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AUGUST 15–21, 2012 I VOLUME 37 I NUMBER 33

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM I FREE

HEMPFEST IS THE CHRONIC PAGE 21 | FILLING THE KOREAN FOOD VOID PAGE 35

On the SKAGIT DELTA, inceasingly aggressive claims of tribal sovereignty have put farmıng IN PERIL.

BY DICK CLEVER


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inside»   August 15-21, 2012

Come to Costco to meet

VOLUME 37 | NUMBER 33» SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

JENNY “The Bloggess” LAWSON photo courtesy of Jenny Lawson

at a book signing of Let’s Pretend This Never Happened

»35

Friday August 17 6 -8 p.m.

1175 N. 205th St. • Seattle, WA 98133 »10

up front 7

NEWS

THE DAILY WEEKLY | No green cards at Hempfest, Seattle shuns the Craftsman, and the local resurgence of gonorrhea.

10 FEATURE

BY DICK CLEVER | It’s fish versus

farms on the Skagit River delta, as aggressive assertions of tribal water rights imperil the crops of a fertile region.

23 THE WEEKLY WIRE The importance of gaming, rhinoceroses, and Vikings.

24 ARTS

24 | VISUAL ARTS

A Chinese artist punks the Frye. 26 | BOOKS | A Texan’s memoir takes him to Seattle. 29 | FUSSY EYE | Anger in a jar.

»cover credits

ILLUSTRATION BY JOEL KIMMEL COPYRIGHT © 2012 BY SEATTLE WEEKLY, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. ISSN 0898 0845 • SEATTLE WEEKLY IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY SEATTLE WEEKLY, LLC. 1008 WESTERN AVE., STE. 300, SEATTLE, WA 98104 • SEATTLE WEEKLY® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK. • PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT SEATTLE, WA • POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO SEATTLE WEEKLY, 1008 WESTERN AVE., STE. 300, SEATTLE, WA 98104 • FOUNDED 1976. MAIN SWITCHBOARD: 206-623-0500 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: 206-623-6231 RETAIL AND ONLINE ADVERTISING: 206-467-4341

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Matthew McConaughey scares us shitless, Jennifer Garner has a problem child, and Salma Hayek removes some of her clothes.

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35 FOOD

35 | CHAN | A sip-and-nosh Korean hideaway in the Market. 37 | FIRST CALL | You won’t find watered-down drinks at Blue Water. 39 | A LITTLE RASKIN | Feeding scientists at sea.

41 MUSIC

41 | DAVIDSON HART KINGSBERY

Putting his faith in song (and Hattie’s). 42 | DUFF | The imperfect genius of Aerosmith and Cheap Trick. 42 | THROUGH @ 2 | Pony Time’s ladies lay it on thick. 44 | THE SHORT LIST | Norah Jones, Three Mile Pilot, Poliça, and more.

other stuff 21 27 32 26 48

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news»The Daily Weekly »dispatches from our news blog

Red Light for Green Cards

L

Hempfest organizers ban marijuana prescriptions after a suspiciously timed crackdown.

seattle Weekly photo-illustration

ast week, the state Department of Health filed charges against two naturopaths who wrote hundreds of medical pot prescriptions at last year’s Hempfest. Don’t expect a repeat this year: Festival organizers have banned greencard providers because of “a perception of inappropriateness.” Hempfest executive director Vivian McPeak says the decision to prohibit medical authorizations at the Seattle pot extravaganza scheduled for this weekend was made more than three months ago after a vote friendly doctors will now have a harder time by the organization’s nine-person board of getting access to their medicine. directors. It is not a response to the DepartAlthough Hempfest was a week away, ment of Health crackdown. Department of Health spokesman Tim “It’s questionable whether a comprehenChurch told Seattle Weekly last week that sive field evaluation for an authorization can the timing of the charges against the natube done in that environment,” McPeak says. “We’re not doctors and we’re not lawyers, but ropaths was purely a coincidence. McPeak, however, is skeptical about that. the appearance of impropriety was enough, “The timing of it seems, let’s face it, straeven before charges were made.” tegic and coordinated,” McPeak says. “Not McPeak says the festival was caught off everybody in this world or community supguard by the same Seattle Times article that ports what we’re doing at Hempfest. We can sparked the Department of Health’s inquiry, only assume this was strategically timed.” in which the reporter wrote about the ease with which he got a prescription. KEEGAN HAMILTON McPeak speculates that medical pot authorizations have been a part of the festival “for as long as there’s been dispensaries in Seattle,” but with more than Last month, we wrote 400 vendors it’s difficult about a controversial Print is great, but if you to keep track of the serdeveloper named Dan want to see the seven . . . vices being offered. (Ten Duffus. Mainly, his critdo’s and don’ts of Hempfest fashion, you’ll vendor booths were ics object to his practice have to check it out on The Daily Weekly. shut down last year for of putting big homes on SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM/DAILYWEEKLY selling cannabis and tiny lots, ones that often cannabis foods, accordpreviously served as ing to Hempfest’s website.) backyards. But neighbors also complain that “To be bluntly honest, this was way off the projects are ugly, too modern, and out of our radar last year when that [Seattle Times] step with the historic character of the neigharticle came out,” McPeak says. “Frankly, we borhoods they’re in. didn’t realize authorizations were being writDuffus’ response: That’s what buyers want. ten at our event. [The article] really kind of “Most people buying right now don’t like sucker-punched us and took us by surprise. traditional homes,” the developer told Seattle We spent several months looking into legality Weekly. He added that he himself lives in a of it all.” modern house in West Seattle. McPeak says the downside of barring “The demand is so high for this modern prescription-writing is that some festival look,” echoed Steele Granger, a builder involved attendees from parts of the state without pot» Continued on page 9

p

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R.I.P., Seattle Charm

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news» The Daily Weekly » from page 7

The Clap Attacks

MATT DRISCOLL E

news@seattleweekly.com

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gonorrhea’s creative mutations and the overuse of antibiotics, these drugs have lost their touch at battling the infection. Recently, only two antibiotics remained that still worked well against gonorrhea—the oral antibiotic cefixime and ceftriaxone. But, as the CDC’s announcement notes, evidence has recently emerged that gonorrhea is starting to become resistant to cefixime in the United States, leading the health agency to proclaim that doctors should immediately stop using it. One of a handful of labs funded by the CDC and associated with the Gonococcal Isolate Surveillance Project (GISP) happens to be located in Seattle, meaning cultures from across the region end up in our backyard to be tested for drug-resistant gonorrhea. Aubin says, in addition to testing cultures from places like Portland, Denver and Hawaii, the lab works closely with Seattle’s STD clinic to monitor gonorrhea’s growing drug resistance. The ability to test gonorrhea cultures for drug resistance isn’t something available at most STD screening clinics across the country, says Aubin, meaning the fact it’s done in Seattle is fairly unique. Additionally, while completely drugresistant gonorrhea has yet to be found in the United States, it has been identified in Europe and Asia. Aubin says researchers work with Joint Base Lewis-McChord to test cultures from servicemembers who’ve been stationed in places where they may have been exposed to drug-resistant strains of the infection. While no completely drug-resistant strains of gonorrhea have been identified in our state, testing has shown the infection to be becoming “more and more resistant.”

156TH

Untreatable gonorrhea: if you were anywhere near the Aerosmith concert at the Tacoma Dome last week, you know it’s a scary proposition. That’s one of many reasons the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is taking action. In releasing new guidelines for the treatment of the sexually transmitted infection last week, the CDC proclaimed that there’s only one medication left recommended for treating gonorrhea, the injectable antibiotic ceftriaxone. And even that option probably won’t be available for much longer. According to the King County Public Health website, approximately 1,700 cases of gonorrhea have been diagnosed each year in the county since 2005—a total “which is much

Researchers work with Joint Base Lewis-McChord to test cultures from servicemembers . . . who may have been exposed to drug-resistant gonorrhea.

H ST

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with Duffus on a Tangletown project. He traces the trend back to Palm Springs , where he says it emerged four or five years ago. But Seattle isn’t Palm Springs. Isn’t the historic Craftsman a thing of reverence here, conveying taste and class to a Northwest sensibility and making neighborhoods like Queen Anne, Wallingford, and Capitol Hill so desirable? Not any more, says Windermere agent Penny Bolton. At least not for youngish buyers. “For the demographic that is 30 to 40, the Craftsman is dead,” she says. She says these buyers want “new and clean” and an open floor plan more readily found in modern homes. They also like the green attributes frequently found in homes built today: “high-efficiency [appliances], “recycled materials.” Duffus’ projects notwithstanding, however, Bolton says “there’s not much to choose from” when it comes to really modern homes in Seattle, meaning those built in the past few years with a sleek, pared-down aesthetic. And so she says buyers often turn to mid-century modern homes—those ramblers from the ’50, ’60s and ’70s that until lately were the stepchildren of the real-estate scene. Bolton recalls one Ballard house she sold recently. It was from the ’30s, but had been renovated with a mid-century aesthetic that had buyers “falling over themselves” to make offers. She also notes the real-estate website 360° Modern, offering lavish displays of local homes from mid-century onwards. John L. Scott agent Bill O’Brien isn’t so sure that modern is now king in Seattle real estate. He says he works with a lot of buyers who are not looking for that. But those who are, he says, tend to be “much more passionate” than other buyers about what they want, and less willing to compromise. They will keep looking until they find a modern home. Given that the supply is low, at least when it comes to very modern homes, O’Brien says they get snapped up quickly when they come on the market. Which helps explains why Duffus homes, despite their small lots and the furor they cause among neighbors, seem to easily attract people who want to live in them. NINA SHAPIRO

higher than previous years.” On the other side of the state, in Yakima County reported cases of gonorrhea tripled from 2010 to 2011. According to the state Department of Health, the overall gonorrhea incidence rate for Washington in 2011 was 40 cases per 100,000, with the only good news being that Washington’s gonorrhea incidence rate in 2011 remained lower than the national incidence rate, which was 101 cases per 100,000 in 2010. Nationally, roughly 500,000 to 700,000 new cases of gonorrhea occur each year—and plenty more likely go unreported. “[Gonorrhea] is the second most commonly reported infectious disease in our state,” says Mark Aubin, program manager for the state Department of Health’s STD Services. “So it is a problem here.” When it comes to the threat of untreatable gonorrhea, the trouble is the bacterium that causes the infection is shifty. While gonorrhea was once treatable with a slew of common antibiotics, over time, thanks to

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On the Skagit delta, increasingly aggressive claims of tribal sovereignty have put farming in peril.

Seattle weekly • AU GU ST 15− 21, 2012

By Dick clever

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H

ere is Dave Hedlin’s recipe for the side-by-side survival of Skagit Valley farmers and Native American fisheries: “Salmon fettuccine,” he says, a smile wreathing his broad face, pink-tinged from summer days spent in his vegetable fields near La Conner.

“You take Skagit salmon, mix it with pasta made from Skagit soft winter wheat, add organic butter and cheese from Alan Mesman’s dairy and vegetables grown here in the valley, and you have a perfect dish—all produced within three miles of here.” The idea reflects Hedlin’s hope that the families who farm the lush Skagit River delta can work with their Swinomish tribal neighbors to see that agriculture and salmon can not only survive but thrive in the same space. But lately, the ingredients have not been mixing well. Here in this delta, where the

fresh waters of the Skagit mingle with the Salish Sea, is the skirmish line for a waterrights battle 158 years in the making. While parties on both sides say they want a fair resolution to the fish-versus-farms dilemma, that may not come without bumps and bruises along the way. The Skagit delta farming system’s intricate rotation of some 80 vegetable and seed crops has been 150 years in the making. Dikes to keep the low-lying farmland dry and tide gates to prevent saltwater incursion into

croplands are valuable to farmers, but not so much to Natives trying to revive salmon runs on the third largest American river on the contiguous West Coast. The Swinomish Tribe’s priority is fish, not farms. And a century and a half of treaty law has put in their hands considerable power to press their case. In 1855, territorial Governor Isaac Stevens negotiated with western Washington tribes, trying to coax them into giving up millions of acres of land and retreat to reservations with prescribed boundaries. The Treaty of Point Elliott, signed by tribal leaders at a place later known as Mukilteo, included a guarantee of perpetual fishing rights. The treaty included this language: “The right of taking fish, at all usual and accustomed grounds and stations, is further secured to said Indians in common with all other citizens of the Territory, and of erecting temporary houses for the purpose of curing

them, together with the privileges of hunting, gathering roots and berries, and pasturing their horses on open and unclaimed lands.” The precise meaning of that passage would not be settled for another 119 years. But the tribes never doubted what it meant to them. Over the next century, congressional efforts were made to eliminate reservations and assimilate Natives into mainstream society. Many reservations were broken into privately owned parcels, with some of the land acquired by non-Natives. By the mid-20th century, salmon stocks began to fade, due in large measure to overfishing and habitat destruction. After a 1953 act of Congress gave states extensive jurisdiction over tribes in criminal and civil matters, Washington state officials interpreted the law to mean that Natives were bound by the same state fish and game regulations as

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The tribes now laid claim to a court-ordered 50 percent of the western Washington salmon catch. The non-Native commercial fishing industry virtually collapsed overnight. A federally financed program was launched to buy the boats of fishermen left without a livelihood, and the 28 treaty tribes of western Washington were now to be the co-managers of what was left of one of the world’s greatest fisheries. The consequences of Boldt’s decision have been felt far from the reservations that are home to the western Washington tribes whose representatives put their “X” marks on the Treaty of Point Elliott. One of the signing chiefs was a Swinomish chief known as Kel-kahl-tsoot, great-great grandfather of the tribe’s current chairman, Brian Cladoosby. Boldt, otherwise little known, had carved himself a special place in federal jurispruThe Boldt decision not only revived Native dence. He was also fisheries, it also assured the tribes that they burned in effigy by not only had the right to co-manage the white fishermen. The Boldt decision not only salmon fishery, but also to exercise their revived Native fishertribal sovereignty as they saw fit. ies, it also assured the tribes that they not only had the right to co-manage the salmon dictionary definition and as intended as used fishery, but also to exercise their tribal soverin the Indian treaties and this decision, ‘in eignty as they saw fit. common with’ means sharing equally the The next crucial measure was supplied by opportunity to take fish at the ‘usual and Congress, which passed the Indian Regulatory accustomed grounds and stations’; therefore, Gaming Act in 1988. The law empowered states non-treaty fishermen shall have the opportuto negotiate compacts with tribes allowing nity to take up to 50 percent of the harvestthem to engage in any kind of gaming activity able number of fish that may be taken by all that was allowed anywhere in the state where fishermen at usual and accustomed grounds the tribe is located. In Washington, an innovaand stations, and treaty-right fishermen shall tive version of the state-sponsored lottery crehave the opportunity to take up to the same ated video games that mimicked slot machines. percentage of harvestable fish.”

On May 17, the Swinomish tribe celebrated the annual Blessing of the Fleet.

Frank Varga / Skagit Valley Herald

THU SEPT 13

TOBYMAC

non-Natives. Commercial fishing fleets, with their superior technology, played a major role in depleting salmon runs. Natives could not compete—by some estimates, they pulled in little more than 5 percent of the total catch. Native “fish-ins” in defiance of state authority were dealt with severely by law enforcement, even on reservations. A violent confrontation over treaty fishing rights between Natives and state and local law enforcement on Sept. 9, 1970, was the catalyst for the federal court case that changed everything for Washington’s tribes. “They gassed us Indians and threw us in jail,” writes Billy Frank Jr. in his newspaper op-ed column, “Being Frank.” Frank is a Nisqually tribal leader who was there that day on the banks of the Puyallup River in Tacoma. Frank, now 80, with a craggy face and white hair to his shoulders, has told the tale many times. “But someone else got gassed that day, too,” he adds. “His name was Stan Pitkin, the U.S. Attorney for western Washington.” An appointee of the Nixon administration, Pitkin had established a reputation for integrity and fair-mindedness. He watched on Sept. 9 as state troopers, sheriff’s deputies, and Tacoma Police SWAT Teams descended on a Native encampment under the Highway 99 bridge over the Puyallup River. Bullets were fired, though nobody was reported hit. But officers’ billy clubs flailed, tear gas filled the air, and about 60 people were arrested. Disturbed by what he had seen, Pitkin filed a federal lawsuit nine days later charging the state of Washington with violating Native treaty fishing rights. U.S. District Court Judge George Boldt presided over the case for more than three years before issuing a decision that would come to be known as the most important in the history of Native law. On Feb. 12, 1974, all the parties to the lawsuit gathered in Judge Boldt’s courtroom in Tacoma. His words shook the room: “By

When non-Native gambling interests in Washington state sought in 2004 to break the tribal monopoly on video machines—the most profitable of gaming devices—the tribes responded with an awesome display of financial clout to defeat Initiative 829. In all, backers of the initiative were outspent by the tribes $6.6 million to $1.06 million. The Tulalip Tribe alone contributed $1 million to the effort, while the Swinomish weighed in with $250,000. Gov. Chris Gregoire, who has negotiated several of the tribal gaming compacts, benefited in her 2008 re-election campaign from about $650,000 in tribal contributions. Empowered by both political and legal muscle, the tribes are driving state and federal agencies to live up to their obligations to preserve salmon with an ever-present threat of lawsuits that’s keeping agency bureaucrats on edge. And Skagit farming could find itself collateral damage as the Swinomish draw a hard line in their quest to revive Skagit River salmon runs.

N

icholas Zaferatos worked for the Swinomish from 1984 to 1999, and is now on the faculty of Western Washington University’s Huxley College of the Environment. In his 2001 WWU doctoral dissertation, he offered this theory: “By declaring a policy that asserted its own political authority in most matters concerning reservation development, the Tribe effectively disrupted the political status quo. No longer would non-tribal jurisdictions presume to have unchallenged authority over activities that affected the reservation.” In other words, the tribe would reach out in any direction where it saw its interests being impacted. It would challenge offreservation authority when it felt its sovereignty threatened, and negotiate settlements where it could. As a result, the Skagit River delta farming community has been dealing with Swinomish demands for a say concerning

» COntinued On page 15


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national tribal leaders to meet with President Obama to discuss Native American issues. He is often showered with praise by other tribal leaders for his devotion to advancing tide-gate improvements and what the tribe tribal sovereignty and his “spirituality”—as a claims are unpermitted extractions of water from drainage ditches for irrigation purposes. Seventh-Day Adventist, Cladoosby frequently invokes “The Creator” in his speeches and The delta is made viable for farming by an writings. He appears at times a holy man intricate system of dikes and tide gates that invoking ancestral spirits, at others a practical keep the low-lying land dry and free of saltpolitician with higher ambitions. water incursion from Puget Sound. Cladoosby was honored last year at the Dave Hedlin’s grandfather was among the annual meeting of the Affiliated Tribes of pioneering delta farmers who built the sysNorthwest Indians, as he stepped down after tem of dikes that exists today, often with little a two-year term as the group’s president. “My more than pick and shovel. Agriculturalists rhapsodize about the quality of delta soil, built elders saw in me something that I didn’t see,” Cladoosby told tribal delegates on the first day from millennia of volcanic ash, glacial silt, of the annual meeting. “God saw something in and clay loam. The Skagit Valley produces 80 me that I didn’t see. As chairman at Swinomvarieties of crops, some—such as red potatoes ish, I have the greatest job in the world.” and Yukon golds, raspberries, blueberries, and strawberries—accounting for significant Cladoosby’s idea of himself as a Godexport income to farmers. The valley also ordained man on a mission only adds to the grows more cabbage, broccoli, and spinach frustration of non-Natives who must contend seed than anyplace else in the United States. with the Swinomish tribe’s demands on water rights, land use, and fish (Cladoosby has “The Swinomish approach is about protections. declined repeated requests constant conflict and zero compromise, over several weeks for interwhich is a failure by all measures other views.) Will Honea, chief deputy prosecutor for than elevating Chairman Cladoosby’s civil Skagit County, has battled in perceived political power.” court with Swinomish tribal attorneys on water issues, The valley cropping system is an intricate and questions what the tribe has gained choreography of rotations needed to assure through litigation. that the land is not exhausted and that seed “The Swinomish approach is about constant crops are protected from pollen drift. The conflict and zero compromise, which is a failcomplexity of Skagit delta farming is the ure by all measures other than elevating Chairprime argument farmers use for maintaining man Cladoosby’s perceived political power,” a “critical mass” of acreage to make the syssays Honea. “This approach has accomplished tem work. Today, the best estimate of experts almost nothing for salmon despite tens of from the Western Washington Agricultural millions spent on litigation, and has soured Association is that the valley’s current 70,000 farmers and rural landowners on the idea of acres of farmland is right at the tipping point; environmental protection.” Skagitonians to Preserve Farmland applied for a $300,000 grant from the U.S. Envioday, the Swinomish and other ronmental Protection Agency to study fishtribes signatory to the 1855 Treaty habitat needs in the delta and what minimum of Point Elliott have consolidated acreage is needed to sustain local agriculture. their reaffirmed fishing rights “It’s just another piece of information in and casino dollars into a new, muscular form an incredibly complex series of questions,” of sovereignty. And they are asserting themsays Hedlin. selves in every way possible. The Swinomish are pressing for a tideIn some of the state’s most important salmongate system that won’t block fish and for a producing watersheds, Native water-rights return of up to 2,700 acres of delta lands to claims are being weighed against competing estuarine habitat for fish, and experimental uses in urban and agricultural communities. projects have been launched that are aimed at Nowhere is that issue more contentious than responding to those goals. Farmers say they in the Skagit Valley, Puget Sound’s largest river are willing to go along, but not without some basin and home to five species of salmonids, assurance from the tribe that agriculture three of which are designated threatened under won’t be expected to give up still more land the Endangered Species Act. later. So far, the tribe has been unwilling to The Swinomish say they are determined offer that assurance. to bring back several of the great Skagit River On one level, it has the flavor of a famsalmon runs of yore. The tribe’s determined ily fight. The tribal and farming families pursuit of that goal has it pushing for somehave formed close relationships over the thing akin to not just co-management of the years. Swinomish Chairman Cladoosby has fish, but of the water they swim in. acknowledged that tribe and town have much The Swinomish and two other tribes to share. Cladoosby, in an interview with the based in the Skagit River watershed sat Skagit Valley Herald last year, remembered down with state, county, and local waterfondly stories elders told him of the generosdistrict officials to hammer out a landmark ity of Dave Hedlin’s mother, Elizabeth, who water-rights agreement in 1996. It led to saw to it that starving tribal members had the setting of rules by the state Department food to eat during the Great Depression. of Ecology regarding minimum flows in But that was then: In recent years, Clathe Skagit River and key salmon-spawning doosby has emerged as not only a leader and tributaries for the protection of salmon. The dominant political force in Northwest Indian purpose of the agreement, as stated by all politics and a fervent advocate of tribal participants, was to avoid litigation over the sovereignty, but a national figure as well. To tribes’ senior water rights for 50 years. The wit, last year he was chosen to be one of 12 » Continued on page 16

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not occur if it will affect the already low flows during summer and early fall.” The 7,000-acre Swinomish reservation is a mix of private ownerships by both Natives Skagit County Public Utility District and the and non-Natives, leaseholds, and a small city of Anacortes were guaranteed water to patch of land owned by the tribal community be set aside for future growth needs. as a whole. The 250-acre patch, known as But somehow, the issue of water rights Swinomish Village, is also the seat of governfor rural well-users was not addressed. The ment for the tribe. Department of Ecology amended the rule This checkerboard pattern of land ownin 2006 to provide for rural wells that were ership on the Swinomish reservation (and, not able to receive piped water. As a result, actually, on most reservations in the country) the Swinomish filed suit against the DOE to is the legacy of the 1887 General Allotment throw out the amended rule. Act, wherein land remaining after tribal Meanwhile, the Swinomish have kept up members received their parcels was distribthe pressure on the DOE to close some creek uted to white settlers. basins to further water draws to protect Where Bob Eberle lives, Natives make the spawning beds. Last June, the agency notirules—to his annoyance, without his say-so. fied Skagit and Snohomish counties that the The sprawling $470,000 rambler he shares Carpenter and Fisher Creek sub-basins were with his wife Claire sits in the middle of the closed to further residential wells. That left Swinomish Indian reservation. The 77-yearZachary Barborinas feeling high and dry after old conservative Republican activist would put spending $155,000 for a one-acre lot with a an end to the sovereignty of America’s treaty well that he now can’t use. tribes if he could. “I think the whole concept of “Here it is,” he says with a sweep of his arm Indian sovereignty is erroneous,” says Eberle, toward the weed-covered lot in a subdivision who objects to coughing up Swinomish Few non-Natives familiar with the tribal taxes and paying history of government repression of for building permits which he also pays Native tribes can blame them for feeling for Skagit County. like it’s time to rebalance the scales. Neither the state nor federal government has an ear for his complaint. Still, he tries. Eberle of mini-mansions, some surrounded by wellwatered and clipped lawns. The property in the and his wife, also a state Republican committeewoman, caused a stir in Native country low-lying hills just south of the Skagit County when they went to June’s state party convenline offers a distant view of Puget Sound. tion in Tacoma armed with a proposed plank A gentle breeze brushes downslope from for the party platform that called for the federal the Cascade Mountains to the east, and the air government to require tribes to allow nonis fresh and clean. Barborinas, a 34-year-old pilot for private clients, bought the property in Native residents on reservations a say in tribal government. Their fellow Republicans let the 2009. Utilities were in place, and a 400-footlanguage die on the platform-committee floor. deep well capable of pumping 35 gallons a Should the Eberles’ efforts one day prove minute would provide more than enough successful, however, an everybody-votes water. He planned to build in the near future. requirement would likely end the SwinomBarborinas and his wife Adele signed the ish tribe’s control over its own reservation, as papers for the property on Dec. 15, 2009. They had no idea that just four days earlier the state about 70 percent of the reservation’s approximately 3,000 residents are white. Department of Ecology had issued a warning that their water supply was in jeopardy. “There was no warning from Snohomish t was a blustery May afternoon on the County Planning or [the] Snohomish County Swinomish reservation, ideal for the Health District prior to or after closing,” Barannual Blessing of the Fleet. The sky borinas says. “Furthermore, I had just comwas mostly cloudless and powder-blue. pleted a septic redesign with the Health DisA procession of about 300 people led by drumtrict to purchase the property—a requirement ming, chanting tribesmen marched from the to ensure it would meet our needs.” reservation gymnasium to the site of the cereScores of other property owners were mony on the west bank of Swinomish Channel. in similar circumstances. Angry meetings The opening of a tribal fishing season is ensued. While it was DOE data that had as much a spiritual event as a celebratory determined the creek basins were tapped out, gathering. Prayers were led in succession it was the Swinomish tribe that had forced by ministers of the Catholic, Methodist, the agency’s hand by threatening a lawsuit. and Native Shaker churches. The haunting For the tribe, the Carpenter-Fisher closure chants of a female Shaker “prayer warrior” was a line in the sand. rose and fell over the crowd. Tribal elder Some blamed the tribe for the action by the Jimmy Wilbur held aloft an eagle carving DOE. But the decades-long paper trail leading containing cedar bows and turned north, to the ban on wells suggests that there was west, east, and south to offer a blessing to ample reason for the DOE to have addressed the four cardinal directions. the issue much sooner. On Dec. 16, 1992, an Chairman Cladoosby underscored the official of the state Department of Fisheries ceremony’s religious significance in his June wrote to the DOE urging that the Carpenter newsletter column, even though he hadn’t Creek watershed be considered for closure been able to attend. “Our Blessing of the Fleet to further water rights. The letter, by Kurt was a very special day for us to thank the CreBuchanan, then regional habitat manager, ator for sharing our most precious resources noted that the creek was then considered “a with us and to ask for a special blessing to very generous system in the production of protect those who harvest our resources from salmonid fishes.” He wrote, “Further approthe Salish Sea,” he wrote. priation of water from this watershed should » Continued on page 18

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Field & Scream » From page 16 Few non-Natives familiar with the history of government repression of Native tribes can blame them for feeling like it’s time to rebalance the scales. Robert Anderson, director of the University of Washington’s Native American Law Center, says the cards were stacked against the tribes almost from the day they signed the Treaty of Point Elliott. “For many years, the government ignored tribal rights as it pursued policies of assimilation,” he says. In all, it has taken the Point Elliott tribes a century and a half to regain what was promised them by Gov. Stevens: the right to fish in “usual and accustomed places” and the right to govern themselves. Anderson says that once the tribes acquired the means to go to court to defend their treaty rights, big changes followed. In the 1960s, tribes started to get their own lawyers and the policies of assimilation ended, Anderson says. “The tribes started to uncover all the legal angles to defending their treaty rights to hunt and fish. It spawned a huge amount of litigation.” Anderson acknowledges that tribes will make mistakes as they move forward with their plans, “but the mistakes are theirs to make.” As sovereign nations, tribes began to revive cultural practices important to their identity as a people, but not always pleasing to non-Natives, even those who supported their sovereignty. Nothing was more telling on that point than what happened in 1999, when the Makah tribe resumed whaling for the first time in 75 years. Environmentalists and animal-rights activists were aghast and mounted emotional protests on the beaches at Neah Bay, the Makah homeland. But the hunt proceeded successfully, as Natives from throughout the Northwest arrived at Neah Bay to help the tribe celebrate the return of its treaty rights to hunt whale. Some non-Natives who have to deal with tribes on water rights complain that state and federal agencies fear coming into conflict with them. The Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, formed by the tribes to coordinate fish-enhancement efforts statewide, has been aggressive in advancing the restoration of habitat. Not believing that state and regional federal agencies were doing enough, NWIFC took its case straight to the White House last year. The Commission, in a report that was referred to the White House Council on Environmental Quality, acknowledged that increased catches of salmon were the immediate result of the Boldt decision. “However,” the report went on, “harvest has been and continues to be constrained dramatically by degraded habitat. As a direct result, treaty harvest has been diminished to levels not seen since before the Boldt decision.” In the report, the Commission argued that the failure by government agencies to address the loss of salmon habitat puts tribal treaty rights “at risk.” It was a forceful reminder to the White House of federal responsibility for America’s treaty tribes. “[The tribes] have got some of these agencies scared to do anything,” says Allen Rozema, the executive director of Skagitonians to Preserve Farmland who once worked for the Swinomish tribe in economic development. When Skagitonians applied for the EPA grant, Larry Wasserman, natural-resources

manager for the Swinomish, wrote to the agency objecting to the proposal because it didn’t meet the tribe’s expectations for fish enhancement. Says Rozema: “The Swinomish seem to want to have veto power over anything that doesn’t fit their agenda.”

T

he Skagit delta has inspired generations of painters, poets, and would-be farmers. Some delta families are in their fourth and fifth generations—almost as long as the Treaty of Point Elliott has been in existence. But, as the Swinomish often point out, they were there first—roughly 10,000 years earlier. On a sunlit day in early summer, a visitor driving northbound on Interstate 5 gets a first glimpse of the Skagit Valley floor as he passes Starbird Road and begins the descent to the flats. The fields, pushing up purpleblossomed potato plants, field corn, cabbage, and strains of wheat and barley, are a revelation to urban eyes. The tulips, with their yellow, red, pink, and variegated blossoms, briefly entertained tourists during the annual Skagit Valley Tulip Festival, but are no longer visible. The plants have been decapitated of their flowers to force more growth into the bulbs, which will ultimately be sold domestically and on the global market. Skagit farming families say they feel no less commitment to stewardship of the land than the tribe across the Swinomish Channel. On a recent late-spring day, Hedlin slogged through the mud in heavy boots, wearing soiled white coveralls that stretched over his 6-foot-4-inch frame as he moved from his workshop to his office. Reclining in a wobbly desk chair, he spoke passionately of his family’s commitment to the land. “The farming that’s going on here has been going on for at least 120 years, and can go on another 120,” he says. Hedlin is saddened at the confrontational turn the farm community’s relations with the Swinomish tribe have taken. He would rather be talking directly to tribal members instead of through lawyers. “I’m a big advocate of stepping back from the brink,” he says of the need for thoughtful reflection on both sides. Hedlin has pleasant memories of his interaction with the Swinomish tribe as a longtime member of the La Conner School Board. The schools have been the place that Native and non-Native children interact—in many cases, for lifelong friendships. The teams are nicknamed the “Braves” without objection from the tribe. Hedlin also admires the progress the tribe has made in cooperation with the schools to launch an enrichment program called “Birth to Three” to prepare tribal children to enter the school system. “We knew we wanted to do something to give tribal kids an extra boost, but we didn’t have the money, so the tribe came up with it,” he says. Hedlin firmly believes that if the tribe and agricultural community can work together, there’s no reason why there shouldn’t be fish and farms for future generations. “There is no question that a whole lot of wrongs were done to Native American people— that’s a fact,” Hedlin says. “Now the question is: What are we going to leave to our kids?” E news@seattleweekly.com

Dick Clever has been a Washington journalist for four decades, working at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, The Seattle Times, and the Skagit Valley Herald.


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here’s really nothing else like being part of a crowd of a couple hundred thousand like-minded people. That’s why those who have been to Hempfest keep going year after year, and telling all their friends to come along. From August 17-19, Myrtle Edwards Park will host only the second Hempfest to run three days after years of existing as a two-day event. Seattle’s Hempfest isn’t just the biggest pro-cannabis protestival in the world. It’s also the best, and for two decades now, this pot party (I know I’m not supposed to call it that, but really . . . ) has not only helped raise consciousness about marijuana, but has given it a friendly face. Out-of-town visitors go back home with a great impression of what

Seattle’s Hempfest isn’t just the biggest pro-cannabis protestival in the world. It’s also the best. a friendly city we have, not to mention the huge cash infusion the event means to THC-attle every year. This year’s theme is “Safer Than Alcohol,” since, at 21, the festival is precisely the age at which adults are allowed to drink. Hempfest may be the largest event in the world for

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BY STEVE ELLIOTT

people who want hemp and cannabis legalized, but it results in surprisingly few arrests every year. It doesn’t hurt any that the voters of Seattle instructed their police department a few years ago to make marijuana their lowest enforcement priority; the SPD traditionally takes a low-key, tolerant attitude towards the extensive pot-smoking that goes on at the event. In 2001, for instance, there was a grand total of one arrest. Besides hosting many bands over the course of the weekend, Hempfest features a plethora of speakers and discussion panels including, well, me. But don’t let that discourage you; there’s also cannabis comedian Ngaio Bealum, Harborside Health Center’s Steve DeAngelo, state Rep. Roger Goodman, state Sen. Jeanne Kohl-Welles, Guru of Ganja Ed Rosenthal, travel show host Rick Steves, and Hempfest director Vivian McPeak, along with a host of others. At any given time at Hempfest, you’ll have the option of no fewer than three main stages, greatly increasing the chances that a band or speaker you really want to see will be there for you. Keep in mind that all scheduled times (noon-8 Friday, 10-8 Saturday and Sunday) at Hempfest are approximate, as stage schedules tend to be revised in the heat of the high moment. You should show up early, and remember that you’ll be negotiating a huge crowd.

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thurs/8/16 BOOKS

Awe and Anxiety

Jenny Lawson’s new Let’s Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir) is

by turns hysterically funny, endearingly odd, and—surprisingly—very moving. By email, the Texan also known as “The Blogess” recently discussed her anxiety about public appearances for Let’s Pretend (Amy Einhorn Books, $26.95). “I still rely on anti-anxiety drugs,” says Lawson, “but the most helpful thing is knowing that if I had to hide in the bathroom to hyperventilate before a reading, people would be okay with it and would understand. That’s the benefit of being a known psychopath.” Who are her non-psychotic literary idols? “Neil Gaiman, Dorothy Parker, Ray Bradbury, and David Sedaris.” And what does Lawson’s young daughter, often featured on her blog, think of her writing career? “She’s seven. She’s fairly unimpressed with the whole thing, but she once saw someone ask me for my autograph, and she was in complete awe.” Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, elliottbaybook. com. Free. 8 p.m. DEBORAH SUSSMAN

fri/8/17 FILM

Shine On? Shine Earlier?

Wait, they’re going to make a prequel to The Shining? Does Stephen King really need the

BOOKS

Visions in the Grass

Rick Bass cares very, very much about the rhinoceros. Yet his travel account The Black Rhinos of Namibia (Houghton Mifflin

Harcourt, $25) is also about the wolves and grizzly bears back home in Montana and all other top-line predators and massive species that, until man’s belated arrival on the planet, had unchecked supremacy of their habitats. Why is the black rhino nearly blind? Because, Bass explains, it didn’t need to see approaching threats far away in the grass. There were none. Natural selection had, over millennia, made the rhino impervious to assault. Stalking the creature with the fellow conservationists whom he celebrates in his book, Bass marvels that “It is all but impossible to imagine this animal being afraid of any other creature, or even any other force, on Earth.” But The Black Rhinos also relates how modern weaponry and the Asian demand for so-called traditional medicine has depleted their numbers and

*

sat/8/18 FESTIVALS

Paean to Cakes

Pancakes (served from 9 a.m.-noon) are the traditional draw to the weekend celebration of Scandinavia that is Viking Days, but the culinary indulgence doesn’t end there. Vendors will also be serving Swedish meatballs, Norwegian lefse, Danish aebleskiver, and

plenty of pickled and dried fish products. The beer garden will be open late tonight (it also serves sausages), and the indoor salmon dinner ($10-$16) is expected to sell out. Besides the music stages, children’s activities, and arts and crafts, a special Viking Encampment will be inhabited by sword-wielding role players. Go ahead, ask them about sacking and pillaging as a career. Also, don’t forget to visit the museum’s Eero Saarinen exhibition, which ends Sunday. Photos and drawings show the great FinnishAmerican modernist architect’s lasting legacy— clean lines and elegant curves we still see in his furniture designs and the famous Gateway Arch in St. Louis. Nordic Heritage Museum, 3014 N.W. 67th St., 789-5707, nordicmuseum.org. Free. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (Sat. & Sun.) T. BONILLA

SPORTS

THURS: GAMING

The One and Only King

Game Show

“My number-one goal in life is to see a game designer nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize. I’ve forecast that this will happen by the year 2023.” Jane McGonigal says this sort of thing with a straight face. To her, gaming is the answer to all of society’s ills, including war and famine. And yo, teach, if your kids are falling asleep during long division, that’s not their problem—it’s yours. You need to introduce them to an online game which makes math seem as cool as SpiderMan. “What we’re trying to counteract is the engagement gap that we have where kids show up in the classroom, and they’re bored and not engaged. With games, their learning is selfmotivated. To not make that connection back to the classroom is a waste of opportunity,” says McGonigal, whose latest game, SuperBetter, helps, for example, aspiring marathoners attain benchmarks en route to actually running a marathon. “I’d like to see half the planet spend an hour a day gaming.” Her twin sister Kelly, a Stanford psychologist, might disagree: She was recently featured in a New York Times article on Silicon Valley’s increased affinity for technology cleanses. But it’s Jane, a TED alum, who’ll be able to state her case in this group event hosted by Committee for Children. McCaw Hall, 321 Mercer St. (Seattle Center), ticketmaster.com. $10-$37. MIKE SEELY

Viking swordplay at last year’s Viking Days.

mon/8/20

JANEMCGONIGAL.COM

Games are good for you, according to McGonigal.

restricted their range to a few small conservation zones. Still, Bass tries to hope for the black rhino that this recent slaughter “has occurred so fast, relative to his evolutionary scale, as to seem like a single brief dream, a nightmare from which he will emerge at any second, blinking.” Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com. Free. 7 p.m. (Also: Eagle Harbor Books, 3 p.m. Sun.) BRIAN MILLER

Now suddenly lukewarm in the AL West, the Mariners should be able to mount a serious challenge to the visiting Cleveland Indians, the coldest team in the American League. The M’s are losing less often, which almost feels like winning. In a three-game series beginning tonight, it’s fortunate that Felix Hernandez is scheduled to pitch (the powerful Venezuelan right-hander was recently named Best Mariner in our Best of Seattle® issue). He’s 10-5 this season with a 2.74 ERA; with Ichiro gone to the Yankees, Felix is the Mariners’ only real draw. Now let him take a few Indian scalps. Safeco Field, 1250 First Ave. S., 3464001, seattle.mariners.mlb.com. $10 and up. 7:10 p.m. MIKE SEELY

Seattle we ekly • AUG U ST 15− 21, 2012

money that badly? Yes and no. While Warner Brothers, which owns the film rights, has hired the screenwriter who adapted Shutter Island to explain how Jack Nicholson’s character went nuts long before reaching the hotel,

King is reportedly working on a sequel to his 1977 novel: Doctor Sleep, in which young Danny is now a middle-aged recovering alcoholic trying to protect a 12-year-old girl with special powers from a band of RV-driving ghouls. According to King’s website, “The True Knot are quasi-immortal, living off the ‘steam’ that children with the ‘shining’ produce when they are slowly tortured to death.” So maybe that, too, will become a movie. In the meantime, screening tonight, Stanley Kubrick’s slow, eerie 1980 adaptation of The Shining has a primal, fairy-tale quality laced with Oedipal conflict. It matters less if Nicholson’s blocked writer is demonically possessed (or Indian-cursed or evil reincarnated or whatever) than that he’s simply a bad father—rough and impatient with son Danny, cruelly dismissive of his wife (Shelley Duvall), selfish in his writerly ambitions. A failure at the typewriter, his imagination turns inward, rotting inside its own topiary maze. Egyptian, 801 E. Pine St., 781-5755, landmarktheatres.com. $8.25. Midnight. (Repeats Sat.) BRIAN MILLER

NORDICMUSEUM.ORG

the»weekly»wire

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arts»Visual Arts »REVIEW

WORLD P REMIERE!

Sep 7 – Oct 7

Slicing Up the Snake

A visiting Chinese artist sections and sells bits of the Frye’s most famous painting. BY BRIAN MILLER

H

A beautiful and powerful story about becoming a man and becoming an American. © LaRae Lobdell

Old Times and No Man’s Land August 15 – 26

© John Ulman

The acclaimed Pinter Festival continues its celebration of the playwright with these two fantastic productions.

Pinter Sketch Night August 17 – 24

Seattle weekly • AU GU ST 15− 21, 2012

© John Ulman

24

Join us for two different fun, casual evenings featuring the entire Festival company in Pinter’s mini-masterpieces.

99 Layoffs August 16 – 25

© John Ulman

Radial Theater Project presents this new romantic comedy by Vincent Delaney about love in the time of pink slips.

Icicle Creek Theatre Fest August 21 – 22

Seven Spots on The Sun by Martin Zimmerman and My Before and After by Michael Louis Serafin-Wells.

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acttheatre.org | (206) 292-7676 700 Union Street, Downtown Seattle

BRIAN MILLER

ow much more valuable would this review be if, though written in the exact same words, it were signed not with my name but that of Dave Eggers, Zadie Smith, or Martin Amis? Or what if you read some other newspaper story with a famous writer’s byline, then discovered it was actually generated one of those news aggregators like the notorious Journatic? What happens then to the perceived value of the piece? In the art world, such questions have long been asked. The ateliers of the great masters were filled with brush-wielding assistants; in his Factory, Warhol likewise farmed out much of the production of his work; and contemporary artists from Jeff Koons to Dale Chihuly to Ai Weiwei have ceased to care who “makes” their artworks, so long as the concept is their own. If the studio master signs the thing, that signature supposedly confers both ownership and originality. Duchamp’s urinal famously tweaked that idea almost 100 years ago, though he signed it with a fake name. A young Chinese artist engages those issues in Liu Ding’s Store: Take Home and Make Real the Priceless in Your Heart , appropriating the Frye’s most famous canvas, Franz von Stuck’s Sin, in 40 iterations—none of which Liu painted. Instead, he isolated and reproduced two elements from that 1893 work, the snake and the gilt frame, with Beijing factory laborers doing all the brushwork. The results are hung indifferently at the Frye, many of them simply leaning against the walls, the back of the canvas facing us so we can read Liu’s signature. The message is clear: It’s not the image you’re paying for, but the artist’s imprimatur. (All the works are for sale at liudingstore.com; prices range from $139 to $2,000.) During Liu’s visit to Seattle last month, his wife and frequent collaborator Carol Yinghua Lu translating most of his remarks, he stated his intent “to test how the value is added with the name,” meaning his signature. Problem is, that notion of assigned value is well past familiar in the Western art world. It only takes a few minutes to determine what Liu has done (nothing new) and whether you’d actually want to buy any of these Sin excerpts on his website (no thanks). The concept here is small and stale, and Liu’s further blurring the line between museum and store in the gift shop—where a few items have been haphazardly arranged on special pink and green tables—is a joke.

Some of Liu’s selective reproductions of Sin.

If Liu wants to investigate value, reproduction, and commerce, let him say how much he paid those Beijing copyists. Are the factory conditions better or worse than at Foxconn, where our iPhones are made? Show us a video. Liu also might explain what Charles and Emma Frye paid for Sin in 1925 during one of their European shopping sprees. As the museum is concurrently showing a selection from its permanent collection (Ties That Bind ) and highlighting its own history (The Perfection of Good-Nature, also continuing through Sept. 23), why not estimate what Sin and those other works might be worth today? (Could they be sold to buy some better art? That’s a question for future consideration.) In a sense, Liu is here borrowing the Frye’s prestige to confer more value to his wares. There’s a halo effect that runs from museum to shop, but I’d rather see Liu work in the other direction. At 60, 15 years after its rebuild, the paint still fresh from this summer’s spruceup, the Frye’s problem isn’t the building, but the permanent collection. Recently changing Deputy Directors from Robin Held to Scott Lawrimore isn’t going to change those holdings. In Liu’s first American solo show, he’s likely unaware of the museum’s history, how Charles Frye intended to bequeath his collection to found Seattle’s first public art museum. Richard E. Fuller got there first with SAM in 1933, placing it in Volunteer Park—just as Frye had proposed in 1915! Following Frye’s 1940 death, SAM rejected his collection as an estate gift, so his executor set up a new museum, which opened in 1952. None of this I’d expect Liu to know or engage. But, if the Frye truly wants to explore value and provenance, it ought to consider what its own name is currently worth. E LIU DING’S STORE Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave., 622-9250, fryemuseum.org. Free. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sun. (Open to 7 p.m. Thurs.) Ends Sept. 9.


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books» »INTERVIEW

Up North

It’s a hard road from Brownsville, Texas to Seattle.

Seattle weekly • AU GU ST 15− 21, 2012

A

26

BY BRIAN MILLER

former colleague at Seattle Weekly, Domingo Martinez has been working on The Boy Kings of Texas: A Memoir (Lyons Press, $16.95) for the past 15 years. That doesn’t mean he was necessarily drafting tidy chapters each night about his Mexican-American family’s travails during the 1980s. “It was mostly written as e-mails to impress girls,” he explains, seated at Caffe Ladro on Lower Queen Anne. “It was never my intention to write a memoir.” Yet he slowly began to grasp how “foreign and alien” a place Brownsville seemed to new friends in Seattle, where he arrived some 20 years ago to reinvent himself. A border town on the Gulf Coast of Texas, Brownsville “has remained completely timeless and insulated,” says Martinez. “Culturally, it exists entirely unto itself.” Of course, it takes a long time for young Domingo—born in the U.S.—to realize those limits in The Boy Kings. There is no world outside his family, which has complicated roots on both sides of the border. His parents’ marriage is flawed, but there are four young kids to keep them together. As the family’s youngest child, Domingo enjoys the most freedom—switching to English, cutting school, embracing bands like The Cure—all of which marks him as an outsider. “This book is about alienation,” says Martinez, “about sublimation and shame and hiding—never being able to say the word ‘Mexican.’” The Boy Kings is hardly a flattering portrait of Brownsville or the Martinez clan. “I thought I would be excommunicated,” says Martinez today. “I didn’t think this book would be read in Texas.” Fortunately, he laughs, “The First Amendment is covering my ass.” The book is very much a coming-of-age tale, one that toggles between the Pacific Northwest and Texas. Down south, there are well-told vignettes about slaughtering pigs, smuggling a truckload of marijuana across the border, and how the author’s two sisters remade themselves as Valley Girls. Martinez writes of his desire to assimilate and distance himself from his Mexican roots: “The further away from speaking Spanish you are, the whiter you could be, and I wanted to be white. So white I was Jewish, actually, like Joel Fleischman, from Northern Exposure. It had been my only intellectual nourishment at this time.” By then, the early ’90s, Martinez was already a stringer for the local newspaper and already scheming to leave Brownsville. “It was a very bleak future I had,” he says. Though Martinez remains close to a family now scattered across Texas, he adds, “I”m the only one who stayed away.” E DOMINGO MARTINEZ Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com. Free. 7 p.m. Weds., Aug. 22.


arts»Performance BY GAVIN BORCHERT

Stage OPENINGS

ARGONAUTIKA Mary Zimmerman’s take on the legend

of Jason and the Golden Fleece. Seattle Public Theater at the Bathhouse, 7312 W. Green Lake Ave. N., 524-1300, seattlepublictheater.org. $5–$10. 9:30 p.m. Fri., Aug. 17-Sat., Aug. 18, 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 19. CABARET Showgirls and their admirers try to deny the Third Reich in Kander & Ebb’s musical. Second Story Repertory Theatre, 16587 N.E. 74th St., Redmond, 425881-6777, secondstoryrep.org. Opens Aug. 17. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Sept. 2. GODSPELL ArtsWest students present Stephen Schwartz’s 1971 musicalization of Bible parables. ArtsWest, 4711 California Ave. S.W., 938-0339, artswest. org. $10–$12. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 15–Sat., Aug. 18; 3 p.m. Sat., Aug. 18–Sun., Aug. 19. IN TENTS Teatro ZinZanni’s kid-friendly spinoff cabaret. Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015, dreams. zinzanni.org. $19–$22. 11 a.m. Sat., Aug. 18. T H I S CO D E TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE THE RUNNERS A concert SEATTLE WEEKLY performance of Bryan Gula’s new Roaring-’20s-set musiIPHONE/ANDROID APP FOR MORE EVENTS OR VISIT cal. Balagan Theatre, 1117 E. seattleweekly.com Pike St., 329-1050, balagan theatre.org. $10. 8 p.m. Fri., Aug. 17–Mon., Aug. 20. SEATTLE REP 50TH-ANNIVERSARY PARTY Celebrate with food, drinks, music, and a theatrical scavenger hunt. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 443-2222, seattlerep.org. Free. Noon, Sat., Aug. 18.

SCAN

CURRENT RUNS

ANNA IN THE TROPICS Nilo Cruz’ Cuban take on Anna

Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

THEATRE FESTIVAL Director Allison Narver • INTIMANRomeo & Juliet in an overpopulated, favela-like

sets her world, a teeming cauldron of life. Starring the alwaysinteresting Marya Sea Kaminski as its tragic heroine, director Andrew Russell’s Hedda Gabler lacks the relevance Narver has found for Romeo. Shanley’s 2003 comedy Dirty Story needs less doctoring to be contemporary, so director Valerie Curtis-Newton hews closely to the ingenious original script: Shawn Law and Carol Roscoe play a couple from geopolitical Hell, bound together in a bare-studs apartment. MARGARET FRIEDMAN Intiman Theatre, Seattle Center, 800-982-2787. $30. See intiman.org for exact schedule. Ends Aug. 26. KITTENS IN A CAGE Kelleen Conway Blanchard’s comic take on women-in-prison movies. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre.org. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., plus 8 p.m. Mon., Aug 13. Ends Aug. 25. 99 LAYOFFS Vincent Delaney’s new play is a must-see for comedy fans: an absurd but coherent romance about two job-seekers and an urgent, Odets-like cri de coeur in the face of a seriously unfair economy. Leads K. Brian Neel and Aimée Bruneau are perfectly cast for their plasticity and—how else to put it?—interestingness. MARGARET FRIEDMAN ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 2927676, acttheatre.org. $5–$25. 8:30 p.m. Thurs.–Fri., 2:30 & 8:30 p.m. Sat., plus 7:30 p.m. Mon., Aug. 20. Ends Aug. 25. PINTER FESTIVAL The Dumb Waiter, Celebration, Old Times, and No Man’s Land in repertory through Aug. 26, plus sketches, films, and more. See acttheatre.org for schedule. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $5–$55. RENT There’s much to recommend about this revival of the Pulitzer-winning musical, including an earnest effort to mine what little humor can be found in Jonathan Larson’s bleak period piece, set in New York at the nadir of the AIDS epidemic. However, director Bill Berry has also coated Larson’s often naked rage with a thick sheen of nostalgia; I miss the grit-and-spit that made Rent such a relevant hit. Yet Berry and musical director R.J. Tancioco elicit one pitch-perfect performance after another from the vocally well-matched cast. Standouts: Jerick Hoffer as drag queen Angel, looking like the child of Ziggy Stardust and Wilma Flintstone, and Ryah Nixon as Maureen, who offers the best “Over the Moon” I’ve yet heard onstage. KEVIN PHINNEY 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave., 625-1418. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see 5th avenue.org for exact schedule. Ends Aug. 19. STEEL MAGNOLIAS UPAC Theatre Group presents Robert Harling’s ensemble piece about Southern women and the salon where they hang. United Evangelical Free Church, 1420 N.W. 80th St., upactheatregroup.org. $15–$18. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Aug. 19. TEATRO ZINZANNI: GANGSTERS OF LOVE Improv cutup Frank Ferrante is back as Caesar; Dietrich-like beauty Dreya Weber plays his long-lost amore Myrna. With music by Francine Reed and Orchestra DeVille. Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015. $106 and up. Ends Sept. 30; see zinzanni.org for exact schedule. A YEAR WITH FROG AND TOAD Arnold Lobel’s children’s classic becomes a musical. Youth Theatre Northwest, 8805 S.E. 40th St., Mercer Island, 232-4145 x109, youththeatre.org. $13–$17. Opens Aug. 10. 7 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Wed.–Thurs. & Sat.–Sun. Ends Aug. 19.

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Dance

FREE COLLABORATION Cellist/composer Lori Goldston

and dance improviser Karen Nelson meet for interdisciplinary exploration. New City Theater, 1404 18th Ave., 2714430, newcitytheater.org. $10–$15. 8 p.m. Tues., Aug. 21.

Classical, Etc.

• SEATTLE OPERA André Barbe’s production, drenched in red, piles visual spectacle (over-the-top costumes and a Zeffirellian set crammed with singers and supers) upon aural (thanks to conductor Asher Fisch and the Seattle Symphony) in Puccini’s lurid tale of a Chinese princess who vows to remain unwed. McCaw Hall, Seattle Center, 389-7676, seattleopera.org. $25 and up. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 15, Fri., Aug. 17, Sat., Aug. 18. OPERA ON TAP Their production of Puccini’s La bohème promises “onstage makeouts and open cans of PBR all around.” Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., 800-838-3006, operaontap.com/ seattle. $15–$20. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 16. OLYMPIC MUSIC FESTIVAL This weekend, Paul Schoenfield’s snappy Café Music. Olympic Music Festival, Center Road, Quilcene, 360-732-4800, olympicmusicfestival.org. $14–$20 lawn, $18–$30 barn. 2 p.m. Sat., Aug. 18–Sun., Aug. 19. MUSIC NORTHWEST A recital (Haydn, Schubert, and more) by student winners of their Tonkonogui Awards for Excellence in Chamber Music. Olympic Recital Hall, S. Seattle Community College, 6000 16th Ave. S.W., 937-2899, musicnorthwest.org. $18. 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 19.

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Karenina. Burien Little Theater, S.W. 146th St. and Fourth Ave. S.W., Des Moines, 242-5180, latinotheatreprojects. org, burienlittletheatre.org. $7–$20. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Aug. 26. ANYTHING GOES The Cole Porter classic. West Seattle High School, 3000 California Ave., 800-838-3006, twelfthnightproductions.org. $15–$18. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 3 p.m. Sun. Ends Aug. 19. CALLING NANCY DREW Catherine Bush and Gary Bartholomew’s new musical updates the teen sleuth to the ’90s. Presented by STAGEright Theatre. Theater Off Jackson, 409 Seventh Ave. S., 800-838-3006, seattle stageright.org. $15. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Aug. 18. THE CELTIC CROSS Matthew Jackson’s play about the Troubles. The Little Theatre, 608 19th Ave. E., 325-5105. $15–$20. Runs Thurs.–Sat.; see washingtonensemble.org for exact schedule. Ends Aug. 18. CHAPS! London, 1944: A visiting American cowboy band misses its live gig at the BBC, so reluctant radio staff must impersonate them. Aside from a few air raids and a micro-romance, not much happens except the rollicking country-Western numbers. Director Karen Lund conjures a mood of shared wartime sacrifice that’s all but extinct in our present era of draftlessness and drones. MARGARET FRIEDMAN Taproot Theatre, 204 N. 85th St., 781-9707, taproottheatre.org. $15–$37. 7:30 p.m. Wed.– Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Ends Aug. 18. DRIVING MISS DAISY Alfred Uhry’s heart-warmer. Richard Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave., 800-838-3006, reacttheatre.org. $6–$15. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., plus 2 p.m. Sat. starting Aug. 11. Ends Aug. 25. EL ULTIMO COCONUT A coming-of-age tale about a Mexican-American cyber-nerd. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre.org. $5–$10. 8 p.m. Tues.–Wed. Ends Aug. 22. GREENSTAGE The Taming of the Shrew and Henry VIII in repertory through Aug. 18. Free, Thurs.–Sun. in area parks; see greenstage.org for exact schedule. THE ILLUSION Tony Kushner’s adaptation of Corneille’s exploration of reality and perception. Center House Theatre, Seattle Center, 800-838-3006, soundtheatre company.org. $10–$15. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun.; also 7:30 p.m. Mon., Aug. 20. Ends Aug. 26.

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arts»Visual Arts

TheFussyeye » by brian miller

BY MA’CHELL DUMA LAVASSAR

Openings & Events “performance art, and an interactive audio/visual installation takes place on BAM’s rooftop sculpture garden. Cash bar. Bold color dress code. Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., 425-519-0770, bellevuearts.org, $10-$12, Fri. Aug. 18, 8-11 p.m. DECOY Curated by Michael Howard and featuring paintings by Eric Elliott, Richard Galling, Michael Howard, Kimberly Trowbridge, and Shane Walsh Decoy considers hidden meanings and deceptions. Artists’ reception, Sun. Aug. 19, 2-4 p.m. Also: same-day panel discussion with artists and invited guest Graham Shutt at 3 p.m. Francine Seders Gallery, 6701 Greenwood Ave. N., 782-0355, sedersgallery.com, Opens Aug. 17, Tues.Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. Through Sept. 9. FRESH PAINT ART FESTIVAL The Everett Marina will be turned into an outdoor studio and gallery lined with over 75 local artists creating, selling, and demonstrating their work. Watch glass art demonstrations, create your own glass art, or get a photography lesson. Everett Marina Promenade, 1620 W. Marine View, schack.org, Free, Sat., Aug. 18; Sun., Aug. 19. PHILIP GOVEDARE The UW art scholar gives a talk on “Evolving Interpretations of Wilderness.” It’s pegged to the ongoing show Commentaries: Artists Respond to the Land (through Sept. 1), which also features his work. Prographica, 3419 E. Denny Wy., 322-3851, prographicadrawings.com, Thu., Aug. 16, 7 p.m. SLIDELUCK POTSHOW SEATTLE IX John Keatley, Daniel Carrilo, Michael Clinard, and Andy Reynolds are just a few of the artists featured. Food, which you can bring, and a slide show are set to music by DJ Erik Blood. See slideluckpotshow.com for details and to RSVP. VODA Studios, 1050 W. Nickerson St., 441-8158, vodastudios. com, $10-$15, Sat. Aug. 18, 7 p.m.

Most of the candy-colored sculptural confections offered by Rebecca Chernow are glass and glossy, cast-off consumer objects (or sculptural restatements of same), some littered on the floor. The real eye-catcher is a bit more political, a pyramid of paraffin-stoppered glass jars—all handmade—full of bright-hued jelly in green, yellow, red, and orange. Yes I Can is a semi-ironic response to Obama’s old campaign slogan, carrying more than a bit of 99-percenter disillusionment. Each jar has an angry

BRIAN MILLER

• BAMIGNITE: FUNK OUT! This evening of music,

Jars of Grievance

label: “Fuck Costco,” “Fuck FOX News,” Fuck the banks,” and so forth. A New Yorker now transplanted to Seattle, Chernow’s stated goal is “to create works that examine consumerism, prosperity, and notions of what defines the American pursuit of happiness in modern times.” The mint and grape and lemon jellies certainly suggest happiness and home preserves; only the labels are sour. Neither Chernow nor any gallery visitor has the power to check Goldman Sachs or Walmart. Instead of anonymously funding her own multimillion-dollar PAC, the best she can do in response to the tilted political playing field is to bottle up her rage. Arranged on shelves, the 37 jars resemble candles on an altar—perhaps some kind of voodoo display intended to destroy Chernow’s enemies. Although at the top is a vessel

assailing “work,” and no artist is ever going to prevail over that. Pratt Gallery at Tashiro Kaplan Studios, 312 S. Washington St., 328-2200, pratt.org. Free. Noon–5 p.m. Wed.–Sat. Ends Sept. 1.

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Be among the first 15,000 fans, 21 and over, at Safeco Field and you’ll be rewarded with this big league Mariners fleece blanket, courtesy of EQC. Its plush, it’s full-size, it’s yours on Friday.

Ongoing

• THE ALLEY ART PROJECT In Nord Alley, which runs

between S. Main St. and S. Jackson St., Patrick Maher, Christopher Sternberg-Powidzki, Christine Betow, and others install diverse new works in metal, glass, and other pigeon-resistant materials. Pioneer Square, Yesler Way, 667-0687, Daily. DAYA B. ASTOR & PATRICE DONOHUE Astor’s Flavor considers international food markets with a variety of forms. Donohue’s Wax, Paper, Scissors stitches together materials also including cloth and clay. Shift Collaborative Studio, 306 S. Washington St. , 547-1215, shiftstudio.org, Fri., Sat., 12-5 p.m. Through Aug. 31.

Get tickets at Mariners.com.

BIG AND BOLD: AN EXHIBITION OF SIZABLE ARTWORKS Big and Bold examines the “bigger = bet-

upcoming events friday

saturday

17

18

• •

Send events to visualarts@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

Felix Kids T-Shirt Day

Fleece Blanket Night

First 15,000 fans 21 & over, courtesy EQC.

7:10 p.m. vs. Twins

sunday

All kids 14 & under, courtesy Boeing.

6:10 p.m. vs. Twins

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1:10 p.m. vs. Twins

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Family Night

Select View Level tickets are just $10 courtesy of BECU.

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Mariners Trading Card Night

First 15,000 fans, courtesy Panasonic

7:10 p.m. vs. Indians

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Seattle we ekly • AUG U ST 15− 21, 2012

ter” formula through some of the largest artworks in the city’s Portable Works Collection. Ten artists include Guy Anderson, Mike Hascall, and William Hoppe. Seattle Municipal Tower Gallery, 700 Fifth Ave., 684-7171, seattle. gov/arts, Mon.-Fri., 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Through Sept. 28. LESLIE W. CAIN She shows large landscapes from east of the Cascades. Also on view: Stephanie J. Frost’s allegorical themes in oil, and work by Shigeki Tomura and Ben Beres. Davidson Galleries, 313 Occidental Ave. S., 624-1324, davidsongalleries.com, Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.5:30 p.m. Through Sept. 1. GEORGE CIARDI & JAMES C. BASSETT Ciadi’s unique night photography uses only existing light to expose images. Bassett’s sculptures employ mostly found and discarded materials. Blindfold Gallery, 1718 E. Olive Way, 328-5100, Weds.-Fri., 1-7 p.m.; Sat., Sun., 1-5 p.m. Through Sept. 9. NOAH DAVIS He addresses tabloid TV culture and racism in his new show Savage Wilds. James Harris Gallery, 312 Second Ave. S., 903-6220, jamesharris gallery.com, Thurs.-Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Aug. 24. EQUIVALENTS Curator W.M. Hunt selected 46 photographers from around the globe for this annual competition. Photographic Center Northwest, 900 12th Ave., 720-7222, pcnw.org, $8-$10, Fri.-Sun., 12-8 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Through Sept. 18. CURTIS ERLINGER Working in a variety of media, the local artist proposes in Scissor Lift to “resurrect the forgotten dead through a process of translation, however impossible the attempt may be.” Particularly striking are his broken-glass patterns and delicate screen prints. Punch Gallery, 119 Prefontaine Place S. , 621-1945, punchgallery.org, Thurs.-Sat., 12-5 p.m. Through Sept. 1.

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film»This Week’s Attractions Aug. 17–23 | 206.324.9996 | siff.net Director Taylor Guterson in person at Friday’s shows.

A local favorite from SIFF 2011

August 17–19 | Film Center

The Story of Film An Odyssey

“The cinematic event of the year…extraordinary” – Daily Telegraph

HELD OVER! Uptown

New film from Takashi Miike, director of 13 Assassins DE AT H OF A S A M U R A I

Americano RUNS FRI., AUG. 17-THURS., AUG. 23 AT VARSITY. NOT RATED. 106 MINUTES.

In his feature directorial debut, actor Mathieu Demy—son of eminent filmmakers Jacques Demy and Agnès Varda—succumbs to and stumbles beneath the anxiety of influence. Americano, which Demy also wrote and stars in, is an ambivalent, occasionally touching work of homage to his parents, yet one whose clumsiness only underscores the superiority of their directly quoted films. Playing a Parisian real estate agent in his late thirties named Martin, Demy is introduced mid-schtup with girlfriend Claire (Chiara Mastroianni, the product of Marcello Mastroianni and frequent Jacques Demy lead Catherine Deneuve). Martin soon receives news of his mother Emilie’s death, which requires him to fly to Los Angeles to settle her affairs. Soon, he is flooded with memories of his childhood years living with Emilie in her Venice Beach bungalow—flashbacks culled directly from Demy’s own mother’s Documenteur (1981). This repurposing does Americano little favor: Varda’s portrait of grief and isolation, one of her best yet least-seen works, pierces with its palpable loneliness—a specific kind of soulsickness that Demy aims to convey through Martin, a character who often just seems callow and rash. Eventually, in Americano’s most poorly structured section, Martin will hound stripper Lola (Salma Hayek) for answers to mysteries in his mother’s life, only to be met with outright scorn or sex-worker worldweariness: “I gave up living a long time ago,” is a typical line, made worse by Hayek’s frequently unmodulated delivery. MELISSA ANDERSON

MPI MEDIA

Uptown

HELD OVER! Uptown

“The documentary equivalent of a page-turner.” – Entertainment Weekly

Uptown

Saturday & Sunday | Film Center

The Odd Life of Timothy Green

Films4Families:

Seattle weekly • AU GU ST 15− 21, 2012

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Moonrise Kingdom Directed by Wes Anderson August 22 | Film Center

Finding Joe

FILM SERIES

From Magic Mike to Killer Joe, McConaughey is having a very good year.

4

August 20 | Film Center Command Performance in HD!

P Killer Joe

BALLET

At one point in Killer Joe, based on Tracy Letts’ play, a hideously funny tabloid noir set on the outskirts of Dallas County, Chris Smith (Emile Hirsch) is let into the family doublewide by a relation whose face has just been pummeled into a Rorschach blot of dried gore. He doesn’t stop to ask what happened—such is the milieu of casual violence in which the film takes place, where it’s easy to slip imperceptibly into perdition. Into some bad men for money, Chris enlists his father, Ansel (Thomas Haden Church), in a plan: Kill Momma and collect on the life insurance policy she has

OPENS FRI., AUG. 17 AT HARVARD EXIT. RATED NC-17. 102 MINUTES.

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made over to teenage daughter Dottie (Juno Temple, a peroxided sprite who’s more than a little touched). They enlist the services of “Killer Joe” Cooper (Matthew McConaughey), a West Dallas detective who moonlights as a hired killer. The Smiths don’t have money for a down payment, but they have something more precious: Dottie is a virgin. No longer content to gigolo along on his looks, McConaughey again shows new depths in an auteur’s film: “His eyes hurt,” says Dottie of Joe, and indeed they do, while the click of Joe’s Zippo sounds like an unsheathed dagger. Director William Friedkin has always been an envelope-pusher, most famously with The Exorcist, and Killer Joe contains one particular scene that is as difficult as any I’ve seen. It is not, however, egregious—in fact, it synthesizes Joe’s double life as cop and killer, revolving around the horrible discord that occurs when interrogationroom psychological warfare is unleashed in a domestic setting. NICK PINKERTON

OPENS WEDS., AUG. 15 AT LINCOLN SQUARE AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG. 125 MINUTES.

“Lots of people hate anything that’s different,” says Cindy Green (Jennifer Garner) to her Pinterest/vision-board child Timothy (CJ Adams) while trying to explain why he must cover up the leaves that sprout on his legs. That hammer-to-nail, nutshelled life lesson is one of the pegs upon which this live-action fertility fairy tale hangs. It’s also one of the few of its kitchen-sink issues and themes around family (infertility, sibling rivalry, emotionally distant fathers/grandfathers, the impact of death on families, transnational adoption) that is actually developed or given space for contemplation. After Cindy (Jennifer Garner) and her husband, Jim (Joel Edgerton), learn that they cannot have a baby of their own, an artfully mud-speckled magic boy Timothy crawls from their garden and—yep—into their hearts. A host of plot points follows: a financial crisis; Timothy’s athletic ineptitude and his crush on a moody,

Hayek shows us the money in Americano.

artsy girl; plus assorted fallout from the boy’s honest-to-a-fault blurting of truths. Garner applies her workmanlike charm to Cindy (her dimples should have their own agent) and has good chemistry with Edgerton, who is scruffily appealing. The supporting cast, meanwhile, is better than the material demands, but there’s something cynically smart in the way the movie peddles catharsis without ever facing trauma. ERNEST HARDY

Old Goats OPENS FRI., AUG. 17 AT SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN. NOT RATED. 91 MINUTES.

Taylor Guterson, son of the local novelist David Guterson, turns an affectionate eye on Northwest geezer-dom in this gentle comedy about the indignities of aging, which debuted at SIFF 2011. Meeting at a weekly coffee klatch for Bainbridge’s over-70 set (no girls allowed!), three old goats from different social strata develop an unlikely friendship. One’s a married, golf-playing, sportscar-driving businessman recently forced into retirement. Another is a salty octogenarian World War II vet and (still) devoted womanizer. The third is a shy bachelor car mechanic, just fired, who lives on a squalid sailboat in Eagle Harbor. Theirs is the common tragedy—mainly played for laughs—of losing one’s vocation, one’s purpose in life. There’s talk of sailing adventures, online dating, and a condo in Palm Springs, but these three live in common terror of the question, “What’s next for you?” They know damn well what’s next! And they’re determined to avoid it for as long as possible. Likewise, Old Goats meanders along at an unhurried pace; it’s an authentic slice of Northwest regionalism not often seen on-screen—one that also doesn’t insist on cute resolutions or easy triumphs. When a duck-hunting trip proves hopeless, one guy declares, “Why don’t we just get a chicken at Costco?” Works for me. BRIAN MILLER


P Sleepless Night

RUNS FRI., AUG. 17-THURS., AUG. 23 AT GRAND ILLUSION. NOT RATED. 103 MINUTES.

Ingeniously simple yet deceptively intricate, this French police thriller abounds in postWoo/Tarantino action tropes: the usual galloping gun battles, absurdly protracted fistfights, and triple-dealing policemen. But co-screenwriter and director Frédéric Jardin also brings a restless intelligence and disciplined glee to Sleepless Night that far surpasses its cinematic influences. Jardin challenges himself and us with a bare-bones plot that takes place in virtually one claustrophobic location: An ostensibly crooked detective, Vincent (Tomer Sisley), steals a satchel full of coke from a Corsican mobster (Serge Riaboukine), who summarily kidnaps the divorced cop’s preteen son (Samy Seghir) and holds him for ransom in a labyrinthine Parisian nightclub. Getting the kid back is a lot harder than hijacking a drug delivery, it turns out, though Vincent does get knifed during the heist—a wound that Jardin slyly returns to throughout the film. Further complications arise in the form of a pair of internal affairs “shit stirrers” and a trio of Caribbean— or is it Turkish?—thugs, and there’s no end to the adrenalized set pieces on the way to the lad’s liberation. It all makes for an involving genre binge, and for once, the thrills aren’t smothered in false gravity or winking cynicism and don’t play out at the expense of character. There are hints of humor and depth early on, but about halfway through, Sleepless Night clicks into something funny and warm without sacrificing its edge; its bruising slapstick, multiple mistaken identities (and ethnicities), and well-developed characters accumulate into something uncommonly human for a shoot-’em-up. MARK HOLCOMB

P Splinters

RUNS FRI., AUG. 17-THURS., AUG. 23 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 95 MINUTES.

There is the expectation in a surfing movie that we should see plenty of wave-riding shots, those sun-bronzed gods astride their boards, ripping out of the blue curl to glory. What this documentary also shows us is surfers chopping wood, baking bread, smuggling scrap metal, building huts, and otherwise eking out a subsistence living in the remote rural village of Vanimo, on the north shore of Papua New Guinea. There, neophyte American filmmaker Adam Pesce, also a surfer,

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COMING 10.6.12

360 OPENS FRI., AUG. 17 AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS. RATED R. 115 MINUTES.

Is there something intrinsic to these wide-net, “We’re all connected” ensemble movies that makes their authors think they need to address every human conundrum in the world? The vast, split-screen-slashed 360, directed by Fernando Meirelles from an overreaching screenplay by Frost/Nixon screenwriter Peter Morgan, is an alleged descendant of the granddaddy of social cross-section dramas, Arthur Schnitzler’s play La Ronde, in which the narrative focus is baton-passed between sexual partners. But in contrast to Schnitzler’s fin-de-siècle Vienna, 360 spreads its characters across various points of the global-capitalism grid, beginning in Vienna and moving from Bratislava to Paris to London to Denver to Phoenix, before retracing its steps. Much of the film takes place in airports, with Ben Foster as a recently released sex offender, Maria Flor as a freshly dumped flirt, and Anthony Hopkins as a whispering Briton. Such slick and impersonal settings suit Meirelles’ fondness for shooting characters through panes of glass, which, one supposes, is meant to say something important about modern alienation from our bodies, for it is part of screenwriter Morgan’s conceit that the important points of contact here are not of a sexual nature. There are fleeting moments, like a fine end-of-the-affair scene from Rachel Weisz (unfaithful to husband Jude Law), but Morgan’s narrative promiscuity leaves 360 feeling only spread out and empty. NICK PINKERTON E film@seattleweekly.com

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Seattle we ekly • AUG U ST 15− 21, 2012

RICARDO VAZ PALMA/TRIBECA FILM

Sisley’s cop tries to get back on the right side of the law in Sleepless Night.

spent six months filming the preparations for that country’s first national surfing competition. Shot on low-grade video, Splinters isn’t interested in glamorizing a sport that Vanimo’s aspiring athletes intently study in old surf mags. Instead, it’s more of an anthropological project. Living among his subjects, Pesce sympathetically listens to their dreams of glory, watches their labors, films their training, and observes some disturbing scenes of drunkenness and domestic violence. Three winners in the competition will earn scholarships to Australia. If Vanimo looks like paradise to us tourists, the top surfer Angelus states his intentions plainly: “I want to get out.” At 16, he explains with a sad smile, the paperwork was lost for another scholarship he won. Now 27, he’s got four kids and an angry ex-wife demanding alimony. She’s also the sister of the rival surf club’s leader; edited together by an HBO veteran, Splinters makes much of this village conflict. If there’s sometimes a reality-TV taint to this drama, it’s far outweighed by the economic stakes involved. We learn of bride prices still unpaid and hear a local surfer/hotelier declare “Eventually, everyone will be civilized.” That’s what tourists will expect for an expensive vacation in a place that’s postcard-pretty but, as Splinters shows, no idyll. BRIAN MILLER

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film» BY BRIAN MILLER

Local Film • THE BIG SLEEP Could Howard Hawks’ 1946 detective

thriller be the greatest Hollywood movie ever made? Quite possibly. “You don’t like to be rated,” says Lauren Bacall’s coltish Vivian Sternwood to Humphrey Bogart’s private dick in a leisurely scene about halfway through, twirling her unlit cigarette like a horsewhip. “You like to get out in front, open up a lead, take a little breather in the back stretch—and then come home free.” Likewise, Hawks allows his mystery to unfold at its own pace, and even to remain playfully unresolved. “I’m learning more about characters and how to let them handle the plot,” he once remarked, “rather than let the plot move them.” So what does it matter who killed Owen Taylor when there’s all this endearing repartee swirling around, not just between Bogie and Bacall, but between the detective and a gorgeously brainy bookseller, a winsome cab driver, a thumb-sucking nymphet, a justly sour gangster’s moll, and a diminutive gumshoe (Elisha Cook Jr.)—as well as between Hawks and the viewer. Expressing affection for every one of Raymond Chandler’s quickwitted characters, The Big Sleep is nothing less than a work of art, a philosophy of life and love, and the definition of bliss. It comes with me to the desert island. (NR) ROB NELSON Central Cinema, $6-$8, Wed., Aug. 15, 9:30 p.m. THE DEVIL, PROBABLY There is a moment at the end of Robert Bresson’s 1977 film when Charles (Antoine Monnier), a young man who has decided on suicide as an abstaining vote against the options offered by society, pauses in his death march to listen to a snatch of a Mozart piano concerto coming through the window of a street-level apartment. He slows his step as though hesitating—for will one experience Mozart after death? Steadily paring away cinema’s usual enticements, Bresson’s style was conceived in opposition to the obvious forms of beauty and drama. Calling his performers “models,” Bresson drilled them until all emotional display was stripped from their actions and readings, and then further abstracted their automatic, affectless performances with framing that dissects them into feet, hands, and broken gestures. Bresson’s images are flat, generally shot with the 50mm lens that most nearly approximates the human eye. Ending in a note of ecohysteria, The Devil is screened from a new 35mm print. (NR) NICK PINKERTON Northwest Film Forum, $6-$10, Aug. 17-23, 7 & 9 p.m.

Seattle weekly • AU GU ST 15− 21, 2012

DREAMWEAVE: FILM AND THE AUSTRALIAN LAND From 1984, the drama Where the Green Ants

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Dream pits Aborigines against greedy oil drillers. (NR) Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org, $8, Fri., Aug. 17, 7:30 p.m. EUROPEAN VACATION You could arguably date Chevy Chase’s career decline to this 1985 sequel. Beverly D’Angelo returns as his patient wife. Anthony Michael Hall wisely departed the franchise, leaving poor Jason Lively to play son Rusty. Call for showtimes. (PG-13) Central Cinema, $6-$8, Aug. 17-22. FREMONT OUTDOOR MOVIES Bill Murray, Chevy Chase, and Rodney Dangerfield star in the always welcome golf comedy Caddyshack (1980). Also note a separate special Friday screening, a double feature of Kevin Smith’s 1994 breakthrough Clerks and the enjoyable Mallrats (1995). Raunchy and funny, both films are a slice of genuine New Jersey in the ‘90s, but it’s a period that seems awfully distant now. Outdoor movies screen at dusk. (R) Fremont Outdoor Cinema, 3501 Phinney Ave. N., 781-4230, fremontoutdoormovies.com, $5, Saturdays, 7 p.m.; Fri., Aug. 17, 7 p.m. Through Aug. 25. • MAD HOT BALLROOM Filmed in the public schools of New York City, this sweet little 2005 documentary follows various squads of fifth-graders through some very fancy footwork. They represent several elementary schools and neighborhoods, ranging from tony TriBeCa to hardscrabble Washington Heights. First the junior hoofers have to learn the steps, then make the team, then dance through the city championships. It’s a lot of pressure for your average 11-year-old, and Ballroom relishes how each one of these kids is average in his or her own unique, embarrassed, confident, excited, and distracted way. The movie’s a love-letter to teachers, too. Says one instructor of the subject at foot, “It’s much more than learning a bunch of steps. It’s etiquette. It’s knowledge of other cultures. It’s life.” To which I’ll add— it’s a lot of fun. (PG) BRIAN MILLER SIFF Film Center, $4, Sat., Aug. 18, 1 p.m.; Sun., Aug. 19, 1 p.m. Send events to film@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

and • MAGNUSON OUTDOOR MOVIES The first Back to the

best of Michael J. Fox’s star-making trilogy, Future (1985) has one of the more preposterous plotlines in movie history: Huey Lewis-listening ’80s dude Marty McFly (shown to be a badass for hitching rides on trucks while on his skateboard) has a buddy who’s inventing a time machine. Shit goes haywire and Marty finds himself stuck in 1955, fending off advances from his future mother (Lea Thompson) while coaching his future father (Crispin Glover) to assert his masculinity. Outdoor movie screens at dusk. (PG) Magnuson Park, 7400 Sand Point Way N.E., moviesatmagnuson.com, $5, Thursdays, 7 p.m. Through Aug. 30. • MARYMOOR PARK OUTDOOR MOVIES Gene Wilder stars as the stern, reclusive candy magnate in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, the 1971 adaptation of Roald Dahl’s children’s novel. Mr. Wonka imparts many valuable lessons to children who are greedy, pushy, and bossy (we’re looking at you, Veruca Salt). Outdoor movies screen at dusk. (G) Marymoor Park, 6046 W. Lake Sammamish Parkway N.E., moviesat marymoor.com, $5, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Through Aug. 29. MOONLIGHT CINEMA Some may come in togas to celebrate the 1978 comedy Animal House. It made John Belushi a star and kept the National Lampoon afloat for another decade. Outdoor film screens at dusk. 21 and over. (R) Redhook Ale Brewery, 14300 N.E. 145th St., Woodinville, 425-483-3232, redhook.com, $5, Thursdays. Through Aug. 30. AT THE MURAL The entire eight-part Harry • MOVIES Potter series is being screened in chronological order. Our three wizardly protagonists will age over a decade (from 2001 to 2011) and the themes gradually darken from there. By the time Harry, Ron, and Hermione graduate Hogwarts, your kids will almost be ready for school to begin. Outdoor movies screen at dusk. (PG) and (PG-13). Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St., 684-7200, seattlecenter. com, Free, Saturdays; Sundays. Through Aug. 26. • ROMAN HOLIDAY Audrey Hepburn stars in this 1953 romance, for which she earned an Oscar playing a princess who dumps her station to cavort with a reporter (Gregory Peck). The two of them tooling around on his scooter through Italian streets has become an icon of love, and of Rome, although William Wyler’s movie doesn’t stand among her best work or his. It’s more a charmer than a classic, and the source story by blacklisted writer Dalton Trumbo seems to look back to a prewar time of innocence. Peck hardly makes for a bohemian journalist, though Eddie Albert scores some laughs as a proto-beatnik. Mainly it’s a chance to enjoy Hepburn’s radiance—in effect, she’s a princess playing a princess. Call for showtimes. (NR) BRIAN MILLER Central Cinema, $6-$8, Aug. 17-22. SHINING SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 23. •THETHESTORY OF FILM: AN ODYSSEY Made for British television, this 15-hour survey of cinema history by Irish scholar Mark Cousins will run in repeating blocks of three episodes (three hours) each. In an Ulster brogue, Cousins narrates, alternating between stabs at lilting poetry (“the spinning, winning brilliance of Soviet editing”) and calculated down-to-earth matey-ness. (Luis Buñuel’s Viridiana is “a knee in the balls to Franco”; a scene from Vera Chytilová’s Daisies is “like the Lumière Brothers on acid”). The tapestry of imagery alternates between excerpted clips and new, ugly interview footage with a curious scattering of personalities— first film historians, then survivors of the eras under discussion (Stanley Donen, Claudia Cardinale, Norman Lloyd, Baz Luhrmann) that the narrative often extravagantly detours to accommodate. Additional original footage includes a travelogue of filmmakers’ birthplaces and studio lots, as well as metaphorical cutaways like a Christmas ornament hanging in the Hollywood Hills, repeatedly used to represent the romantic “baubles” of the American studio system. See the SIFF website for exact schedule. (NR) NICK PINKERTON SIFF Cinema Uptown, $5-$10, Opens Aug. 18, Aug. 18-19, 3:30 & 7 p.m.; Thursdays, 7 p.m. Through Oct. 4. • THREE DOLLAR BILL OUTDOOR CINEMA FondlyThe remembered from 1994, the Australian drag dramedy Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert was a comeback vehicle of sorts for Terence Stamp, who plays an aging transsexual getting tired of the lip-synching act he performs with Hugo Weaving and Guy Pearce. That’s a lot of acting talent for a shaggy but enjoyable road movie, with the bus (nicknamed “Priscilla”) almost a fourth major character in its own right. In truth, the adventures aren’t too daring, and the campy musical numbers can get on your nerves. The movie’s at its best while quietly exploring the trio’s emotional dynamics or revealing Weaving’s paternal feelings—or are they maternal?—for the son he once sired and now desires to reconnect with. Outdoor movie screens at dusk. (PG-13) BRIAN MILLER Cal Anderson Park, 1635 11th Ave., Free, Fridays. Through Aug. 17.


film» Ongoing BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD A zealous gumbo

of regionalism, magical realism, post-Katrina allegory, myth, and ecological parable, this Louisiana-set debut feature by 29-year-old Benh Zeitlin rests, often cloyingly, on the tiny shoulders of Quvenzhané Wallis. Beasts strains to remind us of Hushpuppy’s wisdom and courage beyond her years. She is a motherless child: “She swam away,”explains her drunken father of Mom’s absence. He and Hushpuppy live in a grassy, overgrown expanse in a fictional bayou area called the Bathtub. Stomping around her ramshackle, squalid domain in white plastic rain boots, dirty T-shirt, and orange Underoos, this peewee heroine confidently wields a blowtorch. (PG-13) Melissa Anderson Egyptian BERNIE In a 1997 murder trial in Carthage, Texas, Bernhardt “Bernie” Tiede, a closeted ex-mortician, confessed to the shooting of his benefactress, 81-year-old millionaire widow Marjorie Nugent. In Richard Linklater’s movie, Shirley MacLaine is Nugent, by almost all accounts a sour and unpleasant woman, clutching her purse like a floatation device. Matthew McConaughey is district attorney Danny Buck Davidson, and Jack Black plays Tiede, tackling his duties as church-choir soloist and community-theater impresario, in a performance remarkable for its ability to be at once flamboyant and remote. (PG-13) Nick Pinkerton Varsity FAREWELL MY QUEEN Benoît Jacquot’s soapy, sexy, and lezzie adaptation of Chantal Thomas’s 2003 novel about the chaos at Versailles on the eve of the 1789 revolution is told through the eyes of Sidonie (Léa Seydoux), the besotted reader to Marie Antoinette (Diane Kruger). Farewell relentlessly tracks its protagonist: The camera is often positioned just a few inches behind Sidonie as she

scrambles down corridors and tries to make sense of the rumors. The pleasure of Jacquot’s film is in watching various strains of discreet, heated, and deluded passionate attachment performed. Itchy Sidonie might thrill, however demurely, to the queen’s applying rosewood water to her mosquito bites, but she will seethe in silent jealousy as she watches, unnoticed, Marie Antoinette interlace fingers with and coo over her most prized pet, Gabrielle, who makes la reine lose her mind before she loses her head. (R) Melissa Anderson Varsity Theatre HARA-KIRI: DEATH OF A SAMURAI This may well be Takashi Miike’s best film—a patient, ominous piece of epic storytelling that conscientiously rips the scabs off the honorable samurai mythology. Readapting Yasuhiko Takiguchi’s novel, Miike takes on the portentous shogunate territory of Mizoguchi and Kurosawa with authority; architecture dictates composition, and iconography speaks for itself. In a feudal lord’s palace, news comes from the gate that an unemployed samurai wishes to perform seppuku in the estate courtyard. The would-be gut-cutter (Ebizô Ichikawa) has hidden agendas, not the least of which is to confront the heartless neocon samurai ethos head-on. Miike salutes goldenage Japanese cinema the right way—by respecting its heart and celebrating its iconic dazzle. In fact, his detour away from the hyperactive gore and genre excess that made him famous, by way of this deep-dish morality tale, feels positively heroic. (NR) Michael Atkinson SIFF Cinema Uptown THE IMPOSTER This deft, atmospheric Errol Morris– style tour through the phenomenon that is “serial imposter” Frédéric Bourdin homes in on one brief episode from the man’s berserk career: the period in 1997 when the 23-year-old Frenchman convinced a Texas family he was their disappeared teenage son. The story still harbors queasy mysteries at its center, as

director Bart Layton micro-analyzes every step of the case, via interviews with the Texans, Bourdin, and the FBI. How Bourdin manages to pull off this charade is the first conundrum, but the question of how credulous this wounded American family really is eventually becomes subsumed by others—as in, what really happened to the vanished boy? Thick with reenactments and cute cutaways, the movie evolves into a cultural inquisition, following this stranger through the strange land of bad-news America, where the truth is still waiting to be exhumed. (R) Michael Atkinson SIFF Cinema Uptown MOONRISE KINGDOM It’s 1965, the rainy end of summer on the rocky coast of a fictional New England isle. Twelve-year-old Sam (Jared Gilman) disappears from the Scout camp run by Randy Ward (Edward Norton). Also 12, bad-seed Suzy (Kara Hayward) flees her distracted lawyer parents (Frances McDormand and Bill Murray). Aided by what remains of Ward’s troop (“It’s a chance to do some first-class scouting!”), the grownups, including Bruce Willis’ Captain Sharp, mobilize to find the fugitive young lovers. Moonrise takes the form of old-fashioned pre-teen literature, but, as everything made by Wes Anderson, does so knowingly. The escape Sam engineers for the pair is dangerous and crazy, but it’s also a way for him to exercise control, and to show off to a receptive audience. Suzy doesn’t have it so bad at home, but Sam’s flattering gaze gives her something she isn’t getting, and now won’t easily be able to live without. This utopian romance is thrown into relief by the quiet despair of the adults in Moonrise. (PG-13) Karina Longworth Guild 45th, SIFF Cinema Uptown THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES Lauren Greenfield’s doc tracks the post-crash lifestyle of riche so nouveau it doesn’t realize its appetites strike others as crude. The titular royal is Jackie Siegel, a trophy wife to 70ish time-share mogul David Siegel. Audiences laugh at the Siegel family’s tackiness, but bad taste and questionable hygiene are not crimes. After the 2008 market collapse, the Siegels have to halt construction on their new “house,” a replica of Versailles. “The banks made us do it,” Jackie claims, after Siegel’s company lays off 6,000 workers. Fueling Versailles is a nagging, unresolved tension between what seems like the filmmaker’s sympathy

for the libertarian boldness of David’s unwillingness to compromise and the damning evidence Greenfield presents of the ugly gluttony of that spending in practice. (PG) Karina Longworth Harvard Exit SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED This road-trip rom-com (with a light sci-fi spin) is both the first big starring role for Aubrey Plaza and also the first movie to acknowledge her hotness. Reporter Jeff (Jake Johnson), on assignment to write an exposé on a guy searching for a time-travel partner, suggests that his intern Darius (Plaza) use the fact that she’s a “beautiful woman” to get the story. A typical Plaza tough cookie (though patly softened), Darius calls Jeff out for “dangling my vagina out there like bait.” And then she does what she’s told to gain entry into the weird world of Kenneth (Mark Duplass), a hermit loner who claims to have built a time machine. Plaza and Duplass have an easy, charming chemistry, and plot contrivances aside, as indie-film nerd-mances go, this one is genuinely sweet. (R) Karina Longworth Sundance Cinemas

THEATERS: Admiral, 2343 California Ave. SW, 938-3456;

Big Picture, 2505 First Ave., 256-0566; Big Picture Redmond, 7411 166th Ave. NE, 425-556-0566; Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684; Cinebarre, 6009 SW 244th St. (Mountlake Terrace)., 425-672-7501; Cinerama, 2100 Fourth Ave., 448-6680; Crest, 16505 Fifth Ave. NE, 781-5755; Egyptian, 801 E. Pine St., 781-5755; Grand Illusion, 1403 NE 50th St., 523-3935; Guild 45, 2115 N. 45th St., 781-5755; Harvard Exit, 807 E. Roy St., 781-5755; iPic Theaters, 16451 N.E. 74th St. (Redmond), 425-6365601; Kirkland Parkplace, 404 Park Place, 425-827-9000; Lincoln Square, 700 Bellevue Way N, 425-454-7400; Majestic Bay, 2044 NW Market St., 781-2229; Meridian, 1501 Seventh Ave., 223-9600; Metro, 4500 Ninth Ave. NE, 781-5755; Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 2675380; Oak Tree, 10006 Aurora Ave. N, 527-1748; Pacific Place, 600 Pine St., 888-262-4386; Seven Gables, 911 NE 50th St., 781-5755; SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996; SIFF Film Center, 305 Harrison St. (Seattle Center), 324-9996; Sundance Cinemas, 4500 Ninth Ave NE, 633-0059; Thornton Place, 301 NE 103rd St., 517-9953; Varsity, 4329 University Way NE, 781-5755.

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT WWW.CINERAMA.COM

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Thumbing its nose at Korean tradition, tiny Chan makes the most of its location.

wrote a first paragraph for this review, but I don’t know if I’m ready to share it with you. I mean, I worked pretty hard on it: All the words are spelled correctly, and the grammar’s impeccable. It looks great on the page, and there’s a simile in the second line that would slay you. And if you’re a fool for alliteration, wait till you get a gander at the internal rhyme scheme near the end. Listen, can I be honest here? I’m feeling a little insulted that you want me to just give away prose of this caliber. I know the rest of the story won’t make much sense without its lead, but still, I’m charging nothing for this? The whole business devalues the writing profession, wouldn’t you say? So I’m withholding my brilliant first paragraph, much the way that Chan—a selfproclaimed “modern Korean fusion” restaurant that opened this spring alongside Pike Place’s Inn at the Market—won’t bring banchan to the table unless guests pledge three bucks to Korean Foster Care. That’s not a suggested donation: It’s the mandated price, listed on the menu. Assigning a charitable fee to banchan flips the meaning of the snacks, which are typically given freely and generously as a signal of hospitality. It’s not unusual for a Korean restaurant to present its guests with six to eight complimentary stainless-steel bowls brimming with tangles of spicy mung bean sprouts, shredded dried squid, cubes of snow-white pickled radish, and

braised potatoes. When a bowl’s emptied, it’s returned to the kitchen for a refill. Chan, by contrast, serves a rectangular white plate set with two dainty chopstick scoops apiece of whole shishito peppers, marinated mushrooms, carrots, zucchini, and sprouts. No seconds. Every nibble on the vegetable tray is attractive and fresh, but the decision to charge for the mini-spread is bound to flummox eaters accustomed to Korean traditions. And since it seems unlikely that eaters new to Korean cuisine would even ask for banchan, the cognoscenti are the de facto audience. Chan might have opted to dispense with the banchan format entirely, but the restaurant’s not that daring. “Modern” here doesn’t denote an inventive rewrite of Korean culinary idioms, but the scaling-back of strong flavors and downsizing of plates. Chan serves graceful, tasty food, but it’s positioned on a wide swath of middle ground that

few diners ever traverse. The stylish restaurant is too trendy for purists, who’d rather get their Korean fix in Shoreline or Federal Way, where the banchan’s plentiful and the entreés are cheap. It’s too staid for food geeks, who want their meals seasoned with challenge, and probably too strange for tourists whose Asian food experiences extend from won ton soup to California rolls. “Did it taste . . . different?,” a server asked concernedly when I indicated she could clear a dish that wasn’t scraped clean. By trying to make itself acceptable to anyone (chef/owner Heong Soon Park makes kimchi without fish sauce and pancakes without gluten), Chan risks alienating everyone.

F

or eaters who can dismiss their preconceptions, however, Chan’s a terrific sip-and-nosh hideaway, a near-windowless refuge from the bustling Market beyond. The restaurant has no intention of becoming a chef-driven powerhouse à la Revel, the restaurant to which detractors will inevitably compare it, but it’s a strong pick for happy hour or a casual supper. The cocktails are excellent, and pair splendidly with dishes propped up with just enough garlic, chili, rice vinegar, and soy to remind patrons that downtown’s woefully short on Korean restaurants of any kind. The chipper servers will happily bring a full dinner’s worth of small plates, but Chan’s compact tables can’t accommodate more than two or three at a time. The 38-seat restaurant is tiny, although the dimensions read as classy rather than cramped (so classy, in fact, that when a scheduled review partner realized she’d have to bring her toddler to dinner, we decided to eighty-six our reservation). Furnished with slatted wooden walls

and willow branches wriggling out of squat If you want banchan, you’d ceramic vases, the L-shaped dining room hugs best be in a charitable mood. an open kitchen that doubles as the bar. Chan has devised a number of cocktails presumably intended to introduce Americancantinas than Korean raw-beef joints? It’s a born eaters to the Korean liquor cabinet. delicious cue to order another sojito. Lime juice, ginger, and lots of ice cubes The best dishes on Chan’s menu take transform makgeolli, a fermented blend of advantage of the restaurant’s enviable boiled rice and water, into a refreshing drink Market location. While restaurants specialthat tastes something like banana pulp and izing in global cuisine often get a pass on local carbonated milk. An unassailable “sojito” vegetables and humanely raised meat, Chan slaps Latin training wheels on soju, the uses great ingredients, and really soars when popular rice-based spirit that’s still largely it applies them to the accessible recipes that unknown in the U.S. annually propel Korean cuisine to the top of Park’s efforts to produce remedial versions coming-trends lists. Turns out sliced kalbi of iconic Korean dishes are far less successful. over rice with pickled daikon is a thousand With the volume of its chili glaze turned way times better when it’s garnished with a bright down, there’s no sting to distract from the tooorganic egg yolk and a bouquet of fresh microthick batter encircling fried-chicken wings. Fat greens. Cold buckwheat noodles in a zingy fingers of deep-fried rice cakes, speared three vinaigrette are the beneficiaries of a medley of to a skewer, look like squarecucumbers, cabbage, and red rigged sails, but the dish isn’t onion. And the grilled aspara» PRICE GUIDE going anywhere: The rice gus spears served with a slipBUCKWHEAT SALAD ........ $9 cakes are gummy, and their pery hunk of black cod flaking BIBIMBAP ............................. $11 BACK COD ............................$14 ostensibly chili-based sauce is over a sweet wheel of daikon FRIED RICE CAKE ............... $6 unremittingly sweet. are just as good as the plush PORK SLIDERS .................... $9 SHORT RIB .......................... $10 A kimchi-bacon-paella fish that’s the star of the plate. SOJITO .................................... $8 cheese gratin is even worse Even a preparation as than it sounds: Baked in a pedestrian as bibimbap is casserole, the congealed, pumpkinelevated by the addition of firm, just-plucked hued rice—shrouded with a flavorless white mushrooms and magenta radicchio. Unlike cheese and bereft of kimchi’s defining funk— emasculated seasoning, pay-to-play banchan, tastes like what the least popular kid on the and cheesy bacon, cooking up Pike Place finds soccer team would bring to a potluck.Yet in Korean fashion is an innovation well worth many of the dishes on the side of the menu preserving. E labeled “modern” deserve a spot on the table. hraskin@seattleweekly.com Bulgogi beef sliders are sloppy, but the chili mayonnaise has pep and the meat’s tender. CHAN And so what if a pile of raw tuna and crescents 86 Pine St., 443-5443, chanseattle.com. of avocado soaked in soy owe more to coastal 5–10 p.m. Tues.–Sun.

Seattle we ekly • AUG U ST 15− 21, 2012

Chan has devised a number of cocktails presumably intended to introduce American-born eaters to the Korean liquor cabinet.

JOSHUA HUSTON

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food&drink»Featured Eats $ = $25 or less per person; $$ = $25–$40; $$$ = $40 and up. These capsule reviews are written by editorial staff and have nothing to do with advertising. For hundreds more reviews, searchable by neighborhood and type of cuisine, go to seattleweekly.com/food.

BALLARD

LA CARTA DE OAXACA 5431 Ballard Ave. N.W., Seattle,

782-8722. Perhaps the most stylishly designed Mexican restaurant in the entire Pacific Northwest, La Carta de Oaxaca avoids every piñata-cactus-blanket cliché you’ve ever drunk a strawberry margarita under. Also cliché-free is its menu, great for sampling and sharing tapas-style. Mole negro, the house specialty, is on the sweet side, delicious over pork or chicken with rice and tortillas. Standouts are a spicy fish soup and fried tortillas stuffed with potatoes and beef sausage. The margaritas are practically perfect. $$ LOUIE’S CUISINE OF CHINA 5100 15th Ave. N.W., Seattle, 782-8855. There are restaurants across the city that reflect a range of culinary traditions associated with China, but no restaurant better encapsulates the regionspecific tradition of eating Chinese in Seattle than Louie’s Cuisine. The restaurant traces its roots back to the 1930s, when the Louie family served some of the best food in Chinatown. There aren’t any real misses on the lengthy menu, but oyster beef, garlic chicken with black bean sauce and lobster sauce prawns are reliable standbys. $$ MALENA’S TACO SHOP 2010 N.W. 56th St., Seattle, 789-8207. Malena’s can’t be beat for after-work takeout. It’s not as showy as some of the more ambitious Ballard restaurants, but its tidy ivory curtains, silk flowers, and friendly service make it the neighborhood darling of frenzied families, newspaper-reading singles, and hungry skate punks. $ MATADOR 2221 N.W. Market St., Seattle, 297-2855. The feel of Matador is South of the Border saloon: lots of wood, an open fire pit, and an elaborate wrought-iron doorway with a steel steer skull. The drinks are the focus at this Tex-Mex-inspired spot, which makes for a fun, loud night out. But you can also get gigantic plates of tacos or enchiladas with slow-roasted tomatillo sauce. Weekend brunch is popular, too. $$ SALMON BAY CAFE 5109 Shilshole Ave. W., Seattle, 782-5539. Great ambience if you like parking lots— there’s one out every window. But there’s also a peekaboo vista of working fishing boats and yachts

passing on the canal. Despite the view, lines form on weekends for the vittles. Besides piles of eggs and meats, you get generous mounds of toast and fruit. Bypassing the eggs Benedict is treasonous. Be prepared: Dirty dishes are stacked in plain sight, and the noise level is like a quintuplets’ birthday party. $ SAM’S SUSHI BAR & GRILL 5506 22nd Ave. N.W., Seattle, 783-2262. There are some people who can tell really good sushi from that which is merely OK—but most people can’t. And that’s what makes Sam’s—which specializes in extremely affordable, perfectly edible sushi—such a brilliant concept, seeing as how heartier eaters will have to sneak in a snack later on anyway after not getting filled up on raw fish. Although eating a ton of rice on the side is always an option. $ THAN BROTHERS RESTAURANT 2021 N.W. Market St., Seattle, 782-5715. If you can wait until your pho arrives before you down the Than brothers’ trademark cream puff, you truly have superhuman willpower. Bowls of the traditional Vietnamese rice noodle soup—veggie, chicken, meatball, and 14 varieties of beef—are huge, cheap, steaming, and fragrant. The Godzilla-sized extra-large is only $6.25. $

BELLTOWN

LOLA 2000 Fourth Ave. #B, Seattle, 441-1430. At Tom

Douglas’ Mediterranean-themed venture, hotel guests and Belltowners gather around tables of meze or robustly seasoned fare. The kalamata olive and fig spread is the perfect starter for dipping warm pita into, the salmon kebabs arrive in a cloud of Pernod steam, and the signature goat—braised with Moroccan spices and grilled peaches—is a magnificent hunk of meat (though occasionally oversalted). Overall, service is excellent, but the staff appears harried at times because of the crowd and the noise. $$

CAPITOL HILL

HIGH 5 PIE 1400 12th Ave., Seattle, 695-2284. High 5 has

everything you’d expect from a pie shop owned by a coffee entrepreneur trying to ride the zeitgeist. There are plenty of hot drinks on the board, big windows looking out onto the neighborhood, a long counter full of bakery cases to display the goods, cafe-style seating for about 20, and of course pies. Pies in glorious variety. Pies in all shapes and sizes. There are fruit pies and cream pies, a few savory pies, and a board of specials that changes day-to-day, season-by-season. But the one thing all these

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liquor portion is generous—perhaps because the oft-harried cooks double as bartenders. The patio out back is small, but sunny and sweet— and one of the few available along lower Queen Anne’s drinking corridor. The Verdict: Typically when a restaurant proliferates into a chain, it’s safe to assume any sense of personal service or attention to culinary detail will rapidly wane, but Blue Water pleasantly defies this norm. If you’re looking for an elegant agave infusion, this is not your beat, but for a preshow bite and cocktail next to SIFF Cinema Uptown, this is an idyllic, budget-friendly option. E food@seattleweekly.com

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Seattle we ekly • AUG U ST 15− 21, 2012

HANNAH LEVIN

The Watering Hole: Blue Water Taco Grill, 515 Queen Anne Ave. N., 352-2407, QUEEN ANNE The Atmosphere: Don’t be fooled by its whimsical cartoon seafood motif, assembly-line configuration, or chain status (additional Blue Waters reside in SoDo and several downtown locations)—this is decidedly not a bland, snore-for-the-senses spot. This is simply executed and brightly seasoned coastal Mexican food served in a busy cafeteria splashed with the requisite primary colors (heavy on the blue, of course) and a smattering of charming family photos. At the Queen Anne location, they have hard liquor and some of the best barbacoa to be found outside of taco-truck culture (two barbacoa tacos with rice and beans are just $5 during happy hour). The Drink: While the unfortunate preponderance of Corona swag undoubtedly drives many to order an ice bucket full of mini-Coronitas ($5 for four), there’s nothing wrong with their $4 happy-hour margaritas. The housemade mix is a reasonable balance of tart and sweet, and the

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food&drink»Featured Eats

af e R idge C inne y h pe P p o s ’ m Sh M ae

pies have in common? They are all terrible, with blunt, dull crusts that taste like chewing damp cardboard and fillings that are either overwhelmingly nasty or almost impossibly flavorless, with no sweet middle ground. Steer clear. JAI THAI 235 Broadway E., Seattle, 322-5781. Jai Thai is bustling with action in the early-morning hours, owing to its being the only Thai restaurant in the city that remains open until 2 a.m. The later it gets, the more jaded hipsters, drunken clubbers, and smitten couples can be seen digging into favorites like pad see ew, pumpkin curry, and swimming rama. A word of advice: Dishes are made using a 1-4 scale of hotness, but the cooks are conservative with the spice. Adjust your preference accordingly. $ LARK 926 12th Ave., Seattle, 323-5275. Lark’s artistic spirit is reflected in everything about the restaurant, from the First Thursday regulars who make up its clientele to the poetry on its menu. One is tempted to scan the meter of lines like “Skagit River Ranch beef tongue with horseradish and wild T H I S CO D E watercress,” “Spanish TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE mackerel with fennel, SEATTLE WEEKLY olives, and preserved-lemon IPHONE/ANDROID APP tapenade,” and “naturally FOR MORE RESTAURANTS OR VISIT raised veal sweetbreads seattleweekly.com with spinach, bacon, and grain mustard.” James Beard Award-winning chef John Sundstrom’s food, served up as a swarm of small, composed plates, inspires customers to twirl each bite around to catch the right amount of sauce, breathing in while they graze to catch all the aromatic nuances of the food. That level of attention, from both cooks and diners, is what makes the atmosphere seem so much like a gallery. $$$ PALERMO PIZZA & PASTA 350 15th Ave. E., Seattle, 322-3875. In a perfect world, every neighborhood would have a cozy Italian restaurant to call its own. Palermo is homey enough with the food, though it doesn’t exude an especially friendly vibe. Linguini tossed with prawns in a lemony cream sauce is rich in flavor without sinking like a brick in your stomach, a friend of ours swears by the chicken parm sandwich, and ranch is among your saladdressing choices. This is an easygoing Italian-American place in Capitol Hill’s most laid-back dining district, the kind of place you only visit when you’re already in the neighborhood. $

Serving “Moo-velous” breakfast a-1-1 day. Shake & Eggs our specialty.

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ALittLeRAskin » by hanna raskin

Sea Gal

QUEEN SHEBA 916 E. John St., Seattle, 322-0852. Sheba

is as hidden a gem as you’ll find around Broadway. This intimate spot ladles out solid renditions of Ethiopian cuisine’s most wanted. The requisite vegetable platter is flavorful and generously portioned, while the chicken falls off the bone. Nothing beats hand-feeding your newfound crush before catching a show on the Hill. $ SMITH 332 15th Ave. E., Seattle, 709-1900. The decor at this popular Capitol Hill pub looks like it was patterned after your old English professor’s home study, the impossibly pompous one who treated The Sun Also Rises like gospel. The abundant wood paneling is brown enough to appear black and there is a puzzling amount of stuffed (and mounted) animals. But for all of its taxidermy weirdness, the atmosphere (and the bar) are probably the best things about Smith. The menu—though styled for gastropub simplicity—isn’t expert enough to warrant a special trip just for a meal. Burgers, poutine, mac-andcheese and the like make up the bulk of the board, with occasional high-tone touches like sweetbreads adding little of note. $$ VIA TRIBUNALI 913 E. Pike St., Seattle, 322-9234. The brainchild of Caffé Vita founder Mike McConnell, Via Tribunali was founded to bring authentic Neapolitan pizza to the Northwest, so it’s ironic that the pizza is the least interesting thing about the place. The decor is murky and romantic, and the bar is terrific, if a little pricey. But the ultra-skinny-crust pizzas sag underneath a watery tomato sauce. If you’re planning to eat, the one sure thing on the menu is the popular house salad: mixed greens, arugula, olives, ricotta, and prosciutto cotto. $$ VIOS CAFE AND MARKETPLACE 903 19th Ave. E., Seattle, 329-3236. Thomas Soukakos’ colorful, affordable neighborhood gathering spot isn’t like the Greek restaurants of our nightmares-greasy moussaka, chalky feta cheese. Instead, Greek is more its emotional core than its culinary evocation. The succulent pastitsio is a baked pasta layered with a spicy meat sauce and rich bechamel sauce, while the fennel-braised pork sandwich is subtle and overpowering at once. Order Greek wines by the glass, or pick an inexpensive bottle from the rack and pay retail plus $10 corkage. Bonus feature: a play area for kids. $

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bright and tidy ID noodle shop is beloved for the many varieties of ramen noodles that come in big-as-your-head bowls. We love the seafood ramen, seasoned with miso and soy sauce and chock full of diced veggies, salmon, and shellfish. Service is quick and friendly.

says there’s only so much she can cram into the storage bins beneath the ship’s galley benches. “The first three days, I slept with four watermelons in my bunk,” she says of a recent trip. Turner draws up detailed meal plans since the ship’s freezer can only be opened once a day, but she can’t plan for weather conditions that often conflict with her cooking or baking schedule. “If it’s flat, you can make a cake,” she says. But in a storm, “it becomes really not easy. Pasta is a nightmare. If you’re boiling water and we suddenly go flying, it’s a super dangerous place. We’re fanatics that there’s only one knife in here.” To keep the galley safer, that knife is worn on a belt and boiling pots are bungee-corded together. Meal plans are also adjusted based on the demographics of the crew. When the BBC sends reporters on a voyage, “we go through hoards of tea,” Turner says. “Everyone eats pretty good,” she adds. “We manage to do it.” hraskin@seattleweekly.com

aBLOG ON »FOOD VORACIOUS

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Seattle we ekly • AUG U ST 15− 21, 2012

Scientists aboard the tall ship Kaisei are charged with tracking debris from last year’s Japanese tsunami and investigating the North Pacific gyre choked with trash. And it’s steward Jocelyne Turner’s job to feed them. For centuries, sailors subsisted on salt pork, hardtack and grog, since few other foods were fit for long months at sea in the pre-canning, pre-refrigeration era. Scientists traveling aboard the Kaisei are treated to far more elaborate meals, including frittatas with bacon for breakfast, but Turner says she confronts many of the same problems faced by yesterday’s galley cooks. “On a 30-day voyage, the first two weeks you’re going to have lots of fruits and vegetables, and the third week you’re trying to salvage cabbage,” Turner says. In addition to spoilage threats, Turner is constantly attending to spatial concerns: Feeding dozens of hungry workers for a month requires supplies that tend to overflow the pantry. Turner

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music» »PROFILE

The Hat and the Hart

After leaving religion, Davidson Hart Kingsbery puts his faith in music (and Hattie’s).

keyboardist Strehle and drummer Bryan Crawford. With his renewed perspective on life and music—music he claims he’ll be writing “til I die”—Kingsbery keeps a bit of wisdom the bandleader shared with him in his pocket. “He once told me you can always play country music no matter how old you are.” Kingsbery soon found a regular gig at Hattie’s—as the house band for the venue’s “honky tonk” Thursdays, a role he’ll reprise on Aug. 23—and discovered a tight-knit music community he had never known before. “That was a really great gig for us because it was a residency, and everyone knew we were going to be here.” With dancers attending—and drinking—reliably each month, Hattie’s owner, Max Genereaux, gave Hart a thank-you gift. “We like him so much here we gave him his own hook for his hat,” Genereaux said. Indeed, a gold-plated plaque inscribed with the words, “Reserved for the hat of Davidson Hart Kingsbery,” sits just below a hook reserved for Kingsbery’s trademark accessory, a Stetson Silverbelly, a gift from his dad. Kingsbery is the only person to receive such an honor at Hattie’s.

Davidson Hart Kingsbery’s Stetson Silverbelly is the only hat with a reserved hook at Hattie’s.

Even after leaving religion, Kingsbery maintains a loving relationship with his family. “They’ve always encouraged me to be myself. When I was into Kurt Cobain and grew long hair and wore cardigans with weird T-shirts and looked like an idiot, they let me play my drums in the living room and let me record my music there. They’ve always been really good about supporting me as an a musician.” It’s an unconventional upbringing that’s worked in his favor; Kingsbery and his band have a deal to record another LP with Fin Records ( just a few doors up from Hattie’s) at Wallingford’s Jupiter Studios in September. Both of his parents have come out to see him play. “My mom came to one of the shows and got hit on by a couple of older guys who offered her a drink. I think it made her really uncomfortable,” he mused. “But she got through it.” gelliott@seattleweekly.com

Seattle we ekly • AUG U ST 15− 21, 2012

attie’s Hat is a time-honored institution, cherished as much for its architectural history as for the famous faces who’ve crossed its threshold and downed a beer. It’s a relic from old Ballard, boasting the neighborhood’s first-ever tile floor, the remnants of which are almost 100 years old, along with a carved wooden bar that’s even older, rumored to have been hand-crafted in France. It’s where Ryan Adams fell off a barstool stone drunk, where Neko Case worked in the kitchen, and where Adams’ then-bandmate, Phil Wandscher, met Jesse Sykes and formed their band The Sweet Hereafter. When Davidson Hart Kingsbery started hanging out there, his marriage fell apart. But it wasn’t Hattie’s fault. It was the cat’s. Kingsbery, who recently released his debut LP, Two Horses, on Ballard’s Fin Records, grew up in a strict “I hung out with Christian Science home. “I was it pretty heavily,” he said. the Mormon in “I hung out with the Mormon kids because kids because we both kind of we both had had the same rules: no sex, the same rules: no drinking, no smoking, you We would have a pretty no sex, know. mild time on the weekends.” no drinking, As a child, Kingsbery no smoking.” suffered debilitating breathing problems that, because Western medicine was strictly taboo, went undiagnosed and untreated. As a result, he turned to arts and music—instead of sports—learning piano, cello, drums, and guitar. It was only after Kingsbery left for college, away from the home he shared with his pet cats, parents, and sister, that he learned he was severely allergic to cats. “It was a devastating realization that I didn’t have to go through all that pain and suffering,” he says. “It could have easily been prevented if it was just checked out. I’m not even sure I knew pet allergies existed because I was taken out of all health classes, like biology and chemistry. As soon as we started to talk about diseases, or blood cells or human health, the teacher would be like, ‘OK Hart, you can go home now,’ so I didn’t learn a lot about things like that.” After attending the only Christian Science college in the nation, The Principia in Elsah, Ill., Kingsbery was already married to the first girl he dated there, before he was convinced religion was holding him back. The couple moved to Seattle in 2003. Shortly thereafter, their marriage crumbled. “My divorce came quick,” he says. “I started playing music and getting into the music scene out here, having beers and staying out late once in a while. Not really behavior she was used to, but it was new and fun for me. It was pretty clear she didn’t want to be part of it. But I think some marriages end up that way, whether religion plays a part in it or not.” After splitting with his wife, and formally distancing himself from the church, he recruited a friend to play drums and found a bass player. The three formed Kingsbery’s first band, Hart and The Hurricane, and soon added piano player Ben Strehle. The group was together for about four years until it faded away. “But we played a lot of shows and got to know a lot of bands.” One of those bands was Brent Amaker and the Rodeo, the “new wave country” outfit that shares with Kingsbery’s group

SANDY WILSON

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BY GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

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Just the Trick

BY ERIN K. THOMPSON

Behold, the therapeutic powers of rock and roll. BY DUFF MCKAGAN

S

old riff-writing song-wizardry of yore. Are they getting high again? Is Tom Hamilton going to be okay? Are they going to break up? About 25 years ago, I was given the chance (with GNR) to open for Aerosmith, which was well on its way to being all the way back on top after a bad band breakup and struggles with some serious vice. This was a dream scenario for a band like ours. These guys were our living, breathing heroes, and I remember almost pinching myself every night when the opening piano line of “Dream On” would get played. I mean . . . SHIT! This was fucking Aerosmith! We were there . . . side-stage . . . and now, sort of even doing something in CONJUNCTION with these heroes of ours. It was a magical time, to say the very least. I loved the fact that both bands All of that negative hoopla that surrounds a made more than a handful of band like Aerosmith can mistakes. Mistakes make music and will immediately be more accessible, relatable, washed away and discarded that much more perfect. by going and seeing them live. There IS no tape, of course. Brad Whitford and Joe Perry are knew—hard-core punker or metal maniac— playing better guitar than ever. Steven who didn’t just love Aerosmith and Cheap Tyler is playful, happy, and singing all of Trick. Records like Toys In The Attic and In those impossible high notes. Joey Kramer Color will earn a band a lifelong cool factor. The show was sold out. That’s a good sign has a drum groove like no other. And Tom Hamilton has recovered from his cancer, for rock and roll. and continues to be the steady anchor to Cheap Trick have always kept it real. this ship. They have never strayed from their original Hell, I even loved the fact that both bands goal of writing great rockers with insane made more than a handful of mistakes. melodies. Their live shows are—probably Mistakes make music suddenly human for because of the epic 1979 album, Cheap us . . . more accessible, relatable, and hence, Trick at Budokan—always looked forward that much more perfect, in a way. to with a sort of loving rockticipation (Is I was transformed that a word? It is now!). Wednesday night, The Trick have never back to the ’70s. But it used tape at shows, and Tune in to 97.3 KIRO FM wasn’t in some dumb they have never gone to every Sunday at 3 p.m. to hear music editor Chris Kornelis ‘retro’ way; make no in-ear monitors or other on Seattle Sounds. mistake: these bands are newfangled onstage somehow as currenttechnology. They play sounding as anyone right now. No, I was loud rock music, and no one really does transformed via music, to a time when there this type of thing better than Cheap Trick. were musical heroes and inspiration and AND, they just don’t seem to lose, nor greatness. surrender, a step. (It was an honor, it must Wednesday night, I needed to go to be said, to be asked to sit in with the band Tacoma, and I am so glad that you were during their set.) all there, too. E There has been drama and intrigue surrounding Aerosmith over the past askduff@seattleweekly.com decade. Questions have been asked about Duff McKagan is the founding bassist of how much of some of their show was Guns N’ Roses and the frontman of Seattle’s actually live. Questions have been asked Loaded. Read his column every Thursday at about them trying to capture some of that seattleweekly.com/reverb.

e

Thick Freakness Side Pony doubles the steak, packs the hot sauce.

»COLUMN

ometimes you go to a rock show because you just need to go. Rock and roll has gone through many phases over the years. But once in a while we’re left with bands that rise to the top, bands that stand all tests of time. Aerosmith and Cheap Trick are decidedly two of those bands, bands you just NEED to see every so often; if nothing else, to inspire and remind you of what is great about stripped-down rock music. Both bands played the Tacoma Dome last week, and after thinking of as many reasons as I could to get out of making that drive down south through gross traffic, there was nothing that could keep me from seeing Aerosmith and Cheap Trick. These two bands had an epic musical influence on my formative years. The bands that we formed later on in the early ’80s had a dose of these influences mixed with the aggression of punk rock. There was no one I

»THROUGH @ 2

THE SITUATION I’m lounging at Capitol Hill’s 611 Supreme with two of the bar’s regulars: Kristin Brewster, 26, is blonde and wears tight orange jeans; Dalisha Phillips, 28, sports braided hair and a striped minidress; both are drinking gin. Collectively, they represent the local hip-hop/R&B duo Side Pony. The girls went to the same high school in Kent, and they both played on the rugby team, but their friendship was slow to start because Brewster was crushing on Phillips’ boyfriend. “I was like, I’m just going to be friends with her, and she’s going to like me so much that she won’t be trying to get with my boyfriend anymore,” says Phillips. HOW THEY GOT HERE 10 years later, that old boyfriend’s been ditched and the girls are together all the time. They share an affinity for cooking, nail art, and toilet humor, and both work at Aki Kurose Middle School, Brewster running afterschool programs and Phillips in dropout prevention. Side Pony—the first musical venture for both—was started in January 2011. They describe the first song they wrote together as “witty and silly and raunchy.” SHOP TALK Those descriptors still apply to Side Pony’s fresh, sassy music. They recently released an eight-song EP called That Plus Weird, featuring Phillips’ upbeat, audacious rapping and Brewster’s honey-smooth singing, but their most notable release is a song over a year old called “Thicky Thick Anthem.” The track celebrates curvaceous women, yoga pants, and getting your grub on. “I had a hard time writing it at first,” says Phillips. “Everything I wrote was kind of hokey, and I didn’t want it sound like, ‘Oh yeah, this is a fat-girl jam.’ ” What’s the difference between a thick-girl anthem and a fat-girl jam? “One could really just promote taking ownership of sitting on the couch and eating all the time and never getting off the couch,” explains Phillips. “That’s not the direction we’re trying to go, because we’re not like that at all.” “No, we do Zumba,” says Brewster. BTW: There’s a massively entertaining “Thicky Thick Anthem” video that features the girls dancing in front of green screens of fried chicken, doughnuts, and stacks of buttery pancakes while Brewster sings about eating two steaks and Phillips raps about carrying condiments in her bag. “It’s definitely tongue-in-cheek,” says Brewster. “We don’t take ourselves so seriously that we’re like, ‘This is a revolution in music.’ But that’s still shit that came from our hearts; it’s real shit.” “But,” clarifies Phillips, “I do not have ranch and hot sauce in my purse right now.” E SIDE PONY With Continental Soldiers, Teeter Totter, Blvd Park. Comet Tavern, 922 E. Pike St., 322-9272. $7. 9 p.m. Fri., Aug. 17.

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music»TheShortList on mantra-like repetitions and wild-flaring solos to nowhere. For technical skill and showmanship, you can’t beat it; for songs, you’d do well to look elsewhere. With

Norah Jones SATURDAY, AUGUST 18

It would have been easy for Norah Jones to settle into a comfortable career of easy adult contemporary after the monster success of her jazzy debut album, 2002’s Come Away with Me, and for a few years she did, releasing three more critically acclaimed, soft-spoken records. But Jones has shown herself to have an adventurous spirit, collaborating over the years with OutKast and The Lonely Island, and after guesting on Danger Mouse’s 2011 spaghetti western album Rome, she decided to have him produce a record for her. The result is Little Broken Hearts, a collection of biting songs that Jones wrote about an acerbic breakup and that Danger Mouse turned into sharp and polished pop tracks. Jones’ dusky voice sounds the same, but she’s throwing daggers like “With you gone, I’m alive/Makes me feel like I took happy pills” and “Miriam/You know you done me wrong/I’m gonna smile when I take your life.” Smooth jazz this is not. Marymoor

Nightmare Fortress, Walking Papers, Grave Babies, Trash Fire. Linda’s Tavern, 707 E. Pine St., 325-1220. 6 p.m. Free. ERIC GRANDY

Three Mile Pilot MONDAY, AUGUST 20

Before there was Pinback and the Black Heart Procession, there was Three Mile Pilot. Comprising Pinback singer/bassist Armistead Burwell Smith IV and drummer Thomas Zinser as well as Black Heart Procession singer/guitarist Pall Jenkins, Three Mile Pilot are the ground zero for those bands’ brands of sleepwalking, softspoken, and heart-tugging San Diego indie rock. Three Mile Pilot may be less broadly successful than those bands—especially Pinback, with their insistently catchy and circular hooks—but they rightly have their own quietly ardent fans, and not just for having come first. Revived after a long hibernation with 2010’s The Inevitable Past is the Future Forgotten (and this year’s slightly lagging Maps EP), the band’s dour and driving sob rock proves as timely as ever.

Park, 6046 W. Lake Sammamish Parkway N.E., Redmond, 205-3661. 7 p.m. $44-$64. All ages. ERIN K. THOMPSON

KISS

With Dramady. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599. 9 p.m. $15. ERIC GRANDY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 18

It’s fitting that KISS is touring with Mötley Crüe, because KISS is basically to thank/ hate for making the careers of the Mötley Crües of the world viable. With their goofy stage makeup, troglodyte lyrics and rollicking guitars, KISS were total pussies compared to less gimmicky hard-rock acts, paving the way for guyliner hair metal acts to come along and make Gene Simmons & Co. look substantial by comparison. If a woman’s studies major wanted to capture misogyny in a bottle, this twin bill’s green room would be the place to do it. With

MIKE SEELY

Linda’s Fest

44

Linda’s Fest is a free evening concert in the parking lot behind Capitol Hill mainstay Linda’s Tavern. Now in its third year, this

summer’s lineup is headlined by Reignwolf, the one-man band who’s lately been taking Seattle’s rock establishment by storm. It’s not hard to see why: Reignwolf’s Jordan Cook shreds guitar, howls, and keeps time stomping a kick drum at his feet (or sometimes sitting behind a full kit). It’s a hell of a show, but it’s easy to feel like

Norah Jones: Older, wiser, fiercer.

there’s not much substance beyond the grunge-tinged, blues-based riffing. That’s because Reignwolf’s jams dispense almost entirely with pop song structure—verses, choruses, middle eights—to instead hone in

With the onslaught of seminal releases from 1987 being celebrated this year, we shouldn’t overlook the 25th anniversary of the Cult’s Electric. Detractors tend to lump them in with glitzy ‘80s hair bands, but the Cult has always had a style all their own, and they’ve never really gotten the props they deserve. And while Billy Duffy is guilty of “borrowing” a few riffs from Angus Young on Electric, the band’s early work (“She Sells Sanctuary,” anyone?) and the follow up to Electric, the more commercially successful Sonic Temple, managed to bridge the gap between hard rock and psychedelia with a sexy ease and an influence you can hear today in bands like Black Rebel Motorcycle Club and the Black Angels. With Murder of Crows. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877-784-4849. 8 p.m. $38.50. All ages. MA’CHELL DUMA LAVASSAR

*

EDITOR’S PICK

POLIÇA FRIDAY, AUGUST 17

GRAHAM TOLBERT

Seattle weekly • AU GU ST 15− 21, 2012

SATURDAY, AUGUST 18

TUESDAY, AUGUST 21

FRANK OCKENFELS

Mötley Crüe. White River Amphitheatre, 40601 Auburn-Enumclaw Rd., Auburn, 360-825-6200. 7 p.m. $30-$180. All ages.

The Cult

This Minneapolis electronic R&B quintet, barely a year old, is riding a big wave of buzz, but with all buzz follows backlash, and there are already complaints about the decidedly unorganic sound of their debut album Give You the Ghost—Channy Casselle’s vocals are Auto-Tuned on every single song. But in a recent interview with Vogue, Casselle explained that turning on the Auto-Tune was her way of completely switching gears after years of playing in the bluegrass band Roma di Luna with her ex-husband, stating, “It was a good way for me to forget all the habits I had acquired . . . I have this array of emotions now that I wouldn’t have normally and can sound scary and threatening in ways I wasn’t able to before.” The way that Casselle’s vocals slither over the band’s shadowy and muted rhythms only adds to the music’s creeping effect of conjuring up ghosts of past lives and ruined loves. With Supreme Cuts. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442. 8 p.m. $15. ERIN K. THOMPSON


Seattle we ekly • AUG U ST 15− 21, 2012

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seven»nights 513 N. 36th St., 632-0212, highdiveseattle.com. 9:30 p.m. $8 adv./$10 DOS. JOVANOTTI The term “world beat” was practically invented for the genre-bending stylings of Jovanotti. It’s the Italian songsmith’s delivery—one part worldly folkster, two parts Beat poet—that makes his music so special. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org. 9 p.m. $25. All ages. JR. CADILLAC This local group’s ’50s rock ’n’ roll sound is barely a throwback—it’s been together more than 40 years. With Lily Wilde, Barry Curtis. Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, thetripledoor.net. 8 p.m. $20. All ages. LOWMEN MARKOS This in-store performance doubles as the release party for the instrumental rock quartet’s sophomore record, Flames! Easy Street Records, 4558 California Ave. S.W., 938-3279, easystreetonline.com. 8 p.m. $5.

dinner & show

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sierra leone refugee all stars

Sunday, August 19 ALL DELIGHTED PEOPLE A benefit for the Fremont

Abbey Arts Center, this concert will feature performances of Sufjan Stevens songs by Shenandoah Davis and Josiah Johnson of The Head and the Heart. Triple Door. 8 p.m. $14 adv./$17 DOS. All ages. BRAIN TUMORS Appropriately, these Minneapolis hardcore punks have a song called “Dude Cancer.” With The Botherations, Totes Brute. JewelBox/ Rendezvous. 9 p.m. $5.

THU/AUGUST 16 • 7:30PM

rory block w/ son jack jr.

Monday, August 20 JIM ANDERSON

FRI/AUGUST 17 • 8PM AT THE NEPTUNE THEATRE!

eric johnson

coco montoya SAT/AUGUST 18 • 8PM

jr cadillac

Seattle weekly • AU GU ST 15− 21, 2012

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46

next • 8/19 all delighted people • 8/20 - 8/22 the deadliest instruments • 8/23 broad comedy • 8/24 kristin hersh • 8/25 craig shoemaker: the lovemaster

• 8/15 science! / soyaya • 8/16 peace / pereira duo / hot rod blues revue • 8/17 danny godinez / terry evans’ big city rollers • 8/18 vunt foom • 8/19 leif totusek & 1-2-3 • 8/20 free funk union w/ d’vonne lewis and adam kessler • 8/21 singer-songwriter showcase w/ thomas starks, margaux’s little ploy and alejandro garcia (of no rey) • 8/22 the gloria darlings / fawcett symons and fogg TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE

PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1.5 HOURS PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

thetripledoor.net 216 UNION STREET, SEATTLE 206.838.4333

BLICKY These local ’80s revivalists combine post-punk

and electronica. With Moose Portrait. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-7416, thecrocodile.com. 8 p.m. $5. All ages. COLD SPECKS Twenty-three-year-old London resident Al Spx’s Goth-influenced acoustic soul earned her a record deal with Mute/EMI at the beginning of the year. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, thebarboza.com. 8 p.m. $12.50. TUKTU This local four-piece plays moderately proggy indie rock. With Memory Thief. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880, sunsettavern.com. 9 p.m. $6.

Thursday, August 16 THE HONEYCUTTERS Hailing from western North

Carolina, this honky-tonk duo released its sophomore album, When Bitter Met Sweet, earlier this year. With Aaron Zig. Conor Byrne, 5140 Ballard Ave. N.W., 7843640, conorbyrnepub.com. 9 p.m. $8. LYRICS BORN In his formative years in the Bay Area, this funk-influenced MC collaborated with Blackalicious and DJ Shadow. With The Night Cappers. The Crocodile. T H I S CO D E 8 p.m. $14. All ages. TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE

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THE SPINNING WHIPS

This local rock group recently played a show with FOR MORE CONCERTS OR VISIT Detroit cult rock band The seattleweekly.com Sights. With Gibraltar, Soggy Loggins and the Log Jam Band. Sunset Tavern. 9 p.m. $6. ANDROID HERO This three-piece plays pounding, breakneck punk songs with names like “Adolf Coors, Beer Nazi.” With XSUNS, A God Or Another, Noise A Tron. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, chopsuey.com. 8 p.m. $7.

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Cold Specks visits Barboza on Wednesday, Aug. 15.

elements of electronica and noise music. With The Funeral And the Twilight, XY Beautiful. Funhouse, 206 Fifth Ave. N., 374-8400, thefunhouseseattle.com. 9:30 p.m. $5. HIGHLIGHT BOMB This local punk group’s most recent release is Finals, its third album. Comet Tavern, 922 E. Pike St., 322-9272, comettavern.com. 9 p.m.

Friday, August 17 CREEPING TIME Active since 1997, this modern

bluegrass group once released a live album recorded at the same venue where it will play this show. With Dead Crew Oddwood, Renegade Stringband. Conor Byrne. 9 p.m. $8. DANA FALCONBERRY This Austin, Texas, songwriter’s orchestral folk-pop has earned high praise from the likes of No Depression and PopMatters. With Margaux’s Little Ploy, Steven Nielson. JewelBox/ Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., 441-5823, jewelbox theater.com. 10 p.m. $5. DIAMOND RINGS The solo project of Canadian multimedia artist John O’Regan, Diamond Rings released its debut album, Special Affections, last year. Barboza. 7 p.m. $12. LOVE BATTERY Live performances are rare for this first-wave grunge band, which has yet to release an album in this millennium. With Absolute Monarchs, Wayfinders. Mural Amphitheatre, 305 Harrison St., 684-7200, seattlecenter.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. All ages. THE WALKING PAPERS Duff McKagan and Mike McCready—veterans of Guns N’ Roses and Pearl Jam, respectively—bring their band to Slim’s for an after-work special that benefits The Heroes Project, a nonprofit that brings wounded veterans to the top of the world’s highest peaks. All this evening’s proceeds help pay for single-amputee Marine Kionte Storey’s trip up Mount Vinson in Antarctica. Slim’s Last Chance Chili, 5606 First Avenue S., 762-7900, slimslastchance.com, 6 p.m., $15.

Saturday, August 18 AMDEF The fifth annual Art. Music. Dance.

Entertainment. Fashion. show will feature belly dancing, body piercing, a fetish fashion show, and performances by Billy the Fridge, the Staxx Brothers, and more. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, neumos.com. 6 p.m. $15. CONTINENTAL SOLDIERS It’s hard to say what’s more disquieting about this rap-rock group: its aggressive sound or that Comic Sans is the body font on its Myspace page. With Fictionist, The Hugs. High Dive,

GIOVANNI STEFANO GHIDINI

FRI/AUGUST 17 • 8PM

Wednesday, August 15

CIRCUIT VINE This local experimental duo combines

Jovanotti plays the Neptune on Saturday, Aug. 18.

Tuesday, August 21 INKBLOT True to its name, this Michigan group plays

abstract, electronica-tinged dream-pop that’s open to interpretation. With Falling Up Stairs, Manhole. High Dive. 8 p.m. $6. LEE RITENOUR This Grammy-winning jazz guitarist will release a new album in September with guest appearances by the likes of Chick Corea and George Duke. With Dave Grusin. Jazz Alley, 2033 Sixth Ave., 441-9729, jazzalley.com. 7:30 p.m. $28.50. All ages. MTNS This trio (whose name was formerly spelled “MOUNTAINSS”) plays chaotic, jazz-influenced noise rock. With Stickers, Pony Time. Chop Suey. 8 p.m. Free.


music»Karaoke

KaraoKeKorrespondent » by jeff roman

Karaoke Listings ATLANTIC CROSSING 6508 Roosevelt Way N.E., 729-6266,

theatlanticcrossing.com. Free. Mondays, 9 p.m.

BOXCAR ALEHOUSE 3407 Gilman Ave. W.,

286-6000. Free. Thursdays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.

BUSH GARDEN 614 Maynard Ave. S., 682-6830, bush

garden.net. Free. Sundays, 5 p.m.; Mondays–Thursdays, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m. FOURNO’S GREEK RESTAURANT 4733 University Way N.E., 729-5195. Free. Tuesdays, 10 p.m. INDUSTRY LOUNGE 6601 E. Marginal Way S., 762-3453, myspace.com/206industrylounge. Free. Sundays, 9 p.m. KATE’S PUB 309 N.E. 45th St., 547-6832. Free. Wednesdays, 10 p.m. MARCO POLO BAR & GRILL 5613 Fourth Ave. S., 7623964, marcopolopub.com. Free. Fridays–Saturdays, 9 p.m. R PLACE 619 E. Pine St., 322-8828, rplaceseattle.com. Free. Mondays, Tuesdays, Sundays, 9 p.m. ROOSEVELT ALE HOUSE 8824 Roosevelt Way, 527-5480, rooseveltalehouse.com. Free. Thursdays, 9 p.m.

Power Station

It had been almost two years since my buddy Tim first told me that Medin’s Ravioli Station on Leary Way hosted a karaoke night. I live just two miles away and stopped in for lunch a couple times when they first opened back in the ‘90s. And from what I remembered, I couldn’t imagine there being fun, party-time karaoke going on in that quaint little restaurant. Last week, after a couple beers at the Sunset and three Bombay Sapphire sodas and a Headbutt at the Eastlake Bar & Grill, I finally walked into what is now known as Ravioli Station Trainwreck crocked and ready to sing around 10 p.m. This place is nothing like what it was: It’s been transformed into a bar, and a pretty ghetto one at that. I fell in love with it instantly. There was a younger crowd of about a dozen

people who filled in the small, triangular room nicely. KJ Sweet Leo kept the sixsinger rotation moving along steadily. It was the first time I’d set foot in a karaoke bar in almost two weeks. Within that time I had five rehearsals and two real gigs with the band I’m in. My confidence was at an all-time high, and I felt I delivered my first number, Spandau Ballet’s “True,” at such a professional level that I was ready to call it a night. But it was too good a crowd to bail on. These two gals, Jackie and Kathleen, sang at least 15 songs between them during the time I was there. Every other song was either them doing a solo or a duet with someone, and they seemed most inspired when delivering country selections. For my second offering I tried a newer number (a song released within the past 15 years), “Answering

Bell” by Ryan Adams. It was a simple enough arrangement, but Adams’ pitch is way above my range, so I ended up sounding very “karaoke.” The pick was too obscure for the audience, and I ended up losing them. The other male performers, Sweet Leo included, weren’t the best vocalists, but they did go all-out with every song they performed and received a lot of love for their effort—especially this guy named Peter, who attempted “The Warrior” by Patty Smyth and Scandal and got his ass completely handed to him. The best random cut sung by a dude was “Valerie” by the Zutons. I stuck to my most proven stuff for the rest of the night, and sang a redeeming rendition of Springsteen’s “Thunder Road” that brought high-fives all around. After midnight my friend Cisco arrived, and he and Sweet Leo capped off the night with awesome duets of “After the Love Has Gone” by Earth, Wind & Fire and “I’ll Be There” by the Jackson 5. E karaoke@seattleweekly.com RAVIOLI STATION TRAINWRECK 4620 Leary Way N.W., 789-6680, BALLARD

Send events to karaoke@seattleweekly.com

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I began answering your question in a responsible, journalistic manner, e-mailing a therapist I know, thinking he might have some insights for the Asperger’s-afflicted dater. He laughed (well, as much as you can via e-mail) and said that he’d been so oblivious to her signals that the last woman he dated had to inform him, “You don’t seem to understand—if you come over, I promise you’ll get laid.”

So see—a mental-health professional is as clueless as you! I am not downplaying your dilemma at all, believe me. I know you’re operating at a distinct disadvantage here, but you are not alone. I mean, even Olympics super-stud Ryan Lochte said (not to me), “If I could have one superpower, I’d be like Mel Gibson in What Women Want, where he reads women’s minds.” (Note to Ryan Lochte: If they are heterosexual, they are thinking they want to see you naked. You’re welcome.) We ladies are mysterious, multilayered creatures, capable of changing our minds on a moment’s notice, but here are some signals that a woman might be interested—she’ll touch your arm or shoulder (but probably not your cock) when making a point. Her pupils may dilate. She may blush. Or she may do none of these things and still wish you’d kiss her. Or not. I think your idea of verbalizing is a sound one, and I agree that asking can sound a little wimpy, so instead of asking, make it a statement—something along the lines of “I want to kiss you so fucking bad right now.” That’s hot, and it’s not a question. And if you get rejected, so what? It happens to everyone. You’ll also find that as women get older and figure out that men are kind of clueless (usually after a birthday gift of Nintendo and poly-blend crotchless panties), they’re more apt to tell you what they want and need. E dategirl@seattleweekly.com WANT MORE? Listen to Judy on The Mike & Judy Show on the Heritage Radio Network, follow her tweets@DailyDategirl, visit dategirl.net, or buy her new book, The Official Book of Sex, Drugs and Rock ’n’ Roll Lists.

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Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 Easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: Roommates.com

HOT Guys! HOT Chat! HOT Fun! Try FREE! Call 888-779-2789. Adoption: Active Doctors, Playful Pups, LOVE & Laughter, Stay Home Parent Yearns for 1st Baby. Expenses Paid. Brent & Keri 1-888-411-0530 MEET HOT LOCAL MEN Listen to ads FREE! 206-877-0877 Use FREE code 5831, 18+ EroticEncounters.com Where Hot Girls Share their private fantasies! Instant Connections. Fast & Easy. Mutual Satisfaction Guaranteed. Exchange messages, Talk live 24/7, Private 1-on-1. Give in to Temptation, call now 1-888-700-8511

HELP WANTED!! Extra income!

Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram.com

Seattle weekly • AU GU ST 15− 21, 2012

Get paid for giving infertile couples the chance to have a baby. Women 21-31 and in good health are encouraged to apply. Compensation up to $4,500.

Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800-925-7945

BANKRUPTCY from $299

52

New! Increased Compensation for 1st Time Egg Donors!

undercover clients to judge quality/ customer service. Earn up to $150 a day. Call (888)912-6030

ANNA'S MED HEALTH SPADeep tissue, Relaxing,Chinese healing massage. 425-747-2288 10Am-10Pm 1550 140th Avenue NE, Suite 200 Bellevue Cannabinoid Therapy for Chronic Pain Customized Treatment From a Cannabis Expert www.CascadiaNaturalHealth.com; 425-486-1858

Living Elements Landscaping

Living Elements Landscaping cares about the communities we work, live and play in. We're all about locals helping locals. Encouraging our neighbors to live sustainable lives is something we enjoy doing everyday. That's why special consideration is given to the natural shapes and forms of your landscape to ensure a balanced job that delicately weighs the relationship between well-kept and naturally lush. Some of the other services we offer include hardscaping, planting, pressure washing, fence building and clean up. Our expert staff is professional, hard working and always on-time. Operating out of the Eastside and in West Seattle. Call Today! (425) 466-5981 Movie Extras Make up to $300/day. No Experience required. All looks and ages. Call (866) 339-0331

DONATE YOUR CAR! Tax Write-off/Fast Pickup Running or not. Cancer Fund Of America. (888) 269-6482 Singing Lessons FreeTheVoiceWithin.com Janet Kidder 206-781-5062 Donate Your Car, Truck or Motorcycle! Support Big Brothers Big Sisters of Puget Sound FREE PICK UP OF MOST USED VEHICLES Tax Deductible. (206) 248-5982

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 Cash4car.com

Private Investigator Butler Investigations 206-257-0552

BECOME A BARTENDER! Up to $300 a day. No exp necessary. Training Courses Available. 1-800-965-6520 x 309.

Forum on Marriage Equality August 30, 7 PM

Queen Anne UMC’s welcome statement includes sexual orientation because we know that the LGBTQI community has been especially unwelcome in Christian communities. On August 30, we will explore how Christianscan participate in the effort to support marriage equality and also improve public discourse with clear headed thinking paired with kind but clear language. Special guest Rep. Jamie Pederson will be speaking.

QAUMC.org/the-well

7th Annual Hoquiam On Track Art Festival Celebrating the importance of arts in our community,

August 25-26, 10-6 Saturday & 10-4 Sunday. Local and regional artists - Live entertainment - Workshops with various artists - Something for everyone! Come down and visit us for the weekend and enjoy great art 8th and Levee, Hoquiam, WA. Cityofhoquiam.com/fest_otaf/

TRAVEL TODAY and GET PAID! $500 Sign-on Bonus! Seeking Motivated Guys/Gals. Adventurous Fun Environment. Commission Sales. Lacey 888-451-9904

The Green Skunk The Best Meds at the Best Prices!

Buy 1oz @ Reg Price Get the 2nd @ $150

Buy 1/2oz @ Reg Price Get the 2nd @ $75

Must have this coupon to redeem this deal.

We offer delivery 7 days a week!

WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

HAPPYHAULER.com

Debris Removal • 206-784-0313 • Credit Cards Accepted!

Call today to place your delivery order! 206.417.1973

11231 Roosevelt Way NE • Seattle, WA 98125 TheGreenSkunk206@gmail.com • www.thegreenskunk.com In compliance with RCW 69.15A theSandsOnline.com

Seattle Weekly, August 15, 2012  

August 15, 2012 edition of the Seattle Weekly

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