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February 1–7, 2012 I volume 37 I number 5

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inside»   February 1-7, 2012 VOLUME 37 | NUMBER 5 » SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

»8

»REVERB

up front 7

NEWS

THE DAILY WEEKLY

Despite Howard Schultz’s pledge, Starbucks gives plenty to political causes.

8

FEATURE

BY KEEGAN HAMILTON

The annual Rainbow Family Gatherings attract free spirits from across the U.S., some of whom choose to stick with the countercultural community and drop out of sight—which made it hard for authorities to investigate the mysterious disappearance of Marie Hanson.

»29 REVERB MONTHLY

Seattle Weekly’s music magazine includes reviews of every local release, a portrait of the shredder as a young woman, advice from John Roderick, and much more. Find it following page 20.

24 FILM

THIS WEEK’S ATTRACTIONS

Ralph Fiennes adds automatic weapons to Shakespeare, the evils of Big Tobacco, and an Oscar-nominated drama from Iran.

29 FOOD

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in back 17 THE WEEKLY WIRE Jennifer Egan at the Benny, Oklahoma! at the Fifth, and Don Hertzfeldt at SIFF.

18 ARTS

18 | OPENING NIGHTS | Coping with new

parenthood; coping with a dying parent. 22 | EAR SUPPLY | A winter festival

Seattle we ekly • Febru ary 1– 7, 2012

lounge as an adult. 32 | BOTTOMFEEDER | Hot sauces. 34 | A LITTLE RASKIN | Pit bosses.

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news»Best of the Daily Weekly » DISPATCHES FROM OUR NEWS BLOG

The Buck Stops Here

But not everyone at Howard Schultz’s company has gotten the message. BY RICK ANDERSON

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Seattle we ekly • Febru ary 1– 7, 2012

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not disqualify us from discussing topics of importance.” Schultz is apparently still maintaining his anti-contributions pledge, though he has long been a regular political donor, and only a few months prior to the pledge contributed $5,000 to Sen. Maria Cantwell’s re-election campaign. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, Schultz and his wife Sheri have given $183,650 to federal candidates and political committees in the past 18 years—overwhelmingly to Democrats. They donated only $1,000 to a Republican—the 2000 presidential campaign of Sen. John McCain. When SW last updated Schultz’s donation boycott, in November, 23,147 people had signed the pledge page in four months at the chairman’s Upward Spiral website (upwardspiral2011.org). Now, about three months later, the enthusiasm has slowed, with just 410 additional signatories. Not all Starbucks execs are on board. At least four donated after Schultz announced the pledge, including Steve Johannesen, a director of international development, who gave $2,000 to President Obama’s re-election campaign. K&L Gates, Starbucks’ law and lobbying firm, also donated $40,000 to current and prospective congressional members through its political action committee. Some of that money came indirectly from Starbucks: Schultz’s corporation—which spent $580,000 on its own in-house lobbying effort last year—paid K&L $280,000 to lobby needed legislation in 2011. Meanwhile, a spin-off of Schultz’s donation boycott, Create Jobs for USA, appears to be chugging right along. Starbucks stores and the jobs-creation website accept $5 donations and give out free “Indivisible” wristbands in return. Schultz, in partnership with Opportunity Finance Network, promises 100 percent of all donations will go toward helping “create and sustain jobs in underserved communities.” Starbucks donated $5 million to prime the effort. Create Jobs has not yet reported how much has been contributed by donors. Some critics call the drive a Starbucks “marketing ploy.” But others appear upbeat and eager to join in. “Starbucks isn’t a nonprofit organization,” observes one commenter on createjobsforusa.org, “so if they profit while creating a social movement that creates jobs and benefits Americans, I say ‘Bravo!’ and will get my wristband.” E DAN CARINO

tarbucks CEO Howard Schultz’s pledge to no longer contribute to presidential or congressional campaigns drew a lot of sympathetic publicity for him and his corporation last year. But while Schultz’s money boycott was aimed at persuading pols to tackle the deficit, his company was quietly spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to persuade those same politicians to pass costly laws benefiting Starbucks’ bottom line. The Seattle coffee giant spent $860,000 in 2011 on salaries and expenses to lobby the White House, Congress, and federal agencies on legislation involving taxes, trade, health care, and banking. Among its political targets was the reduction of import duties and other non-tariff barriers related to free-trade agreements with Panama, Colombia, and Korea. According to a new accounting by Open Secrets.org, the D.C. political-money watchdog, Starbucks joined Boeing (the 14th biggest lobbying spender, at $155 million) and other major American companies in pushing for at least five corporate-cost-cutting trade bills, some of which were approved last year. One of them, the United States/Korea Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act, sponsored by Republican House Majority Leader Eric Cantor and signed into law by Barack Obama, is estimated to cost taxpayers $53 million. Like some of the other legislation sought, the new measure effectively lowers corporations’ costs of doing business while increasing the public’s burden. That outcome seems to conflict with Schultz’s stated aim of boycotting political donations until the president and Congress do something about the nation’s soaring debt. A Starbucks spokesperson tells the Weekly in an e-mail response that Starbucks “spends much less on lobbying than most other Fortune 500 companies,” noting that “None of those funds were political contributions.” The company’s lobbyists work on issues “important to our partners (employees), customers, and shareholders—collectively representing Americans from all 50 states and all walks of life,” said the spokesperson. “Expressing concern with our political leaders about the lack of cooperation in Washington should

7


On the snOwy slOpes

Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012

of Mt. St. Helens, a ragged strip of crime-scene tape dangles from the branch of a roadside sapling. Flapping in the winter breeze, breaking the solemn wilderness silence, the bright-yellow plastic is a shocking speck of neon among the emerald expanse of firs.

8

Somewhere ahead, an overgrown trail winds through the woods to a creek, just downstream from a picturesque waterfall secluded by steep terrain and thick brush. This path, through a minuscule sliver of the vast Gifford Pinchot National Forest, is also dotted with strips of tape—this time red, marking spots where human bones were found on October 9. “A few miles up the road is the remains of a dead body,” says Emily McCarty, trudging through the ankle-deep snow. She and dozens of others scoured this neck of the woods throughout last summer and fall, but even cadaver-sniffing police dogs were ultimately unable to locate all that is left in this world of Marie Hanson. Some of Hanson’s skeleton was collected into evidence. The rest, presumably, is still scattered across this backcountry hillside. A 54-year-old grandmother, Hanson vanished while camping at the Rainbow Family Gathering, a legendary counterculture event that draws tens of thousands of hippies, freaks, and free spirits to a different national forest every Independence Day. McCarty, a Rainbow Family advocate, worked on behalf of Hanson’s family, cajoling the local police to pursue the case. She also tried to publicize the incident by posting on Examiner.com, a community news site. Her efforts, she says, were met mostly with indifference from both the cops and media. Tears of frustration well up in McCarty’s eyes as she lights a cigarette with an unsteady hand. “She was out here for three fucking months,” she stammers. “It was hard to convince anybody she really was out here. When they finally found her, there was just this look of shock on the deputy’s face.” Given the condition of Hanson’s remains, the county medical examiner had to verify her identity using dental records. But a silver bracelet found on the trail nearby was confirmation enough for those who’d known her. The jewelry was engraved with a Bible verse, Matthew 4:19: “And he saith unto them, Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.” The Scripture is eerily fitting. While Rainbow festivities are debauched at times, the Gathering culminates with a group prayer for world peace. An easygoing but devout Christian, Hanson left her home in South Lake Tahoe, Calif., to proselytize the tie-dyed masses assembled in this remote corner of southwest Washington. An investigation is still ongoing, but the cause of Hanson’s death remains a mystery. “It’s a suspicious death,” says Jeff Roberson, the detective handling the case for South Lake Tahoe Police. “Until we have something that indicates otherwise, it’s not a homicide.” That Hanson went missing during her Rainbow expedition is not unusual. The Rainbow Family of Living Light, as it is formally known, is a magnet for disaffected young adults seeking to turn on, tune in, and drop out as if the Summer of Love had never ended. The so-called “Rainbow Trail,” a series of festivals and small regional gatherings, offers an alluring combination of positive vibes, free meals, and an off-the-grid lifestyle that make it easy to lose touch with the outside world. But where others have turned up alive and well, Hanson’s life ended tragically. Now two law-enforcement agencies, her surviving family, and some of the most dedicated Rainbows are left wondering whether her demise was the result of an accident or something more sinister.

by keegan hamilton

the search for the grandma who vanished at “hippie disneyland.”

T

he foundation for the modern Rainbow Family was laid in the fall of 1969 when a group of hippies and Vietnam vets who had been camping near Big Sur packed their belongings and headed north. They ended up at a commune in Marblemount, Wash., a tiny hamlet just outside the boundary of North Cascades National Park in a bucolic river valley that the bohemian California transplants dubbed “The Magic Skagit.” The group soon became known as “The Outlaws of Marblemount” for their willingness to guide draft dodgers and deserters across the Canadian border. According to Barry “Plunker” Adams, 66, a Navy veteran and one of the original Marblemount denizens, the Outlaws recruited additional members at the Oregon

Country Fair, and the following year helped organize Vortex, a weeklong concert and counterculture event in Portland. “We rolled out [of Vortex] flying the rainbow colors,” Adams recalls over the phone from his home in Montana. “Along the way I ran into other dreamers and visionaries, and we had a collective visionary process that took place. We fell into following a dream, a vision, and that became what’s known as the first Gathering.” That inaugural Rainbow Family Gathering took place near Strawberry Lake, Colo., in the summer of 1972. Promoted by word-of-mouth and bolstered by a clever publicity stunt— the Rainbows sent an invitation to every congressman and United Nations delegate— the event drew an estimated 20,000 people, despite the threat of a police crackdown.


Equal parts beatnik and good ol’ boy, Adams says the secret to spontaneously establishing a city in the middle of nowhere is to provide adequate supplies and sanitation. He talks of enlisting Vietnam vets to chop firewood, purify water, and dig trench latrines. “You know that old saying,” he says with a laugh. “If you dig a shitter, they will come.” The Gathering’s mantra then was “Welcome Home,” in honor of the troops returning from war, and the experience culminated with everyone joining hands in a silent prayer for peace. But while the war ended in 1975, and with it the hippie zeitgeist, the Rainbow Family, their Gatherings, and their mantra have managed to evolve and persevere. Attendance at this year’s event, held in the Skookum Meadow area of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, reportedly exceeded that of the original. The allure, frequent Gatherers say, is a utopian atmosphere that emphasizes both individual freedom and collective action. There are no rules, no leaders, and no organization, at least not in the traditional sense. A council open to every attendee, regardless of age or experience, makes logistical decisions only after a consensus is reached. Volunteers operate dozens of makeshift kitchens that serve food free of charge, and, much as at Burning Man, cash transactions are strongly discouraged. “It’s a return to community,” says a Rainbow from Seattle who goes by the nickname Circus Maximus. “It may be weird counterculture, but there’s something there that we’re missing in our e-mail and textmessage lifestyle.”

“You know that old saYing,” adams saYs with a laugh. “if You dig a shitter, theY will come.”

Sure, we’ve got toys. But what’s your idea of fun? Rock climbing? Music? Party planning? Techy toys? Yup, we’ve got those too. Come see for yourself.

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Seattle we ekly • Febru ary 1– 7, 2012

Fun: It’s not just for kids anymore. NE AVE

» Continued on page 10

TO EXPLORE

156TH

The Rainbow adherence to loving thy neighbor and other tenets of Christianity is no coincidence. Spirituality plays a pivotal role in the culture, which combines environmentalism, socialism, and Native American customs with Judaism, Buddhism, paganism, and other faiths to form an eclectic, inclusive belief system. Mainstream society is derisively referred to as “Babylon.” Michael Niman, an American Studies professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo, spent 13 years researching the Rainbows for the doctoral thesis that became his 1997 book People of the Rainbow: A Nomadic Utopia. He says the Rainbow ideology and experience is often cathartic. “For many people I’ve spoken to, the time of the Gathering is a transformative experience,” Niman says. “You can slander it and call it a cult if you haven’t been there and haven’t researched it. It’s not something you’ll easily experience someplace else. It’s a profound sense of community.” Of course, the Gathering also doubles as an excuse to throw a wild party in the woods. Although booze is only imbibed in “A Camp” (a motley assemblage of vagabonds and roughnecks, where chaos reigns supreme), pot smoke, public nudity, and drum circles abound. In Adams’ words, “It’s hippie Disneyland.”

M

arie Hanson went to the Rainbow Gathering on a whim. She had just returned from an extended trip to New York to attend her son’s wedding, and she was, according to her family, reluctant to leave the creature comforts of home again so soon. But she’d heard talk of the peace rally with a prayer circle, and thought it sounded like a crowd that might like to hear a thing or two about Jesus. “It was just a spur-of-the-moment thing,” says Billy Hanson, Marie’s husband of 35 years and former high-school sweetheart. “Our neighbor was going. He mentioned it to her, she mentioned to me, and she was off.” Hanson had known her neighbors— 44-year-old Alan Peck, who goes by the nickname “Mellow,” and his girlfriend Cathy Ward, believed to be in her mid50s—for less than two years, but they had a congenial relationship. Hanson was like that, says Nancy Enterline, the motherin-law of Hanson’s daughter Tawny and the spokeswoman for the Hanson family. “Marie was a really, really friendly lady,” Enterline says. “She could make friends with anybody—somebody standing behind her in line at the grocery store—anybody. She’d go next door to hang out and watch videos or things like that.” Hanson worked for the El Dorado County District Attorney’s Office for more than a decade before botched back surgery forced her into early retirement. Her main hobby was doting on her grandchildren, relatives say, and every weekend she managed the Sunday-school nursery at Sierra Community Church in South Lake Tahoe. Hanson was also “an old hippie at heart,” Enterline says, who relished the idea of going on an adventure with her friends. The only thing holding her back was, well, her back. “She was in a lot of pain,” Enterline explains. “The family was amazed that she took off with this guy, and was planning on sleeping in the car because of her back.” Hanson was a Rainbow rookie, but her travel companion, Peck, had attended several Gatherings. He arranged a ride-share via an online message board, and on the morning of July 1 they hit the road, accompanied by Peck’s black-and-white-speckled dog Bandit. Their respective significant others remained at home—Billy Hanson’s back is worse than his wife’s, and Ward planned to meet up with Peck and Hanson after attending a friend’s funeral. In a brief phone interview, Ward says Peck promised both her and Hanson the time of their lives. “When I first met him, all he could talk about is how he wanted me to go to the Rainbow Gathering,” she says. “Alan was talking about it, and [Hanson] said it sounded like a neat thing she’d like to experience.” Hanson and Peck arrived at their destination to find rows of parked cars stretching for miles on the shoulders of the surrounding Forest Service roads. They unloaded their minimal gear, parted ways with their driver, and embarked on the long hike up the trail to the Gathering site. A Rainbow woman who calls herself Momma Kimmie says she greeted Hanson that first day and noticed right away that she was hurting. “I could tell she was in pain,” Kimmie says. “She was ashen, her face looked stressed, and just the way she moved, she looked haggard.”

9


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to the meadow area of the Gathering site to search for his missing neighbor. He showed several people her driver’s license, but all to no avail. On the evening of July 9, Peck phoned Billy Hanson. “He said he’d lost my wife,” Hanson says ruefully. “It sounded like a bad joke.”

Peck and Hanson initially camped near “main meadow,” the Gathering’s city center, near Lovin’ Ovens, a well-known kitchen where Peck volunteered. The weather was much colder than anyone had anticipated. Snowdrifts nearly two feet high were still on y the time the Skamania County the ground in shaded areas, and though it Sheriff’s Office was notified of was plenty warm in the afternoon, overnight Marie Hanson’s disappearance, it temperatures dipped into the low 40s. had already dealt with more than By all accounts, Hanson managed to have two dozen other missing-person cases at the at least a few pleasant experiences. She wore Rainbow Gathering. The temporary wildera shirt with angel wings drawn on the back, ness metropolis was nearly 200 times the size and traded for a doll and other trinkets to of the nearest town (Cougar, Wash., populatake home to her grandchildren. Kimmie tion 122), and at least 30 miles away from cellcrossed paths with Hanson a few days after phone reception. Consequently, friends easily their initial encounter, and noticed that lost track of each other and lots of panicked her condition had improved. “She looked parents reported that their sons and daughradiant,” Kimmie says. ters had failed to check in as scheduled. But at some point Hanson’s achy back began to act up again, and she became badly sunburned. She also contracted a nasty stomach virus. Peck reportedly tried to care for her as best he could, bringing food and water back to their tent, and he eventually requested the help of Barry “Plunker” Rainbows with first-aid training. Adams (second “She didn’t need much care,” from left) and recalls Rob Savoye, who met Circus Maximus briefly with Hanson and advised (right) chat with her to continue drinking fluids. a deputy. “That flu had been going around. You basically shit and puked your brains out for 24 hours.” Peck’s girlfriend Ward says she arrived Although the Gathering is ostensibly late on the evening of July 5, driving a white governed by anarchy, there are volunteers Saturn sedan. She parked on the road, and who coordinate emergency services. The began to inquire about how to find her Rainbows practice a concept called “Shanti friends. Someone remembered seeing the dog Sena,” a Sanskrit term coined by Gandhi Bandit, and guided Ward to their campsite. that translates to “Peace Army.” It means, She found Peck baking biscuits in one of the essentially, that if trouble arises, it is kitchens. Hanson, she was told, was in the everyone’s duty to come to the rescue. Some tent convalescing. people—Adams, Savoye, and Circus Maximus among them—take this calling quite seriously. They carry walkie-talkies, extinguish unsafe campfires, and doggedly pursue legit missingperson reports. “We operate on a case-by-case basis,” says Adams, unofficially the Rainbow’s chief detective. “We’re tenacious. We don’t leave anyone behind. Once we start a search, we don’t end the search until we know for certain what has happened with whatever individual.” But Adams and many of the most hardcore Shanti Sena devotees were already headed home when the alarm for Hanson With the Gathering rapidly winding down was raised. Further complicating matters was after the July 4 climax, the group moved their the conflicting information received by police camp from the meadow to the road where and the Hanson family. “We were contacted Ward’s Saturn was parked. It was here that by every cuckoo bird on the planet,” Enterline Hanson was reportedly last seen. says. “We didn’t know who to trust and who According to Enterline, Peck told police not to. Some people were crazy.” that Hanson had been missing for 72 Some reported seeing Hanson hitch a ride hours, and the last time he saw her she was out of the Gathering in the back of a pickup. “stumbling down the street barefoot in Still others said she’d been hanging out with shorts and a tank top, and heading toward a character nicknamed Owl. One person the shitter.” even went so far as to give a description to a “He said he saw her and went back to sleep police sketch artist. The resulting suspect— and never saw her again,” Enterline says. “He an older man with an Indiana Jones–style didn’t think it was a big deal. She went off hat, braided hair, a beard, and thick glasses— somewhere, whatever.” bore a suspicious resemblance to Barry Hanson left behind all her possessions, “Plunker” Adams. including her wallet, purse, pain medication, Even though police later debunked these and a doll she had gotten for her grandrumors (the would-be witness later admitted children. Later that afternoon, Peck returned » Continued on PAge 12

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he’d never actually seen Hanson during the Gathering) the false leads initially forced Hanson’s family to consider the possibility that she might have been kidnapped, and investigators to suspect Hanson had hit the fabled Rainbow Trail. Also known as “the hippie road,” the Trail is the modern-day equivalent of following the Grateful Dead on tour. Teenage dropouts and adventuresome 20-somethings scrape together enough cash to attend music festivals up and down the West Coast or hitchhike to various Rainbow Family potlucks in a happy-go-lucky odyssey that usually ends when the weather turns cold. Not always the most responsible young adults, they sometimes lose touch with their families, who then contact authorities fearing the worst.

Also known As “the hippie roAd,” the rAinbow trAil is the modern-dAy equivAlent of following the grAteful deAd on tour. In the summer of 2010, in a disappearance not unlike Hanson’s, a 20-year-old St. Louis woman named Melanie Harmann was partying with friends at Hempfest in Seattle when she seemingly vanished into thin air— like Hanson, she left behind her cell phone, journal, and wallet. The case generated headlines, and Harmann’s mother, Skyler Wiseman, received a tip that her daughter had been spotted boarding a bus headed east, perhaps to attend a Rainbow event. After being bounced back and forth between two police departments, Wiseman eventually took matters into her own hands and boarded a flight to Spokane. Wiseman says she marched into the campground carrying a bag of oranges and two jugs of water which she hoped to trade for information, and describes the scene as part Jewish kibbutz, part Hobbit shire, and part Avatar “because about a third of the people were naked and painted blue.” When she eventually found Melanie, the latter was stunned by the news that she had been reported missing. Despite the ordeal, Wiseman says she can understand the appeal of the Rainbow. “I could see how Mel could get sucked into that,” she says. “I’m not saying it’s a cult at all—she was not held by force—but it is a very enticing lifestyle to not have to worry about where your next meal will come from.” Naturally, not every tale from the Rainbow Trail has a happy ending. Enterline says that when the family created a “Marie Hanson Missing” Facebook account and website, she was bombarded by heart-wrenching messages from parents whose estranged kids are rumored to be drifting with the Rainbows. Adams and other Rainbow elders acknowledge that runaways and other marginalized young people are drawn to their Gatherings. But they also point out that their group makes a convenient scapegoat.

“It’s kind of reminiscent of when the Gypsies would roll through,” Adams says. “It’s the circus come to town. ‘The kids will run off, you have to watch ’em!’ ” Neither the FBI’s National Crime Information Center nor the Center for Missing and Exploited Children report investigating any missing-person cases involving the Rainbow Family. Todd Matthews, a spokesman for NamUs, the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, says it’s not uncommon for individuals affiliated with groups such as the Rainbows to cut ties with their kin and never look back. “Some people are alive and well,” he says. “They’re out there. If you’ve been alienated from your family and [are] living an alternative lifestyle, if you Google yourself, you might find they’re looking for you.” But Enterline was deeply disconcerted by how quick the authorities were to assume that Hanson would abandon her family and chase the Rainbow. “The police just kept telling us Marie ‘People make Hanson. stupid decisions. Adults make decisions to leave their normal lives all the time,’ ” she says. “When I talk to people who have missing family members now, I’m hearing law enforcement all over the U.S. are telling people this.” Both law-enforcement agencies involved in the search for Hanson say they were always skeptical of the Rainbow Trail theory, considering her disability and strong family and community ties, and this far-fetched scenario had to be eliminated as a possibility. Once it was determined that Hanson was likely still somewhere in the vicinity of the Gathering, the real challenge became finding out where exactly she was—and, more important, how she got there.

courtesy of nancy enterline

3323 3rd Ave S. Suite 100B Seattle, WA 98134

end of the Rainbow » fRoM page 10

O

n July 13, four days after Hanson was reported missing, Enterline and her daughter-in-law Tawny traveled from South Lake Tahoe to the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. By the time they arrived, most of the volunteer kitchens had stopped cooking and just a few hundred people remained. The search effort for Hanson had been underway in earnest for only a very short while. In time, a dedicated group of Rainbows—including several people with formal search-and-rescue training—would look high and low in the woods where Hanson was last seen, using a grid system to methodically traverse the rough terrain. But most people left the Gathering with no idea that anything was amiss. The sheriffs, meanwhile, were still busy sifting rumors about Hanson, Owl, and the Rainbow Trail. “One of our biggest problems was convincing law enforcement that the stories were just that: stories,” Adams grumbles. “That they should make moves to get back there and bring their dogs and find this woman.” Skamania County Sheriff Dave Brown says the delayed deployment of search-andrescue canines stemmed from concerns about

» Continued on page 14


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End of the Rainbow » fRom pagE 12

Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012

parvo, a deadly disease spread by dog feces (Enterline: “That’s a stupid excuse”), and hypodermic needles at the Gathering site (the Rainbow cleanup crew reportedly did find one hypodermic needle, but only one). The dogs weren’t utilized until mid-August, more than a month later, and the initial search by sheriffs on July 14 focused on the main meadow area, much to the chagrin of the Rainbows. The Rainbow Family takes great pains to leave no trace, and a sizable cleanup crew was already busy scouring the meadow and surrounding areas for cigarette butts and other bits of “microtrash.” If there was a corpse anywhere near the meadow, they argued, it would already have been found.

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“The sheriffs didn’t consider any of the Rainbows a useful source of information,” Savoye says. “The pros came in and thought they knew what they’re doing. We all said searching the meadow is stupid. We all knew she had gone down the road to camp.” The Rainbow Family’s relationship with law enforcement has always been adversarial. Because the Gatherings take place on public forest land, the primary agency that deals with them is the U.S. Forest Service, or USFS. In 2008, the American Civil Liberties Union issued a report stating that the federal agency was guilty of “harassment and general overzealous enforcement” in their dealings with the Rainbows. The USFS public-affairs office did not respond to repeated requests for comment for this story, but 2011, the Rainbows say, was

the first year that the feds largely left them to their own devices. And while the Rainbows were extremely pleased with the handsoff treatment, there is lingering suspicion that because of it the authorities dragged their feet in the search for Hanson. Brown, however, insists that the steps taken by his office in Hanson’s case were “consistent with how we’d treat any report that comes in on any given day.” Controversy aside, the search-and-rescue dogs failed to find any scent of Hanson in the vicinity of the meadow. Likewise, the Rainbow cleanup crew completed their restoration project without uncovering the slightest trace of the missing grandmother. Adams says he formed a special Shanti Sena task force—“Rainbow Team Marie”— to continue the search efforts. Savoye and

Circus Maximus went so far as to rappel several hundred feet down the cliffs adjacent to the waterfall near where Hanson and Peck were last camped to investigate the possibility that she’d fallen in and been swept away. Others worked diligently to get the word out online. As time wore on, Enterline says, the bogus police sketch and talk of Owl actually proved useful. Long after the case went cold, Web forums frequented by Rainbows were abuzz with talk of Owl. “It turns out there are five or 10 Owls,” Enterline says. “It reinvigorated the case and got people talking again.” The key development, though, didn’t occur until mid-September. A young man who wished to remain anonymous contacted Enterline through a third party. He claimed that he had spent July 7, the entire day, with Hanson and Peck and camped with them that night near Ward’s Saturn. Enterline and the rest of the Hanson family were both shocked and suspicious. There hadn’t been any confirmed eyewitness sightings of Hanson after July 6, and Peck reported July 9 that she had been missing for 72 hours. But the young man’s story sounded legit. He said that he’d wanted to visit South Lake Tahoe and had made plans to hitch a ride there with the natives. He also relayed details about Hanson that would have been impossible to fabricate. Hanson was quite sick, he said, “barely keeping food or water down.” The man said the last time he’d seen Hanson was around 1:30 a.m. on the morning of July 8. Upon further questioning, Peck revised his story: He’d actually seen Hanson on the road stumbling toward the trench latrine at around 6:30 a.m. on July 8. “One of the reasons we think Mellow said ‘I haven’t seen her for 72 hours’ is he wanted police to think she’d been gone longer than she was,” Enterline says. “We have a culture that thinks they won’t look for an adult unless they’ve been gone for 72 hours.” Roberson, the South Lake Tahoe detective, says it’s a common misconception that missing-person cases can’t be immediately reported (they can), and that Peck could legitimately have lost track of time. “I’ve never hemmed him up about whether he said 72 hours or whether he actually thought it was 72 hours,” Roberson says. “You’re up there, you’re high all the time, and you’re not really tracking the days—what day it is or what the date is.” But the erroneous timeline wasn’t the only misinformation from Peck. “One time he’d say he was camped next to this kitchen, and the next time it was another,” Enterline says. “He said ‘We were parked by the gate,’ but he didn’t know which one, and there are three.” Seeking to remove all doubt, the Hanson family paid for Peck to fly back to the Gathering site on September 29. Escorted by Skamania County Sheriff’s deputies, he pinpointed the spot where he and Hanson had camped last. A previous search of the bushes near that area had turned up a bag of soiled clothes resembling those worn by Hanson during the Gathering. With winter fast approaching, the sheriffs and Rainbows combined forces and redoubled their efforts. On October 2, the cadaver-sniffing dogs picked up a scent; the following week they made the grisly discovery. Much of the surrounding hillside where Hanson’s skeleton was found is brutally steep—topography maps put the drop at


several hundred vertical feet over less than a quarter mile—but for all the countless hours spent searching, some of her bones were discovered in a patch of underbrush less than 15 yards away from her campsite, easily within shouting distance of the road. “We were pretty appalled,” Enterline says. “I think it would be safe to say I’m horrified by how close it was to the road.”

P

Keegan Hamilton

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arring new evidence or some unforeseen development, the exact cause of Hanson’s death will likely remain a mystery. Adams believes the most plausible version of events is that Hanson woke early in the morning, headed into the woods to relieve herself, and lost her bearings in the predawn darkness. “She could think she’s gone maybe five feet, but she gets turned around,” he says. “It’s deep boonies, pard.” Not only Hanson lost her life at the Gathering in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Two other adults were found dead in their tents, both of natural causes. But three women also gave birth, and Adams notes that there is some symmetry there. “As Bob Dylan, the great prophet, said, ‘Those who aren’t busy being born are busy dying,’ ” Adams says. “Gatherings are that way. People live and people are born and life goes on.” But for the Hanson family and many of the Rainbows who searched for her, there is cold comfort in such coincidences. Back on Mt. St. Helens, Emily McCarty kneels to light a candle as a makeshift memorial. She says that next year, after the snow has melted, she wants to help Hanson’s family return to the woods and recover the remains. In the meantime, McCarty says, the bizarre events surrounding Hanson’s disappearance and discovery are nearly impossible to put out of her mind. “It creeps me out,” she says. “None of this has gone the way it should have. It’s not normal circumstances, not on any level.” E khamilton@seattleweekly.com

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olice say they are still awaiting the results of several tests on Hanson’s remains. In addition to a toxicology report, an anthropologist and pathologist will analyze the remains, looking for marks to confirm the theory that forest animals impacted the condition and location of her body. “I don’t think in the end it will point us in any other direction other than what I would characterize as an unfortunate incident for Mrs. Hanson and her family,” Sheriff Brown says. “There isn’t any information we’ve been able to gather that indicates there’s any foul play involved.” Nevertheless, several questions loom large about the way Peck and Ward handled Hanson’s disappearance. Why didn’t they speak up sooner and more forcefully? Why didn’t they search the woods near the car, if that’s where Peck saw Hanson headed on the morning of July 8? And if Hanson was in such poor physical condition, why didn’t they leave the Gathering and take her to the hospital? Reached by phone last December 18, Peck is in no mood to discuss the matter. “That’s pretty fucked up to be bringing this shit up at Christmastime,” he says before abruptly ending the call. “It ain’t cool. Don’t call me at Christmastime and bring up somebody’s death. It’s not fucking cool.” His girlfriend, Ward, talks briefly but offers little clarification. Improbably, she maintains that she never once laid eyes on Hanson from the time she arrived at the Gathering on July 5 to the time she and Peck left the forest, according to police, on July 10, “I never saw her,” she says repeatedly. “She got up in the middle of the night to go to the restroom and never came back.” Ward says she got separated from Peck several times, and at one point he was left searching for both her and Hanson. And yet she says she still managed to have a good time. “I thought it was beautiful. It was a beautiful gathering, lots of music, good people, the food was free. Everybody was so happy and friendly and nice and warm. It was a great experience.” The couple’s trip home was reportedly far less pleasant. First they lost the keys to the Saturn and had to summon a locksmith to the National Forest. Then, on July 11, the car broke down in Reno, about an hour and a half away from South Lake Tahoe. Finally, multiple sources say Ward ended up spending

about three weeks in the psychiatric ward of Reno’s Renown Regional Medical Center. “I was very upset,” Ward says when asked about her time at the hospital. “I was disturbed by the death of my friend, and the fact that we couldn’t find Marie. Yeah, I went to counseling. It was very stressful for me.” Adding to the intrigue, Adams says that when he investigated Peck’s previous Rainbow Gathering participation, he learned that the man who calls himself Mellow “really liked being naked” at the events. According to Adams, Peck’s first Gathering was in Colorado in 1992, and he roamed the festival grounds in the nude carrying “a little funny sign” that advertised his availability to potential female companions. Adams says some Rainbows recall Peck as being an airhead, but others found him deceptively sharp. “I was hearing from a number of people that this cat Mellow was not very bright, that he was spacey or all whacked-out,” Adams says. “In fact, what I learned was that he’s bright— very bright—and Emily enjoyed getting it McCarty. over on people . . . in discussions people found him to be extremely well-read, extremely intelligent, and maybe a tiny bit of a smartass.”

15


Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012

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Chord of Resolution

Rock lit is on the rise. Soon after Patti Smith’s memoir Just Kids won the 2010 National Book Award, Brooklyn-based Jennifer Egan was awarded the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for her tremendous A Visit From the Goon Squad . Egan’s fourth novel effectively Proust-icizes the rock-memoir genre by spinning out tales of a variegated cast of characters—from Bennie, an ’80s punk leader (of fictitious band the Flaming Dildos) turned millionaire New York record exec, to Lou, a rock-star father attempting to impress his estranged kids with an African safari, to Dolly, a failed publicist reduced to working on a Hollywood-style image overhaul for a South American dictator. By the end, Egan, a finessed and wildly creative writer, ties up all these characters through bonds of love, blood, and rock ’n’ roll. (Presented by Seattle Arts & Lectures.) Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 621-2230, lectures. org. $5–$70. 7:30 p.m. ERIN K. THOMPSON

FILM

Attack of the Balloons!

STAGE

We Belong to the Land

Although the 5th Avenue is billing the show as Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! (to distinguish it from, what, the Bertolt Brecht version?), you hardly need those legendary names to advertise whose fabled state you’re entering. The exclamation point says it all. And for this revival, the 5th plans to use local choreographer Donald Byrd and his Spectrum Dance Theater to make sure the 1943 classic steps in time. Given that Byrd’s company electrified the 5th’s West Side Story five years ago, you’d do well to watch what becomes of this piece’s famed (and sometimes dreaded) Dream Ballet. We’ve also been promised an examination of race in turn-of-the-century America—a dubious prospect, yet director Peter Rothstein has interestingly upped the stakes by casting a black actor as Jud Fry, the farmhand who sends an erotic chill down the lily-white spine of Laurey and rattles her cowboy love Curly. And you’ll get a score that, especially if you haven’t paid it heed in a while, still sounds both fresh and as

*

unshakeable a part of you as your DNA. There’s a bright golden haze on the meadow . . . (Previews begin tonight; opens Feb. 9; runs through March 4.) 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave., 625-1900, 5thavenue. org. $29–$119. 8 p.m. STEVE WIECKING STAGE

Shape-Shifter

You won’t find any actor in the region more suited than Nick Garrison to inhabit Doug Wright’s 2004 Pulitzer- and Tony-winning

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Darc (with Jean Yanne) about to embark on a trip to hell.

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“Fin du cinéma”? At the white-hot cresting moment of his epochal first phase, Jean-Luc Godard conjured his 1967 Week End, a yowling, hilarious black nightmare of capitalist Armageddon, abandoning the fervent romance of his earlier films and plunging nose first into the shit-pit of bourgeois greed. A homicidal couple embark on a car trip to visit the woman’s sickly father, immediately entering a provincial/Dantean landscape of bloodthirsty drivers, ceaseless car wrecks, imaginary personas, cannibalistic revolutionaries, and feral consumerism. (“My Hermés handbag!” Mireille Darc’s antiheroine screams after a burning crash.) The layers of social critique are so many that even Marxists, spouting rhetoric, touting rifles, and eating tourists in the woods, are roasted in the film’s furnace. Overflowing with, famously, not “blood” but “red,” it’s a high-spirited, irreverent gob in the eye, but Weekend is also one of JLG’s most energetic statements of cinematic élan—venturing a dialogue, among filmmaker, movie, and the viewing world, the depth and seriousness of which have no real rival. (Through Thurs.) SIFF Film Center, 305 Harrison St., 324-9996, siff.net. $5–$10. Call for times. MICHAEL ATKINSON

At the Rep, Garrison looks great in pearls. I Am My Own Wife. The chameleonic Garrison is too often easily summed up as a genderbender, when he’s much better described as a performer with an uncanny handle on the slippery, sometimes sad, but often comical nature of identity. He made his name in town (and abroad) packing theaters as the transgendered German rocker of Hedwig and the Angry Inch, then moved on to Oscar Wilde (in Empty Space’s Vera Wilde), a nasty female nurse named Fay (Intiman’s Loot), a gay marine biologist charged with repopulating the planet (boom, at the Rep), and, most recently, one of the ugly stepsisters in the 5th Avenue’s Cinderella. Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, a German antiques collector, played her life as one long, complicated role. Born a biological male, she began dressing in women’s clothes as a teenager, murdered her abusive father, survived the Nazis, then continued to flout convention in Communist East Berlin. Her murky, occasionally unreliable story says as much about the unknowable definition of truth as it does about heroism. But when Garrison’s done bringing Charlotte—and more than 30 other characters—to life, you may want to cheer, anyway. (Previews begin tonight; opens Feb. 8; runs through March 4.) Seattle Repertory Theatre, 155 Mercer St. (Seattle Center), 443-2222, seattlerep.org. $12–$59. 8 p.m. STEVE WIECKING

Seattle we ekly • Febru ary 1– 7, 2012

Unspeakable violence afflicts the stick-figure characters drawn by animator Don Hertzfeldt, whose Oscar-nominated 2000 short Rejected includes the timeless complaint “My anus is bleeding!” In the same film, a guy who dares not to wear a silly hat to a meeting of silly-hat wearers is beaten to death. Lesson: Heed the sign about the silly hats. Those are

fri/2/3

KERI KELLERMAN

thurs/2/2

just some of the miseries inflicted in the darkhumored shorts that Hertzfeldt will screen and discuss tonight. His latest effort, the 23-minute It’s Such a Beautiful Day, continues the misadventures of Bill, a poor nebbish who was essentially born—well, drawn—to suffer. (We’re guessing the film doesn’t end so beautifully for him.) Other titles include Billy’s Balloon—in which a child’s red balloon goes murderously amok—and The Meaning of Life (which can be summed up as cruelty, suffering, and absurdity). SIFF Cinema at the Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, siff.net. $10–$15. 7 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

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arts»Opening Nights THEATER SCHMEATER, 1500 SUMMIT AVE., 800-838-3006, SCHMEATER.ORG. $15–$23. 8 P.M. THURS.–SAT. ENDS FEB. 18.

Warning: Children may cause exhaustion, sexual deprivation, and marital stress. It’s not a terribly new insight, and Daniel Goldfarb’s cautionary tale of bourgeois suffering in Brooklyn Heights doesn’t break any fresh ground. Directed by J.D. Lloyd, Cradle and All is anchored by the captivating Alyson Bedford, whose mercurial beauty, comic timing, and emotional intensity redeem the two stereotypical roles she’s condemned to play. In the first act, she’s Claire, a pretty 41-yearold actress who sets out (armed with “a dozen dozen roses” and a bowl of scented nuts) to convince her younger boyfriend Luke (Matthew Middleton) to have a baby with her. The underwritten Luke, an antiquarian who buys Claire jewels and says “Tut-tut,” mostly just seems to exist to block her maternal desire. Things devolve into a dark night of the soul for these two, in which she explains why she so badly wants a child and he accuses her of changing the script of their relationship. It’s a relief when a neighbor stops by to oh-sosymbolically borrow an egg. The contrivance doesn’t make Claire’s desperation any less affecting, though. Act 2 takes us to the neighboring apartment of Nate and Annie (also Middleton and Bedford, now transformed into haggard, dorky baby-slaves), with a set now dressed in homey

stripes and plaid—unlike the cool urban sophistication of Claire and Luke’s place. Nate and Annie fret, fight, and flounder through their first night of letting their year-old daughter cry herself to sleep. (The baby monitor is switched off for most of the play, thank goodness.) With sheer vigor and commitment, Middleton and Bedford somehow manage to make the play’s potentially irritating beforeand-after premise enjoyable. The second couple has more character and chemistry than the first, physically attacking each other, breaking stuff, joking about their religion (Judaism), and resorting to such low insults as “Slytherin!” and “Hufflepuff!” (as in Harry Potter). They’re insecure, frustrated, and amusingly terrified by parenthood. These two—not Claire and Luke—are clearly Goldfarb’s heroes; they, the play makes clear, have chosen the braver path. Parents who’ve hired a sitter for the show may wearily agree. Couples contemplating conception may not buy Goldfarb’s self-validation. But at least both camps will agree on the quality of the acting. MARGARET FRIEDMAN

P How to Write a New Book for the Bible SEATTLE REPERTORY THEATRE, 155 MERCER ST. (SEATTLE CENTER), 443-2222, SEATTLEREP.ORG. $12–$64. RUNS 7:30 P.M. WED.–SUN., PLUS MATINEES. ENDS FEB. 5.

Bill Cain’s autobiographical play about caring for his mother during her last six months of

elder son and some incilife is both a miracle and dental roles.) Scenes from a mess. Despite defying the past weave through nearly every law of playwriting, it nonetheless the later caretaking scenes as she succumbs to illness, holds the audience rapt all rendered with breathfrom start to finish. (Or to several finishes, since taking specificity. From the smashed pumpkin that there’s a whole series of Mary’s husband Pete (Leo unintentional multiple endings.) The feat is the Marks) pins together with toothpicks to the orchids more remarkable considthat “all the other ladies ering that Cain, a Jesuit priest and author of the had” (an emblem of her deprived marriage), the Elizabethan-era politiplay steps from the quotidcal thriller Equivocation, comes from “a functional ian to the eternal. The dull business of dying and the family” (according to the daily rhythms of family playbill), normally considered a disadvantage for an life are transformed into something part myth, part autobiographical dramaGehringer as the religion, part vital manure. tist (see O’Neill, Williams, dying Bible matriarch. etc.). Indeed, the charmDirected by Kent ingly candid (and not Nicholson, How to Write overly religious) Cain family lives by a handful provides a satisfying mingling of the eternal of emotionally healthy commandments like with the everyday. (Scott Bradley’s lovely set “Never leave a fight before it’s over.” Arriving suggests suspension between the two realms prepackaged from Berkeley Rep, where the play with lamps, chandeliers, stained glass, and a debuted last fall, the cast of four is so tight you’d fractured mirror dangling in the air.) It’s a humthink they had decades of history together. ble, sweeping, and deeply personal processing of The incandescent Linda Gehringer plays the universe to which Cain invites us. With only Mary Cain, a woman described by second son a few performances left, you’d better move fast Bill (Tyler Pierce) as variously being practical, and accept the invitation before this odd, unruly strong, and unimaginative—she has dreams gem disappears. MARGARET FRIEDMAN E about ironing shirts. (Aaron Blakely plays the stage@seattleweekly.com KEVINBERNE.COM

Cradle and All

Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012

BEFORE PICASSO... BEFORE MATISSE...

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Seattle we ekly • Febru ary 1– 7, 2012

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Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012


FEBRUARY 2012

S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / R E V E R B M O N T H LY

Reve r b • Seattle we ekly • Feb ru a ry 1–7, 2012

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Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • Feb rua ry 1– 7, 2012


opening acts »February 2012 VOLUME 2 | NUMBER 2 » SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM/REVERBMONTHLY

presents at

DIMITRIOU’S

»EDITOR’S LETTER

Price of Thieves

2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 j a z z a l l e y. c o m

Kim Wilson’s Blues All Stars

Harmonica Player, Songwriter and Singer - Leader of The Fabulous Thunderbirds February 1

Peter White

Contemporary Jazz Guitarist and Original Songwriter February 2 – 5

Bobby Broom and The Deep Blue Organ Trio Celebrating the Classic Jazz Combo Configuration of the Hammond B3 Organ, Guitar and Drums February 7 - 8

Tower of Power

saxophonist, who explained to me why his band, the Dead Kenny Gs, always take Southwest Airlines. Were it not for Southwest’s policy of not charging for bags, he doubts the band would still be touring. With piracy hobbling the band’s income from recorded-music sales, the road’s where they make their money. But even those profits are being eaten by airline fees and $4-a-gallon gas. Music is a defining part of one’s selfidentity. But so is social responsibility. So when Internet-savvy apostles of free

speech, democracy, and fair-trade coffee are called pirates, it sets them on edge. That’s why the masses fought so hard against the government’s recent anti-piracy proposals— they also were implicated. By taking music without paying for it, they’re no longer supportive fans, but thieves. That’s not just an accurate description. It’s also a fair one. —Chris Kornelis Editor, Reverb Monthly ckornelis@seattleweekly.com

inside»   »feature

5

9

BY DAVID STOESZ | Oooh, baby, here’s

some sweet, sweet V-Day music advice.

5 5

Shin is a rare female guitar shredder.

SENIOR EDITOR Erin K. Thompson

BY ERIN K. THOMPSON | The newest

the unspun truth about a band?

10 REVIEWS

BY DAVE LAKE | Getting inside Wilco’s

The Whole Love.

7

JESSICA DOBSON

SALES PITCH

TELL ME ABOUT THAT ALBUM

Our take on every new local release.

14 THE MONTH AHEAD 29 nights of shows from JFK, Run DMT, Brokaw, and others.

ANSWERS & ADVICE JOHN RODERICK | Conversation

hijacking, bathtub interviews, naked sword fighting, and more.

»reverb monthly EDITOR Chris Kornelis

»the rest

BY CHRIS KORNELIS | How do you tell

Brian Culbertson

Little Bit of Jazz, Little Bit of Funk & a Little Bit of R & B

February 14 - 19

Regina Carter’s Reverse Thread

Genius jazz violinist, classically trained, exploring African folk melodies February 21 - 22

»up front

DIG MY MOOD

One of the Most Dynamic Groups Serving Up Horn-Driven Funk!!! February 9 - 12

»cover credit

PHOTO BY: RENEE MCMAHON

DESIGNER Jane Sherman COPY EDITOR Gavin Borchert PROOFREADER Michael Mahoney COLUMNISTS Indie Anna Jones, Duff McKagan,

John Roderick, David Stoesz

CONTRIBUTORS Litsa Dremousis, Gwendolyn

Elliott, Gregory Franklin, Julia Mullen Gordon, Andrew Gospe, Eric Grandy, Todd Hamm, Dave Lake, Ma’Chell Duma LaVassar, Joe Williams LAYOUT EDITOR Kim Love COPYRIGHT © 2012 BY SEATTLE WEEKLY, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. ISSN 0898 0845 • REVERB IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY SEATTLE WEEKLY, LLC. SEATTLE WEEKLY® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK. 1008 WESTERN AVE., STE. 300, SEATTLE, WA 98104. • FOUNDED 1976. MAIN SWITCHBOARD: 206-623-050 0 RETAIL AND ONLINE ADVERTISING: 206-467-4341

ON SALE NOW Pete Escovedo Latin Jazz Orchestra

featuring Juan and Peter Michael Escovedo February 23 - 26

The Benny Golson Quartet featuring Buster Williams, Carl Allen and Mike LeDonne February 28 - 29

Walk-ins Always Welcome! All Ages • Free Parking • Gift Certificates

Military, Senior and Student Discounts

Reve r b • Seattle we ekly • Feb ru a ry 1–7, 2012

The day after Wikipedia, Google, and, um, I Can Has Cheezburger mounted their fear-mongering campaign directed against a pair of anti-piracy bills last month, Seattle Weekly columnist and Guns N’ Roses co-founder Duff McKagan penned a column titled “Quit Whining About SOPA: Where’s the Public Outrage Over Internet Piracy?” Duff doesn’t support the bills in their current form. He believes they’re too broad and should be reined in. And he raises a very simple question: When will the public, Internet service providers, search engines, and fans get as enraged over piracy as they are about anti-piracy? Few artists are brave enough to say the same—at least publicly. Coming out against piracy isn’t popular. Since people began sharing mp3 files at the turn of the century, public sympathy, remarkably, has been with the pirates. When Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich testified before Congress that illegal downloading and file-sharing were tantamount to stealing, he got clobbered. His image never recovered. When the Recording Industry Association of America mounted a campaign of lawsuits against pirates (some of them teenagers), they got clobbered. The press, public, and plenty of artists pitied the pirates. The RIAA never recovered from the PR disaster. And last month, when Congress proposed anti-piracy legislation, they also got clobbered. Will sensible legislation be forever sidelined? Let’s hope not. As exceptionally talented, Seattle-made singer/songwriter Jesse Sykes wrote in SW last week, piracy has annihilated the music industry’s working class. “Artists like myself rely on music sales for their income,” she says, “but our bands are in danger of going dark for a lot longer than one day if things don’t improve.” It reminds me of a conversation I had recently with Skerik, the great local

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Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • Feb rua ry 1– 7, 2012


distractions&diversions» DIG MY MOOD

Hit List This V-Day, drop the expectations and close the door. BY DAVID STOESZ

T

GRIN AND BARE IT

The fine line between storytelling and legend-peddling. You know why the documentary Pearl Jam Twenty was an arduous, self-serving, and above all painfully boring two hours? Not because director Cameron Crowe didn’t have plenty of material to work with for the anniversary flick, but because Pearl Jam was an equal partner in the doc, not just participants. They told the story they wanted told, and it glazed over the touchy stuff—drugs, inner-band turmoil, all those drummers, etc.—that could have elevated the film above a mere infomercial. The story a band wants to tell and the one that should be told are often two different things. Just ask Jasen Emmons, EMP’s director of curatorial affairs, who was once instructed by Bob Dylan’s management that there was to be no mention of his drug use in the museum’s exhibition on the artist. “If you get the band to buy in and they’re contributing to [an exhibit], you’re going to have that struggle of ‘OK, can we tell that story?’,” he says. “It’s a richer story when you know those different points of view.” Emmons says he was ultimately able to organize that 2004–06 Dylan exhibit to his narrative satisfaction. EMP’s former curatorial manager, Jim Fricke, is today the lead storyteller at Milwaukee’s HarleyDavidson Museum, where his patron has been more forthcoming. “One of the things that made me excited about taking this job,” says Fricke, “[is that] they were interested in telling a complete and honest story. There are parts of the [Harley] story where the company really missed a trend or really made what proved to be negative business moves.” What do Harleys and EMP have in common? The two museums are now preparing a new exhibit called “Worn to Be Wild: The Black Leather Jacket,” due here in October, which will trace the garment’s roots from utiliCOURTESY PHOTO

THE WHOLE LOVE

WED/FEBRUARY 1 • 7:30PM

teitur w/ aunt martha FRI/FEBRUARY 3 • 8PM

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drummond and tyler carson

SAT/FEBRUARY 4 • 8PM

“soul salvation” ruthie foster (band) paul thorn (solo) SUN/FEBRUARY 5 • 7:30PM

john cruz

THU/FEBRUARY 9 • 7:30PM TEAM UP PRESENTS A BENEFIT FOR CLIMATE SOLUTIONS

gigs4good w/ kris orlowski & dawn mitschele

next • 2/10 john gorka • 2/11 - 2/13 the atomic bombshells “j’adore!: a burlesque valentine” • 2/14 sinatra at the sands • 2/16 andy mckee & antoine dufour • 2/17 bob mould

• 2/1 roxi copland • 2/2 first thursday art w/ ryan “henry” ward / tubaluba • 2/3 smoke and honey / youngblood groovement • 2/5 lee redfield • 2/7 trivia + industry night launch! • 2/8 katy bourne • 2/9 spyn reset TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE

PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1.5 HOURS PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

thetripledoor.net 216 UNION STREET, SEATTLE 206.838.4333

Reve r b • Seattle we ekly • Feb ru a ry 1–7, 2012

hose of you who pay attention to the words of songs you put on your Valentine’s Day playlist—and anyone with “Crash” or “Every Breath You Take” in their mix isn’t listening—know good and well that American love songs are largely a record of dysfunction, resentment, and mental illness. “You always hurt the one you love, the one you shouldn’t hurt at all. So if I broke your heart last night, it’s because I love you most of all.” How’s that for some fucked-up Drugs? What drugs? logic? There’s no limit to the amount of abuse you could justify with tarian garment to rebel icon. That includes, says Fricke, that line of thinking. mention of some of motorcycle culture’s racier elements, Country music in from which Harley-Davidson has tried to distance itself. particular is a genre “Why did the Ramones all wear leather jackets? of broken things and It wasn’t because they were all bikers,” Fricke says. broken people. I fall to “They have kind of a bad-boy association.” Whether pieces. I’m crazy. Hello, those associations will include amphetamines and walls. One country love song that routinely speed (not the two-wheeled kind) remains to be seen. tops all-time-greatest lists is the magnifiBeyond “Worn to Be Wild,” Emmons says he’d love cently twisted “He Stopped Loving Her to do an exhibit about Pearl Jam. “No band has docuToday” by George Jones. It’s about a guy mented itself better,” he says. What he wants to know who moped over some woman for decades, is ”How did that band manage to hold it together?”—a then died. And hence stopped loving her. question, like so many others, left unanswered in PJ20. The subtext is “Now that bitch’ll finally CHRIS KORNELIS E realize what an asshole she was not to appreciate this sad sack.” Random advice from Greg Proops, on passing the time Lovers in country songs spend while watching a presidential debate: more time drinking and waiting for the day your cheating heart “Anytime you sense insincerity, light up.” will pine some day and crave the Whose Live Anyway comes to the Moore on Feb. 4. love it threw away than they do engaging in actual love. Where’s the love? More to the point for Valentine’s TELL ME ABOUT THAT ALBUM Day, where’s the fucking? (The Album) was a less-successful version of that. As much as I love country music, for Can you tell me about the title Valentine’s Day mood-setting, I’m inclined and why it changed from the original to go with the tried-and-true: ’70s soul. idea, Get Well Soon, Everybody ? Bassist John Stirratt Cliché? Maybe. In a perfect world I might We had this album art that we thought sold the shares the story behind choose “Warm Valley,” Duke Ellington’s whole thing in a really good way, and we weren’t able instrumental hymn to the vagina. In the to get [it]. We had a lot of hopes wrapped up in the Wilco’s eighth wonder. real world, it’s a little too subtle for the entire package. “The whole love” is parlance for detecoccasion. tives; when a suspect is about to give a confession, SW: Is there any Though it’s no good to be too spot-on (no they say they’re going to get “the whole love.” And I discussion before “Let’s Get It On” or “Erotic City”), you can’t think Jeff [Tweedy] got really attached to that idea. the writing process go wrong with Teddy Pendergrass’ “Close begins about a Was it a famous artwork you the Door.” No neuroses, no self-doubt, no record’s concept or wanted for the cover? impossible ideals to impose on your partmood or agenda? [Laughs] No, it wasn’t all that famous, but they just ner. Just a tender, confident man on his wanted a lot of money for it. The [Joanne] GreenStirratt: It’s usually knees for his woman’s pleasure: “Close the baum stuff on the cover we thought would be part of unspoken until we have a door/Let me give you what you’ve been few songs. [Sometimes] there will be multiple threads the package regardless. waiting for/Baby, I got so much love to going on with a record. This one had that. I love the album cover, the more spiral-y sort of things. give/I wanna give it all to you.” In years past, to try to get a more clean record, After [opening track] “Art of Almost,” where there was Closing the door, opening the wine, we’ve maybe gone one path. Sky Blue Sky was like this almost abstract piece of music leading off the record, and getting down in that sweet groove for that. This record just merged after a while. A sound I think it really felt at home to me. It fell right into the sound some serious love service. There shouldn’t wants to take over, and you have to sort of allow it. and the look of the record to all of us. DAVE LAKE E be any more to it than that. E It is a real challenge to make different sounds and Wilco plays the Paramount on Feb. 7. The show different feels exist on a single record, and I think Wilco is sold out.

dinner & show

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Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • Feb rua ry 1– 7, 2012

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EVENTS

MUSIC NEW SLETTER The inside scoop on upcoming shows and the latest reviews.

EVENTS


answers&advice»

Real Gangster

Regulators: It may be necessary to brandish your sword. BY JOHN RODERICK

John: How do I deal with friends who hijack every conversation and make it about themselves? —Aimee Mann, singer and songwriter Roderick: I’m not going to fall into the

trap of thinking that you’re talking about me, because then I would be totally proving your point. And I’m too smart and wise to slip on that irony banana peel. The best way to deal with a conversation hijacker is to start playing Words With Friends whenever they start rambling about themselves. I’m not saying that will teach them a lesson or anything, but at least you’ll be doing something interesting instead of sitting there seething with resentment that they never ask you about yourself. Eventually you will either stop being friends with them, or you will become a tournamentlevel Scrabble player. Win/win.

Is there a knack to keeping your junk covered when you’re sitting in a bubble bath in a hotel and lots of strangers are walking by? —Luke Burbank, host of the podcast TBTL. Burbank hosts the Sasquatch! launch party, Thurs., Feb. 2 at the Neptune.

Hey, John: What are the best and worst shows to take kids to? —Jody Hall, owner of Cupcake Royale

The best shows to take kids to are the Caspar Babypants shows of Chris Ballew, which have all the great songwriting and high energy of the Presidents of the USA, without PUSA’s adult sophistication and heavy emotional overtones. The worst are anything at the Tacoma Dome with a Disney logo, and GWAR. What kind of unspeakable acts go on during these Nerd Cruises you’ve been going on with the likes of John Hodgman and NPR’s Peter Sagal? —Luke Burbank, again

The Nerd Cruise, better known as the JoCo Cruise after founder Jonathan Coulton, is a seaborne opportunity for gamers, Wiccans, Utilikilt wearers, and

Do you really walk naked around your yard? If so, EXACTLY when? —Duff McKagan, founding bassist of Guns N’ Roses

I consider my garden to be a sovereign nation, and it’s written in our constitution that the whole great state of Roderickania is clothing-optional. Also, my street is a migratory pathway for certain rare breeds of South-end gangbangers, so whenever I see a Caprice Classic on 22s roll by real slow with the bass thumping, I go out to the garden naked and practice sword fighting. (Our national sport is not “fencing,” it’s sword fighting.) It reminds everyone who the REAL gangster is.

»

Many music folks, myself included, have left Seattle. What keeps you there? —Krist Novoselic, founding bassist of Nirvana

I’m loyal to the city because I keep thinking how much better it would be for Seattle if everybody cool didn’t move out to Grays Harbor County and become chairman of their local Grange Hall. I’m not divorced, so there’s no reason to move to Oregon, and I can’t move to Los Angeles because my teeth aren’t weird enough. The only other reasonable option would be New York, where I could enjoy the sound of people screaming at each other through my apartment walls while the smell of frying cat entrails comes in through my air conditioner, but I’m not wealthy enough. Is being a respectable elder statesman of the Seattle music scene an honor? Or just really depressing because it means you’re getting older? —Last one from Luke Burbank

You can’t be depressed about getting older unless you’re callowly clinging to your youth by wearing skinny corduroys, podcasting, and hoping people don’t notice the grey hairs in your ears. For my part I embrace getting old, because it allows you to walk around with your fly unzipped and people think you’re harmless. E John Roderick is the singer and songwriter responsible for Seattle’s The Long Winters. He tweets @jroderick. Send your questions and conundrums to jroderick@seattleweekly.com.

Reve r b • Seattle we ekly • Feb ru a ry 1–7, 2012

Bubble placement is key, although it helps if you ask for a room with a deep tub. When Spencer Moody interviewed me in the bath at the Sorrento Hotel, the tub was very shallow and I spent most of the interview heaping bubbles up around my middle-area to avoid exposing myself to curious onlookers. I don’t mean that Spencer was in the bath with me, by the way. It was one of those “art-happenings” that make Seattle such a fun and vibrant cultural culture-place.

webmasters to indulge their twin passions of human sacrifice and Dr. Who trivia nights without a bunch of “normals” looking on. I’m sure we could find a place for you, Luke Burbank.

7


What’s happening in FEBRUARY

Treehouse Café

welcome to bainbridge island’s premier spot for live music!

FEB 4 Lucas Field

FEB 11 Massy Ferguson FEB 12 Gretchen Peters

MAR 3 Danny Barnes

WEDNESDAY FEB 22

MAR 10 Left Hand Smoke MAR 17 Clumsy Lovers MAR 31 Eldridge Gravy ALL SHOW TIMES ARE 8:00PM.

CATE LE BON

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island,

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(206) 842-2369

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with Charles Leo Gebhardt IV 8pm 21 & over HAPPY HOUR WITH 2 FOR 1 PIZZA 4 TO 7 EVERYDAY IN THE BACK BAR! BOX OFFICE OPENS 1/2 HOUR BEFORE DOORS

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Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • Feb rua ry 1– 7, 2012

CLASSIC HEAVY ROCK, BLUES & PSYCHEDELIA FROM SWEDEN

8

GRAVEYARD

RADIO MOSCOW SANDRIDER

THUR, FEB. 2 NADA SURF ~ SOLD OUT FRI, 2/3 9:30PM ~ $8 LOCAL FOLK-ROCK & AMERICANA

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BLUEGRASS, AMERICANA & FOLK

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FRI, 2/10 8:30PM ~ $17.50ADV/$20DOS SQUARE PEG CONCERTS PRESENTS

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SAT, 2/11 9PM ~ $14ADV/$16DOS THRASHER PRESENTS WHERE’S THE BAND TOUR FEAT. CHRIS CONLEY (OF SAVES THE DAY) MATT PRYOR (OF THE GET UP KIDS) ANTHONY RANERI (OF BAYSIDE) ACE ENDERS (OF THE EARLY NOVEMBER) and EVAN WEISS (OF INTO IT. OVER IT.) SAT, 2/12 7PM ~ $10 SWEETHEARTS SERENADE: AN EVENING OF ROOTS, FOLK & AMERICANA FEAT.

SQUIRREL BUTTER THE GLORIA DARLINGS

BOYS OF GREENWOOD GLEN THE BLACKBERRY BUSHES STRINGBAND

TIMES LISTED ARE SHOW TIMES. DOORS OPEN 30-60 MINUTES BEFORE

&UCOPMING:

2/13 MONDAY SQUARE DANCE with THE TALLBOYS 2/14 CASE + CTRL, FAINTLY 2/15 THE GRIZZLED MIGHTY, SUNDRIES, MYSTERY SHIP 2/16 ARI HEST, LUCAS FIELD 2/17 BUCK 65, BUSDRIVER, METAL CHOCOLATES, SADISTIK 2/19 MATT BEKKER, YOUNGBLOOD GROOVEMENT, FORTUNE DWELLERS 2/20 JENNY OWEN YOUNGS, LITTLE HURRICANE 2/21 VERONICA FALLS, BLEACHED, SEAPONY 2/22 CHUCK PROPHET AND THE MISSION EXPRESS, RED JACKET MINE 2/23 BREATHE OWL BREATHE, CATALDO, KENDL WINTER 2/24 Square Peg presents PURPLE HAZE - Jimi Hendrix tribute, MADMAN SAM 2/27 MONDAY SQUARE DANCE with THE TALLBOYS 2/28 Square Peg presents PRINCETON 2/29 WHITNEY BALLEN, TIMOTHY ROBERT GRAHAM, STEPHEN NIELSEN 3/1 MINIATURE TIGERS, THE CHAIN GANG OF 1974, GEOGRAPHER, PRETTY & NICE 3/2 Square Peg presents RECKLESS KELLY, ROSE’S PAWN SHOP 3/3 REPTAR, QUIET HOOVES, THE WEST


Weekly_Gin_Ad_1-31-12.pdf

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1/31/12

3:49 PM

profile»

C

CM

Lady Killer

Jessica Dobson slays with Beck, the Shins, and Deep Sea Diver.

MY

Renee McMahon

Bold words: Sex and the M City 2 here Cutline here Y cutline here cutline here

CY

CMY

K

By ERIN K. THOMPSON newest reincarnation of the Shins, and she’s the standout “You Go Running,” are live wires since lived something of a double life. One day of happy energy and movement. Propelled by she’s on national television or spending time in Dobson’s uniquely boyish, bawling vocals, it’s Portland recording the Shins’ hotly anticipated an intricate, carefully orchestrated type of new album, Port of Morrow; the next, she’s pop and guitar rock that can’t be compared to at home in her North Seattle apartment with anything else being made in Seattle today. her husband, teaching private guitar lessons and “So many girls don’t push themselves chipping away at History beyond kind of the traditional threeSpeaks, the self-released debut from her own band, chord acoustic-guitar song. That’s just Deep Sea Diver. the way it is . . . but I don’t like being Dobson spent her treated as a novelty.” entire life in Los Angeles before moving here, her husband’s hometown, last year. The presIt could be that Dobson’s parallel words are sure of the self-conscious, tightly wound L.A. about to collide—she hints at the possibility of lifestyle had caused her to consider quitting Deep Sea Diver opening for the Shins on their music altogether. Instead she took a breath of upcoming world tour, but adds “I don’t feel Northwest air and became a storyteller. entitled to anything.” “I’ve been so insular and isolated for a long “I don’t want to buy into being lazy about time,” she says. “[In Seattle,] I really wanted my own record because I’m playing in this to meet new people and get down-and-dirty other band that’s bigger,” she says. “That’s not in people’s lives. [It’s] not so much about how how I see it at all.” E I was feeling, but about how other people ethompson@seattleweekly.com were doing in life, and trying to figure out their story and tell that in a song.” Deep Sea Diver Some songs on History Speaks, like the title With Daniel G. Harmann & The Trouble Starts, Soft track, are slow washes of contemplation (“HisStarts. Columbia City Theater, 4916 Rainier Ave. S., tory speaks, and I’m still listening”); others, like 722-3009. $8 adv./$10 DOS. 9 p.m. Fri., Feb. 24.

Reve r b • Seattle we ekly • Feb ru a ry 1–7, 2012

L

ast September, Late Night With Jimmy Fallon viewers saw a brunette in a short skirt tear through a wicked guitar solo during the Shins’ performance of Pink Floyd’s “Breathe.” That was Seattle’s Jessica Dobson, who adlibbed the majority of the solo on the spot. “I never like to spell things out too much,” Dobson said in a recent phone call. “[With] any sour note, you’re only like a half-note away from correcting it. And I think sour notes are kind of fun anyway.” Dobson is something of a rarity in the current rock-and-roll business—a female guitar shredder. Off the cuff, you could name Annie Clark, Marnie Stern, and Carrie Brownstein as women who assert themselves in lead-guitar roles today. But others are few and far between. “So many girls don’t push themselves beyond kind of the traditional three-chord acoustic-guitar song. That’s just the way it is. And so I think people find it intriguing, but I don’t like being treated as a novelty,” says Dobson, adding, “I don’t doubt that I can play the guitar well.” Neither do Beck, Spoon, and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, all of whom have employed Dobson, 27, in their touring bands in recent years. Last fall, she was invited to join the

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reviews»Our Take on Every Local Release*

It’s February 2012, and Seattle Sounds Like . . .

territory on this droning, slow-sprawling crawl marked by acoustic twang, rattlesnake percussion, and cracked ritual chants. EG Give It to Me Rusty, Pioneer Square

Recordings (out now, Rusty Records, giveittomerusty.com): A pair of local buskers, Aaron Zig and Noah Dassel, take the stories of the city’s homeless and translate them word-for-word into lyrics for their harmonized folk songs. Talk about street cred. DL

LOCAL RELEASES

*

214, Tulum (2/14, Krecordings,

krecordings.com): Seattle producer Chris Roman toasts the Mayan coast with a title track of gently rolling bass, wafting synths, and sly whispering; techno b-side “The Hair in the Biscuit” and remixes move things from the playa to the dance floor. ERIC GRANDY

Golden Gardens, The Covers (out now,

self-released, goldengardens.bandcamp. com): A wispy, ghost-like affair of trippiness, this album of covers (Red House Painters, Tears for Fears) is soothing dream-pop at its best. JW

Mathew Anderson, Wrist (out now,

KRecordings, krecordings.com): On the debut release from new local electronic label KRecordings (not to be confused with K Records): dark, slinky techno that goes from dubby to bumping with the flick of a, well, you know. EG

The Hardcount, Life & Death (out now, self-released, hardcountmusic.com): Gravelvoiced singer Reverend Adumb Green has a bit of that Dicky Barrett rasp, and his band has a bit of that Bosstones sing-along thing, but ska isn’t one of the styles you’ll find on the band’s eight-song debut. The Hardcount are a little bit punk and a little bit twangy, which mostly makes them sound a little bit like Supersuckers, which isn’t a bad thing— especially if it’s Saturday night and you feel like drinking. DL (Fri., March 2, Fuel)

Blame it on the Girl, Vaya con Dios (out now,

Blvd Park, The Sound (out now, self-

Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • Feb rua ry 1– 7, 2012

released, blvdpark.info): Had jug-band nostalgist Caleb Klauder been the dominant creative force in the late Portland-based jam band Calobo, they would have sounded a lot like Blvd Park, a rootsy gang of exCalifornians who stretch their old-tyme aesthetic to mercifully elastic boundaries. MIKE SEELY (Thurs., Feb. 9, Tractor Tavern)

10

Bréag Naofa, Bréag Naofa (out now, Panic Records, breagnaofa.bandcamp.com): Deep, sludgy death metal with those growly, timberrattling evilcore vocals you either really dig or you don’t. MDL (Tues., Feb. 14, Funhouse)

*

Brokaw, Interiors (out now, Good to

Die Records, brokaw.bandcamp.com): Brokaw aren’t so much into melody, but who cares? This is a band more interested in rocking your face off. They have their noiserock sound nailed on their debut: big, buzzing riffs and fuzzy bass lines mixed with a bit of angular, experimental free-for-all, just the way the Melvins or The Jesus Lizard like it. DAVE LAKE (Fri., Feb. 3, Sunset Tavern)

*

Brennan Dignan, Idaho (out now,

Manimal Music, brennandignan.com): Dignan skillfully captures the atmosphere

Yeah, every release

WOODWARD BRENTON

self-released, blameitonthegirl.bandcamp. com): Female-fronted, gothy metal with all the ferocious vocals and speedy guitar work you could ask for. Perfect music for the black-wearing set that catches butterflies with one hand and throws up metal with the other. MA’CHELL DUMA LAVASSAR

of the desolate Northwest wilderness in this aptly named album. Each track plays like something escaped from a round of campfire confessions, lending to its airy, lonely, vulnerable, and lyrically chatty sound. JEVA LANGE

*

Earth, Angels of Darkness, Demons of Light II (2/14, Southern Lord, thronesanddominions.com): Their sludge days long buried, Dylan Carlson’s Earth continues to mine the dark, rusty acoustic drone laid out on this album’s prequel—with cellist Lori Goldston and Karl Blau. EG

*

Tom Eddy, The Bread Maker’s Blues (out now, self-released, tomeddy. bandcamp.com): The five songs on this EP have been recorded with a old-timey, vintage quality, but besides the romantic title track, they aren’t quite adequately described as “blues”—they’re far too lively. Eddy incorporates jumpy Latin-influenced percussion rhythms and lightly strummed guitars alongside his lovely, fluent vocals. ERIN K. THOMPSON

*

Eternal Fair, Eternal Fair, Vol. 1 (2/25, self-released, eternalfair.com): Led by songwriter Andrew Vait, Eternal Fair’s progrock ambitions are largely fulfilled on this EP,

*In each issue, we review every release from local bands and labels scheduled for the coming month. We fully expect a few releases to slip through the cracks. So each issue will also include anything we missed in previous issues, or that had been released in the interim. Send releases and reminders to reverbreviews@seattleweekly.com.

*

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

Vashon Island’s finest, The Pharmacy.

which recalls My Morning Jacket by way of ’70s power-trio sensibilities. ANDREW GOSPE (Sat., Feb. 25, High Dive)

*

Fly Moon Royalty, Fly Moon Royalty

(2/6, Sportn’ Life, flymoonroyalty. bandcamp.com): Vocalist Adraboo’s radiant pipes carry a confident spunk, and MC/DJ Action Jackson’s smooth mixing skills lend a vintage soul feel to songs like “Do What You Say” and single “Lemonade.” Good songwriting, positive vibes, and a heartfelt spirit seal the deal. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT (Fri., Feb. 10, Crocodile)

French Letters, In Tongues (out now,

self-released, frenchletters.bandcamp.com): Fusing spoken-word poetry, jazz, and rock into a unique and bubbly 10-track album is no easy feat, but French Letters has pulled it off wonderfully. Smooth and fun meets intellectual and funky. JOE WILLIAMS (Fri., Feb. 10, Rat and Raven) Friends & Family, “Laura in the Woods” b/w “Vermin” (out now, self-released, friendsandfamilyband.com): Quirky indie pop from an eight-piece band that aims for a New Pornographers or Broken Social Scene sort of thing, only goofier and with more elaborate costumes. DL (Fri., Feb. 10, Comet Tavern) Geist and the Sacred Ensemble, In Search of Fabled Lands (out now, Translinguistic Other, geistthesacredensemble.bandcamp. com): Psych-rock pilgrims hit high-desert

*

Haunted Horses, They Set Us Fevered Water (out now, self-released, haunted horses.com): Spooked but still snorting and kicking, the local duo tears up dark, dirge-y noise rock (and one druggy interlude of a title track) that recalls the Horrors’ early garage squall and Liars’ weirdo witch trials. EG Elke Hautala, Love Songs for a Post Modern

Paradise (out now, self-released, elkehautala. webs.com): Singer/songwriter Hautala’s six-track debut yearns for a Prince Charming through lyrical and spoken-word poetry. Often accompanied by nothing more than an acoustic guitar, her vocals strive for great things, and sometimes reach them. JL

*

The Horde and the Harem,

A Long Midwinter (2/2, self-released, thehordeandtheharem.com): When you’re a big band prone to layered harmonizing, adopting “The H & the H” template for your name is shortsighted. But that’s about all that’s wrong with this splendid group, whose new album sounds like a richly dynamic milieu of Menomena and The Negro Problem, with an infusion of Ben Folds-iness for accessibility’s sake. MS (Wed., Feb. 8, High Dive)

In Cahoots, In Cahoots (out now, self-

released, incahootsband.com): The first impression this EP makes isn’t great: Its fast noise rock comes off as messy and uncomfortable. But the gems that stand out, “Borrowed Time” and “Triggerheart,” have beautiful instrumentation and an addictive attitude. They’re worth the purchase alone. JW (Sat., Feb. 18, The Mix) Klover Jane, Tattoo’d Kandy (out now, selfreleased, reverbnation.com/kloverjane): In the distinct style of Soundgarden, Klover


*

MURDER CITY DEVILS “EVERY DAY I RISE” B/W “BALL BUSTERS IN THE PEANUT GALLERY” (out now, self-released, themurdercitydevils.com) Ten years is a long time, especially if you greet each new day with a writer’s terror of the blank page. The A-side of Murder City NAT Devils’ new single finds frontman Spencer EM ANN Y Moody facing a typewriter and lamenting “Every day I rise and no one cares.” On the B-side (relevant to my interests!), he wonders, howling, “How do I fill the gaps in this life?” The band approximates its old swagger boom on “Every Day,” but “Ball Busters,” with its martial snare rolls, delicate guitar phrases, seasick bass, and wavering organs, sounds more appropriately weathered—everything about the track, from its slower tempo to the soaked-in pathos of Moody’s singing, feels more like the deflations of his post-MCD project Triumph of Lethargy. Murder City Devils are a long way gone from the days of record labels buying them drinks and Nate Manny pissing off the 10th floor, and the distance between those punk rock-’n’-roll dreams and creeping day-to-day reality is palpable like a brick. EG Jane’s wailing vocals and sludgy guitar demand you crank the volume up to 11. The band may be noticeably stuck playing ’90s rock, but no one’s complaining when it’s so damn catchy. JL (Fri., Feb. 3, Hard Rock Cafe) Mark Lanegan, Blues Funeral (2/7, 4AD,

marklanegan.com): Lanegan’s first solo release since 2004’s excellent Bubblegum is a not a downer because of its brooding lyricism—we all love that about Lanegan— but because the grunge icon trades distortion and mystique for cheesy guitar effects and misplaced irony (see “Ode to Sad Disco”) that liken him more to the Dandy Warhols than Screaming Trees. GE

*

Low Hums, Low Hums (2/25, self-

*

Lowlands, The Largest Armies (out

now, self-released, lowlands.bandcamp. com): Tom Rorem has a deep, shapely voice that stands out in a genre run by guys who almost always sound like they’re wearing a plaid shirt. A beautiful, harmonious experience of happy layers, The Largest Armies is a gem of an indie-rock album. JW

Fatal Lucciauno, Respect (2/21, Sportn’ Life, sportnlife.net): Lucciauno’s second release unites the gangsta rapper with past collaborators (Vitamin D, J. Pinder) and new alliances (Larry Mizell Jr., Fly Moon Royalty’s Adraboo, Jake One) for a gritty, street-soaked sound of brooding beats and smooth-lipped lyrics. GE (Fri., Feb. 17, Chop Suey)

*

Graig Markel, Graig Markel (out now,

self-released, graigmarkelmusic.com): Inspired by the organic approach of Nick

Matthew Meadows, “Smokehouse”

(out now, self-released, reverbnation.com/ matthewmeadows): A one-song preview of the Kenmore guitarist’s upcoming Temple of Zither, “Smokehouse” is a blues-rock bar jam that isn’t hip, but isn’t trying to be. DL

MK Speed Dial, Here It Is (out now, selfreleased, mkspeeddial.com): This band’s second and final EP (they broke up earlier this year) bursts with the healthy exuberance of the best pop-rock, via jagged guitar riffs, whipping tempos, and effusive vocal melodies. Their addictive enthusiasm will be missed. EKT Mount Eerie and Selector Dub Narcotic,

“Distorted Cymbals” b/w “Angelpoise Cymbals” (2/7, K Records, krecs.com): Mount Eerie balances rhythmic groove, typically plaintive vocals and piano, and blurts of muddy guitar on the A-side; Selector Dub Narcotic mixes it into an unstable mess on the flip. EG

*

The New Law, The Fifty Year Storm

(out now, self-released, thenewlaw. bandcamp.com): Producers Adam Straney and Justin Neff combine glitchy hip-hop beats with jazz-influenced soundscapes on their first full-length since 2009. It’s downtempo, indelibly chill (but definitely not chillwave), and easy to get lost in. AG

Nice Nate, milo. (out now, self-released,

nicenate.bandcamp.com): With three respectable releases on his Bandcamp page, Seattle producer Nice Nate is off to a good start. There are a fair number of down moments on milo., however, so finding consistency in his songwriting is the next step. TH

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

Reve r b • Seattle we ekly • Feb ru a ry 1–7, 2012

released, lowhums.wordpress.com): This album was partially recorded in a cistern at Fort Worden State Park on the Olympic Peninsula, and that cavernous, eerie environment perfectly complements the band’s dark country-psych. That the release comes only on clear vinyl and purple transparent cassette should surprise no one. JULIA MULLEN GORDON (Sat., Feb. 25, Highline)

Drake and Springsteen’s Nebraska, Markel (a studio owner and member of the Animals at Night) certainly had lofty goals for his new LP, and mostly achieves them. His delivery is sleepy, but occasional lap steel, piano, and ukulele give the record a warm ambience. DL

11


reviews» » FROM PAGE 11

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Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • Feb rua ry 1– 7, 2012

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*

Rosie Thomas, With Love (2/14, Sing-A-

self-released, getokra.com): This old-timey string trio of steadfast Seattle buskers return with their third full-length, a jumpy and carefree 12-track collection of bygone-era bluegrass, spirited harmonies, and murder ballads. GE (Fri., March 16, Couth Buzzard) Posse, Posse (out now, self-released,

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released, facebook.com/leezys): One of Grit City’s (that’s Tacoma) hardest MCs, Soprano has an easy delivery that makes his often harsh lyrics go down smooth. See “From Hell to the Booth” for prime evidence. TODD HAMM

Spyn Reset, Four Dimensional Audio (out now, 23 Sounds Records, spynreset.com): This predominantly instrumental album takes the listener on a unique journey from dental-office jazz to Luscious Jackson and back. Is that a journey worth taking, though? Only if you really like dental-office jazz with a Luscious Jackson intermezzo. MS (Thurs., Feb. 9, Musicquarium)

The Quiet Ones, “You Are a Trial” (out now, In Advanced Records, soundcloud.com): This wobbly alt-rock track suffers under the weight of too many ideas. Pick one and own it, y’all. CHRIS KORNELIS

Empire of Sleep self-titled

Leezy Soprano, United We Ball (out now, self-

Kind Turkey Records, thepharmacy. bandcamp.com): The Pharmacy’s newest EP is a righteous punch of bang-up garage rock, beginning with the exclamatory title track and moving swiftly into the twinkly, harmonic “Pines” and the instrumental “Lazy Bones” before closing with the beautifully bitter “Burn All Yr Bridges,” which moodily reflects thus: “Burn all your bridges down/ Sink them in the Puget Sound/And all the seagulls gather ’round/To shit while burning bridges drown.” EKT (Fri., Feb. 3, Black Lodge)

posseposse.com): Posse makes the understated sort of indie rock that bands like Pixies and Sonic Youth made classic in the ’90s; the best tracks on the trio’s guitar-thickened debut full-length are those on which Sacha Maxim sings lead, like the steady “14 Days” and the thudding, ominous “Sarah.” EKT

@ FUEL

@ SLIM’S

*

The Pharmacy, Dig Your Grave (2/3,

available bandcamp, itunes, amazon and silver platters

available at bandcamp

(out now, self-released, orkestarzirkonium. com): This horn-heavy 13-piece’s sophomore effort is the perfect soundtrack for an Eastern European wedding. It will make you want to dance and drink, although if you’re not in the mood for dancing or drinking, it’s of little utility. MS

*

Sol, Yours Truly (out now, self-released, solsays.com): Combining a suave, nonchalant flow with polished, playful production from Jake One and others, Sol’s sophomore LP is a pitch-perfect hybrid of pop and hip-hop. Fair warning: The über-catchy single “Need Your Love” will get stuck in your head and never leave. KEEGAN HAMILTON

Eet Led Records, reverbnation.com/silver bulletfive): This Yelm quintet synthesizes old-school metal influences for a retro hardrock sound with lyrics as inane as those of the ’80s cock-rock bands they emulate. Leaving no rock cliché unturned, the album also includes a song with cowbell and the requisite power ballad. Bonus points for making themselves Google-proof thanks to a name that echoes Bob Seger’s backing band. DL

The Soft Hills, This Bird Is Coming Down to Earth (2/14, Tapete Records, thesofthills. com): The Soft Hills achieves wonderfully textured harmonies but could stand to rethink their lyricism. The tambourine-tinged title track “Phoenix” includes worn-out passages like “journey to the end of night” and “misty morning,” and the following track, “Days When We Were Young and Free,” comes off a little jaded for a band so green. But the album eventually fleshes out beyond fuzzy folk into psych-rock, with an ultimately mellow, hazy rock sound. GE (Fri., Feb. 3, Comet Tavern)

now, self-released, stereocreeps.bandcamp. com): Stereo Creeps’ bio claims origins of the punk-rock and hardcore variety, which is surprising as you will hear little of either genre here. Instead, you’ll get ’90s alt-rock that goes to bed at night dreaming of a solid pop hook. MDL (Fri., Feb. 17, Darrell’s Tavern)

Long Records, rosiethomas.com): Thomas’ first non-Christmas album in six years came together with a little help from her friends Dave Bazan and Sam Beam, who encouraged her to channel her favorite diva, Bette Midler. Thomas remains a piano-driven singer/ songwriter, so her songs don’t come close to the flamboyance of the Divine Miss M, but on top of her usual subdued sweetness, her vocals do take on a noticeable extra vigor. EKT

The Torn ACLs, Make a Break, Make a Move (out now, self-released, thetornacls.net): Effete indie pop that verges on twee, similar to that of other local groups like The Lonely Forest and Us on Roofs. These songs are occasionally catchy, but that’s about it. AG (Sat., Feb. 11, Comet Tavern) Vox Mod, Spectrum (Remixes by Vox Mod)

(out now, self-released, voxmod.bandcamp. com): This live-electronics dude tackles tracks from chillwave (USF) to electro (Sports, WD4D, & Suttikeeree) to goth industrial (Nightmare Fortress, The Walking Wounded) with vaporizing synths, solid beats, and an overall light touch. EG (Tues., Feb. 14, Comet Tavern)

LOCAL LABELS’ OUT-OF-TOWN BANDS

*

Black Marble, Weight Against the Door (out now, Hardly Art, hardlyart.com): This Brooklyn cold-wave synth-pop act makes a promising Hardly Art debut—five


PERFUME GENIUS * PUT YOUR BACK N 2 IT (2/21, Matador, matadorrecords.com/perfumegenius)

tracks of mopey bedroom dancing that borrow from Joy Division way more credibly than that Mickey Mouse shirt did. EG

*

Michael Chapman, Rainmaker (out

now, Light in the Attic, lightintheattic. net): Chapman’s as proficient at singing and songwriting as he is at guitar-slinging. It’s a curiously rare marriage of talents that adds a dimension to this 1969 debut, rightly getting dusted off for a fresh act. CK

Father John Misty, “I Would Love You” (out

now, Sub Pop, fatherjohnmisty.tumblr.com): This easy, barroom-anthemic single is far livelier and open-ended than the light-footed acoustic records that dominate J. Tillman’s solo catalogue. His first offering under the Misty moniker is already one of his most interesting tracks. CK

Laura Gibson, La Grande (out now,

Hunx, Hairdresser Blues (2/28, Hardly Art, hardlyart.com): The first solo album from Hunx and His Punx founder Seth Bogart is noticeably less gleeful than his band’s girlgroup-inspired material, but the fuzzy pop songs remain memorable for their plainspokenness; the ruthless “Always Forever” and the hooky Bay City Rollers tribute “Do You Remember Being a Roller?” are standouts. EKT La Sera, “Please Be My Third Eye” (out now,

Hardly Art, hardlyart.com): Lo-fi darling Katy Goodman is more polished on this teaser to her March LP, Sees the Light. But she’s as charming as ever. CK

Memoryhouse, The Slideshow Effect (2/28, Sub Pop, subpop.com): This meditative Canadian duo’s first full-length is composed

of slow-moving keyboards and vocalist Denise Nouvion’s plaintive vocals, and is comparable to an afternoon nap—sweet, soothing, and relaxing, but nothing to get too terribly excited about. EKT (Fri., March 3, Crocodile) Nada Surf, The Stars Are Indifferent to

Astronomy (out now, Barsuk, nadasurf.com): After nearly 20 years and six albums, Nada Surf has barely changed musically, and their seventh album continues this trend. Anyone who’s heard one knows what to expect here: lots of big, bright, hook-laden power-pop songs, but little innovation. AG (Thurs., Feb. 2, Tractor Tavern) Nine Lashes, World We View (2/14,

Tooth and Nail, facebook.com/ninelashes): Hearing “Afterglow,” it’s clear this band has the potential to make beautiful, passionate music, but as a whole, World We View is nothing more than an homage to every angry, palm-muted, distorted rock band before them. JW

nonnon, El Socialismo (out now, Automation Records, myspace.com/nonnon): Dripping with energy, El Socialismo is a lively, spastic record with a serious case of multiple personality disorder. Chaotic in nature but in sync with itself, there’s a lot to praise in these 15 tracks of musical anarchy. JW Wendy Rene, After Laughter Comes Tears

(2/7, Light in the Attic, lightintheattic.net): The best thing about falling for a throwback genre is that fans never have to wait for new music—they need only go mining. Appreciators of the current soul revival will find themselves helpless against the power of Rene’s majestic howl. CK

Shearwater, Animal Joy (2/14, Sub Pop, shearwatermusic.com): Okkervil River offshoot and ornithology enthusiast Jonathan Meiburg’s stately, soaring soft-rock balladry finds a fitting new nest at the increasingly “indie/adult contemporary”–friendly Sub Pop. EG E

music@seattleweekly.com

Reve r b • Seattle we ekly • Feb ru a ry 1–7, 2012

Barsuk, lauragibsonmusic.com): Named for a small town in Eastern Oregon, veteran folk artist Gibson’s first album on Barsuk feels appropriately self-contained. The subdued instrumentation and her soft-spoken vocals make for some gorgeous moments, even if this album could be classified as indie-adult contemporary. AG (Sat., Feb. 4, Tractor Tavern)

ANGEL CEBALLOS

On Mike Hadreas’ sophomore album as Perfume Genius, not much has changed since his 2010 debut, Learning. His songs still take on ponderous issues (depression, addiction, and above all the struggles Hadreas faces as a gay man) over softly plinked piano, and his voice still recalls Sufjan Stevens at its most fragile. But while Learning felt like a series of private confessions, Put Your Back N 2 It sounds markedly more self-assured. The improved-by-light-years production helps, as does the album’s remarkable concision (12 songs in just 32 minutes), indicative of an artist who knows exactly what he wants to say. Several songs, like the gorgeous “Hood” or “Dark Parts,” end just as they start to gain momentum, but maybe that’s the point— short and (sometimes) sweet might be the best way for Hadreas to grapple with such personal, painful material. AG (Mon., April 9, Crocodile)

13


the»month»ahead country BY GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

The Dusty 45s

Long Island’s Twin Sister.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3

The Seattle rockabilly roots troupe gathers some of their closest friends for a benefit show for Gimme Shelter with a spirit as rockin’ as the Americana bands on the bill. With the Maldives, Lazy Susan, Young Evils, Betsy Olson, Davidson Hart Kingsbery, the Purrs. Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151. 7 p.m. $15.

Nettle Honey THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9

These Folklife and Ballad Market buskers churn out fiddle-heavy, banjo-jangled string tunes with subtle, rich harmonies and a blithe spirit. With Blvd Park, Creeping Time. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599. 9 p.m. $6. SHAWN BRACKBILL

pop/rock BY ERIN K. THOMPSON

Nada Surf

Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • Feb rua ry 1– 7, 2012

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2

14

At the end of January, Barsuk Records released longtime indie-rock heroes Nada Surf’s sixth LP, The Stars Are Indifferent to Astronomy. The band will promote the record at a show at the Neptune next month as well as at tonight’s more intimate affair, with an opening set by labelmate Eric Elbogen of Say Hi. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W.,

789-3599. 9 p.m. $20.

Los Campesinos! SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4

This Welsh septet is touring on the back of their fourth album, last year’s Hello Sadness—an expertly crafted, exuberant pop record with tracks like the wry “Baby I Got the Death Rattle,” which details dealing with sexual frustration by drawing penises in the snow. Neptune

Theatre, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877-784-4849. 8 p.m. $16 adv./$18 DOS. All ages.

Stumptown Coffee Talent Night MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6

Portland’s best coffee honors some of its most musical Seattle employees; tonight’s show will spotlight the squalling Constant Lovers, blues rockers Mongrel Blood (which includes members of the Murder City Devils), and SW’s Best Garage Band of 2011, the awesome noisemakers of Koko and the Sweetmeats. With Roddy Lee, The Fancy Lads, Tenderfoot. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880. 9:30 p.m. $6.

Twin Sister TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7

This young Long Island quintet’s crystalline In Heaven was one of last year’s most exquisite pop records; live, songs like “Kimmi in a Rice Field” and “Daniel” come off as even more sparkling and rhythmically sensual.

With Ava Luna, Lemolo. Vera Project, 305 Harrison St., 956-8372. 7:30 p.m. $11. All ages.

Wilco TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7

Wilco, one of America’s great live bands, is currently on the road in support of their adventurous latest record, The Whole Love, the first to be released on the band’s own label. It signals Wilco’s return after a yearlong break, and was recently nominated for a Grammy for Best Rock Album. Paramount Theatre, 911 Pine St., 467-5510. 8 p.m. $41.25. All ages.

Eleanor Friedberger THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9

After spending nearly a decade as half of the quirky and critically acclaimed indierock duo Fiery Furnaces, Friedberger went solo last year with Last Summer, a rich and striking collection of piano-driven, Nilsson-esque pop tunes. With Dominant

Legs. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618. 8 p.m. $12.

The Asteroids Galaxy Tour SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18

This Danish group has had songs featured in iPod Touch and Heineken commercials and has opened for both Amy Winehouse and Katy Perry. Their psychedelic swing music is lively and laced with funk. With Vacationer.

Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442. 8 p.m. $13.

The Presidents of the United States of America FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17–SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19

Following a rocking performance at KeyArena at last fall’s Bumbershoot, the Presidents are hitting the Showbox for a three-night stand, their annual PUSA Fest. They haven’t released an album since 2008’s These Are the Good Times People, but in this town they never have trouble selling tickets. Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151. Fri.–Sat., 8 p.m., 21 and over. Sun., 7 p.m., all ages. $20 adv./$25 DOS.

The Fresh and Onlys SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19

This San Francisco psych-pop quartet followed up 2010’s jangly Play It Strange with last year’s Secret Walls EP, a collection of five spectral, reverb-heavy guitar-rock tracks. Later this year, the prolific band will release another full-length on New York’s Mexican Summer. With Disappears, Black

Whales. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005. 8 p.m. $10.

Night Beats SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25

Night Beats are up there among Seattle’s best and most hyped psychedelic rock bands—their electrifying self-titled debut is currently sold out on their label Trouble in Mind’s website. Catch the frequent road warriors here in town before they head out for another tour in March. With Pierced Arrows. Comet Tavern, 922 E. Pike St., 322-9272. 9 p.m. $10.

The Jayhawks THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9

On the heels of last year’s Mockingbird Time, these Twin Cities alt-country stewards and polished professionals swing through Seatown with their lush Americana rock. Neptune Theater, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 781-5755. 8 p.m. $25. All ages.

Dead Winter Carpenters FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10

Hailing from Lake Tahoe, this jumpy roots’n’-roll outfit will warm up Ballard’s coziest pub with their alt-country, old-timey rock. Conor Byrne, 5140 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-3640. 9 p.m. $8.

Izzy Cox FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10

With a barreling country wail that sounds at times like that of indie songstress Jolie Holland, Cox’s powerful stage presence and bluesy guitar work is something you won’t soon forget. With Shivering Denizens, the

Hilltones. Slim’s Last Chance Chili Shack, 5606 First Ave. S., 762-7900. 9 p.m. $8.

Rachel Lyn Harrington & the Knock Outs TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14

A winner of 2011’s MerleFest songwriting contest, Harrington’s soulful, rootsy croon (calling to mind elegant blueswoman Bonnie Raitt), woven through carefully crafted tunes, is pure country soul. With Side

Saddle. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880. 9 p.m. $6.

Left Coast Country SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18

This fun-loving string band—a self-touted “fast-pickin’, easy-livin’, lady-lovin’,


themonthahead» isn’t a knockout upon first glance, you should stop by to check out up-and-coming young guns Kung Foo Grip. With Cool Nutz, E and

late-night-ramblin’, good-time-havin’ ” crew—is sure to keep things light and lively at the High Dive tonight. With the Strange Nails,

Friends of Knuckleshead, Iosis. High Dive, 513 N. 36th St., 632-0212. 7 p.m. $7.

Dae, Kingz of Kush, DJ Astronomar; hosted by Grynch. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442. 8 p.m. $10. All ages.

Don’t Talk to the Cops! SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4

Tonight DTTTC! celebrates the release of its sophomore album Let’s Quit. Show up if you a) like having a good time or b) are a professional dancer and want to challenge djblesOne and/ or Emecks to a dance-off. With Purple & Green, JACKSON VOELKEL

The fast-fiddling Water Tower Bucket Boys.

Water Tower Bucket Boys THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23

If you like your mountain music brisk and playful with youthful Avett Brothers–style harmonies, look no further than this world-touring quartet from Portland, centering a sprightly lineup at the oddly fitting Funhouse. With Rats in the Grass, Gravedigger. Funhouse, 206 Fifth Ave. N., 374-8400. 9:30 p.m. $5.

Massy Ferguson SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25

Named for a line of rugged tractors, this Americana rock band from Seattle is just as down-to-earth, with a catalog of alt-country songs about America’s hard-working, harddrinking folk. With The BGP. Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333. 8 p.m. $12 adv./$15 DOS. All ages.

Anna Coogan WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 29

With Sam Russell. Columbia City Theater, 4916 Rainier Ave. S., 722-3009. 8 p.m. $10.

JFK FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10

Grayskul’s JFK kicks off his Break the Leg Tour with Kublakai (The Let Go) at Fremont’s cafe-by-day/club-by-night The White Rabbit. This should be a good chance to see two solid roleplayers shine in their own spotlight. With Griff J, Apakoliptik. White Rabbit, 513 N. 36th St., 588-0155. 9:30. $6.

Buck 65 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17

“Hip-hop at the Tractor?!” you might have just exclaimed. It’s a rarity for sure, but really, if anyone can pull it off, it’d be the cowboy-tongued, baseballplaying Canadian poet/rapper Buck 65 and his oddball compositions. With Busdriver, Metal

Chocolates, Sadistik. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599. 9:30 p.m. $15.

The Coup FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17

This politically minded Bay Area duo is famous for delivering heavy social commentary (sometimes in ’70s pimp-speak, other times in a proper British accent) over dance-hall-ready funk beats, giving you equal cause to dance and stand up and fight. With Theoretics, DJ Funkscribe. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618. 8 p.m. $13.

Fatal Lucciauno FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17

To further confuse your plans for tonight, Fatal is releasing his extra-mega-highly anticipated sophomore album Respect. If you’re even a casual fan of local hip-hop, you should be there.

hip-hop

With Th3rdz, DJ Action Jackson. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005. 9 p.m. $10.

BY TODD HAMM

Brothers From Another

Hieroglyphics WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1

This time out, the usually nine-count veteran Oakland group is touring sans a few members (notably the highly identifiable, cartoonvoiced Del Tha Funkee Homosapien). Take the opportunity to [re-]discover some underappreciated portions of their catalog. With

Hi-Life Soundsystem. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618. 8 p.m. $12.

Scribes FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3

This show is billed as a birthday bash for local boxing indie-rapper Scribes. Though the bill

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18

The semifinal round of EMP’s 11th annual Sound Off! battle of the bands presents a diverse bouquet of talented minors, fronted by on-the-rise chill-rap duo Brothers From Another. With Honora, Nude, Ulrich.

EMP Sky Church, 325 Fifth Ave. N., 770-2700. 8 p.m. $8–$12. All ages.

THEESatisfaction SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18

The local rap duo previews their forthcoming Sub Pop debut, awE naturalE, on Town Hall’s Saturday Family Concert series (they ding you $20 for not bringing a kid!), so the form

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 17

THE ARTS CHANNEL

Photo by Paul Hernandez

Reve r b • Seattle we ekly • Feb ru a ry 1–7, 2012

This “Roots and urban Americana” songbird (and trained opera singer) crafts tender melodies and gently rolling ballads with a delicate touch.

Sean Majors, Bgeezy, Hanibal. Baltic Room, 1207 Pine St., 625-4444. 9 p.m. $10.

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Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255. 11 a.m. 12 and under free, adults $5–$25.

2Racks Rap Contest THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23

This traveling contest, hosted by San Francisco rap artist/promoter Sellassie, calls for local artists to pit their original songs against one another in a single-elimination tournament for two large ($2,000!). With lots of hungry rappers. Nectar,

412 N. 36th St., 632-2020. 8 p.m. $10.

Hooker. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005. 9 p.m. $10.

Standard SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11

Bass music worth braving Pioneer Square for hits Temple Billiards’ Deep Down Lounge every second Saturday via Car Crash Set producers Cedaa, Ill Cosby, et al. With Astronomar. Temple Billiards, 126 S. Jackson St., 682-3242. 10 p.m. Free before midnight, $3 after.

dj/electronic

Christopher Willits & The Sight Below

BY ERIC GRANDY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15

bar, 1114 Howell St., 233-9873. 11 p.m. $10.

St., 233-9873. 6 p.m. $20 adv./$25 DOS.

Body Heat 4: Safeword

Run DMT

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16

Classcadia’s latest at ETG brings San Francisco duo Safeword’s brand of sexy, insinuating techhouse for what’s sure to be an aptly named edition of Body Heat. With Pezzner, J-Sun,

Two acts go by the admittedly great name Run DMT. One makes awesome, floorcrawling, fifth-plateau ambient hazes. But the one playing tonight makes hard-drilling dubstep for Mortal Kombat soundtracks.

Misha, Joel Pryde. Electric Tea Garden, 1402 E. Pike St., 568-3972. 10 p.m. $12.

With Novatron, Northstar, DJ Darwin. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005. 8 p.m. $10.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10

Goth rave monthly Second Sight scores peerless synth-pop gloomers Cold Cave, stripped down to a drum machine–driven duo, for what is sure to be a massive blowout. With Rxch Wxtch, Ozma

Otacava, Sh6rl6s6. Electric Tea Garden, 1402 E. Pike St., 568-3972. 10 p.m. $10.

Omar S FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10

Detroit’s Omar S makes house and techno in that city’s finest tradition—kinetic, deep, and prizing dance-floor functionality over too-fussy smoothness. A worthy heir to the Motor City mantle. With Nordic Soul,

Justin Timberline. Re-bar, 1114 Howell St., 233-9873. 10 p.m. $13 adv./$15 DOS.

Hossein Alizadeh and Pejman Hadidi THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16

Although he comes from a classical background, Iranian composer and setar player Alizadeh is a beautifully passionate improviser, and is considered one of the most important figures in contemporary Persian music. He’ll be joined by renowned percussionist/tombak player Hadadi. PONCHO Concert Hall, 710 E. Roy St., 323-1400. 8 p.m. $10–$15. All ages.

Fred Hoadley’s Sonando THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16

Sonando combines rhythms of Cuba and Puerto Rico, the improvisational aspects of jazz, and a classical harmonic sensibility. Most likely this is due to pianist and tres player Hoadley’s encouragement of each individual to bring something to the band, creating a Latin-jazz group always greater than the sum of its parts. Tula’s, 2214 Second Ave., 443-4221. 8 p.m. $10.

Regina Carter

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21–WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22

Sweden’s Stavöstrand produces fidgety minimal techno and microhouse that’s simultaneously deconstructed and funky; tonight, he’s joined by similarly smooth Seattle electro tinkerer Randy Jones. Electric Tea

With the release of Reverse Thread, Carter invites us into a world of hypnotically beautiful African folk melodies. Lauded as one of the finest violinists of her generation, Carter captures both the essence and the allure of the original music through a lens of contemporary interpretation. Jazz Alley, 2000 Sixth Ave.,

Garden, 1402 E. Pike St., 568-3972. 10 p.m. $5 before midnight, $10 after.

Grimes Electro-pop performer Grimes is set to be one of 2012’s breakout oddities, a live looping singer/songwriter whose agile beats and fluttering voice only seem fragile. With

Born Gold, USF. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880. 9:30 p.m. $8 adv./$10 DOS.

jazz BY BENJAMIN MORROW

Bobby Broom & the Deep Blue Organ Trio TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7–WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8

Broom began playing guitar at age 12 and never looked back. After touring with Sonny Rollins for years, he went on to record and/or

441-9729. 7:30 p.m. $24.50.

Sachal Vasandani FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24

Hi-Fly, this vocalist’s latest release, confirms the high praise showered on his two previous recordings—that he is one of the freshest, most versatile artists to emerge in recent memory. PONCHO Concert Hall, 710 E. Roy St., 323-1400. 8 p.m. $10–$20. All ages.

John Patitucci SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26

This three-time Grammy-winning bassist has been at the forefront of the jazz world for 25 years, both as a sideman and a leader. He has performed and/or recorded with luminaries like Dizzy Gillespie, Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, and Wynton Marsalis, and remains active as a composer, with 13 solo recordings. With Marc Seales.

Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus. 2 p.m. $15. All ages.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 19

JET SET MONDAYS

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Reve r b • Seattle we ekly • Feb ru a ry 1–7, 2012

CAT STEVENS

Second Sight: Cold Cave

443-4221. 7:30 p.m. $15.

Mikael Stavöstrand & Randy Jones

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20

Cold Cave’s Wesley Eisold.

After studying at New Orleans’ prestigious Thelonious Monk Institute, then touring with acclaimed trumpeter Nicholas Payton, vocalist Kendrick has worked with many jazz legends. Now she’s on the way to becoming one herself. Tula’s, 2214 Second Ave.,

9pm / No Cover Happy Hour all Night Long

W

As one-third of L.A.’s Droog, Justin Sloe makes appealingly weird, warping deep house; expect a fine set of sneaky, low-frequency dance cuts. Re-

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10

K

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3

Forget Valentine’s Day—tonight’s ambient dinner and show celebrates pre-Roman lovefest Lupercalia, with world-class audio/visual immersions from SF’s Christopher Willits and Seattle’s Sight Below and food prepared by chef Travis Koster. Re-bar, 1114 Howell

Johnaye Kendrick Quartet

ISLAND STYLE SUNDAYS

Best Reggae Night with DJ Bookem and DJ Fentar

K

Justin Sloe

441-9729. 7:30 p.m. $20.50.

Top 40 Saturdays w/ DJ Edis & DJ Paycheck

E

This Ghostly International producer makes electronic beats at head-nodding tempos— the stuff of blunted instrumental hip-hop, basically—with absorbing depth and replay value. With Danny Corn, Ghost Feet, DJAO,

this show takes should be interesting. Town

perform with Kenny Burrell, Hugh Masekela, and Stanley Turrentine. For these two performances, Broom celebrates a classic jazz configuration: Hammond B3 organ, guitar, and drums. Jazz Alley, 2000 Sixth Ave.,

L

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11

2/10 Neoplastic with DJ Tony Goods 2/17 DJ Tone Def 2/24 Pre Y2K w/ DJ Gyrate

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Mux Mool

2/8 SOULECTRO - W/ SHO NUFF & WD 4D

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» FROM PAGE 15

2/3 Evening with Potatoes & Homonegro

17


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BURLESQUE Sat. Feb 11th 8 and 10 pm

$15 $2 jello shots, $8 bucket drinks DJ Yoda Spinning from 9pm to 2am

Vibe Bar and Grill 226 1st Ave S - Kent

Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • Feb rua ry 1– 7, 2012

www.thevibebarandgrill.com

18


themonthahead» » FROM PAGE 17

In Flames FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3

The Benny Golson Quartet TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28–WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 29

Saxophonist Golson began his career with such greats as Benny Goodman, Dizzy Gillespie, and Lionel Hampton, and has changed the face of jazz for 55 years. He has recorded more than 30 albums and performed on five continents, and continues to bring his mastery of hard bop/bebop to music lovers around the world. Jazz Alley, 2000 Sixth Ave., 441-9729. 7:30 p.m. $24.50.

the heavies BY HANNAH LEVIN

Brokaw

This Swedish band has been making solid, melodic, and macabre metal for more than two decades; they are perfectly matched on this bill with younger thrash outfit Trivium. Veil of Maya and Kyng open. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 628-3151. 6:30 p.m. $22 adv./$25 DOS. All ages.

Anvil SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18

The 2008 documentary about Anvil’s unflagging devotion to “making it big” is heartwarming stuff; their live shows are a bit more uneven, if still charming in their irrepressible enthusiasm for soldiering forth in an industry that was so negligent in giving them a break. Excellent local doom rockers Vultures 2012 open. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E.,

Brokaw recently made the wise choice of signing with Good to Die Records, and tonight is the celebration of that local label’s release of the brashly beautiful Interiors. Also performing are the reliably volcanic Akimbo and darkly dramatic Deadkill.

Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880. 9 p.m. $7.

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Freedom For Health P.O. Box 2279 Vancouver, WA 98668

381-3094. 8:30 p.m. $15 adv./$20 DOS.

Megadeth & Motörhead TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3

WED 2/1

As long as you’re all right with making the semi-epic drive to Kent, this show won’t likely disappoint, thanks to double-stacked headliners that consistently deliver the best of their back catalog with a minimal sprinkling of newer (and less compelling) material. With Volbeat, Lacuna Coil. ShoWare Center, 625 W. James St., Kent, 253-856-6777. 6:30 p.m. $38–$48. All ages.

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THE BOURBONITES HONDO II • POLAND 9:30PM • $6

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Reve r b • Seattle we ekly • Feb ru a ry 1–7, 2012

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Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • Feb rua ry 1– 7, 2012

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REVERB MUS I C M O N T H LY N O W AVA I L A BL E O N KINDLE & KINDLE FIRE!

Seattle Weekly’s Reverb Music Monthly is the authoritative source for music coming out of and to Seattle. Each issue includes a comprehensive look at upcoming shows and concerts, as well as reviews of every upcoming local release. Sandwiched in between, our critics, reporters, and columnists such as Duff McKagan (Guns N’ Roses) and John Roderick (The Long Winters) - drill down on the happenings in one of the most vibrant music cities in the country.


arts»Performance BY GAVIN BORCHERT

Stage

OPENINGS

THE FAT GUY SHOW A “cacophony of clown, magic,

and . . . madness.” JewelBox/Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., jewelboxtheater.com. $10. 7 p.m. Sun., Feb. 5–Mon., Feb. 6. THE FLYING KARAMAZOV BROTHERS Juggling and beyond from this quartet, active 30 years. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $15–$35. Opens Feb. 2. Runs Thurs.–Sun.; see acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends Feb. 12.

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• I AM MY OWN WIFE SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 17. • OKLAHOMA! SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 17.

SPIN THE BOTTLE Annex’s

late-night variety show includes “borderline-Bjork musical madness” and plenty more. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre.org. $5–$10. 11 p.m. Fri., Feb. 4.

TAO: THE ART OF THE DRUM Heavy-metal taiko drumming. Moore Theatre,

1932 Second Ave., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org. $38–$60. 8 p.m. Fri., Feb. 3. TARTUFFE Moliere’s satire of hypocrisy will likely be both hilarious and, in an election year, depressing, Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

moves in with fellow divorcé Oscar, but their steadfast friendship quickly devolves into an angry, bickering marriage. Charles Leggett is a wonderful Oscar, consistently on the mark as a messy but likable guy. Though he gets some laughs, Chris Ensweiler has the greater challenge of making us sympathize with Felix, deeply irritating and over-the-top. (It’s hard to see how anyone would willingly befriend him.) The supporting cast is superb throughout; Betsy Schwartz and Caitlin Frances are especially entertaining as the Pigeons, two kooky British sisters who go on an ill-fated double date with our heroes. BRENT ARONOWITZ Village Theatre, 303 Front St. N., Issaquah, 425-392-2202. $22–$62. Runs Wed.–Sun. plus some Tues.; see villagetheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends Feb. 26 (then moves to Everett March 2–25).

considering what little has changed since 1664. Taproot Theatre, 204 N. 85th St., 781-9707, taproottheatre.org. $22–$37. Previews Feb. 1 & 2, opens Feb. 3. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Ends March 3. TEATRO ZINZANNI: CALIENTE! Their new Latinflavored show stars El Vez, Christine Deaver, and many others. Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015, zinzanni.org. $76 and up. Opens Feb. 2. 6:30 p.m. Wed.– Sat., 5:30 p.m. Sun. Ends June 10.

THE THRILLING ADVENTURES OF THE FAMOUS LEWIS & CLARK! Nick Poling and Alex DeRoest play

fast and loose with American history. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre.org. $5–$10. Opens Feb. 4. 11 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Feb. 24.

WITH EMMETT • WEIRD AND AWESOME As host and curator of this monthly MONTGOMERY

oddball omnibus, the titular emcee has a delicate task. On the one hand, Montgomery must be funny, which he reliably is, with a deadpan style honed during many years at the People’s Republic of Komedy. But he also has to share the stage with an array of drop-by musicians, visiting comics (sometimes national headliners), skits, and animation (a green, multi-eyed monster called Sweet Pea is often featured). The evening is less standup than vaudeville, an assortment of entertainments with Montgomery—who calls it “a two-hour, booze-soaked, awkward show-and-tell”—providing the segues. BRIAN MILLER Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre.org. $10. 7:30 p.m. Sun., Feb. 5. WHOSE LIVE ANYWAY As seen on TV, comic improv from Ryan Stiles, Greg Proops, Chip Esten, and Jeff B. Davis. Moore Theatre, 1932 Second Ave., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org. $35–$55. 8 p.m. Sat., Feb. 4.

CURRENT RUNS

CRADLE AND ALL SEE REVIEW, PAGE 18. HOW TO WRITE A NEW BOOK FOR THE BIBLE

SEE REVIEW, PAGE 18. THE ODD COUPLE Neil Simon’s rapid-fire tale of two men, a laid-back slob and a compulsively tidy neurotic, comes alive in a snappy revival directed by Jeff Steitzer—and when his cast is funny, they’re really funny. After Felix is kicked out by his soon-to-be ex, he

Dance

EYES OF THE SKIN A collaboration between the UW

Dance Department and DXARTS, UW’s electronic-media department. Henry Art Gallery, UW campus, 543-2280, henryart.org. $6–$10. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Fri., 2 p.m. Sat.– Sun. Ends Feb. 4.

• PACIFIC NORTHWEST BALLET: DON QUIXOTE

Alexei Ratmansky’s version of Cervantes, starring Tom Skerritt in the title role, is PNB’s most lavish production yet. McCaw Hall, Seattle Center, 441-2424, pnb.org. $28 and up. Opens Feb. 3. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 1 p.m. Sat.– Sun., also 7 p.m. Sun., Feb. 12. Ends Feb. 12. SHEN WEI DANCE ARTS Dance theater from China. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries.org. $20–$42. 8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2–Sat., Feb. 4. SALT HORSE An all-star cast of dancers and musicians (Beth Graczyk, Corrie Befort, Dave Knott, and Stuart Dempster, to name only four) collaborate in a 12-hour improv, 6 p.m. Sat. to 6 a.m. Sun. Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave., SaltHorsePerformance.com. $12. CENTURY HIGH This cabaret hits just about every dancefilm cliché since Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland, but it’s the dancing that really makes the evening buzz. SANDRA KURTZ Century Ballroom & Cafe, 915 E. Pine St., 324-7263, centuryballroom.com. $20–$55. 6 p.m. dinner, 7:30 p.m. show, Saturdays. Ends Feb. 4.

Classical, Etc. • ONE-MINUTE SOLOS In this benefit for the

Seattle Improvised Music Festival (Feb. 8–12), local avant-musicians each improvise for 60 seconds tops. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., seattleimprovisedmusic.us. $10–$25. 8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2.

MUSIC SOCIETY WINTER • SEATTLE CHAMBER FESTIVAL SEE EAR SUPPLY, PAGE 22. • SMOKESTACK ARIAS Wayne Horvitz’s new theatrical

song cycle, on texts by Robin Holcomb, tells the story of the 1916 labor uprising that resulted in the deaths of five Wobblies. With soprano Maria Mannisto and pianist Cristina Valdes; directed by Dayna Hanson. (Horvitz and the performers discuss Arias at Cornish College, 12:30 p.m. Tues., Feb. 7.) ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, waynehorvitz.net. $15–$25. Opens Feb. 2. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Feb. 12. UW GUITAR ENSEMBLE Music for one to four guitars by Grieg, Takemitsu, and others. Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, 685-8384, music. washington.edu. $5. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Feb. 3. IN REAL TIME Pacific MusicWorks brings together three improvisers in various genres—violinist Mikhail Schmidt, guitarist Bill Frisell, and lutenist Stephen Stubbs. Daniels Recital Hall, 811 Fifth Ave., 800-838-3006, pacificmusicworks.org. $20–$35. 8 p.m. Fri., Feb. 3. TOM VARNER NONET Music from this hornist’s new CD, Heaven and Hell. Cornish College of the Arts, 710 E. Roy St., cornish.edu. $10–$20. 8 p.m. Sat., Feb. 4. PHILHARMONIA NORTHWEST Julia Tai conducts Mozart’s boisterous “Paris” symphony and two works by Villa-Lobos (with pianist Geisa Dutra). St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 4805 N.E. 45th St., philharmonianw.org. $12–$18. 2:30 p.m. Sun., Feb. 5.

ORCHESTRA SEATTLE/SEATTLE CHAMBER SINGERS Eric Garcia conducts Russian favorites.

Meany Hall, UW campus, 800-838-3006, osscs.org. $10–$20. 3 p.m. Sun., Feb. 5. JAN LISIECKI This Canadian pianist, all of 16, plays Liszt, Chopin, and more. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries.org. $20–$32. 8 p.m. Wed., Feb. 8.

Smokestack Arias Feb 2-12 Song cycle composed by Wayne Horvitz with text by Robin Holcomb

Pinter Fortnightly Feb 6

The Flying Karamazov Brothers | Feb 2-12 “Feh!” – Puyallup Herald Direct from a year in New York, a summer in London, a month in Madrid, and a day too many in Puyallup!

Seattle Confidential: How We Met Feb 13 Submit today to see your story (anonymously) on stage!

eSe Amor Feb 14 Celebrate Valentine’s Day at this elegant and sexy Benefit

Save the Date: ACT Mainstage single tickets go on sale Feb 14!

For more information and to buy tickets visit: acttheatre.org | 206.292.7676 700 Union Street, Downtown Seattle

Seattle we ekly • Febru ary 1– 7, 2012

“A Triumph!” – NY Times

Featuring a reading of Old Times in preparation for the 2012 Pinter Festival

21


arts»Performance EarSupply

» by gavin borchert

Four by Four

Groups of 10 or more call 206-315-8054

DO AS WE SAY AND AS WE DO It’s simple. Creating art for video games is our day job, teaching you is our night job. Don’t you think learning from artists who actually work in the industry is a good idea?

Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012

We do.

22

© BENJAMIN EALOVEGA

SATURDAY | FEB 4, 8PM | THE MOORE

Bartok’s String Quartet no. 4—with its antagonistic opening, bad-dreamish slow movement, and aggressive fury—is possibly his gnarliest, and since the Seattle Chamber Music Society treats music this uncompromising gingerly, it’s a gratifying surprise to see it among the programming for their winter festival. Three of this weekend’s four main concerts (all but Saturday’s) are preceded by less-formal recitals an hour earlier; each of these will feature one of Brahms’ three quartets. In addition, there’s a family concert—the musical fairy tale The Bremen Town Musicians, 11 a.m. Saturday ($10)–and KUOW host Dave Beck chats with SCMS artistic director/violinist James Ehnes on Thursday at noon. Thursday, 7:30 p.m. Shostakovich’s demure and (mostly) innocuous Quartet no. 1, plus Mozart and Schubert. Friday, 7:30 p.m. The Bartok is cushioned by luscious pieces by two composers not known for chamber music, Mahler and Strauss, and by a Beethoven piano trio. Saturday, 7:30 p.m. Ehnes and pianist

Ehnes takes the reins, onstage and backstage.

Andrew Armstrong play Tartini, Beethoven, Paganini, and Franck. Sunday, 1 p.m. Prokofiev’s Cello Sonata, Dvorak’s charming and homely Bagatelles, and a Brahms quintet. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Avenue and Union Street, 283-8808, seattlechamber music.org. Single tickets $15–$45; three concerts $135; four concerts $180.


StoneDance Productions and The Theatre at Meydenbauer Present:

CHOP SHOP BODIES OF WORK

Spectrum Dance Theater Adam Barruch Dance Northwest Dance Project The Stone Dance Collective SANDSTROMMOVEMENT MOVE: the company Jason Ohlberg

Khambatta Dance Company Penny Hutchinson Bellingham Repertory Dance Special film presentation by

BodyVox

February 11th, 2012 7:30pm February 12th, 2012 3:00pm

11100 NE 6th St Bellevue, WA 98004

Tickets on sale now

1 800-838-3006 or www.brownpapertickets.com

Dancer: Emilee Putsche of The Stone Dance Collective Photo: Gabriel Bienczycki, ZebraVisual

Visit our Website at Chopshopdance.org StoneDance Productions is an associated program of Shunpike

Two Black History Month Film Premieres Seattle Art Museum, Downtown

Soul Train: The Hippest Trip in America

Tickets to Both Films

Friday, February 10, 7:30 pm This film celebrates forty years of the breakthrough Chicago TV show Soul Train.

Muhammed Ali: The Long-Lost Movie Friday, February 17, 7:30 pm A warm, humorous portrait of Ali, the boxing artist, poet, philosopher and humanist who dazzled the world.

1st Avenue & Union Street

SAM members: $12 Adults: $14 SIFF, NWFF, TheFilmSchool members: $12 Tickets may be purchased online, by phone (206.654.3121) or at the Ticketing Desk at any of SAM’s three sites. Single-film tickets are $8 for everyone, sold day of show at the auditorium (cash/check only). Boxer Muhammad Ali, circa 1972. Image courtesy of Photofest.

seattleartmuseum.org

Seattle we ekly • Febru ary 1– 7, 2012

Seattle Art Museum proudly presents the Seattle premieres of two outstanding films.

23


film»This Week’s Attractions

arts»Visual Arts BY KAT CHOW

Openings & Events • BAM’S FREE FIRST FRIDAY Strapped for cash?

Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012

GALLERY 110 ANNUAL JURIED EXHIBITION

Nearly two dozen pieces have been selected by Nora Atkinson (of the Bellevue Arts Museum). Note First Thursday opening reception, 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2. Call for regular hours. Gallery 110, 110 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 624-9336, gallery110.com. Feb. 3–25. LISA GEERTSEN Perfect for Valentine’s Day, Show of Heart offers a variety of iterations of that organ, rendered in metal and other materials. Note First Thursday opening reception, 5–8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2. Pratt Gallery at Tashiro Kaplan Studios, 312 S. Washington St., Ste. 1A, 328-2200, pratt.org. Opens Feb. 2. Wed.–Sat., noon–5 p.m. Through Feb. 25. Send events to visualarts@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

24 •

(through Feb. 18) Universal Limited Art Editions print show, featuring reproductions by Helen Frankenthaler, Jasper Johns, and other he selected. Greg Kucera Gallery, 212 Third Ave. S., 624-0770, gregkucera.com. Sat., Feb. 4, noon. INTRIGUE Members of the SAM staff show work in the Subterranean Room. Note opening reception 7–10 p.m. Sat., Feb. 4, featuring music by Paul Klein and DJ Transport. Art/Not Terminal Gallery, 2045 Westlake Ave., 233-0680, antgallery.org. Opens Feb. 4. Sat., 1–6 p.m.; Mon.–Fri., 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Through Feb. 29. CARA JAYE To create Cluster and Control, Bellingham artist Jaye teamed up with her 4-year-old daughter to create abstract work using ink, gouache, paint, pen, serigraphy, and pigmented digital prints. Note First Thursday opening reception, 5–8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2. Punch Gallery, 119 Prefontaine Place S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 621-1945, punchgallery.org. Opens Feb. 2. Thurs.–Sat., noon–5 p.m. Through Feb. 25. LENA LEITZKE She shows new paintings and drawings. Note opening reception 7–10 p.m. Sat., Feb. 4. Art/Not Terminal Gallery, 2045 Westlake Ave., 2330680, antgallery.org. Opens Feb. 4. Mon.–Sat., 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Through Feb. 29. JAMES MARTIN AND BEN DARBY Poke-in-the-Eye and Kick in the Pants, respectively, present new work from Martin and Darby. Note opening reception on First Thursday, 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2. Foster/ White Gallery, 220 Third Ave. S., 622-2833, foster white.com. Opens Feb. 2. Tues.–Sat., 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Through Feb. 25. ONTOLOGUE: PARLIAMENT OF THINGS Joshua Kim talks about Soil’s new show, followed at 1 p.m. by a seminar featuring Dutch sculptor Melis Van Den Berg. Soil Gallery, 112 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 264-8061, soilart.org. Sat., Feb. 4, 11 a.m.–noon. SUZANNE OPTON After nine years, over 4,000 military deaths, and thousands more injuries, the Iraq War is finally over. Soon after the U.S. invasion, New York photographer Suzanne Opton began making portraits of the men and women who serve, posing them near identically in her series Soldier, with heads resting on the ground. Eyes open and closed, some looking relaxed, others just tired, their faces were compared to those in a morgue back in 2008, when Opton bought billboard space to display them in Minneapolis–St. Paul during the Republican National Convention. Naturally the billboard company canceled the contract for fear of offending McCain supporters. Said Opton of her subjects, “They may look troubled, but it’s not easy to be a soldier. Why should that be hidden from us?” In a second series on view, Many Wars, she drapes veterans—some going back to WWII—with robes and places them in almost classical poses, as if they’d stepped out of a painting. You just get a name, no rank, and maybe the length of service. Their sacrifice and our respect is implicit, but it’s the gulf between us that may be the real subject of Opton’s lens. (Also note closing reception with the artist on Thurs., Feb. 4; and an artist talk at the Henry: 7 p.m. Fri., Feb 3.) BRIAN MILLER Platform Gallery, 114 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 323-2808, platformgallery.com. Free. Wed.–Fri., 11 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Feb. 5. UBA OWL Under her nom de plume, the Bay Area artist presents portraiture in “Alterrealist” mode. Her show is called 9 Lives of Karen Elson: A Feminist Eclat No. 9. Elson is the model and musician married to Jack White (of the White Stripes). Note opening reception 6–8 p.m. Wed., Feb. 1. Call for ongoing hours. Form/Space Atelier, 2407 First Ave., 349-2509, formspaceatelier.com. Feb. 2–March 3. (RE)SHIFT For this group show, each member of the collective invites an unaffiliated artist to respond to the theme of “shift.” Guests include Jite Agbro, Ken Barnes, Betsy Best-Spadaro, Larry Calkins, Mary Coss, Judy Cowan, Shaun Doll, Rosalie Frankel, Doug Jarvis, Isabella Leary, Victoria Raymond, June Sekiguchi, Deborah Walker, Kirsten Wilhelm, and Rickie Wolfe. Note First Thursday opening reception, 5–8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2. Shift Collaborative Studio, 306 S. Washington St. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 5471215, shiftstudio.org. Opens Feb. 2. Fri.–Sat., noon– 5 p.m. Through Feb. 25. JOEY VELTKAMP The Blanket Show features his drawings of nearly 50 blankets. Note opening reception, 5–8 p.m. Wed., Feb. 1. Cupcake Royale, 1111 E. Pike St., 328-6544, cupcakeroyale.com. Mon.–Sat., 7 a.m.–11 p.m.; Sun., 8 a.m.–10 p.m. Through March 31. WALLINGFORD ART WALK Participating venues and galleries include Stu Stu Studios, Fuel Coffee, Julia’s Restaurant, and Oasis Art Gallery. See wallingfordartwalk.org. 6–9 p.m. Wed., Feb. 1.

VARIANCE FILMS

BAM offers free admission every first Friday of the month. Here’s your chance to check out the museum’s current exhibits. Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., 425-519-0770, bellevuearts. org. Free. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Fri., Feb. 3. GAYLE BARD “Mystery” is the theme of her new landscape and abstract paintings. Note First Thursday opening reception, 5–8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2. Linda Hodges Gallery, 316 First Ave. S., 624-3034, linda hodgesgallery.com. Opens Feb. 2. Tues.–Fri., 10:30 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Feb. 25. SUE DANIELSON The Truth of What I See collects her new acrylic paintings. Note First Thursday opening reception, 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2, and artist talk 1 p.m. Sat., Feb. 18. Core Gallery, 117 Prefontaine Place S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 467-4444, coregallery. org. Opens Feb. 2. Wed.–Sat., noon–6 p.m. Through Feb. 25. KARIN DAVIE & GUY TILLIM The Canadian-born Davie paints large, colorful works abstracted from the human body. From South Africa, photographer Tillim’s Second Nature presents scenes from the fallen paradise of Polynesia. Note First Thursday opening reception, 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2. James Harris Gallery, 312 Second Ave. S., 903-6220, james harrisgallery.com. Opens Feb. 2. Thurs.–Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through March 17. A DAY WITH COAST SALISH ARTISTS Learn about contemporary Coast Salish art from practicing artists. Featuring demonstrations of basket and loom weaving by Ed Carriere and Darlene Peter, talks, and a panel discussion. Participating artists include Ed Carriere, Darlene Peters, and others. Burke Museum of History and Culture, 15th Ave. N.E. & N.E. 45th St. (UW campus), 543-5590, burkemuseum.org. $7.50– $10. Sun., Feb. 5, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. CARINA A. DEL ROSARIO Balik/Ibalik presents del Rosario’s new photographs of her homeland, the Philippines, taken after a 22-year absence from that country. Note First Thursday opening reception, 5–8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2. Call for ongoing gallery hours. IDEA Odyssey Gallery, 666 S. Jackson St., idea odysseygallery.blogspot.com. Feb. 3–March 31. COOPER EDENS DRAGER Linearia presents some two decades of work from the noted illustrator (some previously featured in children’s books). Also on view: bright, animal-themed etchings by Chicago artist Tony Fitzpatrick. Note First Thursday opening reception. Davidson Galleries, 313 Occidental Ave. S., 624-1324, davidsongalleries.com/home.php. Opens Feb. 2. Tues.–Sat., 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Through Feb. 25. CURTIS ERLINGER After Another is an installation composed of three-dimensional “lightning stools” and drawings of Erlinger’s inspiration: an ingenious safety device used by fire lookout rangers to avoid electrocution from lightning strike. Note First Thursday opening reception, 6–8 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 2. Gallery4Culture, 101 Prefontaine Place S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 296-7580, 4culture.org. Opens Feb. 2. Mon.–Fri., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Feb. 24. FREE FIRST FRIDAY LECTURE Local ceramic artists Jessi Li and George Rodriguez discuss the new Push Play show. Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., Bellevue, 425-519-0770, bellevue arts.org. Fri., Feb. 3, 6:30–7:30 p.m. FREMONT ART WALK Venues include Activspace, Fremont Brewing Co., 509 Winery and Tasting Room, Caffe Vita, and Fremont Abbey. (See fremontfirstfriday. com for participating artists.) 6–9 p.m. Fri., Feb. 3.

Addiction Incorporated: Only you can save this adorable lab rat from smoking.

BILL GOLDSTON He gives a talk on the ongoing

Addiction Incorporated RUNS FRI., FEB. 3–THURS., FEB. 9 AT VARSITY. RATED PG-13. 100 MINUTES.

With a name that not even the PR team at Smokefree America could dream up, Victor DeNoble emerges as the hero of Charles Evans Jr.’s mostly muscular documentary on the 1990s campaign to expose Big Tobacco. DeNoble, a psychologist, was hired by Philip Morris in 1980 to study the effects of nicotine; four years later, he and his colleague Paul Mele were fired for their findings—unwanted evidence that the substance was highly addictive. The first third of Addiction Incorporated is the weakest: Evans tricks out the material (DeNoble and others sitting in front of ochre backdrops recounting these experiments, done on rats, and their implications) with dopey animation and even sillier recreations. But when the chronicle shifts to 1994, the year FDA commissioner David Kessler charged his agency with investigating the tobacco industry, the director skillfully braids the reminiscences of journalists, lawyers, and elected officials who fought the corporations (and some who shilled for them) with C-SPAN footage of the congressional hearings from that April. One of those testifying before the House Subcommittee on Health and Environment was DeNoble, whose suppressed research from a decade earlier proved crucial in starting the battle against a seemingly indestructible opponent. His direct, candid responses then match the respectful, no-nonsense antismoking lectures he delivers to schoolkids across the country now. MELISSA ANDERSON

Coriolanus OPENS FRI., FEB. 3 AT SIFF CINEMA AT THE UPTOWN. RATED R. 122 MINUTES.

Updating Shakespeare seems doubly condescending, the implication being that we need help to relate to the text, and that the text needs to be made relevant. In the case of Ralph Fiennes’ adaptation of Coriolanus—a knotty tragedy about a warrior who refuses to kowtow to the perceived inferiors who control his fate—the transposition to the present day is confusing and counterproductive, dulling the impact of an otherwise fierce, often unbearably immediate production. (However remote Rome in the 5th century B.C. might be, it can’t be as disorienting as a modern urban sniper fight

that culminates in a mano-a-mano, “Beat It”-style blade tussle.) What saves the film is actor Fiennes’ steadfastness to the character of Caius Martius Coriolanus, an irreducible antihero balancing a defiant integrity with damning pride. Fiennes doesn’t understate the general’s monstrosity—he sports frightful facial scars and barks at commoners through exaggeratedly pursed lips—but his physicality complements rather than obscures the Bard’s blunt dialogue. (“Make you a sword of me.” “Anger’s my meat.”) As blood rival Tullus Aufidius, Gerard Butler’s all surface, a beard with a Scottish brogue, leaving Brian Cox and Vanessa Redgrave to remind us how it’s done. They make every line seem personally conceived, surprising yet inevitable, and in the process reaffirm that exquisitely articulated words are where the drama is. ERIC HYNES

P The Innkeepers

RUNS FRI., FEB. 3–THURS., FEB. 9 AT GRAND ILLUSION. RATED R. 103 MINUTES.

Horror movies are lately given to gluttonous effects, but director Ti West (The House of the Devil) is a rare minimalist. His latest takes place almost entirely on the premises of The Yankee Pedlar, a three-story turn-ofthe-last-century hotel located on what might be the Main Street of any smallish, down-onits-heels Northeastern city. It’s the Pedlar’s last weekend of operation, and the skeleton crew of Claire (Sara Paxton) and Luke (Pat Healy) is sleeping over, trading off shifts at the front desk. Since the hotel is nearly empty, however, Claire and Luke devote most of their attention not to the guests but to investigating supernatural goings-on in the hotel. With a mike cued to EVP frequencies, the pair tries to collect solid evidence of haunting-via-suicidecase Madeline O’Malley, whose ghost Luke claims he has seen wandering the halls. What follows is all about withholding, creating a blank canvas of non-events against which the slightest incident, like a piano key that pounds down by itself, takes on an undue significance and becomes something monumental. The Innkeepers is so loaded with false scares and cautious treading that when freshly spilled blood suddenly flashes onscreen, the shock is really alarming—a return to the scrambling, clambering fear of death that is at the center of these silly horror movies. NICK PINKERTON

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 25


film» 206.324.9996 | www.siff.net

This Week’s Attractions » FROM PAGE 24 P Miss Minoes

OPENS FRI., FEB. 3 AT SIFF CINEMA AT THE UPTOWN. NOT RATED. 92 MINUTES.

More delightful than Procatinator and a greater tribute to the power of print journalism than Page One: Inside the New York Times, Miss Minoes centers on a cat who becomes a lady and, with the help of her feline pals, an assistant to a shy, struggling reporter. Vincent Bal’s film, based on a 1970 book by Dutch children’s author Annie M.G. Schmidt and released in the Netherlands in 2001, receives a belated U.S. run in a dubbed version, its actors—kitties and humans both—now speaking plummy British English. Carice van Houten, five years away from her breakthrough role in Paul Verhoeven’s Black Book, plays the title role, “still a cat but in the wrong body.” In exchange for bed (a cardboard box in her host’s garret) and board (lots of fish), Miss Minoes passes news tips gathered from rooftop meetings of the Cat Press Service to Tibbe (Theo Maassen), who writes a front-page exposé about the chair of the Pet Lovers’ Association. Conveying, with a light touch, important

director John Akomfrah to punctuate this very personal meditation on England’s changing social fabric. We see newcomers from the Caribbean and India settling into row houses and factory work; snow must’ve been an unfamiliar shock to them, and Akomfrah includes many, many vistas of snow. In the Alaskan scenes, a figure in a yellow parka stares endlessly at the sea. “Every day is a journey, and the journey itself is home,” reads one of the unattributed interstitials (that one from the 17thcentury Japanese poet Matsuo Basho¯, Google informs me). It is the sea, of course, that carried Odysseus away to war and transported immigrants to British foundries and assembly lines. Exile and a near-permanent sense of displacement are the themes Akomfrah conveys most acutely, if indirectly. As part of the mosaic, he also includes bits of a 1964 documentary about a young Jamaican man struggling to adapt to insular England. You’re left wanting to know his name and full story, but Akomfrah provides only his own heartfelt fragments. BRIAN MILLER

P A Separation

OPENS FRI., FEB. 3 AT EGYPTIAN. RATED PG-13. 123 MINUTES.

511 Queen Anne Avenue North

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Ralph Fiennes in William Shakespeare’s

Coriolanus

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“A quirky, family-friendly fable with lots of meowing!” –New York Times

Miss Minoes

Fri 6:00 | Sat & Sun 2:30, 4:40 | Tues–Thurs 6:00

New 35mm print! Jean-Luc Godard’s

Week End

Fri 8:00 | Sat & Sun 6:45 | Tues & Weds 8:00

SIFF FutureWave Committee presents

(1) Month of Joseph Gordon-Levitt

(500) Days of Summer Sat 9:00 | $5 Youth 22 and under

Films4Families: All seats only $4.00

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen Sat & Sun 12:00PM

Film Craft Commentary

Free Stuff WIN “CHAMPION CHIP” PACKAGE FROM POPCHIPS

Screenwriter Claudia Johnson comments on

Tootsie Mon 7:00 Face The Music

The Who’s Tommy Directed by Ken Russell Thurs 8:00

NOW SHOWING

COMING SOON

MUSIC BOX FILMS

Iranian writer/director Asghar Farhadi’s fifth feature is an urgently shot courtroom drama designed to put you in the jury box. It opens at a Tehran judicial hearing where a quarrelsome husband and wife each make their case. Simin (Leila Hatami) has finally obtained official permission for her family to move abroad, but husband Nader (Peyman Moaadi) has apparently changed his mind. He feels obligated to care for his aged father, and, in order to leave the country, Simin is compelled to sue for divorce. When her petition is denied, she moves in with her parents; Nader stays with his father as does their daughter, Termeh. To look after his father, Nader hires Razieh (Sareh Bayat), who has taken the job without the knowledge of her devout, unemployed husband, Hodjat (Shahab Hosseini). A Separation then heads directly into a real crisis. Nader comes home to find his father’s wrists tied to the bed with Razieh out on an errand. They have words; Razieh is shoved out of the apartment, falls down the stairs, and (Nader later discovers) winds up in the hospital. Turns out she was pregnant and has suffered a miscarriage. Thus the original case is subsumed in a larger one. Hodjat files a complaint, and, according to the law, Nader could be guilty of murder. With its two couples warring on two fronts on behalf of their offspring, A Separation is an Iranian analog to Roman Polanski’s recent parents-in-conflict drama Carnage—but the stakes are much higher. J. HOBERMAN E

PLAYING FEBRUARY 3–9

This newspaper stringer (van Houten) will work for fish in Miss Minoes.

The Nine Muses RUNS FRI., FEB. 3–THURS., FEB. 9 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 94 MINUTES.

Richard Burton lives! An arthouse mashup of The Odyssey and England’s colonial immigration wave following World War II, The Nine Muses samples many more texts than Homer’s. You’ll also hear audio-book snippets from Shakespeare, T.S. Eliot, and Dylan Thomas, read by Burton, Michael Sheen, and even John Barrymore. The soundtrack ranges from opera to Arvo Pärt; the locales alternate between the grainy UK of old newsreels and home movies and newer scenes of snowy Cordova, Alaska. (Why? No idea.) As a structuring device to the montage, the nine Greek muses—of dance, tragedy, music, history, etc.—chiefly allow

OPENS FEBRUARY 10

Logos

Presented by CINERAMA and SIFF Cinema

Tickets available online now at www.cinerama.com!

film@seattleweekly.com

ONLINE » SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM aMORE See reviews of Big Miracle, Chronicle,

and The Woman in Black.

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Seattle we ekly • Febru ary 1– 7, 2012

lessons for kids on the necessity of civic engagement, the perils of edit/ad conflicts, and the need to honor difference, Miss Minoes is also an ailurophile’s dream, featuring a fantastic array of tabbies, calicos, and Birmans who always hit their marks. MELISSA ANDERSON

25


film» • SAY ANYTHING John Cusack as romantic lead? It

BY BRIAN MILLER

didn’t seem likely, but that’s exactly what happened with the alchemy of Cameron Crowe’s lovely 1989 rom-com (his directorial debut). Ione Skye is the girl, and John Mahoney her disapproving father. Cusack was just graduating from teen fodder when Crowe gifted him with the role of a decade. Set in Seattle, the film has Cusack’s kid from the wrong side of the tracks fall hard for a college-bound high achiever. Though something of a shambling oaf, whose only goal in life is to become a pro kick-boxer, he somehow locates his own inner Cary Grant to woo her. Call for showtimes. (R) BRIAN MILLER Central Cinema, $6, Feb. 3-8.

Local Film • CHAC: THE RAIN GOD An exceptionally beautiful 1974

neorealist drama, shot by Chilean director Rolando Klein in the Mayan language, among the indigenous people of Chiapas, Mexico, Chac is a sort of naturalized equivalent to the other mystical Chilean-Mexican cult film of the early ‘70s, El Topo. (NR) J. HOBERMAN Northwest Film Forum, $6-$10, Feb. 3-9, 7 & 9 p.m. CHILDREN’S FILM FESTIVAL This is the season to come in from the cold and slush, when the seventh annual CFF invites kids to immerse themselves in stories from other climates and cultures (possibly sunnier ones, too). Over 100 features and shorts represent almost every continent during an expanded 11-day schedule. Northwest Film Forum. (NR) Through Feb. 5. (500) DAYS OF SUMMER Can there be a thing as too much cute? This is the dilemma for 2009’s Summer (also the name of Zooey Deschanel’s scary-adorable character), which plunges us with twee abandon into a relationship gone bad. The comedy unfolds entirely from the perspective of Tom (the winningly bewildered Joseph Gordon-Levitt), who tries to figure out why the girl of his dreams has dumped him. His inquest is aided by two wacky pals, his preciously wise preteen sister, a basso-voiced NFL-style narrator, and the movie’s dateclicker device, which spins us (and Tom) back and forth during his 500-day period of romance-and-recovery. It’s all a bit much. I laughed consistently, but the quality of those laughs wears thin. The movie is so closely edited, so proud of its wit, that it’s like an entire season of Friends packed into 96 minutes. The movie’s in no way bad; it’s just trying way too hard, frequently slipping from funny to glib and back within the same scene. And the leads are both charmers. (PG-13) BRIAN MILLER SIFF Film Center, $5-$10, Sat., Feb. 4, 9 p.m. HELLBOY You can never have too many tentacles in a movie, or too many Nazis. The 2004 comicbook adaptation Hellboy delivers on both counts. It borrows heavily from the Indiana Jones trilogy, which yields both the Nazis and T H I S CO D E TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE a welcome B-movie sense SEATTLE WEEKLY of humor. Granted, like IPHONE/ANDROID APP its eponymous hero (Ron FOR MORE EVENTS OR VISIT Perlman), the movie isn’t terribly bright. It’s made of seattleweekly.com the same comic-book DNA as X-Men, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and Men in Black: mutants, knife fights, wire work, romantic triangles, extensive use of underground locations, “the seven gods of chaos,” world domination, Armageddon, etc. Crucially, however, Hellboy is free of the portentousness that weighs down those films. After so much overreaching among the postBatman comic-book crop, it’s a relief to enjoy a film that doesn’t treat its source like scripture. Although his origins suggest Milton and Paradise Lost, Hellboy’s idea of poetry is, “Let’s go fight some monsters.” Call for showtimes. (PG-13) BRIAN MILLER Central Cinema, $6, Feb. 3-6. DON HERTZFELDT SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 17. HOUSE OF THE DEVIL The Devil, apparently, lives in an out-of-the-way gingerbread Victorian, just past the cemetery, where college sophomore Samantha (Jocelin Donahue) is lured for overnight housesitting by an elegant, forbidding couple (Tom Noonan and Mary Woronov, both queerly over-intimate). Though its poster and opening title freeze-frames threaten ‘80s kitsch, House of the Devil (2009) drops the quotation marks quick, lingering over wet autumn atmosphere in a couple of well-scouted locations (underpopulated campus; cold, quiet house). Pumping the audience with inhale-exhale zooms and out-of-the-way close-ups, director Ti West’s ratcheting of suspense in this alonein-an-empty-house tale is proficient if not psychologically piercing. What makes House stand out is Donahue, who commands the frame. Gravely gorgeous in the style of a storybook Snow White, Donahue gives eloquent reaction shots, and nails West’s pièce de résistance, a bounding, Walkman-soundtracked, Jazzercise dance through the house. (R) NICK PINKERTON Grand Illusion, $5-$8, Opens Feb. 3, Fri., Sat., 11 p.m. Through Feb. 11.

Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012

SCAN

26

Send events to film@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

+ FANTASY SHORT FILM • SCIENCE FICTION Among the 21 short films being screened FESTIVAL

in two packages, Andrew Bowler’s Time Freak has the distinction of a recent Oscar nomination. The 11-minute comedy takes a Seinfeldesque look at time travel, in which a hapless young scientist never gets around to visiting ancient Rome or the dinosaurs. Instead, when his concerned roomie comes looking for him, poor Stillman (Michael Nathanson) confesses that he’s been caught up in the trivia of the prior day—calling his parents, arguing with a dry cleaner, and desperately flirting with a pretty girl. “It’s complicated” he moans to Evan (John Conor Brooke), “I wanted to get it right.” But instead of wonderful discoveries and historical insights, Evan learns, Stillman has become a prisoner of his life’s daily minutiae, trying frantically and conscientiously to rectify his every mistake—and there are plenty to correct in the film’s well-edited montage of Stillman’s blundering. “It’s a snowball effect!” he despairs. Time Freak is a bit like Groundhog Day in miniature, with Stillman’s tongue-tied flirting gradually becoming successful, he explains, “after a few hundred tries.” Presented by SIFF and EMP. (NR) BRIAN MILLER Cinerama, 2100 Fourth Ave., 324-9996, siff.net, $10-$18, Sat., Feb. 4, 4 & 7:30 p.m. SILENT MOVIE MONDAYS: From 1928, The Last Command stars Emil Jannings as an aristocratic Russian general, now an exile living in Hollywood poverty. There, he naturally ends up in the movies, reduced to playing an extra in a movie about the Russian revolution. With live organ accompaniment by Jim Riggs. (NR) Paramount, 911 Pine St., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org, $34 (series), Mondays, 7 p.m. Through Feb. 13. THE SOFT SKIN From 1964, François Truffaut’s fourth feature has never gotten much respect—even though many people (myself included) regard it as one of his best. Opening with a moody blast of Georges Delerue’s score, the movie immediately establishes itself as a sort of domestic suspense film: Jean Desailly’s lit-crit superstar Pierre rushing from the bosom of his family to Orly Airport to barely catch a plane to Lisbon, where he is to give a lecture on Balzac. En route, he meets a beautiful flight attendant, Nicole (Françoise Dorléac), half his age and fascinated by French literature as well. The Soft Skin is a movie about the agony and ecstasy of an extramarital affair. Truffaut treats it like a crime film—low-key yet tense, filled with carefully planted potential “clues” and an undercurrent of anxiety. It’s not noir, but there’s never a moment when it isn’t clear how large a part chance plays in determining the course of not-so-lucky Pierre’s life. (NR) J. HOBERMAN Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org, $59-$66 series, $8 individual, Thurs., 7:30 p.m. Through March 1. 12 MONKEYS Terry Gilliam’s 1995 riff on Chris Marker’s 1962 La Jetée really isn’t an improvement apart from the addition of moving images (instead of stills) plus Bruce Willis, Madeline Stowe, and Brad Pitt. Willis travels back in time to try and stop a plague; Pitt babbles incessantly (hey—it got him an Oscar nomination!); Stowe gets lost in the scenery and scenery chewing. (R) BRIAN MILLER Egyptian, $8.25, Fri., Feb. 3, 11:59 p.m.; Sat., Feb. 4, 11:59 p.m. WEEKEND SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 17.

THEATERS: Admiral, 2343 California Ave. SW, 938-3456;

Big Picture, 2505 First Ave., 256-0566; Big Picture Redmond, 7411 166th Ave. NE, 425-556-0566; Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684; Cinebarre, 6009 SW 244th St. (Mountlake Terrace)., 425-672-7501; Cinerama, 2100 Fourth Ave., 448-6680; Crest, 16505 Fifth Ave. NE, 781-5755; Egyptian, 801 E. Pine St., 781-5755; Grand Illusion, 1403 NE 50th St., 523-3935; Guild 45, 2115 N. 45th St., 781-5755; Harvard Exit, 807 E. Roy St., 781-5755; Kirkland Parkplace, 404 Park Place, 425-827-9000; Lincoln Square, 700 Bellevue Way N, 425-454-7400; Majestic Bay, 2044 NW Market St., 781-2229; Meridian, 1501 Seventh Ave., 223-9600; Metro, 4500 Ninth Ave. NE, 781-5755; Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 267-5380; Pacific Place, 600 Pine St., 888-262-4386; Seven Gables, 911 NE 50th St., 781-5755; SIFF Cinema at the Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996; SIFF Film Center, 305 Harrison St. (Seattle Center), 324-9996.; Varsity, 4329 University Way NE, 781-5755.


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Like a Sturgeon

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By focusing on legible flavors rather than a facade, Blind Pig is giving eaters what they most desire.

not in the mood to share small plates, the truncated versions are the way to go, since you can have a bit of duck and a bit of steak for the price of one fullsized entrée. Another chalkboard hoisted above the kitchen lists beer and wine. There’s hard alcohol too, but nothing as calculated as a cocktail list. Instead, the restaurant—which took its name from a slang term for speakeasies—stays honest by stocking a few bottles of basic liquors. As a server explained, the booze also helps differentiate Blind Pig from the visionary projects which preceded it. But what’s most Blind Piggish about the restaurant is its unshackled attitude. Walpole, who spent just over two years at Anchovies & Olives before opening Blind Pig last fall, told Seattle Weekly’s Voracious blog: “Here we can cook whatever we want. I can use whatever ingredients I want. It doesn’t have to be all seafood or whatever. I don’t need to have eight pastas on the menu. It’s food we want to eat.”

W

hen Walpole and his crew of two—fellow Stowell alums Matt Fortner and Rene Gutierrez—no longer want to eat a dish, perhaps because they’ve grown tired of it, they erase it from the board. When I first ate at Blind Pig, a server warned that the kitchen was beginning to suffer from sturgeon fatigue. Efforts to do away with the sturgeon haven’t been well-received by patrons, who are incredibly enamored of the dish. The sturgeon is stunning: A hunk of delicate white flesh with a bristle of bronzed skin, the fish’s supremely clean flavor is parried by the assertive saltiness of a buttermilk-hued anchovy sauce, arranged around the sturgeon in three dollops like a run of silk buttons. “Formula” is a sorry word to use in the vicinity of Blind Pig, but every fish and meat is finished with an expertly made sauce and supported by an array of complementary vegetables. The sturgeon shares its plate with a clump of buttery roasted Brussels sprouts tossed with pine nuts and shriveled currants. Popularity has elongated sturgeon’s stay on the board, but I wish the Spanish mackerel had stuck around for my second Blind Pig

visit. A highly successful meeting of sea and Red, red walls: Maybe that’s land, the mackerel preparation featured a what blinded the pig. flap of wonderfully oily fish hunkered in a bittersweet turnip purée. The earthiness of the aromatic dish was accentuated by wedges I wasn’t taken with Blind Pig’s paté, which of spicy chorizo sausage and crescents of struck me as gummy, but most of the starters caramelized red onions. soared. My mouth puckers in recollection Walpole’s seafood expertise is equally of a classed-up coleslaw, a pile of blindingly apparent in a hamachi crudo surging with bright-flavored shredded red endive and acid and a casually assembled bowl of Manila slices of Asian pear showered with a sherry clams bathed in a salsa verde sparkling with vinaigrette. Walpole works the tongue’s sour vivid, grassy flavors. The bowl’s crisscrossed and bitter receptors to beautiful effect, interby a plank of toast slathered with chickpeas weaving blood-orange segments with chunks and stamped with sheets of lardo thin as of posy-pink beets for a salad completed by Bible pages, but it’s worth ordering unadulhorseradish yogurt and toasted farro grains. terated bread for finishing the sauce, if only Attention’s paid to texture too, with a brittle to avoid doing the same with your fingers. roasted kale-and-quinoa salad capped by a Bread costs $2, and it’s partnered with a rich silky poached egg. Atlas olive oil. When I asked about the oil, a For dessert, there’s a chocolate mousse, server returned bearing the vanilla panna cotta, and a canister; the line between choice of two cheeses. It’s the kitchen and the dining not a highfalutin finish, but » PRICE GUIDE BEET SALAD .......................$5/$9 room is charmingly porous it’s exactly what most eaters HAMACHI CRUDO .......... $8/$14 at Blind Pig. are seeking at the end of a CLAMS....................................... $12 MACKEREL ....................... $8/$14 But as Walpole says, it’s meal. By focusing on legible PORK ................................... $9/$16 SKIRT STEAK ................. $10/$18 not all “seafood or whatflavors rather than a facade, ever.” Although I found the Blind Pig is giving eaters terrestial entrées shakier what they most desire—and than their oceanic counterparts—the what may be the hallmark of 2238 Eastlake restaurant twice made the mistake of serving no matter who’s occupying it: a simple space its only complete miss, a tough and tattered with extraordinary food for everyone. E skirt steak, last—both pork riffs I tried at hraskin@seattleweekly.com Blind Pig were lovely. I especially liked an adamantly wintry dish that teetered on the BLIND PIG BISTRO cusp of stewdom, with slow-cooked pork 2238 Eastlake Ave., 329-2744, melting into a bed of braised red cabbage and facebook.com/pages/Blind-Pig-Bistro. cauliflower pudding. 5–10 p.m. Tues.–Thurs., 5–11 p.m. Fri.–Sat. 29

Seattle we ekly • Febru ary 1– 7, 2012

book (there’s a contribution from Tavolata involving stale bread, tinned anchovies, and bigoli noodles). Or, if they’re stationed in Seattle, they could dine marvelously at Blind Pig Bistro, a culinary cranny serving food so satisfying and instinctive that it’s easy to imagine a fancier, stuffier restaurant on the other side of the kitchen. Blind Pig is parked in the same 900-square-foot Eastlake cube that housed Sitka & Spruce and Nettletown. Chef/owner Charles Walpole has described the space as “a quirky location in a wonky little strip mall,” and he hasn’t done anything to unquirk it. The walls have been painted with a red so bright that if it were bottled as nail polish, it would probably be called “Va-va-voom.” Color and decor are synonymous here, since the wooden tables are bare and the walls bald—save for a mounted boar’s head disconcertingly close in size to a black Lab’s noggin and a slab of slate with a chomped-off corner that if you squint suggests a mirror image of Washington. There are no printed menus, so customers look to the chalkboard for the nightly selection of a dozen-plus appetizers, salads, and main-sounding dishes, offered in junior and standard dimensions. Even if you’re

BY HANNA RASKIN

JOSHUA HUSTON

ike children and presidential candidates, diners are forever on watch for unfair treatment. No matter how much foie gras has been piled on their plates, restaurantgoers size up the portion presented to another guest. They wonder why their server didn’t tell them about the pancetta risotto engrossing the guy at the next table, and dolefully conclude they’ll never charm the sommelier into revealing the secret cellared treasures he always seems to be pouring for somebody else. The conviction that a kitchen is withholding its most spectacular flavors—or, more galling still, reserving them for in-crowders— is what drives hungry thrill-seekers to commission menu translations in Chinese restaurants patronized primarily by immigrants, so they too can sample the frog-leg hot pot. It also explains the current hubbub over “family meal,” the staff-only spread that’s wolfed down before service or absorbed after it. “These meals have the nimbleness of tested skill, passion, and food knowledge,” Marissa Guggiana trilled in her recent cookbook, Off the Menu: Staff Meals From America’s Top Restaurants. To emulate the feel of a staff meal in all its accidental brillance and democratic spirit, eaters could swipe a recipe from Guggiana’s

Fish fatigue can’t stop Blind Pig Bistro from excelling.


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$ = $25 or less per person; $$ = $25–$40; $$$ = $40 and up. These capsule reviews are written by editorial staff and have nothing to do with advertising. For hundreds more reviews, searchable by neighborhood and type of cuisine, go to seattleweekly.com/food.

COLUMBIA CITY

FULL TILT ICE CREAM 5041 Rainier Ave. S. #101,

226-2740. Go for the handmade ice cream, of which there is a rotating menu of flavors, from vegan vanilla bean to Sweet Potato Pecan Praline. Stay to geek out with the vintage video games, of which there are an abundance. $ LOTTIE’S LOUNGE 4900 Rainier Ave. S., 725-0519. Lottie’s Lounge is a low-key, funky neighborhood place—the gathering spot for Columbia City’s bohos. The coffee shop turned bar-cafe serves a full dinner menu, allowing you to polish off a grilled ham and cheddar panini or a plate of caper-studded linguine carbonara as you listen to the DJ’s set. $

DOWNTOWN

EL MALECON 1122 Post Ave., 623-7203.

serves lunch to downtown workers on the go, but Puck’s also offers dinner two hours before Benaroya performances on the weekends. Try Puck’s “cream of” soups, especially the mushroom soup with large chunks of shiitake mushrooms, steaming milky broth, and a hint of sherry. The soup pairs perfectly with the mozzarella and white cheddar grilled sourdough sandwich. $

EASTLAKE & SOUTH LAKE UNION EASTLAKE BAR AND GRILL 2947 Eastlake Ave. E.,

957-7777. Wednesday is $5 steak-and-fries night, and Sundays and Mondays are three-course dinner nights, $15. Nice surroundings, Lake Union views, upstairs and downstairs bars, sports on TV, and one of the best bartenders, Brucie Bob, in town. $ FEIERABEND 422 Yale Ave. N., 340-2528. German beer is a great democratizer, appealing to both snobs and dudes (no matter their gender). Same with the food at this slick German pub, located in the bottom of a condo complex and painted the color of a ketchup bottle. There are plump, grilled bratwurst to be eaten, as well as jägerschnitzel, thinly T H I S CO D E pounded pork loins smothered in a creamy TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE mushroom sauce. Or, drink your weissbier SEATTLE WEEKLY with just-baked soft pretzels; light, eggy IPHONE/ANDROID APP spaetzle smothered in cheese; and curryFOR MORE RESTAURANTS OR VISIT wurst, the ultimate Berliner street food. $

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Formerly known as Las Margaritas, this big, airy Mexican joint is nestled in Post Alley, directly under the Highway 99 seattleweekly.com offramp at Seneca, giving it a hideaway GREEN LAKE feel. Plates of big Americanized Mexican DUKE’S GREEN LAKE CHOWDER are cheap and satisfying. They’re not HOUSE 7850 Green Lake Dr. N., 522-4908. Come for exactly reinventing the wheel here, but the food is the chowder, stay for the view. Since Green Lake is still a cut above many of this city’s casual Mexican a freshwater pond, the maritime menu at Duke’s here sit-down spots. Happy hour is every day from 3 to skews toward lighter fare. People like to eat outside, 7 p.m. and again from 9 to close, when margaritas grazing on salads and IPAs so long as the weather’s are $4.25 and drafts and wells are $3. $ WOLFGANG PUCK CATERING 200 University St., above 60 degrees. But those salads are available with 748-7800. Located in Benaroya Hall, this cafe mostly salmon, crab, and other varieties of seafood, so you

FirstCall

» by sonja groset

Chopper 7-and-7

The Watering Hole: Chopsticks, 23025 100th Ave. W., 425-776-1196, EDMONDS The Atmosphere: Chopsticks is the Chinese restaurant our family frequented while I was growing up in Edmonds. Though as a youngster I was never allowed in the bar, I would sometimes

SONJA GROSET

Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012

As well as your other pub favorites and our special, rotating lunch and dinner menus. 1111 NW Ballard Way • 206.782.6181

food&drink»Featured Eats

Karen: Works in Chinese restaurant, but doesn’t eat Chinese food.

peek inside while we waited for takeout. My dad, a building contractor, knew every blue-collar worker in town. And after work, they could reliably be found in the bar at Chopsticks. The restaurant has been in business since 1963. It is now located across the street from its

original location, but the dimly lit lounge, The Cathay Room, looks pretty much as it has since its inception. Vinyl, rolling lounge chairs surround round tables, while swiveling barstools line the faux-wood bar. An electric fireplace flickers on one wall, red lanterns hang from the ceiling, and the carpeted floor absorbs the chatter of regular patrons here for cheap drinks, sweet-andsour pork, almond chicken, and other ChineseAmerican staples. Sure enough, when we stopped in for lunch recently, my dad saw someone he knew in the bar. Some things never change. The Barkeep: Karen has worked at Chopsticks for 35 years. She glides between the lounge and kitchen, delivering plates of lunch specials (just $6.25) to the midday crowd. There are no beers on tap (not to worry, they’ve got bottles), and she’s not quick with cocktail suggestions. She wasn’t about to suggest food, either, claiming she doesn’t eat Chinese chow. Given how long she’s worked at Chopsticks, I can’t really blame her—although I don’t know how anyone could pass up the pot stickers. The Drink: a Mai Tai. Karen says it’s one of the most popular, in part because “It’s really strong.” It’s made with Trader Vic’s mix, three kinds of rum, the juice of a lime, and a splash of orange Curaçao. When asked what other drinks are popular, Karen simply replies, “It’s mostly old people in here. So screwdrivers, vodka tonics, and 7-and-7s are mostly what we sell.” At least she’s honest. The Verdict: I love a Mai Tai, and while this one was overly sweet at first sip, after I squeezed the lime garnish into the drink and let the ice dilute it a bit, it was damn tasty. It was also only $6.75. You don’t go to a Chinese restaurant lounge looking for perfection, but for a strong, cheap cocktail. E food@seattleweekly.com


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GREENWOOD & PHINNEY RIDGE GORGEOUS GEORGE’S 7719 Greenwood Ave. N.,

783-0116. Israeli chef George Rached (who is not the famed pro wrestler, but really does call himself “Gorgeous George”) spends his days and nights in the kitchen of his shoebox restaurant, grilling up peppery lamb shawarma and pureeing hummus into the texture of thick custard. What he comes up with is the best hummus you’ll find anywhere in the city, but this doesn’t leave him too fatigued to occasionally serenade one of his regulars or walk the dining room to check in on his many guests. Dinner is priced upscale, but worth it, and there are some deals at lunch. $-$$

INTERNATIONAL DISTRICT DUK LI DIM SUM 664 S. Weller St., 340-6122. Just

around the corner from the crowded dim sum powerhouse Jade Garden, Duk Li Dim Sum stands on its own

as a quick, inexpensive, and satisfying dumpling haven. Though the menu selection might be limited, Duk Li Dim Sum still has all the dim sum favorites like shu mai, Chinese broccoli and steamed dumplings. The fast and attentive service—and low prices—makes this tiny restaurant even better. $ GREEN LEAF 418 Eighth Ave. S., 340-1388. Perched next to the I-5 overpass that divides the International District, Green Leaf delivers a quick meal that will fill you up. Across the board, the dishes are presented beautifully, and there’s no scrimping on size. Regulars here are often fiercely loyal to their dish of choice, whether that’s the pho (with perfectly spiced broth that some say is the city’s best), the remarkably large vermicelli noodle bowls that teem with meat and veggies, or the Seven Special Courses of Beef for Two. I’m partial to the specialty fried-duck noodle soup, which comes with fresh veggies and egg noodles. Those in the know also revel in Green Leaf’s hole-inthe-wall anonymity, touting it as a Tamarind Tree without the hype. If you can, try to get a table upstairs; the natural light and kitschy wagon-wheel benches make for a better environment than the dim, crowded-feeling dining room on the lower floor. $

BottomFeeder

» by mike seely

Food Porn

It remains one of life’s great injustices that not every American citizen gets to experience the exhilaration of having a load splattered on his or her face and/or mouth during his or her lifetime. Thankfully, a pair of fast-food chains with locations in Seattle—one with local roots, one obscenely global—boast hot, white sauces that simulate the ejaculatory facial. Granted, neither Taco Del Mar nor McDonald’s come close to the sweet stimulation of Beard Papa’s, but touting the semenistic virtues of a cream puff is as obvious as saying Jimi Hendrix was a good guitarist. Fish-taco snobs like to slag on Taco Del Mar, which got its start on the downtown Seattle waterfront in 1992 and has since expanded to include franchises in 17 states and Canada. But without Taco Del Mar, where would the Pacific Northwest fish taco be today? Atop a bed of fries, most likely, and absent any trace of cabbage, pico de gallo, or TDM’s heavenly, mysterious white sauce. Attempts to pry the closely guarded recipe from TDM Corp. proved futile, but a lower-level employee (i.e., a guy who makes the fish tacos for a living) told us that the ingredients include serrano and jalapeño peppers, pickles, and mayonnaise. He did not mention that the sauce includes trace amounts of God’s jism, but based on its mouthwatering taste, it undoubtedly does. Question the authenticity of TDM’s fare if you must, but its addictive quality is unassailable— mainly due to the white sauce.

LUCINDA SWAIN

Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012

www.seattleweekly.com/promosites/50-off

can always pretend you’re within sight of Elliott Bay. Another benefit: the experienced bar staff, which makes Duke’s a good place for a first-time date. Depending on how you hit it off, you can sit down for dinner or flee to your car. $-$$

Just in case the article was too subtle, there’s also the hat.

Compared to McDonald’s, the amount of criticism TDM is subjected to is minuscule. Seattleites hate McDonald’s almost as much as they do Starbucks. And yet, in a blind taste test, Mickey D’s fries would whoop those of local fave Dick’s, and the McChicken would rate highly as well if served at a local gastropub instead of in a yellow wrapper. By itself the crispy chicken filet is merely good, but slathered in hot mayo it’s a secret treat worth savoring in private. Plus it’s $1.49, and times is tough. E mseely@seattleweekly.com

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Seattle we ekly • Febru ary 1– 7, 2012

33


food&drink» ALittLeRAskin » by hanna raskin

Salmon, Smoked

Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012

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As Gabriel’s Fire co-owner Monty Slimp told The Seattle Times last week, his barbecue career started alongside a campfire. Slimp grilled a freshly caught salmon, and was so impressed with the results that he bought himself a Weber grill. He kept trading up until he had a commercial smoker in Ballard. Slimp and his brother now maintain a pit in Mountlake Terrace, smoking brisket, ribs, and chicken for loyal fans who chased the Slimps north and curious new customers. They rarely fuss with salmon. “We got it on a special, but it doesn’t sell as hot as the catfish,” Slimp says, referring to a blackened dish on the restaurant’s expanded entrée menu. “It was a little bit weird to me. I couldn’t twist their arms to go with salmon.” Unlike the meats that figure into the nation’s best-known barbecue styles, such as beef brisket, pork ribs, and mutton shoulder, salmon doesn’t require hours of slow-smoking to make it tender. It’s typically cooked over an open flame, whether in traditional Native American fashion—which calls for the fish to be affixed to a wooden frame—or on a modern grill. Salmon barbecue is such a rarity that when most eaters hear the phrase “smoked salmon,” they immediately think of Nova lox or the candied filets sold in decorative gift boxes. Yet barbecue writer Daniel Vaughn says there’s no reason the region’s pit masters shouldn’t cook salmon low and slow (which, in salmon’s case, clocks in at about one hour.) “Hot smoked salmon is really good,” says Vaughn, who runs the Full Custom Gospel BBQ blog and writes about barbecue for Texas Monthly. “With prime rib, it’s like, that would have been better if you just made prime rib. But with salmon, you can get a good flavor without cooking it all the way through.” Salmon isn’t a regular offering at any of Seattle’s barbecue joints, but Woody D’s in Richardson, Texas, smokes whole salmon over hickory. “It’s incredible,” says Vaughn, who’s also sampled salmon barbecue in Oklahoma City. “It’s really good stuff.” Gabriel’s Fire might again experiment with salmon during Copper River season—Slimp suspects the onslaught of promotions associated with the city’s unofficial salmon holiday could put his customers in a salmon mood—but many pit masters are likely put off by the high cost of fish. Vaughn recently spoke with a barbecue-joint owner who can’t add cabrito (young goat) to the menu because it commands $20 a pound. “His audience wouldn’t pay for it,” Vaughn says. “They’re coming for cheap sandwiches. Even though it’s his specialty, he can’t do it at his restaurant.” The reluctance to smoke salmon isn’t limited to commercial endeavors: The majority of Pacific Northwest BBQ Association competitions center on beef, pork, and chicken, although salmon is a formally sanctioned meat. “There’s no reason a tradition can’t be begun,” Vaughn says, pointing to the example set by Fette Sau and Fatty ’Cue in New York City. “Rather than always trying to be in a Memphis style or Kansas City style, they’re not trying to follow another style, because what’s the point? The style can be your own.” E hraskin@seattleweekly.com

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on Aurora Avenue doesn’t have a huge storefront or a fancy waiting room. What it does have, however, is a friendly, down-home atmosphere, knowledgeable employees, and, crucially, excellent cannabis. After a quick verification process (see last week’s Toke Signals), personable budtender Anthony escorted me to the small but very well-stocked budroom, where I beheld about 25 strains of marijuana. Most were available for donations of $12 a gram, but a few went for $10, and one is usually on sale for $8. On the recent Monday when I visited, that $8 sale strain was Blueberry II. When I asked how it was different from the beautiful, aromatic $12 DJ Short Blueberry which SAM also carries, Anthony told me, faintly apologetically, that Blueberry II is an outdoor-grown strain. Now I don’t subscribe to the theory that outdoor cannabis is automatically inferior to indoor stuff, but if that belief results in my getting a good deal on some weed, then so much the better. I got a $25 eighth of the Blueberry II, and I didn’t regret it once I toke-tested the flowers. It was every bit as good as most of the $12 strains, with great nausea relief. The $12 sativa, Jack Frost (Jack Herer x

Permafrost), had thick, spicy-smelling flowers and an energetic front end, tailing off into relaxed and lackadaisical latter stages. Super Lemon Haze, a $12 sativa-dominant hybrid, had a refreshing citrus bouquet (more redolent of lime than lemon, to my nose) and some of the densest buds I’ve seen; you can really put your herb grinder through its paces with it. SLH took the cannabis world by storm four years ago, winning Amsterdam’s Cannabis Cup in 2008 and 2009. It offers a clear, uplifting, functional buzz and good appetite stimulation and nausea relief. On Sunday, SAM offers a free joint with a $50 purchase; Monday features four-gram eighths; Tuesday is free cookie day with a $50 purchase; Wednesday you get 10 percent off your entire purchase; and on Thursday you get $5 off kief, hash, or tinctures. SAM Collective is at 4023 Aurora Ave. N., 632-4023, samcollective.org. It’s open 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday, and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday. E Steve Elliott edits Toke of the Town, Village Voice Media’s site of cannabis news, views, rumor, and humor. TOKE SIGNALS WANTS TO REVIEW YOUR DISPENSARY E-mail tokesignals@seattleweekly.com.

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Or maybe just stupidity. Even more than catching any kind of cooter cooties, I’ve always been so shit-scared of getting pregnant that I’ve always used birth control vigilantly. I could never understand people who threw caution to the wind and just barebacked freely. So even if there weren’t potentially fatal diseases or incurable sores to worry about, my vagina was covered by my pregnancy paranoia, and I wasn’t going on the pill unless I knew your junk was free from funk. Now that you know too much about the state of my ovaries, let’s talk shit about others, shall we? A few months ago I read a piece on Jane Pratt’s newish site, XOJane.com, in which the writer talked about using Plan B as her birth control of choice. Um, what? Because the birth-control pill wasn’t a “fun” drug, the writer would never remember to take it,

* Seattle Weekly does not accept ads promoting or soliciting illegal conduct.

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and besides, it might make her fat. As for condoms? Her thoughts on them were even more dismissive: “Nope! As if.” Don’t even get me started on her beliefs about abortion, because my head will full-on explode. Did I mention this bitch is their health editor? Note to Jane: If you’re looking for a similarly qualified physics editor, I’m your gal. Sadly, this vapid twit is not the only one risking her health via her lady bits. Gonorrhea is making a comeback, despite the fact that painful discharge is so 40 years ago. Chlamydia and syphilis are on the rise too, and honey, nobody looks good in a chancre. One in six of us is rocking the herp. The deadliest of them all, HIV, has remained stable, but still, according to the CDC, 1.2 million Americans have it, and only one in five of them are aware of it. The reasons why so many people are taking so many risks are legion, but lack of education is definitely a biggie. According to a recent article in The New York Times, “Only 13 states specify that the medical components of the [sex ed] programs must be accurate.” So in the other 37 it’s OK if it’s all lies? Is it

206-467-4309

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Job Location : Contact :

Copyright Notice © This drawing and all reproductions thereof are the property of Sign*A*Rama and may not be reproduced, published, changed or used in any way without written consent.

AI Massage

Salesperson :

Call-in appointment & walk-ins welcome Car accident insurance accepted

253-981-6680 18119 East Valley HWY S. #103 Kent WA 98032 Open 7 Days: 10:30am to 9:00pm


EMPLOYMENT PLACE YOUR AD TODAY • 206-623-6231 FREE ONLINE ADS AND PHOTOS AT WWW.BACKPAGE.COM

167 Restaurants/Hotels/Clubs BECOME A BARTENDER! Up to $300 a day. No exp necessary. Training Courses Available. 1-800-965-6520 x 309.

Classified Ads Get Results!

185 Miscellaneous $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easyworkjobs.com (AAN CAN)

190 Business Opportunities

Senior Graphic Designer. Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects LLP, Seattle, Washington. Oversee and lead graphic design and production of all marketing and public relations collateral, and environmental graphics for architectural and interiors projects. Please see job posting at: http://www.zgf.com/hr/2362 4c for full job description. Applicant must have the ability to travel on less than 24 hours' notice. All applicants for this position should send resume to Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects LLP, Attn: Sara Satterlee, Office Manager (Ref. No. 23624c), 925 Fourth Avenue, Suite 2400, Seattle, Washington 98104 or apply online at https:// careers.zgf.com/appl/23624c

193 Employment Information MYSTERY SHOPPERS Get Paid To Shop! Retail/Dining Establishments Need Undercover Clients To Judge Quality/ Customer Service. Earn Up to $150 A Day. Call 877-737-7559

bulletin board 432 Garage Sales

537 Child Adoption

Vintage Movie Theater Liquidation!! Saturday, Feb. 4th- 10am-5pm & Sunday, Feb. 5th- 11am-4pm. Old South Seattle movie theater where two collectors spent their lives collecting! Vintage Movie & TV Items in this Sale. 206-467-4473 www.VintageEvent.com

ADOPT ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss Adoring Married Software Prof. & Event Planner await 1st baby to LOVE & CHERISH. Expenses paid 1-800-933-1975 ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

Do you have allergic asthma?

Paid In Advance! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN)

If you are...

• 18 to 65 years of age • Non-smoker • Using a daily asthma medication...

RENTALS & REAL ESTATE PLACE YOUR AD TODAY • 206-623-6231 FREE ONLINE ADS AND PHOTOS AT WWW.BACKPAGE.COM

UNIVERSITY DISTRICT 1 and 2 BR Apts. $750-$1,150 5 min. to UW. Parking available! (206) 441-4922 50% OFF FIRST MONTH'S RENT!

300 Rentals 305 307 310 315 320 330 340 350

355 Roommates 360 Rooms for Rent 363 Roommate Services Apartment/Condo/Townhome 365 370 House/Duplexes for Rent Short Term/Corporate Housing 380 Manufactured Home Rentals 390 Vacation

365 Comm Rentals

Greenlake/West Seattle $400 & up Utilities included! busline, some with private bathrooms a Please call Anna between 10am & 8pm a 206-790-5342 SEATTLE Starting at $350 Green Lake, U-District, Wallingford, Greenwood. Lg., clean, well maintained houses. Fully equip. common areas. Free phone and cable, NS/NP. 206-388-3924 www.RoomsAndApartments.com U-DISTRICT $400-$480 All Utilities Included! Call Sue for more information (206) 683-3783 or (206) 551-7472

310 Roommate Services ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

317 Apartments for Rent

200 Real Estate for Sale Condos/Duplexes/Townhomes Homes Lofts for Sale Open House Commercial Acreage/Land for Sale

230 235 240 245 250 260

Real Estate Wanted Manufactured Homes Miscellaneous RE Services Home Improvement Out of Town

215 Open House Open House: Sat 2/4 1-4pm @ 910 Lenora St. #S-902 $349K 1bd/1bth condo @ 2200 Westlake Condo Prj. Hrdwd flrs, chef's kit, ovrszd prkg spc & strg. Bldg amenities incl: concierge, party, game, theater & conf. rooms! Guest ste, gym & hot tub. Claudine Fleury 206.852.5145 Lake & Co. Real Estate

Home Buyer Seminars HOME BUYING SEMINARS at Seattle Central C.C. and Evergreen Home Loans*

FREE! Check www.evergreenedu.com for upcoming seminars.

and medical care provided at no charge to you.

4540 Sand Point Way NE #100

 Seattle, WA 98105

studies@asthmainc.org www.asthmainc.org / 206-525-5520

                  

     

      

         

Please join your instructor Lynne Garton, Evergreen Home Loans (MLO-209901) and and take the worry and stress out of home buying in a relaxed class that guides you through the journey of finding and financing your home whether this is your first or fifth house!

www.evergreenedu.com *Evergreen Home Loans is a registered trade name of Evergreen Moneysource Mortgage Company CL-3182

 

               

             

        

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Classified Ads Get Results!

Seattle we ekly • Febru ary 1– 7, 2012

BELLTOWN Studios and 1BR Apts. Avail now frm $700-$800 2 blocks to Pike Place Market & Westlake Center. Light and airy, views, storage. 206-441-4922 50% OFF FIRST MONTHS RENT!

SODO $1,575 2 Live/work studios in Bemis Building by Safeco Field. 1400 - 2000 sf, arts use only. $1575-$2350 12'-15' ceilings, large windows, kitchen, bath, prkg, freight elevator, steam heat. 206-587-4036 or 206-467-4299

205 210 212 215 220 225

  

 All study-related diagnostic testing, investigational medications

ASTHMA, Inc. research center

  

 

Two Ocean Front Homes 20% OFF DISCOUNT* Newport Oregon Area Fully Furnished. Private beach access. Pets OK. Sleep 9-14 $225/Night Mid Week Discounts Available. (*Excludes Holidays). 503-678-1144

307 Rooms for Rent

Participants will receive compensation for each completed visit.

  

 

350 Vacation

Out of Town Storage Boat/Dockage Comm Rentals Rentals Wanted Miscellaneous Rental Services

you may qualify to participate in this 6 month clinical research study.

39


Ad_Seattle Weekly 260112.ai

1

1/29/12

4:32 PM

Get Ahh-thorized with AHH!

BACK PAGE

®

206.623.6231 Real hook ups, real fast.

Medicinal Cannabis / Medical Marijuana Doctor-Nurse Owned Holistic Center Protection of your PRIVACY is #1 24/7 Service: (888) 508-5428 www.AdvancedHolisticHealth.org

M

Shop and earn $275 - $380/wk. This is a freelance job which will not disturb your present job if you have any. Y JOB REQUIREMENTS: *Good business skills *Honest, responsible and industrious *PC, e-mail and internet skills CM *No starting fee required. For further info contact: debrapletchersh@gmail.com

Donate Your Car, Truck or Motorcycle!

CY

CMY

TRY FOR

206.576.2411 Local #s: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

www.livelinks.com

SEXADDICTIONSPECIALISTS.COM

Professional help for sex & porn addicts, and those who care about them. 206.829.2425

Becca is a natural blonde from Norway, studying Art History in Paris. She is wearing the Unisex Long Wool Coat.

MY

Support Big Brothers Big Sisters of Puget Sound FREE PICK UP OF MOST USED VEHICLES Tax Deductible. (206) 248-5982

Free

C

K

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations.

Private Investigator Butler Investigations 206-257-0552

Massage Special $20 for 2nd hr 425.214.1279 License # MA00020273

TAI CHI & QIGONG / wise-orchid.com

americanapparel.net

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income!

Assembling CD cases from Home!

Issue Date JanuaryNecessary! 26th No Experience Seattle, Washington Call our Live Operators Now!

1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easyworkjobs.com

Singing Lessons FreeTheVoiceWithin.com Janet Kidder 206-781-5062 For an emotion theory / worldview

www.subjectsandrelations.com

Only $49.00 for an hour all day.

ANNA'S MED HEALTH SPA-

Near Crossroads Mall Bellevue. 425-746-1240

Deep tissue, Relaxing,Chinese healing massage. 425-747-2288 10Am-10Pm www.annamedicalhealthspa.com 1550 140th Avenue NE, Suite 200 Bellevue

KDCSTUDIO.COM, for Wedding/Event Photo/Video, (425)-945-0062 2011 Federal Postal Positions. $13.00-$36.50+/hr., Full Benefits plus Paid Training. No Experience plus Job Security. Call Today! 1-866-477-4953 Ext .152.

South Sea Massage Open 10am-11pm 7 days a week (425)922-9271

NOW HIRING!

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings

Paid In Advance! Make $1000 a Week

with photos and maps.

Seattle weekly • February 1–7, 2012

Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: www.Roommates.com

40

AAAA** Donation. Donate Your Car, Boat or Real Estate. IRS Tax Deductible. Free Pick-Up/Tow. Any Model/ Condition. Help Under Privileged Children Outreach Center 1-800-419-7474.

Debt relief agency for bankruptcy. 206-625-0460

Bew Ann Thai Massage

Mailing brochures from home!

Cannabinoid Therapy for Chronic Pain cancer, back pain, migraine, arthritis +more www.CascadiaNaturalHealth.com; 425-486-1858

Experienced Canvasser Wanted We are the largest and most reputable tree service provider in the northwest immediately hiring for a door-to-door residential Canvasser that will generate appointments for our Company. We are a recession-proof industry with a culture based on a positive, generous and supportive system. Job Description: Canvass door-to-door and set up residential appointments for our tree consultants.

Attorney Raymond Ejarque (206) 621-1554 www.seattle-duidefense.com

BANKRUPTCY from $299

EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. (Now 25% Off ) Media Makeup & Airbrush Training. For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. 1 wk class. Learn & build portfolio. AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310-364-0665

WWW.KIRKLANDGOLDBUYER.COM

KING COUNTY DUI CHARGE ? FLAT FEE $1500 - $3000 (15+ Years Exp.)

DIVORCE from $229

FAMILY LAW/BANKRUPTCY/TRAFFIC www.richandjusticelaw.com (253) 237-0546 FREE 30 min. consultation

MOST CASH PAID 4 GOLD JEWELRY 20%-50% MORE 24/7 CASH 425.891.1385

Made in USA Sweatshop Free

What You’ll Receive:

* Get paid for Qualified Appointments Set & Commission on Every Sale. * Earning potential range between $20,000-$60,000. * Proven Training System guaranteeing your success * Company car and Galaxy Tablet based on performance * Cell-gas-medical insurance allowance * Incentives, awards and contest

Quality Carpentry & Painting

20 years experience. Reasonable rates. Local references. James 206-328-1852

Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net $200 - $5,000 CASH FOR ANY CAR ! ! ! (206) 679-2167 SeattleCashForCars.com

THERE’S ONLY ONE WAY TO FIND

THE BEST

MARGARITA

What’s Required:

* Previous door to door canvassing experience * Minimum 25 hours per week including evenings and weekends. * Dependability with the ability to follow a proven training system. * Physical ability to walk for 4 to 6 hours a day outdoors. * An active email account and cell phone. * Reliable vehicle and Driver’s License

Apply online at www.evergreentlc.com or Call 800-684-8733 ext. 3434 or 3321

bestof.voiceplaces.com AVAILABLE ON ANDROID & IPHONE

Seattle Weekly, February 01, 2012  

February 01, 2012 edition of the Seattle Weekly

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