Page 1

Wrestling and Basketball

At the CCC on Feb. 1

Seasons Continue

Grouse of the Okanogan, See Page A3.

See Pages A4, A7

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.Gazette-Tribune.com | thursday, JANUARY 24, 2013 | 75 Cents NEWSSTAND PRICE

Kinross updates on impact, future plans

PICKETERS PROTEST ASSISTED LIVING CLOSING

Average Kinross employee wage tops $82,000 rent Buckhorn Mine, it will probably take several years of additional permitting after the closure before new mining OROVILLE – A representative of could take placed. “We are also doing exploration at K5 Kinross Gold Corporation’s Kettle RiverBuckhorn Project appeared before the near where the K2 Mine used to be (in Oroville City Council to discuss the Ferry County). Surface drilling will wrap mine and mill’s impacts on Oroville and up this month. We should be able to determine by early February if we will Okanogan and Ferry Counties. continue with that project,” Zaker said. Deana Zaker apolOne goal of this ogized that the projrenewed exploration ect’s general maneffort to keep ager couldn’t appear “We made $4 million in istheanKettle River ore as scheduled for the payments to local and mill near Republic in council’s Tuesday, Jan. The mill 15 meeting. She said county government operation. just exceeded two milshe wanted to update agencies...” lion ounces of gold, the council on the according to Zaker. Buckhorn Mine, locatDeana Zaker The Buckhorn Mine ed near Chesaw, which Kinross Gold Corporation has been it’s main is slated to shut down source of ore and over in 2015. the mine’s life Kinross “Last year our target was 125,000 ounces of gold and we real- anticipates it will have generated 1.2 milized 150,000 ounces because we were lion ounces. Kinross contracted an independent mining a higher grade of ore than we expected,” said Zaker. “In 2013 we are socio-economic impact study about six months ago, said Zaker. According to looking at 130,000 ounces.” Although the mine is slated for clo- the study, in 2011, the Kettle Riversure in 2015, Kinross’ subsidiary, Echo Buckhorn operation employed 230 direct Bay Exploration, has submitted permit jobs, with 610 total jobs, direct, indirect applications to the state and federal gov- and induced, in Ferry and Okanogan ernment in 2010 to expand exploration counties. The operation paid $19 million into the adjacent state and federal public in direct payroll in 2011, with a total $27 million in Ferry and Okanogan counties. lands, according to Zaker. “We are exploring in a 9000 acre area The average employee wage, excluding and doing an EIS with the hope to get benefits, is $82,559, said Zaker. “Most of our employees, 95 percent, permits by 2014,” she said. Zaker explained that even though it live locally, with 75 percent of those comsounds like the exploration permitting will line up near the end of the cur- See KINROSS | PG A2 By Gary A. DeVon

Managing Editor

Friends, relatives and concerned citizens picketed in front of the North Valley Assisted Living facility on Friday, Jan. 18, to protest its scheduled closing at the end of March. The North Valley Hospital District’s Board of Commissioners voted to close the facility at its Jan. 10 meeting, but many in the community feel that not all options have been explored in attempting to save the financially ailing facility, which has lost more than $800,000 in the last seven years. The next NVH Board of Commissioners meeting will be held Thursday, Jan. 31, at 7 p.m in the hospital board room. Brent Baker/staff photos

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Roland Clark shows a mock-up he made of how a new memorial at Veterans Memorial Park might appear.

Revamped memorial approved for park By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OROVILLE – The Oroville City Council gave tentative approval to a new, larger memorial at the city’s Veterans Memorial Park. Roland Clark, with the Oroville American Legion Post, appeared before council at their Tuesday, Jan. 15 meeting to request that the current memorial be moved from its present location to a new spot in the park. He also asked that the memorial be enlarged and presented a mock-up of what he envisioned. The memorial at Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park features a tree in an enclosed display case. The tree has copper leaves with a veterans name on each leaf. It was conceived of by a former Oroville student as his senior project a couple years back. Since that time a new senior adopts the project each year to carry on the work. “The problem with the current memo-

rial is it blocks the view of the lake and the plexiglass makes the names kind of hard to read. We’d like to build a concrete wall along a hillside where we can enlarge the tree because we have a lot more leaves with names that need to be added,” said Clark. Mayor Chuck Spieth asked how large the wall would be. Clark said it would be a foot thick and eight feet high by fifteen feet long. Rod Noel, head of the parks department, suggested the wall be placed near the bottom of the sidewalk at the entrance to the park. “Maybe the design could incorporate zero-scape and we could eliminate the watering problems the other one had. We could keep the sprinklers off it that way and if we had bushes that needed some water then we could put in a drip irrigation,” suggested Noel, adding that the city has had trouble getting good water

See MEMORIAL | PG A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune Volume 109 No. 04

Rep. Joel Kretz introduces wolf relocation legislation of wolf reintroduction to the state and two of the San Juan Islands would be perfect for reintroduction. The legislator says he’s having fun, but OLYMPIA - After Western Washington legislators extolled the value of wolf packs is also serious about the measure. “You know I went around with a blue in Eastern Washington, Rep. Joel Kretz (7th District) decided he would assist in sheet thinking they’d rush to get on the efforts to make relocating wolf packs board, but I didn’t get one signature from the west side. This was a to Western Washington easier fun one, because that’s where through legislation this year. all the support for the wolves House Bill 1258 would comes from. They like wolves, remove barriers, both natural but only when they’re in our and regulatory, to the relocadistrict,” said Kretz. tion of wolves from around the House Bill 1258 would ensure state to Western Washington all Washingtonians share in the locations, such as the Olympic benefits of an expanding wolf Peninsula and San Juan Islands. population, according to the “We have a situation where Rep. Joel Kretz bill’s title. folks on the west side of the “This is a one-Washington state really want to share in the ecological benefits wolves bring to our bill, this is a classic of what you hear state, but barriers such as Interstate Five when they want to build a stadium and and waterways, like those surrounding such. This is their chance to step up and the San Juan Islands, inhibit the natural create a truly united Washington. “I’m serious and I’m going to push it. If migration of wolves to those areas,” Kretz explained. “My bill would create a system I could get our delisting bill through that by which community members, includ- would allow regional delisting areas as ing legislators, could request wolves be the federal government (east of Highway transported by the state Department of 97) has done it wouldn’t have such an Fish and Wildlife across the natural bar- impact.” Kretz said the way it stands now the riers to thrive in new habitat where they wolves have to be recovered statewide, will be welcomed.” Kretz said Sen. Kevin Ranker (D-Orcas but he says that could take decades. “Washington state has a long tradition Island) is one of the biggest proponents By Gary A. DeVon

Managing Editor

See Wolves West | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

of land stewardship that makes excellent agriculture regions and habitat for large predators, such as wolves,” Kretz said. “Private landowners are the best and most effective environmentalists. As such, there are areas on the west side of the state that would fit the bill for large predator habitat. We should not geographically limit the migration of wolves to areas where they will be welcomed and there is the habitat that allows them to flourish,” he said. Kretz added that he and other residents in the Seventh District feel greedy for hoarding all the ecological benefits of wolf packs. “It’s clear our part of the state is home to the lion’s share of these large predators. My bill would help the Department of Fish and Wildlife accelerate the pace of translocating wolves so all Washingtonians can enjoy them,” Kretz said. “This move could generate the ecotourism west side legislators always cite as part of growing our economy.” The Wauconda Republican was concerned with the Department of Fish and Wildlife’s decision to host public meetings on wolf management in areas of the state where there aren’t any wolves. “The department hosted public forums in Spokane Valley, Olympia and Seattle.

Valley Life A3 Sports A4, A7 Letters/Opinion A5

Valley Life A6 Classifieds/Legals A8 Real Estate A9

Police Stats Obituaries

A9 A10


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 24, 2013

Burn ban lifted

It’s Showtime Again

35 Years of Service

BY SETH PARSONS

ECOLOGY COMMUNICATIONS

Rick Braman/submitted photos

It’s Showtime was held last Saturday evening at the Backdoor Club at Vicki’s Unique Boutique in Oroville. Clyde Andrews (below, right) manager of the Camaray Motel was the host for the evening. The free events are being held throughout January. The first act was Tyler Graves (bottom photo), who played a great acoustic set of his own creation and some more familiar songs. Bobby Hackett (below, left), of Chesaw was the poetry reader, reciting her own poetry for the first time publicly. Then Randy Battle and Friends (above) took the stage, and played many familiar tunes, including a Beatles medley.Next weekend will be the last official event, featuring Julie Ashmore and Sandy Vaughn, followed by Doug Wilson and Mariliz Romano. The host will be Mark Rabenold, and our poetry reader will be Judy Elven. We are announcing an additional event on Saturday February 2nd. It will be a potluck open mic night at the same venue, starting at 6:30pm until 9:00pm. Anyone wanting to come and join us for food and music is welcome.

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Ecology lifted the Stage 1 burn ban in Chelan, Douglas and Okanogan counties on Jan. 19. A Stage 1 ban applies to the use of uncertified wood-burning devices (including wood stoves, inserts and fireplaces) and to all outdoor burning. Ecology’s burn bans do not apply on tribal reservations, where the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has jurisdiction. Smoke from outdoor burning and wood-burning devices builds up where cold air is trapped near the ground. Fine particles in smoke are so small they can easily get into your lungs. Once there, they can cause heart and breathing problems, and even death. Children, people with asthma and respiratory illnesses, and adults older than 65 are most at risk. The ban remains in Kittitas County.

Terry Mills photo

Rose Rawley recently retired after 35 years of running the Tonasket Liquor Store. She was honored with a party at the Tonasket FOE on Jan. 12, where she was presented with a certificate of appreciation for her years of service by Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb.

WOLVES | FROM A1 These places don’t have any wolf packs, which raises one obvious question: Why hold the meeting there?” Kretz asked. “Those meetings should have been held in locations where people have actual experience in dealing with the animals. My constituents are frustrated and I don’t blame them.” However, if the measure proposed by Kretz is signed into law, meetings in Seattle and other

locales on the west side of the state would be necessary. “My bill, if passed, would truly be a successful collaboration between east and west, urban and rural and rich and poor parts of the state,” said Kretz. “Those residents and communities that support housing wolf packs at all costs are free to do so. Those of us dealing with the economic costs associated with loss of livestock and pets can

deem the wolves nuisances and, therefore, make the animals available for relocation where they will be set free to roam unfettered in new habitat.” Kretz said he expects the legislation will be embraced in a bipartisan manner. “This truly is a ‘one Washington’ bill,” Kretz said. For more information, visit his website at: www.houserepublicans.wa.gov.

KINROSS | FROM A1 ing from Ferry County and 25 percent from Okanogan County. From Okanogan County they are mostly from the Oroville area,” said Zaker. “The property taxes the project pays goes mostly to Okanogan County, with local schools getting about $1.1 million in additional money.” According to the study, in 2011, $1.37 million in property taxes went to Okanogan County and $110,000 to Ferry County. The company did $9 million in direct spending in the two

counties and worked with 354 Washington-based businesses. “We made $4 million in payments to local and county government agencies, including public utilities in Ferry and Okanogan counties,” she said. The mayor and council told Zaker they found the presentation to be very informative and thanked her for giving them an update on the mine. “It was a very good presentation, there was a lot of information,” said Mayor Chuck Spieth.

“We appreciate you giving us notice now about what is being done, because the impacts to our area will be great, especially to the school and the EMS,” added Kathy Jones, city clerk-treasurer, adding that Kinross is also a large contributor to local events. “They contribute to our foundation,” said Arnie Marchand, who sits on the Wenatchee Valley College – Omak Foundation Board. “Last year Kinross contributed $240,000 locally,” said Zaker.

MEMORIAL | FROM A1 pressure to the sprinklers in that area anyway. “It sounds like the council is in agreement, the first thing you should do is fine tune your plans and work with the staff on the location,” Mayor Spieth told Clark.

Application Rejected

Births & Marriages Births Gunner Moss Acord, a boy, was born to Brian and Brigette Acord of Oroville on Monday, January 7, 2013 at Mid Valley Hospital in Omak. Amnira Sharmarke Yusuf, a girl, was born to Joann and Sharmarke Yusef of Omak on Wednesday, January 9, 2013 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. Dotti Lou Youker, a girl, was born to Cassandra Vandeveer and Jason Youker of Oroville on Thursday, January 10, 2013 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. Grace Olivia Griner, a girl, was born to Jocvelyn and Derek Griner of Tonasket on Thursday, January 10, 2013 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. Raelynn Marie Farmbrook, a girl, was born to Angela and Aaron Farmbrook of Tonasket on Friday, January 11, 2013 at North

Valley Hospital in Tonasket.

Marriage Licenses Josephine Sandoval, age 41 of Oroville, will wed Pedro Figueroa, age 41 of Oroville.

Shawna Barber, age 34, of Omak, will wed Randy St Peter, age 36 of Omak. Sandra Moomaw, age 33, of Omak, will wed Miguel Argueta, age 29 of Omak.

EMT Chris Allen’s application to serve with the Oroville ambulance crew was turned down by the council when the mayor asked for a council vote. Citing the fact that Ambulance Coordinator Debra Donoghue was not in favor of the candidate, two council members – Tony Koepke and Jon Neal --voted against. Councilmen Walt Hart and Ed Naillion voted in favor, while Councilwoman Neysa Roley abstained because of her connection to the crew.

“Since it is a tie I’ll have to cast the tie breaker,” said Mayor Spieth. “I have stated in the past that I will go along with Debra’s recommendation. Chris, it is denied.” Neal suggested that if Allen wished to try to mend fences and reapply it would be reconsidered. Allen asked about bringing the issue to the grievance committee. The committee is made up of the mayor, Neal, Jones, and the ambulance coordinator. He was advised to submit a written request.

Ice and Snow In other business, the council approved allowing an ambulance standby at this year’s Northwest Ice Fishing Festival near Molson. The city also waived the fee. Noel, who is the Superintendent of Public Works, said the city’s road grader had lost its engine during snow removal.

Out On The Town TONASKET

“It’s not easily repaired, it’s a 1976 Cat that we bought in pretty good shape in the 1990’s. We will be renting a grader from Beanblossum to get us through the winter,” Noel said. On the subject of snow removal, Scott Eisen who owns a snow removal company, asked to change the operation hours allowed by the city so they could begin earlier in the morning. “By 6 a.m. there is so much traffic it is dangerous. Most of the work is done in the industrial area where the noise would not be as noticeable.” Mayor Spieth suggested the council address the ordinance first, before making any changes to the time allowed. “Also, we get pounded if we aren’t wearing a vest or have a light while the PUD and Border Patrol do whatever they want. If you are going to enforce the rules on one you should enforce it on all of us,” said Eisen.

your guide to

Dining & Entertainment

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At the Tonasket High School Commons Adults(13+): $9.50 Children(12 & under):$4.50 Preschool: FREE All profits go back into the Youth Fund!

Restaurant & Lounge Great Food, Friendly Atmosphere Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

NOTICE OF NON-DISCRIMINATORY POLICY AS TO STUDENTS

The OROVILLE CO-OP PRESCHOOL (OROVILLE COMMUNITY & YOUTH ASSOCIATION) admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs. OROVILLE CO-OP PRESCHOOL (OROVILLE COMMUNITY & YOUTH ASSOCIATION) Located at 816 Juniper Street, Oroville, WA 98844. Phone 509-476-3672.

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entertainment


JANUARY 24, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

Grouse of the Okanogan to be featured at CCC Presentation is part of Okanogan Highland Alliance’s educational series Submitted by Julie Ashmore OHA Conservation Coordinator

TONASKET - On Friday, Feb. 1, Dr. Michael A. Schroeder will share knowledge about the grouse of Washington, with a focus on the grouse found in the Okanogan. “Few wildlife species have accompanied the human experience in North America more than grouse,” says Dr. Schroeder. “They are intertwined with our culture, history, science, conservation, and recreation.” He adds that from the use of grouse by native cultures, to the first law to protect the heath hen from market hunting in 1791, to the current efforts to prevent extinctions, to the pursuit of grouse by bird watchers, grouse provide insight into both our past and future. The Okanogan is fortunate to be in the center of a large region that is rich with opportunities to pursue, observe, and study grouse. Dr. Schroeder is a Certified Wildlife Biologist who has pursued research and management of grouse since 1981. He joined the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) in 1992 and has continued to focus most of his activities on the biology and management of grouse. His research has included studies of population dynamics and behavioral ecology of greater sage-grouse and sharp-tailed grouse; greater sage-grouse and sharp-tailed grouse translocations; effects of wind power on greater sage-grouse and other species of shrubsteppe wildlife;

Submitted photo

Anthony Chavez, grandson of Hispanic activist Cesar Chavez, spoke at Oroville High School’s Martin Luther King assembly on Jan. 16. Chavez is pictured with seventh-grader Jenny Vazquez.

Anthony Chavez speaks at OHS Submitted by Kelsey Stell Oroville High School Dr. Michael A. Schroeder/submitted photo

Dr. Michael Schroeder will be sharing his knowledge about the grouse of the Okanogan at the CCC on Feb. 1. Dr. Schroeder captured the above image of a sharp-tailed grouse. conservation genetics of grouse; and effects of farm programs on greater sage-grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, and other species of shrubsteppe wildlife. Mike is also developing a monitoring and evaluation program for WDFW wildlife areas. He has worked with graduate students from Washington State University, University of Idaho, and Eastern Washington University to address specific management issues related to grouse. For more information on Dr. Schroeder’s work, please visit http://wdfw.wa.gov/ conser vation/research/staff/ schroeder_michael.html. The Highland Wonders indoor educational series brings the natural history of the Okanogan Highlands and surrounding areas to Tonasket on the first Friday of the month, from November through May (skipping December). More excit-

ing Highland Wonders events will be offered in the months to come. OHA’s Education Program is designed to build the capacity of the community to steward natural habitats and resources, by helping to develop an informed and empowered population. Okanogan Highlands Alliance is a non-profit that works to educate the public on watershed issues. The educational series is offered by OHA, free of charge, at the Community Cultural Center (CCC) of Tonasket. The presentation begins at 6:30 pm with desserts, tea and coffee; the dinner benefiting the CCC begins at 5 p.m. The indoor events are held at the CCC, at 411 S Western Avenue, Tonasket, and details are provided on OHA’s website: www. okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw. For more information, email julie@okanoganhighlands. org or call 509-433-7893.

OROVILLE - On Wednesday, Jan. 16 Oroville High School had the honor of having a special guest speaker come to the Martin Luther King Jr. Assembly. Anthony Chavez is the son of Cesar Chavez, who was a Hispanic activist in the 1960’s. He is a 27-year-old Cal State graduate who has dedicated his time to being a special guest speaker for the Office of Education.

Chavez speaks at schools to educate students on what his grandfather did for the United States of America and immigrants. Kelsey Cleveland, a history teacher, invited Chavez to come speak at our school after meeting at an educational conference. He felt it would be a fitting area to come to because of the Latino community. When asked if he could leave a statement for the area to remember him by, he said “It isn’t something that I said I would want to

leave behind, it’s something my grandfather always said: ‘The end of all education should surely be service to others.’” Chavez appreciates the warm welcome from all of the students and staff from Oroville School District. “It’s not something you see every day, having a community gather for such a great memorial,” he said. Having Anthony Chavez come speak at our school was not only educational but it was an honor.

Off to Hobbiton As an incentive, Tonasket Middle School reading specialist Jackie Gliddon challenged her students to read “The Hobbit” and earn a chance to see the newlyreleased movie. Gliddon said her students met the challenge by reading the book during December and working on an extensive comprehension packet. “We are so blessed to live in a community that supports the efforts of students,” she said. “They really enjoyed the show and were able to compare and contrast literature to the movie screen. I want to thank Arne Lassila and the workers (at the Omak Theater) that helped make this activity possible.”

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Apply your discount to any of the following services! • State of the art MRI, CT, Ultrasound, DEXA, Digital X-rays and Digital Mammography.

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Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 24, 2013

SPORTS STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Standings Through games of Jan. 19 Boys Basketball Caribou Trail League

League Total * Okanogan 9-1 15-1 * Chelan 8-1 12-3 * Cashmere 8-2 11-5 * Brewster 7-3 12-4 Quincy 3-7 6-9 Cascade 2-7 4-11 Tonasket 2-8 7-9 Omak 0-10 4-12 *Clinched playoff berth. Top 6 qualify for post-season play.

CWL North Division

League Total Lk Roosevelt 4-1 6-8 Manson 3-1 8-4 Bridgeport 1-2 6-6 Liberty Bell 1-3 6-7 Oroville 1-4 4-10 *Top 3 qualify for post-season play.

CWL South Division

League Total * Riv. Christian 4-0 9-4 * Kittitas 1-1 6-7 * White Swan 1-4 2-14 *All 3 qualify for post-season play.

Girls Basketball Caribou Trail League

League Total * Brewster 10-0 16-0 * Chelan 7-2 12-2 * Okanogan 7-3 13-3 * Cashmere 7-3 9-7 * Cascade 5-4 11-4 Quincy 1-9 4-12 Tonasket 1-9 3-13 Omak 1-9 3-13 *Clinched playoff berth. Top 6 qualify for post-season play.

CWL North Division

League Total Lk Roosevelt 4-1 9-4 Oroville 3-2 7-7 Bridgeport 1-3 4-9 Manson 1-4 2-9 Liberty Bell 0-4 0-12 *Top 3 qualify for post-season play.

CWL South Division

League Total * Riv. Christian 4-0 8-4 * White Swan 4-1 10-6 * Kittitas 0-2 4-7 *All 3 qualify for post-season play.

Wrestling Caribou Trail League League Duals W-L Chelan 4-0 Quincy 4-0 Tonasket 3-1 Cascade 2-2 Omak 1-3 Cashmere 1-3 Brewster 0-3 Okanogan 0-3

High School Sports Schedules, Jan. 24-Feb. 2 All schedules subject to change Thursday, Jan. 24 WR - Okanogan at Tonasket, 7:00 pm Friday, Jan. 25 WR - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 6:00 pm Saturday, Jan. 26 JV/Var BB - White Swan at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm Var/JV GB - White Swan at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm JV/Var BB - Cascade at Tonasket, 6:00/7:30 pm JV/Var GB - Cascade at Tonasket, 4:30/6:00 pm WR - Oroville at Pateros (league mixer), 11:00 am WR - Tonasket at Quincy (also vs. Brewster), 4:00 pm Tuesday, Jan. 29 JV/Var BB - Oroville at Bridgeport, 6:00/7:30 pm Var/JV GB - Oroville at Bridgeport, 6:00/7:30 pm JV/Var BB - Tonasket at Omak, 6:00/7:30 pm JV/Var GB - Tonasket at Omak, 4:30/6:00 pm Thursday, Jan. 31 JV/Var BB - Manson at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm Var/JV GB - Manson at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm Fri.-Sat., Feb. 1-2 WR - Tonasket at Cashmere (District tourney), 6:00 pm/10:00 am Saturday, Feb. 2 WR - Oroville at Republic (league tourney), 11:00 am JV/Var BB - Tonasket at Quincy, 6:00/7:30 pm JV/Var GB - Tonasket at Quincy, 4:30/6:00 pm

Brent Baker/staff photo

Dyllan Walton wrestles his way to a 4-2 victory over Chelan’s Julian Budias during Saturday’s Caribou Trail League dual meet. Walton’s win gave the Tigers a 24-22 lead, but the Goats won four of the final five matches of the night to defeat Tonasket 43-30.

Second-ranked Chelan holds off Tonasket By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

KITTITAS - Oroville’s wrestling team competed at the Coyote Classic in Kittitas on Saturday, Jan. 19, finishing 13th of 17 teams at the tournament. “It was a tough weekend,” said assistant coach Erick Cleveland. Liberty Bell outpointed Kittitas for the team title, with Omak finishing third. Eric Herrera (220 pounds) was

12 week

25 22 21 18 18 7

Handicap Lloyd Caton, Jr. Matt Deebach

19 19

Peterson (113), ninth-ranked Jorge Juarez (126), Dyllan Walton (132) and third-ranked Austin Booker (160). Chelan improved to 4-0 in Caribou Trail League duals, while the Tigers fell to 3-1. With each team filling all but one weight class, the match provided a true dual meet atmosphere, unlike a number of area duals where so many weight classes are empty that the matches are all but decided before they even start. The Tigers will face another such dual Saturday, Jan. 26, at Quincy (4-0), when they face off against the Jackrabbits and Brewster with a shot at either second place in the league or, if Quincy knocks off Chelan, a three-way tie for first. “This is when it gets really exciting,” Mitchell said. “When you have a dual meet like this, you don’t know what the outcome is going to be before you even get started. So these are fun. We just didn’t do quite enough to get them this time.”

the only Oroville medalist, taking fourth place. Also winning matches were Jordan Smith (106), Ronel Kee (113), Michael Ripley (126), Leo Curiel (126) and Eddie Ocampo (152). Angel Camacho won the 145 lb. JV bracket. The Hornets host Liberty Bell for a Senior Night dual meet on Friday, Jan. 25, then travel to Pateros on Saturday for a league mix-and-match meet.

WEIGHT LOSS Challenge

Starting Feb. 4th Sign up TODAY! $50 Entry Fee / Membership Required

Tonasket Gun Club Results 16 yard Matt Deebach Robert McDaniel George Miklos Lloyd Caton, Jr. Jeff McMillan Jeff Taylor

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Austin Knowlton (top) gave Bobby Anderson, the state’s thirdranked 172 pound wrestler in Class 1A, all he could handle in a 6-2 loss to end Saturday’s dual between Caribou Trail League contenders.

Oroville competes at Kittitas tourney By Brent Baker

LR tops Hornet girls By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

CHELAN - The odds weren’t exactly with the Tonasket wrestling team as they headed into Saturday’s dual meet showdown with Chelan, the state’s secondranked team. With three starters out of the lineup, it was going to be a tall order for the Tigers. Still, they had their chances, taking a 24-22 lead with five matches to go. The Goats lived up to their billing, taking four of the five including three pins - to down the Tigers 43-30 and hand Tonasket its first dual meet loss of the year. “We had our chances,” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell. “We lost one that we thought we had, and that made a big difference. But it was a battle and for the most part we wrestled well.” With multiple state-ranked wrestlers in their lineup, the Goats had the edge on paper, but the Tigers made their own impression. In the only match between two state-ranked opponents, the Tigers’ fifth-ranked Collin Aitcheson faced off against eighth-ranked Ivan Reyes at 120 pounds, and Aitcheson controlled the match most of the way, building a 6-0 lead before Reyes scored in the final 30 seconds go narrow the gap. In a couple of individual losses, unranked Tigers comported themselves well. John Rawley, wrestling second-ranked Alex Cortez (195), fell behind early, but avoided getting pinned in a 12-2 major decision loss to preserve two team points. And though the match was decided by the time Austin Knowlton (172) took the match against third-ranked Bobby Anderson, his 6-2 loss let the Tigers end on a high note. Also winning for the Tigers were Frank Holfeltz (182), Trevor

Brent Baker/staff photo

Lily Hilderbrand shoots for two of her 16 points against Lake Roosevelt on Friday, Jan. 18.

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Tonasket 66, Cashmere 15 TONASKET - The Tigers took advantage of three forfeit wins and eight pins in the way to handling Cashmere 66-15 on Thursday, Jan. 17. Winning with pins were Rade Pilkinton (106 pounds), Jorge Juarez (126), Dyllan Walton (132), Dalton Wahl (138), Austin Booker (160), Austin Knowlton (182), John Rawley (195) and Tanner Good (285). Other Tiger winners were Christian Diaz (113), Trevor Peterson (120), Lucas Vugteveen (172).

OROVILLE - It’s rapidly become apparent early in the Central Washington League season that the Oroville girls basketball team will have no problem making it to the district playoffs. It’s also been evident that if they want to play more than a game or two, they will have to play better than they have early in the season. And though they lost 50-37 on Friday, Jan. 18, to North Division leading Lake Roosevelt, the Hornets seem to be headed in the right direction. “The team is definitely starting to come together,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “Especially offensively, we’ve really been working on it and we’re getting better. I feel good about where we’ll be for districts.” Bourn’s optimism came from the Hornets’ play over the first three quarters, during which they offensively settled into a flow and got points out of four players, led by Lily Hilderbrand and Callie Barker with four each. Even after LR finished the half on a 12-5 run for a 28-22 lead, the teams played on even terms through the first three quarters, highlighted by four charging fouls taken by Oroville players. The fourth quarter was a different story. The Raiders hurt

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the Hornets on the offensive boards, while at the other end Oroville managed no field goals and just 3-of-8 shooting at the foul line (the misses including the front ends of two one-andones). “It’s too bad, because for three quarters we played the way we can,” Bourn said. “We stopped boxing out, and a few times they boxed us in (too far under the basket).” Hilderbrand finished with 16 points and 12 rebounds, while Barker added nine points, four rebounds and three steals and Briana Moralez had eight points. The Hornets (7-7, 3-2 CWL) host White Swan on Saturday and travel to Bridgeport on Tuesday, Jan. 29.

Oroville 46, Manson 23 MANSON - Oroville allowed Manson 12 points in the first quarter but just 11 points the rest of the way as they claimed a CWL road victory on Jan. 15, 46-23. The Hornets fell behind 12-10 after a first quarter in which 12 players saw action, but dominated thereafter. Eight Oroville players scored, led by Lily Hilderbrand with 14 points and seven rebounds. Briana Moralez added nine points and five steals; Callie Barker added eight points; and Katie Tietje had four rebounds, three assists and four steals.

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JANUARY 24, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Don’t be shy, we really do want to know what you’re thinking about

Our readers aren’t usually shy about letting us know how they feel. It’s not unusual for people to approach G-T staff members as they go about their daily lives. And although sometimes we have to beg off to get to a story or work on a deadline, we’re usually happy to hear what our readers think – even if it’s criticism. Sometimes it’s just a chance to vent and as the messenger we occasionally get caught in the crossfire. We’re stopped at the grocery store, while walking down the street, even as we cross the border -- to be asked our opinion on something they read in the newspaper or heard on the street. A quick trip to the post office to pick the mail can turn into a half hour discussion. Oftentimes we can fill the questioners in on a few details about what they heard and sometimes they can do the same for us. Last Saturday at Ralph Patterson’s funeral was no exception. Following the service several people took the time to let me know that they were unhappy about the way the North Valley Out of Hospital Board handled the Assisted Living issue. After the Assisted Living’s closure we My Mind a couple letters on the subject from Gary A. DeVon received concerned citizens and we editorialized about it. Since then the hospital has been picketed and we have photos in this week’s newspaper and a slideshow online at www.gazette-tribune.com. There’s also a new poll on our website asking what you think the hospital board should have done differently, or whether you agree with their final decision to close the facility. If you get a chance, take the time to vote and we’ll let you know the results in the newspaper. Hospital District manager Linda Michel has also written a letter this week explaining just how the Assisted Living was financed. Her letter is an effort to clear up who made the original decision to build and what further steps were taken by the board in the past regarding that original financing. So there’s even more grist for the mill. Speaking of Ralph Patterson’s funeral, it was really well attended. I spent a lot of time at his A&W Drive-in and it brings back a lot of good memories. After a Little League game we all loaded in the back of the coach’s pickup (remember when kids were allowed to do that?) and headed down to the drive-in where Ralph and his wife Elvie (who is also gone now) would treat us to a small root beer or an ice cream cone. Later, their son Kevin and I turned out to be best of friends and I spent a lot of time not only at the A&W, but at the Pattersons’ home. They always made me feel part of the family. Like my own dad, having a good time revolved around food. Unlike my dad though, Ralph was a great cook and was always baking and making treats for everyone. Whenever I saw Ralph, especially after I started at the newspaper, he’d greet me with “What do you know Gary?” and when we parted he’d say to me, as he said to everyone, “Don’t take any wooden nickels.” At the funeral everyone was given a “Rotten Ralph’s” wooden nickel and of course afterwards, at a nice meal prepared by the ladies of the Oroville United Methodist Church, there were A&W root beer floats for all.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE, TONASKET & OKANOGAN COUNTY

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Some Assisted Living financing misconceptions Dear Editor: I am writing to clear up a misconception about the Okanogan County Public Hospital District #4 Assisted Living. I read in three different places in the GazetteTribune dated January 17th, that the community voted for and funded the Assisted Living Building. These comments are not factual. Here are the facts: • The Bond of 1995 for $2,000,000 to build the Assisted Living was a Non-Voted Bond, Resolution No. 176 that was passed by the seated Board of Hospital Commissioners. The re-payment was designated to be paid out of the General Funds of the Hospital District. • In 1997, another Non-Voted Bond, Resolution No. 206 was passed by the seated Board of Commissioners, for an additional $700,000. The re-payment was designated to be paid out of the General Funds of the Hospital District. • In 2002 there was a refinance of the Bonds by Resolution No. 273. The payments for the refinance come out of the General Funds from the Hospital District, at $18,000 a month. The Bond payment is paid twice per year at $108,000 per payment. RCW 39.36.020(2)(a)(i) states that Public Hospital Districts are limited to an indebtedness amount not exceeding threefourths of one percent of the value of the taxable property in such Public Hospital Districts without the assent of three-fifths of the voters therein voting at an election held for that purpose. The Bonds mentioned above were Non-Voted according and in compliance with the RCW. Therefore, no vote was required by the community. In 2007, the seated Board of Commissioners supported Resolution No. 362. The Resolution was for an addition to the hospital in the amount of $11,000,000. The principle of and interest on these bonds were to be payable from the annual property tax levies to be made in excess of the regular property tax levies. Therefore, the community had to vote to approve raising those property tax levies. I have double checked my facts with the Okanogan County Treasurer, and she has double checked the records with the Okanogan County Auditor to ensure the veracity of the Bond issues. I am hopeful that this letter clarifies that the Assisted Living was built and the bonds are being paid for out of the General Fund of the Okanogan County Public Hospital District #4. Respectfully, Linda J. Michel, CEO Okanogan County Public Hospital District #4.

The origins of the word ‘Okanogan’ Dear Editor, I have been asked to give a definition of the word Okanogan, and decided to let everyone know because it is a word you hear every day and have never understood. Though there is no real consensus as to the definition of the word Okanogan there is a definite way to explain the word to you. The People who speak Nsylixcn (Okanogan) lived from Wenatchee to Vernon, from Revelstoke to the Kettle River and from the Cascade Mountains to the Kettle Falls. This is Indian Country to me, and a couple of ways to define “Okanagan”. The Okanagan People have “creation stories” and through the centuries a few have remained. The end of one of the stories the girl tells the boy to look (to see) from here, (the top) you can see where we will begin our lives and that was our beginning. I have used this to try to explain the word. I have been asked for a better definition. The following is from Dr. Jeannette Armstrong, Director of the Enowkin Center and Theytus Books, located on the Penticton Indian Reserve. Dr. Armstrong is an authority on the Okanagan Indian People and is a fluent speaker and teacher of our language. She wrote to me: “There is no consensus for the word Okanagan. Some, including Morning Dove, have said that it could be derived from “ukna?quin” which has the root “ukn” (I bring) and the suffix “qin” which refers to the top of something (mountain or a person’s head) and which therefore would refer to bringing something to a mountain top. She also mentioned that people said it could also be derived from “wakna?quin” in which case the “wak” (root word for to see) from “wik” (place to see the head/ mountains). Or (place to see the head) which she and others have

suggested refers to the prominent bluffs which look like human heads in profile (McIntyre Bluff and Giants Head) in this valley. I have heard the first definition more often from my elders. That our People were central to trade over the mountains to the east and the west and they were “packers” sux w a?uk wm of goods over the mountains so the place this valley was called “sukwna?qin”. I hope this makes it clear that to define a single word of the Nsyilxcn (Okanagan language) is not as easy as one of the English or European words in use today. I wish to thank Dr. Armstrong for her kind assistance and I hope this will help you understand another word, something you hear every day. Arnie Marchand, Okanagan Indian, Member of the Colville Tribes

Appreciate the ‘snow angels’ Dear Editor, I would like to thank my “snow angels” for cleaning the snow off the sidewalks in front of my business on a regular basis. I have had sightings of two of these angels an know that there are even more than that out there doing this sort of work. Your deeds do not go unnoticed. Your time and effort is greatly appreciated. It keeps all of us safer from slips and falls. Thank you again for your service. Jackie Daniels Oroville

Stopping the violence Dear Editor, The violence in schools needs to be reduced (nothing involving human beings interaction can be completely stopped). But the decision on what to do and how to do it rests with you. It’s symptomatic of a dysfunctional government and/or culture to see more violence in schools,

not less. Who is personally responsible for these horrific crimes? The parents of the children and the employees of the school district. The killer comes in third. He is being allowed to kill children by extremely fearful parents and school district employees. Schools, shopping malls, post offices, large office buildings, movie theaters, etc. are chosen, for the most part, because they represent a captive audience for the killer. More dead bodies. The intelligence (if any) of the killer doesn’t go beyond this. The following will go a long way towards protecting young children while they are in school. 1) The principal (and assistant principals, if any) needs to be armed with a concealed revolver. Shooting classes should be attended. As most schools are in a weapons-free zone, go concealed anyway, but tell no one of your decision. Jobs and guns are replaceable, seven-year-old children are not. 2) For every 100 students at a school the needs to be one school staff member who is armed. This will provide between six and 15 armed teachers to confront the killer before any damage (hopefully) occurs. In addition to knowing how to use a concealed firearm, one must be willing to use the weapon whenever called upon. If you are too fearful of protecting the children in your care, don’t bother. 3) This is one of those rare occasions (outside of a combat soldier, the police, etc.) in which it pays to get extremely angry, and to vent that anger against the criminal while the children are still alive, not afterwards. 4) Stop being a fearful adult throughout your lifetime and instead become a courageous citizen. This isn’t easy for most, but it can be done. 5) Study the philosophy of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Thomas Reid. Their beliefs are of value within these circumstances. Ray Gattavara, Philosopher Sumner, Wash.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | january 24, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Kriner, Quick to speak at upcoming Center programs

Oroville Senior News

by Dolly Engelbretson

p.m. Or, how about It’s Showtime! at Walt and Vicki’s Backdoor Club at the Boutique on Saturday evening? The program consists of music, art and poetry. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., program starts at 7 p.m. This was scheduled to be the last program of the season, but Feb. 2 will be an open house and open mike with a potluck. In other words, a little informal. It’s Showtime! is sponsored by Friends of the Library. Programs at the Center are always on Tuesday mornings and start at 11 a.m. and end at 11:45 a.m. Lunch starts

Oroville Senior Center

It doesn’t seem possible that we are into the third week of January already, but it is true. I can’t think of any outdoor activities in the offing currently unless you are into skiing, sledding, snowman building, or ice skating. Some other winter possibilities would be Saturday evening pinochle playing at the Senior Center (we are a friendly and helpful bunch). Playing starts at 7

Several new classes coming up soon

The Learning Tree

By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

Next week we have several classes. Some are coming right up. There’s still time to register if these classes have reached the required minimum number of students. They include the four session Art of Welding (metal), one session Candle making (fun), one session Clothes to Dye

For (ever tried it?), one session Felting by Numbers (new skill), one session Your Child’s Car Seat Restraint (vital) , and the one session Different Business Entities (important). Call Ellen to find out if you can still register. Remember, too, the Zumba class! You can sign up any time for six sessions on any six Tuesdays between January 22 and March

Eagledom at Work

Benefit for Vivian Taylor on Feb. 9 By Gai Wisdom Oroville Eagles Auxiliary

We have a date for the benefit for Vivian Taylor. It will be on Saturday, Feb. 9, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. A spaghetti dinner will be offered with an auction to follow. Donations are welcome and being accepted now. Brush off the cast iron and slow-cookers ‘cause we’re having a Chili Cook-off on Sunday, Feb. 17. There will be flyers and more information soon.

Catching up on pinochle scores

The next Ladies’ meeting is the 29th of this month and then we go back to the regular schedule. It seems we spend the first half of the month of January recalling the year previous with all of its ups and downs. Now the triumphs and the errors, the victories and the hurts are all behind us and the Eagles of the world are moving forward. This year is our 115th anniversary of fellowship, commitment and charity. Our Grand Aerie is making a big

Hilltop Comments

By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

I am going to try and catch up with the pinochle winners since before Christmas. I know it is old news but some of the faithful like to see their names in print. Attendance has been down I’m sure it is because of the weather and the rest for the holidays. For the week of 12/26: High’s Mary Ellen Field and Darrell Bunch, Low’s Lani Thompson and Rodney Field, No Traveling winner noted, with 20 players. The week of 1/2/13 with 23 players, the High’s Vivian Emry and George Penner, Low’s Rae Morris (Visser) and Al O’Brian. Traveling - a mystery again this week. Now for the week of 1/7/13 with 20 people

the High’s were Sue O’Brien and Wayne Adams, the Low’s were Cleta Adams and Ken Ripley with the Traveling going to Everett Turner. (Finally a traveling score.) Thank you Willie for trying to keep track of the Winners. Here are the Winners for the week of January 14th: High’s George Penner and Judy Ripley. the Low’s were Ken Ripley and Dolly Engelbretson. Traveling – Larry Smith. The five week winner was George Penner and we were back up to 34 players. That should do for now with the ones we missed over the Holidays. We traveled over the mountains to be with most of our family. The North Carolina five, were not

at 12 noon sharp. The program for this Tuesday will be Mary Lou Kriner, owner of Mary Lou’s Gifts and Things. Steve Quick, Superintendent of Schools, will be our guest speaker on Jan. 29, discussing school security, especially since recent mass shootings at schools and elsewhere. If you would like to address the Senior Center regarding your business or any interesting adventures in your own life, please call the Center at (509) 476-2412 or Dolly at (509) 476-3336. Pinochle scores for Jan. 19: The door prize was won by Beverly Holden; Most Pinochles by Phyllis Shenyer; High Men’s score was won by Ted Zachman, and yours truly won High Woman’s score for the evening. A first. More next time. 26. There are nine Tuesdays remaining. Remember, for all classes please check in with Ellen at the NVCS office at the south end of Oroville High School. We have a new email address. It will appear on all future publications, but for now here it is – communityschools@oroville. wednet.edu. With our telephone number at (509) 476-2011, our website at northvalleycommunityschools.com and, of course our Facebook page, there are plenty of ways to get ahold of NVCS. production of this. Most of that probably won’t filter down to our little aerie, but the inspiration is there to lead us all. With all our resolutions to diet and exercise and improve ourselves in the coming year, let us also resolve to be kinder to our neighbors and to be more gentle with our friends and families. Oroville Aerie #3865 is ready to move on with plans for the New Year. We have plans to make our organization stronger, to support our community and to help people in need. After all, that’s our bottom line: We Are People Helping People, in the New Year and always. with us. We did however,have a boy friend of a granddaughter come to meet the rest of us. Well, just as we were about to sit down (all 18 of us) the new guy stands up and proclaims that he has something to say. He knocked all of our socks off, let me tell you. He certainly had our attention and as he took Kelly’s hand he proposed to her right then and there. Surprise, Surprise, yes it was. Of course she said “yes.” His name is Ryan and he is a pretty brave guy. That was our excitement for the Holidays. We have been glad for all of the beautiful days, and the sun sets and rises. It would be nice to have a little warmth, but that will come. Say an extra prayer for those who are not feeling up to par and need a friend and a smile. Until next week

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quitter and keeps pluggin’ along. Remember there is bus service in Oroville to get you to the places you need to go, if you aren’t comfortable driving in winter. Martin Luther King and I had another birthday the 15th of the month. He has a holiday designated for him but I’m just “thirtynine ninety-five plus shipping and handling.” Peggy Wall is home and trying to adjust to medications that are necessary with side effects that affect her sense of balance. A card or phone call would be a welcome gesture, I’m thinkin’. Having a root beer float served to guests, wasn’t the same as when Ralph and Elvie Patterson served them at their A&W drive in, a lot of years ago, but it certainly did bring back a lot of memories of the two of them as friends and family gathered at the United Methodist Church, last Saturday, to bid farewell to Ralph. The two of them were great assets to the community, in multiple ways. Chad Mathews has been a recent patient in CWH, Wenatchee, due to kidney stones. Ouch! Also Audrey Forney, same hospital, complications of diverticulosis, requiring surgery. Do you wonder why the Canadian honkers don’t go south? There are quite a few that remain here in the cold...silly birds! And there are lots of pigeons, especially around the Garden Apartments. What a shame something couldn’t be worked out to keep the Tonasket Assisted Living open. Our aunt Ellen has moved to a residence near Riverside that accommodates only six people. Kay Tracy has moved to Omak to one of the complexes. Be well, stay safe, and smile. (It makes your face feel good) and if smiles are good, laughs are even better. It’s been said, “You don’t stop laughing when you die, you die when you stop laughing.

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room in this column to mention just a portion of the changes that have occurred in our life during these years. I expect the biggest change would be in technology and all things affiliated with TV and other electric devices. (And we’re still struggling with the recording knobs, getting strange programs, sometimes, instead of what we want). Joe Allemandi had the misfortune, recently, to run off the road that he has traveled many years, near Nighthawk, but his vision was hampered by fog. He is so fortunate to still be with us today, as he was still recovering from his last illness. He is doing okay, but his pickup is another story. But shucks, you can replace a truck, but there is only one Joe. He, too, is one of my classmates of ’44. Mary Bourn was home from Seattle, where she had been living with daughter, Holly. Son, Craig is giving her a hand while she is on this side of the mountains. “Tiny” Bourn has been in Tonasket hospital for adjustments, repairs, and or replacements concerning her hip and is doing very nicely. Crowds at the Senior Center have diminished in size due to the cold and icy conditions. Just one fall on the ice can make you think twice about going outside…take it from one who knows. Florence (Kelly) Rise took a wrong step, and ended up in Central Washington Hospital with a broken bone in her leg, just below the hipbone, and has since been transferred to Tonasket hospital, for recovery and therapy. She’s expecting to be discharged from hospital tomorrow. It was good to see Penny and Carl Cole down from the high country, letting someone else cook their breakfast. Penny has health issues which are made worse with the cold, but she is no

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Technical difficulties were the cause of my Jan 10 article not being printed, so I am going to pick some of the pertinent items for this week, although they will be a bit outdated. The graduating class of 1944 has lost another member with the death of Helen ( Wo o d ) Maynard, a classmate of mine. We were a THIS & THAT very small class, with Joyce Emry only three boys left at the time of graduation, (it was war times and the draft was still in place,) and 13 girls. Obviously, the age of the remaining class is 85 or more, so it is a fact that each year takes its toll. Helen had been living in the New York area for several years. To me, it never seemed the location for her, but one has to sorta be in the area of one’s children when we reach the Golden Years. Helen didn’t have an easy life and hard work was the order of the day for her. She had a gift of ”gab” and you could easily visit with her, or just listen. The Wood family was good sized and it too is dwindling. Condolences go out to the family and friends of Helen. Danny Wietrick had the misfortune of going over the bank, recently, on her way to Molson Grange to play pinochle. She has bruises and sprains and her pretty little red car was severely damaged. Friends are very happy that she is okay, as “things” could have been much worse. Jan. 9 marked 66 years of togetherness for my husband and me. I wouldn’t be allowed enough

Care Credit

Tonasket Eagles choice. Tickets are $5 for one or 3 for $10 and there are only 300 available. The drawing will be held on Founder’s Day weekend at the Aerie. Pinochle scores By Jo Standley from Sunday the 13th are: 1stTonasket Eagles Auxiliary Neil Fifer, 2nd- Lyle Anderson, Low Score- Julie Hovland, Last Our Annual Crab Feed is on Pinochle- Neil and Gladys Fifer. Saturday, Feb. 9th. Get your ticket Pinochle scores for Sunday the soon as there are only 100. They 20th are: 1st- Gib McDougal, are currently on sale at the Aerie, 2nd- Neil Fifer, Low Score- Gene the cost is $20 for crab and $10 Michels, Last Pinochle- Leonard for ham. Both come with rolls, Paulsen and Gene Michels. We salad and coffee. wish anyone who is ill a speedy We have also started our recovery to good health. God Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the Scholarship raffle for $400 in Bless you all. The Biggest Little of groceries, year that winner’s you help save for a child’s college eithertime gas or Eagles in the state.

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JANUARY 24, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

SPORTS Raiders shoot down Hornets By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Lake Roosevelt wanted to push the pace, and the Oroville boys basketball team was only too happy to comply. Unfortunately that was more to the Raiders’ benefit than the Hornets’, and LR pulled away from a narrow halftime lead to defeat Oroville 53-38 on Friday, Jan. 18. “We just got caught up in the fast-paced, lets get it up as fast as we can (mode) in the second half,” said Oroville coach Allen Allie. “In the second half we didn’t run the offense. In the first half, we ran the offense, and that’s how we’re going to score.” It took four minutes for either team to score in the third quarter after the Raiders took a 23-20 halftime lead. Lake Roosevelt’s big run started when Drew Saxon hit a 3-pointer while the Hornets were called for a foul under the basket, giving the ball back to the Raiders. LR converted and went on a 20-4 run that lasted well into the third quarter and gave the Raiders a 43-27 lead. “The kids just got caught up in the pace of the game, and that isn’t really us,” Allie said. “It’s very evident when we don’t have anyone ready to rebound when we get a shot off and miss.” Three-point plays by Connor Hughes and Joe Sarmiento, along with a Sarmiento free throw, cut the LR lead to nine. The Hornets could get no closer as they gave up an offensive rebound basket to undo an impressive defensive stand, then accidentally tipped another rebound into the Raider basket to make it a 13-point deficit with two minutes left. “Connor can make up for a lot by playing inside,” Allie said. “But when we shoot too quickly and he’s not there, we can’t even get the rebound. “And, it’s hard to exchange twos and threes. That’s kind of been our downfall in every game. We’re not a great 3-point shooting team. We have the ability, we just don’t make many of them.”

Brent Baker/staff photo

Joe Sarmiento scored 17 points for the Hornets against Lake Roosevelt on Friday, but no other Oroville player reached double figures in the 53-38 loss. Lake Roosevelt (6-8, 4-1 Central Washington League) didn’t score its first 2-point basket until midway through the second quarter, but held a 16-9 lead after one thanks 3-pointers and free throws. “It’s hard to exchange twos for threes,” Allie said. Nonetheless, the Hornets (4-10, 1-4 CWL) tied it on several occasions before halftime with five players scoring on an 11-4 run. Sarmiento led the Hornets with 17 points with Hughes adding seven. “I don’t think anyone has outplayed us in a league game this year,” Allie said. “Their hustle equals everything they can give and their play is decent, but we just have bad nights of shooting and bad shot choices.”

Manson 52, Oroville 43 MANSON - Oroville and Manson headed to the fourth quarter tied at 35-35 on Tuesday,

Jan. 15, but the Trojans pulled away thanks to a parade to the free throw line down the final stretch. The Hornets scored just six points in the fourth quarter, while Manson went to the free throw line 10 times, hitting five. Manson led 27-24 at the half. Hughes led the Hornets with 17 points, with Sarmiento and Dustin Nigg adding nine apiece.

Catching up ... Thanks to an email glitch, we didn’t have many details from Oroville’s games a couple of weeks ago. Here’s what happened ... Riv. Christian 59, Oroville 49 YAKIMA - Riverside Christian may be shaping up to be the class of the Central Washington League in either division, but Oroville gave the Crusaders as much of a battle as anyone has this year. The Hornets trailed 20-11 after the first quarter, but fought back to pull to within 47-43 heading into the fourth.

“After that first quarter, I was thinking ‘Oh, no, here we go,’” Allie said. “But the guys played as well as they have all year.” Connor Hughes and former teammate Michael Garrett of RC battled for scoring honors on the night, with Hughes scoring 24 and Garrett finishing with 20. The Hornets couldn’t sustain their comeback in the fourth quarter, while Riverside Christian hit just enough free throws down the stretch (8-of-15) to put the game out of reach. Oroville 51, Bridgeport 48 OROVILLE - The Hornets trailed for much of the first half, but outscored Bridgeport 21-13 in the third quarter and held on for a 51-48 victory over the Mustangs on Jan. 10. It was the Hornets’ first CWL victory of the season. Hughes scored 22 points, while Sarmiento hit three 3-pointers and finished with 15. The Hornets trailed 22-20 at the half after scoring just four points in the opening quarter.

Tigers notch season high in loss By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s boys basketball team never gave itself a chance in its first meeting of the season with Cashmere. That wasn’t the case the second time around. Cashmere eventually pulled away to a 93-72 victory, but the Tigers played like a different team than they did in an 80-44 loss to the Bulldogs just before Christmas. “Anytime you go against those guys, it’s going to be tough,” said Tonasket coach Agustin Pedregon. “But I’m very pleased with the guys. It was a much better effort than the last time, and coming after a very good effort at Okanogan on Tuesday, it was good to see everybody step up.” In the team’s first meeting, the Tigers trailed 50-20 at the half. This outing was much different as Tonasket took a quick 12-point lead, held a 22-17 edge after one quarter and was very much in the game at the half, trailing 43-39. “The guys played great team basketball, took care of the ball and made them work for everything,” Pedregon said. “We were able to get a couple of their guys with two fouls on them, but could never quite get them in foul trouble, which would have helped.” Cashmere pulled away in the fourth quarter. “They put it into a different gear, and we couldn’t match them,” Pedregon said. “They just are capable of playing at a different speed right now, and they can throw a lot of guys at you. Their sixth and seventh guys could start for most teams in the league.” Colton Leep led the Tigers with 16 points after being shut out at Cashmere in December. Michael

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Trevor Terris tries to loft a one-handed shot over Okanogan’s Trevor Hathaway on Jan. 15. The Tigers stayed with the Bulldogs well into the third quarter before wearing down in an 83-53 loss. Orozco added 15 points and four assists, Dyllan Gage had 12 points, six assists and three steals and Derek Sund had 12 points and six rebounds. The Tigers (7-9, 2-8 Caribou Trail League) scored a seasonhigh in points despite hitting just one 3-pointer. “It would have been great if we’d hit more,” Pedregon said. “But we had 18 assists and only took eight 3-pointers. We stayed

with them because we moved the ball well and played good team ball. “The guys are starting to figure out who can do what, and are working better and better as a team. And that’s neat to see.”

Okanogan 83, Tonasket 53 OKANOGAN - The score was

ugly, but for most of the game the Tigers were right there with league-leading Okanogan. Tonasket lost 83-53 to the Bulldogs on Tuesday, Jan. 15, but played a solid two and a half quarters before wilting under Okanogan’s combination of speed and height. “It was an improvement, even though we lost by 30,” Pedregon said. “If we don’t have everyone working on all cylinders it’s hard to get going, but giving up 83 is the biggest problem, because we’re not going to score 80.” The Tigers trailed by 12 late in the first half, but Michael Orozco hit a buzzer-beating 3-ppointer, Dyllan Gage opened the second half with a trey and Derek Sund had a layup to get Tonasket to within 38-34. But after another Sund bucket made it 42-36, Okanogan closed the third quarter on an 18-8 run and scored the first 10 points of the fourth to turn it into a blowout. “Turnovers were a huge factor,” Pedregon said. “We were careless -we can’t give those guys easy points in transition. They’re as good as they come, and it’s even harder when you give them the ball. “They also too many second opportunity shots, just over the top. We don’t have the height, but we don’t have to climb them. “Our guys are improving in all kinds of areas,” Pedregon added. “We need to get better, but we’ll get there.” Gage led the Tigers with 18 points, Sund had 14 points, and Trevor Terris had nine assists to go with six points and five rebounds. Justin Rivas paced Okanogan (15-1, 9-1) with 22 points, with Trevor Hathaway adding 16.

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Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Amanda Johnson (32) and Kathryn Cleman defend Okanogan’s Caitlyn Behymer during the Tigers’ loss to the Bulldogs on Tuesday, Jan. 15.

Okanogan, Chelan drop Tiger girls By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OKANOGAN - Tonasket’s girls basketball team continued its gauntlet run through some of the best teams in the state, falling at Okanogan on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 64-15. The top two teams in the state-wide Class 1A computer rankings compiled by ScoreCzar.com are Okanogan and Brewster - which is No. 1 and which is No. 2 changes from week to week -- while Cascade, Chelan and Cashmere have all been top 15 teams at one time or another. Okanogan had recently ended a three-game losing streak during its own gauntlet run, which wasn’t lost on Tonasket coach Mike Larson. “They wanted this one pretty bad,” Larson said. “It’s not that they were angry, but they weren’t messing around.” The Tigers had some success early as they trailed 12-6 midway through the first quarter. But Okanogan went on a 27-point run to end the first half and put the game well out of reach. “We competed to the end,” Larson said. “It’s tough to look at a score like that and say we’re improving, but we gave up a couple of points less than we did to them at home and almost doubled what we scored the last time. “But mainly, I’m glad we kept fighting.” Devan Utt scored nine points to lead the Tigers (3-13, 1-9 Caribou Trail League), who remain tied with Omak and Quincy for the league’s sixth and final playoff spot.

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tigers’ Baylie Tyus looks for room to maneuver at Okanogan last week.

Chelan 64, Tonasket 24 CHELAN - The Tigers played some of their best basketball of the season against ninthranked Chelan, staying within 20 points until being blanked in the fourth quarter of a 64-24 loss on Saturday, Jan. 11. Trailing 31-9 at the half, Tonasket outscored Chelan 15-13 in the third quarter. “It was still about a 26-point game when we emptied our bench,” Larson said. “We came out and competed and did a lot of things well. I was really proud of their effort.” Devan Utt scored 10 points, Kylie Dellinger added seven and Kathryn Cleman had five for the Tigers.

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Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 24, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • January 24, 2013

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Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

BILINGUAL/HEALTH/ FAMILY SUPPORT AIDE for Tonasket ECEAP Program. Provides interpretation services for Spanish speaking families and children and assist families with enrollment, orientation and screening procedures. Requires Spanish/English verbal and written translation skills, high school diploma/ GED. Salary $10.00 per hr. DOE 28 to 30 hrs./wk. You may pick up an application at: OCCDA – 101 4th Ave. W., Omak. Completed application, resume and cover are letter required.

(wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

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61. “Go, ___!�

6

60. “Seinfeld� uncle

1

1. Small Asian arboreal ape with no tail

55. Adaptable truck, for short 57. Blue book filler

8

Puzzle 6 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

8 2

6 5

4

9

8 7

7

4

2

3

5 1

1

8

3

2

9 6

ANSWERS

Across

52. Procedure of assigning names to kinds and groups of organisms (pl.) 56. “Beg pardon ...�

3

49. Cache

5

48. Pellagra preventer

24. Assortment

7

47. Fold, spindle or mutilate

23. Bubkes

22. Slept, Brit. slang

1

45. Animal house

21. Lens cover?

8

42. Game keeper?

13. Fancy

2

40. Abstruse

12. Someone who travels for pleasure

5

34. Excessive eagerness in offering unwanted services 39. Closed, as a business

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 4 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39) The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

11. Supplement

32. Small Australian parrots with brush-tipped tongue

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING Alley Vacation NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Greg Gardinier, who is an owner of property abutting the subject right-ofway has initiated vacation proceedings of portions of the alley between 5th Street, East and 6th Street, East. The right of way under consideration is the Northerly half of the alley in Block 10, Riverview Addition, Tonasket. The City Council of the City of Tonasket will be conducting an open record public hearing to take relevant testimony from the public and will make the final decision on the matter. The open record hearing will take place during the City Council’s regular scheduled Tuesday, February 12, 2013 meeting. Those with special hearing, language or access needs should contact City Hall, (509)486-2132 prior to the public hearing. This meeting is to begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber Room, City Hall, 209 Whitcomb Avenue, South, please consult the agenda as to what order of business the hearing is. All persons interested in presenting testimony for or against the vacation are encouraged to be present to be heard. The initiating petition, resolution fixing the hearing, drawings and maps are available to the public and will be provided upon request, please contact the Clerk’s Office, City Hall, (509) 486-2132 during normal business hours or by visiting the City’s website at www.tonasketcity.org and following the Public Notice links. For further information please contact the responsible official below. Christian D. Johnson, C.B.O., Building Official * Permit Administrator P.O. Box 457, Tonasket, WA 98855 or e-mail: cjohnson.oroville@nvinet.com (509) 560-3534 Official Date of Notice: January 24, 2013 Issued: January 16, 2013 S i g n a t u r e : (on original) This notice is given pursuant to RCW 35.79.020, appeals of the final decision on these applications may be filed by a party of record with standing in Okanogan County Superior Court within 21 days of issuance of the decision as provided by Chapter 36.70C RCW. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 24, 2013 #452262

Sudoku 8

30. “That’s ___�

4

Crosswords

23. Famously

City of Tonasket Job Announcement Police Clerk The City of Tonasket is requesting applications for the position of Police Clerk. For applications and more information contact City Hall,

3

WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Public Notices

5

www.go2worksource.com

DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

2

Updated list of employment at

P.O. Box 487, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, WA. 509-486-2132 or Tonasket Police Department, 509-486-4677. Applications will be accepted until Friday, February 12th, 2013, 4:30 pm. The City of Tonasket is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 24, 31, 2013 #452275

Storage Auction Notice of sale. Attention Lisa Cone (B-18), Lisa Williams (B-25), and Rusty Oliver (B-17) Oroville mini storage located at 140 Chesaw Rd., Oroville, WA. Will sell to the highest bidder the contents of your storage unit due to non-payment. Partial list of contents include: misc. clothing, furniture, appliances, bikes, tools etc. Too much to list. Saturday, January 26th. Gate Opens at 10 a.m. 140 Chesaw Rd., Oroville, WA. No pre-sale or early entry. We accept cash, credit cards and checks, (conditions apply) Call 509-560-0166 for more information. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette, January 24, 2013 #452320

LEGAL SERVICES

1

126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

Public Notices

9

WorkSource Okanogan County

DRIVER --Daily or Weekly Pay., $0.01 increase per mile after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience.. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com

2

www.gazette-tribune.com

DRIVERS -- Inexperienced/Experienced. Unbeatable career Opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 www.centraldrivingjobs.com

3

Equal Housing Opportunity

LOOKING FOR Job Security? Haney Truck Line, seeks CDL-A, Hazmat, Doubles Required! We offer Paid Dock bumps/Benefits, Bonus program/Paid Vacation! Call Now 1-888-414-4467. www.gohaney.com

1

509-476-4057

email: stcharles@gdicom.net

This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error

GORDON TRUCKING -- CDL-A Drivers Needed. Dedicated & OTR Positions Open Now! Consistent Miles, Great Benefits, 401k, EOE. Ask about a Sign on Bonus. Recruiters available 7 days/week! 866-357-0393

5

Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing. “A place to call home�

HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS

8

– Family & Singles –

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF JAN. 21, 2013

LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (800) 563-3005. www.fossmortgage.com

9

“PAY ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR INCOME FOR RENT�

Statewides

FINANCIAL

4

LOW INCOME HOUSING

ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details.

2

ATTENTION:

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

EVENTS-FESTIVALS

7

207 Main St., Oroville, WA

Found

ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified.. Call 866-483-4429. www.CenturaOnline.com

1

St. Charles Place Apartments

Public Notices

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY STATE OF WASHINGTON Estate of ARDEN D. HALVORSEN Deceased. NO. 12-4-01717-0 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time such claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in section RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: January 10, 2013 Personal Representative: Kathy S. Halvorsen Attorneys for Personal Representative: Roger Hawkes, WSBA #5173 Of HAWKES LAW FIRM, P.S. Address for Mailing/Service: 19929 Ballinger Way, N.E., Suite 200 Shoreline, WA 98155 Tel: 206-367-5000 / Fax: 206-3674005 Court of probate proceedings Snohomish County Superior Court and cause number: 12-4-01717-0 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 10, 17, 24, 2013 # 447578

EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING

9

THE FAMILY of Sheri Neal would like to thank everyone for the phone calls, cards, visits and beautiful flowers. Mike, Chad, Aly Neal; Chuck & Dicki Burbery; Tim & Sharon Neal; Deanna Sweet; JenTONASKET - 1 bedroom nifer & Dick; Brad, Glenda, house close to town, quiet. Brendan Carruthers. $495/ month. 509-486-1682

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that Oroville School District No. 410, Okanogan County, Washington (the “District�) will hold a public hearing during a special meeting of the Board of Directors of the District scheduled for January 31, 2013 starting at 6:00 p.m., Pacific Time, or as soon thereafter as possible in the District’s Office, 816 Juniper Street, Oroville, Washington, for the purpose of hearing comments from the public on the proposed issuance by the District of its Limited General Obligation Bond, 2013. The Bond is proposed to be issued in the aggregate principal amount of not to exceed $1,200,000 and will be payable over a term of 3 years with the final payment to occur on December 1, 2015. The Bond proceeds will be used to pay costs of capital improvements at the elementary school (primarily a new roof) and related costs and costs of issuance. Principal of the Bond is expected to be paid from the District’s previously approved capital levy and interest from other funds of the District. Any person may appear and be heard on the issue of issuing the Bond. Comments will be heard from all interested parties attending the hearing. Written comments prior to the hearing may be directed to Shay M. Shaw, Business Manager, Oroville School District No. 410, Okanogan County, Washington, 816 Juniper Street, Oroville, Washington 98844. /s/ Steve Quick, Superintendent Oroville School District No. 410 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 17, 24, 2013 #450906

ADOPTION -- Loving couple wishes to give love, happiness and security to your newborn. Let’s help each other. Can help with expenses. Donna & Al 877-492-8546

6

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Equal Opportunity Employer

ADOPT -- Adoring couple, TV Executive & News Producer yearn to love & cherish your baby. Expenses paid. 1-800-844-1670. JB & Amy

3

Happy Birthday Charlene! Love from your family~

ADOPTION

7

First month free! 2 bedroom apartment for rent in Oroville. 1 3/4 baths, new paint, new carpet/ flooring. Includes W/D, water, sewer & garbage. $520/ month + deposit. Available now! 360-255-3938 Lakefront House 3 Bdrm/2 Bath Garage $995; 2 Bdrm/2 Bath + Den $765; Darling 2 Bdrm/2 Bath, Family Rm w/ pellet stove $875; Lakefront Apt $495-BARGAIN! 1 Bdrm Apt $425; Others available. Call Sun Lakes Realty 509476-2121

Lordy, Lordy, look who turned 40...

6

For Rent

Statewides

4

Quick cash for Real Estate Contracts and Mortgages secured by real estate in the Tonasket, Omak or Oroville area. Private buyer 509 322 4732

Help Wanted

5

Real Estate Wanted

Announcements

8

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

8

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING Bonaparte Creek/Mill Drive Annexation NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the City Council of the City of Tonasket has set the date and time to conduct an open record public hearing on a petition filed by a majority of property owners to annex their properties and others into the City of Tonasket; known collectively as the Bonaparte Creek/Mill Drive Annexation. A complete property description and map will be provided upon request. The petition contained an agreement that the area would only be annexed if the City received funds for construction of a sewer extension into the annexed area. The City has received these funds and the project to install the sewer extension began in 2012 and will continue into the annexation area in early 2013. The City Council of the City of Tonasket will be conducting an open record public hearing in accordance with RCW 35A.14.130 to take relevant testimony from the public, review the proposed annexation ordinance and to make a decision on the proposed ordinance. This hearing will take place during the City Council’s regularly scheduled February 12, 2013 meeting. The meeting is to begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber Room, City Hall, 209 Whitcomb Avenue, South, Tonasket, WA. Please consult the agenda as to what order of business the hearing is. All interested persons are invited to appear and voice approval or disapproval of the annexation. Persons desiring to provide written comments on the proposal or attain party of record status, must file said comments or intentions with the Clerk’s Office no later than 4:00 p.m. the date of the hearing. Those persons with special language, hearing or access needs should contact City Hall at (509) 486-2132, 24 hours prior to the hearing. The petition, resolution, property descriptions, maps and the text of the draft ordinance are available for inspection or purchase, please contact the Clerk’s Office, City Hall during normal business hours or visit the City’s website at www.tonasketcity.org and follow the Public Notice links. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 24, 2013 #452258 TS No.: WA-11-444801-SH APN No.: 8878120200 Title Order No.: 110235870-WA-GNO Grantor(s): SARA A THOMPSON Grantee(s): WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3121759 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant To The Revised Code Of Washington 61.24, et. seq. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee will on 2/1/2013, at 10:00 AM At the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA 98840 sell at public auc-

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JANUARY 24, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune January 24, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

ALONG A CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A DELTA ANGLE OF 08°41’13”, A RADIUS OF 925.00 FEET, FOR A LENGTH OF 140.24 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTHEAST 82°22’08” FOR 561.19 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEAST 89°47’39” FOR 340.00 FEET TO THE THREAD OF SAID CHEWUCH RIVER; THENCE FOLLOWING SAID THREAD SOUTHEAST 14°01’39” FOR 276.15 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEAST 25°47’50” FOR 247.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO KNOWN AS THOMPSON SHORT PLAT, RECORDED IN BOOK A-4 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 4, RECORDED UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 3116373. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 96 CHEWUCH RD W , WINTHROP, WA 98862 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 7/23/2007 recorded 07/27/2007, under 3121759 records of Okanogan County, Washington, from SARA A THOMPSON A SINGLE WOMAN, as Grantor(s), to TRANSNATION TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for

which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $138,683.70 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $661,648.36, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 3/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 2/1/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 1/21/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 1/21/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated at any time after the 1/21/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the Sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME SARA A THOMPSON A SINGLE WOMAN ADDRESS 96 CHEWUCH RD W , WINTHROP, WA

98862 by both first class and certified mail on 7/23/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee, and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property, described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS- The purchaser at the Trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW

61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORCLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 days from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/hom e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National web site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return

continued from previous page

Public Notices tion to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to wit: THAT PART OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 21 EAST, W.M., OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON, LYING WESTERLY OF THE CHEWUCH RIVER, FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE QUARTER CORNER COMMON TO SECTIONS 34 AND 35, AN ORIGINAL STONE, FROM WHICH THE CORNER COMMON TO SECTIONS 26, 27, 34 AND 35 , AN ORIGINAL STONE, BEARS NORTHEAST 00°03’24” DISTANT 2640.68 FEET; THENCE NORTHWEST 89°47’39” ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER FOR 202.44 FEET TO THE THREAD OF THE CHEWUCH RIVER, AND THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, LEAVING SAID THREAD, CONTINUING ALONG SAID BOUNDARY LINE NORTHWEST 89°47’39” FOR 1082.15 FEET, TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OKANOGAN COUNTY ROAD NO. 1213 (WESTSIDE CHEWUCH ROAD); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTHEAST 00°07’25” FOR 273.42 FEET; THENCE

Page A9 9

Public Notices of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 10/1/2012 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-11-444801-SH P987118 1/3, 01/24/2013 Priority Posting & Publishing O u r Control # 987118 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette. January 3, 24, 2013. #446721

Court, 911 Calls, Jail Bookings Superior Court Criminal

The court found probable cause to charge Omar Medina Hermenegildo, 19, with possession of a controlled substance and possession of 40 grams or less of marijuana. He was sentenced to four months. The court found probable cause to charge Shawn Maurice Cook, 35, with two counts of possession of a controlled substance, DWLS third and use of drug paraphernalia. He was sentenced to one year and nine months.

District Court

Jovanny Alvarez, 19, of Tonasket was charged with NVOL without

identification. Dwight Backherms, 49, of Tonasket was charged with DWLS third degree. He received 90 days and a $858 fine. Ryan Bass, 32, of Tonasket was charged with DWLS third degree. He was sentenced to 90 days and a $818 fine. Ernest Defoer, 32, of Tonasket was charged with DWLS third degree.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, January 14, 2013 Armando Fonseca, 20, booked for probation violation. Katlyn Hammons, 25, booked for

theft second and theft first. John Carden, 40, booked for failure to appear, DWLS third, DUI and giving false information. David Long, 56, booked for unlawful possession of a firearm. Tuesday, January 15, 2013 Kyle Davis, 23, booked for child molestation third degree and furnishing alcohol to a minor. Samantha Harding, 42, booked for failure to appear, DWLS third, possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and obstructing a police officer. Jacob Bowles, 29, booked for assault fourth. Nathan Cawstan, 21, booked for DUI and DWLS third.

Joshua Lopez, 24, booked for possession of a controlled substance. Brett Gjerde, 48, booked for 2 counts of violated contracts Robert Parks, 47, booked for possession of a controlled substance. Wednesday, January 16, 2013 In Oroville, on Molson Ave., a caller requires options regarding items left behind at the residence after he was arrested. Rafael Martinez-Garcia, 25, booked for failure to appear and assault third. Robert Blem, 48, booked for malicious mischief second. Harry South, 58, booked for DUI. Thursday, January 17, 2013 In Tonasket, on Hwy. 20, a son left

home yesterday and has not made it home. The neighbors checked the residence and found nobody has been home. The son also did not show up for work today. Francis Edwards, 45, booked for failure to appear and malicious mischief third. Brodie Verstegen, 31, booked for failure to appear and DUI. Mark Lesofsky, 51, booked for possession of a controlled substance. Joseph Rowe, 60, booked for failure to appear and indecent exposure. Jorge Morales, 20, booked for failure to appear and DUI. Terry Weaver, 41, booked for assault fourth. Brandon Marchand, 38, booked for

failure to appear, assault fourth, disorderly conduct and DWLS third. Donevan Smith, 26, booked for controlled substance and drug paraphernalia use. Adrey Leach, 27, booked for failure to appear and assault third. Bradley Sweat, 23, booked for no contact order violation. Duke Holst, 39, booked for failure to appear and forgery. Friday, January 18, 2013 Gustavo Camacho, 19, booked for MIP and possession of drug paraphernalia. For the rest of these week’s stats, see our website at www.gazettetribune.com.

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

www.windermere.com

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

SUN LAKES REALTY

509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

LOCALS - “HEART OF OUR CITY”

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

Start the Happy New Year with Class & Style. Be on Lake Osoyoos, enjoy granite & tile finishes, high ceilings & long lake views, upscale downtown living. 1 bedroom @ $99,000 and 2 bedroom @ $119,000. Call today for private showing.

5 B Rose St. – Lake Osoyoos View Property. Enjoy the spectacular views of Lake Osoyoos and the surrounding mountains from the deck of this well maintained house. Kitchen cabinets have been replace with high end Thomasville cabinets. Separate deck and hot tub off the master bedroom. NWML #395920 $224,900

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Priced to SELL! This home has 3 bd/2 ba and is on 3 acres! There is approx. 1700 sq ft of living space, and a great open concept floor plan. The kitchen is spacious, bright and has lots of cupboard and counter space! MLS® 423509 $149,000

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

- 24 Hour Service Licensed & Bonded

509-486-2692

Attorney

RYAN W. GUNN Attorney at Law

Civil Criminal Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620 Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

Pumps

Service & Trades

Got Water? — Fred Cook —

Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

Bob

Raymer’s

GUNN LAW OFFICES

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Over 25 Years experience!

Automotive

Advertise where the

Service & Trades Professionals Advertise Call Charlene Helm For Rates & More Info

476-3602 • Affordable Full Color ads • Weekly exposure in newspaper and online

MACHINE WORKS

- Over 35 years experience -

We Build Drivelines

Retubing  Shortening

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Building Supplies Quality Supplies Since 1957

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Storage

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Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

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www.foglepump.com


Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | january 24, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Community Bulletin Board Obituaries

Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480.

Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Time to knit away OROVILLE – This North Valley Community School class is for folks of all ages at any level of skill. Perhaps you did some knitting years ago but have forgotten just how some of those stitches are done. You may have an ongoing project, but it would be fun to visit with others while you work on it. If you have never knitted, you can complete a small

project or get a good start on a large one. Bring size 6 or 8 knitting needles and a skein of 4-ply polyester yarn. This four session class starts Thursday, Jan. 24. Call Ellen at (509) 476-2011 or go online to www.northvalleycommunityschools.com to register.

Tonasket Chamber Banquet The 2013 Tonasket Chamber of Commerce Officer Installation and Awards banquet will be Thursday, Jan. 24 at 5:30 p.m. at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center located at 411 Western Ave. For more information you can find us on Facebook or go to our website at www. tonasketchamber.com.

Ballroom Dance Lessons Ballroom Dance Lessons each Thursday at the Tonasket Cultural Center from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Cost $5 per guest. Get ready for the Tonasket “Have a Ball” on March 2 at 6 p.m. to ? Fine dining, free danced lesson, photographer. Contact Jinnie Bartholomew at (509) 485-2039.

Molson Grange Potluck

MOLSON - There will be a Molson Grange potluck 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013. Oroville School Superintendent Steve Quick will be the speaker after supper. The public is invited and encouraged to come.

Fundraiser for Jeré Gillespie TONASKET - A benefit fundraiser for Jeré Gillespie’s who is battling cancer is planned for Friday, Jan. 25 at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center, 411 S. Western Ave. Between 4:30 p.m. and 6 p.m.: Doors open, dinner and silent auction bidding. Suggested donation for the locally-based meal, “A Bioregional Supper for a Bioregional Gal!” is $7-$10. Between 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.: Songwriter’s Concert, with admission by donation.. Performing music in honor of Jeré will be an opening act by Cacophony Choir of Omak; followed by a group of Tonasket area songwriters: Harvey Swanson, Sandy Vaughn, Steve Kinzie, Sunny Lanigan, Reed Engel and Julie (Du Bois) Ashmore.

Daniel A. McDougall

Daniel A. McDougall Daniel A. McDougall, 85, passed away in Bellingham, Wash. on December 23, 2012. He was born on January 12, 1927 in Cashmere, Wash., and grew up in the Wenatchee and Okanogan

By Mary Schilling Master Gardener

Berries are an impressive and beautiful addition to any yard, plus you can truly enjoy the fruits of your labor. Berry plants, bushes and brambles come in a wonderful variety of sizes and shapes and can offer visual interest from January through December. With so many options you can meet the needs of even the most discriminating palate and find those that will thrive in the somewhat tricky climates of our region. Raspberries, blackberries, and trailing blackberries (Marion‚ Boysen and Logan) are all caneberries, sometimes referred to as brambles. These will climb and spread to fill an empty spot or can be trained along a fence. Blueberries come in high bush and low bush types as well as dwarf and semi-dwarf varieties. Attractive as ornamentals, they welcome spring with white or pink blossoms, offer colorful foliage in fall and add contrast with shades of gold or red wood in winter. Plants can be grown in beds, rows, hedges, or even in containers. Strawberries are another favorite of the home gardener and are small enough to allow for a lot of creativity when it comes to planting. Strawberry types are June-bearers, ever-bearers, and day-neutrals; meaning with a little planning you can have strawberries all summer long. Most home gardeners plant their strawberries in hills or rows but I have seen them grown in everything from tiered raised beds to an old cowboy boot. There are many other berries for home gardeners to try, so watch your seed/ plant catalogs if you are interested

in trying something a little more exotic. Most berries need full sun for best performance and yields; however, some will tolerate partial shade. Each type of berry has different needs when it comes to soil type and watering, so it is a good idea to check in with your local Master Gardener or find one of the many great books out there on growing berries at home. For instance, one interesting requirement for blueberries is that they need to have acidic soil. This takes some planning and preparation in our region since our soil is naturally alkaline. Now for my favorite part! Once you have harvested your glorious berries, I encourage you to enjoy them fresh. It is hard to beat the flavor, texture, and nutritional value of fresh berries. They are great on cereal or yogurt, in pancakes or other baked goods or just right out of your hand. If you have some berries left over or really enjoy preserving some of your garden’s bounty, there are several options for berries. Most can be dried or dehydrated and then stored for use throughout the winter and coming year. These are great in homemade granola or trail mix, in baked goods or again, right out of your hand. Sometimes I will add a handful of dried berries or other fruits to my winter pies to help boost flavor (try dried blueberries or huckleberries in your next peach pie!) My favorite way to preserve berries is to freeze them. In the heat of the summer when I end up with a bumper crop of raspberries or find that wonderful, secret patch of huckleberries, I want to preserve them quickly and without heating up my kitchen. I take a time efficient approach to this by rinsing the fruit lightly if necessary (I don’t use any chemicals on my berries), draining, and then packing them

CHURCH GUIDE

immediately in quart size freezer bags. Frozen berries work great in pies and other baked goods but they are also a fabulous base for a healthy fruit smoothie. This is a great way to start off your day with a healthy portion of fruit, vitamin C, fiber and antioxidants. WSU Extension does offer food preservation classes occasionally and these are a great way to learn to preserve food safely and effectively for the best quality and flavor. I hope you will give berries a try in your landscape.

Berry Blast Smoothie (2 large servings)

2 cups of frozen mixed berries or a single variety 1/4 cup plain Greek yogurt or your favorite 1/4 cup old fashioned rolled oats (uncooked) A squeeze of fresh lemon juice (approx. 1 tsp.) 2 bananas 1/2 of an apple, cored, leave the peel on (wash the apple well) 1 tsp. honey 1 1/2 cups of water or orange juice if you prefer Note: Using frozen berries is what makes this smoothie thick, cold and refreshing. If you don’t have frozen berries, you will want to add ice cubes. Add all ingredients except water/orange juice to a blender. Add one cup of the water/juice, put lid on blender and blend for 15 seconds. Add more liquid as necessary to get the smoothie moving in the blender or to the consistency you prefer. Blend for 45-60 seconds. If you are feeling really adventurous try adding a handful of fresh spinach or kale. You really can’t taste it and it adds fabulous nutrition to your drink. Enjoy!

NCW Blue Star Mothers Cell Phones for Soldiers

This fund raiser will be ongoing so remember the military as you upgrade or replace your cell phones!

Find us on Facebook at www. facebook.com/ncw.blue.star. mothers; call (509) 485-2906 or email ncw.bluestars@yahoo.com.

Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck

Put your old or broken cell phones to good use! The Blue Star Mothers are collecting cell phones to help raise funds for military and their families in North Central Washington. As a non-profit 501(c)3, we will receive 50 cents to $30 per phone, up to $150 for a recycled Smartphone. Working phones will be offered to active duty families in need of cell phone communication. Please leave the battery inside the phone and call us at the number below if you would like a donation receipt. In Omak you can drop your phones off at KOMW Radio Station 8am to 5pm Monday through Friday, in Tonasket drop them off at the Legacy Memorial Site office between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and in Oroville at the Oroville Pharmacy.

OROVILLE Oroville Community Bible Fellowship

Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 a.m. Men’s Meeting 9:45 Sunday School (2-17 yrs) • Life Skills (18+) 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Bible Study (13+) Pastor Claude Roberts

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

312 S. Whitcomb

He wrote a book about his life including working in the orchards called, “Old Moo and I.” Dan is survived by brothers Roy (Beulah) McDougall of Oroville and David (Dorothy) McDougall of McMinville, Ore. and sister Joan Verley of Gresham, Ore. He was buried at the Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Portland, Ore.

Okanogan Valley

In the Okanogan Garden Enjoying the edible landscape

Valleys. Dan started work at 12 and became a champion apple picker and box maker. After high school he joined the Merchant Marines and became a cadet engineer at the age of 18, He served for two years. Dan was drafted into the U.S. Army and became a corporal 24. He served as a finance expert, in charge of payrolls at Ft. Lewis. Dan married an Oroville girl, Elizabeth “Betty” Priebe, in 1948 who proceeded him in 2009. After his discharge from the Army he worked for various construction companies in Seattle until he was employed by Wright Schuchart – the largest construction company on the West Coast. The company helped build the Space Needle and many of the large buildings in Seattle and the West Coast. He became vice president of the company and after 30 years retired to Marysville, Wash.

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Barrettes & Hair Clips Acrylic, Feather, Abalone & More

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10:30 a.m., Worship & Youth Sun. School Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church?

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 24, 2013  

January 24, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 24, 2013  

January 24, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune