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OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 I VOLUME 37 I NUMBER 40

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM I FREE


ALCHEMY C O L L E C T I O N S

Seattle weekly • OCTOBER 3−9, 2012

M O D E R N

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BeGiNs Next Week stGPresents.org 877-stG-4tix tickets available through tickets.com and select ticketmaster locations.

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OCtOBeR 10 – NOvemBeR 17 the PARAmOuNt theAtRe

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Most eyeglasses are made and distributed by just a few giant “evil empire” companies. Eyes on Fremont is taking a stand against this. When you buy glasses from Eyes on Fremont, know that you are supporting small independent companies. PROFILE # 13

Sinclair Malcolm WHAT DO YOU DO? Owner/ Halo Salon HOW DO YOU FIGHT EVIL? With Style

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inside»   October 3—9, 2012 VOLUME 37 | NUMBER 40 » SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

»11

JOIN US FOR A DANSKO CUSTOMER APPRECIATION NIGHT! OCTOBER 11, 4 - 8PM Enjoy refreshments while our Dansko representative shows you all of the new Fall Dansko styles. We will also have gifts with purchase and you can enter to win a free pair of shoes! »27

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up front

in back

7 NEWS

17 THE WEEKLY WIRE

THE DAILY WEEKLY | Nina Shapiro

reports on the Eastside’s ambitious— maybe too ambitious—PAC project.

11 FEATURE

BY JOE ESKENAZI | Bleacher Report—

a website built on crap journalism, amateur writing, hyperbolic headlines, and lists, lists, lists—is now the #3 source for online sports news. And it’s making millions.

reverb monthly

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18 ARTS

18 | OPENING NIGHTS | A musty mystery

and a Putin-era fairytale. 20 | EAR SUPPLY | Stalin in sound. 23 | THE FUSSY EYE | Farewell to Western Bridge.

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Unmistakably... One to Two Carat Diamonds set in Platinum. Open seven days a week.

24 | THIS WEEK’S ATTRACTIONS

Tim Burton’s return to (animated) form, gay romance, and a ’90s rocker reunion.

27 FOOD

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Once again Seattle Weekly overtakes Ballard with Reverb, the city’s biggest all-local music festival, this Saturday, October 6. Find a complete list of acts and venues inside—not to mention John Roderick’s invaluable advice to a few select performers. Also, fill your schedule with a show a day from our concert calendar, and read reviews of every local record release. The madness begins following page 18.

Assassins in India, rivalry at the Clink, and a revolution in Russia.

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27 | MIYABI SUSHI | A bit out of the way,

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news»The Daily Weekly »Dispatches from our news blog

Tateuchi and Go in Bellevue

The ambitious effort to bring a $160 million performing-arts center to the east banks of Lake Washington ran into the Great Recession’s headwinds. Was it a fatal blow?

O

rubbing a hand against the wood. The fabric on the seats is to be designed with a pattern inspired by a plant that grows alongside local creeks. When the interior designer visited, Haynes explains, she left with the feeling that Bellevue wasn’t a typical city with a park in it, it was a park with a city in it. So her designs draw from nature, like a colorful rug that is meant to evoke a forest floor. At the same time, Haynes says, the designs pay homage to the Eastside’s high-tech community. Decorative trim on the walls is meant to mimic a circuit board.

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Huge pictures in the presentation center imagine performances to come. “There will be nothing in King County like it,” Haynes says, referring to the variety of acts planned for the facility. “There could be Willie Nelson one night and the Seattle Symphony the next.” The concept was born of the long-standing belief that the Eastside no longer constitutes merely a bedroom community for Seattle, but is rather a “very large metropolitan area” in its own right, says Bellevue investor and Tateuchi board chair Peter Horvitz. Not only does the region deserve its own major arts center, Horvitz says, but worsening traffic— and now tolls—have made it harder for Eastsiders to get to Seattle venues. In fact, research shows that Seattle arts institutions have been losing Eastside audience members at a rate of about 10 percent a year—which is why organizations like the Seattle Symphony and PNB embraced an Eastside venue as a way to recapture that audience, according to Horvitz. In 2002, Freeman kicked off a campaign

» Continued on page 9

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n Nov. 1, the city of Bellevue is expected to issue building permits for an ambitious new performance space called the Tateuchi Center. The city received 900 pages of blueprints for the facility, which is to hold a 2,000-seat concert hall plus an intimate cabaret venue, and intends to attract “world-class” performers, including the Seattle Symphony and the Pacific Northwest Ballet. The Tateuchi Center has already drawn national press attention. Last year, The New York Times wrote about the organization’s planned policy of allowing audience members to text, tweet, and access Facebook during shows. Yet when exactly the center will be built—or even if it will be built at all—remains in question. After a decade of fundraising, the center still has nearly $100 million to raise to meet its $160 million target. Even with prominent backers, most notably Bellevue real-estate magnate Kemper Freeman, fundraising has been painfully slow. “It’s like trying to sail a sailboat directly into a gale,” concedes executive director John Haynes. Over the past year, the center has cut operating expenses in half, according to an e-mail Haynes sent to supporters this summer, obtained by Seattle Weekly. Though Haynes once led a staff of 10, that’s now down to three, including himself. “They keep thanking us for keeping the faith,” says Janis Wold, former secretary of a fundraising volunteer “guild” for the center. But, she says, doing that “is getting harder.” One day last week, Haynes showed off an architectural rendering and other displays of the planned facility meant to keep the faith alive. The presentation center is located inside the Hyatt Regency in downtown Bellevue, where the Tateuchi Center is slated to be built. An entrance to the facility is actually planned for inside the Hyatt, at one end of the hotel’s plush lobby. Behind this rendering is a room containing seats like those planned for the concert hall. “They’ll be made from cherry,” Haynes says,

By NiNa Shapiro

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8

Seattle weekly • OCTOBER 3−9, 2012


news» a million dollars. That meant putting its two fundraising guilds on “temporary inactive status,” according to Haynes’ recent letter to supporters. The guilds had put on special to build the Performing Arts Center Eastevents for potential donors, like candlelight side (PACE), as the concept was then called, dinners. While scuttling fundraising efforts in by donating the $8 million parcel of land order to raise more money might seem counadjacent to the Hyatt. A $6 million donation terintuitive, Haynes says that the events took from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation many months of planning and netted maybe spurred further planning, including the hir$150,000 or $200,000 apiece. Even supposing ing of Norm Pfeiffer, a Los Angeles architect that an event could clear $500,000, he says, with roots on the Eastside. “I would need 199 special events” to make Pfeiffer had worked with Haynes on the the math work. “We’d be done in a hundred building of a $70 million arts center at the years.” University of Notre Dame. Haynes says it was The move deflated some supporters, Pfeiffer who recommended him to the PACE though. “I was very disappointed when the board. Haynes not only built the Notre Dame guilds were put on hiatus,” says Wold, who facility from the ground up, but had previhad organized one dinner for 400. She says ously served as president of an arts center in she understands that the center might need San Diego County, Calif., and before that as a a different fundraising strategy, but she executive at CBS. wonders whether it has yet hit upon a winHe arrived in Bellevue in 2007. The recession, of course, was hot on his tail—the reason ning formula. “It’s been a while and nothing’s happened,” she says. She notes that he and Tateuchi board members give for the the center “was supposed to be open by stalled progress despite the Eastside’s abunnow,” but the date for dance of wealthy potengroundbreaking “has tial donors. “They’re been a moving target.” dealing with the kind of Print is great, but if you want to see why . . . Indeed, while the anxiety they’ve never Portland thinks peanut butter-and-jelly Times and other media dealt with before,” sandwiches are racist, you’ll have to have reported that Haynes says of the milcheck out The Daily Weekly. the center is currently lionaires and billionaires SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM/DAILYWEEKLY scheduled to open in he’s asked for money. 2014, Haynes, ques“I’ve had people say to tioned about a realistic timetable, says he me, ‘I’m afraid that Spain is going to bring won’t give a target date anymore. He mainthe entire banking system down.’ A month tains that 2014 is possible. Asked whether before that, it was Greece. Before that, it was it’s also possible that the effort might fail, he Italy.” At the same time, he says such people says, “I suppose it’s conceivable.” are focused on keeping arts institutions they Some, including Wold, wonder whether already contribute to alive through the recesHaynes should continue at the helm, given sion rather than building an entirely new the slow progress and his high salary— organization. roughly $250,000 a year. But Horvitz says Even so, a wealthy widow named Ina the board remains satisfied with Haynes, and Tateuchi gave the project its most significant recently renewed his contract. The businesspledge—$25 million—in 2010, also resultman says fundraising is as much the board’s ing in a name change for the planned center. responsibility as Haynes’. Tateuchi and her late husband, businessman Board member Jim Hebert admits he’s Atsuhiko Tateuchi, had lived for many years had his doubts about the feasibility of such an in Japan, where cities support “dozens” of expensive project. A few years ago, he says, he arts institutions apiece, according to Tateuchi voiced the idea that the board should scale back Foundation administrator Dan Asher. the concept. “Other trustees disagreed with me,” he says, adding that he came “We recognize we have to— to the conclusion that they were right. I’m going to say in the next “The fact that we have weathered the Recession and stayed the course” year—make some major Great makes him optimistic, he says. progress that shows we can Horvitz also says he remains optiget this done.” mistic. He asserts that the $63 million raised so far “is the largest amount ever raised for an Eastside project.” Of that $63 million, $12 million has already Jim Tune, the former CEO of ArtsFund, gone toward development costs. the grant-making group, says he thought the At the same time, Horvitz concedes that Tateuchi gift would be similar to the one “this is where the rubber meets the road. given the Seattle Symphony by Jack Benaroya, Everything else is done except raising the which triggered other multimillion-dollar money.” And fundraising, he says, “can’t go on donations and jump-started the orchestra’s forever,” adding that some Eastsiders already campaign for a new concert hall. But more wonder whether the project can raise the gifts of that magnitude did not materialize. kind of money it needs, and are reluctant to In the past couple of years, Haynes says, the Tateuchi Center has raised “a couple of million contribute until they see more headway. “We recognize we have to—I’m going to say in the dollars a year, which is great if you’re running next year—make some major progress that a theater, but not if you’re trying to build one.” shows we can get this done.” E A year ago, the board decided to focus all its efforts on chasing donations of more than nshapiro@seattleweekly.com

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ast year, sportswriter King Kaufman stepped up to the lectern at a symposium held on the Google campus. In his 14-year haul at Salon.com, Kaufman earned a reputation as one of the best and most cerebral sports journalists on the Internet. But his subject that day was his new job, improving the content quality at Bleacher Report—an outfit with a reputation almost directly opposite Kaufman’s own. The San Francisco–based site is an aggressively growing online giant, tapping the oceanic labor pool of thousands of unpaid sports fanatics typing on thousands of keyboards. Launched in 2008, Bleacher Report meteorically rose to become one of the nation’s most popular websites, and one of the three most-visited sports sites. Its dramatic success came via valuing site growth and page views over any semblance of journalistic “quality” or even readability. Operating a sports website on a supply-and-demand model turns out just as one would expect: High-trafficking Bleacher Report articles include “25 Wardrobe Malfunctions in Sports,” “The 20 Biggest Criers in Sports,” and “10 Possible Tiger Woods Porn Spin-offs: Mistress Edition.” The site quickly earned a rep for expertly employing the Google search engine to inundate it with content—a lot of which, Kaufman admitted to the audience, was “lowest-common-denominator crap, and horrible.” His task was to alter this perception of the company. But this was not due to any sense of embarrassment or a latenight visit to the site’s brass by the Ghost of Journalistic Standards Past. Like almost every move the company makes, this was a business decision. And a smart one. “This was not a decision made by the CEO, who got tired of his friends saying at parties, ‘Boy, Bleacher Report is terrible,’ ” Kaufman continued. “Bleacher Report reached a point where it couldn’t make the next level of deal, where whatever company says ‘We’re not putting our logo next to yours because you’re publishing crap.’ OK, that’s the market speaking.” Several thousand miles away, Bleacher Report’s hiring of Kaufman and a platoon of professional writers—but continued reliance upon an unpaid cast of thousands—was interpreted differently. During a meeting in New York City, an executive at one of the nation’s largest sports-media companies quipped that Bleacher Report’s new strategy was akin to spritzing a little room deodorizer after leaving a steaming deposit in the toilet and failing to flush. An attendee recalls everyone laughing uproariously. In August, Turner Broadcasting announced it was quite willing to put its logo next to Bleacher Report’s, scooping up the website for a purported $200

Churns out crap stories.

Uses hyperbolic headlines.

Doesn’t pay writers.

Makes millions.

5

It is the future. Michael Waraksa

The Top

Reasons Bleacher Report

million. Bleacher Report has joined The Huffington Post in the exclusive club of Web properties that convert free, crowdsourced content into nine-digit paydays. The transaction was not just a valuation, but a validation. “Information has become more important than the source of information,” says Michael Hall, director of new media for the New England Sports Network. In today’s world, information is money—and few move information faster or more efficiently than Bleacher Report and its roughly 6,000 contributors. “They understand, probably better than any media outlet today, the exact value generated for them for every monthly unique visitor, every page view served,” continues Hall. “They understand that revenue impact better than anyone out there. Better than we do.” Every media entity questioning the wisdom of throwing down $200 million for Bleacher Report, notes Hall, is already co-opting the tricks mastered by Bleacher Report. “It’s here to stay,” he adds, “because it’s what people want.” No one is laughing anymore.

N

o single narrative encapsulates the ascent of Bleacher Report, a site that churns out around 800 articles a day penned by 2,000 “core contributors.” The site is as polarizing as it is popular. And it is very popular. In August, some 14.2 million users visited it. Astronomical page-view numbers have translated into loads of advertising revenue—media reports peg the site as on pace to gross $30 million to $40 million this year. It could be argued that Bleacher Report’s success is a 21st-century iteration of the American Dream. Four 20-something sports nuts, friends since they attended the elite Menlo School in Atherton, Calif., quit their jobs in 2007 to found a sports website written by the fans, for the fans. In doing so, they harnessed the energy of the legions of sports enthusiasts who otherwise would have been yammering on call-in radio or laboring on obscure blogs and message boards, and

bundled this labor into a platform that could be backed by advertising dollars. The site’s deft use of search-engine optimization (SEO)—the tweaking of content and coding to increase online visibility—propelled its unpaid amateur writers’ fare to the top of Google’s search-engine results, placing it on equal footing with original work created by established journalistic outlets. It’s a rare sports-related Google search that doesn’t feature a Bleacher Report article among the top results. And once readers click onto Bleacher Report, they stick there—visitors are besieged with applications to subscribe to team-specific newsletters or mobile applications or drawn into click-happy slide shows, polls, or other user-engaging devices that rack up massive page views per visit (to date, a slide show titled “The 20 Most Boobtastic Athletes of All Time” has amassed 1.4 million views).

By Joe Eskenazi

Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3− 9, 2012

Is the Most successful WebsIte of All tIMe!

» Continued on page 12 11


Bleacher Report » fRom page 11 Every publication has produced its share of jarringly bad writing. Yet Bleacher Report, powered by thousands of hobbyists and publishing more stories in an hour than many sites produce in a year, has lapped the field. The following excerpts of raw copy were all retrieved from the 2011 diary of a bewildered Bleacher Report copy editor: • “From 2001 to 2008, we all know that Matt Millen, the GM of the Detroit Lions, were the worst in NFL history. Much to the instability from the coaching staff were the constant drafting of players who obviously could not play. This slide show is but a simple look at how sad our drafting process was in that 8 year span.” • “An assessment over the last decade illustrates that last season was an irregularity, as many greenhorns fail to sustain success in their rookie campaigns. Despite this evidence, an affinity for adolescent ballplayers

Web with inexpensive user-generated content. They continue to wither while Bleacher Report amasses readers and advertisers alike. But while critics’ lamentations may be increasingly irrelevant, they’re hardly unfounded. Perhaps uniquely among journalistic entities, Bleacher Report has a “blanket policy” forbidding its writers from seeking and breaking news. A dictum on the site states: “While we don’t doubt that some B/R writers have contacts they know and trust, a problem arises when we’re asked to take a leap of faith that those sources are both legitimate and accurate.” Bleacher Report is designed to engage in the far more lucrative practice of pouncing on news broken by others, deploying its legions of writers to craft articles—or better yet, multipage slide shows—linking to its own voluminous archives, and supplanting the original stories in the Google rankings. Breaking a story is no longer valuable: Owning it is. Bleacher Report declined to answer questions about this—or anything else. After weeks of entreaties to the site’s publicity agency, we were informed that all the higher-ups at both Bleacher Report and Turner whom we’d requested, by name, to interview were “unavailable at this time.” (We did speak to several dozen current and former Bleacher Report writers and editors, many of whom requested anonymity due to fear of retribution.) Bleacher Report’s leaders, however, are often rather candid about the company’s goals and values. “Our approach is to really pay attention to what consumers are looking for. There is a notion of consumer demand that any company needs to be mindful of,” Bleacher Report CEO Brian Grey told SI.com. “If you can pay attention to what people are looking for and use that intelligence to produce content that people are looking to consume, from our perspective, that’s kind of where digital media is going.” Yet Bleacher Report does far more than just “pay attention.”

Bleacher Report “is ‘made-to-order news.’ They’ll make up whatever people search for. This is custom-manufactured garbage. It is being mass-produced. This is a dumbing-down of the Web.”

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remains a universal affection among fantasy users. There are several arguments to explain why this empathy exists.” • “Beasley still gets his average of just over five rebounds per game, but the Timberwolves do not ask him to circumcise his game by staying in the blocks the way Miami did.” Not surprisingly, critics from traditional journalistic outlets continue to knock Bleacher Report as a dystopian wasteland where increasingly attention-challenged readers slog through troughs of half-baked word-gruel, inexpertly mixed by novice chefs. Whatever, grandpa. After denigrating and downplaying the influence of the Internet for decades, many legacy media outlets now find themselves outmaneuvered by defter and Web-savvier entities like Bleacher Report, a young company engineered to conquer the Internet. In the days of yore, professional media outlets enjoyed a monopoly on information. Trained editors and writers served as gatekeepers deciding what stories people would read, and the system thrived on massive influxes of advertising dollars. That era has gone, and the Internet has flipped the script. In one sense, readers have never had it so good—the glut of material on the Web translates into more access to great writing than in any prior era. The challenge is sifting through the crap to find it. Most mainstream media outlets are unable or unwilling to compete with a site like Bleacher Report, which floods the

O

ne of the great ironies of Bleacher Report is that a site essentially founded on the mantra “for the fans” operates via an extremely regimented top-down system. While nearly every major publication now has an SEO maven on board, Bleacher Report employs

» Continued on page 14


Clarence Acox Tribute w/ Garfield Jazz Band Lorraine Feather & Russell Ferrante Danilo Perez/Andy Clausen’s Wishbone Ab Baars & Ig Henneman Luciana Souza/Dave Peck Matthew Shipp/Trio X: New York is NOW Jon Hamar Tatsuya Nakatani Bettye LaVette Human Spirit Vijay Iyer Trio/Cuong Vu’s Triggerfish Evan Flory-Barnes, Featured Artist Nik Bärtsch’s Ronin Phil Dadson Paul de Barros George Colligan Buster Williams/Ernie Watts w/ Marc Seales Arga Bileg Lionel Loueke/Dos y Mas Gregoire Maret Bobby Previte’s Silent Way Project Royal Room Conduction Music Ensemble B’shnorkestra/Neil Welch Elina Duni Quartet w/ Colin Vallon Anat Cohen Jake Shimabukuro Tony Malaby's Tamarindo/Shuffleboil Tom Varner Philip Glass w/ Foday Musa Suso JD Allen Jaap Blonk Susan Pascal’s Soul Sauce Rupa & The April Fishes Staff Benda Bilili Chris Lightcap’s Bigmouth/Kate Olson & Naomi Siegel Sumi Tonooka Christian Scott Bandalabra Halloween Party w/ ODAT Band v.2 Mundell Lowe & Mike Magnelli Roosevelt & Ballard Jazz Bands Murl Allen Sanders w/ Warren Rand Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra w/ Branford Marsalis Robert Glasper Experiment

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Evan Flory-Barnes photo by Daniel Sheehan

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an entire analytics team to comb through reams of data, determining who wants to read what, and when, at an almost granular level. In this way, the site can determine the ideal times to post certain types of stories— thus meeting a demand that doesn’t yet exist, but will. Reverse-engineering content to fit a prewritten headline is a Bleacher Report staple. “The analytics team basically says, ‘Hey, we think this is going to be trending, these eight to 10 terms will be trending in the next couple of days,’ ” says a former editor for the site. “We say thank you, and we as editors come up with the headlines and pass those on to writers to write the content.” Methodically crafting a data-driven, SEOfriendly headline and then filling in whatever words justify it has been a smashing success for Bleacher Report. But it’s a long way from any quaint notions of “journalism.” This has been, however, standard practice for content farms such as Demand Media. Danny Sullivan, the editor of SearchEngineLand.com, notes that Bleacher Report’s CFO, Drew Atherton, held a similar position at Demand Media. Sullivan also mentions that Yahoo! analyzed its own search data and used it to reverse-engineer content. Prior to serving as Bleacher Report’s CEO, Grey held the top position at Yahoo! Sports. (Yes, the Web version of Seattle Weekly has on occasion dogpiled on breaking stories, and published the sort of lists and slide shows commonly seen on the Web. And we have undoubtedly engaged in aggressive online practices in hopes of pushing our content and getting page views.) Bleacher Report “is ‘made-to-order news.’ They’ll make up whatever people search for,” says Vivek Wadhwa, a researcher and tech columnist for Bloomberg BusinessWeek and The Washington Post. The triumph of Bleacher Report, he continues, is the natural outcome of gauging success and profitability based on Google-derived clicks. “This is custom-manufactured garbage. It is being mass-produced. This is a dumbing-down of the Web.” And that leads to another great irony of Bleacher Report. A site laden with so much content even its own writers and editors decry as “stupid” is expertly run by some of the smartest executives on the Web. Transforming data into editorial directives, as Grey stated, “is kind of where digital media is going.” Bleacher Report is already there.

T

he next David Halberstam, Bill Simmons, or A.J. Liebling may well be toiling as an unpaid, lower-level Bleacher Report contributor. But he or she will never climb the site’s chain of “reputation levels” without garnering page views—the currency of success at Bleacher Report. Writers are divided into six ranks ranging from “contributor” to “chief writer,” with ascending subdivisions of each plateau (I, II, and III). Earning a promotion to “chief writer I” earns a writer a free Bleacher Report sweatshirt. He or she will also receive less tangible, but far more consequential, perks, such as access to plum spots on the site or within team newsletters, and mandated deference from copy editors. Writers earn “medals” for high-trafficking or much-commented articles and “badges” based on monthly performance numbers. Along with a running page-view count, these plaudits are visually represented on a writer’s profile page. Medals are delineated into seven “gem levels” based upon an article’s popularity: bronze, silver, gold, platinum, sapphire, ruby, and diamond. In the world of social media, steering contributors toward desired behaviors via virtual bling is called “gamification.” It’s not unlike allowing visitors to an animal-centric website to spiff up their profiles with cute avatars—after they leave a requisite number of comments. “Within the Bleacher Report community, [medals and badges] are a point of pride,” says one writer. “It’s hard not to feel like you’re getting somewhere if you have a bunch of badges. It makes you want to work your way up to being an all-star journalist. But you’re just working your way up to being an all-star Bleacher Report journalist.” A former editor at the site estimates that, even with continued editorial hiring, at least 90 percent of Bleacher Report’s gargantuan writing roster remains unpaid. Unable to earn actual crumbs, they compete for virtual crumbs. This is increasingly de rigueur even for established writers—and likely the only model today’s young adults have ever known. The ostensible goal of any enlistee is to ascend to the “featured columnist” position. A recruiting pitch on the site blares: “Ever notice those credibility-enhancing ‘Featured Columnist’ icons in article bylines and on B/R Profile pages? Well, so has everyone else.” Featured columnists form the backbone of Bleacher Report, and some earn a monthly stipend many told us was in the ballpark of


$600. This usually covers three assignments a week. These often require a major investment of time: “Predicting the Next Loss for Every Top 50 College Football Team” may be an inane subject, but its sheer size likely makes it laborious. The road to the promised land is paved with virtual sapphires and diamonds—and real page views and revenue generated for the organization. Bleacher Report’s higher-ups have provided neophyte writers a wealth of materials to help them thrive, and thereby meet the site’s bottom-line needs. The first lesson offered to students of “Bleacher Report U.,” a self-guided new-media training curriculum, is to “key on a keyword.” In short, write about the stuff people are searching for: “The Hot Keyword Database is an updated catalog of the Web’s most popular search terms—and your ability to incorporate these terms in your articles will be instrumental in your efforts to generate visitor traffic and maximize your exposure.” One of Bleacher Report’s top-five strategies for up-and-comers is to pen “hyperbolic headlines” and “always aim to either overstate or understate your position.” As such, “NBA: LeBron James Signs with the Miami Heat,” while accurate, is an unacceptable headline. The right take is “LeBron James Signing Makes the Miami Heat the Best Team in NBA History.”

“An unsophisticated sports fan clicks on the story, and it validates what he thinks. A sophisticated fan is so angry at the dumb headline, he can’t help but hate-click on it.” Finally, writers are urged to “cater to the masses.” “For better or worse, readers love breezy sports-and-culture stories. If you really want to maximize your fan base, your best bet is to give the people what they want.” But at the same time, don’t forget to “bet against the mainstream.” The exemplar of contrarian thinking offered by the site’s curriculum is a Bleacher Report article titled “Why Tom Brady Is the Most Overrated Quarterback in NFL History.” This piece epitomizes much of what frustrates the site’s detractors. The article’s author, an affable 19-year-old college sophomore named Zayne Grantham, tells us he still thinks Brady is an overrated “system quarterback” who largely succeeds thanks to his teams’ capable defenses. (The New England Patriots advanced to the Super Bowl last year with the 31st-ranked defense—in a 32-team league—in terms of passing and overall yardage.) But even Grantham doesn’t believe Brady is history’s most overrated: “In hindsight, I may not have used that headline. I’ll be one of the first to say he’s one of the best quarterbacks we’ve ever seen.” And there you have it: Anyone baited into responding to these hyperbolic stories finds themselves debating a non-starter argument with a teenager from Shreveport who doesn’t even buy the premise of his own article. But people do debate. They do comment. And they do read. That story has generated better than 14,000 page views and more than 440 comments—no “20 Most Boobtastic Athletes” tally, but not bad at all. “One of the

R

eaders don’t just visit Bleacher Report. They’re funneled right into the site’s revenue streams. “I know people who loathe Bleacher Report but are heavy users of its newsletter or app,” says Ben Koo, the CEO of Bloguin,

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goals is to get a lot of people to read your articles,” Grantham explains. “That headline, by the nature of the words, brought in plenty of people.” Serving red meat, sports radio-style, is viewed as something of a necessary evil. One former writer recalls that upon joining Bleacher Report, he rationalized that he would only have to focus on page views until he rose “high enough to say, ‘Now I can start focusing on quality.’ ” He was promoted to featured columnist— but was disappointed to learn his new job largely consisted of providing copy for his editors’ prewritten headlines. And these are often slide shows, several paragraphs of text woven around a photo or video and repeated 50 times. “When they started paying me, I began doing 95 percent slide shows,” says former featured columnist Jeff Shull, who spent four years writing for Bleacher Report. “I did 496 articles, so probably over 400 of them are slide shows.” Even Bleacher Report’s “lead writers”— established and respected Web authors hired in the past year as part of the ostensible drive for quality and paid five-figure salaries—say they too are assigned prewritten headlines. “It’s exactly the kinds of things Bleacher Report has become famous and infamous for, the things serious sports fans roll their eyes at: slide shows, top five this, top 10 that,” says one prominent writer. The prewritten headlines, adds another high-level writer, are “asserting why someone is the best player when he’s not; why the obviously best player isn’t really the best; why somebody is going to take over in the next year when it’s implausible he would—basically, asserting something that’s unlikely, giving it a good hook, and getting someone to click on it.” That’s the technique generations of bloviating sports scribes have used to stir the pot. But Bleacher Report’s lead writers didn’t think this is what they were being brought in to do. “Why pay me lots of money to dumb down my content?” asks one. “They could have used unpaid people to do this.” This way, however, Bleacher Report doubles its pleasure by enjoying the cachet of employing high-end writers while raking in the hits from low-end material. “They can have it both ways,” says one prominent writer. “An unsophisticated sports fan clicks on the story, and it validates what he thinks. A sophisticated fan is so angry at the dumb headline, he can’t help but hate-click on it.” When this writer questioned the length of an assignment, he was told that it was determined by “our computer model.” It’s a model that’s computing well for Bleacher Report, if not for every writer. “I started out being worried that joining up with Bleacher Report would make other people think I’m a fraud and a hack,” says one high-level writer. “Now I’m worried I have become that fraud and hack.” And if he leaves, an army of writers is ready to replace him.

15


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a network of sports blogs. “The inbox is the new social network for content companies.” Visitors to the site are aggressively pestered to sign up for team-specific newsletters or the Team Stream mobile app—which updates fans in real time with articles about their chosen team pulled from around the Web. Bleacher Report has established a direct, regular line of communication with millions of highly specified ad targets—and will continue to do so even if in the future the site is unable to lean so heavily on Google. “People undervalue the app and newsletters,” continues Koo. “I think it’s worth a quarter of Turner’s acquisition price.” The site’s Web dominance is woven into its very fabric. Online marketer and SEO expert Hugo Guzman points out that Bleacher Report’s “site architecture lends itself to SEO. They built a site to facilitate search engines spidering through and picking up all the different article pages and category pages.” This, he notes, is a marked contrast to the legacy media sites that break the stories Bleacher Report goes on to dominate. Many of the nation’s most prominent journalistic outlets are “on website platforms that were not built with SEO in mind. They were built when that was not even a factor.” News sites were constructed to display stories. Bleacher Report is built to disperse them. Guzman rattles off the “best practices” technical elements that have enabled Bleacher Report’s ascent: “Internal linking architecture!” “Metadata!” “Server-side

Now it owns the #3 sports website in the realm. And with a hulking new digital platform on which to sell ads, Turner has a new method of making money. This would provide a leg up in bidding for whatever comes next. “By expanding their set of assets, it allows Turner to go after things, and perhaps successfully obtain things they couldn’t otherwise,” says Ed Desser, president of Desser Sports Media. Before this deal, Desser continues, Bleacher Report was “just another aggregator of customer-created content.” But now? The wave of the future. No media outlet can ignore the allures of crowdsourcing—or dismiss out of hand the rewards of reverseengineering content. “There was a time when the traditional media viewed new media as not up to their standards. But that time has passed,” Desser notes. “Tastes change. Look at TV. Think about how much stuff would never have been on 30 years ago: vulgar language, sexual situations, eating bugs. It’s all out there now. We’re a long way from Ozzie and Harriet.” Or, as Bleacher Report puts it, “If you really want to maximize your fan base, your best bet is to give the people what they want.”

I

n an era when those who have more get more, when so many have been forced to recalibrate their expectations, it’s hard not to see Bleacher Report as epitomizing more than just sportswriting on the Internet. Those at the top have profited handsomely. For the folks whose work powers the site, however, Bleacher Report is often the best opportunity they can find, and a springboard to diminished dreams. Drew Laskey is an occasional writer and onetime copy-editing intern for Bleacher Report—and a full-time North Carolina basketball fanatic. He is now a copy editor for Journatic, an outfit recently popped on This American Life for using fake bylines to obscure that many of its articles were penned in foreign countries by non-native English speakers paid a pittance. Laskey says the articles he copy edits at Journatic, incidentally, are “much cleaner through and through” than those at Bleacher Report. He still remains an unabashed fan of the site. “If you take Bleacher Report seriously and you have the talent and the ability to learn and take constructive criticism, Bleacher Report can pay off for you,” he says. “I’ve seen it pay off. People have gone on to other websites.” He hopes it’ll propel him to an internship writing for InsideCarolina.com. This unpaid position would “be my dream job. To have a payment attached to it would be surreal. It’s something I can’t even fathom.” Bleacher Report alum Lukas Hardonk is one of those writers who’ve gone on to paying gigs elsewhere. He’s now the managing editor of the Maple Leafs Central blog and a contributing editor of TheHockeyWriters. com. “As bad a rap as Bleacher Report gets, it’s really tremendous what they did for me,” he says. Hardonk wrote for the site for three years, but found there were only so many slide shows in his system. By 2011, he realized he’d outgrown Bleacher Report. Still, “they kick-started my career.” It’ll be interesting to see where that career goes after the 17-year-old finishes his senior year of high school. E

“I started out being worried that joining up with Bleacher Report would make other people think I’m a fraud and a hack. Now I’m worried I have become that fraud and hack.” elements!” He pauses and laughs. “I can guarantee you that there are other publications out there that have frameworks on par with Bleacher Report’s,” he says. “So, ultimately, what’s their biggest differentiator? Free content!” Bleacher Report’s volunteer army generates scads of material—and the money the site doesn’t spend on writers is spent to move the company where it wants to go. It couldn’t get there, however, without addressing the pitfalls of crowdsourcing and lowest-common-denominator crap Kaufman mentioned to Google. So over the past two years, the site has worked to rehabilitate its image: Would-be writers must gain admittance via a process that rejects 17 out of every 20 applicants. Lead writers and knowledgeable featured columnists have been added to the roster, and many of the site’s early contributors have been bounced. “A few years ago I couldn’t look at their site without my eyes bleeding and my head pounding,” says veteran sports journalist Kevin Blackistone. These days, “That doesn’t happen with the same frequency.” It’s hard to argue that Bleacher Report hasn’t improved—but it’s impossible to say it hasn’t improved its curb appeal. That’s what enabled its acquisition by Turner—and what may enable the amalgamated entity to strip the “Worldwide Sports Leader” mantle from ESPN. Turner, unlike ESPN, FOX Sports, or Comcast, lacked a major sports Web destination.

Joe.Eskenazi@sfweekly.com


the»weekly»wire wed/10/3 FILM

One-Way Street

DANCE

Identity Art

sat/10/6 BOOKS

7:10 p.m., for a preshow talk by Matt Henley; the program runs through Saturday.) Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries. org. $20–$49. 8 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ BOOKS

A Tale of Two Indias

Call it the Slumdog Millionaire effect. India is booming. It’s the largest democracy on Earth, the wealth divide is vast, it’s full of great writers, and its social contrasts make for fantastic reading. As a journalist, Tarun Tejpal has a deep understanding of how India’s class and caste lines uncomfortably intersect, and his novel The Story of My Assassins (Melville House, $27.95) is based on a true incident. The muckraking Tejpal had a contract taken out on his life; so too does the unnamed narrator of his novel. Under police protection, his newsmagazine close to failing, our hero surveys the five men arrested in the plot: “The roads, bazaars, offices of India were full of men like them. Nameless men who did faceless jobs and perished unmarked in train accidents, fires, floods, epidemics, terrorist blasts, riots. At best, statistical fodder.” But his girlfriend argues they’ve been set up by unseen powers, so he half-heartedly joins her in their defense. That’s

*

Class Warfare

Local historian Douglas Smith has spent five years painstakingly documenting the extermination of the 1 percent. Far from Wall Street, his Former People: The Final Days of the Russian Aristocracy (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, $30) chronicles the systematic destruction of that ruling elite after the Russian Revolution. “If you want to know what class warfare really looks like, read my book,” says Smith, dismissing the hyperbole of our political pundits. “Class warfare is not raising someone’s taxes from 30 to 39 percent. Class warfare is when the secret police come into your house, take the male members of your family, put them in prison, and shoot them.” Declared public enemies and “hunted like dogs,” these families were wiped from the history books under Lenin and Stalin. To tell their forgotten stories, Smith tracked down the descendants of the book’s two most prominent families—the Sheremetevs and the Golitsyns—and studied their letters and diaries. Former People is a family saga both sweepingly historical and intensely personal. Of these old aristocrats, says Smith, “These people [are] not just representatives of a class. They’re human beings with feelings and families—people who lost everything in a way that we can’t even

sun/10/7 SOCCER

Put a Bird on This, A-Holes

I dodged a bullet, and I don’t mind admitting it. The Portland Timbers, you see, have been having a splendidly disastrous season, at the bottom of the MLS standings for most of it, which left me in a dilemma—on the one hand, an obsessive Sounders worshipper; on the other, a typical bleeding-heart, root-for-theunderdog Seattle liberal. And considering the Timbers’ hapless ineptitude, their preposterous and farcical incompetence, I came this close to feeling sorry for them. What fun is it having an archrival who’s the laughingstock of the league? But then came the Sounders’ first away game in Portland, on June 24, at their pathetic little Jeld-Wen field (named for a minor character in Star Wars: The Phantom Menace) when . . . well, I don’t want to talk about it. Suffice it to say all bets were off. In their second at-Portland game last month, the Sounders battled to a draw—understandably, since by that time, with the Timbers’ playoff hopes crumbled to dust, they had literally nothing else to shoot for than the Cascadia Cup (a bragging-rights competition among us and the Vancouver Whitecaps), and played to save their last shred of dignity. But tonight the Timbers play here—and will be taught their place in front of 66,000 fans (at press time; tickets are still available). (Seriously, if not for Powell’s Books and the chopped liver at Kenny & Zuke’s, I’d just as soon that entire stupid city fell through the Earth’s crust.) CenturyLink Field, 800 Occidental Ave. S., soundersfc.com. $15–$115. 6 p.m. GAVIN BORCHERT

MON: BOOKS/MUSIC

Tuneful Reminders

Frank M. Young’s new graphic novel The Carter Family: Don’t Forget This Song (Abrams, $24.95), vibrantly illustrated by David Lasky, reminds us that the Carters were “more than a distant footnote to the careers of June and Johnny.” The book, which includes a CD, starts in 1891, when Alvin Pleasant Carter was born into a clan of struggling Virginia farmers. “You git away from that fiddle!” his mother later scolds. “That’s th’ devil’s instr’ment!” A.P. will subsequently write his first song while deliriously ill with typhoid fever and collect traditional folk songs from his neighbors. We also meet his scandalous, cigarette-smoking, bobbed-haired wife Sara and her “gittar”-playing cousin Maybelle. Lasky depicts the Carter men with long, thin faces and the women with rounder, more feminine ones. Their backdrop is of red, curtained stages, mucky brown pigsties, bustling cities, and bright-blue open skies. They assume concentrated, blissful expressions when they sing; lyrics are scrawled in a big cursive font. Real-life events inspire the fictionalized account, as when Sara leaves A.P. for his cousin at the height of their ’30s fame. At tonight’s book-launch party, besides the pie (and cash bar), Laurel Bliss and Cliff Perry will play some of the Carter Family’s country standards. Richard Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave., 322-7030, hugohouse.org. $10. 7 p.m. ERIN K. THOMPSON

ABRAMS

Choreographer Paul Taylor is an exemplar of American modern dance, a tradition built on the idea that you dance who you are. Members of his Paul Taylor Dance Company have been dancing who he is for more than 50 years, in a signature weighted, swinging style that combines physical power with a fundamental sweetness. With the death of Merce Cunningham, the 82-year-old Taylor is really the last of his generation, but he wears this distinction easily, more interested in making dances than in crafting a reputation. The performances here, all with live music by the Seattle Modern Orchestra, include his new The Uncommitted, set to Arvo Pärt; Kith and Kin; and his phenomenal Brandenburgs, set to the famous Bach concertos. (Get there early, at

Members of Taylor’s company dance Brandenburgs.

begin to imagine, yet accepted their fates with a remarkable stoicism and enduring patriotism for the country that disowned them.” Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, elliott baybook.com. Free. 4 p.m. (Also: Town Hall, 7:30 p.m. Mon., Oct. 22.) ILONA IDILIS

Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3− 9, 2012

thurs/10/4

LOIS GREENFIELD

Part of the “Next 50” Wednesdaynight screening series at Seattle Center, Charles Ferguson’s Oscarwinning doc Inside Job remains the most infuriating movie of 2010—and of the recession as a whole. It should be required viewing for Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan, with their eyes forcibly held open like Malcolm McDowell’s in A Clockwork Orange. Narrated by Matt Damon, the film coolly lays out how deregulation, opaque financial instruments (collateralized debt obligations in particular), Wall Street greed, and complicit politicians created a perfect storm that wrecked the global economy. Trillions of dollars in assets disappeared in 2008, Lehman Brothers and other speculators were destroyed by their wrong bets and double-dealing, millions lost their jobs, WaMu was sucked under, and misguided populist anger led to Tea Party pitchforks— rather than to a call for stronger federal regulation. Even today, the Republican party refuses to heed the film’s lessons. (Or put differently: After Citizens United, the GOP can’t afford not to obey its corporate patrons.) And here’s another fun fact about the movie: Glenn Hubbard, the asshole Columbia economist who has the “Give it your best shot” hissy fit when questioned by Ferguson, is now an advisor to Romney. His advice? Cut taxes on the rich. With one month to go before Election Day, Ferguson’s film is a reminder what a clear choice we have between Mr. Inside and the poor guy in the White House who inherited this mess. SIFF Film Center, 305 Harrison St., 324-9996, siff.net. Free. 7 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

right: The would-be victim helps his wouldbe killers. Each of the five is given a rich, empathetic profile in Assassins; each yields a different facet of post-colonial Indian history, told from the bottom looking up. Low-caste, Muslim, pariah, petty criminal—they’re part of the same modern India that Tejpal covers in Tehelka (which you can read in English at tehelka.com). I’m only halfway through the novel (at killer #2), but it’s the most satisfyingly dense, Dickensian read for me this year. Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E. Prospect St. (Volunteer Park), 654-3100, seattle artmuseum.org. Free. 7 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

17


arts»Opening Nights P The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls THE LITTLE THEATRE, 608 19TH AVE. E., 325-5105, WASHINGTONENSEMBLE.ORG. $15– $25. 7:30 P.M. THURS.–MON. ENDS OCT. 22.

LARAE LOBDELL

This enchanting little tchotchke melds magic and mayhem in post-Soviet Russia, commingling centuries-old folklore with the crass new Putin era. Your head will spin at the decidedly leggy hotness of young damsels trying to keep a foothold in reality while wearing fiveinch heels and dodging ravenous drunken bears and witches who know just how to fatten up a pretty young thing. In a haze of flesh-meets-fantasy, young playwright Meg Miroshnik envisions a culture awash in booze, privation, and misogyny. The brilliant tacticians at Washington Ensemble Theatre render it via multipurpose sets, whimsical shadow-puppet vignettes, and costumes that would wow the judges of Project Runway. Miroshnik’s fable begins in 2005 as Annie (Samie Spring Detzer), a Russian ingenue raised in L.A., returns to her birthplace with plans to lose her American accent and maybe pick up a few professional contacts. Her mother has set her up with a place to stay—with an “auntie” who is no blood relative but just might be a bloodthirsty witch. (She only leaves her tenement late at night to fly the skies in a giant mortar and pestle.) Along the way, Annie meets a variety of alternately chilly and needy Russian women who troll the nightclubs for vodka, men, and money. It’s an ensemble piece; several members of the all-female cast pull extra duty in multiple roles. Under Ali el-Gasseir’s direction, nary a Russian accent is out of place. Moving scrims redirect the action from one locale to another until their spinning takes on a hypnotic effect and, like Annie, you’re left wondering what’s real and what’s imagined. In this regard, Fairytale Lives is an Alice in Wonderland–style tumble down the rabbit hole. Cast into a dangerous and bewildering unknown, an innocent must forge new alliances and become the agent of her own salvation. Miroshnik’s new one-act, in its West Coast premiere, is both familiar and surreal. As with WET’s prior Bed Snake and Milk Milk Lemonade, it lands in the uncharted territory between social commentary and pure imagination. KEVIN PHINNEY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6 i 7:30PM

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Gaudy Night TAPROOT THEATRE, 204 N. 85TH ST., 781-9707, TAPROOTTHEATRE.ORG. $15– $37. 7:30 P.M. WED.–THURS., 8 P.M. FRI., 2 & 8 P.M. SAT. ENDS OCT. 20.

October 20 8pm

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Leaving the theater after the show, I overheard a woman say exactly what I’d been thinking about this treatment of Dorothy L. Sayers’ 1935 detective novel: “They certainly did move a lot of furniture around.” It’s hard to imagine why Taproot chose to produce the piece, which is as bloated and innocuous as a manatee. Despite a good cast and dandy lighting by Roberta Russell, this campus mystery tale feels over-quaint and under-relevant—

The Farirytale Lives of Russian Girls: Shannon O. Campbell as one of the new Russia’s lost girls.

essentially like all the other old Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries from English TV. Frances Limoncelli’s recent adaptation breaks the story into dozens of mini-scenes, some just one beat long. Between them, there is indeed much rearranging of furniture in the darkness, accompanied by elegantly off-kilter interstitial music. Over two and a half hours, it’s a tedious formula for a paltry payoff. Returning to her alma mater for a reunion called Gaudy Night, Harriet (Alyson Scadron Branner) receives a poison-pen note, as do some faculty members. Though the menace never seems particularly violent or real, the mean words frighten and embarrass the lady academics (Pam Nolte, Kim Morris, Gretchen Douma, Nikki Visel, and Ruth McRee), into whose midst lands lovelorn diplomat Wimsey (the excellent Jeff Berryman), determined to protect Harriet. His romantic pursuit of her, and her reluctance to get attached, are more fun than the flimsy main plot. Branner plays it smart and straight in a role that could easily be overdone. Russell’s lighting and Mark Lund’s sound design artfully conjure lush extracurricular settings, like punting on the Isis River. Red herrings dodge about, the class system abrades, and feelings trip the deftest wit-wielders. But why director Scott Nolte chose to revive this deathly dated text is the biggest mystery. Sayers’ original novel celebrated the capable ladies at a women’s college, but now there are more women than men in academia (and almost as many in crime-fighting TV shows). A more relevant Gaudy Night update might’ve had Harriet save Wimsey instead—and with less furniture-shuffling. MARGARET FRIEDMAN E stage@seattleweekly.com


OCTOBER 2012 | SEATTLE WEEKLY’S MUSIC REVIEW

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opening acts »October 2012 VOLUME 2 | NUMBER 10 » SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM/REVERBMONTHLY

»EDITOR’S LETTER

Don’t Forget to Tip Your Songwriter

ckornelis@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY’S REVERB POSTER SHOW features work by local artists like Frida Clements (the Damien Jurado print) and Mike Klay (the reimagined Space Needle). The show takes place during Reverb 2012, Saturday, October 6, behind the New York Fashion Academy stage.

2012»  

4 ANSWERS & ADVICE BY JOHN RODERICK | Nouela, Kato Moody, and Brooke Asbury have their problems solved by our sage.

8 THE WHEELIES

BY ERIN K. THOMPSON | Paying

tribute to Tacoma’s BMX culture.

11 THE FOGHORNS

BY DAVE LAKE | Reinventing Americana

via Brooklyn and Iceland.

12 KITHKIN

BY KEEGAN PROSSER | Moving up

from rowdy ID house parties—even though “the world is sort of ending.”

14 REVERB VENUES 14 | Conor Byrne Pub 14 | Hilliard’s Brewery 14 | Miro Tea 15 | New York Fashion Academy 17 | Salmon Bay Eagles 20 | The Sunset 22 | The Tractor 24 | The 2 Bit Saloon

18 SCHEDULE GRID 19 MAP 27 REVIEWS

The latest from Legendary Oaks, King Tuff, Tea Cozies, and more.

35 THE MONTH AHEAD From Steve Vai to Waka Flocka Flame.

»reverb monthly COPYRIGHT © 2012 BY SEATTLE WEEKLY, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. ISSN 0898 0845 • REVERB IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY SEATTLE WEEKLY, LLC. SEATTLE WEEKLY® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK. 1008 WESTERN AVE., STE. 300, SEATTLE, WA 98104. • FOUNDED 1976. MAIN SWITCHBOARD: 206-623-050 0

»cover credits

NOUELA (SEE PAGES 4 & 17) PHOTOGRAPHED BY RENEE MCMAHON

Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

When I graduated from high school, I went to college to study music performance. I told people I wanted to be a rock star. It wasn’t long before I realized how laughably arrogant and naive that was (to state the obvious, a university is a terrible place to pursue a career in arena rock, though not an impossible one). A couple of years and hundreds of hours in the practice room and on the field with the marching band later, I switched my major to journalism. I felt like a sellout. Still do, to be honest. Everything about music is harder—from the college courses to the lifestyle. If you haven’t noticed, these aren’t exactly salad days for professional journalists. But it’s nirvana compared to what musicians and songwriters go through to feed their families. Sometimes when I feel discouraged or cynical about our industry, I think about the local musicians working two jobs when they’re home and enduring a grueling touring schedule when they’re on the road to make ends meet, and am reminded how fortunate I am to have a steady paycheck, health insurance, and the opportunity to sleep with my wife every night. I am paid to do what I love, something that gives me a defining sense of self. Too often, that’s not the case for musicians. That’s not just bad for bands, but for anyone who appreciates a good melody. Fifty-six local bands are playing Seattle Weekly’s Reverb Local Music Festival on Saturday. None of them played the annual event last year. For six years in a row, that’s been the case. We’ve worked with a local booker—the talented and tattooed Kwab Copeland—to curate a festival featuring the best of Seattle’s bubbling music scene, and we’ve rotated the roster every year. It testifies to what a deep talent bench our music scene has that year after year we can fill 50, 60, or 70 spots without repeating bands. Only a fraction of these artists are on labels, and even fewer of them make music for a living. As difficult as the journalism and music businesses have become, I’d also argue that there hasn’t been a more exciting time to work in either industry in the past 100 years. Everything’s changing; the old barriers are coming down. It no longer takes a printing press or a broadcast license to break news or connect with readers—you barely need a smartphone—and it’s never been easier to make an album, find bands to tour with, and interact with fans. It’s never been easier to pay for music, either—on iTunes, Bandcamp, or Kickstarter, to name just three click-ready methods—but it’s never been harder to get people to do it. Do me a favor: Next time you’re online listening to an album and there’s an option to pay what you want, shove aside your excuses and throw down a buck. Don’t just “like” them. Pay them. You can afford it. Anyone who can afford the apparatus necessary to listen to a song on the Internet—and certainly anyone who thinks SOMEONE ELSE’S taxes should be raised—can afford to chip in a dollar for the other one percent. Is this going to turn the financial tide for musicians? Probably not. But we as a society should want talented musicians to think of music as a career option, ideally a well-paid one, just as we want our sharpest college graduates to consider teaching— not just banking—as a career option, ideally a well-paid one. We want them to have the good fortune of making a living by making a product they love and the rest of us ravenously consume. But we’re never going to get there if we don’t value music-makers with our wallets and turn paying for music into a habit and a priority. Paying for the music we like is an easy place to start. E Chris Kornelis, editor, Reverb Monthly

3


2012» Nouela: paying her opening-act dues.

ANSWERS & ADVICE

Showbiz Ain’t Friend-Biz And the merits of the butt-peepage clause. BY JOHN RODERICK

is out now. She plays the New York Fashion Academy at 9:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 6 as part of SW’s Reverb Local Music Festival.

Dear John: Should I audition for The Voice? —Nouela Roderick: Is there a voice telling you that

you need to audition for it, Nouela? Listen to me, that voice isn’t real. You’re wonderful the way you are, you don’t need to audition for anything! Whatever that voice is saying is just your own insecurities, and that’s really common. But we love you, and you don’t have to prove your worth. Stand up and say, “The Voice, you are a worthless piece of shit and I renounce you!”

Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

I have to stand for 12 hours at a time for a job. The only shoes that don’t hurt my feet are Crocs. But people are so mean to the Crocs. What should I do?

4

I’d get a pair of wooden shoes from the Netherlands in an extra-large size and then wear my Crocs inside the wooden shoes. People are mean to Crocs because they look like shoes you’d wear to clean out an execution chamber, but wooden shoes are universally acknowledged as the COOLEST and most FAR-OUT shoes in history. People will be tripping so hard that you are wearing wooden shoes, they won’t even notice that your gross Crocs are tucked inside. Plus, it will make you look like you have huge feet, which is something everyone desires. I recently started practicing guitar for the first time in 10 years. I think tabs are stupid hard. My brain would rather picture me playing on piano, then picture notes on a grand staff, then try to find notes on the guitar. How do I change this?

I think your method is the best. If you translate music through one instrument, then through imagined sheet music, and then into a second instrument, you will inevitably make enough small errors and transpositions that you’ll teach yourself the new instrument in a way unlike anyone else’s way. This is how I taught myself to play the “glass harp,” an instrument made of half-full wine glasses. You’ll be so busy trying to make sense of how your brain sees music you’ll probably end up inventing a whole new style of guitar playing. My only suggestion is that you add one more format. Like, envision the tabs as MIDI files, then piano parts, then sheet music, then guitar, and pretty soon you’ll be playing like Robert Fripp.

Recently a member of a headlining band I was opening for walked in on me in the bathroom. He saw my butt and everything. What would you have done in this situation?

For every tour I’ve ever done, either as an opener or as a headliner, there’s been a clause in the contract that says the headliner has a right to see the opener’s butt(s). It’s just one of those bits of music-business boilerplate that keeps making it into contracts, even though most people don’t remember it’s there and almost no one ever invokes the clause. It’s a good idea to read every contract thoroughly. Still, I would chalk it up to experience, and consider yourself now a fully initiated member of the Guild of Openers, an organization that admits only artists who have worked their way up in the touring game according to the strict traditions of our profession. When you start doing major headlining tours, you may find that a butt-peepage clause is something you want to retain. Kato Moody ’s band, Side Saddle, plays the Tractor Tavern at 7 p.m. as part of Reverb. Dear John: Brooke is in Nashville right now, so I get to ask you whatever I want. What else should I try to get away with while she is gone? —Moody

Kato, I shouldn’t have to tell you this, but every time your songwriting partner leaves the room, you should always assume she is consulting a lawyer to cut you out of the songwriting royalties. Especially if she goes to Nashville. That’s basically all they do in Nashville these days. So as soon as Brooke left, you immediately should have set about changing all the passwords on your shared computers and the settings on all the gear, and then change your percentages on ASCAP or BMI as a defensive precaution. It might be too late now, but remember: It’s not called show-friends, it’s called show business. Lexi is moving away, and we may be looking for a new harmony singer. Are you available?

What the hell did you guys do to Lexi to make her have to MOVE AWAY? I think you need to all sit down together and have a heart-to-heart, and say, “Lexi, we know you got a good job working at the White House, or met the man of your dreams and he’s a millionaire feminist astronaut, or joined a apocalyptic religious cult, or

RENEE MCMAHON

Nouela’s debut LP, Chants,

decided to just get a job somewhere that pays actual money on a regular schedule, or whatever, but you can’t BREAK UP THE BAND!” I work for the ACLU, but I am in a country band. Can you help me?

You sound like exactly what this country needs. Will you help us? Old country is cool now, but new country gets a bad rap. Do you know of anywhere around here I can listen to my Brad Paisley CD without getting a mustachioed lecture?

There are plenty of Ballard dopes who will lecture you all day about the brilliance of Bob Seger and John Cougar, but turn around and dis on young country, oblivious to the fact that Brad Paisley is indistinguishable from Bob Cougar Mellensegercamp. Then they’ll wax all philosophical about old-fashioned country music, forgetting that fully half of old country is hokey comedy music designed to make hayseeds spit chewing tobacco through their noses by making racist jokes sound like nursery rhymes. The lessons here are threefold: First, the more seriously someone takes country music,

the more of an idiot they are, unless they’re German and can’t help it; second, Young Country is just Classic Rock with someone singing in a fake Southern accent, which basically describes the Rolling Stones; and third, you can listen to whatever dumb music you like IN YOUR CAR, which is where everyone listens to the dumb music they like. Brooke Asbury is also a member of

Side Saddle.

What started the vintage country/ honky-tonk scene in Seattle? When and where did it start, and what bands and/or scenes or groups contributed to it getting popular? —Asbury

Many years ago there were men and women, young folk, who walked the land in cowboy shirts and horn-rimmed glasses, back when you could find those things only at Goodwill. It was a long time ago, and no one knows when they first arrived. They weren’t being ironic—there was nothing ironic about them. They believed in music, American music, and they liked their hair greasy and their beer in cans. They worked on their own

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 7


Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

5


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Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

CITY ARTS FEST 2012

6

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RODRIGUEZ | OCT 12 | MARKET • FALLING IN REVERSE | OCT 12 | SODO • CIRCA SURVIVE | OCT 13 | MARKET • DEFTONES | OCT 13 | SODO • JEFF THE BROTHERHOOD | OCT 14 | THE CROCODILE •

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SAT JAN 21 • 21+• ELDRIDGE GRAVY & THE COURT SUPREME AND THEORETICS | NOV 9 | MARKET • DATSIK | NOV 9 | SODO • THE DEVIL MAKES THREE | NOV 10 | MARKET • GWAR | NOV 10 | SODO • RICHARD CHEESE | NOV 8 | CHOP SUEY & LOUNGE AGAINST THE MACHINE | NOV 11 | MARKET • THE GREEN | NOV 13 | MARKET • BENJAMIN FRANCIS LEFTWICH | NOV 15 | TRACTOR TAVERN • MINUS THE BEAR | NOV 17 | MARKET • ASKING ALEXANDRIA | NOV 20 | SODO • WALK THE MOON | NOV 23 | MARKET • DETHKLOK | NOV 23 | SODO • WALK OFF THE EARTH | NOV 26 | MARKET • RNDM IS JEFF AMENT OF PEARL JAM, JOSEPH ARTHUR AND RICHARD STUVERUD | NOV 27 | MARKET • BLUE SCHOLARS | NOV 30 | MARKET • THE CAVE SINGERS | DEC 7 | MARKET • THE TRAGICALLY HIP | DEC 7 | SODO • LAMB OF GOD | DEC 16 | SODO • PENTATONIX | DEC 19 | MARKET • PICKWICK | DEC 31 | MARKET

SHOWBOX AT THE MARKET 1426 1ST AVENUE :: SHOWBOX SODO 1700 1ST AVENUE S. :: SHOWBOXONLINE.COM


2012» Side Saddle: Now hiring a harmony singer.

Showbiz Ain’t Friend-Biz » From pAge 4

Does vinyl really sound better than digital?

Well, try saying the following sentences aloud and tell me which sounds better: “Our

What groups or publications are the movers and shakers on the Seattle music scene right now? Who’s got the credibility to be pushing things forward in Seattle and then outside of Seattle?

Stephen RuSk

motorcycles. The real ones drove Fords. They listened to old-fashioned music and made new music that sounded old-fashioned but as if it was powered by a harsher cut of trucker speed. These folk blurred the line between punk rock and cowboy; they were both and neither. They were The Outsiders. Then the great fashion drought hit the Americas. All the fashions had been done, so younger kids just started taking fashions from everywhere and glomming them together. Pretty soon all kinds of people were wearing cowboy shirts and horn-rimmed glasses, ones they bought new at American Eagle Outfitters. Very few of them worked on their own motorcycles, and they were all strumming acoustic guitars and making old-fashioned music that sounded like city folk taking turns farting on a banjo. The “lifestyle” went out of it, and pretty soon it was just another style. Somewhere on the outskirts of Georgetown, a few old stragglers are hanging on, but they can’t hold back the tide. Every third kid on Capitol Hill looks like a sharecropper from Oklahoma now, and none of them would even consider driving a Ford.

someone says “I’ll be there in 10 minutes wearing [whatever],” it’s a safe bet they’ve got a halfway decent night planned for you, and even if they’re speaking half gibberish, it’s probably a good idea at least to have them show up so you can look at them through the peephole. So anyway, to recap: Yes, vinyl almost always sounds better than digital, except in certain instances where you’re just throwing caution to the wind.

new record is only out on vinyl.” “Our new record is only out on digital.” Vinyl sounds better in that context, doesn’t it? Vinyl wins. Let’s try another: “I’m breaking up with you and taking all your vinyl.” “I’m breaking up with you and taking all your digital.” That second one doesn’t even make sense. Vinyl wins again!

One more: “I’ll be at your house in 10 minutes wearing all vinyl.” “I’ll be at your house in 10 minutes wearing all digital.” Even though the last one makes almost no sense at all, it’s somehow more intriguing. Like, what the hell are they talking about? I think I’d go with “digital” on that one, just to see if they show up dressed all in fingers. I mean, when

Brooke, this is the type of question you should never ask anyone, even in jest. As a musician, you want to do everything in your power to avoid ever talking like this in real life. The “business” side of the music business can be accomplished just by being honest and thorough in all your dealings, just as you would in any business, including crime. If someone ever uses the phrase “credibility to be pushing things forward” while discussing an artist, you should spray them with mace and run. E jroderick@seattleweekly.com

John Roderick is the singer and songwriter responsible for Seattle’s The Long Winters. He tweets @johnroderick.

Turntables by Rega HAND CRAFTED IN ENGLAND SINCE 1973

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Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

Even before Definitive opened our doors in 1975, Rega was building their remarkable turntables in Westcliff-on-Sea, Southend, England. Today, their award-winning Rega tonearms, cartridges and turntables are still produced by hand, to achieve their goal of “making high quality products at sensible prices, as a means of reproducing music as faithfully as possible”.

7


2012»Festival Guide

presents at

DIMITRIOU’S

Fathers, hide your Mustangs.

SW: What are some similarities between BMX riding and playing in the Wheelies? Doherty: Hanging out with your best

friends, creating your own path, and just having fun with it. Describe the Wheelies’ sound in three words.

2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 j a z z a l l e y. c o m

Best Friends Forever.

Visit us Online!

How does the landscape and culture of Tacoma influence the Wheelies’ music?

The drinks are cheap, the bars are dim, and our music history is deep. We all grew up here, and still see it as a place to run wild and free in.

Wayne Krantz Group

Spontaneous, Exhilarating, Improvisational Jazz Guitarist

October 3

Would you rather receive as a gift a new bike wheel or a wheel of cheese? Why?

Kurt Elling

It would be pretty fun to throw a party with a big block of cheese . . .

Daring and Dynamic GrammyWinning Baritone Vocalist

October 4 – 7

If you could have any celebrity come onstage and do wheelies on a bike while the Wheelies played, who would it be and why?

Strunz & Farah

Dana Carvey as Garth from Wayne’s World; we all look up to Garth.

Grammy-Nominated, Billboard Chart-Topping Acoustic Guitar Duo Fusing World Music and Flamenco October 9 - 10

What elements make a great Wheelies show?

ANASTASIA DIXON

Leela James

Raw and Fiery Neo-Soul Singer Touring in Support of her New Release “In the Spirit of Etta James”

October 11 - 14

Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

Captain Smartypants: A Benefit for Healing the Children

8

Seattle Men’s Chorus Ensemble Performance October 15

Candido 91st B’day Bash featuring Larry Harlow, Pete Escovedo, Frankie Figueroa & more! Salsa, Mambo and Afro-Cuban Beats

October 18 - 21

ON SALE NOW Manhattan Transfer Taj Mahal Trio

Walk-ins Always Welcome! All Ages • Free Parking • Gift Certificates Military, Senior and Student Discounts

Jazz Alley is a Supper Club

Patrick Doherty.

QUESTIONS/ANSWERS

Rough Riders

The Wheelies’ Patrick Doherty talks BFFs and BMX. BY ERIN K. THOMPSON

I

n University Place, a small town situated on the Puget Sound waterfront near Tacoma, it’s not uncommon to see teenage boys riding bicycles so tiny their knees almost touch the handlebars. That’s because in U.P., BMX biking, more

“It would be pretty fun to throw a party with a big block of cheese . . . ”

November 1 – 4

November 16 – 18 & 20 – 25

Hanging out behind the club and some old guy comes and starts talking about how he played in a band back in the ’80s and how wild it was, then asking if we have a dollar.

than football or skateboarding, is a young man’s hobby of choice. Patrick Doherty, who is from there, happened to be better at it than most. At 19 he started receiving sponsorships to ride competitively, his photos appeared in BMX magazines like Dig and Ride, and he was able to make a modest living off of the sport. (It should be said that I also grew up in University Place, and for a time Doherty and I lived across the street from each other. My

mom drove us to junior high together, and we brought him soup and lemonade when he was sick. On prom night he got his crutch stuck in the droptop of my date’s red Mustang convertible and shattered the back window.) In 2009, when Doherty started a band with three friends he’d met at the Tacoma School of the Arts—Thomas Crow, Rusty Trusky, and Joseph Yohann—it was only natural to call it the Wheelies. The band’s impetuous brand of guitar rock—jumping party anthems fronted by Doherty’s languid vocals, which occasionally lag and then unexpectedly pitch upward into a scream—has become a hallmark of Tacoma’s music scene. They’re currently recording a full-length follow-up to their first two EPs, Don’t Be Shy and Pizza Party. Doherty took time to answer a few questions (via e-mail, where his name appears as Wheelies Neverdie) to acquaint our readers with the Wheelies before their Reverb performance.

Complete this sentence: The Wheelies would make great background music for _______ .

Remembering what you did last night.

What wild animal do the Wheelies most relate to?

Mankind.

Who is the sexiest member of the Wheelies?

Rusty [the drummer]. He has the longest hair and a cat named Booty. E

music@seattleweekly.com

The Wheelies play the 2 Bit Saloon at 8:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 6 as part of Seattle Weekly’s Reverb Local Music Festival.


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Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

WED, OCT 3 • 9PM ~ $10 ADV / $12 DOS FOLKY GOSPEL MUSIC PLAYED BY A POST-PUNK BAND

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Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

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2012»Festival Guide The Foghorns are always searching for new flavors.

ANDREW IMANAKA

Buckets and Mops The Foghorns pull from bluegrass, Brooklyn, and anything under the kitchen sink. BY DAVE LAKE

of the Foghorns’ original lineup, and that spirit of musical camaraderie remains part of the Foghorns’ DNA. The band worked hard, releasing two independent albums and playing as often as they could. But in 2003, Cameron, then an aspiring writer, headed to Iceland on a Fulbright. “I wanted to write a book like the Icelandic fiction I’d become obsessed with,” he said. “At the time, there weren’t a lot of people traveling there, but it fascinated me.” Overseas, Cameron put together a version of the Foghorns that was more in line with his original vision: an anti-folk group that utilized accordions, French horns, buckets, and anything else they could get their hands on. The band did several trans-Icelandic tours, played some major festivals, and released several more independent records before Cameron graduated and relocated to Seattle in 2006, where he’s been ever since. Over the past few years, the band has become a celebrated local act, with regular gigs at the Comet, the Blue Moon, and the Tractor. Last year the band issued To the Stars on the Wings of a Pig, the first release

“I know we’re working on good songs, but we’re not spending too much time on the haircuts.” Despite the band’s recent momentum, Cameron remains cynical about the music business and cautiously optimistic about future success, saying he doesn’t know any bands that have gotten popular nationally that haven’t had to compromise artistically. “It’s been strange times,” he said. “We keep watching bands we play with end up on TV. I have no idea how popular music works,” he added. “I know we’re working on good songs, but we’re not spending too much time on the haircuts.” E music@seattleweekly.com

The Foghorns play the Tractor at 5 p.m., Sat., Oct. 6, as part of Seattle Weekly’s Reverb Local Music Festival.

Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

N

ot many Seattle rock bands have a history that includes transIcelandic tours, Brooklyn bluegrass acts, and Fulbright scholarships, but most bands aren’t the Foghorns. Founded by Bart Cameron in 2001, the band’s history is as colorful as their music, a folky Americana hodgepodge that includes a variety of instruments and just as many surprises. Their story starts on the shores of Lake Michigan in Cameron’s childhood hometown of Racine, Wisconsin, where he traveled after 9/11 and wrote some songs with friends— songs he brought back to Brooklyn a few weeks later, and which eventually made their debut in a bluegrass style, which wouldn’t be so weird if the Foghorns were supposed to be a bluegrass band. Cameron had become enmeshed in the bluegrass scene on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. Though it wasn’t a genre he had a particular affinity for, there was a rich musical community in his neighborhood’s bars and clubs. He explains its initial appeal: “It was easy to borrow an instrument,” which allowed him to sit in on guitar or bass with a slew of bands on virtually any night of the week. One of them, the Cobble Hillbillies, became the backbone

from local label Knick Knack and the first the band didn’t have to finance themselves. SW music editor Chris Kornelis called the record “one of the most substantially listenable local albums of the year; easy to access, and hard to put down.” The album is warm with vintage instruments and hummable melodies—which makes sense given Cameron’s occasional gigs at a local studio, where his job is simply to coax great sounds out of the mikes, amps, and recording equipment of decades past.

11


2012»Festival Guide

ZIP YOUR WAY INTO VIP!

Bandmates, scamps, fire-starters.

DAVE LICHTERMAN

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Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

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12

Kithkin is one to watch (but view at your own risk). BY KEEGAN PROSSER

W

e will be the extremely skinny, short, young dudes with one guy who looks like Heath Ledger had a child with Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison,” says Kithkin’s Alex Barr. Comprising Barr, Ian McCutcheon (said Ledger look-alike), Kelton Sears, and Bob Martin, Seattle woods-rock act Kithkin has been on the steady rise since releasing their debut EP, Takers & Leavers, in January. Built around their love for Magic: The Gathering and Dungeons and Dragons and an appreciation for creatures of the woodland variety, the act’s Where the Wild Things Are personas have become just as much a part of their image as the delightfully messy, percussion-driven party rock they create. “I think every show should be an experience on a visual and emotional level as well as musical,” McCutcheon says. “And I think that having that mystery or fantasy kind of does that.” Dorky? Yes. Effective? More than you would imagine. The band members got their start playing now-infamous house parties in the International District, where shenanigans included Barr tomahawking a girl in the face with his guitar (it was an accident), Sears lighting his drumsticks on fire (not an accident), and a close call involving a rowdy set on the not-so-sturdy floor of a second-story apartment. This summer they graduated to the local festival scene— the Catapult Musical Festival in Anacortes, the Capitol Hill Block Party, and most recently a highly acclaimed Doe Bay set that found them collaborating with local hip-hop outfit Kung Foo Grip (watch the video, it’s badass). Next on the agenda is finishing writing their full-length debut—a project the Kith-clan describes as more thematic and cohesive than the thunderous Takers & Leavers. “On our EP, it was our first chance to get out there,” Sears says. “So we were like, ‘Let’s make these songs really, really big.’ ”

Drawing inspiration from the psychedelic and world-music albums frequenting their headphones as of late, Kithkin’s new material is expected to be more stripped-down, with a focus on tighter, more emphatic world beats. “I like the idea that [psychedelic bands] can do an epic 15-minute song as well as a two-minute pop song—and they both fit on the same album,” McCutcheon says. They hope the space of a full-length and an expanded variety of percussion instruments, including bongos and a digital drum pad, will provide this opportunity. “It’s still as energetic as it was before, but maybe without as much layering—and I think it will be easier for people to catch on to more immediately.”

“I always say that we are kind of living in the apocalypse right now . . . the world is sort of ending.” From the funky, tribal-inspired clothes they wear onstage to their highly charged, participatory tuneage, the men of Kithkin are set to be one of the most excitable and entertaining bands at Reverb—ironically, considering the dark, somewhat apocalyptic nature of their music’s subject matter. “I always say that we are kind of living in the apocalypse right now,” Sears explains, citing global warming and the dichotomy of life and death as main inspirations. “It’s not going to happen all at once—but the world is sort of ending.” Until then, they’ll keep Seattle dancing. E music@seattleweekly.com

Kithkin plays the Salmon Bay Eagles at 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 6 as part of Seattle Weekly’s Reverb Local Music Festival.


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2012»Seattle Weekly’s Local Music Festival»Saturday, October 6 the Long Winters’ John Roderick (who also produced the record) that our Mike Seely called “an early front-runner for best song put out by any artist in 2011.”

HILLIARD’S BREWERY (all ages) BY ERIC GRANDY

Mike DC, 6 p.m. This Canadian-born, Port

Townsend–based MC does that earnestwhite-rapper thing that’s so popular around these parts, spitting it hella sincere whether he’s snarling about his hip-hop cred or Slugishly mourning some doomed romance. Brain Fruit, 7 p.m. For sure one of the more

out-there bands playing this year’s Reverb Fest, this Seattle drum-and-synth duo applies muscular live drumming to hypnotically evolving synth arpeggios, with results that can range from motorik-krautrock cool to fully unhinged noise jams. If all those words sound like nonsense to you, just trust and go get your mind blown.

SHERRY LOESER

Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

(21 and over) BY JULIA MULLEN GORDON

14

NoRey, 6:30 p.m. Since the “dogmatic, coked-up, llama-killing, Esperanza Spalding– boning, Michael Pollan–scolding, überlocavore Cascade foothills chef” Lou Kohl appeared on SW’s cover last year, it’s been a challenge to separate him from NoRey frontman Alejandro Garcia, who portrayed the fur-coat-clad spoof on the cover. By day, Garcia may masquerade as a culinary outlaw, but by night his distinct accent is put to use in NoRey, whose globally influenced, edgy pop wouldn’t sound out of place in an Iñárritu film. Lifestyles of the Poor and Unknown, 7:30 p.m. Not many bands call Port

Townsend home, but this one makes an exception. Led by Spencer Tucker (a tugboat deckhand and high-school classmate of this writer), LPU isn’t far from the whimsical, off-kilter style of early Modest Mouse, while Tucker’s deep vocals recall Wolf Parade’s Dan Boeckner.

Gabriel Mintz, 8:30 p.m. If you’ve been

traumatized by one too many Bumbershoot drum circles, you’ll naturally be apprehensive of Gabriel Mintz’s socks-with-sandals style. But give a listen to 2010’s Volume 1, which proves him a highly skilled player whose pop sensibility shares equal space with insightful songwriting. We promise it sounds nothing like the Dave Matthews Band.

Shannon Stephens plays Conor Byrne at 9:30 p.m., Saturday October 6, as part of Seattle Weekly’s Reverb Local Music Festival. Shannon Stephens, 9:30 p.m. “Faces Like Ours,” Shannon Stephens’ duet with Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy from this year’s Pull It Together, is a strange take on the country lament, calling attention to white privilege with its slant lyrics. Stephens’ secret weapon is her ability to twist traditional forms, making topics like rent and dishes vessels for philosophical exploration.

Julie C, 9 p.m. On the cover of her Sliding Scale EP, Julie C looks more like a cool librarian than a battle-tested rapper, but her 206 Zulu affiliations profess a love for hip-hop culture both progressive and traditionalist, and her rhymes are nimble and sturdy enough to stand on their own. OCnotes, 10 p.m. Otis Calvin “Notes” III is

currently reigning as this city’s most inspired beat-maker and maybe most promising all-

Whitney Ballen, 10:30 p.m. When Ballen

turned 21, she didn’t drink a sip of booze. Her album, White Feathers, White Linens is similarly pure; from its very title to Ballen’s childlike vocals to the tinkling music box that marks the album’s beginning, her songs come from a place of innocence and wonder.

Rachel Harrington, 11:30 p.m. From the

opening twangs of slide guitar on Harrington’s new record, Makin’ Our House a Honkytonk, it’s clear this is party music. Harrington proves herself a charismatic and commanding vocalist whose songs are perfect for a twirl around the dance floor—hat and boots required.

Shelby Earl, 12:30 a.m. On her debut

album, last year’s Burn the Boats, Earl proved her chops at intelligent country, showing she could compete with genre masters like Neko Case on songs like “At the Start,” a duet with

LUCIEN PELLEGRIN

CONOR BYRNE PUB

Chocolate Chuck, 8 p.m. Little brother of queens THEESatisfaction, Chocolate Chuck would be, what, like an archduke among Seattle hip-hop royalty? Lineage aside, the young producer has plenty going for him in his own right, with a sample-flipping style that’s simultaneously breezy, bass-y, and based.

OCnotes performs at Hilliard’s Brewery at 10 p.m.

around musician. In his solo productions and those with heady, freestyling duo Metal Chocolates, he sways from jazzy and glitchy hip-hop instrumentals to soulful not-quitehouse tracks to tropicalia-inflected singer/ songwriter material. His tastes and talents are boundless; watch where he goes next. Brothers From Another, 11 p.m. On their

recent Taco Tuesday EP, this Seattle hip-hop duo dedicates a song to artisanal-ice-cream queen Molly Moon, extols the virtues of love (worth changing your college major for), and praises their 206 elders in “Sonic Boom.” If it wasn’t clear: This is one profoundly pos-vibing, town-friendly rap act.

Soul Senate, midnight Forever subordinate to the whims of the Funky President and hemmed in by the decisions of the Jazzy Judiciary, Seattle band Soul Senate nonetheless delivers a traditional suit-and-tie soul revue—including a loungey cover of “You Can’t Always Get What You Want”—that both sides of the aisle can agree upon.

MIRO TEA

(all ages) BY KEEGAN PROSSER Darren Loucas, 6 p.m. The veteran blues

rocker who brought us the Jelly Rollers and Juke steps into the limelight as a solo act. Weaving simple melodies, a mean falsetto, and intricate guitar riffs, Loucas channels the honesty of the ’90s, bathed in raw folk tradition.

Eugenie Jones Quartet, 7 p.m. This sassy jazz vocalist delivers soulful tunes in the same vein as sultry mamas Sharon Jones and Nina Simone, backed by a stellar lineup of seasoned musicians. Don’t be surprised if she name-checks Beyoncé and Angelina (she has before), or drops a sexy, piano-driven rendition of “Cry Me a River” (she’s done that too).


Prom Queen, 8 p.m. Churning

out sickly sweet pop tracks inspired by pinup girls and 1960s housewives, Celene “Leeni” Ramadan is, naturally, everything Lana Del Rey tries too hard to be. A multiinstrumentalist with sultry vocals and a killer retro style, Ramadan pulls you in with her sugary disposition—and keeps you with her edgy girl power.

The Crow Quill Night Owls, 9 p.m. Think old-timey string music

of the 1920s and ’30s variety. If you’re a sucker for a good washtub bass, this act, which fluctuates from a duo to a six-person collective, delivers the goods. It’s the stuff you dance to drunkenly when your lady (or man) is fussin’—and all you want is a stiff drink.

New York FashioN academY (all ages) By Ma’Chell DuMa laVassar

Charlie ainslie

Spoonshine, 10 p.m. Playing bouncy Americana jams of the bluegrass persuasion, this act had a rowdy group of hippies stomping at Folklife earlier this year—and are bound to bring the same mischief to Ballard Avenue. Also of note: Their new EP, Song of Sockeye, was produced by Soundgarden knob-twister Adam Kasper, and features George Schwindt of Flogging Molly.

prom Queen plays Miro tea at 8 p.m. Secret Colors, 5:30 p.m. Secret Colors, aka Matt Lawson, combines experimental sound and visual art for a multisensory musical experience meant to lull you into sweet submission. Using meticulously placed random sound bites and heavy effects perpetrated by both guitars and synths, Lawson does not directly push you down the rabbit hole, but serves as more of an enveloping, seductive spirit guide who tinkers with your senses in a way both pleasing and a little disturbing. Haunted Horses, 6:30 p.m. We could

Grave Babies plays the NY Fashion Academy at 8:30 p.m. Perpetual Ritual, 4:30 p.m. Mitchell

Saulsberry is one of those enigmatic types who like to operate under a moniker. By keeping it undercover, this musical Svengali (who can also be heard in his very different project Grave Babies) recruits a hefty number of talented collaborators who keep each of his tracks extremely fresh. His blend of lo-fi, electro-chill, and melodic choruses make for a sound fans of “the chill room” can get behind.

Naomi Punk, 7:30 p.m. One of the great

things about our fair city is that you can get your punk rock in any flavor you choose: Brit, garage, grunge, or gutter, we have a band that fits the bill. However, it’s been a while since we’ve heard a band successfully marry a slurry Oly ethos and sludgy Seattleness like Naomi Punk has. These boy wonders appreciate bastardizing the basics, taking 1, 2, 3, 4 to another level, and have created an

» CoNtiNued oN pAGe 17

Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

emily Denton

spend hours and countless words trying to get you to wrap your head around the awesomeness of demonic, druggy electro-duo Haunted Horses, or we could just let the band’s Web tags for their February release, Live at the Embassy, do it—“Tags: punk, dark noise, rock, post-apocalyptic satanic space jams, true-exorcism-fantasy, Seattle.” Yep. Why go on? We know we had you at “post-apocalyptic satanic space jams” . . .

15


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Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

CONCERT

16

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2012»Festival Guide posse plays Salmon Bay eagles at 9 p.m.

We Make It EASY!!

Jonathan Moran

» from page 15 earworm with their track “Voodoo Trust,” one of this year’s gems, which somehow simultaneously screams “new” and “Northwest.” Grave Babies, 8:30 p.m. Sweet local label

Nouela, 9:30 p.m. Reminiscent of some

other forceful ladies behind the keyboard— namely Fiona, Chan, and Tori—Nouela Johnston’s classical training comes through not only in her stellar ivory tickling but also in her dramatic vocal delivery. The former frontwoman of People Eating People can take her voice from subtle to symphonic in just a few bars on her latest, Chants, a record that simultaneously explores and celebrates all the dark, moody places love-gone-wrong can take you.

Arrington de Dionyso, 10:30 p.m. You will never forget the first time you experience Mr. de Dionyso. Sensual horn solos, Tuvanstyle vocals, and lyrics in Indonesian make for music as weird as it is raw, as sexy as it is spiritual, and truly unlike anything you’ve

UniversityVW.com

Salmon Bay EaglES (all ages) By ERIN K. THOMPSON

Baby Guns, 5 p.m. This duo, singer/

guitarist Neil Giardino and singer/ keyboardist Erin Shannon, makes scuzzy, funereal music inspired by classic noir films, complete with heavy synths and eerie vocals. Their black-and-white-toned songs can be heard on this year’s Kingdom Come cassette and on an upcoming 7-inch single from the local Flatfield Records.

No One Gives YOU More!!

Sweet Pups, 6 p.m. This surf-pop quar-

tet (three gals and one dude drummer) is fronted by bitchin’ singer/keytarist Prisilla Ray, formerly of the Cute Lepers. The band’s chanty, girly melodies and riffing guitars owe as much to sweet ’60s girl groups as to tough ’80s lady rockers like the Runaways.

So Pitted, 7 p.m. Their Facebook page states “RECORDING SIT TIGHT SEATTLE.” In the meantime, there are just two rough demos by this punk outfit on Bandcamp. Which is fine, because both “Party Boyz Anthem” and “Heaven Sent” are the type of thrashing, devilish, heavily distorted stuff that’s best witnessed live anyway. Kithkin, 8 p.m. Following exuberant performances at the Capitol Hill Block Party

» Continued on page 20

4701 11th Ave NE Seattle 17315 Hwy 99 Lynnwood

UniversityAudi.com

Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

Hardly Art’s signing of Grave Babies is kinda reminiscent of that good-natured couple who take in a child whose parents disappeared under mysterious circumstances in every B movie ever. Because, as with that sweet-faced child, you never know what’s brewing under that appealing package. They are the label’s Orphan, if you will. Hope you didn’t burn through your stash during Haunted Horses, because the trippy, brutal, sexy nightmare on Ecstasy which is the Grave Babies begs to be appreciated on the not-so-sober tip. Songs like “Eating Babies”—and even the title of their EP, Gothdammit—show they have the smarts to approach themselves as one would any good B movie: with tongues firmly in cheek.

ever heard, which in this day and age is saying a lot. Much like all good things of a kinky nature, the first time you hear it you won’t know what to make of it, but once you give in to the rhythm and let yourself get caught up in it, not only will you like it, you’ll find yourself craving it again and again.

4724 Roosevelt Way NE Right off 1-5 in the U District

17


2012»Saturday, October 6 REVERB GALLERIA 4:00 5:00 5:30 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00

Poster Show (All Day) • Merch and Wristband Sales (All Day)

SALMON BAY EAGLES

THE SUNSET

THE 2 BIT SALOON

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Opens at 4:30 p.m. Baby Guns 5:00

Opens at 5 p.m. Wristbands on sale. Chastity Belt 5:30

Perpetual Ritual 4:30

Gold Records

Secret Colors

5:30

Sweet Pups Cristina Bautista 6:30

Full Toilet 6:30

12:00 12:30

5:00

7:00

7:00

Assfuzz 7:30

8:00

The Wheelies 8:30

7:00

Eugenie Jones Quartet

Chocolate Chuck

Prom Queen

Brain Fruit

8:00

9:30

Boat

9:30

Deadkill 10:30

Midday Veil 11:30

Erik Blood 12:30

Ticktockman 10:30

Ayron Jones and The Way 11:30

The Missionary Position 12:30

Lifestyles of the Poor and Unknown 7:30

8:00

Gabriel Mintz

8:30

Wayfinders The Shivering Denizens

7:00

6:30

Grave Babies

Posse Brokaw

6:00

7:30

The Chasers 8:30

Opens at 6 p.m.

Darren Loucas

Naomi Punk

Kithkin Monogamy Party

6:00

No Rey Side Saddle

7:30

Mike DC

6:30

So Pitted Spaceneedles

Opens at 5:30 p.m. Wristbands on sale.

Haunted Horses

10:00

11:30

The Foghorns

6:00

9:00

11:00

Opens at 4:30 p.m.

Country Lips

6:00

9:30

10:30

CONOR BYRNE PUB

MIRO TEA

5:30

8:00

10:00

HILLIARD’S BREWERY

Opens at 4 p.m.

8:30 9:00

THE TRACTOR

Julie C

9:00

9:00

9:00

Nouela 9:30

Arrington de Dionyso 10:30

OCnotes 10:00

10:00

11:00

Shannon Stephens 9:30

Cosmic Panther Land Band Sweet Water

8:30

The Crow Quill Night Owls Spoonshine 10:00

Whitney Ballen 10:30

Brothers From Another 11:00

Rachel Harrington 11:30

The Greatest Rock n’ Roll Band in the World

Soul Senate

12:00

12:00

Shelby Earl 12:30

REVERB FEST 2012 OFFER:

Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

Show us your REVERB wristband and receive a 10% discount on any room. (Expires 12/31/2012)

18

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WRISTBAND DISCOUNTS BUY YOUR WRISTBANDS AT THE DOOR VENUES

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Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

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The Market Arms

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2012»Festival Guide » from page 17 and Doe Bay Fest, this quartet of Seattle U. undergrads is creating a big local buzz for their noisy, polyrhythmic style and all four members’ joyous, percussion-loving penchant to smash and bang things onstage. See preview, page 12. Posse, 9 p.m. The winner of Seattle Weekly’s

Best Garage Band of 2012, this bassless rock trio is dually fronted by guitarist Sacha Maxim and Paul Wittmann-Todd’s charismatic, quirky vocals. The band’s self-titled album and their Bill Callahan covers EP, Some Dongs, stand equally as two of the year’s best local releases.

BOAT, 10 p.m. This jaunty, mischievous

pop-rock quartet, led by Tacoma schoolteacher D. Crane, has been a beloved local mainstay for years, and is preparing the release of its fifth LP, the as-yet-untitled follow-up to 2011’s bold and boisterous Dress Like Your Idols.

The SunSeT

(21 and over) by HannaH Levin Chastity Belt, 5:30 p.m.

Low-Residency MFA in Visual Studies

As sweet and sharp as the onion their hometown of Walla Walla is named for, Chastity Belt traverses territory similar to that mined by Reverb veterans TacocaT: They favor raunchy, mischievous themes of sex and debauchery set to a riotous, party-punk soundtrack, but with an even rawer, garagerock edge.

Monogamy Party, 8:30 p.m. Choosing seminal, drum-and-bass-heavy acts like KARP and godheadSilo as inspiration is a fine starting point, and the ideal launching pad for kinetically charismatic (and often scantily clothed) frontman Kennedy to launch his confrontational audience assault. It’s safe to say the Sunset floor will be sufficiently beer- and sweat-soaked by the time these guys finish one of their signature frenetic sets. Brokaw, 9:30 p.m. Good to Die Records

founder Nik Christofferson harbors an affection for a certain caliber of sonic shrapnel, which is likely why three of his bands are on this particular stage. However, Brokaw may exemplify Christofferson’s fetish for barbaric bass the best. Fans of Jesus Lizard, Shellac, and nearly anything a modern-day incarnation of Touch & Go Records would sign should get in line early.

Deadkill, 10:30 p.m. Keeping it simple doesn’t have to mean keeping it stupid. Deadkill knows the line between the two is fine, but not worth fussing with too terribly much. When he’s not bashing the drum kit behind Absolute Monarchs, guitarist Michael Stubz channels his love of the Germs, the Circle Jerks, and Black Flag into this gleefully dark, primal punk valentine.

erik Blood plays the Sunset at 12:30 a.m.

20

8 Week Summer Sessions

reason former Visqueen frontwoman Rachel Flotard plucked this petite powerhouse to be her band’s bassist during their final years (R.I.P. Visqueen). Bautista exudes every ounce of what makes punk-pop its most powerful: confident singing that comes from the soul— and the soles of her feet, evidently, given the arenasized presence she brings to the stage.

Spaceneedles, 7:30 p.m. It’s surprising that

pnca.edu

Portland, Oregon

Brian O’Shea

Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

Cristina Bautista, 6:30 p.m. There’s clearly a

this artfully angular postpunk quartet hasn’t been saddled with the “supergroup” tag, because Thomas Wright (Grand Archives, exbestfriends), bassist Jim Cotton (Feral Children), second guitarist Ben Kersten (exbestfriends), and drummer Scott Blue are some of the city’s most accomplished and adventurous players. Expect the exceptional.

Midday Veil, 11:30 p.m. Prior to joining this band, percussionist Sam Yoder described his future psych-rock family as “the perfect soundtrack to an opium den.” While clearly not an inaccurate perception, what makes Midday Veil succeed so gracefully is their shunning of the genre’s more ponderous moments in favor

» Continued on page 22


Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

21


2012»Festival Guide » from page 20 of lucid, finely drawn song structures that require attention, not lazy, lysergic detours.

dinner & show

WED/OCTOBER 3 & THU/OCTOBER 4 • 7:30PM 91.3 KBCS WELCOMES

bebel gilberto

Erik Blood, 12:30 a.m. Early in Erik

Blood’s career, while watching a member of the Strokes spontaneously compose a song in Blood’s instrument-strewn, zeitgeistchanneling basement studio, SW contributor Ma’Chell Duma LaVassar told me she viewed him as the budding “Prince of Seattle.” That girl is a soothsayer: Between his early work as a multi-instrumentalist in the Turn-Ons and his recent groundbreaking work producing artists as diverse as the Moondoggies and Shabazz Palaces, Blood is well on his way to becoming a defining architect of Seattle’s contemporary arts culture.

The TracTor

(21 and over) by DAVE LAKE Foghorns, 5 p.m. These Ballard locals play approachable anti-folk with creative instrumentation, including accordion, saxophone, and sometimes a bucket player instead of a drummer. See preview, page 11. Country Lips, 6 p.m. A nine-piece outlaw country outfit with a great sense of humor and a name culled from a Dylan lyric—what’s not to like? Side Saddle, 7 p.m. A trio of pretty ladies sing pretty harmonies in tribute to their

» Continued on page 24

FRI/OCTOBER 5 • 8PM

star anna & the

laughing dogs w/ kasey anderson SAT/OCTOBER 6 • 7PM

the bad plus SUN/OCTOBER 7 • 7:30PM TRUE WEST PRESENTS

greg brown

MON/OCTOBER 8 • 7PM & 9:30PM

marcus miller Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

22

little green cars next • 10/10 tom rush w/ jim page • 10/11 j. von stratton designs fall fashion presentation • 10/12 the be good tanyas • 10/13 kris orlowski & andrew joslyn

Jen Seaman Miller talks about—what else?—spooge. Editor’s Note: The Reverb Questionnaire is a stock list of questions we pose to people outside the music business. Here, Jen Seaman—one of the comics charged with introducing bands at Seattle Weekly’s Reverb Local Music Festival—tells us about the Murder City Devils, Belltown playlists, and growing up agnostic. SW: What music have you been listening to today? Did you like it? Miller: I’ve been listen-

ing to a lot of Johnny Cash, Depeche Mode, and ’80s music . . . I liked and didn’t like it, so sayeth Pandora. What’s your preferred method for listening to music (iPod, car, home stereo, etc.)?

My record player. I like to listen to old jazz records, mostly Fats Waller, while my cats judge my attempt at dancing, which always turns into some form of the sprinkler. My least favorite is driving through Belltown around last call while the girls flood the street singing broken Adele lyrics. She deserves to be whole for once in her life!

When was the last time you heard “Stairway to Heaven”? Did you turn it off?

• 10/3 flip and fly / daniel rapport trio • 10/4 first thursday art opening w/ sarah ghanooni / hardcoretet • 10/5 ayron jones (solo) / spyn reset • 10/6 doug cassell band • 10/7 nathaniel talbot quartet • 10/8 free funk union w/ rotating hosts: d’vonne lewis and adam kessler • 10/9 singer-songwriter showcase w/ greg spence wolf, dana pierce and jeremy serwer • 10/10 istvan and farko / gin creek TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE

PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1.5 HOURS PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

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My family were agnostic, so we preferred not to listen to religious hymns. When you sing karaoke, what’s your go-to number?

“Blister in the Sun” by the Violent Femmes, even though Burger King exploited it! Really, thanks for making me think your burgers have spooge in them—GREAT! Now I want women who are late to call their boyfriends to say “You shouldn’t have Whoppered in me!” What is the last song you want to hear before you die?

“Personal Jesus” by Depeche Mode. I want a priest with a toy phone to read me my rites while saying “Pick up the receiver,

courtesy of Jen seaman miller

TUE/OCTOBER 9 • 7:30PM

ReveRb QuestionnaiRe

I’ll make you a believer.” I’ll respond by cracking up into a flatline of joy! Please share a favorite musical moment/story from your past.

I’ve been performing comedy for over five years now. One of my favorite bands when I was in college was the Murder City Devils. Their lead singer, Spencer Moody, owned the Anne Bonny at the time, and I invited him to come to my first show, which he did (I was surprised that anyone did). He later ended up booking me to do comedy at the Anne Bonny. It was great to have someone that I admired support my dream. E Jen Seaman Miller hosts at the Tractor during Seattle Weekly’s Reverb Local Music Festival on Sat., Oct. 6.


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Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

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23


2012»Festival Guide Wayfinders play the Tractor at 9 p.m.

THE SPRING STANDARDS ELK AND BOAR AND MELVILLE

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» FROM PAGE 22 favorite female country icons: Loretta, Patsy, Emmylou. They’re what the Dixie Chicks might be if they washed all the pop from their sound and left only the roots. The Chasers, 8 p.m. Balls-to-the-wall hard rock that’s turned up to 11 and held together by heavy grooves and heavier riffs, deftly balancing modern loud rock with classic metal. Wayfinders, 9 p.m. Retro hippie rock that

borrows from ’60s psychedelia, ’70s glam rock, and ’90s Urge Overkill, all slathered in glorious vintage reverb.

24

(21 and over) BY TODD HAMM

Gold Records, 5:30 p.m. This local trio lands somewhere between NOFX’s straightahead pop punk and Foo Fighters’ yelled-out “garage” rock. They are goofy, and remind one of fellow fun-loving area punkers Schew Aquarium, with semi-sensical lyrics and simplistic guitar licks riding up front. They are talented, though, when it comes down to it, and know what to do with a guitar solo/ bass riff/drum fill if the mood calls for it. Full Toilet, 6:30 p.m. With a loaded name like Full Toilet, people are going to expect you to play some pretty ridiculous . . . shit, and frontguy “Piss” Don Sheets doesn’t disappoint. Sure, last year’s self-titled 7-inch went down right away as one of the most

occasional Seattle folk supergroup featuring members of the Maldives, the Moondoggies, Widower, and Shim, which probably gives you an idea what they sound like: finger-picked Ticktockman plays folk tunes with killer the 2 Bit at 10:30 p.m. harmonies.

Sweet Water, 11 p.m.

They signed to the majors in the height of Nirvana-mania, retired in 2000, then resurfaced at the end of the decade to tour with Stone Temple Pilots—a perfect fit given their big guitars, big choruses, and big rock sound.

AMBER ZBITNOFF

Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

Cosmic Panther Land Band, 10 p.m. An

THE 2 BIT SALOON

The Greatest Rock ’n’ Roll Band in the World, midnight They outlived the

Beatles, survived—and thrived in—disco, and still look great in shorts. Don’t get stuck in the line outside this one. Get there early, and drunk. THE GREATEST ROCK WRITER IN THE WORLD

bizarre records Sub Pop has ever decided to lend their stamp to, but its beauty—if you can call it that—lies in that very absurdity. On the low, it’s an expertly engineered/arranged project with well-balanced acoustics and rough but discernible pieces that come together in a choreographed-car-crash sort of way that makes the mere idea of a live show seem all the more intriguing.


Assfuzz, 7:30 p.m. The parade of scuzzy-

named, loud rock bands continues with this trio of Bremerton dudes who don’t always take the adventurous or easy-listening route (the vocals, for example), but it’s led them to our all-local, show-and-prove music festival, where they are in a prime position to surprise some unsuspecting distortion-heads drinking bargain whiskey at the bar or hustling vintage Dr. Martens on Leary Way and turn them into hardcore Assfuzz-heads.

The Wheelies, 8:30 p.m. This highly melodic Tacoma quartet has a deep well of catchy pop songs sprinkled with moments of the loud stuff, and thrives in the fun little environment the name suggests, with songs about partying with friends and young love. The band’s ability to traverse styles and volumes while maintaining its trademark upbeat flavor enables it to have extremely wide appeal without necessarily breaking new ground. See preview, page 8. The Shivering Denizens, 9:30 p.m.

Man, if stompin’ honky tonk is your bag, you will absolutely love the Shivering Denizens. They’ve got it all: guitar twang, a stand-up double bass, a banjo (!). Lead howler Ron E. “The Rebel” Banner goes all in, singing slackjawed songs about the skid-row lifestyle and catching the wrath of a “Cheatin’ Woman,” “Mad Momma,” “Honky Tonk Witch,” etc. The 2 Bit Saloon should be a perfect backdrop for such hootin’ and hollerin’.

Come Join uS! ALL MONTH CELEBRATION IN OCTOBER! Copper Gate’s 66th Year Anniversary featuring a birthday tribute to jazz legend Thelonious Monk

INDUSTRY NIGHT EVERY MONDAY

All night happy hour for service industry, 5pm-close

Music to Your Mouth

Find Dry Fly in your Favorite Local Stores and Establishments.

Every Tuesday, 8-11pm

Jazzgrind with the Suffering Fuckheads. No cover.

Every Thursday, 8-11pm

Live jazz with the Fu Kun Wu Trio. No cover.

FRIDAY, OCT. 5, 8PM

Live music with Michael Serpe, Greg Markel, Girl Singer and Terri Tarantula. $5 cover.

SATURDAY, OCT. 6, 8PM

Live music with Blue Star Creeper and Ethan Freckleton Band. $5 cover.

MONK-A-THON SPECIAL:

TUESDAY, OCT. 9, 8-11pm: Jazzgrind tribute to Thelonious Monk by the Suffering Fuckheads. No cover. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10, 8-11pm: Origin Records Night Tribute to Thelonious Monk. No cover. THURSDAY, OCT. 11, 8-11pm: A jazz tribute to Thelonious Monk by the Fu Kun Wu Trio. No cover.

FRIDAY, OCT. 26, 8PM

Live music with Olivia Lombardi from New Mexico and Seattle’s own Earl Brooks. $5 cover.

SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 8PM

Masquerade party and live music with Jessica Lynne and Fleur Jack. $5 cover.

SUNDAY, OCT. 28, 8-11PM

Singer/songwriter showcase with host kubby c. No cover.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31, 8PM

“That Thing”: Halloween edition - an open mic of all sorts, with host Andy Roo Forest. $3 cover donated to charity.

Happy hour! Every day · 5-7pm

Explore www.dryflydistilling.com

Plus, $6 Aquavit (“water of life”) shots all month! 6301 24th Ave. NW in uptown Ballard · 206.706.3292 Events subject to change – get updates at thecoppergate.com

Ticktockman, 10:30 p.m. Seattle’s

Ayron Jones and The Way, 11:30 p.m.

Jones has one of those rich, buttery voices that he can make sandpaper-rough to match the moments when he steps on his guitar’s distortion pedal. Nailing traditional blues-rock and R&B with original songs that sound like they could be tried-and-true standards, Jones and his band have the spirit of old blues vets, injected with contemporary soul. Oh, and dude can shred on the guitar. Should be a good one. The Missionary Position, 12:30 a.m.

From the ashes of stellar local rock outfit Post Stardom Depression, The Missionary Position has emerged to glam things up and strut the rock out. The band’s albums contain flashes of arena rockers like Velvet Revolver: wailing guitar solos; big, sturdy drums; booming, gravelly vocals filled to the brim with sexuality. Frontman Jeff Angell is at the band’s writhing center, fleshing out the guitar- and saxophone-riff-built numbers with tales of living on the edge. In bed and at the bar, a great way to close out the night. E music@seattleweekly.com

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• Children (6-18) & active military admitted free • High-quality, affordable & accessible concerts for more info visit watermusicfestival.com or call (360) 665-4466

Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

Ticktockman set up shop in the more accessible regions of The Mars Volta’s hyperprog catalogue, and plays with some interesting ideas along the way. That influence is a bit too pronounced at times: Ryan Van Wieringen’s soaring vocals sound like they were gleaned from the Cedric Bixler-Zavala School of Abstract Singing, and the post-production matches the blueprint; the band’s tangential song structures are a bit more original, but closely follow TMV’s lead. But opinions vary widely, so your best bet is to see the group live and judge for yourself.

25


Take Warning Presents

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presents the 30th Annual Hood River Valley

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Friday 1-7pm • Saturday 10am-7pm Sunday 10am-5pm Farmers Market • Huge Art Show Great Food, Craft Beer, & Gorge Wines Live Music • Kids Zone Giant Pumpkin Carving & More!

Lauren Mann & The Fairly Odd Folk, Kate Lynne Logan 21+ ONLY - Tickets available @ ticketweb.com - 8:30 PM Wed. November 14 @ Neptune Theater

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@seattleweekly

My Big Fabulous Jewish Gay Wedding Sunday Oct 14, 2012 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. at Sorrento Hotel 900 Madison St., Seattle

This free class is open to all LGBTQ couples who plan to have a Jewish wedding. We will explore the traditional ceremony and creative ways to adapt it just for you.

DIN ING N EW SLE TTE R

BRING IN YOUR REVERB FESTIVAL WRISTBAND ON OCT 6TH & 7TH FOR $1 OFF ALL DRAFT BEERS!

A large selection of local beers, ciders, wines by the glass and delicious craft cocktails. The inside scoop on openings, hotspots and offers. Interfaith couples are welcome. Light dinner will be served. *This course is hosted by Temple B’nai Torah and Temple De Hirsch Sinai and is made possible through a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle and the generosity of the Sorrento Hotel.

Upcoming Class:

Reve r b • Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3−9, 2012

Temple B’nai Torah

26

Birth Rituals Sunday, Nov. 18, 5:00 p.m. Location: Temple B’nai Torah

To RSVP or for more info, contact Rabbi Kinberg, RabbiKinberg@templebnaitorah.org, (425) 603-9677

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My Big Fabulous Jewish Gay Wedding Sunday Oct 14, 2012 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. at Sorrento Hotel 900 Madison St., Seattle

This free class is open to all LGBTQ couples who plan to have a Jewish wedding. We will explore the traditional ceremony and creative ways to adapt it just for you. Interfaith couples are welcome. Light dinner will be served.

Enjoy Reverb!

*This course is hosted by Temple B’nai Torah and Temple De Hirsch Sinai and is made possible through a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle and the generosity of the Sorrento Hotel.

Upcoming Class:

Birth Rituals Sunday, Nov. 18, 5:00 p.m. Location: Temple B’nai Torah

To RSVP or for more info, contact Rabbi Kinberg, RabbiKinberg@templebnaitorah.org, (425) 603-9677

4818 17th Ave NW Ballard

Temple B’nai Torah

My Big Fabulous Jewish Gay Wedding 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. at Sorrento Hotel

MUSIC NEW SLETTER The inside scoop on upcoming shows and the latest reviews.

Temple De Hirsch Sinai

To view our upcoming s hows v is it 2 b i t sa l o o n b a l l a rd .c o m

Sunday Oct 14, 2012

WWW.SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM/READERS/REGIS TER

This free class is open to all LGBTQ couples who plan to have a Jewish

DINING

WEEK LY

M USIC

EVENT S


reviews»Our Take on Every Local Release* LOCAL RELEASES

*

A Dark Horse, A Dark Horse (out now, self-released, adarkhorse.bandcamp. com): James Parker and Hugh Rodgers’ pretty, folksy indie rock makes you wonder if the ghost of Elliott Smith has chosen to haunt them in Seattle. Creating a sound that is compelling, dense, and dreamy, A Dark Horse prove themselves to be more than commercial-radio-ready. MA’CHELL DUMA LAVASSAR

com): Straddling the awkward line between “instant hit” and “I never want to hear this again.” Instrumentally, “East on 8” and “Cabin Fever” are exhilarating, but the excessively countrified vocals detract from the experience. JOE WILLIAMS (Fri., Oct. 19, Nectar)

It’s October 2012, and Seattle Sounds Like . . .

Demon Dogs, Demon Dogs (out now, self-

released, demondogs.org): Old-school metal that worships at the altar of Iron Maiden and Mercyful Fate, hitting all the requisite notes, including double bass-drum patterns, harmonized guitar riffing, and soaring lead vocals. DL

Alex’s Hand, Madame Psychosis (10/15,

self-released, alexshand.bandcamp.com): A bizarre quartet of tunes that jumps among rock-musical resemblances (“Stalker”), Zappainspired weirdness (“Laura”), and Jesus Lizard heaviness (“Robot”). The soundtrack to your fucked-up drug trip. DAVE LAKE

*

Everything Points Up, 2.0 (out now, selfreleased, everythingpointsup.bandcamp.com): Formed by two members of power-pop group The Glass Notes, 2.0 plays like a collective of outtakes that were “too electronic” for their primary band—spry guitar-pop songs augmented with synthesizer and drum machines. AG

The Tea Cozies’ new EP, Bang Up, is out Oct. 30.

Avatar Young Blaze, Soviet Goonion

(out now, self-released, avyoungblaze. com): The latest AYB offering packs some highgrade rhymes, as one would expect, though it’s not his strongest front-to-back collection. You’ll find some of his cleverest lines sprinkled throughout, but the most interesting moments come when he pushes himself to rap abstractly over left-field beats (as on “Fast Life Experts”), or when he’s at his most unapologetic (“Darko,” “The Scumbag Anthem”). TODD HAMM

Explone, Telescope & Satellite (out now, selfreleased, explone.com): Uncompromised indie pop that oozes nostalgia for bands like Queen and R.E.M. Probably would have gone over better during those confusing early-to-mid’90s years. TH (Thurs., Oct. 4, Sunset Tavern) Zach Fleury, Be Still, Neverland, Egypt (out

now, self-released, myspace.com/zachfleurymusic): This frequent session player (he’s worked with Macklemore, Allen Stone, and Noah Gundersen, among others) strikes out on his own—showing he’s more than just a hired hand—and steps out on songs like “Neverland, Egypt,” which showcases his smooth vocals and skilled guitar picking. JMG

The Badlands, The Badlands (out now, Shit Starter Records, reverbnation.com/ thebadlandsusa): Straightforward party punk meant for chugging PBR in dives. Frontwoman Ginnie Ko’s low growl recalls Joan Jett after several packs of cigarettes. The band recently signed with Oakland’s Shit Starter Records, which is releasing this EP on blue 7-inch vinyl. JULIA MULLEN GORDON

Billy the Fridge, Old Fashioned (out now, self-released, billythefridge.bandcamp.com): It’s easy to write off the new project from this jokey Internet battle-rap star, competitive eater, and occasional amateur wrestler as simple novelty—so before I do, I will inform you that he was able to finagle beats by Jake One, Sabzi, MTK, and Mack Formway for the project, and that novelty can be entertaining at least once. TH (Tues., Oct. 9, Nectar) The Bitter Roots, Chiaroscuro (10/9, Water

Works Hill Recording Co., bitterrootsmusic. com): The Bitter Roots are nothing if not

Yeah, every release

versatile. Stylistically, their sprawling Chiaroscuro goes from Alice in Chains to moe and back. If their lyrics and vocals were as sharp as their musicianship and creative chutzpah, they’d be a force to reckon with. MS (Sat., Oct. 13, Cafe Venus/Mars Bar) The Blanket Truth, Urban Wildlife (out now,

self-released, blankettruth.bandcamp.com): Just how cutesy are the cutesy pop songs on Urban Wildlife? The liner notes differentiate between soprano and baritone ukelele. They include whistling, handclaps, beatboxing, and shouted group backup vocals. It’s the most aggressively twee album you’ll hear all year.

ANDREW GOSPE

* In each issue, we review every release from local bands and labels scheduled for the coming month. We fully expect a few releases to slip through the cracks. So each issue will also include anything we missed in previous issues, or that had been released in the interim. Send releases and reminders to reverbreviews@seattleweekly.com.

*

Blue Sky Black Death, Aquatic Reverie

(out now, Behold the Destroyer, bsbdmusic.com): In-house producers for rising 206 rapper Nacho Picasso, Blue Sky Black Death’s latest beat tape, surveying the duo’s productions from 2006 to 2012, largely sticks to the promise of its title, presenting dreamy, underwater beats just on the cusp of evaporating into the rap cloud. ERIC GRANDY (Fri., Oct. 26, Chop Suey)

Cascadia ’10, “The Secret Is Out” (out now,

self-released, cascadia10.bandcamp.com): The spicy Afrobeat from this Seattle ninepiece sounds like it could have fallen right off a Budos Band album—but hey, Budos Band’s albums are fun to listen to. TH (Fri., Nov. 9, Showbox at the Market) Dead Winter Carpenters, Ain’t It Strange

(10/19, self-released, deadwintercarpenters.

*

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

The Good Hurt, You Are Here (out now, self-

released, music.goodhurtband.com): These hooky, vocal harmony–laden pop-rock songs often err toward the saccharine (lyrics-wise, the chorus of “Half Hearted” recalls that one song from the ’90s about putting a heart in a blender), but frontman James Lanman does boast some fundamentally sound songwriting abilities and a radio-ready voice. AG (Fri., Oct. 5, The Crocodile) The Great Um, What the People Want

(10/15, self-released, thegreatum.com): This Seattle trio play KEXP-style indie rock with clean guitar tones and an affinity for ’60s British pop like the Kinks and indie icons like Pavement. Things are mostly subdued, but the band lets loose on “Sweet Baby K,” which has a White Stripes vibe thanks to its big riffs and bluesy progression. DL (Thurs., Oct. 18, Sunset Tavern)

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

now, Precedent Records, jimbasnight.com): It’s odd that Basnight is only now introducing himself, because his band has been around for more than two decades, playing multidate summer runs at Roche Harbor Resort like they’re the Allman Brothers at the Beacon Theatre. At his best, Basnight is a poor man’s Mick Jagger, which is still pretty rich. MIKE SEELY

JAMES ELLIOTT BAILEY

Jim Basnight, Introducing Jim Basnight (out

Benjamin Gibbard, Former Lives (10/16, Barsuk, benjamingibbard.com): Based on the title alone, it’s tempting to read Gibbard’s solo effort in the context of last year’s wellpublicized divorce from Zooey Deschanel. But instead, Former Lives strikes an optimistic tone, anthologizing (and celebrating) the past through the prism of Gibbard’s distinctive songwriting. AG (Fri., Nov. 16, Showbox at the Market)

27


reviews» » FROM PAGE 27 Hannalee, Cucurbita (10/9, self-released,

hannaleesong.com): Hannalee’s admittedly attractive members make similarly appealing, layered folk. In three-part harmony, Michael Harley, Anna-Lisa Notter, and Fidelia Rowe discuss joy and light while dustings of harmonica, music box, and organ fill out their version of the new Seattle sound: feel-good folk. JMG (Sat., Oct. 6, St. Mark’s Cathedral)

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Heiress, Early Frost (10/23, Deathwish Inc.,

heiress.bandcamp.com): These hardcore/ slowcore champs enlisted storied rock engineer Jack Endino for this somewhat trippy 10-track voyage. Though many of the compositions don’t seem overly complex up front, they build upon their simpler foundations in unconventional ways (pan flute!) to create a sound all their own. TH (Wed., Oct. 24, El Corazon)

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Coty Hogue, When We Get to Shore: Live at Empty Sea Studios (out now, Hearth Music, cotyhogue.com): On this live CD, banjo-picker and Appalachia expert Coty Hogue shares her love of traditional folk songs (“Handsome Molly,” “Wedding Dress”) and a whimsical take on modern classics (Springsteen’s “I’m on Fire,” Fleetwood Mac’s “Second Hand News”) in a lusty, ringing alto. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

*

Jackrabbit, A Better Place (out now,

self-released, jackrabbit.bandcamp.com): Spun into an intricate web of bluegrass, Americana, and rock, A Better Place is as transparent as it is honest. With beautiful harmonies and bouncing instrumentation, “Fathers and Sons” is perfect after a stressful day of anything. JW (Thurs., Oct. 25, Tractor Tavern)

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28

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Bars of Light (out now, self-released, legendaryoaks.bandcamp.com): Rootsy without falling prey to Northwest folkies’ tendency to hump a bale of hay, Legendary Oaks’ superb sophomore effort is loose and sunny, evocative of the Byrds, only on way less acid. MS (Thurs., Oct. 18, Barboza)

Whitney Lyman, Wandering, Wonder-

ing (out now, self-released, whitneylyman. com): This multi-instrumentalist’s gentle voice is the anchor of her 10-song release, which comprises mostly baroque pop ballads. Drums are sparse, but there’s plenty of piano, banjo, strings, and even horns, all of which help keep the record interesting. DL (Tues., Oct. 16, Comet Tavern) Magnetic Circus, We Die in Fire (10/10, self-

released, magneticcircus.bandcamp.com): It’s obvious Magnetic Circus can rock. However, somewhere in this album’s fusion of heavy rock, lo-fi recording, and ambient sounds is a strong disconnect in the timing, tone, and delivery. JW (Wed., Oct. 10, High Dive)

*

The Maldives, Muscle for the Wing (10/16, Spark & Shine, sparkandshine. com): It’s tempting to accuse Maldives lyricist Jason Dodson of being a cornpone poser until you consider that The Band, with the exception of Levon Helm, hailed from Canada. Fittingly, Muscle for the Wing solidifies the Maldives’ position as The Band’s heir apparent. Their hallmark dueling guitars and multipart harmonies still emerge with regularity, but never has Dodson’s pure, pretty voice been featured so adroitly. If this is posing, then it’s runway-caliber stuff. MS (Tues., Oct. 16, Queen Anne Easy Street Records)

(10/16, Dais Records, daisrecords.com) In his old thrash- and black-metal bands Teen Cthulhu and Book of Black Earth, singer/guitarist (and Actual Pain clothier) TJ Cowgill affected an unnatural, strangulated shriek—sometimes even for his between-song banter. As King Dude, a black-clad death-country crooner in the style of an exhumed and ghoulish Johnny Cash, Cowgill stretches his voice to an equally unnatural though aesthetically opposite end: a low, bellowing moan that grinds down to a croak at its slowest crawl. Paired with acoustic guitar alternately cleanly recorded and decimated by reverb and noise, it makes for a convincingly spooky presence. ERIC GRANDY (Wed., Oct. 24, Chop Suey)

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now, self-released, datpiff.com): Rising lyricist Raz shines on this five-track EP, and although his delivery sounds a little

less natural, Sam Lachow (who also made the beats here) rhymes respectably as well. TH (Fri., Oct. 5, Neumos)


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MACKLEMORE & RYAN LEWIS, The Heist (10/9, self-released, macklemore.com)

Doused in personal disclosure and weighty subject matter, The Heist is aimed at forcing its listeners to more closely examine their lives and the world around them, and in that it succeeds. The album’s lyrics feel as much like a conversation about the sad or goofy specifics of life as they do rap proper; different songs find Macklemore drifting from inspirational speaker to class clown as that conversation shifts moods. Musically, the album bulges with Lewis’ elaborate compositions, which are thoughtful but (with several exceptions) mostly recapitulate the album’s exhausting length and slow pace. The good songs hold up for the duration, but others could stand to be truncated or omitted altogether: “Can’t Hold Us” and “Gold,” for example, are terribly disposable pop songs, and “Wings,” while lyrically powerful, is lengthy and overblown in its presentation. On the flip side, you probably won’t hear more moving songs all year than the absolutely beautiful “Starting Over” and “Same Love.” As a whole, The Heist is a (sometimes too) dramatic feature with striking moments of clarity; its main fault is that it sets out to accomplish too much. TODD HAMM (Fri., Oct. 12, WaMu Theater)

9 Lb Beaver, Paradise Awaits (out now, Big

Steve Records, facebook.com/ninepound beaver): This is sloppy, four-chord, beer-

Kris Orlowski & Andrew Joslyn, Pieces We Are (10/16, self-released, krisorlowski. com, andrewjoslynmusic.com): Backed by a 17-piece orchestra, Joslyn’s sweeping compositions, featuring Orlowski’s honeyed baritone and mingled with the talents of choir members Allen Stone and Campfire Ok’s Melodie Knight and Mychal Cohen, strike an ethereal chord. GE (Sat., Oct. 13, Triple Door) Police Teeth, Police Teeth (10/16, Latest Flame, policeteeth.bandcamp.com): Although the propulsive punk on this trio’s fourth album is a bit one-note, it has hints of bands as disparate as Fugazi and Hüsker Dü, and the big, jagged guitar riffs never hamper the songs’ incisive energy. AG (Fri., Nov. 11, Sunset Tavern) Red Jacket Mine, “Amy” b/w “Any Major

Dude Will Tell You” (10/16, Fin Records, red jacketmine.net): The latest single from this power-pop band, “Amy” is full of breezy pop

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 31

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released, reverbnation.com/murderparty): Like a less-quirky B-52s without Fred Schneider and with fewer dancy bits, Murder Party have the Eastside on the brain. This EP’s title is a reference to Bellevue with “your SUV and your sense of entitlement,” while “545” describes a ride on a Seattleto-Redmond SoundTransit bus line that is apparently packed with passengers into self-help books and fantasy novels. DL

now, self-released, omegamoo.com): Running just under nine minutes, this three-song EP is practically over before it starts. However, Omega Moo’s breakneck bar-rock shoutalongs have enough going on (well-placed keyboard, a slight tinge of rockabilly) to warrant repeat listens. AG (Sun., Oct. 28, High Dive)

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Mts. & Tunnels, Mts + Tunnels (out now, self-released, mtstunnels.band camp.com): This debut album is cozy, oldschool garage rock filled with bluesy guitar riffs punctuated by vintage horns. At times the local group has a classic Northwest folk-rock sound, made more apparent on tracks like “Something in the Light,” where the complementary vocals are reminiscent of The Head and the Heart’s harmonies. SARAH ELSON

guzzling punk rock (think Guttermouth) with songs about partying in North Korea and girls from Yakima. DL (Sun., Oct. 14, Funhouse)

E

released, ericmillerband.com): In the 12 songs on City Lights, Eric Miller engages in approximately 12 different styles of music. A pop chameleon in the best sense of the word, he sounds as though Loudon Wainwright III accompanied Robyn Hitchcock to a bar where the Traveling Wilburys and Chet Baker happened to be hanging out. MS

TH

*

Eric Miller, City Lights (out now, self-

29


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reviews» » FROM PAGE 29 melodies and plenty of doo-wops that will have you humming for days. On the flip side, it’s all smooth soul. SE (Sun., Oct. 14, Locöl Barley & Vine) Red Sea, Planets Align (out now, self-released, redseaband.com): Red Sea is a classic bar band: They play well, their songs are decent, but they’re not at all contemporary. That’s not necessarily a bad thing if you’re into classic rock like Pink Floyd, whose influence looms large over “Something Else.” DL (Sat., Nov. 17, Fuel)

*

Smokey Brights, No Sheer Force of Will

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(out now, self-released, ballofwax.org): In what has to be curator Levi Fuller’s most controversial compilation to date, BOW 29 features keyboards, winds, banjos, mandolas, percussion, voices and more, but not a single axe, acoustic, electric, or bass: Fuller dares to go guitarless in the city Kurt and Jimi built. MDL now, self-released, music.kristenward. com) Ward’s powerful vocals and guitar work roughen up the usual female-fronted alt-country thing on this stellar effort. MDL (Thurs., Oct. 25, Tractor Tavern)

We Say Bang!, Ignite (out now, self-released,

Mike Simmons, Sunburn (out now, self-

Wickerbird, The Crow Mother (out now,

Sundries, “I Found Perfection” (out now, self-released, sundries.bandcamp.com): The new single from this relatively new rock band features a propulsive rhythm and the powerful, pleading singing of frontwoman Sadie Ava, whose vocals have a richness and maturity that belie her 19 years. ERIN K. THOMPSON (Wed., Oct. 10, Chop Suey)

*

Tea Cozies, Bang Up (10/30, self-

released, tea-cozies.com): Tea Cozies returns with another dose (its third) of raucous, organ-laced garage pop. Fans of The Pharmacy, Posse, and even Camera Obscura should take notice. JMG (Sat., Oct. 27, Columbia City Theater)

Thaddillac, Adayzndalyfalayk/One Man

*

Tiki Joe’s Ocean, Soul of the Sea (out now, self-released, tikijoesocean.com): Multi-instrumentalist/composer Andy Nazzal has created a serene but vigorous, Latin-lounge-influenced album that’s straight-up addicting. The opener, “Hotter in the Shade,” is overflowing with classy piano, bongo drums, and three helpings of soul. JW

Tokyoidaho, Tokyoidaho (out now, Neon

Sigh, tokyoidaho.com): On this synth-rock group’s self-titled debut, the most relaxed songs are the best, like the meandering mid-album number “The Ballard of the Teenage Shut-In” and the album closer “Deep Cushions”—an ambitious space-rock track even if it doesn’t quite earn its 10-minute run time. AG

myspace.com/wesaybang): Trading traditional studio recording for a DIY project recorded in the lead singer’s basement using shoddy software, Ignite features sporadic bursts of bright crash, fast snare rolls, and distorted guitar that beg to be seen live. JW

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self-released, wickerbird.bandcamp.com): With a crackling sound quality, this debut album from NYC-by-way-of-Puyallup’s Wickerbird is an oddly soothing collection of indie-rock lullabies full of hushed harmonies and ambient fuzz. GE

Wiscon, Wiscon (out now, self-released, reverbnation.com/wiscon): This femalefronted band plays a strain of dark new wave that’s powered by vintage synths and driving bass lines. With no guitar player, there’s lots of room for the songs to breathe, which is simultaneously a strength and weakness. DL (Thurs., Oct. 18, Funhouse) Younger Shoulder, Younger Shoulder (out

now, self-released, youngershoulder.bandcamp. com): Sweet, lo-fi indie pop with classical-guitar elements and emotive, whispery vocals. MDL

Your Favorite Book, Remember the Narwhal

(out now, self-released, yourfavoritebook.org): This album’s 11 songs travel the well-worn road of literate indie rock carved by bands like the Weakerthans. If acoustic folk punk is your jam, you’ll find something to love here. JMG

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Black Marble, A Different Arrangement (10/9, Hardly Art, blackmarblenyc.com): This Brooklyn coldwave duo doesn’t radically alter its sound for its debut full-length, following the Weight Against the Door EP from earlier this year. Drum-machine beats drive spare guitar and synth melodies, the vocals

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 33

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Trash Can Band (out now, Jewel Turner, thadillac.com): An original take on guitarbased funk from local character Thaddeus Turner. This double album is cleanly engineered and creatively arranged with traditional-style rock numbers alongside vocoder-voiced synth-funk. As always, though, his personality is his loudest instrument. TH

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reviews» » FROM PAGE 31

most exhilarating rock record. EKT (Fri., Nov. 2, Barboza)

drip with melancholy, and everything has the mournfully spare sense of space of New Order’s earliest post-Curtis recordings. EG Jeremy Camp, Christmas: God With Us (out now, BEC, jeremycamp.com): It’s never too soon to get in the holiday spirit. Camp puts an upbeat, modern twist on classics like “Jingle Bell Rock,” though his voice shines best on the less-poppy songs, like “O Come O Come Emmanuel.” JW

Squeeze, suicidesqueeze.net): Atlanta garage gals the Coathangers thread a jagged, catchy dance-punk guitar riff through an appropriately circling beat on “Merry Go Round”; like-minded Nashville band Heavy Cream follows with an equally fun punk charge. EG

*

Gap Dream, Ali Baba (out now, Suicide

Squeeze, suicidesqueeze.net): The two shuffling, psychedelic tracks on this 7-inch, “Generator” and “A Little Past Midnight,” feature warm beats and desultory guitars; it’s the bedroom project of Cleveland’s Gabe Fulvimar, whose spacey, mumbling vocals make him sound like a computerized Lou Reed. EKT

The Glorious Unseen, Lovesick (10/9, BEC, facebook.com/thegloriousunseen): After raising

Sub Pop will release King Tuff’s single “Screaming Skull” on Oct. 9.

$21,000 via Kickstarter, vocalist Ben Crist turned inward for an album that varies drastically from the indie-rock vibe of “Brand New” to the soft strum of “Can a Nation Be Changed?” JW Hyland, Finding Our Way (10/9, Tooth & Nail, hylandofficial.com): Hyland melds the instrumentation and upbeat vibe of Mutemath with the faith-based pop-rock feel of Anberlin. “Beauty in the Broken” is supported by a powerful bass drum and a soaring chorus by vocalist Jon Lewis. JW

*

King Tuff, “Screaming Skull” b/w “Love Potion” (10/9, Sub Pop, facebook.

JEFFREY SAUGER

The Coathangers, “Merry Go Round” b/w Heavy Cream, “Toasted” (out now, Suicide

Bebo Norman, Lights of Distant Cities (10/22, BEC, bebonorman.com): This singer/ songwriter captures a personal religious journey in 11 rich, beautifully written songs. The standout, “Collide,” begins with a soft acoustic-guitar intro that crescendos into a mammoth song of devotion. JW

com/kingtuffy): The follow-up to Kyle Thomas’ full-length debut as garage-pop squealer King Tuff is a clap-happy, ultracatchy track in which Thomas pledges, “I’ll give you my heart and my soul/All I want is your screaming skull.” The single’s B-side is the robust and sexy “Love Potion.” EKT

*

METZ, METZ (10/9, Sub Pop,

subpop.com): The Sub Pop debut of this Toronto trio claws and pummels its way through 11 opaque tracks—including an ominous, wordless closer called “--))--”—of savage guitar riffs, brutalizing percussion, and thick walls of reverb. Easily the year’s

*

Peace, The World Is Too Much With Us

(10/16, Suicide Squeeze, peacevancouver. bandcamp.com): Three cheers for Vancouver, B.C.’s Peace for this Wordsworth-inspired album title and especially its cover: The band’s mustachioed, suit-clad guitarist sits on a footbridge over a stream holding a halfeaten banana. The artwork’s juxtapositions are similar to the band’s sound, which mixes melancholy post-punk progressions with the uniquely half-sung melodies of singer Dan Geddes. DL (Fri., Oct. 12, Hollow Earth Radio)

*

Total Control, “Scene From a Marriage” b/w ”Contract” (10/9, Sub Pop, subpop.com): The new single from these Australian post-punk howlers doesn’t have the hooks of last year’s killer “Carpet Rash,” but the deadpan drag of its guitars, drums, and wounded vocals aptly evokes the grueling slog of an unraveling marriage. (Ingmar Bergman would be proud). The B-side is a crisp, synthblipping electro dub version. EG E

Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

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the»month»ahead OCTOBER

22 Wolfgang Gartner This Southern California house DJ’s resume includes recent collaborations with will.i.am, Skrillex, Tiësto, and Deadmau5. ShowboxSoDo. 7 p.m. $25 adv./$30 DOS. All ages. 23 Flying Lotus Melding house, drumand-bass, hip-hop, and jazz (he’s the great-nephew of Alice Coltrane), Steven Ellison’s productions as Flying Lotus are some of the headiest in modern electronica. The Neptune. 8 p.m. $24. All ages. 24 The Whigs This Athens, Ga., garage-rock group is touring behind September’s rollicking Enjoy the Company. Tractor Tavern, 5231 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. 8 p.m. $12 adv./$15 DOS. BARBARA ANASTACIO

6 Carrie Underwood Billboard proclaimed this multiplatinum artist “country’s reigning queen” earlier this year, and with the success of May’s Blown Away (267,000 copies sold its first week) and her current tour of that name (her show at London’s Royal Albert hall sold out in 90 minutes), it’s not hard to see why. KeyArena, 305 Harrison St., 684-7200, keyarena.com. 7:30 p.m. $55–$85. All ages. 7 Thee Oh Sees The ever-prolific John Dwyer has released three albums with his primary garage-rock project in the past year and a half, the most recent of which is September’s Putrifiers II. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 784-4849, stgpresents.org. 8 p.m. $15. All ages.

12 Macklemore & Ryan Lewis The meteoric rise of rapper Ben Haggerty will continue this month with the Oct. 9 release of The Heist, which already looks like the biggest Seattle album of the year. WaMu Theater, 800 Occidental Ave. S., 381-7555, wamutheater.com. 7 p.m. $29.50 adv./ $35 DOS. All ages.

26 Menomena Now a two-piece after keyboardist/guitarist Brent Knopf left the band last year, this Portland group’s fifth and latest record is the heavy, transitory Moms. Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showbox online.com. 8 p.m. $18 adv./$20 DOS. All ages. 27 Kithkin This local quartet’s beat-centric tribal pop would be as appropriate for a drum circle as for a house party—or in this case, an early Halloween show. Columbia City Theater, 4918 Rainier Ave. S., 723-0088, columbiacitytheater.com. 9 p.m. $7 adv./$10 DOS.

Grizzly Bear plays the Paramount on Friday, October 5.

13 Drew Grow & The Pastors’ Wives Portland songwriter Grow and his backing band play a rootsy blend of folk, gospel, and country. Comet Tavern. 9 p.m. $10.

looped electronics and Boucher’s pixieish vocals, was included alongside EDM acts like Pretty Lights and Diplo on Skrillex’s “Full Flex Express” summer tour. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $16.

14 Kendrick Lamar This Compton, Calif., rapper will be performing in the U District for the second time in six months at this show; he opened for The-Dream at UW’s “Spring Fling” concert in May. The Neptune. 9 p.m. $36. All ages.

17 Brother Ali Seattle’s Jake One has produced tracks for local rappers like Sol and Grynch this year, but he also worked on this Minnesota MC’s fifth full-length, Mourning in America and Dreaming in Color. Neumos. 7 p.m. $15.

15 Frightened Rabbit On last month’s State Hospital EP, this Scottish five-piece continues its trajectory of brooding, melodramatic indie rock. Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, thetripledoor.net. 7:30 p.m. $20. All ages.

18 The Jesus Rehab Brothers Jared and Dominic Cortese craft ragged, muscular power pop. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880, sunsettavern.com. 9 p.m. $6.

16 Grimes One of 2012’s breakout artists, Canadian Claire Boucher’s solo project, featuring

25 Other Lives On the strength of the cinematic Tamer Animals, this five-piece earned opening gigs last year for Bon Iver and Radiohead. The Neptune. 8 p.m. $15. All ages.

19 Omar Rodríguez-López A versatile guitarist whose career has spanned post-hardcore (At the Drive-In), reggae (De Facto), and progressive

28 Waka Flocka Flame One of gangsta rap’s most bankable acts, Flocka recently dropped Salute Me or Shoot Me Vol. 4, a trap-rap mixtape featuring the likes of Gucci Mane and Wale. ShowboxSoDo. 7 p.m. $30 adv./$35 DOS. All ages. 29 Nneka This German-Nigerian soul and hiphop artist sings in both English and Igbo; March’s Soul Is Heavy was released to modest success in Europe. Tractor Tavern. 9 p.m. $13 adv./$15 DOS. 30 I-Taweh and the Reggae Lions Veteran reggae singer and guitarist I-Taweh (aka Donovan Cunningham) and his 10-piece band released the full-length Overload last year. Nectar, 412 N. 36th St., 632-2020, nectarlounge.com.8 p.m. $5 adv./$8 DOS. 31 Crypts Either for its name or its sound, it’s hard to think of a more appropriate headliner for a Halloween show than this noise trio, and the undercard—especially goth rockers Haunted Horses—is equally spooky. Chop Suey. 8 p.m. $7. E

Reve r b • Seattle weekly • O CTO BER 3− 9, 2012

11 Leela James The latest from this Los Angeles singer is Loving You More . . . In the Spirit of Etta James, a contemporary take on nine songs associated with the iconic soul artist (no relation). Jazz Alley, 2033 Sixth Ave., 441-9729, jazzalley.com. 7:30 p.m. $30.50. All ages. Through Oct. 14.

More options online at seattleweekly.com.

21 A$AP Rocky On the heels of last year’s LiveLoveA$AP mixtape and August’s Lord$ Never Worry by his A$AP Mob collective, this Brooklyn MC will release his major-label debut on Halloween. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 652-0444, showbox online.com. 8 p.m. $27.50 adv./$30 DOS. All ages.

5 Grizzly Bear Three years after the massively successful Veckatimest, which debuted at #8 on Billboard and included the Super Bowlcommercial-scoring single “Two Weeks,” these Brooklynites released Shields, their dense and proggy fourth album, last month. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 467-5520, stgpresents.org. 8 p.m. $29.50 adv./$31.25 DOS. All ages.

10 Cumulus Though her songs with Cumulus are fuzzy and abrasive, Alexandra Niedzialkowski recently played a stripped-down solo set to open for British songstress Laura Marling. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, chopsuey.com. 7 p.m. $8.

check out our comprehensive music calendar.

20 Lost in the Trees This North Carolina band plays folk-inflected tunes with orchestral instrumentation. The Crocodile. 7 p.m. $13.

4 Steve Vai A former protégé of Frank Zappa, guitarist Vai has built a career out of sheer technical prowess, and founded the Favored Nations record label for artists who “have attained the highest performance level.” The Moore, 1931 Second Ave., 467-5510, stgpresents. com. 7:30 p.m. $27–$57. All ages.

9 Hospitality This rising New York trio released its self-titled debut on Merge in January. Barboza, 925 E. Pike, 709-9951, thebarboza.com. 8 p.m. $12.

start planning your upcoming nights out,

rock (The Mars Volta), Rodríguez-López has released 22 albums as a solo artist since 2004. Triple Door. $15 adv./$20 DOS. All ages.

3 Six Organs of Admittance The latest from songwriter and guitarist Ben Chasny is August’s Ascent, which expands on his mixture of folk, psych, and ambient music. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-7416, thecrocodile.com. 8 p.m. $12. All ages.

8 The Orchestrion This local trio’s spacey guitar rock bears the clear influence of Built to Spill. Comet Tavern, 922 E. Pike St., 322-9272, comettavern.com. 9 p.m. $6.

Living in the city equals options. Before you

35


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arts»Performance Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

ARSENIC AND OLD LACE Two sweet old ladies

share a secret in this classic comedy. The Theatre at Meydenbauer, 11100 N.E. Sixth St., 425-235-5087, bellevuecivic.org. $30. Opens Oct. 5. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 13. THE GAYEST OF ALL TIME TOUR Stand-up, hosted by Jinkx Monsoon and starring LOGO’s Julie Goldman and Jonny McGovern. Julia’s, 300 Broadway Ave. E., 800-8383006, brownpapertickets.com. $25. 8 p.m. Wed., Oct. 3. THE JACKET If you’ve spent time watching The Matrix and Hong Kong action movies, Nanda may seem awfully familiar. In the “Acrobaticalist Ninja Theater” quartet’s show, about four adventurers searching for a magical coat that bestows superpowers, there are elements of vaudeville, parkour, mime, capoeira, “kung faux,” and plenty of sight gags. SANDRA KURTZ Broadway Performance Hall, 1625 Broadway, nandatown.com. $30–$40. 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 5, 2 & 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 6–Sun., Oct. 7.

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Radiolab contributor & New York Times columnist

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10/10 @ 7:30p. Only $5

Presidential Debate Viewing Party (10/3) + Gar Alperovitz: America Beyond Capitalism (10/3) + The ‘Slate’ Political Gabfest Live (10/4) + Davy Rothbart: My Heart is an Idiot (10/4) + Simple Measures: Rhythm (10/5) + SBO: Bach Violin Concertos (10/6) + SAF: Innovation in Workplaces: Building Your Community (10/8) + PSC: Beneath the Sands of Egypt: An Archaeologist Explores the Valley of the Kings (10/9) + David Quammen: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic (10/9) + Seattle Antiquarian Book Fair: Andrei Codrescu (10/10) + Steven Strogatz: The Joy of X (10/10)

townhallseattle.org

LADY WINDERMERE’S FAN The Endangered

Species Project reads Oscar Wilde’s epigram-stuffed comedy of manners. Stage One Theater, 9600 College Way N., endangeredspeciesproject. org. Free. 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 8. THE LAST NIGHT AT MANUELA’S Buffy

Aakaash’s radio play is set in Mexico on the Day of the Dead. Hollow Earth Radio Studio, 2018 E. Union St., the furnaceseattle.wordpress.com. Free. 6 p.m. Wed., Oct. 3. THE LATE NOW Leo Daedalus hosts this PDX-based “avant-variety-talk show.” West of Lenin, 203 N. 36th St., 800-838-3006, thelatenow.com. $10–$18. 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 5. PULLMAN PORTER BLUES Cheryl L. West’s play follows black railway workers on a 1937 journey from Chicago to New Orleans. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 443-2222. $15–$80. Opens Oct. 3. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends Oct. 28. SPIN THE BOTTLE Annex Theatre’s late-night variety show. October’s show includes “one-woman girl-group deliciousness,” “uncomfortably intimate confessions,” and plenty more. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre.org. $5–$10. 11 p.m. Fri., Oct. 5. TEATRO ZINZANNI Their new show, “Return to Paradise,” goes populuxe, time-traveling to Seattle’s World’s-Fair past. Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015, zinzanni.org. $106 and up. Opens Oct. 5; see dreams.zinzanni.org for exact schedule. Ends Jan. 27. UNCLE HIDEKI A staged reading of Jean Davies Okimoto’s play about two assimilated teens who encounter their Japanese heritage. Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, reacttheatre.org. $5. 6:30 p.m. Sun., Oct. 7. UNDERBELLY The Degenerate Art Ensemble’s new multimedia performance is inspired by “engineered subterranean underpinnings that supported the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair structures.” Seattle Center, degenerateart ensemble.com. Free. 8 & 10 p.m. Fri., Oct. 5–Sat., Oct. 6.

CURRENT RUNS

THE BETTY PLAYS Four short plays for actor Betty

Campbell. Theater Schmeater, 1500 Summit Ave., 3245801, schmeater.org. $10–$15. 4 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 7. DISCO PIGS In Enda Walsh’s play, “teenagers Pig and Runt share everything: a birthday, secrets, and a darkness in their souls.” The Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., 800-838-3006, giantprojects.org. $10–$15. Runs Thurs.–Sat. Ends Oct. 6. THE FAIRYTALE LIVES OF RUSSIAN GIRLS SEE REVIEW, PAGE 18. GAUDY NIGHT SEE REVIEW, PAGE 18. LEGALLY BLONDE A musical version of the Reese Witherspoon vehicle. Seattle Musical Theatre, 7400 Sand Point Way N.E. # 101N, 363-2809, seattlemusical theatre.org. $35–$40. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun., plus 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 4. Ends Oct. 7. Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

rock ‘n’ roll, with an interracial romance at its center, this mainstreamed Memphis is slick and surefooted, but it also sheds much of the grit and grits so vital to its story. KEVIN PHINNEY 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave., 625-1418. $29 and up. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see 5th avenue.org for exact schedule. Ends Oct. 7. SKETCHFEST Comedy troupes (including favorites like the Cody Rivers Show) gather for the 14th annual festival. See sketchfest.org for full lineup, venue, and price info. 7 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 4; 7 & 9 p.m. Fri., Oct. 5–Sat., Oct. 6. THIS LAND/WOODY GUTHRIE Greg Carter’s valentine to Guthrie and his politics, blending crackerjack live musicians with films and animated projections, would add up to a memorable night if only he’d developed a through-line in it. KEVIN PHINNEY Erickson Theatre Off Broadway, 1524 Harvard Ave., 800-838-3006, strawshop. org. $10–$30. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 6. TINY KUSHNER Five one-acts by Tony Kushner. New City Theater, 1404 18th Ave., 271-4430, newcitytheater.org. $15–$20. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Oct. 6. TITUS ANDRONICUS The all-female Upstart Crow’s stab at Shakespeare’s revenge play manages to wring a surprising degree of pathos from this gory pie. MARGARET FRIEDMAN Seattle University, Lee Center for the Arts, 901 12th Ave., upstartcrowcollective.blogspot.com. $20. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 4:30 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 7. UNCLE HO TO UNCLE SAM Writer/performer Trieu Tran earned a standing ovation on the night I saw his oneman show about his experiences as a Vietnamese immigrant. But what were people applauding? Hardship, not art. Born in 1975, young Tran survived a pirate attack as one of the boat people headed to a Thai refugee camp. Settling in Canada and later Boston, he endured poverty, family violence, sexual abuse, and a drive-by shooting. Yet today he’s a working actor in Hollywood, with a regular role on HBO’s The Newsroom. In his entirely earnest recitation of a remarkable life trajectory, Tran reaches for themes of reconciliation, healing, and forgiveness, but the show only comes alive in recounting his youthful pleasures: Michael Jackson, McDonald’s, Three’s Company, and Wayne Gretzky. In Boston, he embraces Run-D.M.C. and hip-hop, but these must be traded for Shakespeare and college. Maybe it’s not fair to compare Tran to Spalding Gray or Eric Bogosian, but dark themes require modulation. Sometimes it takes

humor, even irony, to assess the hurt—as Jewish comics often employ. But Tran comes from the theater, not stand-up, and his show ends up being a sweaty, cathartic ritual for one. BRIAN MILLER ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $15–$55. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends Oct. 7. For many more Current Runs, see seattleweekly.com.

Dance

• MARK MORRIS DANCE GROUP You may remember

seeing Morris’ first performances at OtB, or following his development at Meany Hall and then with Seattle Theater Group. But if not, be sure to see the new work (the premiere of A Wooden Tree) and old (1993’s Grand Duo) of one of Seattle’s (in)famous native sons. SANDRA KURTZ On the Boards, 100 W. Roy St., 217-9886, on the boards.org. $40. 8 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 4–Sat., Oct. 6. PAUL TAYLOR SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 17.

Classical, Etc.

SEATTLE SYMPHONY SSO cellist Efe Baltacigil solos

• • •

in Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $19–$112. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 4, 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 6, 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 7. NORTHWEST SINFONIETTA Cuban musicians from the Orquesta de Cámara Concierto Sur join the NS in an unprecedented collaboration on Beethoven’s Ninth. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, northwest sinfonietta.org. $30–$42.50. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 5. SIMPLE MEASURES The Pacific Rims Percussion Quartet plays Vivaldi, Cage, and Stravinsky. At Town Hall, 1119 Eighth, 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 5, and Mt. Baker Community Club, 2811 Mount Rainier Dr. S., 6:30 p.m. Sun., Oct. 7. $15–$30. simplemeasures.org. CLARINETTISSIMO Recitals, workshops, vendors, and more. Seattle Pacific University, 3307 Third Ave. W., osbornmusic.com. Free. Noon–9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 6, noon– 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 7.

SEATTLE/SEATTLE CHAMBER • ORCHESTRA SEE EAR SUPPLY, THIS PAGE.

SINGERS SEATTLE BAROQUE ORCHESTRA Bach violin concer-

tos, with soloist Ingrid Matthews, plus music by Purcell. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 325-7066, earlymusicguild. org. $15–$40. 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 6.

EarSupply

» by gavin borchert

Message in a Bottle

It’s been impossible to verify that Testimony (1979), the purported memoirs of Dmitri Shostakovich, is actually that. Its editor, or possibly author, Solomon Volkov, claims it’s simply transcribed interviews with the composer, but there are reasons to doubt this. If the book is dubious as a literal record of Shostakovich’s words, it’s riveting if read as fiction, a first-person roman à clef about a composer crushed by bitterness and the madness of the Soviet system. Fact or fantasy, Testimony did present to the world a new way of thinking about Shostakovich’s music: the notion that a work can be ironic, can somehow have both a surface meaning and a “real,” buried meaning. For example, “Shostakovich” reveals the secret of the frenzied, aggressive second movement of his Tenth Symphony from 1953: “I wrote it right after Stalin’s death, and no one has yet guessed what the symphony is about. It’s about Stalin and the Stalin years . . . the scherzo is a musical portrait of Stalin, roughly speaking.” One clue that every Soviet listener did catch is that Shostakovich wove himself into the symphony—or rather, his initials: his musical monogram, D. Sch. represented by the notes D, E flat, C, and B. This fournote hook makes its most powerful appearance in the finale: The volume builds frantically, in music not unlike the earlier “Stalin” scherzo, and the

US ARMY SIGNAL CORPS VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Seattle weekly • OCTOBER 3−9, 2012

The Joy of

• MEMPHIS Set in the segregated South at the dawn of

BY GAVIN BORCHERT

Shostakovich turned a tyrant’s life into art.

monogram blares out in the brass at the crest of the tumult—stamping out the conflagration, really, as if Shostakovich were asserting his victory over the dead tyrant. Listen to the Tenth and see what it suggests to you, as Orchestra Seattle performs it Saturday, paired with Bach’s Magnificat. Jeremy Briggs-Roberts conducts—the first of six musicdirector finalists leading concerts this season as the OS looks to replace George Shangrow. First Free Methodist Church, 3200 Third Ave. W., osscs.org. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 6.


Shaolin Warriors Oct 6 | The Moore

Stephen Stephen Tobolowsky Tobolowsky Oct Oct 13 13 I The The Moore Moore

Seattle Theatre Group 2012 | 2013 Season

Let the world revolve around you! Take your seat at our 3 historic theatres for a season of performing arts experiences that revolve around you! The Paramount | The Moore | The Neptune Our 2012-2013 Season brings Seattle contemporary and classical dance rooted in Africa, Chicago, Israel, and Harlem, local, national and international theater, Broadway musicals, comedy, family entertainment, classic silent films, local and international music, martial arts, and youth performances.

WAT C H M O R E

SUNDAY 9PM See what’s new at the UW this fall!

Experience Experience the the Beatles Beatles with with Rain Rain Jan Jan 30 30 –– Feb Feb 33 || The The Moore Moore

with Carolyn Douglas

Dance Theatre of Harlem Nov 16 & 17 I The Moore W A T C H O N C H A N N E L 2 7 O R O N L I N E U W T V. O R G

Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3− 9, 2012

channel 27

Photos: Dance Theatre of Harlem: Rachel Neville; Paramount: Bob Cerelli; Neptune: Christopher Nelson

We’ve got a seat for you for 37 performances offered this season, visit STGPresents.org/Season for full listing and information.

21


arts»Visual Arts BY MA’CHELL DUMA LAVASSAR

Openings & Events AHN, CHENG, & GALE Sang-gyeun Ahn and Karen

OCTOBER 9

Cheng present work in the East Gallery. Ann Gale’s portraits are displayed in the West Gallery. Gale artist lecture: 6 p.m. Tues., Oct. 9 (Art Building Room 3). Jacob Lawrence Gallery, UW campus, Art Building #132, 685-1805, art.washington.edu/jlg. Wed.–Sat., Noon–4 p.m. Through Oct. 19. KURT E. ARMBRUSTER Armbruster’s photos in Our American Landscape consider our myths, symbols, and material conveniences. Opening reception 7–10 p.m. Sat., Oct. 6. Art/Not Terminal Gallery, 2045 Westlake Ave., 233-0680, antgallery.org. Opens Oct. 6. Mon.–Sat., 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sun., noon–5 p.m. Through Nov. 1. ART 1100 GROUP SHOW Lois Graham, Suzanne Tidwell, Susan Zoccola, and over 20 other co-op members present their painting, sculpture, and photography. Union Art Cooperative, 1100 E. Union St., unionart.coop/ art1100. Sun., Oct. 7, 2–6 p.m. B: AN ART SHOW TRIBUTE TO B-MOVIES Dane Ault, Crystal Barbre, Barry Blankenship, and others drawn inspiration from their favorite old horror and sci-fi flicks. Opening reception 7–11 p.m. Fri., Oct. 5. Ltd. Art Gallery, 307 E. Pike St., 457-2970, ltdartgallery.com. Opens Oct. 5. Tues.–Sun., 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Through Nov. 3. BAM’S FREE FIRST FRIDAY Strapped for cash? BAM offers free admission every first Friday of the month. Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., 425-5190770, bellevuearts.org. Free. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Fri., Oct. 6.

TICKETS: $39

THE FLATLANDERS Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall

Forty years into their friendship, these ‘founding fathers of Americana’ — Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Joe Ely and Butch Hancock — are hitting the road again. Country Concerts at Benaroya Hall are sponsored by an anonymous donor.

Oct 12 – Nov 11

OCTOBER 24

TICKETS FROM: $30

JAKE SHIMABUKURO

One of the world’s most beloved and enduring legends, brought spectacularly to life.

S. Mark Taper Foundation Auditorium

“Jake is taking [the ukelele] to a place that I can’t see anybody else catching up with him.” — Eddie Vedder

© Himalayan Academy Dinodia

BELLEVUE COLLEGE ART FACULTY EXHIBIT

Shadows of the Ramayana in Puppets, Politics and Film (Lecture), Oct 7

Jake Shimabukuro’s performance is generously underwritten by Katrina Russell and Jeff Lehman.

Professor Laurie Sears explores how Ramayana traditions continue to thrive and impact Islamic Javanese culture.

OCTOBER 25

The Great Soul of Russia Oct 9

TICKETS: $37

CARLOS NÚñEZ

Reading series by members of The Seagull Project. This month’s theme is They Ate Cabbage and Brown Bread.

Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall

22

The Ramayana and the Sacred Temples of Angkor: Cambodia and Beyond (Lecture), Oct 14 Professor Boreth Ly looks at visual narratives of the Ramayana as rendered in Cambodia and Thailand.

NOVEMBER 1, 2 & 4

FLAMENCO

Many Sitas (Lecture) Nov 3

TICKETS: $33

Professor Heidi Pauwels describes the variety of Sita’s characteristics that relate with the other roles in the Ramayana.

FEATURING KAREN LUGO Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall

Join Fundación Conservatorio Flamenco Casa Patas for some fiery footwork and live flamenco music presented in collaboration with Seattle’s Honorary Consulate of Spain.

FOR TICKETS:

206.215.4747

BENAROYAHALL.ORG

WI

NNER

See it all with an ACTPass!

acttheatre.org | (206) 292-7676 700 Union Street, Downtown Seattle

Send events to visualarts@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

Yugoslavia and now residing in Canada, combines text slogans with bold colors in the 46 years of work represented in Skalamerija. First Thursday reception: 6–8 p.m. Call for ongoing hours. Foster/White Gallery, 220 Third Ave. S., 622-2833, fosterwhite.com. Oct. 4–27. JASMINE IONA BROWN She draws inspiration from Russian Orthodox icons and the Civil Rights era in Urban Martyrs. First Thursday reception: 6–8 p.m. Poetry reading: 5 p.m. Sat., Oct. 6. Call for ongoing hours. Gallery 110, 110 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 624-9336, gallery110.com. Oct. 4–27. ROMSON REGARDE BUSTILLO & KAMLA KAKARIA Filipino artist Bustillo takes pictures of

tools in Chasing Device and Softening Tools. Kakaria draws inspiration from Hindu festivals. First Thursday reception: 5–8 p.m. Shift Collaborative Studio, 306 S. Washington St. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 547-1215, shiftstudio.org. Opens Oct. 5. Fri.–Sat., noon–5 p.m. Through Oct. 28. BY THE YARD Eleven artists were challenged to create a piece of work that is one yard long by one foot high, which will be sold by the inch. Visitors will be encouraged to use tape measures and rulers to divvy up their favorite parts of the artwork. Bherd Studios, 8537 Greenwood Ave. N., 234-8348, bherdclothing.com. Fri., Oct. 5, 6–10 p.m. DAVID IVAN CLARK He shows big chromatic studies painted on steel. First Thursday reception: 6–8 p.m. Call for ongoing hours. Gallery I|M|A, 123 S. Jackson St., 625-0055, galleryima.com. Oct. 4–27. DONALD COLE The 80-year-old Vashon artist looks at transcultural archetypes in the paintings of Conversations. First Thursday reception 5–8 p.m. Artist talk, 1–3 p.m. Sat., Oct. 20. ArtXchange, 512 First Ave. S., 839-0377, artxchange.org. Opens Oct. 4. Tues., Thurs.–Sat., 11 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Through Nov. 17. DECLARATIVE SENTENCES Mackenzie Boetes, Allison Manch, and Ries Niemi use needles and embroidery to make their statements. First Thursday reception, 5–8 p.m. Punch Gallery, 119 Prefontaine Place S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 621-1945, punchgallery.org. Opens Oct. 4. Thurs.–Sat., Noon–5 p.m. Through Oct. 27. NEGAR FARAJIANI Mix and Unmatch features dozens of collage works in the Iranian artist’s first U.S. solo exhibition. First Thursday reception with the artist: 6–8 p.m. M.I.A Gallery, 1203 2nd Ave., 467-4927, m-i-a-gallery.com. Opens Oct. 4. Mon.–Fri., 11 a.m.–

TheFussyeye » by brian miller

Final Inning

Since opening in 2004, Bill and Ruth True’s Western Bridge has been one of Seattle’s favorite galleries, both for its massive size and festive openings. For its last group show before closing this month, I’m thinking how happy I am, the catering was again excellent, and artgoers had a jolly time kicking baseballs around the huge main floor. In Lutz Bacher’s Baseballs II, they number in the hundreds, and no two are identical, since all have the unique scuffs and markings of use. Pick one up and it might have a different manufacturer than another, or some smell of grass and dirt; and as at an Easter egg hunt, you find yourself looking for special colors—like a red, white, and blue MLB commemorative ball I noticed. Small children scampered around, clearly enjoying the piece. Adults stepped carefully over the balls, or stooped to snap photos, not sure what to make of them. Conceptual artists often contrast the scale of Western Bridge to their installations, but Baseballs II is particularly underwhelming, and the few other contributions by Walead Beshty, Roy McMakin, and Euan

BRIAN MILLER

Seattle weekly • OCTOBER 3−9, 2012

Longtime Chieftains collaborator Carlos Núñez is at the heart of the Galician folk revival, with album sales surpassing the million mark worldwide.

Opening reception 3–7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 3. Bellevue College, 3000 Landerholm Circle S.E., 425-564-1000, bellevuecollege.edu. Mon.–Thurs., 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Through Oct. 24. BIRD LOVERS’ WEEKEND The yearly event sees Oiva Toikka debut her bird design, while Tero Välimaa and Heikki Hiukkamäki work in the Hot Shop to create versions of same. Brunch served 11 a.m. Sun., Oct. 7. Museum of Glass, 1801 E. Dock St., Tacoma, 253-2844750, museumofglass.org. $12. Opens Oct. 5. Fri.–Sat.,

10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sun., noon–5 p.m. Through Oct. 7.

BONIFACHO The one-named artist, born in the former

Macdonald make no more of an impression. Macdonald once built a huge mountaintop here with taxidermy goats that I loved, but all these ideas seem exhausted by engaging the big space. The baseballs assume a random pattern, though only in one plane. There are no bats or gloves or even a batting cage to enliven the exhibit, nothing to raise it beyond the floor. There is motility, but no arc. Western Bridge, 3412 Fourth Ave. S., 8387444, westernbridge.org. Free. Noon–6 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Oct. 20.


arts»Visual Arts

Travel & advenT ure October 5–11 | 206.324.9996 | siff.net

6 p.m.; Sat., noon–5 p.m. Through Nov. 16.

DONALD FELS Circles and Other Projections features

big abstract paintings on wood. First Thursday reception: 6–8 p.m. Davidson Galleries, 313 Occidental Ave. S., 624-1324, davidsongalleries.com. Opens Oct. 5. Tues.–Sat., 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Through Oct. 27. FREMONT ART WALK Venues include Activspace, Fremont Brewing Co., 509 Winery and Tasting Room, Caffé Vita, and Fremont Abbey. See fremontfirstfriday. com. 6–9 p.m. Fri., Oct. 6. CHRISTINE GEDYE In her fourth solo exhibit, she shows over two dozen landscape paintings depicting both sides of the Cascades. Opening reception: 5–7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 6. Fountainhead Gallery, 625 W. McGraw St., 285-4467, fountainheadgallery.com. Opens Oct. 4. Thurs.–Fri., 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sat.–Sun., noon–5 p.m. Through Oct. 27. A GENERATION RISES Young Native artists find inspiration in the art forms of their ancestors in this group show. First Thursday reception: 6–8 p.m. Stonington Gallery, 119 S. Jackson St., 405-4040, stoningtongallery. com. Opens Oct. 4. Mon.–Fri., 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; Sun., noon–5 p.m. Through Oct. 27. ED KAMUDA Music in the Wood features new oil paintings on wood by this established Northwest artist. First Thursday reception: 6–8 p.m. Lisa Harris Gallery, 1922 Pike Place, 443-3315, lisaharrisgallery.com. Opens Oct. 4. Mon.–Sat., 10:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.– 4 p.m. Through Oct. 29. JOHN KILEY Aurorae collects his new work in glass. First Thursday reception: 6–8 p.m. Call for ongoing hours. William Traver Gallery, 110 Union St., 587-6501, travergallery.com. Oct. 4–Nov. 11. AMANDA KOSTER She talks about NGOs and photographing residents of the Third World. Seattle University, Pigott Auditorium, 901 12th Ave., 296-6000,

seattleu.edu. $8–$10. Thurs., Oct. 4, 7 p.m.

• LORENZO MOOG Appropriate to our current The Pizza

campaign season, he tackles politics in Presidents; Expansion, Prohibitions, War. First Thursday reception: 6–8 p.m. Artist talk: noon, Mon., Oct. 15. Gallery4Culture, 101 Prefontaine Place S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 296-7580, 4culture.org. Opens Oct. 4. Mon.–Thurs., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Oct. 26. MUSEUMS ON US If you have a Bank of America card, that beloved little financial institution is offering free admission this weekend to SAM, TAM, and the Northwest African American Museum. Sat., Oct. 6– Sun., Oct. 7. NO THEME/NO PROBLEM At this Seattle Storefronts space, Tom DesLongchamp, Jill Labieniec, Brittany Kusa, and others show prints, drawings on the walls, and videos. See storefrontsseattle.wordpress.com for ongoing hours. International House of Paintings, 666 S. Jackson St. Thurs., Oct. 4, 7 p.m.–midnight; Oct. 5–31. MARY ANN PETERS & TANIA KITCHELL Peters’ paintings in from a history of ruin are partly inspired by the Arab Spring and her own Lebanese-American family. Kitchell uses 3-D plastic sculptures and text works on paper in response to the natural environment of her native Canada. First Thursday reception: 6–8 p.m. Artist talk with Peters: 11 a.m. Sat., Oct. 6. James Harris Gallery, 312 Second Ave. S., 903-6220, jamesharris gallery.com. Opens Oct. 4. Thurs.–Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Through Oct. 27. SMALL VOIDS Over 100 small art installations will be deployed around Pioneer Square and the Tashiro Kaplan Building. According to the organizers of the touring show, “Each piece of art is mounted on a small bracket and will be temporarily attached to street signs and light poles to cover a city block.” Thurs., Oct. 4, 5–9 p.m.

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Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3− 9, 2012

Mark Twain’s great American novel is re-told with Roger Miller’s stunning music.

23


film»This Week’s Attractions Backwards RUNS FRI., OCT. 5–THURS., OCT. 11 AT OAK TREE. RATED PG. 89 MINUTES.

You can’t go home again—or at least that’s the feeling of ex-jock Abi, who $ fails to make the cut for her second shot as an Olympic rower. “You’re 30 years old,” warns her mother in this wholesome sports melodrama, and she pushes Abi toward an MBA program. Instead, Abi takes a coaching gig at her old Philadelphia prep school, where her former boyfriend Geoff (James Van Der Beek) is conveniently now athletic director. As the writer, producer, and star of Backwards, Sarah Megan Thomas is in fact an ex-rower, and she convincingly portrays the compulsion of an athlete who wakes up for a 400 North 43rd Street 5 a.m. workout—then realizes there isn’t one. As an actress, she holds her own with Van Der Seattle, Wa 98103 Beek, but the performances here are secondary to the many montages of rowing (ponytails backlit by the golden sun) and training (includ-ROGER EBERT, ing not one but two trips up the famous Rocky CHICAGO SUN-TIMES stairs). Abi mentors a pair of teen girls on her team, explaining via Thomas Eakins how “rowing is an art.” More important, she learns -ROGER EBERT -J.R. JONES, how to relax her jock intensity, get a manicure, CHICAGO READER and undergo a fashion makeover just in time to chaperone the school prom. And there, 12 years after her first slow dance with Geoff, the DJ naturally cues up Cyndi Lauper’s “Time I N D E P E N D E N T S P I R I T AWA R D N O M I N E E www.inthefamilythemovie.com After Time.” Corny and predictable, sure, but Backwards will appeal to a few junior oarsNORTHWEST FILM FORUM STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5 1515 12th Avenue, Seattle (206) 267-5380 women around Seattle. Whether it’ll make DIRECTOR PATRICK WANG IN PERSON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY parents want to get up to drive them to 5 a.m. 4.81" X 2" WED 10/3 practice is a different matter. BRIAN MILLER © 2012 DISNEY ENTERPRISES

249

“HHHH COURAGEOUS!”

CRITIC’S CHOICE

“ONE OF THE YEAR’S BEST.”

IN THE FAMILY SEATTLE WEEKLY

Aurelio Emmett

Seattle weekly • OCTOBER 3−9, 2012

Confirmation #:

24

Artist: (circle one:) Heather Staci Freelance 2 Jay

Steve

A boy and his dog in Frankenweenie.

Philip

AE: (circle one:) Angela Maria Josh Tim

McCool Deadline:

Chicken With Plums OPENS FRI., OCT. 5 AT SEVEN GABLES. ART APPROVED NOT RATED. 91 MINUTES. AE APPROVED Narrated by Death himself, embodied by the archangel Azraël, Chicken With Plums is CLIENT APPROVED

the second adaptation of comic book artist Marjane Satrapi’s thematic trilogy of Iranian stories, adapted from the follow-up to her graphic novel Persepolis. (Vincent Paronnaud and Satrapi also directed the adaptation of that book.) Nasser Ali Khan (Mathieu Amalric), a brilliant musician, is driven to suicidal despair when his wife (Maria de Medeiros) smashes his beloved violin (it’s not a crazy, dramatic injustice—she actually has a square beef ), and he waits eight days in his bed for death to come. As a young man, Nasser Ali fell in love with a woman named Irâne (the inhumanly beautiful Golshifteh Farahani), whose father refuses permission for their marriage. Her face haunts him for the rest of his life, and she looms over the extravagant fantasy sequences that comprise Azraël’s unauthorized Nasser Ali bio. Emulating film techniques of the French new wave, stupid American sitcoms, and storybook illustrations, the dreams and flashbacks conjured by Azraël are occasionally too vivid, like a high-wattage bulb in a small room, the sequences erring on the side of too much whimsy, overbroad comedy, and surplus emoting. But the evocation of passionate love is palpable, what with Amalric’s sad longing and Farahani’s Nobel Prize–winning face and everything, and the honest undercurrent of melancholy keeps the whole thing from becoming unmoored. CHRIS PACKHAM

P Frankenweenie

OPENS FRI., OCT. 5 AT VARSITY AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG. 85 MINUTES.

Ever since Mars Attacks!, Tim Burton has been mostly in the adaptation business, rendering dark and becurlicued Sleepy Hollows and the like. With Frankenweenie, he adapts his own work—the first animated short he ever produced for a major film studio, and the one which semi-famously got him fired from Disney back in ’84. Working for “the man” generally entails a minimum of originality, yet—for all his faults—Burton’s vision is still unlike any other filmmaker’s. In his films, introverts have access to bat caves, wonderlands, and the surprisingly comfortable interiors of giant peaches, all of which become the inner worlds of lonely people. It’s remarkable that this entire sensibility sprang so fully formed in that original short. It’s here, too. When his weenie dog Sparky is killed by a car, young Victor Frankenstein is inspired by his new science teacher to generate some impressive innovations in the untapped field of reanimation. Victor, voiced by Charlie Tahan, intends to submit his reassembled and electrically resurrected dog at his school’s science fair, but he’s actually motivated by a broken heart. The dog is great. Sparky isn’t a cartoon character as much as a behaviorally accurate little canine, which is 10 times cuter than if the script had gone in a Dreamworks Animation direction, with, like, Ben Stiller voicing the dog, and then a song by Smash Mouth. Lenny Ripps’ script, from Burton’s original story, is tight and brief, hitting all the marks you’d expect from an animated kid’s film, and it’s all enlivened by Burton’s visual style. The man should make more small movies like this one. CHRIS PACKHAM

P In the Family

RUNS FRI., OCT. 5–THURS., OCT. 11 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 169 MINUTES.

With an incisive understanding of character, believably naturalistic acting, and lengthy scenes that don’t feel so much stretched out as given room to breathe, In the Family proves that smart direction and an innate feeling for one’s material trumps potentially precious subject matter. Writer/director/star Patrick Wang’s film chronicles the efforts of Joey Williams (Wang) to retain custody of the 6-year-old boy he raised as a son after the boy’s father (and Joey’s romantic partner), Cody (Trevor St. John), is killed in a car accident. As homophobia rears its ugly head both subtly and brutally, Joey fights the efforts of Cody’s sister and brother-in-law to take


his son away. But rather than turn this into a melodramatic look at gay victimization, Wang keeps his film pitched at the same level as his mild-mannered hero’s demeanor. Using long, fixed takes, the director makes his argument about family values not through overheated dramatics but simply through observation. Whether depicting Joey’s son opening a beer and offering it to his dad, flashing back to Joey and Cody’s first kiss, or presenting Joey’s stirring testimony at a legal deposition, Wang evinces a keen awareness of the ways in which family members interact, grieve, and open their hearts to one another. ANDREW SCHENKER

P Keep the Lights On

OPENS FRI., OCT. 5 AT SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN. NOT RATED. 101 MINUTES.

Exhibiting great specificity about gay sexual mores (the phone-sex hookups, the fear of AIDS, the dichotomy between carefree promiscuity and a desire for stable monogamy)

while also rooting its story in tumultuous universal emotions, Keep the Lights On details a long-term romance fraught with turmoil. Like his prior Forty Shades of Blue and Married Life, director Ira Sachs’ latest boasts a riveting attention to troubled characters—in this case documentary filmmaker Erik (Thure Lindhardt) and Paul (Zachary Booth), who meet for anonymous sex in 1998 and spend the next decade struggling to stay together amid Paul’s increasingly destructive drug addiction and Erik’s consuming need to save Paul from himself. Shooting with acute attention to shifting relationship dynamics and cutting in and out of scenes with a graceful fleetness that’s attuned to the rhythms of Erik and Paul’s up-and-down affair, Sachs creates an intensely intimate stew of fear, anger, longing, and regret. He’s aided in this by a sterling Lindhardt, whose unaffected expression of confused, desperate need is both charming and pitiful, and does much to further illuminate the unavoidable reality

that, no matter how ardent, love ultimately can’t survive without trust. NICK SCHAGER

What Did You Expect? RUNS FRI., OCT. 5–THURS., OCT. 11 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 88 MINUTES.

It was 1998. Bill Clinton was president. The dot-com bubble hadn’t yet burst. The national debt was under control. And who could foresee a housing bubble, 9/11, two foreign wars, or a black president? That’s when Archers of Loaf broke up. Thirteen years later, as captured in this fannish documentary by Gorman Bechard, they reconvened for a two-night stand at the Cat’s Cradle—a popular club near Chapel Hill, N.C., where the band made its reputation. Do we really want to go back to the ’90s for yet another aging-indie-rocker reunion? Bechard certainly does, and the crowd looks happy. The four band members, when interviewed, seem less nostalgic. Singer/bandleader Eric Bachmann says of their current musical activity, “We’re just sort of weekend warriors.” Why

did he pull the plug on the group? Bechard doesn’t ask. Are the other three guys bitter about it? Could Archers have been bigger? Again, there are no hard questions in a film that’s about 80 percent performance footage and 20 percent reminiscences.The bass player talks of bonding in the van on road trips, back in the day, without GPS or cell phones—then adds with a laugh, “not to sound like a cantankerous old man.” He doesn’t, but neither do Bechard and these affable dudes make the case for the band’s continued relevance. Archers played Sasquatch! 2011 and Neumos last fall (their reunion tour coinciding with the rerelease of four albums on Merge). If you were there, this doc’s for you. BRIAN MILLER E film@seattleweekly.com

ONLINE » SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM aMORE See reviews of Butter, The Oranges, Taken 2, and V/H/S.

Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3− 9, 2012

25


film» BY BRIAN MILLER

Local Film •

• •

OF ALL MONSTERS ATTACK! See the GI’s website for a full schedule of scary titles programmed through Halloween. Among the first week highlights are John Carpenter’s The Thing, Sam Raimi’s The Evil Dead, and the marital horror drama Possession, with Isabelle Adjani and Sam Neill. (R) Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 523-3935, grandillusioncinema.org, $5-$8, Oct. 5-31. FILMS4FAMILIES: ANIMAL KINGDOMS See the SIFF website for full list of titles in this squee-tastic weekend series, which includes March of the Penguins, Babe, Fantastic Mr. Fox, and other barnyard faves. (G) SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, siff.net, $4, Sat., Sun., 1 p.m. Through Oct. 28. INSIDE JOB SEE THE WIRE, PAGE 17. LAWRENCE OF ARABIA David Lean’s 1962 widescreen classic has been digitized and cleaned up for its Blu-ray DVD release. It’s well worth the three-plus hours to experience its majesty. Peter O’Toole captures the charismatic yet flawed leader of British-sponsored pre-war Arab insurrection—heroic, weak, sadistic, and alluring at once. The winner of seven Oscars, Lawrence is deservedly renowned for Freddie Young’s cinematography, but it’s Robert Bolt’s script that elevates it above contemporary imitators. Unlike the screen-filling, eye-popping spectaculars of today, this film grounds the epic in the man—not the terrain sprawling beneath his feet. It also doesn’t hurt that in support of O’Toole are Alec Guinness, Omar Sharif, and Anthony Quinn. “On to Aqaba!” See FathomEvents.com for other local theaters including Thornton Place. (PG) BRIAN MILLER Pacific Place, 600 Pine St., $10, Thu., Oct. 4, 1 & 7 p.m.

MAELSTROM INTERNATIONAL FANTASTIC FILM FESTIVAL Playing at both of SIFF’s venues, a short walk

Send events to film@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

apart, this weekend mini-fest offers around 10 different packages of shorts, categorized into horror, sci-fi, fantasy, and the like. See MIFFF.org for full schedule and details. (NR) SIFF Film Center, 305 Harrison St. (Seattle Center), $8-$10, Oct. 5-7. SEATTLE LATINO FILM FESTIVAL Playing at several venues around town, this year’s festival begins on Friday with the Brazilian family drama Meu País (7 p.m. SIFF Cinema Uptown). Director Andre Ristum and actor Rodrigo Santoro will attend the screening, which is followed by an afterparty. This year’s fest has a Brazilian theme. See slff.org for full schedule, ticket prices, and other details. (NR) Oct. 5-14. SHAUN OF THE DEAD Co-screenwriters Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg’s 2004 “rom-zom-com” shows laudable imagination and irreverence. Shaun (Pegg) is an utter dullard, an interim electronics store manager who frequents the same London dive bar every night, retains boorish college crony Ed as a flatmate, and can’t be bothered to disengage from PS2 long enough to accommodate easily aggravated girlfriend Liz. When a (never-explained) zombie plague commences right outside Shaun and Ed’s door, they’re hilariously oblivious. However, Wright and Pegg do share Kevin Smith’s weakness for extracting lame life lessons out of inspired lunacy. Call for showtimes. (R) ANDREW BONAZELLI Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684, centralcinema.com, $6-$8, Oct. 5-9. THE STORY OF FILM: AN ODYSSEY Made for British television, this 15-hour survey of cinema history by Irish scholar Mark Cousins will run in repeating blocks of three episodes (three hours) each. In an Ulster brogue, Cousins narrates, alternating between stabs at lilting poetry and calculated down-to-earth matey-ness. This Story, for all its claims of rewriting, is too reliant on received film-buff wisdom. (NR) NICK PINKERTON SIFF Film Center, $5-$10, Thurs., 7 p.m. Through Oct. 4. SUPERBAD Judd Apatow’s 2007 Superbad is about a couple of chronically unpopular best friends (Jonah Hill and Michael Cera) who, after four years stuck on the lowest rung of the high-school social ladder, find themselves invited to a legitimately cool party. Goodbye, Friday nights chugging Old Milwaukees in their parents’

Seattle weekly • OCTOBER 3−9, 2012

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basements; hello, getting shitfaced in the company of a few dozen of their not-particularly-close friends. More importantly, having completed their independent study in Internet porn, our heroes finally get the chance to put their virtual carnal knowledge to practical use. Provided, that is, they can actually get to the party. Written by Knocked Up star Seth Rogen and co-writer Evan Goldberg, Superbad turns into something like the Lord of the Rings of adolescent nookie movies—a hazardfilled journey towards the fiery gates of Mount Poon. It’s achingly funny, but what sets it apart from other high school comedies is its sweet, soulful vulnerability. That naughty-but-nice approach might seem something of an Apatow cliché by now if the characters themselves didn’t ring so true. Make no mistake: Superbad is a movie about getting wasted and getting laid, but it is above all an ode to the end of teenage innocence in all its wonderful, horrible splendor. Movie screens at midnight. (R) SCOTT FOUNDAS Egyptian, 805 E. Pine St., 720-4560, landmarktheatres.com, $8.25, Fri., Oct. 5; Sat., Oct. 6. U2: RATTLE AND HUM: From 1988, Phil Joanou’s black-and-white documentary captures the Irish band at the apex of its early fame. Bono and the boys are a little easier to take today. Songs include “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” and “Angel of Harlem.” Call for showtimes. (PG-13) Central Cinema, $6-$8, Oct. 5-9. UNFORGIVEN Clint Eastwood’s Oscar-winning Western from 1992 is screened for this year’s 20/20 Awards. (R) Grand Illusion, $5-$8, Thu., Oct. 4, 8:45 p.m. WOMEN IN THE SHADOWS Recently remade by Todd Haynes for HBO (with Kate Winslet in the starring role), the 1945 melodrama Mildred Pierce has Joan Crawford destroy her family while searching for wealth and social acceptance. Based on the James M. Cain novel. (NR) Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3100, seattleart museum.org, $63-$68 (series), $8 (individual), Thurs., 7:30 p.m. Through Dec. 6.

Ongoing

• ARBITRAGE Slick and grown-up as Richard Gere

himself, this intricate fiscal thriller takes a dead bead on extreme privilege, with Gere’s Madoff-like billionaire fund-runner scrambling to keep his personal empire from crumbling like crackers. He has everything until he

doesn’t—with the sale of his company for nine figures already jeopardized by cooked books, a car wreck, and warm corpse get him scrambling one step ahead of the cops. Jarecki slices his cake and has it, too: We bizarrely empathize with the amoral hero’s stressed-out tightrope walk, wanting him to get away with being an untouchable plutocratic scumbag, while the film simultaneously limns the rank injustices money can buy in bulk. (R) Michael Atkinson Kirkland Parkplace, Majestic Bay Theatres, SIFF Cinema Uptown, Bainbridge LOOPER Early in Rian Johnson’s thriller, Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) sits at a diner and chats with his self from 30 years in the future (Bruce Willis), who tells him not to worry about the particulars of time travel. Looper is more intent on the moral implications of a charged situation grounded in character, and it turns both Joes loose to make their own life-altering choices. Thrilling in its deft juggling of complex narrative elements, utterly clear in its presentation and unfolding with what feels like serious moral purpose, Looper favors the human scale over abstract philosophizing or meta-cinematic frippery. For Johnson, the inveterate pasticheur, it qualifies as a significant step forward. (R) Andrew Schenker Sundance Cinemas, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Cinebarre, Sundance THE MASTER In admitting that Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman), the figurehead of a growing faith movement in 1950s America, was inspired by L. Ron Hubbard, Paul Thomas Anderson set up expectations of an exposé of the origins of Scientology. Instead, he has delivered a free-form work of expressionism, more room-size painting than biopic. Anderson has never made a film so coded, so opaque. Dodd teaches a drunk named Freddie (Joaquin Phoenix) not to apologize for who he is—”a scoundrel”—and gets him to submit to the Master’s conversion therapy (this includes accessing memories from past lives). In Freddie he has a man who chewed through every leash ever clipped to his collar. Dodd asks him, “Do your past failures bother you?” Can he change? Does he want to? Is this all vague enough? The film’s ambiguity could hardly be unintentional, but more interesting is Anderson’s use of sumptuous technique to tell a story defined by withholding. It’s a film of breathtaking cinematic romanticism and nearcomplete denial of conventional catharsis. (R) Karina Longworth Guild 45th, Lincoln Square, Cinerama

Palette

Primary


food&drink»

Flying for Fish

Miyabi never goes too far wrong, but a few dishes which seemed like shoo-ins on the menu failed to excite. A tripe soup wasn’t bad, but was indistinguishable from a mild chicken soup meant to cure colds. Gyoza stuffed with more ginger than absolutely necessary were unevenly crisped. Finally, to put it in Kida’s terms, black-cod collar is a closer: The cut reliably delivers a buttery hit of fat, but Miyabi’s version was glazed a mite too exuberantly, and the collar tasted mostly of oil and char. There are two different noodle programs at Miyabi. Mutsuko Soma, who runs soba popups around town, makes 15 orders daily for the restaurant. But it’s not uncommon for the fresh soba to sell out by lunchtime, which is why I ended up with the frozen noodles that supplement Soma’s stock. Afloat with shrimp and asparagus wearing tempura coats, a bloated mushroom cap, radishes, and ribbons of nori, the gentle broth is good enough that Miyabi sells plenty of it even when customers know they’ll have to settle for pasty udon.

A Southcenter sushi sensation is worth crossing oceans for.

I

BY HANNA RASKIN

I

Chef Masa Ishikura exhibits a cross-cut of Japanese cuisine.

section. Although the kitchen doesn’t invest every dish with the powerful flavors that connoisseurs with long-unconsummated cravings might seek, many of its simplest preparations are stunning. A quartet of silvery shishamo, or grilled smelt, are bundled on a rectangular black tray cornered by a dollop of garlicky mayonnaise and a tuft of showily green lettuce. The oily flavor of the delicate fish, perfectly sized for head-to-tail gobbling, is as pretty and stark as the plate’s composition. For a more boisterous starter, a tangle of frizzy deep-fried squid legs, dribbled with fresh lemon juice, tastes clean and salty-sweet. An equally classic agedashi tofu also benefits from Miyabi’s deep-frying aptitude, bouncy beneath its crunchy, purplish skin of potato starch. Among the lighter dishes, a savory, soy-soaked salad of aromatic stir-fried mushrooms, spinach leaves, and snippets of kabocha pumpkin—which seemed to be on every table the night I ordered it—is outstanding.

f I had three wishes to expend at Miyabi, I’d first wish for more soba. Then I might wish for a better selection of drinks; the restaurant has an extensive wine selection, but offers only three sakes by the glass. And the signature cocktails are pretty frightful: A wildly imbalanced mix of plum wine, whiskey, and sake is a Japanese liquor cabinet in a single slosh. Finally, if the genie would allow it, I’d wish for a lifetime pass to Miyabi’s sushi bar. There typically aren’t too many unconventional choices in Miyabi’s fish case. An omakase order is likely to bring yellowtail, tuna, mackerel, salmon, and flounder. But they’re all extraordinarily fresh. Uni, which does a notoriously poor job of hiding its age, sits at the vaunted intersection of firm and creamy. Tender amberjack is blissfully bright, while plummy, firm-fleshed tuna has a muscular, seaborne flavor. Ordered as sashimi, the fish are propped up on a plate furnished with citrus wheels, shiso leaves, and a bamboo mat, creating a polychromatic diorama. Served as nigiri, the fish are treated with a tad more wasabi than many local sushi bars apply and nestled against stillwarm vinegared rice. Miyabi recently announced plans to open a second location in November in the Wallingford venue previously occupied by Rain Sushi. Although it’s still unclear whether the new restaurant will focus primarily on sushi or noodles, it will surely be worth the trip from Tukwila. Or maybe even Japan. E hraskin@seattleweekly.com MIYABI 16820 Southcenter Pkwy., Tukwila, 575-6815, miyabisushi.com. 11:15 a.m.–2:30 p.m. & 4:30–9:30 p.m. Mon.–Thurs. 11:15 a.m.–2:30 p.m. & 4:30–10 p.m. Fri. Noon–10 p.m. Sat. 4:30–9 p.m. Sun.

Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3− 9, 2012

S

Miyabi has contrived a fairly sophisticated formula that transcends inborn allegiances.

JOSHUA HUSTON

f your workday ends in downtown Seattle, Miyabi Sushi isn’t the most convenient choice for dinner. Every meal I ate at the Tukwila restaurant started ludicrously early or regrettably late, in deference to dining companions terrified by the prospect of getting stuck in exasperating southbound traffic. But if it seems slightly masochistic to make a 14-mile sushi run when artful rolls are readily available from grocery stores and food trucks within the city limits, take comfort in knowing that if the perpetually packed restaurant gave a nightly prize to the guest who’d traveled farthest, you wouldn’t win. According to Miyabi co-owner Hisako Shirakura—who’s almost always on the floor in her role as hostess, pouring green tea, whisking away emptied bento boxes, and bidding departing diners a hearty “Arigato!”— the restaurant’s mighty corps of loyal customers includes a number of eaters living in Japan. Miyabi’s proximity to the airport makes it a popular sushi stopover for Japanese natives and expats stationed in cities with miserable raw-fish scenes, although Shirakura claims guests in downtown hotels also arrive by the vanload. While it’s impossible to divine someone’s postal code by sight, Miyabi definitely draws a Japanese crowd. But it also attracts diners who look as though their last fling with underwater creatures involved a camopatterned bass boat. It’s rare for a restaurant’s appeal to tread across national borders and cultural divisions, but Miyabi has contrived a fairly sophisticated formula that transcends inborn allegiances. The restaurant cultivates goodwill through holiday parties; weekly “lucky days,” when gift cards are sold at a 15-percent discount; complimentary edasushi bar and a lineup of noodle soups. It’s mame service; and live music that’s more little wonder that Miyabi’s website teaches jazzy than Japanese. Mostly, though, Miyabi visitors how to say “I’m so full” in Japanese. has reached its seventh anniversary by serving great food. Niche restaurants are a Japanese tradition. hirakura’s partners are chef The country is home to noodle shops that Masa Ishikura and Masao Kida, a only serve ramen with pork fried a certain Japanese pro baseball player who way, and pubs whose menus consist entirely briefly pitched for the Mariners in of grilled chicken skewers. 2004 and ’05. His uniform That kind of specializahangs on the back wall of tion is unknown at Miyabi, Miyabi’s recently reno» PRICE GUIDE SHISAMO ��������������������������������������������$5 which is more like a mervated dining room, which AGEDASHI TOFU �����������������������������$6 COD COLLAR �������������������������������������$8 cantile of mainstream Japis dolled up with distincMUSHROOM SALAD ����������������������� $7 anese eating styles. Miyabi tively Japanese touches NABEYAKI UDON����������������������$12�95 SUSHI PLATE �����������������������������$19�95 is not an izakaya, but its such as paper lanterns, lengthy list of appetizers ceramic fish sculptures, includes chicken karaage, and a gorgeous naturalagedashi tofu, pickles, and yakitori. The reswood sushi bar. In true Japanese fashion, the taurant doesn’t demand that diners commit bathrooms are equipped with heated toilets. to a full-on meal, but it offers entrée-sized It all feels abstractedly authentic. portions of salmon teriyaki, tofu sukiyaki, and Even if you’ve come for sushi, it’s worth chicken katsu. There’s also an accomplished first detouring through Miyabi’s appetizer

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food&drink»Featured Eats $ = $25 or less per person; $$ = $25–$40; $$$ = $40 and up. These capsule reviews are written by editorial staff and have nothing to do with advertising. For hundreds more reviews, searchable by neighborhood and type of cuisine, go to seattleweekly.com/food.

BALLARD

FIREHOUSE COFFEE 2622 N.W. Market St., 784-2911.

There’s a kids’ play gym next door (Gymboree) which can be handy or noisy, depending on your need or mood. But it’s a cozy coffeehouse atmosphere, with reliable sandwiches and tasty pastries. $ THE PEOPLE’S PUB 5429 Ballard Ave. N.W., 783-6521. The People’s Pub menu is like a love letter to Southern Germany, boasting a wide assortment of wursts and spaetzles. It will not disappoint with brews, either, which are served in a sampleable 10-ounce form. Spatens, Bitburgers, pils and others are all on tap. The star of the show, though, is the comfort food, especially the grilled cheese/tomato soup combo and the five lightly breaded dills with garlic aioli that, during happy hour, you can get for less than the price of a pint. In fact, People’s does a number of things surprisingly well, not the least of which is getting you tipsy on a budget. $ RAY’S BOATHOUSE AND CAFE 6049 Seaview Ave. N.W., 789-6309. Ray’s recently embarked on a reinvention campaign, which included adding lots of the trendy small plates to the 60-year old restaurant’s menu. Unfortunately, all the culinary tricks the kitchen could muster are too often foisted upon the same dish, creating a debacle of excess. But Ray’s couldn’t muss with the seminal views, and there are few greater local pleasures than a hot coffee cocktail and a plaid blanket on the back deck. If you’re tempted to try a new menu item, the fried egg sandwich is remarkably good. $$

Alexa’s Garden Cafe

SHIKU 5310 Ballard Ave. N.W., 588-2151. There are neigh-

borhoods that count dry cleaners and gas stations as necessary amenities. In Ballard, the list of must-haves includes a cozy sushi den, a niche neatly filled by Shiku. The brick-walled lounge is fond of embossing its menu and website with adjectives like “inventive” and “innovative,” but there’s nothing really mindblowing here. The quasi-izakaya’s won fans with its pert cocktails and fairly-priced spicy tuna rolls, not its omakase. No matter: The fish is fresh, the vibe is homey and the restaurant saves Ballardites the trouble of straying too far from the ‘hood. $$

Dine Green!

Inside Swanson’s Nursery 9701 15th Ave NW | Seattle, WA 98117

www.alexascafe.com open daily from 9am-5pm

GO ! KS HAW

BELLTOWN

EL GAUCHO 2505 First Ave., 728-1337. If you show up

at El Gaucho without a special occasion to celebrate, you’ll mystify the staff. “And what brings you to El Gaucho?,” a server asks as he offers an escorting arm to a bathroom-bound guest. Perhaps its the zaniness of the darkly-lit room, which looks like a cut-rate Tropicana Club stage set. Or perhaps you’re drawn by the flaming beef torches bolero-clad servers hustle across the dance floor. The overpriced steaks are plain and the sides are wildly inconsistent, but El Gaucho offers a singular experience that always closes with a complimentary dessert basket of fresh fruit and a hunk of blue cheese. $$$ THE HURRICANE CAFE 2230 Seventh Ave., 682-5858. On Friday and Saturday nights after hours, punk rockers, geeks, ravers, and the bitter underaged all come to this 24-hour diner. The menu’s typical (burgers, waffles, eggs, sandwiches), and the reasonably priced food is good by middle-of-the-night standards. Many swear that the bottomless hash browns prevent a hangover and, if it’s too late for that, you can always ease the pain with an awesome Bloody Mary. $ SPUR GASTROPUB 113 Blanchard St., 728-6706. The problem with so many of today’s flailing attempts at

FirstCall

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Root Rocks

TIFFANY RAN

Brandy Black makes the root-beer float an adult drink.

responsible producers. Art in the Age’s hearty ROOT liqueur became the base of the Cakery’s boozy root-beer float. According to the company’s website (artintheage.com), its root liqueur came from an age-old recipe for alcoholic root tea. During the temperance movement, a pharmacist made the tea sans alcohol and dubbed it “root beer.” Black serves the float by pouring root beer and the 80-proof ROOT over a pure white ball of vanillabean ice cream from Bluebird Microcreamery. The Verdict: Despite my talk of past comforts and simpler times, this is not your childhood float. One sip of the Cakery’s float brings a wallop of intense, earthy root flavors. The slow-melting ice cream rounds out the punchy drink with a creamy finish, while the aromas of sassafras, sarsaparilla, birch bark, and wild roots linger. But those looking to avoid a milk mustache might consider using a spoon. E food@seattleweekly.com

Officer, • I wish to contact my Attorney, Casey Jason at 425-223-7701 now. • I will provide my drivers license, registration, and proof of insurance. • I will sign a citation, if any, then I want to leave immediately. • I will not answer any questions without an attorney present. • I do not have to do “Field Sobriety Tests” and I refuse to do them. • I do not consent to or want to be recorded. • I do not consent to my person, car, or other property being searched. • I do not waive my rights. If you want me to take a breath or blood test, I want to talk to Casey Jason at 425-223-7701, first.

Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3− 9, 2012

The Watering Hole: Hot Cakes Molten Chocolate Cakery, 5427 Ballard Ave. N.W., 420-3431, BALLARD The Atmosphere: A box of vintage photos, bright yellow flowers, and a shelf of canning jars at Hot Cakes Molten Chocolate Cakery evokes a sense of old American comfort in simpler days. Autumn Martin opened the Cakery this year as a storefront and restaurant for her eponymous take-and-bake molten chocolate cakes in a jar. The space is a quintessential Pacific Northwest dessert bar, with sleek wooden tables, large blackboard menus, and vintage accents alluding to bygone-era soda shops. While a menu of grilled cheeses and cakes might seem like child’s play, the Cakery’s spin on each item—from a grilled “Big Boy” sandwich with prosciutto, blue cheese, and dates to its boozy floats and shakes—makes growing up a little sweeter for us all. The Barkeep: Brandy Black is working behind the Cakery’s “bar” these days. She met Martin when Black was a baker at Honey Bear Bakery, where Martin was using the back room to push out batches of hot cakes to sell at local farmers markets. Black started at Hot Cakes shortly after it opened, where she soon discovered her knack for matching sweets with spirits. The Drink: When Black stumbled upon craft spirits made by the company Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, she forwarded the information to Martin, knowing that its use of natural and organic ingredients fell in line with the Cakery’s commitment to environmentally

Fresh Healthy Fare Delicious Breakfasts All day Saturday & Sunday

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Seattle weekly • OCTOBER 3−9, 2012

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modernist cuisine and molecular gastronomy is that, in their breathless fascination with all the goop, gear, and gadgetry involved in turning cheese into pasta and fish into foam, many chefs forget that they’re still being paid to make people dinner. That means that the food itself still has to be a recognizable part of the “dining experience” and not get completely lost amid the chemicals and lasers. This, then, is the strength of Spur—a kitchen where a grounding in locality, seasonality, and recognizable ingredients (hedgehog mushrooms, salmon, potatoes, leeks, bacon) balances the impulse toward abstract gastronomic modernism, always elevating the trout above the almond foam and the sockeye salmon and house-made mascarpone above pure gimmickry. Because Spur’s crew can manage this (at prices considerably lower than those at many of the country’s other temples of molecular gastronomy), dinner here can be an event and an eyeopening indulgence without T H I S CO D E ever slipping over the line TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE into a piece of egotistical SEATTLE WEEKLY performance art staged by IPHONE/ANDROID APP cooks solely for their own FOR MORE RESTAURANTS OR VISIT enjoyment. $$$ seattleweekly.com TAVOLATA 2323 Second Ave., 838-8008. With its rawcement walls and ultralate hours, entrées for two, and crowd of bargoers waiting for seats, Tavolata is the party place in party town. Those willing to dive in to the experience will find that Tavolata delivers much of what it promises: honest, well-prepared Italian food; a reasonable check; and good odds of chatting up whomever the host seats next to you at the 30-person communal table. Chef Ethan Stowell’s handmade pastas are supple and golden, soaking up flavor from the sauce but still leaving you something to chew on. The octopus salad is fantastic, as is his grilled fish, seasoned only with lemon and smoke, perfectly Italian in its minimalism. $$ TILIKUM PLACE CAFÉ 407 Cedar St., 282-4830. Tilikum Place is an unexpectedly successful hybrid between an all-day diner and a erudite little bistro. During the day, Chef Ba Culbert serves nostalgic classics like

SCAN

ALittLeRAskin » by hanna raskin

For Sake’s Sake

Seattle lags far behind Portland in sake sales, and sake advocate Marcus Pakiser says distributors bear the blame. “In Seattle, there’s not enough education,” says Pakiser, sake sommelier for Young’s Columbia Distributing Co. “There’s no one really educating restaurateurs. Distributors don’t know anything about sake.” Even restaurateurs who’ve gotten the message that sake pairs with everything (except maybe sushi, which is traditionally accompanied by green tea) often don’t realize that an opened bottle will last up to six months if properly refrigerated. And because they’re reluctant to pour sake by the glass, they tend to list small bottles at prices that discourage experimentation. “The cheapest bottle will be $35,” says Pakiser, ticking off the various excuses restaurant owners give for not diversifying their by-the-glass sake selection, such as limited customer interest or storage difficulties. “Bullcrap. They’re lazy.” Pakiser, who led an introduction-tosake session at Feast Portland, has been

baked beans on toast and airy Dutch babies made to order in cast-iron pans. The day’s sweet option may be laden with roasted apple slices and walnuts, the savory, with tendrils of duck confit. Dusk shutters the Cafe’s wide-open atmosphere, transforming it into an intimate hideaway. Now’s the time to order the specials of the day, which can be anything from scallops set atop two purees, yam wasabi and spinach, or a tender haunch of rabbit with spinachmushroom dumpling cakes. $-$$ THE YELLOW LEAF CUPCAKE CO. 2209 Fourth Ave., 441-4240. In the Miss Seattle Cupcake pagent, Yellow Leaf would be voted “Most Likely to Take Chances.” The signature cake’s tomato soup—basically a spice cake from a wacky Depression-era recipe—and the bakers regularly feature flavors like white chocolate pretzel (good), vanilla toffee (order two), and root beer float (skip). The distinctive element of these cupcakes is their silky, gossamer Italian buttercream. $

CAPITOL HILL

FUEL COFFEE 610 19th Ave. E., 329-4700. This scrappy

little Capitol Hill coffee shop’s patrons are as loyal as the atmosphere is laid-back. Fuel represents the middle ground in Seattle coffee culture: It’s a place for folks who are neither Stumptown nor Starbucks, aficionado or layman. But if ever a roast tastes familiar, it’s because Fuel buys its beans from local roaster Caffé Vita. $

COLUMBIA CITY

FULL TILT ICE CREAM 5041 Rainier Ave. S. #101,

226-2740. Go for the handmade ice cream, of which there is a rotating menu of flavors, from vegan vanilla bean to Sweet Potato Pecan Praline. Stay to geek out with the vintage video games, of which there are an abundance. $ JONES BARBEQUE 3810 S. Ferdinand St., 722-4414. The Joneses must be the most prolific artists in town, tossing off masterpieces for their adoring fans. Jones’ sauce, widely acknowledged as the best in town, recalibrates diners’ sense of taste—the rich, soothing spice blend complements the hot stuff rather than struggling against it. Ribs, chicken, and brisket all offer just the right resistance to cutting and chewing, and the sweet, sweet baked beans make an excellent dessert. Even if you’re done with sweets after the beans and cornbread, grab a slice of pecan or sweet-potato pie on your way out—you know you’ll want it at midnight. $

instrumental in pushing sake toward the mainstream in Portland. Food and wine magazines perennially run features touting the suitability of sake for the Thanksgiving table: “It’s much more versatile than wine,” Pakiser promises. “Think Mexican food. Think cheese.” (Or, based on the tasting session following Pakiser’s talk, think specifically about cave-aged Gruyère with a chilled Yuki No Bosha.) But only in Portland, which leads the nation in per capita sake consumption, do non-Japanese restaurants offer sake flights and regularly serve the beverage with food that’s not remotely Asian. “Portland gets it,” says Stella Parker, western regional manager for Joto Sake. “Portland gets it more than anywhere. I’ve just gotten back from Vegas and L.A., and they have a long way to go to catch up with Portland.” Still, Pakiser cautions that even in Portland there are drinkers who mispronounce sake and insist on drinking it hot. “We have a long way to go, but we’re ahead of the curve,” he says. E hraskin@seattleweekly.com

aBLOG ON »FOOD VORACIOUS

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM/VORACIOUS


food&drink»Featured Eats DOWNTOWN

EL MALECON 1122 Post Ave., 623-7203. Formerly known

as Las Margaritas, this big, airy Mexican joint is nestled in Post Alley, directly under the Highway 99 offramp at Seneca, giving it a hideaway feel. Plates of big Americanized Mexican are cheap and satisfying. They’re not exactly reinventing the wheel here, but the food is still a cut above many of this city’s casual Mexican sit-down spots. Happy hour is every day from 3 to 7 p.m. and again from 9 to close, when margaritas are $4.25, drafts and wells are $3. $ FIRST HILL BAR AND GRILL 901 Madison Ave., 623-6333. A Greek diner with the works. Customers have their pick of seats at the counter, in cozy booths, or upstairs. The FHB&G serves breakfast classics (eggs any way you want ‘em, pancakes, omelets, lotsa sausage) all day and traditional hot entrées (burgers, melts, salads, soups) later on. $ GUAYMAS CANTINA 1303 First Ave., 624-5062. Perched above the Harbor Steps, the patio of this downtown branch of the local Mexican chain is a great spot to savor a sunny summer lunch and dinner. For the other 10 months of the year, you can always enjoy the cheery interior and catch some soccer on the telly. Food is cheap and serviceable, which in the Four Seasons district is very handy to have. $ MAXIMUS MINIMUS Location varies, 601-5510. Easily the most-recognized vehicle in town after the Ducks, this pig-shaped Airstream serves a small menu of pulled-pork sandwiches, slaws, chips, and drinks. All come in either mild (minimus) or spicy (maximus) versions. The pork sandwiches, served on a whole-wheat bun, spill over with meat that has almost been braised long enough to shred up on its own and thickly coated in a sweet-tangy barbecue sauce. (Sorry, vegetarians, but the veg sandwich, with barley grains and caramelized onions in the same sauces, can’t compete.) $ RED BOWLS 812 Third Ave., 344-2695. Good takeaway lunch food is exactly what you expect to find in a working downtown. And yet many parts of Seattle’s skyscraper district can feel like utter wastelands in this regard. That’s why Red Bowls is such a relief—and so addictive. This little family-run shop serves Korean- and Japanese-style bowls that are healthy, fresh, and quick (once you get through the line). There’s bulgogi and bibimbop, with a choice of meats, and several vegetarian options, all filled out with a terrific variety of veggies, over rice. For six or seven bucks, you get something that’s neither a grease bomb nor a big starchy sandwich, and leaves you satisfied, not craving a nap. $ TAP HOUSE GRILL 1506 Sixth Ave., 816-3314. It’s no surprise that three-quarters of the diners at Tap House Grill, just a block away from the convention center, are straight (-appearing) men. The giant underground warehouse—decorated in a handsome palette of copper and chocolate—is dominated by a bar with 160 tap handles, staffed with a team of lovely women, and lined with a Circuit City’s worth of flat-panel TVs. The global menu includes everything from sushi to steaks, wings to dinner salads. Rule of thumb: The less you spend (that means burgers and snacks), the better off you are. $-$$ THE TOP OF THE HILTON 1301 Sixth Ave., 695-6015. As a friend put it, this is the place you take your date when you’re having an affair: quiet to the point of being clandestine, with fabulous, romantic views to the west, north, and east from downtown. Few Seattle bars do more to nurture conversation; it’s perfect for gathering after a 5th Avenue or Benaroya Hall performance to chew it over with friends. $$ DUKE’S GREENLAKE CHOWDER HOUSE 7850 Green

Lake Dr. N., 522-4908. Come for the chowder, stay for the view. Since Green Lake is a freshwater pond, the maritime menu at Duke’s here skews toward lighter fare. People like to eat outside, grazing on salads and IPAs so long as the weather’s above 60 degrees. But those salads are available with salmon, crab, and other varieties of seafood, so you can always pretend you’re within sight of Elliott Bay. Another benefit: the experienced bar staff, which makes Duke’s a good place for a first date. Depending on how you hit it off, you can sit down for dinner or flee to your car. $-$$

LESCHI & MADRONA

HI SPOT CAFE 1410 34th St., 325-7905. Partially housed in

a proud Madrona manor, the Hi Spot looks as though it’d trend toward the highfalutin set, the type of place that serves tea, crumpets, and caviar to well-heeled women in pearls and pumps. It’s anything but (although, this being Madrona, the ladies by the lake are welcome as well). Rather, the Hi Spot offers an exhaustive menu filled with highbrow spins on lowbrow classics, such as green eggs and ham, French toast, and Greek omelets. It’s like a greasy spoon without the grease, and with much better coffee; in other words, quintessentially Seattle. $

SEATTLE PIE COMPANY 3111 W. McGraw St. Ste 101, 217-

4743. With its simple wood paneling and black walls, tabletop burners next to the counter for making Swedish pancakes, and a “Thanks, darlin’” approach to greeting customers, Seattle Pie Co. is the quintessential mom-and-pop shop, even though owners Alyssa and Patrick Lewis aren’t yet middle-aged. The Lewises make shortening pies instead of butter, but the crusts crackle and crumble when your fork cuts through, and almost all the fruit is Washington grown. From deep-purple marionberries to bright peach-raspberry, the fillings hit that perfect point just when tart becomes sweet. And the banana cream pie is everything you wished your grandmother’s would have been. $-$$

PIKE PLACE MARKET

KELLS IRISH RESTAURANT & PUB 1916 Post Alley,

728-1916. Ireland meets the Pacific Northwest in this Pike Place Market back-alley pub, whose dim wooden rooms seem like they should smell like peat smoke and potato farmers (but don’t) and where even craft-beer snobs will be tempted away from their brew by the whiskey collection. Ireland meets too, in the steamed clams in a beergarlic-ginger broth, the traditional Irish soda bread, the corned beef with cabbage, and, if you just need to offset that last glass of Jameson, meat pasties and sausage rolls. They also boast a single-malt scotch list that stretches on and on (weighing in as the largest in the city), packed with Glen-this and More-that, and a perfectly poured Guinness that you can sip amid savory smells, the din of conversation and a backdrop of live traditional Irish folk music. $ MICHOU FRESCA 1904 Pike Place, 448-4758. This little place offers fresh, high-end ingredients, innovatively combined and ready for gourmands on the go. While Italian fare is prominent, the cuisine ventures as far afield as Tunisia (the cucumber salad) and Spain (torte Espanola). Seating’s largely nonexistent, so get there early and take your pick of humongous sandwiches, focaccia, and soups. $

PIONEER SQUARE

DOME BURGER 111 Occidental Ave. S., 340-1457. Asian-

American owners? Check. Decent-yet-unspectacular burgers and teriyaki dishes? Check. McDonald’s-esque (meaning awesome) fries? Check. What separates Dome Burger from the plethora of Asian-owned burger/teriyaki joints that line the cityscape is that it’s one of few area businesses to hold on to the Kingdome moniker in spite of the fact that the Dome’s long since imploded. So next time you find yourself dodging the colorful daytime denizens of Occidental Square, patronize Dome Burger in the name of historic preservation. $

QUEEN ANNE

HOW TO COOK A WOLF 2208 Queen Anne Ave. N.,

838-8090. Ethan Stowell’s third restaurant looks like a cross between a cigar box and a sauna, and not much bigger than either. It’s a casual neighborhood joint for people who enjoy hanging out in tiny, refined spaces and are comfortable ordering off a menu that refuses to define itself in courses. A meal at Wolf might start with a plate of escolar crudo, which gives way to chickenliver bruschetta drizzled in balsamic vinaigrette, then a bowl of gnocchi with cauliflower and olives. The dishes are of the moment, both in terms of food trends and the seasons, and the cooking is frequently exquisite. So are Angela Stowell’s list of Italian wines. $$ LAREDOS GRILL 555 Aloha St. #100, 218-1040. This new Queen Anne sports bar—sorry, “Northern Mexican” restaurant—serves food similar to Peso’s, but not as carefully made: mediocre cocktails, limp salads (with chips in them), lackluster salsas, and a bizarre chicken breast drowned in sour cream. There are two bright spots, however for you to nosh on while you watch the flat-screen TVs: the warm, light, salty tortilla chips (which the servers replenish continually) and the tacos al pastor. Rubbed with chiles and cooked on the spit, the pork—a Lebanese-Mexican variation on shawerma—is sliced off in tender chunks and wrapped between freshly made corn tortillas with tiny chunks of charred pineapple. $-$$ SHIKI 4 W. Roy St., 281-1352. At Shiki, the lights are bright, a homemade shoji screen separates off one corner, and the music rattling over the speakers is liable to be some form of Japanese easy listening. But you’re not here for the atmosphere, you’re here to sample chef Yamamoto’s supreme sushi. His nigiri sushi is all done with crisp precision and pristine freshness. Sushi sophisticates who want to venture off the beaten path should consult the white board near the door, where they might find such rarities as anago (ocean eel) or ayu (trout) flown in from Japan. In the way of cooked foods, black cod in sake is grilled to the approximate consistency of butter, and delicacies like monkfish or quail are prepared hot-pot-style. Bonus: Yamamoto is the sole practitioner in the state of fugu-the Japanese blowfish so poisonous it can kill you if it’s not prepared right. $$

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column»Toke Signals

S.A.M. COLLE

Grape Expectations

L

ast time I visited this address in Fremont, it housed the medicalmarijuana collective Purple Cross, and the day ended in disappointment; the dispensary was out of weed. Hoping it wouldn’t be déjà vu all over again—and attracted by their $10-a-gram prices—I entered the lobby of Fremont Gardens. The lady behind the counter asked if this was my first visit, and I told her I’d visited Purple Cross. She was quick to tell me that Fremont Gardens has “completely different management” than the previous tenants. And yes, they had plenty of cannabis. That plenitude of pot became happily obvious to me the moment I walked into the budroom. There before me were two gorgeous high-rise glass display cases housing a total of about 20 strains of marijuana. A third display case, on the left, held a respectable selection of medibles. (The Wrecking Balls—powdered-sugar-covered, gluten-free wads of cannabutter, sugar, flour, and pecans—are worth checking out at $8 for the four-pack. The packaging tells you “Single Dose: One Piece,” but trust me, you’ll achieve much better results by eating all four at once.) There were around nine indicas, half a dozen sativas, and five hybrid strains—and everything, as I mentioned, is just $10. Wishing I’d had more cash with which to explore their flower menu, I eventually settled on two selections: Haze Wreck, a sativa, and Grape Daddy, an indica. Haze Wreck is a combination of a member

x

BY STEVE ELLIOTT

of the Haze family of strains and Trainwreck, so it’s either a pure sativa or damn near it. Its gorgeous, crystal-covered flowers have a subtle fruity smell, and the toke test quickly revealed the pleasant thought-fuel properties that keep many patients coming back to these strains, not only for stress reduction and nausea control but also for what Big Pharma would have you believe is a “side effect”—the euphoria. Don’t believe them; the high is a part of the healing, as most patients already know. Just as Haze Wreck is a combination of two popular sativas, Grape Daddy is a combo of two popular indicas, Grape Ape and Granddaddy Purple. Since Grape Ape is itself a higher-producing sister phenotype of Granddaddy Purple, it’s a pretty stable cross, showing characteristics of its Afghani and Skunk forebears from both sides of the family. Grape Daddy more resembles Grape Ape in that I was able to maintain a clearer head after toking than I had with Grandaddy Purple; although both strains have the painkilling narcotic effects of many indicas, Grape Ape (and Grape Daddy) are more suitable for daytime use than most Purple strains. Fremont Gardens’ overwhelmingly positive online reviews were confirmed by my happy customer experience at the collective; when you combine helpful, knowledgeable budtenders with top-shelf cannabis strains at just $10 a gram, what you get are happy patients. E

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Seat tle weekly • O CTOBER 3− 9, 2012

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Seattle Weekly, October 03, 2012  

October 03, 2012 edition of the Seattle Weekly

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