’s Onry Ozzborn drops some twisted imagery to match, but Thad’s verses aren’t as strong as they’ve been in the past, and Parker’s chorus is too faux–Dirty South. TH

*

Demon Hunter, The World Is a Thorn (Deluxe Edition) (out now, Solid State, demonhunter.net): Gorgeous, unrelenting, and excellently crafted, this re-release boasts a new string mix of “Driving Nails” and a few acoustic hits, including “Down in a Hole.” JOE WILLIAMS

Dub Lounge International, 2011 Live Compilation (out now, self-released, dubloungeintl. com): Funky and fun, DLI’s live album boasts

*

How to Operate Your Brain, self-titled (out now, self-released, howtooperateyour brain.bandcamp.com): As band names go? Terrible. Thankfully, the songs on this debut EP are better—a tiny bit early-2000s emo throwback, but otherwise clean and tight guitar rock replete with interesting riffage and a lot of obvious heart. ERIN K.THOMPSON (Wed., Jan. 11, Funhouse) iji, Yerself (out now, self-released, ijiiji.band camp.com): Yerself finds a compatible context

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 13

COLOR FORCE SWEET SECRETS

(out now, self-released, sweetsecretsband.com) This Seattle six-piece merges the best of their previous two EPs into a debut full-length that gently straddles the line between the sweeping guitar rock of the early ’90s (The The, U2) and the lush indie rock of the ’00s (Interpol, The National, the Strokes). Roger Lloyd’s fluid vocals next to Corey Knafelz’s steady percussion inspire comparisons to a range of influences, but the band wholly owns these 12 tracks, blending dreamy song structures, killer guitar hooks, and luscious harmonies into gorgeous pop resonance. GE (Fri., Jan. 13, Skylark Cafe and Club)

REVERB • sEattlE wEEkly • JanuaRy 4 – 10, 2012

The Acoustic Reign Project, Arc (out now, Sol Disk, soldisk.com): Do you like free jazz? If so, you’ll probably dig Arc, notable both for the inclusion of former Heart guitarist Roger Fisher in its lineup and for lending credibility to the notion that Seattle has a viable jazz scene. If you’re not familiar with the genre, smoke some opium, replace your regular lightbulbs with red ones, and start drinking chartreuse. It will liven things up considerably. MIKE SEELY

twisted, and neither his singing nor his rap flow have ever sounded so smooth. TH

GENEVIEVE PIERSON

LOCAL RELEASES

*

The Hoot Hoots, Appetite for Distraction (out now, self-released, thehoot hoots.com): The Hoot Hoots pick up where the Shins and the Unicorns left off with tight pop arrangements, expressive, lush harmonies, and sound effects across the board: spacey blips, synth landscapes, cartoony-sounding refrains in the key of Futurama’s Zoidberg. Wrapped up in lyrics about ghosts and Pac-Man, the Hoots damn near define goof-pop. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT (Sat., Jan. 7, High Dive)

11


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R E V E R B • s E at t l E w E E k ly • J a n u a Ry 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2

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reviews» » FROM PAGE 11 for Zach Burba, iji’s alternately bewitching and affectedly cutesy frontman. Burba has a near-sexless voice fit for a prepubescent, but Yerself coaxes stunning warmth from track after track of mid-tempo, hand-woven funk. M.T. RICHARDS

Into the Storm, Captains (out now, selfreleased, intothestorm. bandcamp.com): The recording (especially on the drum tracks) could be more even, and screamer Oliver Reeves could stand to go easy on the vocalcord shredding, but the music beneath it all is a delightful punch in the face. TH (Wed., Jan. 4, Comet Tavern)

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JVigil, self-titled (1/10, self-released, j-vigil. com): JVigil’s voice bears a passing resemblance to Usher’s, and his debut album has some outwardly slicksounding production, but those two facts can’t mask the songs’ uninspired dullness. R&B for amateurs. EKT (Thurs., Jan. 12, Sole Repair) The Luna Moth, Speak Destination (1/5, self-released, thelunamoth.com): Clocking in at just under 35 minutes, this three-song EP is best suited to be angry elevator music. The nonstop crescendos get lost in a sea of constantly-beating-you-over-the-head trance music that barely breaks yawn-worthy. JW (Thurs., Jan. 5, Chop Suey)

Massiah, “Homage” (out now, self-released, massiah.bandcamp.com): The second single from Massiah’s upcoming Welcome to Shadowville mixtape is packed with overly literal rhetoric that might have cut deeper had it come out before MCs like Immortal Technique blew the lid off the niche. He sounds like a genuine guy with a lot to say, though, so we’ll check back in. TH

*

The Maxines, Drugstore (1/24, K Records, krecs.com): Four songs of super-fuzzed-out garage rock from this Olympia duo, Matt Murillo and Kelly Norman. For just two people, they make a helluva lot of racket, taking turns singing lead vocals and playing fierce and pounding simple riffs. Think equal parts Bikini Kill, the Melvins, and White Stripes. DAVE LAKE (Sun., Jan. 8, Rendezvous)

*

OC Notes, Emerald City Sequence (out now, self-released, emeraldcitysequence. blogspot.com): The Seattle studio wizard returns with a conceptual audio-visual treat: He puts his own twist on the 1978 Afro-celebratory Wizard of Oz remake The Wiz. Notes can do no wrong. TH (Tues., Jan. 10, Neumos) Out Like Pluto, Take Over (1/10, The James Polk Shuffle Music, outlikepluto.com): A fun pop-punk effort fronted by female vocalist Kari Tarr, though the smidgen of anger and attitude on songs like “Rocco” and “Bridge” plays a lot like Taylor Swift would if she wore Converse and listened to Simple Plan. JW (Fri., Jan. 13, King Cat Theater)

*

Gregory Paul, The Fremont Abbey Sessions (out now, self-released, gregpaul. com): The hiss of analog tape and the cavernous natural reverb of Fremont Abbey adds a layer of pathos to Gregory Paul and Holly Merrill’s transcendent harmonies, lending an old-school air to Paul’s already classic songwriting. JMG

*

qp, Go Dum (1/17, Car Crash Set, car crashset.com): qp’s bass track is both more engagingly hollowed-out and more rhythmically hyperactive than the hyphy to which it nods. Remixes from Car Crash don Ill Cosby to Seattle expat Jerry Abstract. ERIC GRANDY

Quickie, “Phoenix Jones” (out now, selfreleased, quickietheband.com): Quickie’s homage to our local man in tights is beyondpolished pop-punk, so commercial that it gives you the feeling that at any moment they may bust out some tips to improve your credit score. MDL (Sat., Jan. 14, Comet Tavern)

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

INCLUDE: 1) Copy of legal WA I.D. 2) Copy of medical record page verifying physician’s diagnosis of one of above conditions 3) The physicians name, address & phone 4) Include check or money order for $125 paid to “Hood Anesthesia” 5) Include return addressed envelope & phone

For questions, contact: jimfhood@msn.com

REVERB • sEattlE wEEkly • JanuaRy 4 – 10, 2012

Manooghi Hi, Silence (out now, Mowlawner Records, manooghihi.com): This Seattle rockand-world-fusion collective’s second album is most successful when it blends riffing electric guitars and Indian-inspired chants, led by Bombay native Mehnaz Hoosein’s piercing vocals—such as on the opening track, “My Friends,” and particularly on the band’s dizzying cover of “Kashmir.” EKT (Fri., Jan. 20, Crocodile)

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R E V E R B • S E AT T L E W E E K LY • J A N U A RY 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2

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Spurm, Spurm 3 (1/14, ggnzla Records, spurm. me): The GGNZLA house band goes out with one last blast of horn-y, strangulated punk spunk (and one Who cover) before label boss TV Coahran and crew split for other projects. Comes as a 5˝ x 7˝ flexi-disc postcard. EG

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» FROM PAGE 13

Soul the Interrogator, “Remainder” (out now, self-released, soundcloud.com/soulthe interrogator): Hesitant brag-rap with boring cadences. Skip. TH

Un.SIcoCm LIVE COUNwwTwR.liYttlerM he ed JUKEHOUSE HOUNDS 9PM $3 COVER

Paradoxically, music and art space Cairo is small enough to hold maybe 50 people at a crowded show, but big enough to land on the front page of The Seattle Times. It’s the current Velvet Underground of Seattle’s DIY scene: a Kool-Aid drunk by only double digits’ worth of people—all of whom, however, were inspired to start bands. Cairo Records’ annual Expo Festival–accompanying compilation, this year dubbed Coastal Sightings, scans the breadth of that small but fertile scene—from analog electronics and ambient noise (acts like John Oven, Teflon Don, U, White Rainbow, and Secret Colors) to abrasive no-wave punk (Footwork, M.Women, Stickers, Flexions, Stephanie), plus outliers like King Dude’s doom folk and Idle Times’ garage-rock classicism. It also includes one wonderfully odd, weightless collab between twee poppers Witch Gardens and chillwavers USF—a cross-genre pairing that brings out the best in both and a fine example of the sort of creative dialogue for which Cairo provides space. EG

Red Jacket Mine, “Poplar Bluff” (out now, self-released, redjacketmine.bandcamp.com): This Seattle rock-and-soul trio’s genial new single boasts easy, mellow instrumentation, a compelling chorus, and—the sharpest arrow in the band’s quiver—frontman Lincoln Barr’s sweet, smooth, and unassuming vocals. EKT

#1 RATED CLINIC IN WA

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Gabriel Teodros, Colored People’s Time Machine (1/19, Fresh Chopped Beats/MADK, gabrielteodros.blogspot.com): Like those of onetime bandmate Khingz, each song Teodros writes is an earnest statement that approaches current world issues with a lovefirst attitude. Though he doesn’t balance his good-natured demeanor with cutting lyricism as well as his friend does, his is a positive voice that deserves to be heard. TH (Thurs., Jan. 19, Chop Suey) Urban Seeds, Grow (out now, self-released, urbanseeds.net): Easygoing, sample-free R&B that alternates between smoothed-out MC rhymes and soulful, reggae-influenced vocals. Not edgy or groundbreaking, but full of solid musicianship. MDL (Fri., Jan. 6, El Corazon)

*

Wings and Wounds, self-titled (out now, Fated Empire, fatedempire.com): Emo rap is alive and well in the Northwest— but more Rhymesayers’ hoodie-pulled-down brooding than Drake-era whining, with Graves 33 providing dark backdrops for Sarx and guests’ gruff rhymes. EG

*

Kendl Winter, The Mechanics of Hovering Flight (1/24, K Records, krecs. com): Banjo-wielding multi-instrumentalist Kendl Winter’s second release on K is rich and earthy, with the same sort of regionspecific details that tied 2010’s Apple Core to Puget Sound (there it was banana slugs,

here chanterelles and Douglas firs), though it moves beyond that album’s strained yodeling for a rootsy, raspy register and light accents of psychedelic banjo for a rightly centered bluegrass sound that’s as indie as it is Appalachian. GE Wizdom & Epidemmik, Unearthed (out now, self-released, wizdom80.bandcamp. com/): Wiz has trouble straying from his monotonous sports/shoes/growing up in Seattle inkwell here, but Epidemmik’s soulsampled beats work well over the album’s 10 tracks. TH

LOCAL LABELS’ OUT-OF-TOWN BANDS August Burns Red, “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen” (out now, Solid State, augustburnsred.com): More along the lines of the Trans-Siberian Orchestra on crack, ABR’s version of “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen” captures the traditional melody while giving it a metal flavor complete with fingersplitting guitar solos, slow-mo breakdowns, and even a slow, pretty part. JW (Sat., Feb. 11, El Corazon)

*

Becoming the Archetype, “O Holy Night” (out now, Solid State, facebook. com/becomingthearchetypemusic): Ominous and chilling, this single begins with children softly singing over piano. The real magic begins when the electric guitar hits at 1:17, leading into a majestic solo . . . before crashing into an oxymoronic Christmas breakdown of pig squeals and screams. JW

Blessed by a Broken Heart, Feel the Power (1/24, Tooth & Nail, blessed.mu): A fun mixture of glam rock and power metal, Feel the Power incorporates speedy, crying guitar solos that burst right out of the ’80s. A teaspoon of screaming rounds out the record, hitting its groove best with “Shut Up and Rock.” JW David Hahn, Apocalypse Cow (out now, Fin Records, davidhahnonline.com): The title track is a industrial mashup of the Bush administration’s drumbeat to war, porn, and W.’s comments about not waiting for the mushroom cloud. It’s backed with “Chernobyl,” which is equally menacing but not as orgasmic. CK E


the»month»ahead pop/rock BY ERIN K. THOMPSON

Charles Leo Gebhardt IV WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4

The ginger garage-rock man-about-town will play the lovable, jangly indie-pop songs that make up his solo material, most recently heard on last year’s buzzy Begin Again. With Idle Times, Orca Team, the First Times. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442. 8 p.m. $8.

Detective Agency SUNDAY, JANUARY 8

Detective Agency is a local, three-quarters female, breezy pop-rock quartet; their songs are innocuous and quietly charming. Tonight they play the Rendezvous’ Grotto with Olympia’s K Records–signed fuzz duo the Maxines. With Broomsticks. JewelBox/

Blouse THURSDAY, JANUARY 12

Last year this Portland dream-pop trio released a single on Sub Pop and a pretty, sighing debut full-length on Captured Tracks. Opening tonight’s show are their Seattle haze-pop contemporaries Seapony. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880. 9:30 p.m. $8.

Ambulance FRIDAY, JANUARY 13

The very young post-punkers of Ambulance competed in Sound Off! last year; though they didn’t win the big prize, their darkly agitated and surprisingly mature brand of guitar rock is still worth checking out. With Friday at the Lake, Plant Party, Brandon Keeley. Q Cafe, 3223 15th Ave. W., 352-2525. 8 p.m. $8. All ages.

Sound on the Sound’s Annual Birthday Party Our friends and fellow local-music bloggers at Sound on the Sound will celebrate with the raucous rockers of Dude York, powerpop favorites the Golden Blondes, and an ultra-secret headliner you’ll have to find out about for yourself. Blue Moon Tavern, 712 N.E. 45th St., 675-9116. 10 p.m. $8.

Gold Leaves SATURDAY, JANUARY 14

Arthur & Yu’s Grant Olsen performs songs from last year’s The Ornament, his Hardly Art debut as Gold Leaves: a gorgeous collection of opulent, moving pop-rock songs. With Cumulus. Tractor Tavern, 5213

Ravenna Woods

Elvis Tribute Show

FRIDAY, JANUARY 20

SATURDAY, JANUARY 7

Seattle’s favorite rock-acoustic-folk-toy piano-jamming band plays a tour kickoff tonight before a two-week jaunt down the West Coast. With A Lull, Deleted Scenes.

To celebrate both what would have been the King’s 77th birthday and the Memphis label that launched his career, the Roy Kay Combo presents a special set of Sun Records tunes next to a host of Seattle bands, each with their own spin on Presley’s timeless, iconic rock ’n’ roll. With Lucky Lawrence,

Comet Tavern, 922 E. Pike St., 322-9272. 9 p.m. $10.

Girl Trouble FRIDAY, JANUARY 20

Nearly 28 years after their first show, a Steilacoom battle of the bands, Tacoma’s old-school garage-rockers are still rocking it live with all four original members. With the Pynnacles. Funhouse, 206 Fifth Ave. N., 374-8400. 9:30 p.m. $7.

country BY GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

Steep Canyon Rangers THURSDAY, JANUARY 5

These five string players from North Carolina nabbed acclaim as the bluegrass quintet that backed Steve Martin on tour and on his Grammy-nominated album Rare Bird Alert. Their peppy Appalachian stylings and resonant harmonies are the real thing, with or without that bluegrass version of “King Tut.” Snoqualmie Casino, 37500 S.E. North Bend Way, Snoqualmie, 425-888-1234. 7 p.m. $25.

Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599. 9:30 p.m. $8.

Youth Lagoon

Risky Liver FRIDAY, JANUARY 6

Youth Lagoon is 22-year-old Boisean multiinstrumentalist and songwriter Trevor Powers, who last fall released his debut, the glowing and extraordinarily tender The Year of Hibernation, to deserved critical praise.

Risky Liver is the tongue-in-cheek Americana side project of the Starlings’ Joy Mills, who performs alongside Zoe Muth and the Lost High Rollers bassist Mike McDermott and croons with an easy, rich sweetness and a twinkle in her eye. Conor Byrne, 5140

Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442. 8 p.m. $12.

Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-3640. 9:30 p.m. $7.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19

Miles and Karina, Levi Dexter, Marti Brom, Billy Joe Huels, Side Saddle, Marshall Scott Warner, Kim Fields with Lisa Angelatini. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599. 9:30 p.m. $10.

Hot Club of Cowtown TUESDAY, JANUARY 10

This Austin trio makes fiddle-fueled Western swing fused with ragtime jazz—a toe-tapping, two-stepping style influenced by both Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Grappelli’s gypsy jazz and the music of “King of Western Swing” Bob Wills, whom they cover on their new album, What Makes Bob Holler. With Rachel Lyn Harrington & the Knock Outs. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599. 8 p.m. $15.

Weatherside Whiskey Band THURSDAY, JANUARY 12

Performing bluegrass and Americana covers along with originals, this five-piece, with members from Seattle to Whidbey Island, is a whiskey-swilling roadhouse outfit with jumpy two- and four-part harmonies. A new EP is slated for release early this year. With The Table of Contents, Relentless Rhythm Machine. High Dive, 513 N. 36th St., 632-0212. 9 p.m. $6.

Shivering Denizens FRIDAY, JANUARY 13

Having shared the stage with the likes of David Allan Coe and Eddie Spaghetti, roots/

Portland haze-poppers Blouse.

rockabilly/outlaw country band Shivering Denizens keep things heavy and hopping with their blend of banjo, lap steel, honkytonk piano, and attitude. With 800 Mile Monday, the Dan Family, Texas Rangers. Slim’s Last Chance Chili Shack, 5606 First Ave. S., 762-7900. 9 p.m. $8.

Honky Tonk Angels SATURDAY, JANUARY 14

Few lineups could combine the talent, personality, and gender specificity of these local bands (like SW favorite Zoe Muth and rootsy songstress Shelby Earl), led by soulful ladies with a predominantly country slant. With the Brambles, Kaylee Cole, the Rachel Mae Band, Side Saddle. Columbia City Theater, 4916 Rainier Ave. S., 722-3009. 9 p.m. $15.

Lonesome Shack SATURDAY, JANUARY 14

After four years living in a shack he built in New Mexico, guitarist Ben Todd was inspired to form this rootsy, roadside blues duo (with Kristian Garrard of Thousands on drums). Imagine a super-stripped-down My Goodness, Black Keys, or Soledad Brothers, and you’re on the right track. With The Curious Mystery, Sugar Sugar Sugar. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880. 10 p.m. $7.

Casey Neill & the Norway Rats FRIDAY, JANUARY 27

This Portland country supergroup (including members of the Decemberists, the Lucinda Williams Band, the Eels, and The Minus 5) delivers harmony-heavy, easy-rolling ballads and roots-fueled numbers somewhere between Son Volt and R.E.M. With Renegade String Band, Sassparilla. High Dive, 513 N. 36th St., 632-0212. 9:30 p.m. $7.

REVERB • sEattlE wEEkly • JanuaRy 4 – 10, 2012

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13

CAPTURED TRACKS

Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., 441-5823. 9 p.m. $5.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 16 15


themonthahead» Nipsey Hussle

hip-hop

Gifted L.A. lyricist Nipsey Hussle is an artist notable for his surprisingly level-headed commentary on life in his South Central sector. Whether you’re looking for a grimier strain of street rap, something to dance to, or thoughtful storytelling, you’ll find something to jive with tonight. With Eighty 4 Fly, Avatar

BY TODD HAMM

Tulsi FRIDAY, JANUARY 6

TACO THURSDAYS 5 shredded beef tacos for $5, with $3 house margaritas and $3 Coronas all night. DJ spinning at 7 PM until midnight

Saturdays

Special Events 3rd Saturday of the month B.E.N.T. Drag Show @ 9 PM Drag Kings and Queens Drink specials all night DJ Mike Yoda Spinning at 9 PM

Rapping and occasionally singing, Tulsi’s playful yet real-life vibe is reminiscent of fellow deep-voiced West Coaster Abstract Rude. With The GNU Deal, Scribes, DJ

Young Blaze, Bonaphied. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442. 8 p.m. $18. All ages.

Modul8r, The MC Type. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005. 8 p.m. $7. All ages.

Roach Gigz SUNDAY, JANUARY 22

Roach Gigz is an Oakland rapper with a distinct sense of humor and a knack for cadence. His bouncy delivery can make even his more sincere tracks sound like party jams, and his party jams sound downright goofy, so look forward to a wild night. With DJ Nima Fadavi. Nectar,

Grayskul SATURDAY, JANUARY 7

This legendary Seattle duo, JFK and Onry Ozzborn, are not only some of Seattle’s most thorough rap artists on record; they’re also notoriously great in concert. This month’s KEXP Audioasis gig should be an energetic re-emergence after the two took time off to pursue side projects and solo careers. With

Wu-Tang Clan WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25

At their 2007 Bumbershoot performance, the most famous hip-hop collective of all time had yet to figure out what to do with all those amazing MCs onstage when they weren’t rapping. It also proved they could turn a relatively sloppy set into a fantastically memorable show with any one of their classic tracks. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S.,

$5 Cover for Drag Shows

Vibe Bar and Grill 226 1st Ave S - Kent

652-0444. 8 p.m. $35 adv./$40 DOS. All ages.

Doomtree

www.thevibebarandgrill.com

NATHANAEL KECK

FRIDAY, JANUARY 27

Gabriel Teodros THURSDAY, JANUARY 19

R E V E R B • S E AT T L E W E E K LY • J A N U A RY 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2

Perhaps the town’s most community-forward rap artist, the ever-positive Teodros is releasing his long-awaited album Colored People’s Time Machine tonight, a good chance to enjoy some smooth music and feel inspired. With

16

Meklit Hadero, OC Notes, Spyc-E, WD4D, EarDr.Umz. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005. 9 p.m. $10. All ages.

The MC Type FRIDAY, JANUARY 20

Make fun of the man all you want, but the joke-telling ringleader of local raunch-rap is a seriously hardworking individual who puts on entertaining live displays. He’s been performing with a live band as of late, which enhances the spectacle. With Prof, Fictitious, the Bad Tenants, T11. Nectar, 412 N. 36th St., 632-2020. 8 p.m. $7.

Sol FRIDAY, JANUARY 20

Lounging somewhere between the conscious-minded Blue Scholars and the feel-good aura of Grynch is local MC Sol. Celebrating the release of his new album Yours Truly at a moderate-size venue like Neumos is a good indicator of his progress up the local hip-hop ladder. With Shad, Brothers From Another, DJ Supreme, Sabzi (host). Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442. 8 p.m. $10. All ages.

Max Cooper.

Max Cooper

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13

From twitchy techno remixes of Hot Chip to his own prolific productions, Max Cooper balances beautiful minimalist composition with club-wise rhythms and bass. Tonight kicks off a new monthly from Decibel at Re-bar. With Cyanwave, Nordic Soul. Re-bar, 1114 Howell St., 233-9873. 10 p.m. $12 adv./$15 DOS.

412 N. 36th St., 632-2020. 8:30 p.m. $12.

Constant Lovers, Monogamy Party. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880. 10 p.m. $7 adv./$8 DOS.

Gabriel Teodros.

BEN SLATER

SUNDAY, JANUARY 22

Just after the Wu-Tang Clan invades Showbox SoDo, the similarly large yet far more underground Doomtree takes on the Croc. This gang of Twin Cities rappers and DJs, which includes quality acts like P.O.S. and Dessa, has an abundance of both group and individual material with which to impress. Crocodile,

Pictureplane FRIDAY, JANUARY 13

Actual Pain’s actually awesome goth rave brings “post-physical” lo-fi electro dude (and Actual Pain model) Pictureplane out to headline its first night of the new year. Electric Tea Garden, 1402 E. Pike St., 568-3972. 10 p.m. $7.

Motor City Drum Ensemble SATURDAY, JANUARY 14

Stuttgart producer Danilo Plessow (aka MCDE) helmed one of 2011’s best DJ mixes with his DJ-Kicks entry, unearthing the wide range of sounds, from Afrobeat to jazz to techno, that inform his impeccable deep-house originals. Re-bar, 1114 Howell St., 233-9873. 10 p.m.

Redemption THURSDAY, JANUARY 26– SATURDAY, JANUARY 28

dj/electronic

Local producer Steve Fisk’s resume ranges from grunge heavyweights to his own experimental electronic productions, including one bona fide “big beat” hit (via Lo-Fidelity All Stars’ remix of “Battle Flag”). Tonight, he plugs in with punkaligned marimba player Erin Jorgensen for a unique performance. On the Boards, 100 W.

BY ERIC GRANDY

Roy St., 217-9886. 8 p.m. $20. All ages.

V206 Episode 3: Falling Up What Stairs?

Fujiya & Miyagi

2200 Second Ave., 441-4618. 8 p.m. $15.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4

Ease into the new year with an evening of diverse electronic sounds in the cozy confines of The Living Room, headlined by smart, tunefully complex producer and DJ The Naturebot. With Eric Moon, Laura Lamb. The Living

FRIDAY, JANUARY 27

This UK quartet melds deadpan electrofunk to motorik lock-grooves, tops it off with cheeky vocals, and sets stiff-limbed audiences to wiggling. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 7099442. 8 p.m. $13.

Room, 1355 E. Olive St., 708-6021. 9 p.m. Free.

Beats Antique

Body Heat 3

SATURDAY, JANUARY 28

SATURDAY, JANUARY 7

The latest in Classcadia’s series of smart, high-endurance house nights is this month headlined by deep-house sophisticate Manik, with solid local support from 214 and Pezzner. With J. Alvarez, OFDM. Electric Tea Garden, 1402 E. Pike St., 568-3972. 10 p.m. $12.

Stop Biting TUESDAY, JANUARY 10

Seattle’s well-loved beats-and-break-dancing weekly hosts NYC’s Blind Prophet and local Ill Cosby, two producers bound to bring some dubstep depth to the night’s usual hip-hop groove. Lo-Fi Performance Gallery, 429 Eastlake Ave. E., 254-2824. 9:30 p.m. $5.

Your tolerance for world music, Gypsy affectations, belly dancing, and burner “culture” may unfairly color your reaction to this otherwise unremarkable down-tempo trio conceived by ex-I.R.S. Records boss Miles Copeland. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 652-0444. 8 p.m. $25. All ages.

The Social SATURDAY, JANUARY 28

Hedonic local crew Shameless presents a showcase of friends and family for one of their own’s birthday (headliner Adlib). Expect conviviality and raving good times. With Adlib, Pete Spinning, Brooke Would, Rhines, Recess, Joe Bellingham. Electric Tea Garden, 1402 E. Pike St., 568-3972. 10 p.m.


themonthahead» jazz BY BEN MORROW

Arturo Sandoval THURSDAY, JANUARY 12–SUNDAY, JANUARY 15

As a founding member of Irakere, trumpet virtuoso Sandoval helped create that band’s explosive mixture of jazz, classical, rock, and traditional Cuban music. Since leaving the group in 1981, he has earned four Grammy Awards, six Billboard Awards, and an Emmy, and was voted Cuba’s Best Instrumentalist from 1982 to 1990. In the dead of our winter, his sound could easily transport any listener to Miami or Cuba, and he may even bring some vitamin D to boot. Jazz Alley, 2033

Witchburn FRIDAY, JANUARY 6

Witchburn fly their horns high in classic metal style, spearheaded by the stunning stage presence of frontwoman Jamie Nova and propelled by Mischa Kianne’s powerfully seductive guitar work. With Ancient Warlocks, Curse of the North, Skullbot. Funhouse, 206 Fifth Ave. N., 374-8400. 9:30 p.m. $5.

Monogamy Party SATURDAY, JANUARY 7

Newcomers Monogamy Party’s angular, caustic punk would have been right at home on the Touch & Go roster circa ’95. It’s perfectly paired with the equally mouthy if more melodic sounds of Constant Lovers. With

Sixth Ave., 441-9729. 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $28.50.

Grayskul. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880. 9 p.m. $7.

McTuff Trio

Mico de Noche

TUESDAY, JANUARY 17

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11

Leading the trio through funk, jazz, and beyond, Hammond B3 organist Joe Doria is a prime example of a Seattle musician who’s carved out his own voice, adding depth and dimension to every project he’s involved in and leaving no musical stone unturned. McTuff shows often range from atmospheric psychedelia to soul-jazz to funk, seemingly randomly. But rest assured there’s a definite method to the madness. With Andy Coe, Tarik

Easily one of Seattle’s best-kept secrets in terms of doom-driven, acerbic metal. Also on the bill, Portland’s White Orange channel psych and desert rock with pop heart and hard-rock soul.

Abouzied. Seamonster Lounge, 2202 N. 45th St., 992-1120. 10 p.m. Free.

Chris Minh Doky & the Nomads TUESDAY, JANUARY 17– WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18

Carrying on the Danish tradition of spotlighting the bass as a lead instrument, Doky’s sound is rooted in East Coast jazz and seasoned with the lyrical traditions of Scandinavia. Widely recognized as a master of his instrument, he plays with authority and clarity on his latest release, Scenes From a Dream—a beautifully sparse album that blends jazz fusion with electronica, often creating music that feels cinematic and expansive. With Dave Weckl. Jazz Alley,

With He Whose Ox Is Gored, Ancient Warlocks. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442. 9 p.m. $7.

Fu Manchu SATURDAY, JANUARY 14

These SoCal stoner-rock stalwarts finally return to Seattle in support of the reissue of 1996’s In Search Of . . . album, which they’ll play in its entirety. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 381-3094. 8 p.m. $13 adv./$15 DOS.

Wolves in the Throne Room TUESDAY, JANUARY 17

Olympia’s fraternal duo came to fully textured, deeply disturbing fruition on this year’s critically heralded Celestial Lineage, a work of consistently engrossing and challenging black metal. With Master Musicians of Bukkake, Druden. Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618. 8 p.m. $13.

Princess

2033 Sixth Ave., 441-9729. 7:30 p.m. $20.50.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 21

Varmint

Rarely are four-band bills this worthwhile. After a protracted hiatus, Portland’s Black Elk is playing shows again, as is our own Princess. With Nether Regions, Helms Alee. Funhouse, 206 Fifth Ave. N., 374-8400. 9 p.m. $8.

Royal Room, 5000 Rainier Ave. S., 906-9902. 9 p.m. Free.

the heavies

The Pack A.D.

BY HANNAH LEVIN

Grudge Rock THURSDAY, JANUARY 5

The latest installment of Jake Stratton’s ongoing homage to Family Feud is a formidable smackdown between Bellingham prog-metal mavens Dog Shredder and Akimbo side project Sandrider. Re-bar, 1114 Howell St., 233-9873. 8 p.m. $8.

The Pack A.D. SATURDAY, JANUARY 21

This hugely promising punk duo out of Vancouver, B.C., essentially sounds like the bratty love child of Sleater-Kinney and the White Stripes. Hobosexual delivers 4:20 rock at blissfully blistering volumes. With Wylie & The Wild West. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599. 9:30 p.m. $10.

REVERB • sEattlE wEEkly • JanuaRy 4 – 10, 2012

Now performing in the brand-spankin’-new Royal Room, Varmint has slowly migrated just down the street since their early days at Lottie’s Lounge. While the group has always been a cover band, they take a jazz approach—they don’t rehearse and frequently have guest musicians sit in. Expect them to cover anything from Neil Diamond to Sun Ra, with a healthy dose of country mixed in.

COURTESY OF THE PACK A.D.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19

17


arty! 4 Year Annayiv, eJarsnuaarryy 11tPh nesd Wedne

Happy Hour Every Day 4-6pm & 10-midnight

Wednesday, January 11th

SPECIALS INCLUDE: WINE O WEDNESDAY | 6PM 1/2 Off Bottles and Glasses of Wine! 1/2 Off Specialty House Cocktails!

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT | 4PM $1 Off Drafts, $3 Wells & Select Appetizers $5 Pickled Ponies $3.75!!

Thank you for your love and support! Continue the Celebration Friday the 13th with DJ PETE BITTY NO COVER and Happy Hour PRICES ALL NIGHT!

4PM - CLOSE

5105 BALLARD AVE. NW • SEATTLE, WA 98107 (206) 420-2737 • WWW.BALLARDLOFT.COM • INFO@BALLARDLOFT.COM

OPen for lunch at both locations daily at 11:30am Weekend Mexican Brunch Sunday at both Locations Saturday too at Greenwood! West Seattle: 2620 Alki Ave SW 206.933.7345 Greenwood: 6711 Greenwood Ave N 206.706.4889

New Happy hour menu Fri & Sat Kitchen Open Til Midnight

www.facebook.com/bar.chupacabra

GET LUCKY IN THE MORNING Lucky 7 Breakfast Hour Mon - Fri 7am - 9am Lots of options for only $7 2630 1st Ave. Belltown (Corner of 1st and Cedar) TheLuckyDiner.com

Monday thru Thursday 7am - 10pm Open 24 hrs 7am Friday thru Sunday at 9pm

Seattle's Most Comfortable Gentlemen's Club

R E V E R B • S E AT T L E W E E K LY • J A N U A RY 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2

Dancing Bare

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Genghis Khan Restaurant 1422 First Ave Seattle, WA 98101 (206)682-3606

order online www.gkseattle.com

Happy Hour All Beer $1.50

Free Delivery


lastpage»Stats » LISSSSSTS

11 Lessons From 2011 Books, music, Chile, and the Twitter. BY DUFF MCKAGAN 8. I look terrible in cartoon form. Whoever the illustrator at Seattle Weekly is probably needs some glasses. I’m not THAT old-looking. Geez, I am only 47, er . . . just about 48. Uh, never mind. Carry on. 9. Riding Harleys in Chile with my friends is pretty damn kick-ass. Enough said. 10. This is a question, actually: Didn’t we already pay a toll on the 520 bridge? Seems like back in the day, until I was a late-teenager (see #8), we paid a toll at a toll booth on that bridge. What are we paying for now? 11. If you are on the Twitter, beware of this thing I now call the “tweet-to-follower ratio.” If you have, say, a 1,000/1 tweet ratio (for example, if you’ve tweeted 10,000 times and you have 10 followers), you should consider backing off on the Twitter time. Conversely, if someone with a 1,000/1 tweet ratio actually tweets you, you should think twice about replying. You are probably dealing with someone who might Twitter until the wheels come off. Just an observation. E JEM

1.

If you write a book about yourself, just remember: A LOT of people will now know those things about you that you have shared. 2. The Seattle band the Chasers are KILLER! How can you lose when you have a bare-chested, white-leather-coat-wearing guitar player nicknamed the Ice Wizard! (Assuming you’d like Muse, Queen, Maiden, Death Cab, and Zeke all mixed into one.) 3. If you want something done right, you gotta do it yourself. No explanation needed. 4. When your kids are ages 11 and 14, they no longer believe in Santa Claus—even after I queried, “Well then, WHO ate those cookies and drank the milk?” C’mon, Dad. This is getting embarrassing . . . 5. Seattle is the best place on this earth. I didn’t just learn this in 2011, but it still stands. 6. Seattle needs the NBA back. Again, I didn’t learn this in 2011, but it still stands. 7. Cormac McCarthy first-edition hardbacks are expensive and hard to find. I toured many bookstores this fall, and could only find a first-edition Blood Meridian. It was $2,000. Uh, never mind.

askduff@seattleweekly.com

Duff McKagan is the founding bassist in Guns N’ Roses and the leader of Seattle’s Loaded.

NEIGHBORHOOD SALES REPORT: DECEMBER CAPITOL HILL

WEST SEATTLE

NORTHGATE

1. Black Keys, El Camino 2. Various artists, Live at KEXP Volume 7 3. Tom Waits, Bad as Me 4. M83, Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming 5. Adele, 21 6. Florence & The Machine, Ceremonials 7. Amy Winehouse, Lioness: Hidden Treasures 8. The Roots, Undun 9. Beirut, The Rip Tide 10. She & Him, A Very She & Him Christmas

1. Black Keys, El Camino 2. Adele, 21 3. Various artists, Live at KEXP Volume 7 4. She & Him, A Very She & Him Christmas 5. Amy Winehouse, Lioness: Hidden Treasures 6. Tom Waits, Bad as Me 7. Florence & The Machine, Ceremonials 8. Pickwick, Myths 9. The Head and the Heart, The Head and the Heart 10. The Roots, Undun

1. Black Keys, El Camino 2. Michael Bublé, Christmas 3. Adele, 21 4. Tom Waits, Bad as Me 5. Tony Bennett, Duets II 6. Amy Winehouse, Lioness: Hidden Treasures 7. Various artists, Live at KEXP Volume 7 8. She & Him, A Very She & Him Christmas 9. Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer, and Chris Thile, The Goat Rodeo Sessions 10. The Head and the Heart, The Head and the Heart

Everyday Music

Sonic Boom 1. Black Keys, El Camino 2. Various artists, Live at KEXP Volume 7 3. Pickwick, Myths 4. The Head and the Heart, The Head and the Heart 5. She & Him, A Very She & Him Christmas 6. Adele, 21 7. Amy Winehouse, Lioness: Hidden Treasures 8. Florence & The Machine, Ceremonials 9. M83, Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming 10. The Roots, Undun

QUEEN ANNE

Silver Platters

Silver Platters

MISSOULA, MONT.

1. Black Keys, El Camino 2. Amy Winehouse, Lioness: Hidden Treasures 3. Michael Bublé, Christmas 4. Adele, 21 5. Tony Bennett, Duets II 6. The Cory Band, Stop the Cavalry 7. Pink Martini, Joy to the World 8. She & Him, A Very She & Him Christmas 9. Kate Bush, 50 Words for Snow 10. The Head and the Heart, The Head and the Heart

1. Black Keys, El Camino 2. Adele, Live at the Royal Albert Hall 3. Florence & The Machine, Ceremonials 4. Mark O’Connor, An Appalachian Christmas 5. Mumford & Sons, Sigh No More 6. Amy Winehouse, Lioness: Hidden Treasures 7. The Civil Wars, Barton Hollow 8.The Rolling Stones, Some Girls reissue 9. M83, Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming 10. Betty Wright and the Roots, Betty Wright: The Movie

Rockin Rudy’s

REVERB • sEattlE wEEkly • JanuaRy 4 – 10, 2012

BALLARD

Easy Street

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S E A T T L E W E E K LY ’ S

Thursday January 5th (21 & Over)

Goose Vargis • Stoic F.B. • Woodshed • The Chopps • Suburban Vermin $8 ADV / $10 DOS • Doors at 8:00pm • Show at 8:30pm

Friday January 6th (All Ages/Bar W/ID)

KUBE 93.3 FM Presents: Urban Seeds (CD Release) • Bryn King • Dirty O • Tre Eight • Lavish • Carl Roe • Kin • Shigg & The Rhymespeaker • Saan One • JBre Hosted by Harrison Woods with DJ B Mello Spinning $10 ADV / $12 DOS • Doors at 8:00pm • Show at 9:00pm

Saturday January 7th (All Ages/Bar W/ID) EARLY SHOW A Hope Not Forgotten • Prestige • Vessels • Vices • Prepare The Bride • Tomorrow May Fail $8 ADV / $10 DOS • Doors at 5:00pm • Show at 5:30pm

Saturday January 7th (21 & Over) LATE SHOW

Pabst Blue Ribbon & MASSRADAWESOME present: APPETITE FOR AWESOME 4! Come see full cover sets of : JAWBREAKER, 90’S PUNK SUPER MIX, COCK SPARRER, BLACK FLAG, HATEBREED, MINOR THREAT AND ANDREW WK! Performed by members of The Hollowpoints, The Loss, Curse Of The North, People Eating People, Heiress, Oblivion, Breag Nafoa, Cascabel, Skarp, Theories, Earth Control and More. There will be hourly prizes and a grand prize raffle! All proceeds will benefit Coffee Strong a coffee house for veterans run by veterans. FREE • Doors at 9:00pm • Show at 10:00pm

Tuesday January 10th (All Ages/Bar W/ID

Total Chaos • Dreadful Children • The Piss Drunks • Koozbane • The Downstrokes $8 ADV / $10 DOS • Doors at 7:00pm • Show at 7:30pm

Wednesday January 11th (21 & Over)

Jupiter • Letters • Oceans On Fire • Plus Guests $6 ADV / $8 DOS • Doors at 8:00pm • Show at 8:30pm

Thursday January 12th (All Ages/Bar W/ID)

Gunmetal Grey • Grasp Logic • Medic Medic • Coitus $8 ADV / $10 DOS • Doors at 7:30pm • Show at 8:00pm

Friday January 13th (21 & Over)

Norma Beach • The Jason Childs Band • Plus Guests $8 ADV / $10 DOS • Doors at 8:00pm • Show at 9:00pm

Saturday January 14th (21 & Over)

Tuesday January 24th (All Ages/Bar W/ID)

KINGfriday • Midnight Atmosphere • Rising Union • Jacob McCaslin • August Giaccaglia • Mixd Feelings $16 ADV / $20 DOS • Doors at 7:00pm • Show at 7:30pm

Wednesday January 25th (All Ages/Bar W/ID)

Tragedy Awaits Us All • Anything Anastasia • Tomorrow May Fail • At Horizons End • What’s Beneath $8 ADV / $10 DOS • Doors at 7:00pm • Show at 7:30pm

REVERB MUS I C M O N T H LY N O W AVA I L A BL E O N KINDLE & KINDLE FIRE!

Thursday January 26th (All Ages/Bar W/ID)

Mike Thrasher Presents: Authority Zero • Voodoo Glow Skulls • Skyfox • Success! $16 ADV / $18 DOS • Doors at 7:00pm • Show at 8:00pm

Friday January 27th (21 & Over)

As Heard On “The Howard Stern Show” Ronnie Mund Block Party featuring: Ronnie Mund • Scott The Engineer • SHULI • John Tole • Gary The Retard • Yucko The Clown / Hosted by Jason Stewart $25 • VIP Meet & Greet Tickets Available for $35 Meet & Greet for VIP Ticket Holders begins at 7:30pm Doors at 8:00pm • Show at 8:30pm

Saturday January 28th (21 & Over)

Musicwerks Seattle & El Corazon Present: Jakalope • Left Spine Down • Fake Shark Real Zombie $15 ADV / $20 DOS • Doors at 8:00pm • Show at 9:00pm

Sunday January 29th (21 & Over)

Social Club • Really Old Airplanes • Citizen Escape • WinterSeeker $6 ADV / $8 DOS • Doors at 8:00pm • Show at 8:30pm

Monday January 30th (All Ages/Bar W/ID)

Mike Thrasher Presents: Ghost • Blood Ceremony • Ancient VVisdom $13 ADV / $15 DOS • Doors at 7:00pm • Show at 8:00pm

Monday January 30th (21 & Over) LATE LOUNGE SHOW The Ghost Afterparty featuring Live Music From: Deathmocracy FREE • Music begins immediately after the conclusion of the Ghost performance in the main showroom.

Tuesday January 31st (21 & Over) LOUNGE SHOW Mike Thrasher Presents: Stolen Babies • Plus Guests $10 ADV / $12 DOS • Doors at 7:00pm • Show at 8:00pm

Mike Thrasher Presents: Fu Manchu • Helms Alee • Witchburn $13 ADV / $15 DOS • Doors at 7:00pm • Show at 8:00pm

R E V E R B • S E AT T L E W E E K LY • J A N U A RY 4 – 1 0 , 2 0 1 2

Saturday January 14th (21 & Over) LATE LOUNGE SHOW

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The Fu Manchu Afterparty featuring Live Music From: Big Wheel Stunt Show FREE • Music begins immediately after the conclusion of the Fu Manchu performance in the main showroom

Sunday January 15th (All Ages/Bar W/ID)

A Lot Like Birds • Just Like Vinyl • I The Mighty • Pharaohs Of The Sun • Plus Guests $8 ADV / $10 DOS • Doors at 7:00pm • Show at 7:30pm

Tuesday January 17th (All Ages/Bar W/ID)

Falling Up • Monarch •Lybecker • Step One $8 ADV / $10 DOS • Doors at 6:00pm • Show at 6:30pm

Thursday January 19th (21 & Over)

Moral Crux • Koozbane • Kids On Fire • Conniption Fits $5 • Doors at 8:30pm •Show at 9:00pm

Saturday January 21st (All Ages/Bar W/ID)

Mike Thrasher Presents: Allstar Weekend • Hollywood Ending • The After Party • Paradise Fears) $20 ADV / $23 DOS • Doors at 5:30pm • Show at 6:00pm

COMING SOON 2/4 – The Toasters 2/7 – Maylene & The Sons Of Disaster 2/10 – Falling In Reverse 2/11 – August Burns Red 2/14 – D.R.U.G.S. 2/15 – Uli Jon Roth 2/16 – Dark Funeral 2/18 – Anvil 2/18 LOUNGE – The Dangerous Summer 2/24 – The Business 2/25 – Possessed 2/25 LOUNGE – The Jealous Sound 3/3 – The Spittin’ Cobras / Witchburn 3/18 – Deicide 3/23 – Rehab 3/28 – We Came As Romans 4/18 – King’s X 4/24 – Kittie 4/30 – Overkill 5/6 – Negura Bunget

Tickets now available at CascadeTickets.com – no per order fees for online purchases! Charge by phone at 1-800-514-3849. Online at www.CascadeTickets.com. Tickets are subject to a service charge.

109 Eastlake Ave. E

elcorazonseattle.com

Seattle Weekly’s Reverb Music Monthly is the authoritative source for music coming out of and to Seattle. Each issue includes a comprehensive look at upcoming shows and concerts, as well as reviews of every upcoming local release. Sandwiched in between, our critics, reporters, and columnists such as Duff McKagan (Guns N’ Roses) and John Roderick (The Long Winters) - drill down on the happenings in one of the most vibrant music cities in the country.


Seattle Weekly, January 04, 2012