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MAY 9–15, 2012 I VOLUME 37 I NUMBER 19

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RESTAURANT ZOË’S SLOPPY SECONDS PAGE 29 | JORDAN COOK: REIGN MAN PAGE 34

Pull-Out Inside

TALES BUST from the

By Nina Shapiro

These days, when people walk away from an underwater mortgage, they don’t always walk away.


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Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012


Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

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THE DAILY WEEKLY | Nefarious deeds

from supervillains, border interpreters, and horse caretakers.

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FEATURE

BY NINA SHAPIRO | The housingmarket bust changed the rules. For some couples, letting the bank foreclose on their home is now the most financially beneficial strategy—especially since it doesn’t mean they have to move out.

in back What’s wrong with the Mariners, ExxonMobil, and Republicans.

20 ARTS

20 | CLASSICAL REVIEW | Butterfly

goes where the Sonics once played. 21 | EAR SUPPLY | An opera born at 40.

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ILLUSTRATION BY PETER RYAN COPYRIGHT © 2012 BY SEATTLE WEEKLY, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. ISSN 0898 0845 • SEATTLE WEEKLY IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY SEATTLE WEEKLY, LLC. SEATTLE WEEKLY® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK. • PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT SEATTLE, WA • POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO SEATTLE WEEKLY, 1008 WESTERN AVE., STE. 300, SEATTLE, WA 98104-1006 • FOUNDED 1976. MAIN SWITCHBOARD: 206-623-0500 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: 206-623-6231 RETAIL AND ONLINE ADVERTISING: 206-467-4341

THIS WEEK’S ATTRACTIONS

Judi Dench in India, horse racing in Australia, and Johnny Depp as a vampire in Maine.

29 FOOD

29 | RESTAURANT ZOË | A Capitol Hill

reboot is marred by aggravating flaws. 31 | FIRST CALL | A chocolate bar. 32 | A LITTLE RASKIN | Let your

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34 | JORDAN COOK | He loves Seattle, and Seattle musicians love him back. 37 | X | Punk’s last band standing. 37 | THROUGH @ 2 | Proud to be girls. 39 | THE SHORT LIST | The Maxines. The Weeknd. The-Dream. And more.

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21 | PERFORMANCE 22 | VISUAL ARTS 28 | FILM CALENDAR 31 | FEATURED EATS 40 | SEVEN NIGHTS 41 | KARAOKE KORRESPONDENT 43 | TOKE SIGNALS 44 | DATEGIRL

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news»The Daily Weekly »Dispatches for our news blog

Phoenix Riling

Seattle’s most prominent real-life superhero gets a nemesis.

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As for Velvet, Harrison is eattle’s new intrigued. “I think it’s interestsupervillain ing, and it’s timed just right,” goes by the he says of Velvet’s emergence name of on the same day Jones faced Rex Velvet, and he’s allegations of pepper-spraying chosen the polarpeople in Seattle’s May Day izing man-in-rubber, crowd. MATT DRISCOLL Phoenix Jones, as the primary target of his fictionally villainous efforts. Judging by Velvet’s introductory YouTube Less than a week after the video, he obviously Border Patrol was hit with a classunderstands the action lawsuit, the agency is facing importance of a new challenge. Last week, the production value— Northwest Immigrant Rights a characteristic Project filed a complaint with the he shares with his federal departments of Justice masked nemesis. And if and Homeland Security, charghistory has taught us anything, ing that agents’ practice of acting it’s that a man with an up-curling as “interpreters” while interrogating mustache should always be taken people about their immigration status seriously. is a civil-rights violation. Calling himself “the people’s vilNWIRP, which also joined the Amerilain,” Velvet wants to put an end can Civil Liberties Union in filing a lawto Seattle’s real-life-superhero suit alleging racial profiling, submitted movement. KIRO-FM’s Ross this new complaint on behalf of six and Burbank Show got individuals stopped for in on the action, asking traffic violations by officers Jones about his newfrom various local law Print is great, but if est rival last week. “I agencies throughout the you want to see . . . our list of the five things Ann Romney looked him up. He’s state. The officers called in could have bought with the money actually just a wedding the Border Patrol, ostensishe spent on that fugly T-shirt, you’ll photographer who made bly to interpret, and the six have to check out The Daily Weekly. a funny video,” said wound up in deportation SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM/DAILYWEEKLY Jones. “If he was a true proceedings. Most are the supervillain I would be parents of American citimore interested, because at least I would have zens. Two were pregnant when detained. something to do. Right now it’s like [a] war of NWIRP claims that the practice violates social media, and I have better things to do several provisions of the Civil Rights Act, with my time.” including its guarantee of “meaningful Matt Harrison, director of the forthcoming access” to government services (in this case, documentary Citizen Heroes, billed as “a look interpretation) regardless of race or national into the soul of Seattle’s real-life-superhero origin. It would not be acceptable “if people movement,” knows a thing or two about were being charged for interpretation,” how this intricate world of make-believe NWIRP executive director Jorge Barón says. works. Harrison, who accompanied Jones on “In this case, it’s even worse. People are havnumerous patrols over roughly seven months ing to endure questioning from the Border of shooting, says real-life superheroes often Patrol about their immigration status.” feed off real-life supervillains. “For the most It is indeed a strange use of the Border part, the majority of these guys are what you Patrol, as we wrote in a cover story (“Twilight would call Internet trolls,” says Harrison. for Immigrants,” July 27, 2011) prompted by “[They’re] kind of an accepted part of the the death of a Forks man who drowned after movement. It’s kind of understood that they running away from an “interpreter.” That don’t actually go out and do deeds of evil— incident and others like it suggest that local they don’t actively do anything. They just law-enforcement officers sometimes have post things. They call out the heroes when another agenda when calling in the Border they act less than heroic. They kind of keep Patrol. Barón says he’s dealt with cases in them honest, in a way.” which agents were called even though the Indeed, contrary to reports, Velvet is not individuals in question spoke English. the first supervillain to emerge from Seattle. The notion of a hidden agenda is bolAgent Beryllium and her crew ROACH, for stered by a dash-cam video NWIRP released instance, have taken up the Seattle supervillast week. The video, obtained by NWIRP lain calling in the past. » Continued on page 9

Language Barrier

rino

Dan Ca

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

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What you should know BEFORE being stopped for DUI By James C. Egan, Professional DUI Defense Attorney The Law Offices of James C. Egan • Licensed since 1998 Call 206-749-0333 • eganattorney.com

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1 in 4 adults is arrested for DUI at some point. 5 minutes of reading could save you 5 years of probation.

riving Under the Influence (DUI) is a common but serious crime in Washington, where last year 30,000 accused drivers faced mandatory jail, fines, license suspensions and five years of probation. On holiday weekends “DUI emphasis” by police results in scores of people being arrested and charged, even when they are under .08 Breath Alcohol Content (BAC). If you ever drink alcohol and then drive a car, you must read this article and download our free iPhone app (see top right)! Having helped over 1,200 DUI clients with our team of DUI attorneys, I am often asked what to do when stopped after drinking. This article clarifies your rights and contains tips to minimize consequences. You should not commit DUI to try out methods here. Please contact us with questions or if you need our help!

*MYTHS AND TRUTHS ABOUT DUI LAW

CLIP AND SAVE

Can I only be stopped If I’m driving badly? No. DUI Officers look for headlight, tail or license plate lights out, expired tabs or plates obscured by tow balls or bicycle racks. Officers run plates to see if car owners’ licenses are suspended. Tossing cigarettes, not wearing seatbelts or hand-holding cell phones are now infractions which can get you stopped. If I’m pulled over, should I roll down my window an inch so the officer can’t smell me, and then pass my license through a crack in the window? Absolutely do not do anything that looks suspicious, including drinking alcohol after being pulled over.

Should you admit to drinking when asked? If you’re impaired and the officer asks how much you had to drink tonight, say “Can I talk to a lawyer?” Repeat if necessary. Must I do the roadside field sobriety tests? ABSOLUTELY NOT! Do not do field tests, ever. “Field tests” are roadside tests to gather evidence against you, which include an eye check, balance and walking test. Do them and you’re guaranteed to “fail” by the officer’s biased opinion, where physical limitations (heels, age, injuries) are not seriously factored. The officer may not clarify that Field Tests are voluntary, but they are, so DO NOT DO FIELD TESTS, EVER. After any drinking your best answer is, “No thank you. A lawyer said I shouldn’t.” If pressured, say “Can I talk to a lawyer first?”

Can I really talk with a lawyer at 3 am? Yes you can! Upon request officers must try to put you in contact with a free phone lawyer at the soonest chance (usually the station). Do not waive your right to remain silent or talk to a lawyer. Assert both rights, and then be quiet! What happens when I ask for a lawyer? No further questioning should occur. If requested right after you’re stopped, the officer shouldn’t ask for field tests or about your drinking. Repeat yourself if the officer “didn’t hear” you. At that point, the “investigation” ceases, but you must cooperate with police orders. The officer probably will arrest you (which happens to most people stopped after drinking). However, your goal is not to avoid being arrested – but to limit evidence against you. What should I do after I’m arrested? Politely cooperate but remain silent. Your car will be legally towed. The handcuffs are demeaning but temporary. Don’t hang your head or appear impaired. Sit quietly as you’re driven to the police station. You’ll be escorted to a room where you’ll have a private phone call with a 24-hour free attorney – any DUI attorney will do. This attorney will say to not answer questions and to blow into the BAC machine. Refusing the BAC machine test means they don’t have evidence, right? In Washington, if you drive a car, you have consented to provide a test of your breath (or blood, in limited cases) if you’re arrested for DUI. Breaking that “implied consent contract” will likely result in a year long license suspension. Plus, you will still be prosecuted for DUI, where the refusal is used as proof you were guilty of DUI. There are various challenges against BAC machines – not refusals –we’ve used to eliminate BAC results altogether. Don’t refuse (even if the free lawyer’s “unavailable!”) Quietly take the BAC test and have your lawyers try to “suppress” the BAC result from the State’s evidence later. Without a BAC result can I still be prosecuted? The prosecution will argue the officer’s opinion alone proves impairment. As long as you didn’t refuse the BAC, this is easier to defend because the officer’s credibility and observations are uncorroborated. Again, take the BAC test and call us later. ADVERTISEMENT

Does It help to hide a penny in my mouth? Nothing instantly ‘eliminates’ alcohol content. However, if there’s a provable foreign substance in your mouth (i.e. pen/cap, hair/clips, chewed fingernails) shortly before you blow into the machine, the BAC result is invalid. Sometimes the video camera in the BAC room records a “foreign object” in your mouth while the officer looks away or ignores it. What If I have a tongue or lip ring? Excellent. An unremoved tongue or lip ring is a “foreign object” which nullifies the breath test if the officer sees and ignores it. Refusing to remove mouth jewelry is perfectly legal and cannot result in a valid BAC “refusal;” it could lead to a legal blood draw, which may benefit you. Can I make sure I’m not booked In jaIl? YES! REMEMBER THIS: If you’re being taken to jail, say “Can I get a blood draw?” Ask again if ignored. If booked anyway, case law supports dismissal of your DUI due to police misconduct (interference with your right to your own evidence.) While the officer might wait for your blood draw then book you, that’s unlikely. Instead you may be dropped off at a hospital where for about $30 you can get a blood draw to compare with the State’s BAC machine, which could help you.

FREE iPhone App TAKES THE MYSTERY OUT OF BEING DUI! The Law Offices of James C. Egan created a unique and free application which tracks your alcohol consumption and plots your BAC level in real time as you drink! This time-tested formula on your phone will tell you if and when you’re safe to drive! Includes a sobriety game, all the tips of this article, a way to record an officer (legal in Washington), and a FREE way to text or call us easily. Find it for FREE at the iPhone App Store under “James Egan.” (Other smartphones, updates pending). We’re here to help.

When will I know if I’m getting charged? Contact us right away to explain procedures and begin preserving evidence that’s lost if you wait. We beat many license suspensions on these matters, but only if contacted soon after arrest. Don’t delay! Save this article, download the app, bookmark our website on your phone and tell your friends about us. *Does this article encourage DUI’s? No. Under Lawyers’ Rule of Professional Conduct 1.2(d), I merely discuss legal consequences of courses of conduct after a crime may have occurred and the scope and application of DUI laws. This hypothetical opinion is for informational purposes only, and does not guarantee accuracy nor create legal relationships or liability from following pointers herein. I encourage readers not to drive impaired and be DUI. Last year over 200 people died in Washington due to drunk drivers. After drinking, people get over-confident about driving abilities. Following these suggestions upon being stopped will not prevent a DUI charge (or possible conviction), but could increase your chance of a more successful legal outcome. People with prior DUI offenses, high BAC’s or current accidents will find prosecutions unforgiving, regardless of these tips. DUI’s are costly to everyone, so take a cab or designated driver if you’re impaired. Do I have to follow the tips perfectly? No, we can always help. Contact us or write me at info@ eganattorney.com. Downloading the app will provide you ready access to the article and to us. ◆

The Law Offices of James C. Egan

Author and DUI Lawyer James Egan, A recognized authority in DUI defense, appearing on a local television station. FREE consultations / Payment Plans / $200 off legal fees with this ad / Call 206-LAW-TEAM Visit website / bookmark article online at www.eganattorney.com / (or call 206-749-0333)

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

Is the entire stop on video? Police car video recordings are rare; you should be told if the officer’s recording you. However, it is perfectly legal to record the conversation with or without the officer’s knowledge and you should. Download our free iPhone application to do this, or use a phone recorder. This keeps an officer from overstating your impairment, putting words in your mouth or coercing you without a record. As events show, recordings of police bullying don’t lie.

But if I don’t do the roadside field tests, won’t I be arrested? Maybe not. When you refuse Field Sobriety Tests, the officer may have little evidence to support a DUI arrest. The officer may then offer a Portable Breath Test (a small hand-held breath testing box) which should be politely refused unless you are very close to sober, in which case you should be released. NOTE: This is not to be confused with the large BAC machine at the station, which you should take, regardless.

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Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

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news» The Daily Weekly » from page 6 through public disclosure, captures a Washington state trooper talking to Border Patrol agents she called in after making a traffic stop in Bellingham last February. Near the end of the encounter, the trooper thanks the agents for coming. “No problem,” replies an agent. “Give us a call anytime.” “Oh yeah, well, we like to,” the trooper responds. “We just have to do it in a roundabout way.” State Patrol spokesperson Bob Calkins says he has “no idea what she meant by that.” But he says that it’s apparent from the video that the trooper really needed interpretation services, and asked dispatch for anyone available, not just Border Patrol agents. Calkins says the Border Patrol will continue to be “in the mix” of interpreters used by state troopers. Local agents are undoubtedly thankful for that, because they might have little to do otherwise. NINA SHAPIRO

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Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

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After she was declared mentally incompetent in Washington, an elderly Bellevue woman and her exhusband accused of abandoning a herd of valuable show horses last winter had dozens of animal-neglect charges dropped in Oregon. Subsequently, the couple’s partners in the ranching operation alleged that the woman, once a wealthy psychotherapist, feigned symptoms of mental illness to avoid paying her debts and facing prosecution. Byrde Lynn Hill and Frank Baxter faced 100 counts each of animal neglect in the second degree, meaning they “unlawfully and recklessly failed to provide minimum care for an animal,” after the Wallowa County Sheriff seized 150 Portuguese Lusitano and Andalusian horses last February. The couple—recently divorced—owned and financed Carpe Diem, a 500-acre ranch in the far northeastern corner of Oregon. When a midwinter blizzard struck in 2011, the ranch was snowed in and cut off from supplies. At some point, the 78-year-old Hill fired the couple in charge of maintaining the property. Not enough hay had been stockpiled, and a well pump broke, leaving the animals without adequate food and water. By the time sheriff’s deputies arrived, several horses reportedly had died, while others suffered injuries resulting from downed fences and lack of grooming. The pitiful conditions are especially shocking considering the horses are worth thousands of dollars each. The ranch’s website, now offline, boasted that Hill owned the “largest, traditionally preserved herd of classical Lusitano horses in the United States.”

According to court documents, the collection included a stallion valued at $20,000. At one time Hill could afford the extravagant costs of maintaining exotic horses. Court documents say she was once “one of the top therapists in the country,” charging $150 an hour. She owns a lavish house on the Bellevue waterfront and a 32-foot racing sloop. But a pair of horrific car crashes ended Hill’s career, leaving her permanently incapacitated. After the second, her doctor noted that she was “at a very high risk to have someone take advantage of her from a financial standpoint.” The warning apparently went unheeded: Hill is now nearly penniless, and has tried and failed repeatedly to file for bankruptcy. One court filing says she has $308,000 worth of outstanding debts and an income of just $1,400. Records from Hill’s divorce case, initiated in King County last April, allege that Baxter is to blame for Hill’s financial ruin. “Byrde has been the subject of financial exploitation,” one document states. “Byrde had a substantial estate, which Mr. Baxter and others have almost completely dispossessed her from.” Baxter, 71, did not answer several calls to his Tacoma residence seeking comment for this story. Given her diminished faculties, a judge ultimately decided that Hill was unfit to participate in legal proceedings. She now has a courtappointed guardian, Michael Longyear, who declined to arrange an interview with Hill. But not everyone believes Hill is a victim. Vincent and Pretina Shevham, Hill’s former managers at Carpe Diem, go so far as to accuse the trained therapist of faking her illness to avoid paying her debts and standing trial. The Shevhams did not respond to several messages seeking comment for this story, but after being fired as caretakers at the ranch, they sued Hill for breach of contract. A jury awarded the pair a $322,000 judgment, but Hill’s incompetency could keep them from collecting. Hill’s assets now are managed by her guardian, making them much harder to get at through the courts. “Ms. Hill has routinely used allegations of mental incapacity to gain advantage during litigation,” the Shevhams’ attorney wrote in appealing the incompetency ruling. The appeal ultimately was denied. The other result of the incompetency ruling was that Wallowa County prosecutor Mona Williams decided to drop the neglect charges against Hill and Baxter, telling The Oregonian that pursuing the case against the couple would prove too difficult and expensive for the tiny county. Twenty-six of the seized horses were auctioned off last April, netting $62,000 to pay off Hill’s debts. The county also recouped all but $12,000 spent caring for the abandoned horses. KEEGAN HAMILTON E

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Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

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Dallas-The year was 1976, America was celebrating the bicentennial, gas was only 59 cents, the first Apple computer was created, Matsushita introduced VHS video to compliment Sony’s Beta Max, and the modern day matchmaker was born. In February 1976, Great Expectations opened their doors for the first time. The idea for video dating came about when founder, Jeffrey Ullman, was at a dinner party and ran into an old college friend. As they spoke, she began telling him some of her recent blind-date horror stories, and how she was having a difficult time meeting single men in general. Ullman, who started tinkering with videos as a journalism student in college, took the idea of a video dating service to his parents. A dating company that markets professional singles to the type of person they’re

looking for. Great Expectations started out as a small family business, Ullman’s parents gave him the startup loan, has now grown into a multimarket dating service. With more than 35 years of experience, Great Expectations has continued to not only set the standard in the dating world, but also the business model for all dating services. Constantly trying to stay ahead of the curve, Great Expectations was the first dating service to take old school matchmaking methods and mix them with modern technology to help singles meet the love of their life. “When Great Expectations first started, members would come into their local center for their interview with the matchmakers, and they would then continue to come into the center each week to make their selections, or find out who selected them, but with the emerging of the internet and

online dating we decided a few changes needed to be made. In the late 90s we introduced GE Online. It’s a private and secure website accessible only to GE members to view profiles, watch video interviews, and make their selections from the privacy of their home, but all members are still required to have their initial interviews in person at the local center.”” said Jennifer, Seattle Center Director. Great Expectations is one of the few dating services around today that offer background checks and emotional screenings of all potential members before allowing them to join. Great Expectations also does all of the photography that are found in the member profiles. “Member safety is our top priority, especially with the way online dating is now days, people lie on their profiles constantly. There’s no blind dating when it comes to Great Expectations,

what you see on the profile is what you get.” said Jennifer. Great Expectations is not for the casual dater, they are for serious singles that are looking for love and commitment. All members have the opportunity to work with relationship specialist that will guide them on every step of their journey to finding that special someone. To schedule your in-person interview with one of Great Expectations experienced matchmakers call at 425-4443916, or check out their website, www.geseattle.com.


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n 2008, “Jane,” an engineer living in an apartment on Beacon Hill, saw her rent go up to $1,200 a month. While only 24, she thought she might as well buy a place for that money, rather than see it “continuing to go down the drain.” She started looking in Seattle, but found prices too high. So she explored Renton, where she worked. There she found a two-bedroom condominium for $175,000. It was nothing fancy, but it had big windows and was near a slick new retail complex called The Landing. She assumed she got a pretty good deal since housing prices had dipped since the height of the bubble. When her boyfriend, also an engineer, became her husband, he moved in. What they didn’t know is that prices would not only continue to drop, but would go into free fall in south King County’s condo market—one that real-estate lawyer Craig Blackmon observes “has been absolutely hammered.” The couple watched the value of their condo plummet to $80,000, then $70,000, then even lower. A one-bedroom in their 120-unit complex is currently listed at $40,000. In

other south King County complexes, some condos are selling for under $30,000. “It kept me up at nights,” Jane wrote on a blog she started to chronicle the decision she was on the verge of making. “It would depress me at the most random times.” (Wary of provoking her bank, she uses pseudonyms for herself and her husband. “Cory,” on the blog—schrodingershouse. blogspot.com—and asked to be identified that way in this story.) Unlike millions of Americans caught by disastrous subprime mortgages and their own desire to live above their means, Jane and Cory can easily afford their mortgage, which with taxes runs roughly the same as the rent for her old Beacon Hill apartment. Earning more than $100,000 between them, they could afford at least twice that. The problem is they don’t want to stay in what Jane has taken to calling their “sad little condo”—and if they attempt to sell it, they’re looking at a huge loss. In February they consulted a lawyer, who asked not to be identified for this article.

These days, when people walk away from an mortgage, they don’t always walk away.

Tales from the BusT

Peter ryan

By Nina Shapiro

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

underwater

“Walk away, right now!” the couple recalls the lawyer saying. The attorney indicated that the couple should simply stop making mortgage payments and let the bank foreclose on the property—a course of action, among relatively affluent homeowners, known as a strategic default. In fact, the attorney said that if they were a business, they would be obligated to default. “It would be the right choice for our stockholders,” Cory relates. Even two or three years ago, they might have received different advice. A 2010 study by Fannie Mae found that 88 percent of respondents believed it was morally wrong to default on one’s mortgage. The business community was solidly behind this moral code, which served their interests. The national conversation then centered on how to keep people in their homes. But today no one paradigm governs the housing bust, which has given rise to market trends never before seen, unpredictable behavior by banks, and a new morality on the part of homeowners and the professionals who advise them. While local figures on strategic defaults aren’t available, statistics for this state from the Mortgage Bankers Association show that defaults as a whole are at a record high. Washington now has the fifth highest rate of mortgage payments that are more than 90 days past due—remarkable given that in 2007, Washington ranked almost dead last among states. Just a year ago, it placed 20th. “Why is Washington state going in this direction?” asks Scott Jarvis, director of the state Department of Financial Institutions. “Boeing is going great guns. The last time I checked, Microsoft is still in business. It’s not like we’re in the middle of the Arizona desert.” One possibility, Jarvis acknowledges, is that a growing number of homeowners can pay their mortgage, but are choosing not to. Blackmon says such people now constitute “the vast majority” of his clients. Likewise, fellow attorney David Leen says he gets “dozens of calls a day” from people wanting to leave their homes—and mortgages—behind them. He says the calls come from “doctors, lawyers, people with means.” “Most of the cases I see are not economic hardship,” echoes Lars Neste, another attorney who frequently represents underwater homeowners. “A lot of them have done the math, and realize that the market isn’t going up anytime soon.” Or if it does go up—and the past few months have seen an uptick in Seattle—they believe it won’t be enough to justify all the money they’ll spend during the life of their mortgages. Says Blackmon: “People might as well be burying money in their backyard.” As in Jane and Cory’s case, the situation usually sparks tremendous anxiety—which is not to say it doesn’t have an upside. As Blackmon points out, defaulters effectively get to squat in their homes “with zero housing costs.” And because banks have gotten slower and slower at carrying out foreclosures—often because they don’t want the properties either—people are sometimes staying for years in homes they’ve stopped paying for. The rules of the game have changed, if not been thrown out entirely.

» Continued on page 12 11


Tales from the Bust » from page 11

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or the past two years, Tami and Ron have been living in a stunning $1.4 million house in Shoreline. Their housing costs during that time: zero. That’s not what they intended, though. The couple tells their convoluted tale one morning while their two children, who know nothing about the situation, are at school. (The desire to protect their kids, as well as anxiety about prompting the bank into further action, leads them to request that they be identified by their first names only.) Their story, Tami admits, highlights the excesses of the bubble as much as the resulting chaos. Until the bust, Tami and Ron were making a lot of money—particularly Tami, a chatty 42-year-old realtor. Ron, 48, is a lawyer who until recently worked for the federal government. “Our best year, we probably made $300,000,” Tami says, about 70 percent of which came from her income selling houses. Consequently, they splashed out when, expecting a second child, they decided to tear down their small house and build a bigger one that stretched above a neighboring property to offer sweeping views of Puget Sound. In 2007, they took out a $1.4 million “construction loan” to build the house, which was supposed to roll over into a conventional mortgage after they moved in. They had so much money—and so much faith in the market—that they then bought, for $550,000, another house a few blocks away to live in during the construction. In July 2009, almost done with construction, they moved into what Ron calls their “forever house,” with the Sound glimmering into almost every room, lots of room for the kids, an expansive kitchen, his-and-hers offices, and a second-floor hallway like a bridge floating through space, connecting the children’s bedrooms on one side with their parents’ on the other. In December, they let the bank know they were wrapping up construction and ready for the loan to roll over. But by then the bust had kicked in, and banks were being much tighter with mortgage requirements. Still, the couple maintains, the rollover was part of the deal they’d signed in 2007. The bank, according to Tami, told her it should only take a couple of weeks to process. All they had to do was fill in a few more forms to update their income and other information. The rollover never came through. The couple continued to receive bills for their construction loan. Then, in June 2010, according to bank documents reviewed by Seattle Weekly, they received a jaw-dropping invoice for nearly $1.4 million—the entire balance of their loan. “Oh, how weird. I better call the bank,” Tami says, characterizing her initial reaction to the whopping bill. At that point, she and Ron stress, they had paid every bill except the one before, an omission they attribute to their concern over why the loan hadn’t yet rolled over. She says she was told that the bill was no mistake, but was given no explanation. They simply had to pay $1.4 million, plus the $5,000 owed from the month before, within two weeks or they would be in default. Paying $1.4 million wasn’t an option. They didn’t make that much money. In fact, Tami’s income had dramatically dropped due to the housing crisis as well as the three-month hiatus she’d taken from work while undergoing

treatment for thyroid cancer. As for paying the back amount, she says there was no point, given that they would be in default anyway. “Screw you,” she says she thought. “I’m going to keep my $5,000.” A month later, the couple received a terse e-mail from a loan administrator containing several bullet-pointed reasons why they no longer qualified for a conventional mortgage. “Unacceptable payment history with us” is one, a charge the couple denies except for the one unpaid bill. “Misreps [sic] in file—coborrower’s employment” is another. The alleged misrepresentations are apparently a reference to the discrepancy between Tami’s income at the time she applied for the construction/rollover loan and her 2010 income, which she says dropped by about half. The final reason: “Rental property in foreclosure.” This appears to be a reference to the house they bought while building their dream home. And here’s where the bust pulled a double whammy on them: “The market was super-hot,” Tami says, explaining the decision to buy rather than rent a temporary home. “I thought I’d sell it and make $150,000.” Instead, when it came time to sell and move back into house #1, house #2 had lost $75,000. They ended up doing a short sale, wherein banks agree to let houses sell for less than the mortgages and, in many cases, forgive the difference. Before that, they’d missed close to a dozen payments, cognizant that banks are reluctant to approve short sales if they’re still getting money from homeowners. Tami says the house fleetingly went into foreclosure during that time.

“A lot oF people would think, ‘Good For you, you’re livinG rent-Free,’ ” tAmi sAys. in reAlity, she sAys, “it’s not thAt cool.” Now Tami and Ron faced a foreclosure on their forever house. They considered walking away, but this was the house they never wanted to leave. So they hired an attorney, Leen, and decided to fight. And they’ve kept living there. “A lot of people would think, ‘Good for you, you’re living rent-free,’ ” Tami says. In reality, she says, “It’s not that cool.” They went into bankruptcy to put off a foreclosure auction. They achieved a delay, but shot their credit. Ron found the stress “was affecting the quality of my work. I made a decision to leave before anything got worse.” He is now looking for work. Tami also lost her zeal for work, and gained 30 pounds. They’ve largely kept what’s going on a secret, which hasn’t always been easy—like the time a client stopped by just as a bank representative was nailing a foreclosure notice onto the house. Their castle has more than a few chinks in it, since they hadn’t put the finishing touches on the house when they went into default, and don’t want to put any more money into it until they know they’re keeping it. As they give a tour, they point out the paintings that

» ConTinued on page 15


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Tales from the Bust » from page 12 are covering holes in the walls, the missing range hood that frequently results in a smoke-filled kitchen, the blackened cedar shingles, and the raggedy yard in desperate need of retaining walls—which prompts Tami to describe their home as the “big-ass house with a crappy yard.” Their predicament has dragged on. A second foreclosure auction was scheduled and then canceled after the state last year passed a law requiring banks to agree to mediation if requested by homeowners. A mediation session was scheduled, delayed, then scheduled again for this past February. A few days before it was to take place, the couple says, the bank called to request another postponement. Since February, they have heard nothing from the bank. Leen figures they will. The bank, he says, is not going to give Tami and Ron “a free house.” “We’re in limbo,” Tami says.

B

rian Heberling was a Bellevue-based real-estate investor, buying properties and fixing them up or renting them out, when the market started to collapse. As his holdings suddenly lost value, he sensed a new business opportunity. In 2009, he started Nest Financial, with the idea of helping others caught by the downturn. Initially, one line of the business was devoted to securing loan modifications for homeowners—or trying to. “It was a maddening experience,” Heberling says of dealing with banks. “They wouldn’t modify.” As a stalling tactic, he claims, lenders

“would lie and say they didn’t have the paperwork” from homeowners. Eventually, Heberling devoted himself to the other side of his business: helping people shed their homes. He does this specifically through short sales, and says his five-person operation has now done several hundred. He markets his business with populist rhetoric. “The banks are not on your side,” his website proclaims, adding that homeowners need a “take-no-prisoners team” to handle these financial sharks. Wearing jeans and an untucked shirt one afternoon as he talks about his business, he evinces the chic/scruffy air of someone who enjoys wrestling with the suits of the financial world. His rhetoric is even sharper in person: He talks about banks “raping the system” and participating in “fraud squared.” Heberling says he’s spent a lot of time researching the subject. He traveled to the mountains of North Carolina, for instance, to take part in a multiday “boot camp” given by an attorney there named Max Gardner, who over fine meals and single-malt Scotch teaches colleagues how to challenge foreclosures by calling attention to errors by banks, who are often in the process of selling the mortgages to investors. Inside Job, the scathing 2010 documentary that looks at this flawed process of mortgage “securitization”—which entails selling mortgages in investment bundles—is a touchstone for Heberling. He talks tough about his tactics with banks, saying he’ll tell them to “take it or leave it” when presented with an offer. But part of his strategy has to do with keeping some things to himself. All banks require proof of a homeowner’s “hardship”—backed up by bank statements— before they will sign off on a short sale.

“I don’t lie,” he says. “But I certainly don’t tell them what they don’t need to know.” For instance, he elaborates, “What is the definition of a ‘bank statement’? If a person’s got $250,000 in a retirement account and a bank’s not asking for it, I’m not necessarily going to disclose that.”

“Homeowners sHould Be walking away in droves,” He wrote. “But tHey aren’t.”

Heberling says he’s proudest, however, not of his tangles with banks, but of his role as a kind of morality coach. His clients, he says, have included a “high Microsoft wage earner” and a “prominent Seattle businessman,” who inevitably come to him “shocked and embarrassed.” He tells them “they’ve done nothing wrong,” that a mortgage is “nothing more than a financial contract,” and that “there’s nothing wrong with a homeowner seeking a financial renegotiation.” Before he gets to that, though, he insists that all his clients buy Underwater Home, a book by University of Arizona law professor Brent White. In 2008, White was an untenured faculty member who specialized in “social psychology”—in essence, the ways groups

of people make decisions. The housing crisis hit Arizona early and hard, and as he watched, he wondered why, given the dramatic loss in value of homes, more people weren’t intentionally defaulting. “At that point, the default rate was quite low,” White recalls. The statistics he gathered by late 2009 showed that as many as a third of American homeowners were underwater. In Arizona, nearly half of homeowners had homes worth less than they owed; in parts of California, that figure reached 85 percent. (The Seattle area hit the one-third mark in 2011, according to a Zillow.com estimate.) Negative equity sometimes reached into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Yet the rate of homeowners defaulting or going into foreclosure was only about 14 percent in 2009, according to Mortgage Bankers Association data. One estimate, published that year in a joint report by consulting firms Experian and Oliver Wyman, suggested that strategic defaults accounted for just a quarter of the 14 percent. Homeowners’ reluctance to stiff their banks struck White as running counter to economic theory, which holds that people operate in their financial self-interest. He wrote a paper in late 2009 about this disconnect, because, as he puts it now, “that’s what academics do,” especially in their publish-or-perish world. “Homeowners should be walking away in droves,” he wrote. “But they aren’t.” He argued that people’s “shame and guilt” caused this “irrational” behavior. They were indoctrinated in the deeply held belief that paying one’s mortgage is the right thing to do. They also had an “exaggerated” idea of the consequences

» ConTinued on page 16

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of not doing so. “A few years of poor credit need not seriously impact one’s life.” “I thought a few hundred people might look at it,” White says of his paper. Instead, it set off a national debate. He says he was not intending to present a moral argument, merely a societal analysis. But the moral questions the paper raised by implication were central to its reception. University of Chicago economist Luigi Zingales, in the policy magazine City Journal, warned that the erosion of the social stigma associated with not paying one’s mortgage, which White advised, would lead to “catastrophic results.” Housing prices would fall even further into negative territory. Zingales’ piece was entitled “The Menace of Strategic Default.” “There’s a moral dimension to this, as homeowners who simply abandon their homes contribute to the destabilization of their neighborhood and community,” echoed Fannie Mae spokesperson Brian Faith in a Washington Post piece about what author Kenneth Harney termed White’s “incendiary core message.” So White tackled the morality questions head-on in further papers and then, in 2010, Underwater Home. He argued that defaulting on one’s mortgage may in fact be the moral choice—even if one can technically afford it “according to some arbitrary debt-to-income ratio established by the banking industry”— when faced with a home that is no longer an investment but a threat to the “financial security” of one’s family. To seal this argument in the public’s mind, he noted that corporations had no scruples about defaulting themselves: Witness Morgan Stanley’s 2009 default, despite record profits, on a $1.5 billion mortgage in San Francisco. White’s message no longer seems so incendiary. He’s been quoted approvingly in such publications as The New Yorker and The New York Times. And White notes that Suze Orman, the queen of financial responsibility, has taken to advising homeowners to default if they’re underwater by 20 percent or more and the bank refuses to negotiate a short sale. Again and again, you can hear his thinking show up in the rhetoric of what The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki sees as the beginnings of a “DeOccupy Your House Movement.”

I

n 2010, a Vancouver, Wash., man—who asks to be identified by his online name, “Izzle”—started to think about walking away from a house on which he owed $300,000, but which was then worth only about $225,000. Researching the matter online, he stumbled across a website called LoanSafe.org, which offers a forum for underwater homeowners to discuss their plight. Strategic default was a popular discussion thread for posters from California, Nevada, Arizona, and Florida. But Izzle says he was one of the first from Washington to post on the subject. The housing crisis’ delayed local timetable, he figures, made strategic default a rare phenomenon in Washington. “A year later there are a lot of people from Washington [posting on the site],” Izzle says. One LoanSafe member, “KentWalk”— she’s from Kent and walked away from her home—decided to invite local posters to get together in person to share their stories. In January, about 20 met for lunch at Bellevue’s Rock Bottom Brewery, according to Izzle,

who attended. In late March, Izzle arranged another such lunch in Vancouver, and there is talk of yet another in Olympia. Izzle declined Seattle Weekly’s request to attend the Vancouver lunch because, he says, his cohorts wanted to talk freely. Judging by LoanSafe’s webpage, the conversation could have turned to some tactics that might raise eyebrows among the general public. Consider, for instance, the “HAMPSTER wheel game” described on the site—so named after the federal Home Affordable Modification Program, which facilitates loan modifications for people within certain income ranges. “Here’s how a homeowner plays,” the website declares. “The homeowner has already decided to walk, but wants to stay rent/mortgage free for as long as possible. So the homeowner, even knowingly not qualified, submits the . . . [HAMP application process] to the loan servicer.” When the homeowner is inevitably denied, the homeowner can simply reapply or perhaps try for a short sale, thereby dragging out the process even longer—perhaps “for a couple years. This would indeed be a game well played!” “And for bonus points,” the website continues, “here’s an added strategy. When the foreclosure sale appears imminent, the homeowner moves into new living accommodations, rents their home, and collects rent.” This strategy isn’t entirely acceptable to lawyers in the field. Blackmon, for instance, says he thinks “acting in bad faith” through bogus applications to HAMP “is a bad idea.” Seattle real-estate attorney Lynn Arends says she warns homeowners against offering longterm leases for properties they’re about to default on. “That could be fraud,” she says. But if defaulting homeowners rent out their places month-to-month, that’s a different story, Arends and others suggest. After all, somebody should live in the home to make sure it’s kept up. Defaulting or not, homeowners are responsible for their properties until the titles are transferred.For that reason, lawyers have no problem with homeowners staying put. “I tell clients to live there until the bitter end,” says Arends. And bankers apparently prefer it that way. “It’s better to have people in the home,” says Jim Pishue, president and CEO of the Washington Bankers Association. “Vacant homes lose value.” Transients move in or homes fall into disrepair, dragging property values down throughout the neighborhood. In fact, he says that’s partly why banks are so slow to foreclose: They don’t want a whole lot of homes that are just going to sit vacant.

T

he banks’ unhurried pace furthers the opportunities to game the system, which is exactly what some of Jane’s Facebook friends thought she was doing. They called her a “freeloader” and a “squatter.” Jane’s mom, too, questioned her and Cory about the ethics of their decision. Over coffee, the couple says they aren’t trying to pull one over on anyone. “My feeling is we’re on a sinking ship and we have to jump off,” Jane says. She and her husband are quick to resort to numbers and technical specifications. “We’re engineers,” Cory says repeatedly. They hand over a chart they created which shows, assuming modest market growth, that they wouldn’t break even on their condo until 2029. Cory, initially unsure about defaulting, says he became convinced after scrutinizing the


to a website called Credit Karma and found that her score would improve if she had more credit cards. So she applied for a new one, also from a credit union. “My credit score went up one point!” she says laughingly. It’s not much compared to the hundreds of points it will soon fall. But then again, she figures, so many people have foreclosures on their records that standards are a lot lower than they used to be. At least for landlords, that definitely seems to be the case. “It’s not a big problem getting a rental if you’ve gone through a foreclosure,” says Tim Seth, president of the Washington Landlord Association. In fact, he says that some landlords see a past foreclosure in favorable terms, reasoning that the prospective tenant “had the get-up-and-go to buy the house in the first place.” The decreasing stigma attached to foreclosures would seem to foretell even more strategic defaults down the road. But Gary Crellin, associate research director for the University of Washington’s Runstad Center for Real Estate Studies, doesn’t think so. He ventures that more homeowners may instead choose to refinance, because, for the first time, the feds are rolling out a program that may actually work.

“Part of this economic adventure has been realizing that i don’t want to be with a bank anymore,” Jane writes on her blog. Known as HARP 2.0 (the Home Affordable Refinance Program, a revamped version of the original), this program is designed specifically for underwater homeowners. And it doesn’t matter whether you’re financially strapped or not, making it a good fit for potential strategic defaulters. In fact, HARP 2.0 requires participants to be current on their mortgages, which Crellin says may give people incentive not to default. Matthew Gardner, a Seattle real-estate consultant catering to corporations and public entities, also hazards that the exodus of people from their homes may be slowing. Exhibit A: King County currently has the lowest inventory of houses for sale it’s had in years. In March, just over 5,000 single-family homes were on offer—less than half the number on the market in 2008. “A lot of people are waiting,” Gardner speculates. “They’re seeing signs of stability and hoping for modest price increases.” But there’s another possibility, Gardner acknowledges: The sparse inventory might reflect, at least to some extent, the number of houses that are in a kind of netherworld, their owners defaulting and waiting for the banks to foreclose—a theory bolstered by the recent high default figures. There’s even a name for this reservoir of forfeited homes: “the shadow inventory.” Just how many Tamis, Rons, Janes, and Corys are out there, though, is a question that escapes even the best real-estate economists. Says Gardner, “That’s the great unknown.” E nshapiro@seattleweekly.com

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

mortgage contract itself, which he stresses has written into it the possibility and the consequences of defaulting. “We’re putting up collateral—our house—and if we don’t pay you back, you have the right to take the collateral,” he says. He felt himself on even firmer ground when he looked up the state’s foreclosure laws. He found out that in Washington, unlike in some states, most foreclosures occur outside of court. These “non-judicial” foreclosures generally leave homeowners owing nothing, even if a property sells for far less than what is owed. That’s why some homeowners, in contrast to Heberling’s approach, favor foreclosures over short sales, which offer no such protection unless you’re crafty enough to negotiate it. There are a few exceptions to these rules. If you have a second mortgage, that debt lingers after a foreclosure. More pertinent for Jane and Cory, a bank can decide to sue you for your full debt through a judicial foreclosure. The couple’s lawyer, however, thinks this is unlikely to happen. The more likely legal pitfall is that they could be sued by their homeowners’ association should they default on their $300-a-month dues in addition to their mortgage. Attorney Dean Pody, who specializes in representing condo associations, says he’s frequently tasked with going after deadbeat residents. Associations have little choice but to sue, he says, because they’re struggling to raise money for necessary repairs at a time when significant portions of their complexes are in default. Pody recalls one suit against a “professional athlete”—he won’t say who—who stopped paying dues after he left town for another team and walked away from his condo. The athlete, Pody says, was making more than $4 million a year, yet refused to pay $20,000 in back dues. The problem, Pody says, is compounded by the recent trend of banks to be even slower to foreclose on condos; he says it can take up to three years. Many speculate that this is because banks are on the hook for association dues once they assume ownership. Jane and Cory say they understand this issue, and have therefore decided to continue to pay their dues. “We didn’t feel like stiffing our neighbors,” she says. They have no such concern, however, about their bank—an institution Jane associates with public bailouts, excessive bonuses, and “heartless” behavior. Day 1 of their adventures in defaulting began on March 1. The calls from the bank started coming immediately, and daily. “You have no obligation to even be polite,” their lawyer advised. “Just hang up.” The attorney was concerned that the bank might find out the couple has money, and decide to exercise the rare option of a judicial foreclosure. Jane and Cory do one better and don’t answer their home line at all. “That’s what cell phones are for,” Jane says. Jane also plans to close her current bank account and move her money to a credit union. That way, she figures, the bank that holds her mortgage (which at one time got automatic payments from her account at another bank) won’t be able to track her money. It’s a move that corresponds nicely to her new antibanking credo. “Part of this economic adventure has been realizing that I don’t want to be with a bank anymore,” Jane writes on her blog. She also outlines her “next plan of action”: improving her credit score as much as possible before the looming tumble. She went

17


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Books

Film

Voting at the Pump

Love During Wartime

Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power

(Penguin, $36) grimly depicts a might that outlasts any presidential administration, Republican or Democrat. The company can afford to fight global warming research on the one hand, then agree to a carbon tax on the other, because delay is always in its best interests. The longer it stalls, the longer it can extract and sell its one precious product. The EPA and environmental lawsuits and occasional government takeovers of oil fields hardly matter; those are just birds pecking on the rhino’s back. Reading all 685 pages of Private Empire might drive you to despair, because no amount of Priusdriving individual virtue can stanch the thirst of China and other developing countries. Like a casino, ExxonMobil always wins. And if Coll’s tone is too measured for the Inconvenient Truth crowd, that’s because casinos depend on willing customers. Even if you walk to work each day, whistling to the music from your iPod, that device was shipped from Shenzhen on a freighter powered by diesel fuel. In effect, we have all voted ExxonMobil into power. Seattle Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., 386-4636, spl.org. Free. 7 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

What’s left to be said about Marcel Carné’s towering, intimate epic of early 19th-century love and the lives of performers, often heralded as the greatest French film of all time? That Children of Paradise, being shown in a new 4K-quality digital restoration, was made at all only enhances its legendary status: It was shot in wartime Nice from August 1943 to April 1944 and finally premiered in Paris in March 1945. Establishing its fascination with the theater (and the theatrical), the film commences with a raised curtain. Frustrated rakish actor Frédérick (Pierre Brasseur) and heartsick mime Baptiste (Jean-Louis Barrault) are both drawn—the latter, especially—to Garance (the magnificent Arletty, later accused of collaborating with the enemy for having taken a German lover during the Occupation). This onetime “model for Ingres” will also enchant murderous intellectual Lacenaire (Marcel Herrand) and the libertine Count de Montray (Louis Salou). “I want you to love me the way I love you” is heard twice in Children of Paradise, a perfect summation of screenwriter Jacques Prévert’s rich detailing of romantic desperation and feelings not reciprocated—or realized too late. Barrault’s silent, white-faced character has long been the film’s most indelible image. Seen anew, his Baptiste, delicate, bashful, and wraith-like, makes for a fascinatingly incongruous romantic lead—which somehow makes Children of Paradise even more touching. (Through Thurs.) SIFF Film Center, 305 Harrison St. (Seattle Center), 324-9996, siff.net. $5–$10. 8 p.m. MELISSA ANDERSON

EpicEntEr prEss

Wells argues that the M’s have (under)spent their way to mediocrity.

Books

2 + 2 = Liberal Bias!

Chris Mooney is back with another GOPbashing tome, and why not? As the world becomes ever more complex and dependent on technology, as the U.S. fails to educate enough engineers, programmers, scientists, and doctors, the Republican primary debate regressed to ever-simpler terms. Instead of evidence and rationality, Romney and company embraced an agenda of . . . FREEDOM! As in freedom from facts, statistics, and the empirical method. In The Republican Brain: The Science of Why They Deny Science—and Reality (Wiley, $25.95), Mooney blames the subcortex, that older, lizard-descended part of the brain that dictates our fight-or-flight emotional impulses. This leads to “motivated reasoning,” where the newer parts of the brain (i.e., the prefrontal cortex) get overwhelmed with key memories and associations from the older bits. (Do you want to reason with the spider or crush it?!?) Every time you argue with your father-in-law or click to FOX News to make yourself angry, there’s

Thurs: BaseBall/Books

Jon Wells is the publisher and editor of The Grand Salami, the independent Mariners monthly magazine sold outside Safeco Field on game days, and his new book is called Shipwrecked: A Peoples’ History of the Seattle Mariners (Epicenter, $15.95). As per the subtitle’s reference to Howard Zinn, the book offers a contrarian take on why the M’s are one of only two MLB teams that have never played in a World Series. Explaining in detail why the team has sucked so bad for so long— or, spinning it optimistically, why it wasn’t able to sustain the successes of 1995 and 2001—might sound like an exercise in masochism, but Wells does an admirable job of rehashing the futility without getting too bitter. In Wells’ estimation, the trouble with the Mariners is that management— namely team president Chuck Armstrong and CEO Howard Lincoln—is too risk-averse and stingy to spend the extra $10 to 20 million in salaries necessary to keep the M’s competitive with the Yankees, Red Sox, Angels, and other high rollers. Over a recent beer at F.X. McRory’s, Wells characterized management’s position as “‘Now we’ve got our stadium, screw you.’” He concludes, “Their priorities are making profits, not putting a good team on the field.” Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way N.E., 366-3333, thirdplacebooks.com. Free. 7 p.m. (Also: 7 p.m. Tues., May 15 at Elliott Bay.) KEEGAN HAMILTON

a kind of synaptic reinforcement at work—for both liberals and conservatives—as those emotions are rehashed. Says Mooney, “The more we activate a particular series of connections, the more powerful it becomes. It grows more and more a part of us, like the ability to play guitar or juggle a soccer ball.” Put differently, practice makes us all very pissed off. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER Film

Dancing on Her Own Grave

Black Swan isn’t a standard ballet movie in the tradition of The Red Shoes or The Turning Point. And director Darren Aronofsky is no scholar of dance. From Pi to Requiem for a Dream to The Wrestler, he’s been intent on society’s obsessive outcasts, the performers/artists/freaks who entertain us with their self-abnegating devotion. The better their craft, the greater their sacrifice. They’re the Roman gladiators, we’re the cheering mob. Natalie Portman won an Oscar for her 2010 role as Nina, a virginal young woman in her early 20s who lives with her overbearing mother (Barbara Hershey). Feeling unrecognized and underappreciated as a corps dancer, Nina lobbies for the dual role of the Swan Queen/Black Swan in Swan Lake, which triggers a profound split in her personality. As Nina prepares for the first curtain, Aronofsky is intent on the gruesome details of the dancer’s art. Bulimia, broken toes, and protruding backbones—these are the stigmata of Nina’s career path. If she’s to become a black swan, that means embracing the dark side of her art and becoming her own doppelgänger. Black Swan is more a horror movie than an art film. Nina may be hallucinating her whole ordeal, but Aronofsky suggests there’s a like insanity in all artistic creation. Egyptian, 801 E. Pine St., 781-5755, landmarktheatres.com. $8.25. Midnight. (Repeats Sat.) BRIAN MILLER

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

*

Cheap, Cheap, Cheap

niko tavErnisE/Fox sEarchlight

Corporations are people, my friend. Except, Pulitzer-winning journalist Steve Coll might argue, when the corporation in question is ExxonMobil. The oil behemoth is bigger than people, and, with annual profits exceeding $30 billion, bigger than many national economies. It is, with unrelenting and rising global demand, a bigger presence on the map than the U.S. (Though our military is deployed abroad in part to keep its interests safe—an expense for which the company is devoted to paying the least amount of tax possible.) Private

Portman’s ballerina receives a bad education from Vincent Cassel in Black Swan.

19


WED, MAY 9 R-RATED

“TWISTED” THR, MAY 10 THE LEGEND HIMSELF

HENEGHEN

FRI&SAT, MAY 11&12 DIRECT FROM “CONAN”

RON FUNCHES

PLUS KORTNEY SHANE WILLIAMS SUN, MAY 13 PROS DO NEW STUFF

CULTIVATE

MON, MAY 14 EVERYONE’S A COMIC

OPEN MIC NIGHT

Wednesday, 5/9 at 7:30 pm

United for a Fair Economy: ‘The Self-Made Myth’

Thursday, 5/10 at 12 pm

CityClub: 2012 LASER Awards

Thursday, 5/10 at 7 pm

John Gottman: Making Marriage Work

Thursday, 5/10 at 7:30 pm

Pamela Matson: Seeds of Sustainability

Friday, 5/11 at 6 pm

Nancy Gibbs & Michael Duffy: The Presidents Club

Friday, 5/11 at 7 pm

Ustad Amjad Ali Khan

Friday, 5/11 at 7:30 pm

Chris Mooney:Republican Brain

Saturday, 5/12 at 11 am & 1 pm

Family: Message From Guinea

Saturday, 5/12 at 8 pm

Thalia Symphony 109 S. Washington St. (at Occidental)

206.628.0303

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

WWW.COMEDYUNDERGROUND.COM

20

Tuesday, 5/15 at 7:30 pm

Baratunde Thurston: How to Be Black

www.townhallseattle.org

arts»Opera »REVIEW

In the Right Key

Seattle Opera brings a beloved tearjerker to the Sonics’ empty old home.

J

BY GAVIN BORCHERT

umping on the opera-in-movie-theaters bandwagon, Seattle Opera decided charity begins at home, live-streaming Saturday’s McCaw Hall opening-night performance roughly a hundred yards west to KeyArena, where a crowd of just over 5,000 enjoyed it for free. The show was shrewdly chosen, a proven crowd-pleaser: Madama Butterfly, Puccini’s tragedy about a geisha seduced and abandoned by a naval officer. Twenty minutes before conductor Julian Kovatchev’s downbeat, the buzz among the gathering Key crowd was giddier than even McCaw’s most-anticipated opening nights. The enormous screen, 50 by 80 feet, blocked off one end of the arena’s bowl. The opposite end was packed; the crowd thinned out along the sides and in several hundred more folding chairs covering the floor. As attendees laden with popcorn, nachos, and Kidd Valley bags found their seats, vendors strolled the aisles offering more munchies. (Not during the performance, fear not.) Bonus features onscreen and off included a tour of the SO costume shop; an interview with Patricia Racette, who sings the title role; a green-tea tasting; and a costume try-on station (who hasn’t always wanted to see himself in a turban?). The picture, for its size, was of startling crispness. The sound quality offered clarity, picking up an impressive amount of orchestral detail, but lacked warmth, seeming to add a shrill edge to Racette’s soprano (or was it there to begin with?). The voice/pit balance picked up by the mikes, though not obtrusively artificial, favored the singers; my guess is they didn’t top the orchestra so robustly in McCaw. Simulcast director Frank Zamacona, a veteran of San Francisco Opera’s broadcasts to AT&T Park, made some intelligent choices: A close-up on Sarah Larsen, as Butterfly’s devoted maid Suzuki, overhearing Lt. Pinkerton admit his plan to eventually get a “real American wife,” pointed up a dramatic moment for KeyArena viewers that the live audience may have missed; a split screen, both sides featuring Jonathan Dean’s expert captions, captured the clashing points of view in the Act 3 trio. As for the performance: I don’t envy any singer who has to try to make a character out of Pinkerton. What do you do with someone whose most salient personality trait is smug obliviousness? You live up to the audience’s expectations about Italian tenors and provide us with some vocal thrills. This Stefano Secco does, milking his ringing high notes and selling the heck out of the Act 1 love duet. Racette, as they say, leaves it all on the dance floor, in a performance of intense commitment and heat. The role of Butterfly must convince on two levels: making us believe she’s a woman making herself believe Pinkerton will return. The

ELISE BAKKETUN

A TALE OF THREE WITTIES

TOWN HALL HIGHLIGHTS 5/9 - 5/15

Racette brings Butterfly heat and intensity.

fervor Racette throws into her signature aria, “Un bel dì,” is the heartbreaking desperation of a woman fighting to maintain the illusions that are her sole reason for living. Stage director Peter Kazaras’ masterstroke is the handling of her suicide, her final tableau (enhanced in KeyArena with a close-up) a sock in the gut.

T

hough the simulcast was a success in itself (I urge SO to offer one every season), everyone must be wondering about opera-at-the-Bijou’s potential long-term benefits to the company and to the art form in general. Will it provide the boost that supertitles, opera’s previous major innovation, did? Or will it become a replacement for, not an enhancement of, live opera? In a New York Times article just this past Sunday, Zachary Woolfe indulges in hand-wringing about the effects on regional opera companies of the Metropolitan Opera’s movie-theater broadcasts: the risk that audiences spoiled with close-ups and surround sound will be discouraged from attending live performances. “It is the undoing of opera,” Woolfe says; “a present, active audience is fundamental.” But he neglects to acknowledge the obvious: Opera productions have been broadcast on radio and TV for decades, and recorded, from vinyl platters to mp3s, for more than a century; if reproduction risked “undoing” live performance, it would have already. Seattle Opera’s experiment did debunk one persistent myth. Ask classical pundits about the Death of Classical Music™, and they’ll claim that what keeps potential listeners away is the stultifying oppressiveness of concert-hall protocol. So you’d think that if any audience would have taken advantage of having the cold, dead hand of formality lifted, it’d have been the KeyArena throng—sitting in a sports palace, not a tuxedo in sight. Yet the riveted crowd was just as raptly silent as those paying customers over at McCaw (if not more so; we could hear their coughs loud and clear). Guess what? People listening to opera are quiet not because they’re cruelly forced to be, but because the music sounds better that way. E gborchert@seattleweekly.com MADAMA BUTTERFLY McCaw Hall, 321 Mercer St. (Seattle Center), 3897676, seattleopera.org. $25 and up. Ends May 20.


arts»Performance Downstage, 4029 Stone Way, 800-838-3006, thewrecking crewtheatreco.blogspot.com. $15–$25. Opens May 11. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat., plus 10 p.m. May 19. Ends May 19.

BY GAVIN BORCHERT

Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

BED SNAKE Performer/creators Noah Benezra and

Hannah Victoria Franklin promise “a world of light and crunk.” Washington Ensemble Theatre, 608 19th Ave. E., washingtonensemble.org. $10–$50. Opens May 11. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Mon. Ends May 28. THE BLACK-JEW DIALOGUES Performer/writers Larry Jay Tish and Ron Jones bring you comedy and a postshow discussion. Center House Theatre, Seattle Center, theblackjewdialogues.com. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 16. CABARET Wilkommen zu The Schoolyard’s rock rethinking of Kander & Ebb. Re-bar, 1114 Howell St., theschoolyard. net. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., May 10–Sat., May 12. KRISTIN CHENOWETH If you’re reading this, you already know who she is, and you love her. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org. $31.25– $121.25. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 9.

REVOLUTION IN SEATTLE: VOICES FROM THE 1919 SEATTLE GENERAL STRIKE The Wobblies live again

in this evening of stories and songs. New Freeway Hall, 5018 Rainier Ave. S., 722-2453, socialism.com. $3–$8.50. 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 12. SEATTLE CONFIDENTIAL Ian Bell turns your deepest secrets into theater. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., seattleconfidential.org. $5–$15. 7:30 p.m. Tues., May 15.

CURRENT RUNS

• CAFÉ NORDO’S CABINET OF CURIOSITIES Tour

JET CITY IMPROV’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION! A week of events, May 13–20;

see jetcityimprov.com for details. Wing-It Productions, 5510 University Way N.E., 781-3879. MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET This touring jukebox musical centers on an actual recording session that included Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, and Johnny Cash. Expect all their hits. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 877-STG-4TIX, stgpresents.org. $25 and up. 7:30 p.m. Tues., May 15–Thurs., May 17; 8 p.m. Fri., May 18; 2 & 8 p.m.Sat., May 19; 1 & 6:30 p.m. Sun., May 20. MOTHER’S DAY IMPROV Unexpected Productions turns your mom stories into theater. Market Theatre, 1428 Post Alley, 587-2414, unexpectedproductions.org. $12. 8:30 p.m. Fri., May 11–Sat., May 12, 7 p.m. Sun., May 13. THE PRODUCERS Richard Gray and Brian Earp star in Mel Brooks’ blockbuster. Village Theatre, 303 Front St. N., Issaquah, 425-392-2202. $22–$62. Opens May 9; see villagetheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends July 1. PUGILIST SPECIALIST Adriano Shaplin’s look at four Marines assigned to assassinate a dictator. Stone Soup

“The World’s Most Elusive Culinary Museum” while savoring five courses plus wine. Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave., 800-838-3006, cafenordo.com. $60–$80. Runs 7:30 p.m. Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., plus 7:30 p.m. Sundays starting June 3. Ends June 17. CLYBOURNE PARK The first act of Bruce Norris’ Pulitzer-winning drama is set in 1959, when blacks are first buying into a white suburb of Chicago despite fierce local resistance. The second act reverses the dynamic, as whites begin to creep back into the distressed allblack neighborhood. The times may have changed, but none of Norris’ characters seem able to communicate across the racial divide. T. BONILLA Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 443-2210. $15–$74. Runs Wed.– Sun; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends May 13. DAMN YANKEES Richard Adler and Jerry Ross’ 1955 musical tells of the cellar-dwelling Washington Senators’ Faustian quest to beat their titular archrivals: Middle-aged fan Joe Boyd (Hugh Hastings) sells his soul to be transformed into Joe Hardy (Christopher Charles Wood), a home-run king half his age. Standouts include Patti Cohenour, who brings a great deal of warmth to Mrs. Boyd, and Chryssie Whitehead as the devil’s agent, Lola, whose would-be locker-room seduction of Hardy is both steamy and hilarious. 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave., 625-1900. $19 and up. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see 5thavenue.org for exact schedule. Ends May 20. FIRST DATE In this gossamer new musical, Aaron (Eric Ankrim) meets Casey (Kelly Karbacz) at a local bistro. Around them, the other patrons take on the guises of

EarSupply

» by gavin borchert

I Will Survive

Dance

INTRODANS In their first U.S. tour (and thus Seattle

debut), this Dutch troupe dances to Handel, Wagner, and more. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworld series.org. $20–$42. 8 p.m. Thurs., May 10–Sat., May 12. KALEIDOSCOPE DANCE COMPANY New works and revivals by Marlayna Locklear, Anna Mansbridge, andC others. Broadway Performance Hall, 1625 Broadway, 800-838-3006, creativedance.org. $8–$35. 7:30 p.m. Fri.,M May 11, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 12, 3:30 p.m. Sun., May 13. Y CO-LAB 4 Coriolis Dance Collective collaborates on new works with choreographers Rainbow Fletcher and Ezra CM Dickinson and their Offshore Project. Erickson Theatre Off Broadway, 1524 Harvard Ave., 800-838-3006, coriolis MY dance.com. $20. 8 p.m. Fri., May 11–Sat., May 12.

Classical, Etc.

CY

CMY

METROPOLITAN OPERA AT THE MOVIES Encore

broadcasts of Wagner’s Ring. See fathomevents.comK for participating theaters. 6:30 p.m. Wed., May 9, Mon., May 14, & Wed., May 16; noon Sat., May 19. SEATTLE OPERA SEE REVIEW, PAGE 20. COMPOSER SPOTLIGHT Seattle composer Jarrad Powell discusses the Indonesian gamelan and his new work for it, to be premiered May 12 (see Ki Midiyanto, below). Jack Straw Studios, 4261 Roosevelt Way N.E., jackstraw.org. Free. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 9. TED POOR This jazz/improv drummer performs. Penthouse Theatre, UW campus, 685-8384. See music.washington. edu for other IMPfest IV improv events this week. $5–$10. 7:30 p.m. Fri., May 11. CHORAL ARTS Music by Brahms, Randall Thompson, Seattle composer Karen P. Thomas, and more. Saint Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, 1245 Tenth Ave. E., 877-4042269, choral-arts.org. $18–$25. 8 p.m. Fri., May 11. NORTHWEST CHORALE Mendelssohn’s Elijah. Seattle First Baptist Church, 1111 Harvard St., 522-9853, nwchorale.org. Freewill offering. 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 12. KI MIDIYANTO This master of traditional Indonesian puppet theater performs with Gamelan Pacifica. Cornish College/PONCHO Concert Hall, 710 E. Roy St., cornish.edu. 8 p.m. Sat., May 12. NOVI_SAD Electro-acoustic music from Greece. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., 789-1939, waywardmusic.blogspot.com. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Sat., May 12. THALIA SYMPHONY Beethoven’s “Emperor” concerto and Glazunov’s ballet The Seasons. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., thaliasymphony.org. $18. 8 p.m. Sat., May 12.

• •

Chihuly’s cold flame, onstage at Benaroya.

to Bartók’s over-the-top one-act Bluebeard’s Castle (the title nobleman’s seventh wife meets the ghosts of her six murdered predecessors) in a semi-staged production that uses gorgeous sculptural set pieces by Dale Chihuly. (Diamond accompanies Bartók only on Thursday; next Tuesday, Bluebeard is preceded by a piano concerto— another premiere—by Michael Hirsch.) Benaroya Hall, Third Avenue and Union Street, 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $17–$74. 7:30 p.m. Tues., May 15 & Thurs., May 17.

ORCHESTRA SEATTLE/SEATTLE CHAMBER SINGERS

Liturgical works by Bruckner and Mozart, plus Beethoven’s “Eroica.” First Free Methodist Church, 3200 Third Ave. W., 800-838-3006, osscs.org. $10–$20. 3 p.m. Sun., May 13. MUSIC OF REMEMBRANCE The premiere of Jake Heggie’s song cycle Another Sunrise, settings of the satiric poems of a Polish Jew. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 365-7770, musicof remembrance.org. $36. 6:30 p.m. Mon., May 14. SEATTLE SYMPHONY SEE EAR SUPPLY. ANGELA HEWITT Known for her Bach, this pianist also performs music by his contemporaries Couperin and Rameau. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries.org. $20–$42. 8 p.m. Tues., May 15. CONCERT SPIRITUEL Music for lute, flute, and cello from the court of Wilhelmine, sister of Frederick the Great. Christ Episcopal Church, 4548 Brooklyn Ave., concertspirituel.org. $15–$20. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 16.

• •

Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

TERESA NOURI RISHEL

Composer David Diamond (1915–2005) was always an outspoken advocate of traditional musical ideals—expression, communication, craftsmanship—during decades of questioning experimentation from American music’s avantgarde wing. His steadfastness of purpose was sorely necessary during the travails of his opera The Noblest Game. Scheduled for a New York City Opera production in 1975, it was canceled due to a change in leadership at that company; reslated and re-canceled in 1995; and finally taken up by Diamond champion Gerard Schwarz, who programmed a suite of six arias for a 1998 Seattle Symphony concert. This too had to be canceled when the singer fell ill. So cross your fingers that nothing happens to soprano Jennifer Zetlan before, at last, next Thursday’s world premiere of the only fully orchestrated, performance-ready fragments of Diamond’s ill-fated opera, four decades after he began work. The libretto is by socialite and State Department official Katie Louchheim, who set her story in a milieu she knew well, the snake pit of Washington, D.C., politics. (The title may or may not be ironic.) Diamond juiced up the music for Louchheim’s heroinewith-a-past, Sabina, with a thrusting vocal line, plenty of high Bs, and—at one point in the score—a “bloodcurdling scream.” In fact, the whole thing sounds lurid enough to stand up next

those who influence their evening—parents, clergy, old beaux, etc. Aaron and Casey’s fragile new relationship never seems anything but authentic, and director Bill Berry juggles the action well. Overall, there’s much more right than wrong here. KEVIN PHINNEY ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $15–$69. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends May 20. THE PITMEN PAINTERS Lee Hall’s endearing hit about English coal miners during the 1930s and ’40s who get turned on to art—a true story. When the miners lose themselves in art and forget their class, their intelligence shines. All they need is an opportunity—a theme familiar from Hall’s script for Billy Elliot. Arts and education funding can be transformative, he reminds us, but those same benefits can heartbreakingly disappear during times of austerity. MARGARET FRIEDMAN ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $15–$55. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends May 20. For many more Current Runs, see seattleweekly.com.

21


arts»Visual Arts • GEORGETOWN ART ATTACK The May edition fea-

BY GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

Openings & Events • BALLARD ARTWALK Every second Saturday, Ballard’s

galleries stay open late for their monthly artwalk. Peek into venues including Ambach & Rice, 20Twenty, and many others. 5–9 p.m. Sat., May 12. BELLTOWN ART WALK Every third Thursday of the month, the neighborhood galleries (including Roq La Rue and others) and non-galleries (Yellow Leaf Cupcakes, Whiskey Bar, Pintxo, etc.) extend their hours so you can see work by local artists. See bedlamite.com/bawm for more info. Free. 6 p.m. Thurs., May 17. BLITZ! CAPITOL HILL ART WALK Check out the participating galleries and stores on Pike and Pine Streets, including Vermillion, Ltd. Gallery, True Love Art Gallery, and Photo Center NW, which will extend their hours to feature art, music, and more. See blitzcapitolhill. com. 5–8 p.m. Thurs., May 10. CONTEMPLATING NATURE This group show features art influenced by natural forms. Artists include Eva Isaksen, Iskra Johnson, Aithan Shapira, Nina Tichava, and Allyce Wood. Opening reception May 10 at 5 p.m. SAM Gallery, 1220 Third Ave., 343-1101, seattleartmuseum.org. Tues.– Sat., 10:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Through June 9. CORNISH 2012 ART SHOW The much-anticipated annual exhibit showcasing the work of 67 graduating art students. At the Virginia/Terry Building. Note May 11 opening reception, 5–9 p.m. Cornish College, Main Campus Center, 1000 Lenora St., 726-5069, cornish.edu. Opens May 11. Mon.–Sat., noon–5 p.m. Through May 26. MARIE GAGNON The Space Between features nine oil paintings and a dozen photos. Opening reception: Thurs., May 10, 6–9 p.m. during Capitol Hill Blitz! Arts Walk. Blindfold Gallery, 1718 E. Olive Way, 328-5100, Wed.–Sat., 1–7 p.m. Through June 9.

Send events to visualarts@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

tures iPhone images by Liz Ophoven and Jena Lacomis Garcia at All City Coffee, Tom Radio’s underwater photos at American Pie, and Mark Walker’s sculpture at Nautilus Studios. Also be sure to visit the usual Attack venues, including Bella Vitale, the Georgetown Arts and Cultural Center, and the Georgetown Trailer Park Mall. Afterward, you’re encouraged to continue the evening at any number of watering holes along Airport Way, including booze and music at the Georgetown Liquor Company, Jules Maes, 9 Lb. Hammer, and anyplace else you care to bend an elbow. See georgetownartattack. com. T. BOND 6–9 p.m. Sat., May 12. AALIYAH GUPTA Gupta’s new paintings explore her interest in dispersion, symbiosis, and coexistence. Also on view: new work by Scott Mansfield in Triggered Out. Note artist reception May 12, 5–7 p.m. Core Gallery, 117 Prefontaine Place S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 467-4444, coregallery.org. Wed.–Sat., noon–6 p.m. Through June 2. MISHA HUNTTING In Home, she shows pencil and ink drawings that explore and interpret a collection of found photographs. Note West Seattle Art Walk opening party Thursday, May 10, 6–9 p.m. Twilight Artist Collective, 4306 S.W. Alaska St., 933-2444, twilightart.net. Mon., Wed.–Fri., 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; Sat.–Sun., 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Through June 1. KIRKLAND ART WALK Howard/Mandville and other downtown galleries are represented at this free monthly event. 6–9 p.m. Sat., May 12. DAVID MAZAK He shows new work in Better Living Through Stereo. Note opening reception Saturday, May 12, 6–9 p.m. during the Georgetown Art Attack. Gallery open by appointment only. The Firm, 5813 Airport Way S., Seattle, thefirmgeorgetown.com. Opens May 12. Mon.–Sun. Through July 7. YURIKO MIYAMOTO Character and Me collects paintings and archival prints by the Portland artist, who examines the role of characters (i.e. lettering) in Japanese culture as a reflection of her own identity. Note opening reception Friday, May 11 at 6 p.m. Form/Space Atelier, 2407 First Ave., 349-2509, formspaceatelier.com. Opens May 11. Wed.–Sat., noon–4 p.m. Through June 2.

VISIT BroadwayAtTheParamount.com OR CALL 888.451.4042

OPENING RECEPTION: MAY 11, 5 – 9 PM

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

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Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

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D E C 6 – 23, 2012 | MOORE | $22 - $47.50

ANGELA HEWITT

JULY 12 & 13 | MOORE | $15.50

SISTER ACT

DEC 1, 2012 | MOORE | $18.50 PIANIST

MAY 28 - JUNE 2, 2013 | PARAMOUNT | $23.75 - $68.75

SEATTLE ROCK ORCHESTRA PERFORMS LED ZEPPELIN DANCE THEATRE OF HARLEM

May 10-12, 8pm

MARCH 29, 2013 | MOORE | $13

MORE MUSIC @ THE MOORE

NOV 2, 2012 | NEPTUNE | $25

—De Telegraaf

STARBUCKS HOT JAVA COOL JAZZ

A L L P R I C E S R E F L E C T S U B S C R I B E R P R I C I N G . A R T I S TS , D AT E S , V E N U E S A N D T I M E S S U B J E C T TO C H A N G E .

UW World Series

“This is a program that expresses all the best things about Introdans.”

JAN 19, 2013 | MOORE | $32 - $59

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arts»Visual Arts PROCESS Gallery artists share a behind-the-scenes

look at how they make their work. Note reception 5–7 p.m. Sat., May 12. Fraker/Scott Gallery, 121 Prefontaine Place S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 883-4633, fraker scottgallery.com. Wed.–Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through May 26. THE REDUCTIVIST SHOW David Brody, Steve Costie, Graham Shutt, Vannessa Tran, and Duane Zaloudek try to remove essential information from their drawings. Note lecture by critic Jim Demetre 7 p.m. Thurs., May 10. Prographica, 3419 E. Denny Way., prographica drawings.com. Wed.–Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through May 26. TABLEAUX VIVANT Working in collage, portraiture, and sculpture, six gallery artists exhibit their work. Note artist reception Thurs., May 10, 6–7:30 p.m. ArtsWest, 4711 California Ave. S.W., 938-0339, artswest.org. Tues.–Sat., noon–7 p.m. Through July 7. VIGNETTES CASH, John Osgood, Kellie Talbot, and Siolo Thompson each contribute a series of work. Media include paintings, masks, and photography, Note artist openings Fri., May 11 from 6–10 p.m. and Sat., May 12 from noon–5 p.m. Bherd Studios, 8537 Greenwood Ave. N., 234-8348, bherdclothing.com. Opens May 11, Wed.– Fri., noon–6 p.m. Through June 1. WEST SEATTLE ART WALK Over 60 venues showcase local art every second Thursday of the month, including Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, ArtsWest, and Twilight Artist Collective. 6–9 p.m. Thurs., May 10.

Museums

DALE CHIHULY Celebrating the Museum of Glass’ 10th

anniversary and the 50th anniversary of the Studio Glass movement, Origins: Early Works by Dale Chihuly features early works including central piece Persian Seaforms, a 33-piece installation recently added to the museum’s permanent collection. Museum of Glass, 1801 E. Dock St., Tacoma, 253-284-4750, museumof glass.org. Opens May 12. Wed.–Sat., 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sun., noon–5 p.m.; Every third Thursday, 10 a.m.–8 p.m. Through Oct. 21.

COLORS OF THE OASIS: CENTRAL ASIAN IKATS

Over 60 ultra-colorful ikats, the traditional robe-like garment of Uzbekistan, are displayed, along with vintage and recent photos of the region and a few videos. Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E. Prospect St. (Volunteer Park), 654-3100, seattleartmuseum. org. $5–$7. First Wednesday, Friday–Sunday of every month, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Thurs., 10 a.m.–8 p.m. Through Aug. 5. ANDREW DADSON Dadson won the Henry’s Brink Award, and he’s now showing his recent photographs and paintings. Henry Art Gallery, 4100 15th Ave. N.E., 543-2280, henryart.org. $6–$10. Thurs., Fri., 11 a.m.– 9 p.m.; Wed., Sat., Sun., 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Through July 22. THEASTER GATES In The Listening Room, the Chicago artist has rearchived the albums from a defunct R&B record store as a kind of tribute to the Civil Rights era. Flag-like arrangements of flattened fire hoses cover the

walls, and he’s set up a DJ’s console on an old church altar, too. Visitors are encouraged to browse through another trove of old vinyl on the floor, where turntables also invite your use. Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org. $12–$15. Thurs., Fri., 10 a.m.–9 p.m.; Wed., Sat., Sun., 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Through July 1. HIDE/SEEK Hide/Seek is a gay-centric group show organized by the Smithsonian, now on its West Coast tour. The rainbow roster includes heavyweight names like Eakins, O’Keeffe, Rauschenberg, Mapplethorpe, and Warhol. Mostly men, with few up-and-comers here, the exhibit is like a pantheon of Dead White Gay Men (DWGM). The roughly 90 works—mostly paintings and photos, plus a few videos—are divided into historical and post-WWII galleries. Thus it’s possible to construct a happy historical progression from Walt Whitman’s 19th-century freedom to the closet (and its codes) to Stonewall and AIDS and, finally, gay marriage. The problem with this kind of up-from-slavery reading of the art, as the DWGM might tell you, is that their lives and circumstances weren’t so simple. Was Andy Warhol more or less free, more or less tormented, than Thomas Eakins? Which man put more of himself into his art, imbued it with more longing or less sex? A good example of this ambiguity is Grant Wood’s 1930 Arnold Comes of Age, impossible to see now as anything but a screaming case of repression. Prim, prissy, V-necked Arnold turns away from some nude male bathers in what—disgust, longing, self-disgust, fear, or Protestant self-denial? Lips pursed, hair neatly combed, he’s both pitiable and ridiculous. There’s a Midwestern sadness to his not getting what he (presumably) wants in life, but are all “liberated” gay men truly happy today? Full of good individual pieces, Hide/Seek means well, but it’s inherently reductive. The show doesn’t exactly create a Fire Island ghetto of gay artists; rather, it subordinates individual achievement to group identity. I’d much rather see a Warhol show, a Minor White show, a Marsden Hartley show than a greatest-gay-hits sampler such as this. BRIAN MILLER Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, 253-272-4258, tacomaart museum.org. $8–$10. Wed., Fri.–Sun., 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Thurs., 10 a.m.–8 p.m. Through June 10. GARY HILL glossodelic attractors includes 12 of Hill’s works, which consider how visual and verbal communication are experienced and affect each other. Henry Art Gallery, 4100 15th Ave. N.E., 543-2280, henryart.org. $6–$10. Thurs.–Fri., 11 a.m.–9 p.m.; Sat.–Sun., 11 a.m.– 4 p.m.; Wed., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Sept. 16. MARY LEE HU The local jeweler presents 90 earrings, rings, brooches, and neckpieces. Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., 425-519-0770, bellevuearts.org. $7–$10. Tues.–Thurs., Sat.–Sun., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through June 17. NORTHWEST BIENNIAL TAM celebrates 30 different artists from the region. Open to 8 p.m. on Thurs. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, 253272-4258, tacomaartmuseum.org. $8-$10. Wed.–Sun., 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Through May 20.

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

HAPPY BIKE MONTH!

24

BIKE RENTALS BUY • SELL • TRADE • CONSIGN “Seattle’s Used Bike Shop”

1007 NE BOAT STREET (206) 547-4491

1109 N 35TH STREET (206) 397-4286 recycledcycles.com Mon-Fri 10am-8pm • Sat-Sun 10am-6pm


O FFICIAL SEATTLE BEER W EEK GU IDE 2012

1


SEATTLE BEER WEEK

Same Great Beer

aweSome Fourth Annual SBW New is Seattle’s Celebration of All Things Beer LaBeL!

BY GEOFF KAISER

A Specialty Beer and Wine Store * 700+ rotating domestic and international beers * 400+ wines, ports & bubbles * Largest mead & hard cider selection in the Northwest!

www.fullthrottlebottles.com (206) 763-2079 * 5909 Airport Way S Seattle, WA 98108 info@fullthrottlebottles.com *

Do you like beer?

YES

how about cheese?

OFFI CIAL SEAT TLE BEER WEEK G UIDE 2012

YES!

2

doing anything

this friday?

NOT YET...

Would you like them both at the same time? so come to this on wednesday! NO REALLY! I AM!

YES

NO

YES

NO

don’t be ridiculous.

come on.

no you’re not.

now you are.

Avery Brewing (Boulder, CO) and boneyard beer (Bend, OR) take over our taps each beer paired with its own cheese course. Friday May 11th - 4pm 5329 Ballard Avenue Northwest (206) 783-2337 - www.urbanfamilypublichouse.com

NAH

Really? Ok. come to this instead!

Evil Twin night 6 taps, 10 bottles from our favorite (evil) danish brewer

Wednesday may 16th - 4pm

Welcome to the fourth Annual Seattle Beer Week! If you somehow managed to miss out on all of the fun that was had during the first three years, just keep reading and you should get an idea of just how exciting the next 11 days are going to be. Yes, SBW is actually a bit longer than your normal week. With so many great breweries, bars, retailers, and restaurants that focus on good beer yearround in Seattle without the need for a special occasion, you could almost call every week your own personal SBW. But SBW is one hell of an excuse for every beer venue in town to throw a collective party that celebrates everything that is great about one of the best beer cities in the country. Seattle helped start the now-booming countrywide craft-beer craze, and our fine city continues to boast some of the best breweries and beer bars anywhere. Whether you are a hard-core beer geek searching out one of the many rare beers that will pour throughout the week or a casual drinker just planning to knock back a few pints, SBW has more events than you could ever hope to fit into your personal calendar. The fun will kick off on Thursday, May 10 at the Elysian Brewing Capitol Hill brewpub, where at 6 p.m. they will tap the first keg of the official 2012 SBW beer, Split Shot Espresso Milk Stout. This 7.25% ABV stout from Elysian features coldinfused coffee from Lighthouse Roasters in Fremont to complement the dark malt flavors and light sweetness from the use of milk sugar. It will be available on draft all over town, as well as in 22 oz. bottles at many retailers. Food-related events are always popular choices for SBW, and there are many options to choose from this year. The most over-the-top dinner is sure to be the dinner at Brouwer’s Cafe on May 16 featuring chef Sean Paxton, known as the “homebrew chef,” and beer from California’s Firestone Walker Brewing. Attendees will be stuffed full after eight courses and 12 beers, but you will no doubt walk (or crawl) away with a new appreciation for both how beer can be used in preparing dishes and how beer can pair with various courses. On a different note, vegetarians will enjoy the five-course dinner at Carmelita in Phinney Ridge on May 17 featuring Pike Brewing Company. Charles and Rose Ann Finkel of Pike are two of the nicest and most interesting people in the beer industry, and they will be on hand for conversation throughout the dinner. Brave Horse Tavern will have quite a few events throughout the week, including a West Coast Brewers Dinner on May 16. Four courses will be paired with a total of nine beers from Anderson Valley Brewing Company, Hopworks Urban Brewery and

Chuckanut Brewing Company. Brewers and representatives will also be on hand for the dinner. SBW is also a great chance to check out some of the newer beer spots in town. The Pine Box, located in Capitol Hill, is owned in part by one of the organizers for SBW, and will have several events worth attending. On May 14 they host an event called “Can You Handle My Randall?” where they will feature more than 11 different beers poured through a device called a Randall that imparts the flavor of whatever you add to it, like hops, cocoa nibs, or wood chips. They will also be hosting an event on May 15 pairing some seriously rare beers from Firestone Walker with chocolate from Fran’s Chocolates, and featuring photography of each company by Rawi Nanakul. The Burgundian is a new beer bar in Tangletown brought to you from the people behind Brouwer’s Cafe and Bottleworks. On May 12, they will have an East Coast Tap Takeover, where they’ll pour beer from breweries back east from all 22 of their taps. This one is definitely a good opportunity to see what breweries from other parts of the country are up to these days. If you are looking to concentrate on local beers from the Pacific Northwest, you won’t be disappointed. Beveridge Place Pub is one of the best beer bars in town and always puts the focus on our great local breweries. Join them for “This is Washington Dammit!” on May 14, where they will pour $3 pints from 24 different Washington breweries. The Noble Fir will pair two of my favorite Oregon breweries when they host their Double Mountain vs. Terminal Gravity Tap Takeover on May 11. SBW has sports fans covered as well. If you’re an avid Sounders fan, don’t miss an event at The Yard Cafe in Greenwood on May 19 where they will feature an array of sour beers from Cascade Brewing while the Sounders take on Vancouver as they try to hold on to the Cascadia Cup. The Seattle Taphouse Grill will also host their third annual Brewers 9 Ball Tournament on May 12, where teams of five compete to take home gift certificates and bragging rights. With so many events to choose from, it might be hard to decide where to spend your time. In my opinion, you can’t go wrong. No matter what you do, chances are you’ll be looking forward to next year’s SBW more than ever. For more information on these and other events, make sure to check out Seattlebeerweek.com. Geoff Kaiser writes about the Seattle beer scene for SeattleBeerNews.com and the Northwest Brewing News.


SEATTLE BEER WEEK THURSDAY MAY 10 SBW 2012 Kickoff pt. 1

Come celebrate the kickoff of Seattle Beer Week 2012 at the historic Elysian Capitol Hill Brewery. We will be tapping the official SBW 2012 beer, Split Shot, at 6 p.m.

5-7 p.m. Elysian Capitol Hill

Beer O’clock

It’s Quinn’s Beer O’Clock on steroids! During Beer O’Clock, we’re offering our entire beer list at half price for the duration of Seattle Beer Week! This includes any of our 14 draft beers, all of our Trappist Ales, our large format list and the rest of our 50+ bottle list of ales, lagers, sours and ciders.

All Day Quinn’s

Tap Takeover: Stone Brewing Co. Super Deli Mart’s taps are being taken over by Stone Brewing Co. Come in for some very special beers from San Diego’s Stone Brewing Co. You never know what we might have stashed away for this event. Bring your Growler in and take a look.

All Day Super Deli Mart

Bottleworks Window Takeover

Creativity will reign supreme in this design battle for our newest window display. Bring by your idea by Thursday, May 10, drawn out or a scale model for folks to vote on all beer week long. The winner’s design/art will get to take over our window display for an entire month. Must be beer related/themed. Stop by beforehand for dimensions/electrical restrictions. Votes will be totaled and the winner decided on Monday the 21st.

All Day Bottleworks

Kill the Line Up!

Brave Horse Tavern is gearing up for rolling and tapping loads of kegs. Thursday we will be featuring Kill the Line Up! Beer Specials to make room for Seattle Beer Week

All Day Brave Horse Tavern

Cask-O-Rama pt. 1

Twelve Seattle breweries, 12 casks on the bar top!

6 p.m.-midnight Beveridge Place Pub

Boundary Bay Brewery Night

Brewers Special Draft & a Special Cask Beer. Glassware Night! Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last) Brewery rep on hand!

Firefighter Benefit featuring Ninkasi

Benefit for families of firefighters who have lost their lives in the line of duty. All proceeds of Ninkasi Commonwealth Multigrain Ale will be donated.

7-10 p.m. McCoy’s Firehouse

Back in Black

A night of the biggest of the big, and the blackest of the black Stouts from around the way.

All Day Brouwer’s Cafe

Beer Club Kick-Off Party

Brave Horse Tavern Beer Club members only!

All Day Brave Horse Tavern

Avery, Boneyard and Fromage

Join us as Avery Brewing and Boneyard Brewing take over our taps and Washington cheese takes over our kitchen. Each beer will be paired with its own cheese course to bring out the best.

4 p.m.-midnight Urban Family Public House

Cask-O-Rama pt. 2

Twelve Seattle breweries, 12 casks on the bar top!

6 p.m.-midnight Beveridge Place Pub

Maple Leaf Art Walk

See, and buy(?), artwork from local artists while enjoying a beer.

3-9 p.m. Cooper’s Alehouse

Dogfish Head Takeover

Super Deli Mart will surrender all taps to Dogfish Head Craft Brewery. Come and try a ton of great beers from Delaware’s Dogfish Head Craft Brewery. Pint, Schooner and Growler specials.

All Day Super Deli Mart

The Four Seasons

Friday - Sunday, May 11-13. This event at the Duck will be a lubricated stroll down beer memory lane as we revisit some of the wonderful beers we’ve had this past year. We will feature at least two beers to represent the seasons past.

All Day The Duck Island Alehouse

SATURDAY MAY 12

6-9 p.m. 74th Street Alehouse

HOP IPA Brunch @ Tangletown

Squirreled Away

10 a.m.-3 p.m. Elysian Tangletown

All week long during SBW. Rare, off season and cellared beers from our secret stash. Pop in and find out what’s pouring.

All Day The Dray

Join us for “a day at the races” at Cooper’s Alehouse. Bet on the ponies while enjoying one of six Sierra Nevada beers on tap including something special from the cellar.

6-9 p.m. Cooper’s Alehouse

FRIDAY MAY 11 Double Mountain vs. Terminal Gravity

Double Mountain vs. Terminal Gravity Tap Takeover.

The race is on! Come and try your luck racing cans Cub Scout-style down the tracks to beer glory. Build a can car on the spot or build your own at home and bring it in. Beer Prizes will be awarded! Build Your own at Home!

3rd Annual Brewers 9 Ball Tourney

Pair up with 1 of 8 breweries in teams of 5 and go head to head in a winning team takes all ($800 in brewery/Taphouse gift certificates) championship! Featuring team captains from these awesome breweries: Ayinger, Skagit River, Flyers, Ninkasi, American, Fremont, Iron Horse, and Naked City. Beers from all breweries on tap. Free entry. Please call 816-3314 to make your reservation.

3:30-6:30 p.m. Taphouse Grill Seattle

Phinney Artwalk featuring Rawi Nanakul

Dogfish Head vs. Cascade

6-9 p.m. Naked City Taphouse

Watch the video

3-8 p.m. The Pine Box

4-8 p.m. The Noble Fir

Phinneywood Art Walk Gallery Opening featuring renowned brewery photographer Rawi Nanakul’s black-and-white metal prints of Cascade Brewery, Naked City Brewery, and home brewers doing what they love best. The artist will be on hand to share the stories behind the photographs and to sell these amazing metal prints. Grab one while they last!

When where you live inspires what you do, we call that living life Alaskan.

Pine Box Can Derby

Beer/Wine Hybrid Night! We’ll be putting up The Vine and Sang Royal from Cascade head to head against Noble Rot and Red and White from Dogfish Head.

4-8 p.m. The Noble Fir

An Evening with Lagunitas

Old school Bottleworks-style tasting of their current bottle offerings, a special draft beer and maybe a little sumpin’ sumpin’ from our cellar.

Brewer/Commercial Fisherman Michael King

Handcrafted in Juneau, Alaska

alaskanbeer.com

O FFICIAL SEATTLE BEER W EEK GU IDE 2012

A day at the races with Sierra Nevada

Join us for weekend brunch as we feature 10 of our hop-tastic IPAs with suggested breakfast pairings.

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OFFI CIAL SEAT TLE BEER WEEK G UIDE 2012


SEATTLE BEER WEEK Stop by to try some beers, maybe score some swag, and find out the latest news from Petaluma.

4-7 p.m. Bottleworks

Colorado Brewers Night

Join us for the real taste of the Rockies with the finest offerings from five stellar Colorado breweries: Oskar Blues, Left Hand, Boulder, Avery, and Great Divide. Special brews include a keg of Great Divide’s 17th Anniversary Wood Aged Double IPA, a Bronze Medal Winner at the 2010 Stockholm Beer and Whiskey Festival. More details on special brews to come. And of course, Naked City’s Chef Tessa will whip up a batch of Rocky Mountain Oysters for the night!

6-9 p.m. Naked City Taphouse

color. Bock was traditionally brewed for special occasions, often religious festivals such as Christmas, Easter or Lent.Bocks have a long history of being brewed and consumed by Roman Catholic monks in Germany. During the spring religious season of Lent, monks were required to fast. High-gravity Bock beers are higher in food energy and nutrients than lighter lagers, thus providing sustenance during this period. Similar high-gravity Lenten beers of various styles were brewed by monks in other lands as well (see Trappist beer). Featured Bocks: Hacker Pschorr Maibock, Einbecker Mai-Bock, The original MaiBock, Hofbrau Maibock, Bayreuther Mai-bock

All Day Prost! Phinney

HOP IPA Brunch @ Tangletown 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Elysian Tangletown

All Day The Burgundian

Half off beer during Brunch for all of you mothers out there. Plus special beers from Widmer Brothers.

We will replace all 22 taps with beer from back east. This is an all-day event.

Mothers Day Beerunch!

Kegs’ Eggs w/ Elysian Brewing Co.

11 a.m.-3 p.m. The Pine Box

Elysian Brewing Co. the official Beer of 2012 Seattle Beer Week, Split Shot Espresso Milk Stout. We’re pairing it with a brunch special of house-made doughnuts with bourbon caramel chocolate dips.

Mother’s Day featuring Winesap Estate Cider

Pig Roast and Homebrew Competition

1-4 p.m. The Noble Fir

Quinn’s and Fremont are teaming up to make Quinn’s 3rd Annual Pig Roast the best one yet! Due to high demand we’re doubling our capacity and we’re stepping up our offerings. In addition to live music and special casks from Fremont, we’ll also be hosting the only Homebrew Competition of SBW! The crew from Fremont Brewing will be on hand to review each entry and will pick a winner based on flavor, balance and style. The winner will get behind the scenes access to Fremont Brewing for a whole day of brewing! Get tips and hints and see how the pros get ‘er done! Additional prizes will be available for the best label art of the day, as judged by the crowd. As usual, one ticket gets you beer and all the pig you can eat. $30 plus tax presale. $35+ at the door. For details, reservations or to sign up for the homebrew contest, contact the restaurant at 325-7711. Don’t put this off! Entries and space are limited.

11 a.m.-3 p.m. Quinn’s

Tour de Pints #4

Oil up your chains, grab your helmet, and come join Flying Bike Cooperative Brewery on this year’s 4th annual Tour de Pints! For more information check us out on Facebook at www.facebook.com/tourdepints.

11:30 a.m.-7 p.m. The Pike Brewing Company

Hoppy Drinks On The Tiny Links

4-6:30 p.m. Interbay Golf Center

The Dray 4th Anniversary Celebration

Soccer, beer and more. Annual Parking Lot Party outback. Food trucks and rare beers. Sounders vs. RSL at 7 p.m. live. Catch a ride to the match or stick around and watch with a good beer in your hand.

11 a.m.-5 p.m. The Dray

SUNDAY MAY 13 Mai-Bock, Your MOM’S Bock!!

Join Seattle’s Original German Pubs everyday as they welcome in Spring and Seattle Beer Week with a selection of rare German Mai-Bock beers. Also celebrating Mother’s Day, all moms receive 50% off everything! Bock is a type of strong lager beer, first brewed in the 14th century in the Hanseatic town of Einbeck, Germany, from which it gets its name (originally “Einbeck” / “Einbock”). The original Bocks were dark beers, brewed from high-colored malts. Modern Bocks can be dark, amber, red or pale in

Fine Wine, Beer & Spirits

We’ll give the Moms a break from the kids with Winesap Estate Cider Seasonal Peach Cider and Cherry Cider.

Mother’s Day Brewers Dinner

A very special brewers table on Mother’s Day with Head Brewer Don Webb, featuring the beer-soaked cuisine of Naked City’s Head Chef, Tessa Roberts. Ticketed event, 30 seats available, seven paired courses of beer and food. $60 each, and only 30 seats available. Seats can be purchased one of two ways: stop by the pub in person or call the pub at 838-6299 during business hours. Delicious Dinner Menu and Full Beer List will be announced a week prior to the event. Seven Naked City beers will be featured, including these two(!): NC-17 Malt Liquor, and Opacity bourbon-barrel-aged Imperial Stout.

5-7 p.m. Naked City Taphouse

Classic Movie DJ Session #1

Wind down from a glorious day of beer tasting & feasting with a screening of that perfect Mother’s Day feature, Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, accompanied a live synchronized soundtrack from DJ Nicfit. Naked City’s Screening Room seats about 70 people and features full table service for dining and drinking. DJ Nicfit’s live film soundtrack performances have drawn crowds and acclaim at the Seattle International Film Festival’s Uptown Theatre, at Bauhaus Coffee, and at Naked City’s own Screening Room on the last Sunday of every month. Free & open to the public!

8-10 p.m. Naked City Taphouse

All That and a Fat Sack of Chips!!! Avery Brewing Co is taking over the taps @Superdelimart. Come in grab some delicious award winning Avery beer and you will get a free bag of Tim’s Cascade Chips, a Northwest Favorite!!

All Day Super Deli Mart

Handcrafted since 2001. Portland’s first certified organic brewery. Find us wherever quality craft beer is sold throughout Oregon and Washington, or visit us at one of our pub locations.

Kegs’ Eggs w/ Elysian Brewing Co. Elysian Brewing Co. the official Beer of 2012 Seattle Beer Week, Split Shot Espresso Milk Stout. We’re pairing it with a brunch special of house-made doughnuts with bourbon caramel chocolate dips.

10 a.m.-3p.m Brave Horse Tavern

Bottleworks and Jacobs Creamery Bottleworks and Jacobs Creamery team up for a beer and cheese tasting. Jacobs Creamery from Chehalis will be in the house and we will match each of their cheese offerings with 6 oz. of the beer of our choice. Tickets for this event are being pre-sold at Bottleworks. Jacobs Creamery will also be selling their cheeses to take home at the tasting.

1-3:30 p.m. Bottleworks

Mother’s Day Cheese & Cider Festival

Bring Mom by Quinn’s and explore the world of fine ciders and cheese. We’ll be offering ciders from both

laurelwoodbrewpub.com

O FFICIAL SEATTLE BEER W EEK GU IDE 2012

Join a foursome with your favorite breweries and compete for best score, worst score and best costume. Breweries include Ninkasi Brewing, Diamond Knot, Elysian, Fremont Brewing, Firestone Walker and Skagit River Brewing. Trophy ceremony and more beers after the match at The Leary Traveler. Sign-up & questions? Email joshua@ninkasibrewing.com

Wholesale Distributing

Join us for weekend brunch as we feature 10 of our hop-tastic IPAs with suggested breakfast pairings.

East Coast Tap Takeover!!

10 a.m.-3p.m Brave Horse Tavern

Celebrate Seattle Beer Week with a Pick from Click!

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enjoy seattle beer week at your neighborhood pubs! Your neighborhood pub at

GREEN LAKE

Your neighborhood pub on

CAPITOL HILL

Your neighborhood pub in

WEDGWOOD

fresh & wonderful beer! visit 3pubs.com

Late Night HAPPY HOUR 11pm - 1am Fri & Sat

Norm’s “Smoak-in’” Deal on Mondays! Widmer Drafts for the price of Justin Smoak’s batting average all day!

OFFI CIAL SEAT TLE BEER WEEK G UIDE 2012

206-547-1417 • 460 N 36th St in the Heart of Fremont

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Saturday, May 12 6pm-10pm Hale’s Ales Brewers Night 1447 NW Ballard Way Seattle, WA 98107 (206)782-2808. bardsbeer.com 1.877.440.2337 Please enjoy responsibly

Featured on the Food Network

Family Owned For 4 Generations!


SEATTLE BEER WEEK sides of the pond in many different styles side by side with cheese from Corsican Cellars, one of Seattle’s premiere importers. Come and experiment with flavor pairings and learn from the cheesemongers and cider makers themselves! All ciders and cheeses will be available for take-home purchase and the first 25 reservations made will receive a special basket of hand-selected goodies. Sign up soon, availability is limited! $30 plus tax. Contact the restaurant for details or reservations. 325-7711

3:30-6 p.m. Quinn’s

Iron Brewer Triple Header!

WE choose the secret ingredient, THEY brew the beer, YOU decide the winner!

5-8 p.m. Beveridge Place Pub

Hale’s Ale’s Brewery Night

Brewers Special Draft and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night! Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supply lasts) Brewery rep will be on hand !

6-9 p.m. 74th Street Alehouse

Odin Brewery Night

Brewers Special Draft and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night! Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last). Brewery rep on hand !

6-9 p.m. Hilltop Alehouse

Boundary Bay Brewery Night

Get Lucky with Lagunitas Feeling Brave? Get lucky with Lagunitas.

4-7 p.m.Brave Horse Tavern

Ninkasi Brewery Night

Brewers Special Beer! Glassware Night. Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last) Brewery rep on hand!

6-9 p.m. Hilltop Alehouse

This Is Washington Dammit!

Twenty-four Washington Beers from 24 different breweries. All $3 pints

All Day Beveridge Place Pub

Big Beer Challenge with Great Divide

Super Deli Mart is proud to feature some big beers from Colorado’s Great Divide Brewing. Hercules, Yeti, Titan, Anniversary and a few others will all be in the house. Come in and check it out! Growler specials.

All Day Super Deli Mart

Mai-Bock-A-Licious!!

Join Seattle’s Original German Pubs everyday as they welcome in Spring and Seattle Beer Week with a selection of rare German Mai-Bock beers.

All Day Feierabend

Brewers Special Draft and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night. Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last). Brewery rep on hand!

Meet the Brewers: Pike, Scuttlebutt & Alpine

Newbies Night

4-7 p.m. Emmer and Rye

6-9 p.m. Columbia City Alehouse

Let’s celebrate some of the newest breweries in Washington! Lift a pint to their beginnings and to our futures! Twelve Bar Brews, North Sound Brewing, Slippery Pig, Dirty Bucket and Brick Yard will all be here.

6-10 p.m. Brave Horse Tavern

MONDAY MAY 14 Stone Brewing Co. @ Ballard Pizza Co.

Stone Brewing Co. at Ballard Pizza Co. presented by The Noble Fir. Join Rick and Ellen for Vanilla Bean Porter, Stone IPA and Levitation Dry Hopped Amber paired with mouthwatering pizza from Ethan Stowell.

11 a.m.-11 p.m. Ballard Pizza Company

Can You Handle My Randall?

We’re turning our Randall count up to 11, bringing you over 11 different Beers Randallized with whatever our twisted minds can come up with. More details as we gather the breweries to be Randallized.

3-10 p.m. The Pine Box

West Sound & East of the Mountains Brewers Night. Join us for an epic night featuring 18 taps from 18 of the finest breweries in Washington State—nine from West of Puget Sound and nine from East of the Cascades—for a showcase of ales far-flung and hidden in the corners. This is a mini-beer fest in one night! Meet the brewers from 7 Seas, Port Townsend, Silver City, Peaks, Der Blokken, Sound, Iron Horse, Icicle, Northern Lights, and many more!

6-9 p.m. Naked City Taphouse

Beer Bingo!

Free to play! Awesome Pyramid prizes to win! We’ll have some sweet drink specials happening to keep your pipes primed to shout BINGO!

6-9 p.m. Pyramid Breweries’ Seattle Alehouse

Classic Movie DJ Session #2

Wind down after the West Sound & East of the Mountains Brewers Night at Naked City with a screening of the original vampire film, F.W. Murnau’s Nosferatu, accompanied by a live synchronized soundtrack from DJ Nicfit.

9-10:30 p.m. Naked City Taphouse

Big Sky Bull Riding

Cowboy Up! Wear your Western Wear!

6-11 p.m. Brouwer’s Cafe

Maritime Pacific Brewery Night Brewers Special Draft and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night! Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last). Brewery rep on hand!

6-9 p.m. 74th Street Alehouse

Big Al’s Brewery Night

Brewers Special Draft and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night. Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last). Brewery rep on hand !

6-9 p.m. Columbia City Alehouse

Legends Night with Chuckanut Brewing

Come taste a sampling of GABF “Brewery of the year” Chuckanut Brewery and meet the legend Will Kemper!

6-7:30 p.m. Shultzy’s Sausage

Collabeeration: Beer makes friends

We work in an great industry which usually favors Collaboration over, Litigation; this is our ode to keeping everything copacetic.

7-10 p.m. The Burgundian

Anniversary Series w/ Anacortes Brewing

Taste the brew made for Seattle Beer Week and the Latona’s 25th Anniversary. We will include not only the anniversary beer but a lineup of fantastic ale from our friends up north.

8-11 p.m. Latona Pub

Hale’s Bingo Night ! Everybody loves bingo!

6-9 p.m.Cooper’s Alehouse

TUESDAY MAY 15 Firestone & Frans Beer & Chocolate

A night pairing some of the boldest beers, with some of the finest chocolates. Join David Walker, of Firestone Walker, and Andrina Bigelow, of Fran’s

O FFICIAL SEATTLE BEER W EEK GU IDE 2012

West Sound & East of the Mountains

Rub elbows and taste a selection beers from our great locals breweries paired with bites from Chef Seth. $20. Call 282-0680 for reservations, or just drop in!

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Seattle Beer Week Events

May 10th–20th, 2012 Fri 11th

Back In Black Stout Fe st @ Brou wer ’s – All Day Sat 12th

An Evening w/ Lagunitas @ Bot tle works - 4pm Laurelwood 5 Course Beer Dinner @ Burgundian - 7pm (ticke ts on sale) Sun 13th

Beer & Chee se Tasting fe aturing Jacobs Cre amer y @ Bot tle works - 1pm (ticke ts on sale) Mon 14th

Collabeeration Night Sponsored by Ne w Belgium @ Burgundian - 7pm Blue Sk y Ride the Bull Night @ Brou wer ’s – 6pm Tue s 15th

Cellar Tasting @ Bot tle works Six Dif ferent 6oz Pours – 5pm (ticke ts on sale) The infamous Beer & Burger Bat tle @ Brou wer ’s – 6pm Wed 16th

Dinner w/ Fire stone Walker & Homebre w Chef Se an Paxton @ Brou wer ’s - 6pm (ticke ts on sale at BPTs) Thurs 17th

Ever ybody’s favorite ‘Sour Fe st’ @ Brou wer ’s – All Day Fri 18th

HUB 11 Tap Takeover @ Burgundian – 5pm Sat 19th

Nink asi Sensor y Class w/ Jamie Floyd @ Bo t tle works - 1-3pm

SEATTLE BEER WEEK Chocolates, as we explore the boundaries of two very different fermented delicacies.This will be a 10-course pairing accompanied by a photography exhibit of each company by Rawi Nanakul. $55 including gratuity. Please email Ian@Pineboxbar. com for reservations. Seating is very limited

7-10 p.m. The Pine Box

6-9 p.m. 74th Street Alehouse

Trivia Tuesday w/ Snoqualmie Falls Brewing

See Monday’s Mai-Bock-A-Licious!!

Extreme Growler Smackdown!

12 Pack at the Troll

Mai-Bock, Your Bock All Day Feierabend

Super Deli is offering some smoking hot deals on Organic draft beers from Portland’s Hopworks Urban Brewery, aka HUB. The more Growlers you bring the better the price gets.. 1 Growler fill = $10, 2 Growler fills=$9, 3 Growler fills=$8 and so on.... Don’t miss out.

All Day Super Deli Mart

Battle of Eugene

Battle of Eugene with Ninkasi and Oakshire, both bringing specialty beers and beer flights: you be the judge.

4-7 p.m.Brave Horse Tavern

Beer & Burger Battle

Five Burgers, five world class brewers, and at the end there can only be one. Confirmed Brewers: Reigning champs, Fremont Brewing (Wash.) taking on this year’s challengers New Belgium Brewing Co. (Colo.), 21st Amendment (Calif.), Black Raven (Wash.) and Hair of the Dog (Ore.).

5-11 p.m. Brouwer’s Cafe

Bottleworks Cellar Tasting

This first-ever tasting of beers from our cellar will include six different 6 oz. pours. Barleywines, Stouts, Sours, who knows what will be brought out of the depths of our cellar. Tickets are limited and pre-sold only at Bottleworks.

Bock Dinner w/ Mr. Schumacher Join Seattle’s Original German Pubs everyday as they welcome in Spring and Seattle Beer Week with a selection of rare German Mai-Bock beers and authentic German cuisine. Please call for reservations as this will sell out soon. 340-2528

8:45-11 p.m. Cooper’s Alehouse

Seattle Beer Week’s quickest, most rogue, flash mob of an event. Tell your friends.

11-11:30 p.m. The Troll

WEDNESDAY MAY 16 4th Annual Firkin-Firkin

Seattle vs. San Diego @ Elysian Capitol Hill. This year eight Seattle area breweries are taking on eight San Diego area breweries to see which city has the most kick-ass Cask ! Come taste a great line-up of cask beer and help us choose a winner by voting for your favorite brews!

3-10 p.m. Elysian Capitol Hill

Snipes Mountain Sour Night

We’ll have 5 Snipes taps pouring: Sour Coyote (Dark English Mild) Darkstrong (Port barrel aged version)Twangzister #3 (Bourbon barrel) Dali’s Garage (Spontaneously fermented unhopped heather and mugwort blonde, Bordeaux barrel aged) Quinceanera, the blended culmination of the above 4 barrels.

4-8 p.m. The Noble Fir

Georgetown Brewery Night

Brewers Special Beer (Bob’s Brown)and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night. Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last) Brewery rep on hand!

6-9 p.m. Hilltop Alehouse

Oregon Brewers Night

Pike Brewing Co. Museum Room. Women brewed beer or favorite beers to sample. Women-owned food business, small bite samples. Come learn about the historic significance of women brewers.Raffle, food, beer and the proceeds benefit Planned Parenthood! Not just for women; guys should come too!!

Naked City’s current brewhouse had a former life as the original brew system at Oakshire Brewing, and the Oakshire boys are mashing in to their old brew kettle once again for a collaboration IPA with Naked City’s Don Webb, featuring ingredients from both the Yakima Valley and the Williamette Valley. Join Ninkasi founder Jamie Floyd, Mark Marzano from Deschutes Brewing, Brian Maheux from Full Sail, and more Oregon brewers from Double Mountain and Boneyard for a night celebrating the fantastic ales from the state to the south.

Mac & Jack’s Brewery Night

Pub Trivia!!

6-9 p.m.Hilltop Alehouse

7:30-11 p.m. Pyramid Breweries’ Seattle Alehouse

6-9 p.m. Feierabend

Northwest Women in Beer

6-8:30 p.m. The Pike Brewing Company

OFFI CIAL SEAT TLE BEER WEEK G UIDE 2012

Brewers Special Beer. Glassware Night! Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last) Brewery rep on hand!!

Tuesday’s normal trivia night at 8:45 p.m. will be sponsored by Snoqualmie Brewing. We’ll have a special round of questions and some great beers from Snoqualmie on tap. Prizes from the brewery and special pint prices too.

5-8 p.m. Bottleworks

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Ninkasi Brewery Night

Brewers Special Beer! Glassware Night. Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last) Brewery rep on hand!

Georgetown Night

Brewers Special Draft (Bob’s Brown) and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night. Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last) Brewery rep on hand!

6-9 p.m. Columbia City Alehouse

3rd Annual Trappist Dinner

The 3rd Annual Quinn’s Trappist Dinner is here and it’s bigger than ever. Special bottlings, rare vintages and a big ol’ goodie bag full of Trappist merch. Chef Jeremy Ravetz is already hard at work on what’s sure to be the finest beer dinner in the city this year. Six courses. Six Trappist houses. Zero reasons not to go. Get your tickets now, this is always one of the first SBW events to sell out. For reservations, please contact the restaurant at 325-7711.

6-9 p.m. Quinn’s

Black Raven Brewing and BBQ

The zany boys from Black Raven Brewing Company are back for their annual trip to the ‘Vine. Amazing beer will be involved. There will be a cask on the bar and brats on the grill. The crazy raven returns.

6-10 p.m. Hopvine

6-9 p.m. Naked City Taphouse

Get your brains working and you might win some free Pyramid swag. And bragging rights.

Firestone / Homebrew Chef Dinner A closed door beer dinner with the beers of Firestone Walker. We will have 8 courses / 12 beers prepared by the renowned “Homebrew Chef” Sean Paxton and our own chef. Think English Pub food meets Brouwer’s Cafe meets Firestone Walker Beer. Tickets are $125. Tax and gratuity included. Tickets can be purchasedthrough Brown Paper Tickets. www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/240894

8-11 p.m. Brouwer’s Cafe

Classic Movie DJ Session #3

Wind down after the Oregon Brewers Night at Naked City with a screening of the classic silent film, Sunrise: A Tale of Two Humans, accompanied by a live synchronized soundtrack from guest DJ Jon Francois.

9-10:30 p.m. Naked City Taphouse

Mai-Bock, Your Bock

See Monday’s Mai-Bock-A-Licious!!

All Day die Bierstube


SEATTLE BEER WEEK A Mid-day beer with Tomme

Port Brewing and the Lost Abbey are invading the Taps at Super Deli Mart. Come in for an Angel’s Share, Mongo, Hop 15 or a couple other Port / The Lost Abbey beers that we have stashed and you might even run into Tomme Arthur, the man behind Port Brewing / The Lost Abbey. He has been known to pop in to the store for a cold one when his beers are pouring.

All Day Super Deli Mart

Hops & Schnapps

From Beer to Schnapps. Hosted by Michael Haselman of Bunited WT.

All Day die Bierstube

Tap Your Lunch w/ Pike Brewing Co.

Elliott Bay Pizza Company presents Tap Your Lunch with Pike Brewing Company. Join Laura Stoudt and Rose Ann and Charles Finkel for a Luncheon at Elliot Bay Pizza Company in Mill Creek.

noon-2 p.m. Elliott Bay Pizza & Pub

Legends Night with Pike Brewing Co.

Join Rose Anne and Charles Finkel for a Q and A of their history in the beer industry. Shultzy’s will feature all of the Pike beers and the Finkels will be on hand to answer any questions

5-8 p.m. Shultzy’s Sausage

Silver City Brewery Night

Brewers Special Draft and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night! Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last) Brewery rep on hand! !

Fri. 18. The tasting will be blind but you know the four beers being poured. Firestone Walker Double Jack and Boneyard Hop Venom are the first two entrants.

3-8 p.m. Cooper’s Alehouse

THURSDAY MAY 17 The Art of Arrogance

Come for the Capitol Hill Artwalk, Stay for the specials on Stone Brewing Co. Beers. More details to come including information on art and special beers.

5-8 p.m. The Pine Box

Barley Wine Brewer’s Dinner

Enjoy a four-course, beer-paired dinner featuring our special Beer Week Cask Barley Wine. The dinner includes a brewery tour and a free growler to take home. 7 p.m. $45, all-inclusive. Advanced purchase required. Tickets available at www.pyramidseattle.eventbrite.com

7-11 p.m. Pyramid Breweries’ Seattle Alehouse

Ninkasi Brewers Dinner w/Jamie Floyd Details and menu to come.

7-10 p.m. Etta’s Seafood Kitchen

Sour Fest

No details needed, you know what’s going down here.

All Day Brouwer’s Cafe

6-9 p.m. 74th Street Alehouse

Alpha Acid Overload!!

Diamond Knot Brewery Night

4-7 p.m. Brave Horse Tavern

Brewers Special Draft and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night. Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last) Brewery rep on hand !

6-9 p.m. Columbia City Alehouse

West Coast Brewers Dinner

Featuring beers from Anderson Valley Brewing Company, Hopworks Urban Brewery and Chuckanut Brewing Company paired with courses by Brave Horse’s chef Brian Walczyk. Guests in attendance: Fal Allen, Head Brewer, Anderson Valley Brewing Co. Jamie Rodrigues, Brewer, Hopworks Urban Brewery Mari Kemper, Founder and Owner, Chuckanut Family Brewery. Total of nine beers and four courses. $50 online at www.tomdouglas.com

6:30-9 p.m. Brave Horse Tavern

The SoDo Brothers

Schooner Exact, Two Beers, & Epic Ales Celebrate with the brewers of the SoDo District (South of Downtown). We will showcase the talents of our brewer friends on Wednesday. Expect some beer surprises and special food.

7-10 p.m. Fiddler’s Inn

All the questions this night will be related to beer, including taste tests!

8-10 p.m. Beveridge Place Pub

SCORE ON SKIP!

Our master brewer, Skip Madsen, has a life-long love of two things ... beer and hockey! He is going to suit up in his goalie uniform and challenge anyone to try and score on him. For a small fee, you can take three shots at Skip...if you score, we’ll have a fun prize for you! We’ll have a cask (or two) of a special beer to serve as well as the ever popular Hot Dog Buffet. Join us for some laughs, fine beer and fun eats!

6-10 p.m. American Brewing Company

New Belgium Sour Symposium

This will be a sour beer seminar and blending workshop led by New Belgium’s master blenders Lauren Woods and Eric Salazar. There will be two sessions. Space is very limited. More details to come.

1-6 p.m. The Stumbling Monk

IPA Fest Championships!

And for our Beer Week finale, the IPA Fest Championships! Four winning double IPA’s from our IPA Fest blind tastings will face off for three days from Wed. 16-

Rare Dogfish Head Night

Come on out to try some of the rare Dogfish Head beers on draft.

5-8 p.m. The Beer Junction

American Brewery Night

Brewers Special Draft and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night. Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last). Brewery rep on hand!

6-9 p.m. 74th Street Alehouse

Hale’s Ale’s Brewery Night

Brewers Special Draft and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night. Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last). Brewery rep on hand !

6-9 p.m. Hilltop Alehouse

Odin Brewery Night

Brewers Special Draft and a Special Cask Beer! Glassware Night. Buy a pint, keep the glass! (while supplies last) Brewery rep on hand !

6-9 p.m. Columbia City Alehouse

Pike/Carmelita Intimate Dinner

Join Carmelita vegetarian restaurant & bar and Pike Brewing Company for a five course pairing dinner, Thursday May 17 at 6 p.m. The evening begins with a social gathering in the bar with conversation, local beer and delicious snacks from Chef Carlos and beer banter with Seattle icons in the industry, Charles and Rose Ann Finkel. Following the social hour we will meet up for a communal gathering for a five-course dinner with notes from the brewer and the chef to accompany each course. Weather permitting, this event will take place in Carmelita’s garden. Menu will be forth coming, expect only the freshest, seasonal offerings. Price per person, $65 and is limited to 25 people. Book now at www.Carmelita.net

6-10 p.m. Carmelita

WALL OF CASKS!!

The Cask Wall returns for Beer Week. We will showcase some of your favorite beers on cask. The brewers will be attending and the freshest beer will be tapped. Join the fun.

6-10 p.m. Latona Pub

Sausage Fest at Duck Island

Fire-grilled specialty sausages? High octane, supercomplex, hard-to find Strong Ales? Duck Island wel-

O FFICIAL SEATTLE BEER W EEK GU IDE 2012

All Beer Quiz Night!

A Mouthful of Bud with Double Mountain, Schooner Exact, and Everybody’s Brewing.

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Chuckanut Brewery

World Beer Cup Winner 2010 & 2012!

Award Winning Ales & Lagers 601 W Holly St, Bellingham, WA 360-75-BEERS (360-752-3377)

• GABF Small Brewpub of the Year 2009 • GABF Small Brewing Co. of the Year 2011

www.chuckanutbreweryandkitchen.com

the PARK PUB

6114 Phinney Ave N

206-789-8187

4th Annual New Brewers Night Tuesday, May 15th 5-9 PM

Featuring Hilliard’s Beer, NW Peaks Brewing & 12 Bar Brews!

www.theparkpub.com

C r a f t Beer an d Music Festival

Hops & Crops harvest festival at the

mary olson farm Saturday, September 15th / Noon - 6PM 28728 Green River Road / Auburn, WA CRAFT BEER • FOOD • KID’S ACTIVITIES • MARKETPLACE • LIVE MUSIC

OFFI CIAL SEAT TLE BEER WEEK G UIDE 2012

www.wrvmuseum.org

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We are hosting an

OPEN HOUSE Tuesday, May 15th, 5:30pm - 7:30pm

Please join our head brewer Drew Colpitts in the GB cellar to sample German style lagers right from the tank! Cost is $10 - Includes beer and food.

GORDON BIERSCH Pacific Place 600 Pine St., Level 4 Seattle, WA 98101 p: 206.405.4205


SEATTLE BEER WEEK comes you to a night of meat and mayhem. Sausage flights will include four different kinds of meat, each accompanied with a sauce. Enjoy samplers of our featured strong beers: Samichlaus Doppelbock (14%), Double Mountain Goliathon Belgian-Style Dark Ale (11%), Boneyard Hop Venom IPA (10%), Gulden Draak Belgian Quad (11.3%). Come prepared with cab fare!

4-9 p.m. The Duck Island Alehouse

FRIDAY MAY 18 Boulevard Brewing Night.

Shultzy’s German Bier Extravaganza

Stop in Saturday during the University Street Fair and sample all of Northwest Beverage Group German Import portfolio. We will be tasting some classics and preview some biers that have never been to the U.S. 3-9 p.m. Shultzy’s Sausage

Hawaiian Night Featuring Maui Brewing Co.

Maui Brewing Co. will be featured at this one of a kind event. 4-8 p.m. The Noble Fir

4-8 p.m. The Noble Fir

Elysian/New Belgium Collaboration BBQ

Pallin’ around with Fal Allen

6-9 p.m. Fiddler’s Inn

We’ll be pouring Rye on Rye Chocolate Ale

Join us for a relaxed evening with acclaimed brewer Fal Allen and his beers as head brewer at Anderson Valley Brewing. Along with his presence we’ll have some special reserve beers from their cellar.

5-8 p.m. The Pine Box

BEER COCKTAILS

Ninkasi brewing and Oola distillery present Beer Cocktails with Ninkasi founding brewer Jamie Floyd and Oola’s own Brandon Gillespie. Come see how these two beverages can be made into artful cocktails by talented bartenders.

8 p.m.-midnight Liberty

Bodacious Beverages Brewfest!

We will highlight some of the best of the two combined with something awesome on the barbecue.

1st Annual Sudsy Shuffle w/ Beer West

First Annual Sudsy Shuffle with Beer West Magazine were talking shuffleboard tournament!

11 a.m.-3 p.m. Brave Horse Tavern

Jet City Roller Girl Fundraiser w/Ninkasi

Jet City Roller Girl fund raiser and Ninkasi Brewers night with founding brewer Jamie Floyd and the girls of Jet City. Live music and Ninkasi beers on tap. Come out and help raise money with good beer! Proceeds for the night go directly to the girls!

As many unusual beers as we can come up with. Barrelaged, hoppy, sour, spicy, etc. Taster trays encouraged!

7-11 p.m. Elliott Bay Pizza & Pub

Whiskey Beer - Boilermakers

Anderson Valley presents “Pizza and Pints” at Beer Authority. Beer and pizza on the patio with Fal Allen. Pouring specialty beer from the cellar and some of our favorites in the bottle.

All Day Beveridge Place Pub

Woodinville Whiskey Company with Maritime Maybock, Fremont Mischief with Snoqualmie Pre-Prohibition Pilsner, Dry Fly Distilling with Iron Horse Irish Death, aged in oak barrels that previously held whiskey.

3-7 p.m. Brave Horse Tavern

Pizza and Pints with Mr Fal Allen 2-4 p.m. Beer Authority

Cascadia Cup vs. Cascadia Cup

Hopped out? Palate obliterated by double digit ABV’s saturated in whiskey barrels? The Beer Authority will host a “Palate Rehabilitation Clinic” to set your taste buds right.

Cascadia Cup of soccer meets the Cascade Cup of beer. Come watch the Sounders beat Vancouver at 2 p.m. as they attempt to hold onto the trophy. And help to pick the best of the bunch in an array of sour beers from Cascade Brewing. Not to mention Champions League Final at 11:45 a.m. live.

Hub Invasion!!

Fire and Ice

“Palate Rehabilitation Clinic” 4-6 p.m. Beer Authority

Our good friends from Portland come up for an evening of fun.

5:30-9 p.m. The Burgundian

Sound Brewing Night

7-10 p.m. Hopvine

BEER FLIGHTS!

A Fundraiser for historic flight foundation education fund. For more information: www.beerflights.org Tickets: www.beerflights.org/events/beer-flights/

7-10 p.m. Historic Flight Foundation

Sierra Nevada Takeover & Rock Show! Sierra Nevada Tap Takeover Brewers will be in town! $3 Pints of Sierra! The Real McKenzies Civet 13 Scars (CD Release) Sledgeback Plus Guests $5 ADV / $12 DOS. Doors open at 8 p.m.

8-11 p.m. El Corazon

SATURDAY MAY 19 Beer Sensory Panel w/ Jamie Floyd

We will have a sign-up in the store starting Wednesday April 25th. Space is very limited so please reserve your space soon.

1-3 p.m. Bottleworks

11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. The Yard Cafe

Come and try some of the more interesting examples of the lager style of brewing: Dogfish Head My Antonia Imperial Pilsner, Anchor Bock, Kostritzer Marzen or Saimchlaus Dopplebock (14%). Or sit back with some old favorites, Radeberger German Pilsner or Belgium’s Bavik Lager in a can. Three different kinds of chili, cornbread and all the fixin’s means that dinner is done for you and at a price that will make you smile.

4-9 p.m. The Duck Island Alehouse

“Aurora’s Finest”

SUNDAY MAY 20

MAY 17: SAUSAGEFEST/STRONG ALE NIGHT Sausage flights with complimentary strong beer selections

Ellen’s 40th Birthday!!

It’s Ellen’s 40th Birthday, and she’s getting a tattoo of the Cubs Walking Bear logo. Two Beers Brewing Co. is celebrating with Ellen and Rick at The Noble Fir by releasing a one-off batch of Walking Bear Imperial IPA!

1-5 p.m. The Noble Fir

SEATTLE BEER WEEK EVENTS MAY 11, 12 & 13: THE FOUR SEASONS featuring seasonal beers from the past year

24 Taps

MAY 19: FIRE & ICE: Chili & Lagers, 3 different chilis and a variety of lagers Duckislandalehouse.blogspot.com

Kegs’ Eggs featuring Pike

Kegs’ Eggs Pairing up Brunch with Pike Brewing Co.

10 a.m.-3 p.m. Brave Horse Tavern

Super Deli’s 3rd Anniversary

Super Deli’s 3rd Anniversary and Customer Appreciation BBQ with New Belgian Brewing Company.

All Day Super Deli Mart

For more information on these and other events, make sure to check out Seattlebeerweek.com

HAPPY HOUR

3-6pm Daily • Food and Drink Specials

7317 Aurora Ave N (next door to Beth’s Cafe)

O FFICIAL SEATTLE BEER W EEK GU IDE 2012

Sound Brewery Night: A Night of Beer, Food and Music. The boys in Poulsbo are brewing some amazing beer and we will be sharing some of their special craft with you on Friday. Live music and something special from the kitchen will be included in the fun.

Check our Facebook page & Odinbrewing.com for details on Seattle Beer Week events.

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Your Sister's Sister

CENTERPIECE GALA | The Chef CLOSING NIGHT | Grassroots

OFFI CIAL SEAT TLE BEER WEEK G UIDE 2012

ACTRESS

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TRIBUTES

Sissy Spacek

(Badlands, Carrie, Coal Miner’s Daughter)

Be sure to join us on May 18th at 8pm for a chance to win a Victoria Clipper Cruise with an overnight stay on Friday Harbor in our “Sail Away” contest sponsored by

DIRECTOR

William Friedkin

(The Exorcist, The French Connection, Killer Joe)

Take a flight around our 17 NW draft beers for Seattle Beer Week! Draft beer flight specials + Daily Draft Specials all week long!

Tickets On Sale Now!

206.324.9996 | siff.net Pick up your FREE Guide at participating Starbucks stores and other convenient locations around town.

HAPPY HOUR

Just steps away from the Space Needle!

Monday - Friday 3-7PM

New $5 Happy Hour Menu! Sliders, Tacos and more! Vegetarian options also available $1 Off Well, Wine and Draft Beers

731 WESTLAKE AVE. N, SEATTLE • 206.223.0300


film»This Week’s Attractions

MYRIAD PICTURES/VILLAGE ROADSHOW

OPENS FRI., MAY 11 AT GUILD 45TH AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG-13. 122 MINUTES.

The British have practically cornered the multiplex’s senior demo (think Waking Ned Devine and Calendar Girls) and look to be continuing the run with Hotel, a recent hit with the UK’s aging boomer set, now stateside. Reliable middlebrow craftsman John Madden (Shakespeare in Love) makes neat work of Deborah Moggach’s novel about a group of disparate British retirees lured—for cut-rate surgery, low-overhead living, or reasons they hope to keep private—to the Indian subcontinent, where they find themselves together under the roof of the titular hotel. The cast is led by Dame Judi Dench as a long-sheltered widow looking to stand on her own two feet. Hotel has that oh-so-tactful British touch, the seeming result of an industry-wide gentleman’s agreement never to go too far. The material is ribald, but of course never crude, and sown with “Life begins at 60” affirmations; the plot twists are about as venerable as the cast, and predictably affecting when performed with such old-hand proficiency. Although the film is overextended by a few plotlines too many, you’ll look forward to Tom Wilkinson’s turn as a retired high-court judge who still goes fluttery over the memory of an affair from schoolboy days and Bill Nighy as a shy, ineffably decent man, quietly surprised by how nimble he becomes in this new atmosphere. NICK PINKERTON

The Cup Because so many Americans closely follow Australian horse racing, we can assume you already know the true-life story of jockey Damien Oliver and his noble steed. But wait, here comes Irish horse trainer Dermot Weld (Brendan Gleeson) to tell us “With the right jockey, Media Puzzle could win the Melbourne Cup.” It’s 2002 when Weld flies the pampered, temperamental horse Down Under, where Oliver (Stephen Curry) appears to be that jockey—until tragedy on the track! From National Velvet to Seabiscuit, there will always be a market for horse-racing movies, because the ponies are so damn cinematic. And The Cup does supply equine scenes of Irish meadow frolics, training sessions on the beach, and slo-mo thundering hooves on the track. But in a sport well supplied with money,

BRIAN MILLER

Dark Shadows OPENS FRI., MAY 11 AT KIRKLAND PARKPLACE. RATED PG-13. 113 MINUTES.

Dark Shadows slips the “Tim Burton treatment” to the supernaturally themed daytime soap of the same name, which aired daily on ABC from 1966 to 1971. Burton standby Johnny Depp fills the central role of vampire Barnabas Collins, which begins with a prologue revealing the origin of the Collins curse. Leaving Liverpool, a still-mortal Barnabas arrives with his parents in colonial-era Maine, where they build a commercial empire and establish the family seat, Collinwood Mansion. As a young man, Barnabas is torn between two loves—lowly servant Angelique (Eva Green) and hypergamous fiancée Josette (Bella Heathcote)—and winds up with neither, for the spurned Angelique practices black magic, hexing Josette to death and Barnabas to endless suffering as a vampire, imprisoned in a chained-up coffin and buried (eternally) alive. The bulk of Dark Shadows, however, takes place in 1972, after Barnabas has been accidentally exhumed, to resume the head of his dysfunctional family of descendants. More than its gothic tropes, Burton’s Dark Shadows is committed to fish-out-of-water material— culture-clash humor that rummages through the collective thrift-store memory of the ’70s and relies on slow-pitch, wasn’t-the-pastdumb humor. In the midst of all this is an unusually dandy bit of dress-up from Depp, weaving his elongated Nosferatu fingers through the air, recalling 1994’s Ed Wood. That movie is still by far Depp and Burton’s best collaboration, exhibiting the balance of tone, between campy parody and zealous fantasy, that’s missing in Dark Shadows, less a resurrection than a clumsy desecration. NICK PINKERTON

The ponies take to the track in The Cup!

Michael RUNS FRI., MAY 11–THURS., MAY 17 AT SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN. NOT RATED. 96 MINUTES.

Michael (Michael Fuith) is a 30-something unmarried insurance agent who, by necessity, meticulously keeps up domestic ritual. Michael, you see, is a homosexual pederast. Behind his suburban home’s mechanical steel shutters and a soundproof basement door, Michael is holding a 10-year-old boy (David Rauchenberger) captive, and apparently has been for some time. Depicting this domestic hell, writer/director Markus Schleinzer stays detached and objective; the boy sheds tears only with his back turned tactfully to the camera, so as not to be accused of petitioning the viewer for sympathy. It’s an anti-entertainment style that forswears obvious tools of viewer manipulation without adding much of anything in their place. The poker-faced “sustained tone” is often indistinguishable from cruise control. Given the subject’s intrinsic queasiness, Michael is a difficult movie to watch. But aside from whatever special problems come with casting and financing a movie about a pedophile, was it really difficult to make? Schleinzer approaches his subject not as an investigator, but as though he’s covering up a crime scene, scrubbing it of anything that might provide insight or empathy or psychological traction. The cleanup is so thorough, you can’t detect what possible motive he might have had for making Michael, other than to play a nasty game with the viewer’s natural concern for a child’s life. This is cheap when it comes with a Hollywood happy ending, and no better without. NICK PINKERTON

Nobody Else But You RUNS FRI., MAY 11–THURS., MAY 17 AT HARVARD EXIT. NOT RATED. 102 MINUTES.

David Rousseau, a famous detective novelist, is passing through the small town of Mouthe, colloquially known as “Little Siberia” for its freezing climate, when inspiration strikes. The body of local celebrity Candice Lecoeur (the cherubic, bleached-blonde Sophie Quinton), a cheese spokesmodel and TV weatherwoman, is found buried in the snow with a bottle of pills in hand, her lifeless face looking as blue and waxy as Twin Peaks’ Laura Palmer’s. The police rule her death a suicide, but to Rousseau

Patience (After Sebald) RUNS FRI., MAY 11–THURS., MAY 17 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 82 MINUTES.

As suggested by a scholar in this numinous essay-doc, if the current craze for walking a pilgrim’s path can’t be tied directly to the German writer W.G. Sebald, it certainly feels Sebaldian. That he secured adjectival status in the decade following his premature 2001 death suggests the extent to which the author’s discursive, form-bending novels speak to the conditions of modern life. Having already inspired its own pilgrims, The Rings of Saturn—which details Sebald-as-narrator’s walking tour of the English town of Suffolk—forms the basis of this companion documentary. Director Grant Gee (Meeting People Is Easy, Joy Division) retraces Sebald’s steps, reuniting the novel’s descriptions

Patience (After Sebald): Director Gee takes a bleak tour through Suffolk.

of actual places and spaces with their images and weaving in illuminating commentary from admirers (Rick Moody, Robert McFarlane). Much is made of Sebald’s ability to capture fleeting perceptions and articulate the universe’s uncanny connections; at times, Gee risks stepping on that ability with his array of literal and semi-literal evocations. More successful as a primer on the Sebaldian worldview than a visual representation of Saturn’s specifics, Patience— a reference to the game otherwise known as solitaire, which features in Sebald’s final novel, Austerlitz—serves its subject best when it echoes his rapt and penetrative attention through a perspective of its own. MICHELLE ORANGE film@seattleweekly.com

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Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

RUNS FRI., MAY 11–THURS., MAY 17 AT ADMIRAL. NOT RATED. 99 MINUTES.

cheating, and eccentrics, the assignment given director Simon Wincer (Free Willy, Phar Lap) is earnest family melodrama. That means urgent hospital scenes, teary phone calls, and bedside declarations like “Remember, you’ll be riding with me always.” Curry is affecting as the grief-stricken jockey; he’s given one quietly effective scene when he explains all his scars and injuries to a girlfriend. Gleeson, always a dependable rogue, must play it mild and straight. He, like the horse, has a job to do. One white-haired track sage says of the Cup, “Anything can happen.” Not in this movie.

ILLUMINATIONS FILMS/CINEMA GUILD

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

it’s an unsolved mystery—and thus ripe for crime-novel treatment. Rousseau, played by the likably dry-witted Jean-Paul Rouve, begins his own side investigation. Aided by a young local cop, he sneaks into the morgue to see the body and tracks down her psychologist—who tells him that Candice believed she was the reincarnation of Marilyn Monroe. But it’s only when Rousseau breaks into Candice’s apartment and reads her diaries that the seamy underworld of her life is revealed—a jealous, abusive ex-husband, obsessive fans, date-rape drugs, affairs with politicians. The plot and all its intrigues are not entirely original, but Nobody Else But You—called Poupoupidou when it screened at SIFF last year—can be thrilling and spooky, particularly with Candice’s voiceovers from the grave. “Even cold, I’m still the hottest gal in all Franche-Comté,” her ghost sasses. ERIN K. THOMPSON

25


“CREEPY to the EXTREME.

It gets UNDER YOUR SKIN and STAYS THERE.” – Jason Bene, KILLERFILM.COM

“A FANTASTIC HORROR FILM.

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“INCREDIBLY INTENSE,

and as FRIGHTENING AS THEY COME.” – Steve Barton, DREAD CENTRAL

NOBODY LEAVES

a film by Yam Laranas

www.nobodyleavestheroad.com

STARTS FRIDAY, MAY 11 4.81” X 5"

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Aurelio Emmett

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Starts Friday, May 11 4.81” X 7"

Aurelio Emmett Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

Confirmation #:

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Local Film BLACK SWAN SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 19. •CALL OF LIFE Discussion follows the screening of

Monte Thompson’s recent doc about biodiversity and species extinction. (NR) Keystone Congregational Church, 5019 Keystone Place N., 632-6021, keystoneseattle.org, Free, Fri., May 11, 7 p.m. CHILDREN OF PARADISE SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 19. CLUE This 1985 movie, based on the popular movie, stars Tim Curry, Michael McKean, Madeline Kahn, and others who know how to raise a laugh. Call for showtimes. (PG) Central Cinema, $6-$8, May 11-14. MUSIC-CRAFT Jimi Hendrix, Fleetwood Mac, and The Police are featured in this hour-long compilation of old performance films. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, $6-$10, Fri., May 11, 10 p.m. NEXT 50 FILM SERIES SIFF helps Seattle Center celebrate its 50th anniversary with a free Wednesday-night series touching upon topics like organic farming, music, beekeeping, clean water, Sputnik, and Woody Guthrie. See the SIFF website for full schedule and details. (NR) SIFF Film Center, Free, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Through July 18. OPEN SCREENING Local filmmakers screen and discuss their final and rough-cut shorts. Greg Gould is emcee. Under 10 minutes, please, and on DVD. (NR) Seattle Film Institute, 1709 23rd Ave., 568-4387, seattlefilminstitute.com, $2, Second Sunday of every month, 7 p.m.

SEATTLE TRUE INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL:

Venues also include the Varsity and Central Cinema See trueindependent.org for full schedule and details. (NR) Grand Illusion, $8 (individual), $50 (pass), Through May 12.

SHADOW STREET: THE BEST OF BRITISH FILM NOIR From 1963, a young Oliver Reed leads a pack of

delinquents in These Are the Damned. As it turns out, he and his cohort are the puppets of an evil Cold War conspiracy. (NR) Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org, $53-$59 series, $8 individual, Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through May 24. STARSHIP TROOPERS Paul Verhoeven’s violent and sometimes on-target satire of U.S. military deployment in space dates to 1997. It’s neither his best nor his worst film; but who doesn’t enjoy blasting giant space bugs? The troopers don’t matter so much when squashed. Call for showtimes. (R) Central Cinema, $6-$8, May 11-14. STEVE JOBS: THE LOST INTERVIEW The late Apple co-founder lives again in a 1995 long-form interview, originally made for TV. The 70-minute sit-down chat has been enhanced from its original VHS format. Jobs would not approve. Note: no early show Tues.; no late show Thurs. (NR) Grand Illusion, $5-$8, May 13-17, 7 & 9 p.m.

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Ongoing THE AVENGERS The Tesseract—a powerful glowing

cube—is captured by Loki (Tom Hiddleston), brother of demigod Thor (Chris Hemsworth). Ass-kicking Girl Friday Natasha Romanoff (Scarlett Johansson) and eye-patched S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) gather a motley crew to get it back, including Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Bruce Banner/Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Captain America (Chris Evans), and Thor. Writer/director Joss Whedon effectively creates a sketch of a working universe, but the most Whedon-esque parts of the script are the superheroes’s flippant wisecracks. Yet we never get the sense that any of the heroes might not sur-

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the series include Robert Altman’s Come Back to the Five and Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean and a dozen other repertory picks. See nwfilmforum.org for full schedule and details. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, $6-$10, Through May 27.

vive to snark again, and the suspense-free movie amounts to a gallery of masculine neurosis. (PG-13) Karina Longworth Bainbridge Cinemas, Cinebarre, Cinerama, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Majestic Bay, Thornton Place, Varsity THE CABIN IN THE WOODS Writers Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard (who also directs) have created an intricate design that makes this horror comedy nearly impossible to talk about without giving away surprises. Five college kids go up to a remote cabin for a weekend of hijinks. They are a near-perfect collection of stereotypes/archetypes of their genre, each there to subvert/upend expectations. Whedon and Goddard attempt to honor, send up, and advance genre conventions simultaneously. Sometimes it works. But too often the film wants it both ways, trying to make the audience have a genuine reaction while at the same time never letting go of the self-conscious acknowledgement of how it is leading the audience to that response. (R) Mark Olsen Cinebarre, Pacific Place, Thornton Place DAMSELS IN DISTRESS Back with his first film in 14 years, Whit Stillman still operates in a world of his own. On her first day at Seven Oaks College, transfer student Lily (Analeigh Tipton) is scooped up by a trio of prepossessed coeds who school her on campus culture and their own oddly refined sensibilities. Ringleader Violet (Greta Gerwig), prim Rose (Megalyn Echikunwoke), and petite Heather (Carrie MacLemore) preach the virtues of good hygiene, dating down to less intelligent boys, and suicide prevention via the restorative potential of the old soft-shoe. Lily serves as our disoriented guide, but it’s anachronistic, hopelessly romantic, impeccably mannered Violet who prevails as Stillman’s heroine. Four features in, Whit Stillman’s cinematic sensibility is both plain as day and hard to pin down. Dancing breaks out in all of his films, and usually just because. All the cardigans and brass-buttoned blazers in the world can’t cloak that kind of eccentricity. (PG-13) Eric Hynes Crest DARLING COMPANION Beth Winter (Diane Keaton) is unhappily married to overweening, distant surgeon Joseph (Kevin Kline). In this tale of privileged boomer pulse-taking from Lawrence Kasdan, their dog goes missing at their Colorado vacation home. Beth blames the hound’s disappearance on her husband, who was distracted by a work phone call while walking it, and he accuses her of neurosis and not loving him enough. The Winters form a search party (including Dianne Wiest, Richard Jenkins, and Mark Duplass). In the healing treks through the woods, feelings are processed, snobbery leveled, and happiness restored. (PG-13) Melissa Anderson Guild 45 THE DEEP BLUE SEA Terence Davies’ adaptation of the Terence Rattigan play is a film about love that in no way reassures that love conquers all. Lady Hester Collyer (Rachel Weisz) has left her husband, high court judge Sir William (Simon Russell Beale)— and a postwar life of cultured conversation and posh fireside comfort—to live in slummy sin with Freddie (Tom Hiddleston), an emotionally immature former RAF pilot who survived the Battle of Britain but never readapted to civilian life, and whose lovemaking has irreparably shaken up the foundations of Hester’s existence. Hester recalls the events that have led her here, establishing the pattern of alternating between the present-tense drama of the affair’s dissolution and history. In a richly symphonic work, Davies and his cast create the rare triangular affair where every side of the triangle is drawn with equal care and sympathy, where each party’s hopes—and their disappointments—are eloquently understood. (R) Nick Pinkerton Seven Gables ELLES As she prepares for a dinner party and fields rude dismissals from her two spoiled sons, journalist Anne (Juliette Binoche) thinks back on her probing interviews for a just-filed French Elle profile of two student-prostitutes (Anaïs Demoustier and Joanna Kulig) who cater to a rich “bored husband” clientele. Elles tracks Anne’s evolving feelings about her subjects’ line of work: shock at their casual attitude toward it, titillation at their descriptions of it, disgust at the depravity of the class she belongs to, and total revulsion at the realization that the indignities inherent in her haute housewifery are perhaps not so different from the ones the hookers face. It’s entirely too much for co-writer/director Malgoska Szumowska to coherently flesh out in an hour and a half. (NR) Benjamin Mercer Varsity THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT Chef Tom (Jason Segel) and Violet (Emily Blunt) meet cute in San Francisco. They postpone the wedding so that they can get settled at the University of Michigan,

“a hint of Twin Peaks and a large helping of the coen brothers in this offbeat, cleverly crafted french thriller.”

27


PLayInG May 11–17

511 Queen Anne Avenue North

Wednesday | 7:00

presents

Fresh “A crisp indictment of industrial farming… focused on practical solutions.” –Seattle Times

ALL FILMS MUST END THURSDAY!

Michael “From the Michael Haneke school of brutally austere cinema... a chilling film about the routine business of unspeakable acts.” –Scott Tobias, The Onion

The Island President To save his country, he has to save our planet!

pina in 3D Seattle Center Northwest Rooms

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

where Violet has just been accepted to do postdoc research. While he makes Reubens at Zingerman’s deli, Violet thrives under the academic mentorship of Welsh charmer Winton (Rhys Ifans). When her postdoc is extended, Tom’s deepening misery at being stuck in the Wolverine State culminates in extracurricular drunken kisses, an amputated big toe, and the couple’s decision to call it quits—with about 45 minutes to fill before the preordained conclusion. (R) Melissa Anderson Bainbridge Cinemas, Cinebarre, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Pacific Place INDIE GAME: THE MOVIE Seattle is home to legions of pallid, sleep-deprived programmers, and Microsoft’s Xbox gaming platform is central to this insightful new geek documentary. Well-directed by first-timers Lisanne Pajot and James Swirsky, Indie Game ought then to be a perfect fit for this market, but it fails in one crucial respect. There is a bright line, likely determined by age, between those who game and those who don’t, and the film makes no concessions to the latter camp. The doc gains remarkable access to three groups of designers, one of whom hopes to recreate “that experience of playing games before the Internet existed.” They’re obsessed, incredibly overstressed as they try to meet the deadlines imposed by cruel Microsoft, and more than a little sad. Though Indie Game doesn’t pretend all its subjects will prosper, it tells us nothing about the broader vid-game market (worth more than $40 billion) or a youth culture that’s been profoundly changed by gaming. It’s like writing about McDonald’s without mentioning the obesity epidemic. (NR) Brian Miller SIFF Film Center THE ISLAND PRESIDENT Jon Shenk’s lionizing documentary of Mohamed Nasheed, the first democratically elected leader of the Republic of Maldives, the archipelago nation in the Indian Ocean consisting of 1,200 tiny islands, closely follows the charming president from 2008 to 2009, his first year in office. The film is now inadvertently a record of a bygone era: Nasheed was forced out of office by a February coup. The Island President uses as its throughline the months leading up to the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in December 2009. Positioning himself as an eco-activist and declaring that his country will be the first to go carbon-neutral, Nasheed reveals his gifts for quippy doomsaying: “It won’t be any good to have a democracy if we don’t have a country.” (PG) Melissa Anderson Lynwood Theater, SIFF Cinema Uptown JIRO DREAMS OF SUSHI Tucked away in the basement of a Tokyo office building, Sukiyabashi Jiro seats only a handful, boasts three Michelin stars, and is presided over by renowned 85-year-old sushi chef Jiro Ono. For tens of thousands of yen, you can get a taste of the craft he has been tirelessly honing since the age of 10. This is, of course, a calculus apt to explode the mind of even the most casual gourmand, and the foodie set is well taken care of in director David Gelb’s portrait. Gelb documents many of Jiro’s unorthodox methods in the kitchen, but significant screen time goes as well to Jiro’s relationship with his sons. Gelb might flit around a bit too much, but his appealing documentary always comes back to its subject’s determination (sometimes overbearing) to leave the most meaningful possible legacy to his family and his craft. (PG) Benjamin Mercer Harvard Exit, Kirkland Parkplace MARLEY Thoroughly researched and packed with phenomenal archival footage, Kevin Macdonald’s documentary is a long, rousing tribute to a mesmerizing performer that forgoes blind hero worship. Macdonald interviews 60 people on three different continents, many of whom remain entranced by the singer’s talent and charisma. The film’s most fascinating talking head, wife Rita Marley has perplexing thoughts on Bob’s biracial makeup. Of the melanoma found on her husband’s toe in 1977, she avows “it was the whiteness in him” that caused it. Whiteness, in a way, did bedevil Marley, who was always puzzled by the lack of black audience members at his sold-out concerts, especially in the U.S. Yet footage of Marley performing is transcendent, enraptured. (PG-13) Melissa Anderson Lynwood Theater MONSIEUR LAZHAR The Montreal schoolyard where Alice and Simon exchange their usual morning jabs is capped with snow, and their classroom is filled with bright winter light. Then that light is cut by an incongruous moment of darkness, and the rest of Philippe Falardeau’s understated, affecting Canadian drama charts the resulting wave of grief as it breaks across a school community. Alice and Simon’s class gets a new coat of paint and a new teacher—the

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monsieur of the title (Mohamed Fellag), a mysterious Algerian emigrant. Falardeau meshes Lazhar’s secrets and the hidden turbulence of the situation he has stepped into with a sensitivity that lifts the story out of refugee cliché. (PG-13) Michelle Orange Big Picture Redmond, Egyptian PINA Choreographer Pina Bausch died unexpectedly right before shooting on this 3-D project began in 2009. Yet her friend Wim Wenders was convinced by her ensemble members to proceed. Their brief, mostly alfresco solo and duet performances are interspersed with voice-over memories of their beloved leader and excerpts from live stagings of four of Bausch’s works. Bausch’s choreography (at least to this unversed writer) emphasizes big emotions, Sisyphean gestures, and the pleasingly absurd, sometimes all at once. Wenders’ expert use of 3-D puts viewers up close to the spaces, both psychic and physical, inside and out, of Bausch’s work. Pina gives us the supreme pleasure of watching fascinating bodies of widely varying ages in motion, whether leaping, falling, catching, diving, grieving, or exulting. (NR) Melissa Anderson SIFF Cinema Uptown THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS It’s 1837 as Queen Victoria (voiced by Imelda Staunton and animated in clay as a shrewish little turnip of a woman) decrees war on buccaneering. Well down her Most Wanted list is the Pirate Captain (Hugh Grant), a perennial also-ran for Pirate of the Year. On the way to the Queen and Captain’s crossing swords, Aardman Animations’ Pirates! hits the usual kid’s pic stops, but its script consistently finds fresh outlets for its running gags. Screenwriter Gideon Defoe adapts from his own series of comedy books for young people, and the humor ranges from obliviously brutal slapstick to 19th-century name dropping, with a cast that includes Charles Darwin, Jane Austen, and the Elephant Man. (PG) Nick Pinkerton Bainbridge Cinemas, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Meridian, Thornton Place SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN Lasse Hallstrom’s adaptation mostly sacrifices the political satire and epistolary structure of Paul Torday’s source novel in favor of cute, if strained, rom-com shenanigans. If you’re not getting enough of that from network TV, this movie’s for you. Salmon Fishing, which sets up its premise and expectations in the title, concerns London fisheries specialist Fred Jones (Ewan McGregor), who’s tasked by the prime minister’s flack (Kristin Scott Thomas) to export British salmon to a Yemeni river at the request of a sheikh (Amr Waked) with a jones for fly-fishing. The sheikh’s real estate assistant (Emily Blunt) tags along to help and, in the process, entices the unhappily married Jones into romance and Hallstrom-ian self-actualization. The first section of the film deploys chipper barbs at the expense of career bureaucrats, which is funny and effective— Scott Thomas, who brings the raunch, is particularly good—but once McGregor and Blunt start dissecting their complicated feelings for each other, things turn unexpectedly dire. Hallstrom overwhelms them (and the lush Scottish and Moroccan locations, and us) with his customary brand of lightweight heavyhandedness. (PG-13) Mark Holcomb Bainbridge Cinemas, Kirkland Parkplace, Pacific Place A SEPARATION Iranian writer-director Asghar Farhadi’s urgently shot courtroom drama puts you

Pina dancers Ottavio Bigi and Clementine Deluy. in the jury box. It opens at a Tehran judicial hearing where a quarrelsome husband and wife each make their case. Simin has finally obtained official permission for her family to move abroad, but husband Nader has apparently changed his mind. He feels obligated to care for his aged father, and, in order to leave the country, Simin is compelled to sue for divorce. When her petition is denied, she moves in with her parents; Nader stays with his father as does their daughter. To look after his father, Nader hires Razieh, who has taken the job without the knowledge of her devout, unemployed husband, Hodjat. A Separation then heads directly into a real crisis. Nader comes home to find his father’s wrists tied to the bed with Razieh out on an errand. They have words; Razieh is shoved out of the apartment, falls down the stairs, and (Nader later discovers) winds up in the hospital. With its two couples warring on two fronts on behalf of their offspring, A Separation is an Iranian analog to Roman Polanski’s Carnage, but the stakes are much higher. (PG-13) J. Hoberman Crest SOUND OF MY VOICE Twentysomething Silver Lake couple Peter (Christopher Denham) and Lorna (Nicole Vicius) talk their way into an unnamed cult that meets to follow the teachings of the enigmatic Maggie (Brit Marling). Maggie claims to have been born in 2030 and mysteriously transported to the present day to prepare a chosen few for an endtimes civil war. Lorna and Peter, both in search of direction, think they’ve found it in surreptitiously making a documentary exposing Maggie as a fraud. Sound of My Voice has the hallmarks of the uninspired micro-budget calling card, but the bland, jittery visual “realism” can’t counteract overheated performances of tin-eared dialogue, which strain for pulp but often land at soap. Barely cinematic enough to fill the space of the big screen, the film ultimately feels like a teaser prologue for something that doesn’t yet exist. (R) Karina Longworth Varsity THEATERS: Admiral, 2343 California Ave. SW, 938-3456;

Big Picture, 2505 First Ave., 256-0566; Big Picture Redmond, 7411 166th Ave. NE, 425-556-0566; Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684; Cinebarre, 6009 SW 244th St. (Mountlake Terrace)., 425-672-7501; Cinerama, 2100 Fourth Ave., 448-6680; Crest, 16505 Fifth Ave. NE, 781-5755; Egyptian, 801 E. Pine St., 781-5755; Grand Illusion, 1403 NE 50th St., 523-3935; Guild 45, 2115 N. 45th St., 781-5755; Harvard Exit, 807 E. Roy St., 781-5755; iPic Theaters, 16451 N.E. 74th St. (Redmond), 425-636-5601; Kirkland Parkplace, 404 Park Place, 425-827-9000; Lincoln Square, 700 Bellevue Way N, 425-454-7400; Majestic Bay, 2044 NW Market St., 781-2229; Meridian, 1501 Seventh Ave., 223-9600; Metro, 4500 Ninth Ave. NE, 781-5755; Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 267-5380; Oak Tree, 10006 Aurora Ave. N, 527-1748; Pacific Place, 600 Pine St., 888-262-4386; Seven Gables, 911 NE 50th St., 781-5755; SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996; SIFF Film Center, 305 Harrison St. (Seattle Center), 324-9996.; Thornton Place, 301 NE 103rd St., 517-9953; Varsity, 4329 University Way NE, 781-5755.


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Sloppy Seconds

Zoë’s Capitol Hill reboot is fraught with bugs.

eorge Smathers called Claude Pepper plenty of nasty names during a 1950 primary race, but the Florida senator is best remembered for a slew of epithets he never flung. Smathers didn’t say Pepper was “a shameless extrovert,” nor did he accuse him of practicing celibacy before marriage. The apocryphal accusations, which first showed up in The Washington Post, were a remix of a decades-old Capitol Hill gag in which a sputtering Mississippi legislator refuses to fund coed schools because the boys and girls “matriculate together and use the same curriculum.” Yet campaign reporters, weary of finding new ways to cover Smathers’ notoriously dull stump speech, jumped on it. “[You’ll] have a difficult time persuading the general public that you did not in fact make those remarks,” William F. Buckley told a despairing Smathers, who offered $10,000 to anyone who could prove he’d tried to bait backwoods voters with big words. The charges stuck because it seemed plausible that a politician seeking an edge at the polls just might resort to semantic skullduggery. What’s the harm of a little hocus-pocus when there’s a Senate seat at stake? I was reminded of the speech Smathers never gave while dining at Restaurant Zoë, the second incarnation of Scott and Heather Staples’ terrifically popular Belltown restaurant. The first Zoë shut down last summer,

“Is this a menu or a Scrabble board?”

At a tauter restaurant, polysyllabic descriptors might well be harbingers of blissful dishes that couldn’t possibly be conveyed in simpler terms. But when a celery-root soup with Dungeness crab and pumpkinseed pistou turns out to be a cream-sodden, ocherous puddle with a faint curry flavor, it’s clear the million-dollar words amount to little more than sound and fury. Our server’s roundabout definitions, which hinged on terms unfamiliar to restaurantgoers who’d rather eat their food than photograph it, did little to clear the cloud of defeat that hovered above my guests. They contemplated ordering burgers. In fact, the Stapleses serve an excellent Painted Hills beef burger at Quinn’s Pub and Uneeda Burger, where a patty can be topped with bacon and barbecue sauce. At Zoë, the toppings are balsamic mushrooms, taleggio, and pimenton aioli, but the humble $15 sandwich still seems out of place alongside a $32 serving of braised short ribs that were pushing their seasonal welcome in April. Zoë’s menu structure is confounding: In addition to the burger and short ribs, there are two entrées, six small plates, and seven “snacks”—essentially small plates that don’t require utensils. The small plates are too insubstantial to add up to a meal that someone who’s spent the day working could comfortably afford, but the paucity of “large plates” suggests Zoë isn’t an app-and-entrée joint either. Best of luck.

I

f the menu is scattered, the decor is doubly so. The restaurant is divided into two very different—albeit equally well-groomed—halves. Fashioned after a barn motif, the main room is attractively lit by an expansive west-facing window

that nearly stretches to a lofty ceiling with Snail croquettes: oddly pixilated. exposed beams. The wooden dining tables are separated from the back of the house by shelves supporting jars of brightly colored pappardelle noodles in the same bowl were pickled vegetables, a barrier which can’t conmushy and limp. Gnudi paired with lamb tain the nervous energy that erupts when the sausage were overfloured, so the delicate restaurant gets busy. A hostess who seated us dumplings struck a cottony chord. And at a table between the kitchen and the front braised short ribs didn’t just yield to a fork’s door warned that we’d be exposed to bustle touch, but nearly decomposed beneath its and cold, and she was right on both counts. weight. These preparations aren’t worth the (Service is refreshingly frank at Zoë: When wait, which at Zoë is often very long: Even an we asked after a costly abalone appetizer, our early weeknight dinner can consume hours. server immediately instructed us to skip it.) Most of the dishes I sampled at Zoë were An enclosed patio off the dining room is disappointments, but a few items rose to calmer and more comfortable. The rigorous meet a slightly higher bar. Salted caramel rusticity of the front room is relaxed out back: macarons sound like a double helping of There’s a woodpile, but no pickles, and the cliché, but pastry chef Andrea Terrenzio’s chairs and floor are rain-cloud gray. From the version of the confection was perfectly tuned. vantage point of the patio, Zoë feels less awkA pristine steak tartare served with stubby, wardly special-occasion-ish and more like the crisp cornichons and a rush of housemade kind of restaurant that could earn a spot in a chips cut from fingerling potatoes was terdiner’s regular rotation. rific, as was a gorgeously oiled On my second visit, when salad of fleshy, split radishes Zoë’s staff seemed to identify and white anchovies. » price guide Pork rinds ................... $4 me as a food critic, dinner It’s probably worth noting Lamb ribs .....................$10 boLognese ..................$10 started with a free serving that all the dishes mentioned steak tartare ......... $12 of chewy roasted chickpeas in the above paragraph radishes ......................$10 short ribs ................. $32 dusted with Moroccan spices. surfaced the night our server macarons .................... $4 The snack outclassed most of recognized me. Even the the starters. Cardboardy pork short ribs, so droopy on the rinds looked and tasted like puffed paperfirst go-round, were better. While that’s not weights. Snail croquettes, plopped in a smear surprising, it’s a shame that Restaurant Zoë of tart remoulade, had an oddly pixilated is hustling to conceal its errors instead of quality. Lamb ribs painted with a shiny tamaproffering the stellar food and service that rind sauce were the victims of prep inattenSeattleites have come to expect from a Staples tion, resulting in unpleasant mouthfuls of fat operation. E that should have been rendered or trimmed. hraskin@seattleweekly.com Other dishes had apparently spent too much time in the kitchen. A swim of zingy RestauRant Zoë Bolognese showcasing wild boar—a signature 1318 E. Union St., 256-2060, restaurantzoe.com. Staples protein—was excellent, but the nettle 5 p.m.–close daily. 29

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

just short of its 11th anniversary, with the Stapleses publicly reasoning that fleeing to a neighborhood with more culinary gravitas would be cheaper than reinventing their brand in situ. The problem for diners at the new Zoë—which earlier this year opened at the Capitol Hill corner anchored by Skillet Diner, Marjorie, and Oola Distillery— is that the restaurant still feels as though it’s conceptually in the midst of moving. The Stapleses have transplanted successful elements from their other enterprises (Uneeda Burger, Quinn’s Pub. and Zoe 1.0), but they’re an uneasy fit, and both the food and service at Zoë are marred by aggravating flaws. Zoë is doing its darnedest to distract patrons from its shortcomings, diverting them with remarkably strong cocktails, a smattering of dishes draped in gratuitous scads of fat, and a menu studded with lingo that would have made Senator Smathers blush. “Is this a menu or a Scrabble board?” asked one of the college-educated companions at my table, bewildered by the references to amaranth, panisse, and speculaas.

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PORK SPARERIBS $ = $25 or less per person; $$ = $25–$40; $$$ = $40 and up. These capsule reviews are written by editorial staff and have nothing to do with advertising. For hundreds more reviews, searchable by neighborhood and type of cuisine, go to seattleweekly.com/food.

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LaLibeLa ethiopian RestauRant 2800 E. Cherry

St. # A, 322-8565. Don’t be fooled by the blacked-out windows. Decent duro wat and ice-cold Harar can be found in this Madrona joint. But with so many East African restaurants in a four-block area, if you’d rather not eat inside a place that, from the outside, looks like an X-rated bookstore, you’ve got plenty of other options. $

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723-6023. This airy bakery offers the perfect croissant: flaky, buttery and served with raspberry jam on the side. There are chocolate and almond varieties, as well as an array of cookies, breads and seasonal specials like Valentine’s Day chocolate truffles. Come after school lets out, or on weekend mornings, and you will find half of the neighborhood here with their kids. $ GeRaLdine’s CounteR 4872 Rainier Ave. S., 723-2080. This colorful corner restaurant is where Columbia City assembles for brunch, and where the rest of us wait

for a table or spot at the counter. Despite the fact that you can order chicken-fried steak and eggs or a baked hash-brown-and-sausage casserole for breakfast, the meal transcends the greasy-spoon genre with a hint of class. Lunch and dinner follows the same format, with classics like chili, chicken pot pie, and beef stroganoff. $

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Quick take-out Mexican in the heart of downtown is the game plan for this outlet of the local mini-chain, started by the same guy who ran the Todo Loco wrap shops in the ’90s. Burritos are solid, especially at breakfast, and can even be pretty healthy, if you customize them right. (Whole wheat tortilla? Right on.) $ ChoCoLate box 108 Pine St., 443-3900. Tourists usually aren’t too thick at downtown Seattle’s premier emporium of imported candies, teas, and cocoa mixes, so when you’re done ringing up your $12 ultra-bittersweet bar and tin of cherry-vanilla tea, sit down with a scoop of gelato, a petit four, a lemon bar, or something else yummy from their dessert case. $ daiLy GRiLL 629 Pike St., 624-8400. You can tell the Daily Grill is a chain from the shiny edges of the insta-retro decor and the massive menu, which means to please all of the people all of the time. But it falls on the class end of the spectrum one step down from McCormick & Schmick’s and five steps up from the Cheesecake

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Served in a martini glass striped in white chocolate with a salted-cocoa rim, it contains Ephemere Truffle sauce, caramel sauce, vodka, and Caramel Bailey’s. It’s a cake in a glass. The Verdict: “It doesn’t taste like alcohol,” I say. He responds, “That’s why they can be dangerous,” and goes off to mix another cake, leaving me to absorb just how rich, sweet, and deceptively strong this drink is. I could see why, as a normal straight-shooter, Rob likes this one among all the saccharine fare on the menu: The salt cuts through the sugar, giving the drink a round, complex taste that’s not too overwhelming. While this isn’t the ordinary drink of someone who actually enjoys the taste of alcohol, there is something to be said about it if you happen to like both drinking and melted chocolate. Rob says that one reason he enjoys working here is “the look on people’s faces when they first sip a chocolate martini . . . It’s like, oh, my God.” He adds, “You did it.” I’ll admit: I totally did. E food@seattleweekly.com

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The Watering Hole: Dilettante Mocha Cafe & Chocolate Martini Bar, 538 Broadway E., 329-6463, CAPITOL HILL The Atmosphere: One could initially be put off by this remaining pillar of smooth-jazz-playing latte culture until one remembers that Dilettante comes by it relatively honestly. They officially hit Seattle in 1976 not too far away from where this cafe is currently located, so sitting at this dark marble bar surrounded by dark, warm wood tones and bulbous chandeliers feels legitimate. Besides, Dilettante caters in the kind of rich chocolate experience that a certain generation of (boring) women equates with sex, so the bar is chock-full of Oxygen Channel eroticism. The Barkeep: Rob Lehmann mans both the booze and coffee orders on his weekday shifts, and is a man of few words. When I ask if he has a background in both, he gives me a muted head shake. When I follow up by asking which he has more passion for, he discreetly nods toward Dilettante’s pristine mountain of liquor bottles. Though he’s been at Dilettante only about six months, Rob says he’s worked at Broadway watering holes, which he wishes to keep anonymous, for years. While Dilettante gets regulars, he says, the difference between them and those at the places he used to work is like night and day: “It’s a whole new crowd. “I like the people aspect of [being a bartender],” he eventually adds once he’s warmed up a little. It’s hard to describe the sheer conversational depth that Rob can convey with just nods and chuckles. But he was able to verbalize about what kind of boozin’ he likes to do. The Drink: “I don’t really like sweet drinks,” Rob admits. He normally drinks straight vodka. He decides to bring me a Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Martini anyway, justifying it with “If I were out with friends, I’d get that anyway, because you can’t get it anywhere else.” It contains vodka, but that’s about where the similarity to a martini ends:

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For residents of Washington, D.C., such as the writer who chronicled Uber for The Atlantic’s current issue, the new on-demand sedan service is handy because its drivers are willing to venture into low-income neighborhoods when called. But in Seattle, the company is gaining a foothold with restaurantgoers. “We’ve had restaurants reach out to us,” says Jen Joyce, who manages the Seattle branch of Uber, which is active in nine major U.S. cities. “They want to extend the service they’re giving, instead of having diners go into the street and flag down a cab.” Uber is a digital mashup of traditional taxiing and private car services. Launched in San Francisco in 2010, the concept connects riders with drivers in ways that wouldn’t have been possible before the smartphone era. With Uber, prospective riders set up an online account with credit-card information. They’re then granted access to a smartphone app showing the nearest available drivers and how long it would take for them to reach the pickup location. All it takes is a click to summon a car, and the order is immediately confirmed via a text message introducing the driver by name and star rating. I recently used Uber and didn’t have any trouble appreciating its charms. I didn’t have to worry about whether I had cash in my wallet, since the gratuity-included fare was automatically charged

to my credit card. It took me about 12 minutes to reach Capitol Hill’s Skillet Diner from Madison Street and Western Avenue. Unlike most livery services, Uber charges by time or distance, depending on how quickly the car is moving. My trip cost $15, a price steep enough for me to sympathize with complaints that Uber is skimming wealthy passengers from the taxi pool, creating hardships for cab drivers struggling to pay the bills. Uber’s drivers, however, aren’t complaining. Mine told me he feels much safer traveling without cash, and likes that Uber allows him to rate passengers. Riders who receive extremely low ratings, such as the backseat fistfighters he recently transported, are banned from the system. Joyce says Seattle has been very responsive to the Uber concept. “We’re a steady climb, but it’s definitely growing,” Joyce says. The company’s pushing growth by partnering with restaurants in Belltown and Capitol Hill. Earlier this year, Manhattan Drugs’ Facebook page promoted a free-ride code, and a recent distillers’ dinner at Spur included transportation by Uber. Joyce says Uber has also distributed $10 discount cards for restaurants to slip into check presenters. The card is a conversation starter, she says. She especially likes the conversations which unfold along the lines of a tweet she recently forwarded me. During Restaurant Week, a Mistral Kitchen diner tweeted, “Restaurant calls cab for us, no show. Calls again, still no show. I summon @ Uber_SEA, showed up in <3 minutes.” Joyce called the dispatch “a perfect tweet.” hraskin@seattleweekly.com


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Factory. The grill’s classic Americana bent comes through in its dark wood booths and checkered floor, as well as its steaks, salads, and seafood. The polished service provides the executive ego with everything it needs to stay aloft. $$ EL MALECON 1122 Post Ave., 623-7203. Formerly known as Las Margaritas, this big, airy Mexican joint is nestled in Post Alley, directly under the Highway 99 offramp at Seneca, giving it a hideaway feel. Plates of big Americanized Mexican are cheap and satisfying. They’re not exactly reinventing the wheel here, but the food is still a cut above many of this city’s casual Mexican sit-down spots. Happy hour is every day from 3 to 7 p.m. and again from 9 to close, when margaritas are $4.25 and drafts and wells are $3. $ ELEPHANT & CASTLE 1415 Fifth Ave., 624-9977. It’s refreshing sometimes to pretend you’re in town on a business meeting, and too spent at day’s end to venture outside of the hotel. That said, you don’t want to let the fact that you’re away from the wife and kids for two days go to waste entirely; and besides, you’ve got an expense account to burn through. If this is your predicament, you can do far worse than to ingest some shepherd’s pie and microbrews at the downtown Red Lion’s sprawling, British-themed pub. $$ FALAFEL KING 1509 First Ave., 381-0857. This tiny spot’s namesake sandwich contains several extremely well-seasoned patties; if you like them well dressed, you’ll want to ask for extra sauce. The chicken shawarma is full of excellent marinated chicken, lemony and peppery, while the spanakopita is covered T H I S CO D E TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE in creamy garlic sauce. On a SEATTLE WEEKLY platter of vegetarian stuffed IPHONE/ANDROID APP grape leaves, hummus, FOR MORE RESTAURANTS OR VISIT turmeric rice, and salad, the seattleweekly.com tahini-rich hummus is buttery, not greasy; the bright yellow rice is flavorful and expertly cooked; and the leaves are nice and lemony. Whatever you order, don’t be surprised if it’s spicy; the flirty guys at the counter go as heavy on the paprika as they do on the compliments. $ O’ASIAN KITCHEN 800 Fifth Ave., Ste. Plaza 1, 264-1789. O’Asian is the perfect place to power-lunch over spinach-and-shrimp dumplings and turnip cake, because it’s tucked so far back at the back of the Bank of America plaza that the casual passerby would never know it was there. Though more glamorous in its presentation, the restaurant’s dim sum follows the standard procedure: Women (dressed in catering tuxes) push around carts of steamers (polished bamboo, not dented aluminum) whose contents are so varied that you’ll curse the heavens for making your stomach smaller than it should be. Dinner aims for a mix of high-end regional Chinese dishes and more fusion-y fare, with less success. $$ POST ALLEY PIZZA 1123 Post Ave., 382-8475. Regular 9-to-5ers from every demographic can be found hunkering down over a slice or two of Post Alley’s New York-style street pizza, thin-crusted and bedecked with vegetables and meats. The staff have an understated air of friendliness; niceties may be unknown, but they’ll remember what you like to order on Wednesdays when it’s raining. $ SPECIALTY’S CAFE & BAKERY 1023 Third Ave., 264-0887. The smell of sinfully rich chocolate-chip cookies may lure you in, but Specialty’s is at heart a utilitarian lunch place. Sandwiches and salads come out quick, even if you don’t order ahead online. It’s quite a few notches above Subway, though: Sandwiches come on homemade bread and are enlivened with ingredients like pesto, avocado and cranberries. $ TAP HOUSE GRILL 1506 Sixth Ave., 816-3314. It’s no surprise that three-quarters of the diners at Tap House Grill, just a block away from the convention center, are straight (-appearing) men. The giant underground warehouse—decorated in a handsome palette of copper and chocolate—is dominated by a bar with 160 tap handles, staffed with a team of lovely women, and lined with a Circuit City’s worth of flat-panel TVs. The global menu includes everything from sushi to steaks, wings to dinner salads. Rule of thumb: The less you spend (that means burgers and snacks), the better off you are. $-$$ THE TOP OF THE HILTON 1301 Sixth Ave., 695-6015. As a friend put it, this is the place you take your date when you’re having an affair: quiet to the point of being clandestine, with fabulous, romantic views to the west, north, and east from downtown. Few Seattle bars do more to nurture conversation; it’s perfect for gathering after a 5th Avenue or Benaroya Hall performance to chew it over with friends. $$

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t’s Record Store Day, and the crowd at Easy Street Records has spilled out onto the sidewalk and into spaces between parked cars on West Seattle’s California Avenue. The headliner, Reignwolf, is on his hands and knees fumbling with a spider’s web of chords and connections. His set is running 20 minutes behind schedule. Store owner Matt Vaughan steps up to the mike and kills a little time thanking everyone for coming out. Vaughan wraps up his speech and turns things over to the guitarist, who’s finally ready to go. People throughout the audience hit record on their cell phones and cameras to capture the spectacle they’ve heard about from their friends and glimpsed online. Reignwolf stands before them, alone onstage, wielding a shiny black Gibson 355, wearing a tattered black T-shirt and a fantastic smile. He gives them exactly what they’ve come for. When Reignwolf—born Jordan Cook— was 2 years old, he picked up his dad’s Fender Stratocaster for the first time and began making noise. It wasn’t long before his dad bought him his own axe. “At 2 years old, of course, I’m just slamming on it, making probably the greatest racket ever, you know,” Cook says. “But I connected with it. It was something I loved; it was better than playing with toys.” Though his father has since passed away, his mother, Deb Cook, remembers those days well. “When the rest of the kids on our street were out playing hockey and baseball, Jordan was in our basement playing guitar at a very early age,”

“He’ll blow your doors off and clean your clock within a couple measures. No gimmicks just raw performance, North American style.” she says in an e-mail. “Bedtime was hard for Jordan, as he never wanted to put down the guitar. The rest of the family would be upstairs, and our china cabinet would ring and rattle from the vibration of Jordan’s intense guitar playing.” Today, “the greatest racket ever” could be Cook’s professional motto. Onstage, the Saskatchewan native finger-picks, pounds, slides, and grinds sounds from his guitar not regularly heard outside an artillery range. With only one formal album in his catalogue, his explosive live show is what’s built him a reputation in his home country and, over time, around the world. He toured China in 2006, and is heading to Europe this summer, where he’s previously made his mark at the Montreux Jazz Festival. But strangely enough, Seattle, where he’s lived for the past five months, is where he feels most at home. “It’s definitely where a musician wants to be,” he says. “I know it’s classic to say, but even the weather here being up and down, it makes you feel moods like crazy,

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2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 j a z z a l l e y. c o m

BY TODD HAMM

and makes you want to play music.” In 2005, prolific Seattle-based session drummer Matt Chamberlain (Pearl Jam, Fiona Apple, Elton John) got a call from a producer in Memphis asking him to lay down drums on an album from a new Canadian artist. A well-traveled studio ace, Chamberlain accepted the invitation and began work on what would become Cook’s debut full-length Seven Deadly Sins. Impressed with Cook’s playing, and in need of a bassist to finish the album, Chamberlain called on his friend, Soundgarden’s Ben Shepherd, who was flown in immediately. After the recording wrapped, Cook boldly asked the two veterans to serve as his band on a Canadian tour in support of the album. “Within honestly a month or two, we were on the road in minus-40 [degree weather] across western Canada,” recalls Cook. “So they went back to the start, touring in a van again, and that support obviously was the best to me. Because the fact is they don’t need to do that, they were just up for playing some music, and it was one of the best times of my entire life.” “We played like, Saskatoon and all these places I’d never been before,” remembers Chamberlain over the phone. “It was bizarre . . . nobody had any idea that we were playing with him. It was fun, it was an adventure.” Since then, Cook has caught the ears of a few other established musicians, including, through Shepherd, a fair number in Seattle; last December, he moved here. One such musician was Soundgarden/Pearl Jam drummer Matt Cameron, who recently recorded with Cook. “I was always really impressed with how he made guitar playing look very easy, and I really enjoy guitar players that can do that,” says Cameron. “He has a really good singing voice, and really good stage presence, great performer. He’s the total package.” Similar praise comes from Shepherd. “So

Leader of the pack.

you like playing guitar? So you like listening to guitar? You like seeing someone playing the guitar maybe to learn something or just to be immersed in it, well then check out Jordan, he’ll blow your doors off and clean your clock within a couple measures,” he wrote in a text message. “No gimmicks just raw performance, North American style.”

A

s he sits at a table outside Broadway’s Espresso Vivace on a sunny April afternoon, Cook’s look is analogous to his prototypical onstage howl (which a friend of mine has aptly described as “like a cement mixer made out of diamonds and gold”): gritty and raw up front, but polished and together. His shiny black hair tumbles over his forehead from underneath a knit beanie; his perfectly symmetrical pearly whites could be Photoshopped from a GQ ad. Cook’s currently recording with Shepherd, Chamberlain, and Cameron, among other players, and hopes to have a new EP ready in time for his May 27 Sasquatch! performance. With this new batch of songs, he says, he’s trying to harness the massive energy that people have come to expect of his stage show. “The one thing that makes the live performance so great is the improvisation, and the connection between the people and myself,” he continues. “It is difficult trying to catch this on record, but what I’ve found lately is the rawness of the original stages is usually what I come back to.” From behind his coffee, Cook’s brilliant onstage smile returns as he looks out at the bustling community he now calls home. “This feels right,” he says. “Why would I go away from that?” E music@seattleweekly.com


Seattle weekly â&#x20AC;˘ M AY 9 - 15, 2012

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Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

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36

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music» »PREVIEW

Survivor

T

COURTESY MAD INK PR

Why John Doe’s X is the last band standing. BY JOSH KERNS

hirty-five years is a long time to do anything, especially play punk rock. But John Doe is unapologetic—in fact downright proud—to still be fronting seminal L.A. punk band X, celebrating three and a half decades with a West Coast tour that includes a Saturday stop at Showbox at the Market. “I think we all love it,” he said in a recent phone call. “At this point we’re the last band standing—certainly out of the L.A. bands and out of all the punk-rock bands, the last one that still plays loud and hard.” X is part of the legendary class of ’77 that included the Sex Pistols, the Ramones, and The Clash. But the band had no delusions of grandeur as it pioneered a new sound, marrying the rockabilly-tinged guitar of Billy Zoom and the dissonant but captivating harmonies of Doe and singer Exene Cervenka. After Rolling Stone and others named 1981’s Wild Gift the record of the year and X signed with Elektra Records, making it one of the first underground acts to ink a major-label deal, the band seemed poised for a commercial breakthrough. But despite a ton of critical acclaim, X never broke big. “I suppose for

»THROUGH @ 2

Thong Songs Sweet Pups keep it short, tight, and mostly lady. BY ERIN K. THOMPSON

KEITH JOHNSON

music@seattleweekly.com

work at Rudy’s, where they met, and originally wanted to start an all-girl band. But after one practice with Herb, they decided to keep him. “I don’t

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just have a guy in my girl band, I have an awesome German guy,” says Ray, who’d played with local punk outfit Cute Lepers for years before forming Sweet Pups last summer. For her new project, she thought about playing the keyboard, but wanted something more portable and manageable—so she bought a keytar on eBay from Japan. SHOP TALK Early next month, Sweet Pups hits the studio with Johnny Sangster; they plan to record a five-song EP, which, considering the brevity of their peppy pop-rock tracks, could total about 10 minutes. That’s about how long their sets usually last—“We could do 13 minutes if we talked,” says Ray. BTW Just because Sweet Pups are fierce and female doesn’t mean they want to be classified with the R word. “Riot grrrl draws more attention to your gender, and we’re trying to break away from that,” says Brunner. “We want people to respect us for being good musicians, not just for being girls in a band.” “Although I will say,” Barrett interjects, “if you’re cute, get up onstage and be cute. I mean, I don’t tape my boobs down. I’ll wear a thong. I’m proud to be a girl up onstage.” E ethompson@seattleweekly.com

HOW THEY GOT HERE Ray and Brunner both

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SWEET PUPS With Elk Rider, Badlands, Clutch Douglass, Wiscon, Gravy Grime Girls, Abi Swanson. Comet Tavern, 922 E. Pike St., 322-9272. $8. 6 p.m. Sun., May 13.

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

THE SITUATION I’m spending a late night at Jabu’s Pub in lower Queen Anne with Seattle’s babeliest band, Sweet Pups—bassist Rachel Barrett, guitarist Erica Brunner, singer and keytarist Prisilla Ray, and the band’s sole male, drummer Roman Herb. Originally hailing from Stuttgart, Germany, Herb is a cook at Jabu’s; he just finished a long shift making tacos for Taco Tuesday.

some of us on different levels [it was a disappointment],” Doe says. “On the other hand, it’s worked out all right. We still have credibility that a one- or two-hit wonder would not.” Some might say it’s time to hang it up after all these years, but don’t tell that to the thousands of new fans who discovered the band on its South American tour with Pearl Jam last summer. The bands will hook up again this summer for a European swing. And if people want to see an aging “icon,” that’s just fine with Doe. “When you see someone [when you’re] 17 or 18, and there’s a thousand people or more and you realize you’re part of something a little bigger, maybe, then you realize this is good and this is fun,” he says. “It encourages you to continue.” E

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music»TheShortList WEDNESDAY, MAY 9

Damn, nobody told me Craft Spells’ main dude Justin Vallesteros moved to San Francisco. Bummer for us, because their new EP, Gallery, represents a huge leap forward for the restless dream-pop band. Where last year’s full-length debut Idle Labor was a breezy but insubstantial bit of bedroom-sized New Order new wave, Gallery tightens their sound substantially, while better representing the expanded live band’s more filled-in sound. This is the record that should be cementing Craft Spells as one of Seattle’s— not SF’s—best young bands (although threequarters of them still live here). In any case, they’ll make a fine opener for the Drums’ melancholic, surf-inflected indie pop. With Part Time. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9467. 7 p.m. $13. All ages. ERIC GRANDY

band, the Maxines (named after Norman’s BFF), released their first EP, Drugstore, on K Records. The longest of Drugstore’s four tracks, the chugging “Ghost in the Cove,” clocks in at just two minutes and 20 seconds, but what the songs lack in duration they make up for in punchy zest. Murillo’s guitar wails, Norman’s drums thrash, both sing with cocksure bravado, and it all comes together as a riotous good time. With Night Beats, Unnatural Helpers. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951. 8 p.m. $8. ERIN K. THOMPSON

Mickey Hart Band

The Weeknd

WEDNESDAY, MAY 9

ANGEL CEBALLOS

The Drums & Craft Spells

FRIDAY, MAY 11 The high-tech concept of Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart’s Mysterium Now that the smoke-andTremendum is way too difficult to describe coke mirrors surrounding in terms commonly understood by humans. once-mysterious Toronto noiR&B project Just know that, like pretty much everything The Weeknd have cleared, we’re left with Hart has collaborated on in his life, expeone moody, indie-styled R&B crooner/rapper, riencing his “music” live is a much better Abel Tesfaye, and the three free mixtapes he investment than purchasing and playing it released over the past year, which range from on your living-room stereo. Unless you’re essential (House of Balloons) to essentially on acid—then it’s awesome even if you disposable (Thursday) to somewhere in listen to it in a Costco produce cooler. But between (Echoes of Silence). That barrage of no matter how high material may have yielded Hart ascends, he’ll never diminishing returns and atone for performing somewhat dulled The Tune in to 97.3 KIRO FM every Sunday at 3 p.m. “Fire on the Mountain” Weeknd’s appeal, but to hear music editor Chris Kornelis as a rap shortly after tonight’s rapidly sold-out on Seattle Sounds. Garcia’s death, the musishow is proof that Tesfaye cal equivalent of taking is still one of the most a dump on Jerry’s headstone. The Neptune, exciting voices currently working on the borders, or in the darker corners, of R&B. 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877-784-4849. 8 p.m.

e

$32 adv./$35 DOS. All ages. MIKE SEELY

The Maxines THURSDAY, MAY 10

Earlier this year, Matt Murillo and Kelly Norman, two Texas transplants now living in Olympia, made a splash with just seven minutes of music. In January, their garage-pop

Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 6283151. 8 p.m. Sold out. All ages. ERIC GRANDY

The Moondoggies FRIDAY, MAY 11–SATURDAY, MAY 12

After two well-received albums on Hardly Art Records, the Moondoggies aren’t the new kids in town anymore, but they’re absolutely

still a band to watch. Never ones to get comfortable, they’ve been experimenting with an expanded onstage lineup for their sprawling, electric Americana, heard on the recording of their holiday set at the Neptune (which can be had free at moondoggiesmusic. com). Tonight’s show will feature the original quartet plus longtime pedal-steel collaborator Jon Pontrello; this crew is chipping away at the band’s third album, which they hope to finish this year. But, says frontman Kevin Murphy, they’re taking their time. “We have somewhere around 30 songs for the next record,” he says. “Don’t wanna rush this one like we’ve done before.” With the Maldives. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599. 9:30 p.m. $12. CHRIS KORNELIS

Death Cab for Cutie SUNDAY, MAY 13

It’s rare for Death Cab for Cutie to let outsiders into their music. Guitarist Chris Walla produces the band’s records, and few friends have ever been invited to join them onstage. But for their spring tour, the Seattle quartet

Craft Spells: now 75 percent local.

enlisted San Francisco’s eight-piece string ensemble, the Magik*Magik Orchestra, for a series of intimate shows. Frontman Ben Gibbard says the band’s on their electric instruments “95 percent of the time,” but “certainly, it’s not a rock show.” He says the outing’s collaborative nature is giving him ideas for the next DCFC record, even if it doesn’t involve strings. “I think we sometimes forget that if you hear a song in your head, or I should say a sound for a song in your head, there’s somebody who plays that instrument that you can call on the phone, and they’ll come over and record it or play it with you,” Gibbard says. “I think now, just having these people onstage with us for the last month or so and hearing what a different kind of sonic palette can bring to the band, it certainly has opened up my ears [to the idea] that there are no limits to the possibilities to what you can do in a studio. If you can hear something, you can find somebody to play it.” With Youth Lagoon. The Paramount, 911 Pike St., 877-784-4849. $31.25–$61.25. All ages. CHRIS KORNELIS

THE-DREAM FRIDAY, MAY 11

RADIO KILLA

One of today’s strongest songwriters, Terius Nash has had a hand in writing three of the best pop songs in recent memory—Rihanna’s “Umbrella,” Justin Bieber’s “Baby,” and Beyoncé’s “Single Ladies”—and he’s also penned smash hits for Mariah Carey, Britney Spears, and Mary J. Blige, among others. In fact, his prolificacy as a writer threatens to overshadow his own singing career, for which he goes by the stage name The-Dream. Last year, a stunning demo of him singing his power ballad “1+1” (which he eventually gave to Beyoncé) leaked and served as a good reminder of his own gorgeous vocal talents. And after more than a year of teases and title changes and a couple of tantalizing new tracks (“ROC,” “Kill the Lights”), The-Dream is now gearing up to release the official follow-up to his acclaimed 2010 Love King album—Love IV MMXII is slated for release sometime this summer. With Kendrick Lamar, The Bar, Brothers From Another. Hec Edmundson Pavilion, UW campus, 3870 Montlake Blvd. N.E., 543-2100. 7 p.m. $17 adv./$20 DOS/ Free for UW students. All ages. ERIN K. THOMPSON

River Giant SUNDAY, MAY 13

River Giant’s new self-titled release, produced by Chris Early (Gold Leaves, Grand Hallway, Band of Horses), is one of the latest vignettes in Seattle’s ongoing folk-rock opera. The band isn’t breaking the most innovative sound, but their bluesy bars, lusty riffs, and low-end bass lines—especially on tracks like “Western” and “Taylor Mountain”—work a repurposed, harder edge into the overplayed genre. Whether they’re rocking out or softly harmonizing, this solid three-piece, led by Kyle Jacobson’s wailing Neil Young-meetsRobin Pecknold vocals, will sound great in Columbia City Theater’s reverby room. With Plant Party, Parade Schedule. Columbia City Theater, 4916 Rainier Ave. S., 722-3009. 8 p.m. $6. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

*

EDITOR’S PICK

39


seven»nights Wednesday, May 9

Twee-pop outfit Allo Darlin’ plays the Vera on May 11.

JON AUER This power-pop veteran co-founded the

Posies and played with the most recent incarnation of Big Star. With Simon Lynge. Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, thetripledoor.net. 7:30 p.m. $10. All ages. 1 WIZE MONKEY This recently formed four-piece blends hip-hop and funk with straight-ahead indie rock. With Peace Nuckle, No More Knives, Selecta LB. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880, sunsettavern. com. 9 p.m. $7. PIGEON JOHN This Southern California hip-hop artist released the R&B-inflected Dragon Slayer in 2010. With Tanya Morgan, Cookbook, Playdough, City Hall. Nectar, 412 N. 36th St., 632-2020, nectarlounge.com. 8 p.m. $10.

Thursday, May 10

Friday, May 11 ALLO DARLIN’ Slumberland band’s shimmering twee pop

40

Saturday, May 12 AYO This Seattle-by-way-of-Lagos, Nigeria rapper

boasts a laid-back flow and fluid instrumentals. With Saturday Morning Cartoon, The Rush Project. High Dive, 513 N. 36th St., 632-0212, highdiveseattle.com. 9:30 p.m. $7. BASSNECTAR Lorin Ashton has been one of the biggest beneficiaries of the great dubstep boom of the past few years, becoming one of EDM’s biggest names after years of moderate success. Get there early to see how the raver crowd receives Ghostland Observatory’s trademark electro-pastiche. With VibeSquaD, Mr. Projectile. WaMu Theater, 800 Occidental Ave. S., 381-7555, wamutheater.com. 7 p.m. $35. All ages. CUMULUS Alexandra Niedzialkowski’s hushed acoustic recordings have evolved into fuzzed-out indie pop, courtesy of a full band featuring members of Say Hi and Great Waves. With Alcoholic Sweet Faith Mission. Comet Tavern. 9 p.m. $8. ORIGIN Masters of the new wave of death metal, Origin are touring in support of their upcoming fifth studio album, Entity. With Cattle Decapitation, Decrepit Birth, Aborted, Rings of Saturn, Battle Cross, Loculus, Triosis, Those Who Lie Beneath. Studio Seven, 110 S. Horton St., 286-1312, studioseven.us. 4 p.m. $15 adv./$17 DOS. All ages. SEATTLE ROCK ORCHESTRA This 50-piece orchestra takes on two Beatles classics, Rubber Soul and BRETT WILDE

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

recalls labelmates The Pains of Being Pure at Heart. With the Wave Pictures. Vera Project, 305 Harrison St., 956-8372, theveraproject.org. 7:30 p.m. $11. All ages. BLACK DICE The electronic noise-rock weirdos and occasional Animal Collective collaborators who released the esoteric Mr. Impossible last month. With Jabon, Uncle Pooch. Sunset Tavern. 10 p.m. $12. THE DEAD MILKMEN This seminal Philadelphia punk band reunited in 2008 and released The King in Yellow, its first album since 1995, last year. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 381-3094, elcorazonseattle.com. 8 p.m. $20 adv./$25 DOS.

1303 N.E. 45th St., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org. 9 p.m. $14 adv./$16 DOS. All ages. LAURA VEIRS This Portland chanteuse may be one of the newest singer/songwriters to pen a children’s album (her latest release, Tumble Bee), but her upstanding catalog of folk harmonies, including 2010’s critically acclaimed July Flame, rings with mature and refined beauty. With Cataldo, Pretty Broken Things. Columbia City Theater, 4916 Rainier Ave. S., 722-3009, columbiacitytheater.com. $10 adv./$15 DOS. 9 p.m.

San Francisco’s Sleepy Sun rocks Barboza on May 12. DOG SHREDDER This fast-rising metal trio has a deal

with local label Good to Die, and received an allimportant positive review from Pitchfork for its Brass Tactics EP. With The Ruby Doe, Black Elk. Comet Tavern, 922 E. Pike St., 322-9272, comettavern.com. 9 p.m. $10. IVAN & ALYOSHA This local duo infuses Head & the Heart-ish earthiness with Beatlesque whimsy, thus making them better than either The Head & the Heart or the Beatles. With Rosie Thomas. The Neptune,

Revolver, in their entirety. Moore Theatre, 1931 Second Ave., 467-5510, stgpresents.com. 8 p.m. $18. All ages. (Also 2 p.m. Sun., May 13.) SLEEPY SUN This San Francisco psych-rock quintet recently took some time out from their frequent travels to record their third full-length, the haunting Spine Hits. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, thebarboza.com. 7 p.m. $10. SPECIAL EXPLOSION This up-and-coming local band was a 2012 Sound Off! finalist, and recently opened for Brad at the Showbox SoDo. With Us on Roofs, Winnebago, Ruler. Vera Project. 7:30 p.m. $6. All ages.

Sunday, May 13 DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE Ben Gibbard and friends play

a smaller-than-usual stage with the accompaniment of San Francisco’s Magik*Magik Orchestra. With Youth Lagoon. Paramount Theatre, 911 Pine St., 467-5520, stgpresents.org. 8 p.m. $31.25–$62.25. All ages. GREAT LAKE SWIMMERS Known for recording in unusual places (abandoned grain silos, rural churches), this Canadian folk band’s most recent album, New Wild Everywhere, was their first to be recorded in a traditional studio. With Cold Specks. Tractor Tavern, 5231 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. $12 adv./$14 DOS. 8 p.m. HOODIE ALLEN On last month’s All American, Allen comes across as a more polished version of Asher Roth—better lyrics, better beats, and no “I Love College” frat-party pandering. With Shelton Harris. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-7416, thecrocodile. com. 8 p.m. $14. All ages. THE PROPHETS OF ADDICTION A perfect blend of glam, punk, and good ol’ rock ’n’ roll. With Freehands and the Curbside Avengers. High Dive. 9:30 p.m. $6.

behind its forthcoming sixth album, 3’s. With The Veer Union, Ionia, No Buffer, One Gun Shy, Silent Theory. El Corazon. 8 p.m. $13 adv./$15 DOS. All ages.

Tuesday, May 15 E-40 This veteran MC and perennial contender for the

title of the Bay Area’s hardest-working rapper (he sees Lil B), E-40 hits Neumos on the heels of his new triple album The Block Brochure—not to mention the two double albums that preceded it and a catalog stretching back to ’92. With Keak Da Sneak, BSE Family Luck, Young Fee, Blue Nose Music, T-Wisdom. Neumos, 925 Pike St., 709-9467. 7 p.m. $30. RODINA This funk and soul group features members of jam bands like Kinetix and Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad. With Unsinkable Heavies. Tractor Tavern. $10 adv./$12 DOS. 9 p.m. TIN MAN Americana-tinged rock tunes from down south—Puyallup, that is. With Colin Bradford, Ian Jones, B Willing James. High Dive. 8 p.m. $6.

Rap star Hoodie Allen hits the Crocodile on May 13.

Monday, May 14 THE JESUS REHAB Brothers Jared and Dominic

Cortese spin raucous garage rock on the appropriately named Drunken Hillbilly Bar Fight EP. With Slowwave, The Great UM. The Crocodile. 7 p.m. $5. All ages. SMILE EMPTY SOUL Holdovers from the post-grunge era of the early aughts, this three-piece is touring Send events to music@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended, NC = no charge, AA = all ages.

DIANA LEVINE

groove-based jams are deceptively mellow and surprisingly musically diverse. With Eric Tollefson Band, Funktion. Nectar. 8 p.m. $7. TRACE BUNDY Known as the “Acoustic Ninja” for his deft finger-picking skills, Bundy has been recognized multiple times by Acoustic Guitar magazine as one of the country’s best fingerstyle guitarists. With Shook Twins. Triple Door. 7:30 p.m. $16 adv./$20 DOS. All ages. CURREN$Y A hip-hop show headlined by a weed enthusiast and supported by seven other names on the bill: You think this one might be a late-running shitshow? With Styles P, the Jets, Smoke DZA, Fiend 4 Da Money, Corner Boy P, Trademark, Young Roddy. Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxonline.com. 8 p.m. $20 adv./$24 DOS. All ages. SAD FACE This local quintet plays brooding indie rock that’s heavy on the reverb and atmosphere. With Timothy Robert Graham, A Leaf, Friends and Family. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, chopsuey. com. 8 p.m. $6.

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in the main bar area just outside the big room where their karaoke stage is set. It was a busy night, with more than 40 people there. It’s a fantastic place to watch a game. They have three huge projection TVs. At 9 p.m., as the Clippers-Grizzlies game was winding down, a sultry voice came echoing from the other room. It was the host, Aury, kicking off the night with a super-loungy version of Billy Joel’s “Just the Way You Are.” We quickly relocated to a table in that room, and found it already full. It was a young crowd—lots of girls in their 20s—which made it clear that this literally is the spot to hang out in downtown Bellevue. The dudes that night could really sing. One guy, Josh, had pure crooner pipes and masterfully delivered Sinatra and Bublé numbers as Aury scatted behind him. Later he and his buddy sang a killer doo-wop duet of the Marcels’ “Blue Moon.” Juan singing Lenny Kravitz’s “Get Away” followed by a dude singing a great rendition of 3 Doors Down’s “Kryptonite” inspired me to sing some ’90s of my own. I did “Daughter” by Pearl Jam, and smoked it. The sound quality there is phenomenal. I definitely made the right call this week. E karaoke@seattleweekly.com THE SPOT OFF MAIN 20 103rd Ave. N.E., 425-646-6434, BELLEVUE

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Wednesdays are my favorite weeknight to sing, but I rarely get out that night anymore (I’m usually up before dawn Thursdays cramming to get this column done). I woke up last Wednesday thinking of a venue I very much wanted to check out, a sports bar on the southern edge of downtown Bellevue called The Spot Off Main. Some may consider a locale on the so-called “soulless” Eastside an odd choice over a voguish venue in one of the trendier parts of Seattle. But I’ve sung many nights in both settings, and have come to understand that the variables that contribute to a k-bar’s success have little to do with which side (or end) of the lake they’re on. Good song selection and sound quality is always important, but it really boils down to having a popular host with the ability to draw a consistent crowd. The Spot Off Main’s show is run by Karr Productions, a well-established karaoke company involved in some of the most popular local venues—most notably the Little Red Hen (hosted by Robert, aka “DJ Forrest Gump”), whose Wednesday shows are to this day the busiest, craziest karaoke nights I have ever experienced. My buddy Juan and I hooked up early on Wednesday to watch playoff hoops. We got to The Spot at around 7:30 and took our seats

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41


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column»Toke Signals

A Powerful Pair

W

BY STEVE ELLIOTT

e’re in the karma business,” Jason of Seattle’s Best Cannabis

explained to me the first time we talked on the phone. “And we want to keep it good.” I thought a lot about that quote, as one is wont to do under the influence of marijuana, and after examining it from multiple angles, I like it a lot. Of course, it’s cannabis, not karma, for which you donate $10 a gram, and Seattle’s Best doesn’t disappoint. Though I caught them between harvests, when their stock was down to only two strains, those two, at least, were both excellent and showed signs of care in their cultivation and curing. Scot, the master grower, delivered my medicine (I love getting my medicine directly from the dude who grew it). He may look a little like Virgin CEO Richard Branson, but Scot almost

It’s an accomplishmentoriented strain—if you consider attentively listening to music an accomplishment. certainly knows a lot more than Dick about growing marijuana. He took the time to talk about his organic growing methods, involving individual care for all his plants and— crucially—real organic soil rather than a soilless hydroponic medium. Scot is clearly a man to whom growing quality cannabis means a

ON » POT TOKEOFTHETOWN.COM xBLOG

lot; he bemoans the “mass production” of cannabis in warehouse-like environments and the resulting lack of individual attention to plants. The two strains in stock were White Widow, a hybrid renowned for its potency, and Bubblegum, an indicadominant. White Widow’s fat flowers are covered with trichomes to the point of fuzzy stickiness. The buds emit a pungent, funky bouquet with hints of sweetness, and the effects are swift and pronounced. It’s an accomplishment-oriented strain—especially if you consider attentively listening to a piece of music an accomplishment. The Bubblegum, on the other hand, establishes its indica credentials from the very first toke. The “Whoa Factor” is very strong with this one: Each time I sampled Bubblegum, about three or four tokes in I couldn’t stop myself from thinking, “Whoa!” The onset seems quicker than a typical indica’s, and the expected pain relief comes quickly as well. Although it’s not one of those “hammer to the head” knockout strains that will leave you drooling as you nod out on the couch, Bubblegum can be a useful sleep aid, especially when more than a few tokes are taken. E

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What do I think? I think you should listen to “something” and throw him back. Woman, you may have a degree-and-a-half, but where’s your common sense? A 44-year-old pothead who lives in a dump furnished with a folding chair and a card table is telling you exactly who he is. There’s no ambiguity about who he might become or what he may achieve— he’s there, and it ain’t pretty (or comfortable). As for having had a rough time of it, so what? Loads of people have had very bad things happen, yet have managed not only to survive, but thrive. It sounds as if your guy is

more comfortable wallowing in this mysterious pain and using it to excuse his loserdom. Boyfriend has enough money for weed, but none to fix his car or buy a sofa. This tells you exactly where his priorities lay, and they aren’t with creature comforts. Great (I guess) that he’s not using you for sex, but serious potheads are more into brownie mix than getting down anyway. And for all you know, he’s using you for your vehicle, your recliner, or the wide array of delicious snack foods in your refrigerator. His degree doesn’t mean a thing. I have a degree in criminology and I write a dating-advice column, ferchrissakes. All it means is that at one point, he was motivated enough to complete school. That was over 20 years ago! I would say his criminal record probably has a lot to do with his sketchy employment situation. Not to mention—what the hell? Aren’t you curious why he was arrested and if he did time? What if it was for beating up or killing an ex? Or child molestation or armed robbery?! If you’re going to decide he’s paid his debt to society, you need to know what the tab was.

A 44-year-old pothead who lives in a dump is telling you exactly who he is. You’re nearly 30 and have your shit together, except for the part where you think it’s OK to settle for someone whose best quality is that he hasn’t pulled a fuck-and-dump. Don’t you think you should fix that before you try to fix someone else? E dategirl@seattleweekly.com WANT MORE? Listen to Judy on The Mike & Judy Show on the Heritage Radio Network, follow her tweets @DailyDategirl, or visit dategirl.net.


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420 Auto-Truck **************** DONATE YOUR CAR! Tax Write-off/Fast Pickup Running or not. Cancer Fund Of America. (888) 269-6482

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PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

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Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

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Golden Spa Deep Tissue, Swedish, Combination of all Asian Massage. Alternative Therapy, and Very Sweet Friendly Staff.

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Are your child’s bad moods tearing at your family? Moodiness and sleep changes may mean depression. Try to get help now. Qualified kids and teens may receive: . Fast and frequent access to a local child psychiatrist . Depression medication approved for use in adults . Medication and care at no cost . Compensation for time and travel No health insurance required.

Act now. Call 888-795-0061 Visit www.OptionsForKidsDepression.com


EMPLOYMENT PLACE YOUR AD TODAY • 206-623-6231 FREE ONLINE ADS AND PHOTOS AT WWW.BACKPAGE.COM

102 103 105 110 112 120 125 127 140 145 150 155 160 167 170 172 175 177 180 183 185 187 190 193 195 198 130

Architecture/Engineering Auditions/Show Biz Career/Training/Schools Computer/Technical Construction/Labor Drivers/Delivery/Courier Domestic Education Financial/Accounting Management/Professional Medical/Dental/Health Medical Research Studies Office/Clerical Restaurants/Hotels/Clubs Retail Sales and Marketing Telemarketing/Call Center Salons Security/Law Enforcement Trades Miscellaneous Part-Time Jobs Business Opportunities Employment Information Position Wanted Non-Profit Entertainment

185 Miscellaneous

Frank Russell Company (dba Russell Investment Group), global investment services firm in Seattle, WA seeks Senior Trader to execute domestic & international equity transactions for investment managers. Min. Req.: BS + 7 yrs exp (or MS + 5 yrs). Must have Series 7, 55, 63 licenses. Send resume to Russell.com/careers and apply online.

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$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

193 Employment Information A PHAT JOB Hiring 12 fresh faces! See the USA! A great first job! Contact Shirley 702-219-7625

172 Sales and Marketing Undercover Shoppers Get paid to shop. Retail/Dining establishments need undercover clients to judge quality/ customer service. Earn up to $150 a day. Call (800)722-6351

APPRAISERS WANTED Certified & Licensed Real Estate Appraisers. Established multi-state firm is seeking Residential & Commercial Appraisers. Employee opportunities w/benefits. Email resume and sample report to: recruiting@livecom

www.seattleweekly.com

140 Financial/Accounting

APPOINTMENT SPECIALIST Generate Free Estimate Appointments for Tree Work, Landscaping & Home Improvement Services. We work year round helping home owners keep their Homes Safe and Beautiful! PAID TRAINING & MARKETING MATERIALS PROVIDED GREAT EARNING POTENTIAL (Top reps are earning up to $60,000/ year) CELL PHONE, TRAVEL & MEDICAL ALLOWANCE AVAILABLE EXTRA INCENTIVES CAN BE EARNED • FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE * Work for a Company where you set your own Hours. * Work any day of the week during the hours of 9am-7pm. * Work Part-Time or Full-Time REQUIREMENTS: * Vehicle & Driver’s License * Cell Phone * Internet Access you can use on a daily basis * Ability to work a minimum of 25 hours a week

537 Child Adoption ADOPT ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss Active, young, successful, creative, musical couple lovingly await 1st miracle baby. Expenses Paid. Dave & Robin 800.990.7667 ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

ADOPT ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss Broadway Executives in 30's, unconditional LOVE, travel, playful pup awaits precious 1st baby. Expenses paid sssssssssss 1-800-989-6766 sssssssssss

595 Volunteers University of Washington MAPP Research Study Are you a male over 18 years old? Do you experience chronic fatigue? Are you currently in a period of fatigue? If so, you may be eligible to participate in a UW study! Contact the research coordinator at mapprc@uw.edu or 206.616.4497 for more information. Note we cannot guarantee the confidentiality of any information sent via email. Look up our study at www.ClinicalTrials.gov (search for NCT01098279).

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To Apply: Go to www.evergreentlc.com or Call 800-684-8733 ext. 3434 or 3321 or Send resume to recruiting@evergreentlc.com

RENTALS & REAL ESTATE PLACE YOUR AD TODAY • 206-623-6231 FREE ONLINE ADS AND PHOTOS AT WWW.BACKPAGE.COM 310 Roommate Services

300 Rentals

355 Roommates 360 Rooms for Rent 363 Roommate Services Apartment/Condo/Townhome 365 370 House/Duplexes for Rent Short Term/Corporate Housing 380 Manufactured Home Rentals 390 Vacation

Out of Town Storage Boat/Dockage Comm Rentals Rentals Wanted Miscellaneous Rental Services

307 Rooms for Rent Greenlake/West Seattle $400 & up Utilities included! busline, some with private bathrooms a Please call Anna between 10am & 8pm a 206-790-5342 SEATTLE Starting at $350 Green Lake, U-District, Wallingford, Greenwood. Lg., clean, well maintained houses. Fully equip. common areas. Free phone and cable, NS/NP. 206-388-3924 www.RoomsAndApartments.com

U-DISTRICT $400-$480 All Utilities Included! Call Sue for more information (206) 683-3783 or (206) 551-7472

317 Apartments for Rent $750 1 bds $750. 2 blocks to Pike Place Market & Westlake Center. Light and airy, views, storage. 206-441-4922

BELLTOWN

SHORELINE Starting at $645 Large 1bd, deck, Fireplace, quiet, parking, free storage. Also 2bd for $845. Must pass credit check. Larry 206-363-3356 UNIVERSITY DISTRICT 1 and 2 BR Apts. $850-$1300 5 min. to UW. Parking available! (206) 441-4922

350 Vacation Two Ocean Front Homes 20% OFF DISCOUNT* Newport Oregon Area Fully Furnished. Private beach access. Pets OK. Sleep 9-14 $225/Night Mid Week Discounts Available. (*Excludes Holidays). 503-678-1144

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

305 307 310 315 320 330 340 350

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

47


BACK PAGE • 206.623.6231 Northwest Cannabis Market ®

Celebrate and Party at our 100th Market Day Anniversary! Come for the meds & stay for the Fun! Highest Quality Lowest Donations Celebrate and Party

Thursday May 10th

Free Pizza!!

Northwest Cannabis Market America’s only daily cannabis farmers market Open Wednesday -Sunday 11-7pm 9640 16th Ave SW Seattle, WA 98106 • 360-420-4303 • info@nwcannabismarket.com FUN, FLIRTY, LOCAL WOMEN Call FREE! 206-576-2411 or 800-210-1010 18+ www.livelinks.com

Bew Ann Thai Massage

Only $49.00 for an hour all day. Near Crossroads Mall Bellevue. 425-746-1240

Cannabinoid Therapy for Chronic Pain

DIVORCE from $229 BANKRUPTCY from $299

Debt relief agency for bankruptcy. 206-625-0460

South Sea Massage Open 10am-11pm 7 days a week (425)922-9271

Customized Treatment From a Cannabis Expert www.CascadiaNaturalHealth.com; 425-486-1858

Debris Removal • 206-784-0313 • Credit Cards Accepted!

ANNA'S MED HEALTH SPADeep tissue, Relaxing,Chinese healing massage. 425-747-2288 10Am-10Pm www.annamedicalhealthspa.com 1550 140th Avenue NE, Suite 200 Bellevue Singing Lessons FreeTheVoiceWithin.com Janet Kidder 206-781-5062

SUN-YA MASSAGE

14314 Greenwood Ave N Seattle, WA 98133 206-403-1143

Donate Your Car, Truck or Motorcycle! Support Big Brothers Big Sisters of Puget Sound FREE PICK UP OF MOST USED VEHICLES Tax Deductible. (206) 248-5982

www.eghydroponics.com

SEXADDICTIONSPECIALISTS.COM

Professional help for sex & porn addicts, and those who care about them. 206.829.2425 FREE initial consult

Private Investigator Butler Investigations 206-257-0552

MOST CASH PAID 4 GOLD JEWELRY 20%-50% MORE 24/7 CASH 425.891.1385

Seattle weekly • M AY 9 - 15, 2012

WWW.KIRKLANDGOLDBUYER.COM

48

$$Cut your STUDENT LOAN payments in HALF or more? Get Relief NOW w/LOWER payments! Late or in Default NO Problem. Call NOW Student Hotline 888-317-3861

New! Increased compensation for 1st time egg donors! Get paid for giving infertile couples the chance to have a baby. Women 21-31 and in good health are encouraged to apply. Compensation up to $4,500. Email Amy.Smith@integramed.com or Call 206-301-5000

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Medicinal Cannabis / Medical Marijuana Doctor-Nurse Owned Holistic Center Protection of your PRIVACY is #1 24/7 Service: (888) 508-5428 www.AdvancedHolisticHealth.org

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SUMMER

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to Protect Our Civil Liberties Work with Grassroots Campaigns, Inc. on behalf of the ACLU to stand up for our liberties and protect the right to vote!

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CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

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Needed in Seattle! Make $40-$80 an hour

Free seminar on Thursday, 5/17/2012 from 6pm - 9pm at the Hilton Garden Inn 1800 NW Gilman Blvd Issaquah, WA 98027 To register call 1-800-899-1980, or visit

www.accountbiz.com/11805

NOW HIRING! Downtown Seattle City Target Position: Overnight Logistics Backroom Team Lead OffSite Apply: www.target.com/careers or go into any Target store and apply at the hiring kiosk Experience : -High school graduate or equivalent -Means of transportation -Minimum age of 18 years Job Knowledge and/or Capabilities: -Successful completion of the Team Leader training program -Cheerful and helpful attitude toward guests and other team members -Demonstrates Fast, Fun and Friendly Availability : -Flexible work schedule, able to work rotational schedules, including days, nights, weekends and holidays, and regular attendance necessary

HAPPYHAULER.com

Kirkland (425) 894-8949

Freelance Bookkeepers

NOW HIRING! Downtown Seattle City Target Position: Overnight Logistic Flow Team Member Apply: www.target.com/careers or go into any Target store and apply at the hiring kiosk Experience: -High school graduate or equivalent Job Knowledge and Capabilities: -Work independently -Must successfully complete the Backroom team member training program -Must successfully complete Target's Food Safety Program and Quiz -Physical Ability -Able to move merchandise with appropriate equipment to and from backroom and sales floor -Able to climb and descend ladders carrying merchandise -Able to lift 40 lbs -Able to place and arrange items on all shelves and/or racks on sales floor Availability: -Able to work nights, weekends and some holidays

JOBS!

Full Time and Career Opportunities Available Earn $5,695-$9,095 through the summer!

Call Alex: 206-329-4416

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BEAUTIFUL BRAND NEW AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Immediate occupancy. NON-Smoking building. Studios $700 -$800/mo. 1 Bedrooms $750 - $900/mo. Rent includes in-floor radiant heat, water (including hot water), sewer, garbage and high speed internet. Rooftop deck, onsite laundry and community room. Applicant must meet income requirements at more than 30% and less than 60% AMI Info/application (206) 357-3133 dekkoplace@compasshousingalliance.org


Seattle Weekly, May 09, 2012