Page 1

Tiger, Hornet boys each pick up

State champs again

home victories

County Endurance Riders win second straight state title

See Page A7

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.Gazette-Tribune.com | thursday, january 10, 2013 | 75 Cents NEWSSTAND PRICE

NVH starts new tax credit program

If It’s Saturday, It’s Showtime

Services discount equal to property taxes paid in support of North Valley Hospital District Development Coordinator Terri Orford. “Also, it helps people to have an awareness of what they pay into the district. TONASKET - In an effort to keep This gives people credit for what they’re patients close to home and to thank local paying into the district and makes them taxpayers for their support, North Valley aware of how little they’re really paying, Hospital debuted a new tax credit pro- as well as reminding them of the benefit of having the hospital so close to home.” gram beginning Jan. 1. Patients need to Approved by the “The aim is to increase complete a short appliNVH District Board form and proof Commissioners in our business... thank cation vide a copy of their November, the program the taxpayers for sup- local property tax bill gives property owners porting us with their that shows the amount within the North Valley paid into the hospital Hospital District a distax dollars.” district. The credit can count on hospital servicTerri Orford, also be applied to legal es equal to the amount Business Development Coordinator dependents as claimed of property taxes paid on one’s income tax into the hospital district during the previous year, up to a maxi- return. The tax credit can be applied to hosmum of $500. “The aim is both to increase our pital-related services such as imaging business and acknowledge and thank services, rehabilitation, respiratory care, the tax payers for supporting us with their tax dollars,” said NVH Business By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

See Credit | PG. A3

Smith chosen to replace Morton on Senate By Gary A. DeVon Managing Editor

OLYMPIA – John Smith, a Colville area farmer was appointed to take the place of retired state Senator Bob Morton for the Seventh Legislative District. Smith was selected on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2012 by the county commissioners from the five counties that are partially or completely within the Seventh Legislative District, which includes those from Okanogan County. Okanogan County Commissioner Jim Detro was one of the 15 county commissioners in attendance at the meeting held in Colville to chose a new senator. “Although the county commissioners

The first of this year’s It’s Showtime! events took place at the Back Door Club at Vicki’s Unique Boutique in Oroville last Saturday evening. Performing that night were Broken Arrow (above) and Brock Hires (left). The stage was also open to those that wanted to read or recite poetry between the performances. A lineup of talented local musicians is planned for each week at the nocharge-to-get-in events which take place every Saturday through July and start at 6:30 p.m. They are sponsored by the Oroville Friends of the Library and money raised from sales of coffee, cocoa and treats goes toward renovating and refurbishing the library building.

didn’t cast a unanimous vote as there were two conflicting votes, I was among those who voted in favor of the selection,” Detro said. Detro went on to explain that Smith took the time seek out each individual commissioner to have a “sit down” and answer any questions they might have. “He’s very well grounded and articulate,” said Detro. “Although he doesn’t have a lot of name recognition he has run some campaigns and is active in the party. “Smith is involved in agriculture and has some other business interests. He took the farmers market, which was

Gary DeVon/staff photos

See Smith | PG A3

Looking back at 2012: Editor’s Note: This week we take a look at some of the stories that graced the front pages of the GazetteTribune in the second half of 2012. We’re also looking back at the year in photos again from the last six months of last year on page 4. We hope you enjoy this look back as much as we do. G.A.D.

July Okanogan County recipient of federal dollars – The county receives about $2.5 million in Secure Rural School funding through an amendment to the transportation bill cosponsored by U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell. IJC seeks comment on lake levels – The International Joint Commission, made up of U.S. and Canadian board members, sought comments from the public regarding the regulation of water levels of Lake Osoyoos at meetings in Oroville and Osoyoos, B.C. It’s a Grand Ol’ Flag on Chesaw Fourth – Photos from the Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo parade feature lots of the stars and stripes in celebration of Independence Day. Hospital CEO breaks down NVH performance – “Is the glass half full, or half empty?” was the question asked. North Valley Hospital District CEO Linda Michel seems to see that right now, it’s both as the overall financial standing in the hospital has improved, the need to get warrants down is still a priority. Odd weather hasn’t dampened cherry harvest – You don’t like the weather in the valley, just wait five minutes it will change – from extreme heat to rain and hail, this year’s cherry harvest has seen it all. Bid for crossing upgrade accepted – Tonasket moved to re-bid the pending pedestrian crossing project appears to have paid dividends based on the response it got though a process it was able to utilize

known as a public interest finding. Focus changed to remodeling Oroville Library – Rick Braman, with the Oroville Friends of the Library, told the Oroville Council their focus has changed from tearing down the public library and building fresh, to remodeling and refurbishing the existing building.

August Search called off for Ed Jeffko – Search agencies suspended their search for Tonasket’s Ed Jeffko on July 29, after six days of looking for the pilot and his small pane that hadn’t been seen or heard from since July 23. Buckhorn mine fined $395,000 for water quality violations – The state Department of Ecology issued the penalty against the Crown Resources Corp. for violations but the company vows to appeal the penalties. Methow Valley continues to lead in new construction – The Methow Valley School District represented nearly one-third of the value of all new construction, according to Assessor Scott Furman. Oroville sees next highest construction level, Tonasket fourth. Tonasket mayor apologizes, takes heat for remarks – Sometimes it seems as though no one pays attention until you make a mistake. That had to be going through Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb’s mind as he faced a full house of angry constituents at the Aug. 14 council meeting. Plumb apologizesdfor remarks he made regarding the Democratic party and Okanogan County Transportation and Nutrition. Dick Graham retires from U.S. Border Patrol – Richard “Dick” Graham, Agent in Charge at the Oroville Station of the U.S. Border Patrol for the past 15 years, hung up his spurs and rode off into

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune Volume 109 No. 02

the sunset. Olson envisions improvements to Bonaparte Creek – Tonasket City Councilman Scott Olson hopers that adding walkable, accessible green space to the city in more than just a dream. Rawson elected to Superior Court seat – Okanogan County has a new Superior Court Judge in Henry “Hank” Rawson who won a winner-takesall primary vote in a race against Prosecutor Karl Sloan. Environmental groups appeal Ecology permit for Enloe Dam – In August several national, state and local environmental groups appealed a decision by state Ecology that would allow the licensing of the proposed Enloe Dam hydropower project on the Similkameen River to move forward. Oroville School Board approves 8th graders in high school sports – After tabling the issue two weeks before, the board approved a one-year pilot program allowing eighth graders to participate in non-contact high school sports because of low turnout numbers. Oroville Critical Areas Ordinance extended – Concurring on the need to incorporate changes suggested by state Ecology, the Oroville City Council agreed to another extension of the city’s Interim Critical Area’s Ordinance.

September Oroville area property being reassessed – The Oroville area is undergoing a new assessment by the county assessor’s office to determine property values within the school district for taxation purposes. Gold mine is one-quarter of entire property valuation. Council deals with construction project issues – The Tonasket City Council seemed to feel it was two steps forward, one step back with a number

See LAST SIX | PG. A3

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

of city construction projects that have been in the works for more than a year. The hope was construction would take place this summer and fall on the Bonaparte Creek Sewer expansion. Hometown pride at County Fair – Front page photos feature scenes from the Okanogan County Fair where Tonasket and Oroville students win several prizes for their exhibits. Oroville and USBP agree on water – After several months of back and forth, the Oroville City Council authorized Mayor Chuck Spieth to sign an agreement with the U.S. Border Patrol to supply water to their new multi-million dollar facility north of the city. Council, residents debate ORV ordinance – The potential for an ordinance that would permit allterrain or off-road vehicles on Tonasket city streets received plenty of attention at the Tonasket City Council meeting. Hospital starts making warrant progress – Thanks in large part to a cost report settlement, North Valley Hospital’s warrant levels have begun to come down. Roundabout plan draws crowd to DOT Open House – A proposal to install a roundabout at the intersection of Highway 97 and Cameron Lake Road drew more than 200 people to an open house at the state DOT’s nearby maintenance facility. The roundabout idea drew lots of controversy becuase of costs and a the big reduction of speed it would cause on the highway. Airport abuzz with activity – Steven Johnston, Airport Services Manager, told the Oroville City Council that the amount of activity at the airport has been “amazing.” Throughout August and September things seemed to get busier every day, said Johnston. Operators include Homeland Security and a com-

Valley Life A4 Obituaries A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community A6 Sports A7 Classifieds/Legals A8

Real Estate A9 Police Stats A9 Sports in Review A10


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 10, 2013

County Endurance Riders win state title two years running

AFFordable winter Housing

Oroville’s Heidi Hylton and Crazy Horse win Featherweight Division By Kim Black

Okanogan County Endurance Rider

The 2012 Endurance season ended with Okanogan County Endurance riders again placed well in the Pacific Northwest region. The last two seasons added new faces to the county competitors and proved to be outstanding years for the local riders. Last year heads were turned when a new rider with her Appendix Quarter Horse mare entered the competition. In 2011 Heidi Hylton of Oroville and her phenomenal mare ‘Crazy Horse’ completed fourteen 50-mile competitions and one 75-mile distance, a feat most seasoned horses rarely accomplish. Of the 15 rides she placed first seven times, receiving three Best Condition awards. Crazy Horse was never out of top ten placing other than one ride where multiple riders got lost and rode 10 extra miles. Hylton and Crazy finished 2011 as the first place Featherweight rider and second place in overall points. With 775 miles they were second in regional mileage. The team won the Washington State Championship and received a Sandybaar award which goes to any horse completing 10 or more

Charlene Helm/staff photo

This igloo was built in Oroville in one day by Clayton Naillon at his parents’ Marcia and Ed Naillon’s house. His three children, little sister, niece, nephew and Winston the bulldog have enjoyed playing in it during the cold winter days.

College Goal Sunday events in Okanogan County by Craig Kanaya College Goal Communication Mngr.

SEATTLE – College Goal Sunday Washington aims to reduce the barriers students face in paying for college. This year’s annual events will take place at more than 60 different locations around Washington State beginning this month, including Oroville, Tonasket and Omak.

Okanogan County Locations

· Wednesday, Jan. 9, Jan. 16 and Feb. 13 from 6-8 p.m. at Oroville High School · Wednesday, Jan.16 from 6-8 p.m. at Tonasket High School · Wednesday, Jan. 20 from 1-3 p.m. at WVC – Omak This is a \free, on-site program that helps students and families complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the form that is required to apply for federal financial assistance for higher education. The FAFSA is the single-most important appli-

cation for financial aid. Northwest Education Loan Association, statewide coordinators of the national College Goal Sunday program, is partnering with the Washington Student Achievement Council, College Success Foundation, the Roadmap Project, Washington College Access Network (WCAN), UW Dream Project, College Spark Washington and school districts to ensure the class of 2013 has access to the resources and support needed to complete the financial aid process. “As college costs rise, it has become even more important to apply for financial aid,” said Christine McCabe, Executive Director for College Spark Washington, a private foundation that funds programs across Washington State to help lowincome students become collegeready and earn their degrees. “Students should apply for aid through FAFSA, scholarships, and grants to maximize their college funds.” Nearly 63 percent of stu-

dents rely on financial aid to make attending college a reality. However, the paperwork can be confusing. At College Goal Sunday Washington students and parents can talk to experts and get in-depth help filling out the FAFSA. In one day, they will learn how to get money for college. Students and families can: · Talk with expert financial aid administrators · Complete and submit the FAFSA · Learn about filing deadlines and other important information regarding paying for college · Connect with resources for undocumented students and other non-FAFSA filers · Enter to win a $250-$500 scholarship Whether students plan to attend a four-year college, community college, vocational or technical school, this program can help them find the financial resources to make it happen. For more info visit www.collegegoalsundaywa.org or call 888758-2253.

consecutive rides without being pulled from competition by the veterinarians. This year Hylton and Crazy came back to complete another six rides, all finishes in the Top Ten, and were awarded one Best Condition. Our county saw another new rider enter endurance competition in 2011, with Kendal Ingraham of Okanogan competing. Riding a horse for Kathleen Ferguson last year, Ingraham completed one Limited Distance ride of 25 miles. She then went on to finish her first 50-mile distance. This year she rode two different horses for their owners, introducing one new horse to the sport. They completed four Limited Distance rides, placing twice in the Top Ten. Another new team made an appearance in 2012. Tony Larson of Oroville was bitten by the endurance bug while ‘crewing’ last year, for his partner Hylton. Larson introduced his Paint stallion, ‘Horse With No Name,’ to endurance this year. They completed five 50-mile rides and placed Top Ten three times. Veteran rider Kathleen Ferguson of Okanogan, with 5,335 endurance miles, has had two great seasons with her Arabian, ‘SS Shamrock.’ In 2011 Shamrock completed 355 miles with two of his rides being one day hundred mile distances. They placed seventh in their weight division for the year. This year Kathleen and Shamrock rode 510 miles, including one 75 and one 80 mile distance. They placed in the Top Ten six times out of

nine completions and are second place team in Washington State. Of the 374 horses that competed in the Pacific Northwest this year Shamrock placed 11th in mileage. The region includes British Columbia, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Alaska and Western Montana. Kim Black of Tonasket and her veteran horse ‘Smooth,’ a grade Arab, have also enjoyed two great years. Smooth completed 530 miles in 2011, finished a single hundred mile distance and received Best Condition on a 75 mile ride. He also received national recognition for reaching a goal of 3,000 miles of competition. The 3,000 milestone is admired by endurance riders, being attained by few horses. This year Smooth and Black rode 610 miles placing sixth in regional mileage. Smooth was awarded two Best Conditions on 75- and 80-mile distances, with two first places and seven Top Tens in the 11 rides he completed. The team won the 2012 Washington State Championship and will receive Smooths’ third Sandybaar award this year. Black, Ferguson and their mounts finished two days at “The Pink Flamingo Classic” this year. A fund raiser for Breast Cancer research, the ride donated $4,778 to the cause. All these horse and rider teams expect to continue to compete in 2013 as the sport of endurance riding becomes quite addictive. New participants are welcome at any level with any breed of equine.

breakfast meeting includes a breakfast buffet of eggs, sausage, bacon, waffles and juice or coffee for only $15 per person. Our keynote speaker for this meeting is Glenn Mandziuk, President and CEO of the Thompson Okanagan Tourism Association. Mandziuk will speak about areas of common interest in tourism and how we can work collaboratively and how the Thompson Okanogan Tourism Association is embracing their potential  with an industry-led strategy that demonstrates how we can create exceptional visitor experiences that will expand our tourism success beyond the peak season.  One key underlying objective to this strategy is to encourage partnerships within

the industry, and to work in an integrated way to embrace opportunities for growth in a manner that benefits all partners and increases a year-round strength as a destination. We will also have a short business meeting to elect officers for 2013 and make some changes to the OCTC  Bylaws. (Please see attached for proposed changes.) This annual membership meeting helps to creates opportunities to get to know others in the tourism industry and will increase your knowledge about how tourism is flourishing in our county and how, partnering and working together, we can keep it growing. Please RSVP to Carolyn at the office (509) 826-5107 or cdavis@ economic-alliance.com by Jan. 15.

County tourism group to hold annual meeting Keynote speaker will discuss the common interests of U.S. and Canadian ‘Okanogans’ By Carolyn Davis Okanogan County Tourism Council

OMAK – The public is invited to join colleagues in celebrating tourism in Okanogan Country on Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, at the Elks Lodge in Omak (110 South Ash Street), 9. a.m. for the Annual Membership Meeting. OCTC’s annual membership meeting offers information and fun, along with good food. This

Want your own website? OROVILLE – The January meeting of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce will discuss owning and maintaining your own business website. Did you know that for about $60 a year you can own and maintain your own website and

domain from several different online vendors? Chamber President Clyde Andrews will present some options, as well as when it might be best for you to hire someone to do this for you. If you already do this, then you will certainly be welcome to share

your experiences and tips. The chamber will meet at 1 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 10 at the Plaza Restaurant. “Come a bit early to get your order in if you want to eat. We will start as close to 1 as possible,” said Andrews.

Out On The Town Alpine Vet Clinic knows that our communities are facing tough financial times, so we are doing our part to help by offering a discount on our already low priced food.

10% off

entertainment

Hill’s Science Diet Products Pet Foods  Pet Treats Prescription Pet Foods For the month of

JANUARY

Restaurant & Lounge

Alpine Veterinary Clinic P.L.L.C.

Great Food, Friendly Atmosphere Restaurant Open: 7am to 9pm Lounge Open : 12pm to Close •

PULLTABS ARE HERE! • Thursday Karaoke 9-Close • Oyster Fry on Friday Night • Prime Rib Saturday

Denise S. Krytenberg, D.V.M.

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Join Us!

Steak Night

1412 Main St. Oroville Ph: 509-476-2664

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

509-826-5882

741 E. Riverside Dr., Omak

WANT THEIR ATTENTION? ADVERTISE YOUR EVENTS HERE

Call Charlene at 476-3602 EVERY WEEK

(8 oz top sirloin)

entertainment

Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000


JANUARY 10, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

LOOKING BACK AT 2012

LAst Six Months | FROM A1 pany that dries cherries with their helicopters.

Ray Campbell. Halloween happenings in North County – Halloween promised a lot of fun things to do in the North County, including the return of The Haunted Hayride and the Oroville Downtown Trick or Treat.

October

The Gazette-Tribune wins General Excellence Award – The newspaper took top honors at the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association convention with a first place in the prestigious General Excellence category for Circulation Group 1. And so it begins… - The front page photo features a large excavating machine at the start of the construction on the long-awaited Bonaparte Creek water and sewer project in Tonasket. Henneman will be crowned rodeo queen – Karlie Henneman, a Tonasket High School senior, will be crowned Miss Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo Queen on Oct. 13. She is the daughter of Mike and Toni Henneman. Golden opportunity? – Bob Larson believes he’s located gold in what he calls a paleo-channel, an ancient dry riverbed that parallels and crosses the Similkameen River and is the source of the Rich Bar, the first gold strike in Washington State. Oroville students score above state levels – Oroville Elementary School students scored at or above state targets in nearly every grade level, with third graders scoring especially high in reading and math. School board opposes charter initiative – The Tonasket School board unanimously approved a resolution opposing Initiative 1240, which, if passed would allow the creation of up to 40 charter schools in the state over the next five years. Candidates speak at Oroville – Several candidates for local county office were welcomed to the Oroville Chamber to say why they were seeking office. Among the candidates were District Court Judge hopefulls Scot Stuart and Heidi Smith and would be county commissioner Albert Roberts, Bud Hover and

November

Tax hike discussed at Tonasket – Faced with rising costs and revenues that are flat at best, the Tonasket City Council is considering whether to raise the ad valorem property tax for the first time in three years. North Valley Hospital to consider tax credit – The hospital district board in an effort to help boost hospital volumes, is considering whether to offer patients a discount tied to the patients’ tax assessment to the district (see related article this week). Oroville School Board short one director – With the official acceptance of David Nutt’s resignation, the Oroville School Board finds itself short one director and is taking letters of interest. Building a lasting legacy – The U.S. Armed Forces Legacy held an open house at the new building at the memorial site and a fundraising dinner auction. Five months, ten days, eight hours in captivity – We look at WWII veteran Jim Pruitt’s ordeal as a POW for nearly half a year. Pruitt was honored at the Veteran’s Assembly hosted by Tonasket High School. He sat down with Vietnam War veteran Michael Stewart for an interview. Oroville school capital improvement levy trailing – The school levy was failing by just a few votes, while the City of Tonasket’s new Criminal Justice Tax seemed to have gone down in defeat. Sheila Kennedy won a spot on the Okanogan County Board of Commissioners, while fellow Republicans Ray Campbell and Bud Hover’s race for the other open seat was too close to call.

Tonasket council approves two percent tax hike – A divided Tonasket City Council approved a two percent hike in the ad valorem in an effort to balance revenues and rising expenses that are creating a budget crunch. County receives A+ bond rating – While pursing the refinancing of $2.2 million in bonds used for construction improvements, Okanogan County received an A+ rating from national rating agency Standard and Poor’s. Refinancing at a lower interest rate should save the county $220,000. Close commissioner’s race triggers recount – Just 10 votes separate Ray L. Campbell and Don “Bud” Hover in the race for County Commissioner Position 2, forcing a manual recount to determine the winner. In other elections the Capital Improvement Levy asked for by the Oroville School District turned around in the district’s favor; Tonasket’s Criminal Justice tax made gains but in the end went down to defeat and EMS levies for Oroville and Oroville Rural passed with ease. Give an iPad to each student? - Is the Oroville School District ready to put one computer device like an iPad or a notebook in the hands of each student. A presentation on “one to one computing” was given to the school board by teacher Ed Naillon, the district’s technology director.

December

NVH seeks ways to deal with Assisted Living costs – When North Valley Hospital District CEO Linda Michel, CFO Helen Verhasselt and the Board of Commissioners tried to find data for the time when running the Assisted Living facility was profitable, it turned out there was no such data for any time within the last seven years. The district must find a way of turning Assisted Living around or it may drag the whole district further into debt.

Credit | FROM A1 Sen. Bob Morton announces retirement – After more than two decades in the state senate, Sen. Bob Morton (R-7th District) announced he will retire at the first of the new year (see related article this week). Ray Campbell wins county – It looks like Ray L. Campbell is the new Okanogan County Commissioner in Position 2, according to the results of the manual recount released Tuesday, Dec. 4. Campbell defeated incumbent commissioner Don “Bud” Hover by just 10 votes. Oroville airport out of gas – Oroville’s out of gas at Dorothy Scott Airport and the city can’t afford to refill its tanks until after the new year because of the high price of delivery and the money not being in the 2012 budget. Tonasket gives spray park go-ahead – Efforts to rebuild Tonasket’s city swimming pool may be moving at a glacial pace, but not so Linda Black’s work toward a water spray park. The council gives Black permission to pursue the project that will be placed in Chief Tonasket Park. The spray park, which would be paid for through donations, is estimated to cost between $150,000 to $200,000. Oroville passes $8 million 2013 budget – The new budget is $1.5 million over the 2012 budget, but includes several projects like construction of the North End Reservoir, financed by the U.S. Border Patrol and grantfunded improvements to Central Ave. from Main St. to Cherry St. and from there to the Cherry Street Bridge. Oroville Schools named ‘Schools of Distinction’ – Oroville Junior/Senior High School was named a 2012 School of Distinction by the Center for Educational Effectiveness. To be eligible a school must perform at or above the state median in grades six through eight (middle schools) or grade 10 (for high schools) in state reading and math assessments.

dietary services, Emergency Room services and in-patient costs. It does not apply to expenses associated with extended care. The policy was modeled after a similar program in use at the Lake Chelan Community Hospital. “It’s been successful for them for several years now,” Orford said. “What it’s done - and what we hope it does for us - is to encourage people to use the services at our hospital.” Those who paid, for example, $200 in property taxes to the hospital district can receive up to a $200 credit to their bill for services rendered during that calendar year. Those who paid $501 or more will receive up to a $500 credit. The credit will be applied to a patient’s balance after the hospital has received payment from an insurance the patient may have. For private pay patients, it can be combined with the hospital’s 20/30 policy, in which a patient paying off a full bill within a 30 days receives a 30 percent discount, or within a year receives a 20 percent discount. “So you can use that and apply the tax discount as well,” Orford said. The credit does not have to be

Smith | FROM A1 failing in Colville, and brought it go with being a citizen legislator, back and privatized it.” especially so far from the Capitol. Sen. Mark Schoesler, leader of John is joining the Senate at an the state’s Republican senators, important time in its history, as we said he is looking forward to servstrive for a new ing with Smith in level of biparti“John is joining the Senate. san cooperation. “It is an honor the Senate at an I look forward and a pleasure to important time in its to working with welcome John to history as we strive him.” the Senate,” said Morton offiSchoesler (9th for a new level of cially stepped District). “I have bipartisan cooperation” down Monday every confidence after 22 years of Sen. Mark Schoesler, he will repreLeader, State Repoublican Senators legislative sersent northeast vice. Smith was Washington as scheduled to be effectively and faithfully as Senator Morton; I also sworn in on Wednesday, Jan. 9. The 2013 legislative session appreciate that he is willing to step up and make the commitments that begins Jan. 14 in Olympia.

509-476-3280

AUTO & TRUCK SALES

Quality Pre-Owned Vehicles

used all at once, but must be used within the calendar year. “The rest of the credit could then be applied to future expenses within the same calendar year,” Orford said. The discount also cannot be applied to delinquent accounts, nor will patients receive cash back in lieu of a reduction to their balance. It must be used within 120 days from the date services were billed, or 120 days from the date other insurance paid all that can be applied to the hospital bill. The discount will be applied based upon the date the services were rendered; i.e. a patient seen in Nov., 2013, will be have their credit applied their 2013 eligibility even if they aren’t billed until 2014. More information is available on the hospital’s website, www.nvhospital.org, or by calling Krista Harden at (509) 4863136. Application packets can be printed out from the website or picked up at the hospital’s admitting desk. “The form is very short and simple,” Orford said. “People have enough forms to deal with as it is, so we wanted to make sure it didn’t take much time or effort to complete it.”

Open Monday - Friday 1123 N. Hwy 97, Oroville (next to Les Schwab) Call on weekend www.beattlesauto.com for appointment!

NEW

Inve Ar rivingntor y Daily!

GET UP TO $500 OFF YOUR HOSPITAL BILL TAX DISCOUNT PROGRAM How does it work? If you own property in the North Valley Hospital District then you qualify for this discount. The discount can be applied to your account balances at North Valley Hospital, or to your dependent’s account balances. To find out how much you qualify for look at your Okanogan County tax statement for the amount paid to Okanogan County Public Hospital District #4.

Apply your discount to any of the following services! • State of the art MRI, CT, Ultrasound, DEXA, Digital X-rays and Digital Mammography.

Get credit for the amount you pay into our Hospital District on your Okanogan County Property Taxes!

• Full-service Laboratory, Nutritional Services, and Respiratory Care. • Beautiful New Birthing Center • General Surgery

For more information call

509-486-3136

• Superior Rehabilitation known through Eastern Washington, which includes Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Massage Therapy.

or go to www.nvhospital.org to download the application today! North Valley Hospital District

• 24/7 Emergency Department staffed with highly trained physicians.

203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph: 509-486-3107 www.nvhospital.org


Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 10, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life 2012 THROUGH THE LENS

Brent Baker & Gary DeVon/staff photos

Scenes from the latter half of 2012 (clockwise from upper left): Canola meal, produced at Carbon Cycle Crush in Oroville, is loaded into a trailer; a helicopter from RJ Helicopters hovers over a cherry orchard off Sawtell Rd. in Oroville in an effort to dry off one of the many rains that hit the valley early last summer; Andy Eccleshall, creator of the murals that decorate the CCC, was in town to add more of his creative touch to the building; a holding area at Buckhorn Mine, where water is held until it can go through the treatment facility, provides a striking contrast with its pristine surroundings; Tonasket’s three 2013 rodeo queens - (l-r) Breanna Howell, Karlie Henneman and Trinity DeJong - enjoy the A Cavallo equines at Winterfest; a few of the ghouls at the 2012 Haunted Hayride; the reptiles perform as “The Tortoise vs. the Hare, the Greatest Race,” a Missoula Childrens Theater production.

Obituaries County Habitat For Humanity, P.O. Box 1679, Tonasket, WA 98855. Please share your memories of Art by signing his online guestbook at www.berghfuneralservice.com.

Arthur Emmanuel Westlund

Arthur E. Westlund Arthur Emmanuel Westlund, age 102, of Tonasket, died December 23, 2012 at North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket, Wash. He was born July 17, 1910 in Anoka, Minnesota to John and Mary Westlund. Art was raised on a farm 12 miles north of Anoka, Minn. He was hard working and industrious. In his late teens, Art was custom farming with one of the first tractors in their community. He married his wife, Ethel, in 1938 at age 28. In the early 40’s Art sold his animals and equipment and moved to San Diego, Calif. to join the war effort building airplanes. Daughter, Arlene, was born in 1943 and son, Gene, in 1944. In 1948 Art and family would move back to Minnesota. There he got involved in the motel business. 1959 would find Art and family returning to San Diego to further develop his business interests. He was a devout Christian and was always very active in his church. He and wife Ethel moved to Washington in 2003 to make their home at the North Valley Assisted Living facility and most recently the North Valley Extended Care. Surviving relatives: spouse: Ethel Westlund; children: Arlene Johnson of Tonasket, Wash., Gene Westlund of Twisp, Wash., grandchildren: Brendalee Johnson,Cathy Abplanalp, Aaron Westlund, Anders Johnson; great grandchildren: Anders Johnson, Olivia and Reuben Abplanalp, Reese and Hadley Westlund, Hudson and Beckett Chambers Gabriel and Ezra Trevino. He was preceded in death by three sisters and one brother. A Memorial Celebration of Life will be held Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, at 2 p.m. at the Tonasket Free Methodist Church, 1 Stanton Loop Rd., Tonasket, with Pastor Ron Wise officiating. Memorials may be made to Okanogan

Raymond Elmer Colbert

Raymond E. Colbert Raymond Elmer Colbert, a lifelong orchardist and community volunteer, passed away peacefully at his home on Boundary Lane in Oroville, Washington on January 1st. Ray was born in Tonasket on December 19, 1932 to Esther Owens Colbert and John Henry Colbert. Ray graduated from Tonasket High School in 1950. He married Mary Ellen Anliker in November of 1952 and was blessed with four children, Ellen Rae Colbert, John Colbert, Cathy Colbert and Jim Colbert. Ray purchased his first orchard in 1952, beginning his life-long career as an orchardist. He also worked for Verbeck Bros. and later opened the H.R. Spinner office in Tonasket, Wash. Ray later owned and operated Oroville Fruits while continuing to develop and farm large blocks of apple and pear orchards in the Oroville and Tonasket area. In 1983 Ray married Rhonda Buoy in Yakima, Wash. Robert Raymond was born June 1985 and Patrick Raymond was born October 1988. The family resides

on Lake Osoyoos in Oroville. Ray continued to expand his agricultural holdings to cherries in Okanogan County, wheat ranches in Odessa, Wash. and vineyards in Benton County. Ray later managed Chief Tonasket Growers and Regal Fruit Inc. In the fall of 2001, Ray traveled to Moldova, a former state of the U.S.S.R., as an Agricultural Specialist for the Citizen’s Network for Foreign Affairs. In addition to the orchards, Ray raised cattle and horses and developed a nice riding arena north of Tonasket. Ray was instrumental in the growth of barrel racing events in Okanogan and Ferry Counties and assisted with many youth activities for the Tonasket Comancheros. In the last five years, Colbert Orchards expanded into hauling fruit during harvest for growers and for fruit cooperatives. During the fall of 2012, Ray’s son Patrick managed eight trucks hauling fruit as well as hauling straw. This fall marked Ray’s 60th year as owner of Colbert Orchards. Ray was a very active father, coaching the Chief Tonasket youth soccer team, traveling to wrestling matches, basketball games, trap shoots and numerous other academic and athletic events. Ray hauled the boys and their horses to rodeos and barrel races throughout the western United States. The family attended several Northwest Trapping Conventions in Washington, Idaho and Montana. Ray enjoyed fishing, trapping and hunting with the boys and with Patrick’s encouragement developed an extensive gun collection. Ray was actively involved in community service organizations. He was a past member of the Tonasket Chamber of Commerce, Tonasket School Board and Ski Patrol at Sitzmark Ski Hill. He was a current member of the Washington Pilot’s Association, Tonasket Car Club, Comancheros and a 54-year Tonasket Kiwanis member. During Ray’s 12 years of service as Okanogan County PUD Commissioner he served as County Chairperson, Washington State PUD President, State Legislative Chairperson and also

served on the Board of Directors for Washington Public Power Supply System. Ray served on the Board of Directors for Okanogan County Farm Service Agency and was recently honored by Tree Top, Inc for 40 years of dedicated service as Tree Top Board of Directors. Ray had a passion for flying. He was licensed in fixed wing planes, float planes, power gliders and helicopters. For years Ray gave helicopter rides to curious friends and neighbors and later offered free airplane rides to kids at the annual Father’s Day FlyIn. Ray, John, Bobby and Patrick enjoyed motor home trips to the annual Experimental Aircraft Association air show in Oshkosh, Wisc. Ray loved motorcycles and enjoyed frequent Harley rides with sons, Robert and John. He

greatly loved the annual Wilbur Ellis ride each summer – a great ride with great friends Ray loved life and for each season had specials activities he enjoyed – skiing, snowmobiling, water skiing, motor boating, sailing and bicycling. Ray loved traveling to new places, experiencing new adventures and meeting new people. He was honored as Tonasket’s Grand Marshal, received special recognitions from the Tonasket Kiwanis, Tonasket Comancheros and Bulls and Barrels. Ray is survived by his wife, Rhonda Colbert, children, Patrick Colbert, Tonasket; Robert Colbert, Oroville; Jim (Cory) Colbert, Chelan; Cathy (Michael) McCarty, Bellevue; John (Julie) Colbert, Tonasket; Ellen (Tom) Swensen, Ketchum, ID; Esteban Ibarra, Tonasket; sisters Mary

d n a l n o ti 2013 a e r c e R

Beth (John) Appel, Oakview, CA; Lucile Hammond, Seattle and brother Don (Jean) Colbert, Tonasket. He was blessed with numerous cousins, nieces, nephews and five grandchildren. Ray was preceded in death by his father John Henry Colbert and mother Esther Owens Colbert. A memorial service will be held Saturday, Jan. 12 at 11 a.m. at the Ellisforde Church of the Brethren. Please share your memories by signing Ray’s online guest book at www.berghfuneralservice.com. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to be made to “Ride for Ray” a youth/family activity planned for the summer of 2013. Donations can be sent to P.O. Box 39, Oroville, WA. 98844. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

The most important advertisement you will buy

ington

l Wash Centra North C uide to Okanagan, B G e re uth Your F and So

for 2013~ Book Now!

Recreationland

2013 2013 Recreationland Vacation Planner and Mobile Web Application. Recreationland 2012 Recreationland Vacation Planner and Mobile Web Application.

All Ads Are In FULL COLOR

The mobile web site will provide tourists the ability to search, contact and map their trips and stops on smart phones, tablets and computers.

to the lement A supp ette-Tribune lley Gaz online: gan Va Visit us ne.com Okano ribu azette-t www.g

The most important advertisement you will buy for 2012 Recreationland is the most effective visitor guide in Okanogan, Ferry and Douglas Counties, and Super Natural British Columbia. It promotes the natural beauty and recreation that has made this area a year-round tourist destination. It’s a competitive world. Recreationland strives to make your advertisement seen by those most important to your business – our tourists.

DISTRIBUTION 25,000 DISTRIBUTION This year Recreationland will distribute 25,000, 25,000 color glossy print copies fullfull color glossy print copies FREE listing in our

NEW Mobile Tourism With an ad, you get a FREE listing in our NEW Application All advertisers that purchase an ad in Mobile Tourism Application the 2012 Recreationland also receive

of Recreationland across Okanogan County and selected of Recreationland across Okanogan County and Washington State and British Columbia visitors centers. selected Washington State and British Columbia Advertising Deadline: March 9, 2012 visitorsPaycenters. by April 2, 2012 and receive 5% discount off regular pricing.

editorial support and a FREE listing in

our new Mobile Tourism All advertisers that purchase an ad in the 2012 Recreationland alsoApplication receive which will go live in March 2012. Recreationland and Recreation-Land. editorial support and a FREE listing in our new Mobile Tourism mobi give visitors from around the US and Canada valuable Application which will go live information in March about attractions, activities and tourist hospitality across the Okanogan and 2012. Recreationland and Recreationsurrounding regions. *Allvisitors listings include basic listings Land.mobi give from around the on the Recreation-Land mobile Site that includes directory listing, phone US and Canada valuable information number and map link. about attractions, Gold activities tourist Member -and $300/yr Basic listing plus… hospitality across the Okanogan and User administration Link to Website surrounding regions. Top of search (alphabetical)      Upload Video or Pictures  Badge link to Facebook/Twitter pages  Prominence on “nearby” map searched

*All listings include basic listings on the Recreation-Land mobile Site that Member - $200/yr. includes directory listing, phone number and map link.BasicSilver listing plus...   User administration  Link to Website  Top of search (alphabetical)  Upload Video or Pictures

Full Page............................ $900.00 1/2 page..............................$525.00 1/4 page............................. $300.00 1/8 page..............................$187.50 Inside Front Cover.............$1125.00 Back Inside Cover.............$1125.00 Back Cover........................$1350.00 $75 Directory Listing

ADVERTISING DEADLINE March 9, 2013

Full page: Half page: 1/4 page: 1/8 page:

7.5” wide x 9.875” 7.5” wide x 4.75” 3.625” wide x 4.75” 3.625” wide x 2.25”

All advertising pricing includes full process color!

or Pay by April 2, 2013 and receive 5% discount off regular pricing. CONTACT: Charlene at 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712 / Fax: 509-476-3054 CONTACT Charlene: charlene@gazette-tribune.com 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712 Fax: 509-476-3054


JANUARY 10, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER Congressional Mailbag

The new year bringing changes in the Fourth Congressional District As some of you likely noted when you received your ballots earlier this year, starting in 2013, Congressional districts in Washington state are going to look a little different. The change in Congressional districts is due to a process as old as our country itself. The House of Representatives was created to be the “people’s House,” where the number of representatives are based on population. While our Founding Fathers likely never envisioned a nation spanning from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean with nearly 315 million people, they did have the foresight to create a system within the U.S. Constitution to ensure that Congressional districts remain roughly equal in population as people move from place to place. Every ten years, the United States Census Bureau conducts a count of all of the people in the United States and the 435 voting seats within the House of Representatives are then divided up among the 50 states based on population. After the 2010 Census, this meant Opinion by Washington state gained a seat, while states U.S. Rep. like Louisiana and Missouri lost seats. Each state then determines how it wishes to draw Doc Hastings the lines separating Congressional districts, as long as the population in each district is approximately the same. Here in Washington state, this is done by a bipartisan commission made up of two Republicans and two Democrats. On February 7 of this year, the final redistricting plan that had been adopted by the Washington State Redistricting Commission was signed into law by Governor Gregoire. The new congressional districts go into effect beginning on January 3rd of 2013. Within Central Washington, Congressman Reichert will now be representing those in Chelan and Kittitas counties, as well as the residents of East Wenatchee. Congresswoman Herrera Beutler will be representing the people of Klickitat and Skamania counties. I have the honor of representing residents of Okanogan County, all of Adams County and a portion of Walla Walla County that were previously represented by Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers. I look forward to working with the new residents of my district, as well as those in Benton, Douglas, Franklin, Grant, and Yakima counties that I will continue to represent. I will very much miss the opportunity to work on behalf of the people from the areas that are no longer part of the Fourth Congressional District. However, I encourage the residents of these areas to learn more about your new representatives and their positions on issues by visiting their websites at www.reichert.house.gov and www.herrerabeutler.house.gov. To those in my district feel free to visit my website at www.hastings.house.gov or call at (509) 5439396.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. Devon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott selliott@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley GazetteTribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE, TONASKET & OKANOGAN COUNTY

Missing out on airport business Dear Gary, As a member of the local area, I have to wonder about what is going on about our airport. I understand that the pilots who gas up at the airport pay for the gas. Also those who park their planes there pay a fee for whatever type space they use. Aircraft fuel is expensive and they have been paying for it. Where’s the money paid for that gas gone? Plain and simple.... Also, as of now our airport is closed to border-type crossing or any aircraft other than helicopters and only if the chopper has it’s own gas. The runways are not plowed. We are not getting any of the business we would get from layovers of Canadian planes or otherwise...they have to land other places that are accredited for border flights. In God I trust, Betty Roberts Oroville

March for Life in Omak, Jan. 22 Dear Editor, On Tuesday, 12 noon at Omak City Park, Jan. 22, 2013, there will be a March for Life in Omak so that we will not forget that it is legal to kill an innocent, helpless baby in a mother’s womb through abortion. Everyone is welcome to join us. Jan. 22 commemorates the sad, infamous day that the U.S. Supreme Court passed the Roe vs. Wade decision legalizBY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER PUBLISHER

75 YEARS AGO: January 7 – 14, 1938: The U.S. Weather Bureau Station in Oroville gives some interest figures on rain and snowfall during the past year. The records show that we had more moisture here during 1937 that for several years past. In 1935, there were 8.7 inches of precipitation, in 1936, 9.77 inches and in 1937, 3.38 inches. The most snow of the season fell in February with 22.3 inches, although December just passed a record of 12.1 inches. Designed, if approved by federal WPA authorities, to take up the slack in employment in county for the next two years, a county wide road project is being worked out by County Commissioners and County Engineer, James Bannon. It seeks an allocation of $99,000 of federal funds to be matched with about $145,000 of county road funds. Highlights from the Hill, (by Oroville High School students) the students are proud to be able to congratulate Ken Morley for winning first honors in this district’s amateur contest. Ken will represent our district in the amateur trials in Okanogan next Wednesday night. Friday, Jan. 7, the local team journeys to Republic to play the Miners and Saturday, Jan. 8, we will be visited by the Molson team. The Molson Broadcaster: The hot lunches started Monday, Jan. 3. Mrs. Brugh has charge of making the soup and Mrs. Brumbaugh is in charge at school. Monday lunch was rice tomato soup; Tuesday, vegetable beef and Wednesday,

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ing abortion on demand in the United States of America in 1973. Common Sense tells us that this is wrong. It seems that not much attention is directed at the killing of these babies any longer, it seems to be an acceptable part of society’s norms. I participated in the National March for Life in Washington, D.C. in 2008 which took place the day after President Obama was inaugurated. There 400,000 Pro Life marchers and as usual the media did not hardly even mention this newsworthy event. At the same time that we were marching, the first bill President Obama signed was an executive order removing the ban on taxpayer funding of abortion overseas (the Mexico City Policy). I wonder what God thinks when He sees 1.4 million babies a year in the USA alone being killed because of our selfishness? How much longer is He going to put up with us? God is so merciful that even now if we repented he will forgive us. There is another victim in abortion that suffers immensely in the heart, the mother especially and also the father. They know that they have killed their child and have kept it locked inside for 50 years while society tries to tell them that everything is OK, but they know it isn’t OK inside. My heart goes out to their silent suffering an I pray that they may know hope and healing is avail-

able. No sin is too great for God’s mercy. Thank you, Al & Judy Bosco Omak

If it walks like a duck Dear Editor, John Connot must have forgotten the many statements by various leaders, (B.O. being one of them) alluding to Islam as a peaceful religion. So why would having our first Muslim President be a bad thing here in progressive America? It was nice though to learn some of the minimum requirements of being a Muslim, although when one is actively involved in jihad against an enemy, the duty of prostrating one’s self five times a day toward Mecca would leave the guy kind of vulnerable. If the Black leaders of America are willing to label Bill Clinton our first black president, then we should have no problem allowing Obama to be our first Muslim President. I’m sure Barak could have taken his other name: Barry Soetoro, but he didn’t. Hussein is a popular name for Muslim boys, his childhood teacher praised his ability to recite portions of the Quran, and with his efforts to change aspects of the NASA space center into a Muslim outreach facility, and his

ITEMS FROM THE PAST it was corn chowder. The cook’s salary is paid by the PTA and the soup costs three cents a cup. Ken Morely was awarded second place in the final amateur contest. Morely and Monte McDaniel were selected to represent Oroville. On Jan. 15, Morely will go to Spokane, with all expenses paid in addition to the cash prize, on Saturday and will perform in the contest over station KFPY. He sang a vocal, accompanying himself on the guitar. The F. W. McNess man from Chelan was around through this locality last week. Thelma McKinney spent Thursday night with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John McKinney.

50 YEARS AGO:

January 10 – 17, 1963: The ski school at the Sitzmark Ski area will start this Saturday at 10 a.m., according to Earl Freels, Manager. Everything is ready for skiing to begin this weekend with enough snow for the first day of lessons. At a meeting Monday night, the Molson School Board decided instead of being elected according to districts, they would number their positions. Paul Loe has position 1, Richard Pickering, position 2 and Mary Teas, position 3. Positions 1 and 3 will be filled in the coming March election and Pickering will be retained in No. 2. The Oroville High School Band is sponsoring a chili feed to be held in the grade school cafeteria Saturday evening, Jan. 12. Proceeds will be used to purchase additional needed band uniforms. Meet Mr.

Digit. He is VP in charge of Numbers at Pacific Northwest Bell. He’s announcing that telephone users in Oroville now have All-Number-Calling. The introduction of these “new look” telephone numbers became effective in Oroville on Sunday, Jan. 6. At that time, telephone numbers changed to all numerals – no letters. American Legion Flag History. When the field of stars was added to the flag, George Washington said, “We take the stars from heaven, the red from the mother country, separating it by white strips, this showing that we have separated from her and the white stripes will go down in posterity, representing liberty.” Real Estate Advertisements: Stock Ranch in Chesaw area, 1675 acres deeded, 200 leased. Nice house and good outbuildings, $60,000. Grocery items: Sliced bacon, 2# pkg. $98; Chuck roast, $.69 per lb.; IGA coffee, 1#, $.47; Brownie Mix, 16 ounce pkg. 4 pkgs, $1.00; Margarine, 5 # for $1.00. Weather Wise: Jan. 3, 47 degrees max and 32 min; Jan. 4, 51 and 34, Jan. 5, 40 and 24, Jan. 6, 38 and 28, Jan. 7, 39 and 33, Jan. 8, 38 and 33 and Jan. 9, 36 and 33. Precipitation on Jan. 3 was .07” and Jan. 4 was .32“ with no snow reported.

25 YEARS AGO:

January 7 – 14, 1988: Arson is the alleged cause of an early New Year’s morning fire that gutted the Maverick Tavern in Tonasket, according to State Fire Marshall Duane Dormaier. The

work at helping one of the Muslim Brotherhood become leader of Egypt, and carrying the water for the Muslim Brotherhood by falsely blaming a video that offended Islam for the killing of a U.S. Ambassador and three others, his flying around the world on vacations and other business but not having time to stop at Israel, surely these and other actions like them will get him into paradise as a good Muslim. No John, the FACT is Barak Obama is not pro-American, he is not for limited constitutional government, or private property rights, he will do all he can to divide the people of this nation, and he is doing a great job of destroying our financial foundations through wealth redistribution, more taxes, government spending/waste and inflation. The good thing about a $17 trillion debt from his standpoint has to be it’s only some one else’s money. Where would we look to find a president whose political proclivities better align with the Muslim people? Even John has to love hearing him tell the nation we must get our fiscal house in order, as he flies off on another extravagant vacation. It is sad to see the average Obama supporter questioned about some of the simplest things that made up this nation’s historic framework. The real question for John is, if it looks like a duck, walks and quacks like a duck, can a majority of people be deceived into thinking it’s an eagle? Not without the help of the media! Steve Lorz Tonasket fire was reported by some passing Canadian motorists at 5:15 a.m. and by the time the Tonasket Fire Department arrived at 5:21 a.m., the fire had nearly burned itself out. Damage estimates at first were place at about $20,000 but was later changed to $70,000. Washington State’s Jr. Miss Pageant begins Saturday, Jan. 9. Tonasket’s representative is Shari Watson, 17. She was selected during the local contest last fall and is a senior at THS. New Year’s baby is a boy, Rolando Daniel Hernandez. He was born to Marchelle and Elias Hernandez a 3:53 a.m. on Jan. 2 at North Valley Hospital. Returning councilman Dennis Wilder and Rookies Ernie “Scoop” Thornton and Linda Schwilke signed their oaths of office. They join Susan Christensen and Gil Turner in making up Oroville’s Council. In last Friday night’s encounter with the Lady Jackrabbits, the Lady Tigers of Tonasket out shot their opponents and came out with their first league win of 42-40. The Oroville Hornets got behind early in a Caribou League match-up on the home court. Despite making a dramatic fourth quarter run on the Okanogan Bulldogs, were never able to catch up. Final score was 55-48. Good year for hay. Alfalfa hay, in the barn, $60 per ton or $2 per bale; high wuality alfalfa hay covered, green bales, $65.; second and third cutting hay, $100.00 per ton. Real Estate for sale: Beautiful 3 brm, 2 bth home on 1 acre with fantastic view overlooking Wannacut Lake. Home also has electric heat along w/ fireplace with insert. Owner is asking $76,000.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 10, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

Birds of a feather have been flocking together on this power pole on 16th Street in Oroville. The pigeon pow wow seems to take place every day as they gather by the dozens to sit on the wires watching traffic slide by during the snowy days of winter.

By Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

Gary DeVon/staff photo

THE LEARNING TREE ‘Fabulous Fondue’ fundraiser for Community Schools Submitted by Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

Several months ago we applied to Kinross Gold Corporation for a grant to help financially support Community Schools. On Nov. 29 we received notice that our program had been approved for a good portion of our grant request. Excitement prevailed! These funds will help to keep us in business for a few months and

we are ever so grateful to Kinross for making this investment and recognizing the value of the Community Schools program. Funding for Community Schools comes from a variety of sources. While class registration fees help, they don’t begin to pay for the program. We keep class fees low so that most everyone can participate. We have one part-time paid employee, supplies and materials to purchase and, except for those who choose to volunteer their time, we pay our instructors for the hours they teach. We count on hundreds of volunteer hours by our Board members and others to support the

program in countless ways. We must depend on business and individual contributions, advertising in our catalogs, fund-raising events and grant donations to sustain the program. We are forever scrambling to meet our annual expenses, but it’s worth the effort. Our next fund-raising event will be on Sunday, Feb. 24, at Esther Bricques Winery, starting at 4 p.m. We’re calling it Fabulous Fondue and it will be a fun fondue affair! Expect music, conversation, lots of appetizers and yummy fondues. Wines and soda will be available. More to come. Mark your calendar!

EAGLEDOM AT WORK Christmas festivities a huge success By Gai Wisdom Eagles Auxiliary

We are sending our very best wishes for the New Year to everyone from the Oroville Eagles #3865. We are sorry to report that the Benefit Dinner and Auction for Vivian Taylor has been postponed. It will go on just not at this time.

Our good and true Auxiliary Sister Danny Wietrick was in an automobile accident last week. She sustained moderate injuries and her car was badly damaged. She wants to thank the first responders. The ambulance crew and the fire department treated her with all kindness and gentle care. The Christmas festivities were a huge success for the kids thanks in part to our sister Nancy Sharp, who is our Worthy President’s mother. All the ladies came together in a big way to bring

this off. Remember that our dues are at a discount from now until May. We only require one half dues at this time of year. Get those new members in and our re-ups back! Taco Monday continues as does Pool Burgers on Wednesday. Thursday is Bingo night and Burgers. Friday is Steak Nite, Meat Draw and Karaoke. Saturday is open mike night and Sunday we play free pool. Come join your friends who are People Helping People!

POOL LEAGUE NEWS Seeking committee members for awards banquet By Gai Wisdom NOV Pool League

NORTH COUNTY - North Okanogan Valley Pool League is headed into the second half of the season at a high rate of speed. It is now time to put out the call for committee members for

Results - JAN. 6 16-yard Robert McDaniel Pat Davisson Lloyd Caton Bob McDaniel Jake Bradley Jerry Bradley

25 24 23 21 20 14

Handicap Pat Davisson Lloyd Caton Jake Bradley

21 19 13

Club Meeting Sunday, Jan. 13, 1 PM

the banquet and trophies/prizes. we’ll vote on it and announce it at Call Jan or Gai if you would like the banquet. to help. Or even if you wouldn’t. The top eight teams are really The Meat Shoot that happened tightening up in the stats with on the Dec. 16 had 30 people at least two more teams ready to shooting and was great fun. break in. Prizes were hams and turkeys and Everyone be careful on the our top two winners were Dylan roads and don’t forget we have a Mulligan and Justin Clough. rescheduling system built in to Congrats guys. We raised a little the rules. Don’t take any unnecesmoney and not nowstart we need suggessary risks out Make there. this The first Why a new holiday tradition? the half tions as to who to give it to. Put of the season has gone well. Keep time of year that you help save for a child’s college your ideas on your score sheets, up the good work and Play Pool!

Give a Holiday Gift That Doesn’t End When the aBatteries Give Holiday Run Gift Out. That Doesn’t End When the Batteries Run Out. education.

Edward Jones can work with you to develop a strategy save foracollege. One option is a Make 529 college Whytonot start new holiday tradition? this thesavings plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, time of year that you help save for a child’s college family members and the child.* education.

So Much Planning

to save You for college. One option is a 529 collegeaS savings have thought about taxeS Well?

MOVIES

Oliver Theatre

Oliver, B.C.

Reg. Showtimes: Sun.-Mon.-Tue.-Thur. 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7:00 and 9:00 p.m.

THE GUILT TRIP

250-498-2277

www.olivertheatre.ca

PG13

Thurs Jan. 10 at 7:30pm & Fri. , Jan 11 at 7&9pm. COMEDY WITH

Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638

enjoy what you’ve worked so current hard to achieve. to help long-term investors meet their needs and future financial goals.

PG13

SandraandRasmussen Edward Jones, its employees financial advisors cannot provide tax advice. You should

Sat. 7:00pm & 9:30pm

SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES.-JAN 12,13,14,15. ACTION CRIME DRAMA STARRING TOM CRUISE.

MONSTERS INC. 3-D

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

32 N Main St Suite A call today toOmak, see how our unique, face-to-face approach WA 98841 makes us best-suited to help long-term investors meet their 509-826-1638

DISNEY PIXAR. ANIMATED COMEDY.

Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. Jan 17, 18 & 19 Matinee Sat. 2:00pm. All Seats $6 for Matinee

LIFE OF PI

G

Sun-Mon-Tues-Thurs-Fri-Sat. Jan 20-21-22, 24-25-26. Showtimes Fri&Sat 7pm&9:25pm

OMAK THEATER 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

THE HOBBIT 170 min An Unexpected Journey

PG13

Adventure/Fantasy Starring Ian McKellen, Martin Freeman, Andy Serkis. Fri. 6:00pm & 9:45pm Sat. *2:30pm, 6:00pm, & 9:45pm Sun *3:30pm, 7:00pm Weekdays 7:00pm

current needs and future financial goals. www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638

www.edwardjones.com

Member SIPC

113 min

Fri. 6:45 & 9:45 Sat. *3:45, 6:45 & 9:45 Sun. *4:00 & 7:00 Wkdys: 7:00pm DRAMA STARRING DANIEL DAY LEWIS, SALLY FIELD, TOMMY LEE JONES & JOSEPH GORDON-LEVITT

Fri. 6:00 & 9:30 Sat. *2:45, 6:00 & 9:30 Sun. *3:45 & 7:00 Wkdys: 7:00

THE GUILT TRIP

312 S. Whitcomb

509-486-0615

PG13

PG13

96 min COMEDY STARRING BARBARA STREISAND, SETH ROGAN & KATHY NAJIMY.

Fri. 6:45 & 9:15 Sat. *4:15, 6:45 & 9:15 Sun. *4:30 & 7:00 Wkdys: 7:00pm

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Have your fine jewelry repaired, rings sized, gems remounted, chains repaired, handmade & custom designs in sterling and gold!

Adults $7.50 Kids 11-under & *Discount Matinee-kids/adults $5 ea

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

Keith R. BaRnett , GRaduate JeweleR GemoloGist (Gia)

There will be an American Red Cross Blood Drive on Thursday, Jan. 10 between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the Tonasket Community Church. The church is located at 24 E. 4th Ave in Tonasket (one block above the U.S. Bank). To schedule an appointment or for more information call 800-REDCROSS (800-733-2767).

NVCS Winter Quarter Jan. 21 OROVILLE – Winter Quarter with North Valley Community Schools (NVCS) is here! Our first class is Beginning Guitar, starting on Monday, Jan. 21. At the end of six sessions you will know how to pick, strum, and make beautiful

EYECARE

Tonasket Chamber of Commerce Banquet The 2013 Tonasket Chamber of Commerce Officer Installation and Awards banquet will be Thursday, Jan. 24 at 5:30 p.m. at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center located at 411 Western Ave. There will be live music, dinner and silent and live auctions. Tickets are for sale at II Sisters, Tonasket Interiors and Lee Franks. For more information you can find us on Facebook or go to our website at www.tonasketchamber. com.

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

WATERFRONT eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

HEALTH CARE

TONASKET

OKANOGAN

HEALTH CARE

(509) 826-6191

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

HEALTH CARE

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health

(509) 826-8496

MEDICAL

509-476-3602

STARTS FRIDAY, ACTION/CRIME/DRAMA STARRING SEAN PENN, RYAN GOSLING, JOSH BROLIN, EMMA STONE.

150 min

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Family Health Centers

R

Red Cross Blood Drive

Call us . . . Se Habla Español

Centros de Salud Familiar

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386. The Food Bank is looking for donations. The food bank shelves are pretty empty now.

OROVILLE – This comprehensive First Aid/CPR three session class at North Valley Community Schools starts on Monday, Jan. 21 and covers the basics of first aid including medical, injury and environmental emergencies and adult, child and infant CPR. Students will receive a stated Department of Labor and Industries card, valid for three years, upon completion of the course. For those working in the medical field the American Heart Association certified First Aid/ CPR card is required. This class will be offered in March. Grab a blue catalog from around town or call Ellen at (509) 476-2011 for information and to register.

OMAK

www.wvmedical.com

.

MIRAGE THEATER

GANGSTER SQUAD

FAMILY PRACTICE

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

.

Oroville Food Bank

First Aid and CPR

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

consult with a qualified tax specialist for professional advice on your specific situation. Financial Advisor

G

TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480.

sounds with your instrument. You’ll be playing songs for your own, and others, enjoyment. Bring an acoustic guitar. Pick up a blue catalog in stores or call Ellen at (509) 476-2011 for more information and to register.

Your Complete Eyecare Centre

Financial Advisor

Edwardyour Jones, its employees and financial cannotsavings provide tax advice. You should consult with a qualifiedoptions tax specialist for for portfolio. Atadvisors Edward Jones, we have many To make your college gift in time professional advice on your specific situation. 32more N Maincontrol St Suiteover A your taxes, so you can that can give you for thetoholidays, call or visit today. Call today see how our unique, face-to-face approach makes us best-suited .

SETH ROGAN, BARBARA STREISAND.

JACK REACHER

plan, where gift canincome have tax you, sourcIt’s likely thattoday’s your retirement maybenefits come from many To make your collegepension savings giftcome infor time It’s thatSocial your retirement income may es, likely suchmembers as distributions, afrom 401(k) or family andSecurity, the child.* the holidays, call ifSecurity, or taxes visitare today. IRA for withdrawals. That’s why, a concern for you, many sources, such as Social pension distributions, *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in it’s401(k) important to residents. choose the right investments for your statesor for IRA those acertain withdrawals. That’s why, if taxes are aportfolio. At Edward Jones, we have many options that can give you more control over Sandra Rasmussen concern you,can it’senjoy important to choose right investments your taxes,for so you what you’ve worked the so hard to achieve.

Tonasket Food Bank

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

*Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in certainJones states forcan thosework residents. Edward with you to develop a strategy

At the

LINCOLN

TONASKET GUN CLUB

DENTISTRY

goeS into RetiReMent.

The

Happy New Year! Time to get back on our regular routine. I hear many of our members have been or are in the hospital over the holidays. Not a good thing. Bonnie Maynard has been in the Cascade Hospital in Wenatchee for further treatment. Doris Hughes is under the weather and several others are coughing and sneezing, as well. No matter the weather, pinochle will still be played at the Center. On Dec. 29 the scores were: Annie Munds won the door prize; Evelyn Dull was high for the women; Jim Fry for the men and Wilma Colburn had the most pinochles. The Jan. 5 scores were: Dolly Engelbretson had the most pinochles; Judy Ripley won the door prize; Boots Emry was high for the ladies and Jim Fry was high for the men. John and Joy Lawson and Friends will be providing music for our entertainment on Jan. 18. More next time.

Bulletin Board

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel (509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line (509) 826-6191

Toll Free

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

MASSAGE

 Anti

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

 Behavioral

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion  Walk

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 OPTICAL

Su Ianniello

Licensed Massage Practitioner

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


JANUARY 10, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

SPORTS

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Standings

Through games of Jan. 5. Check our website at gazette-tribune.com for up-to-date scores and standings

Boys Basketball Caribou Trail League

League Total Chelan 5-0 9-1 Okanogan 5-1 11-1 Brewster 4-2 9-3 Cashmere 4-2 7-5 Quincy 3-3 6-4 Cascade 1-4 3-8 Tonasket 1-5 6-6 Omak 0-6 4-8 *Top 6 qualify for post-season

CWL North Division

League Total Bridgeport 1-0 6-4 Manson 1-0 5-3 Liberty Bell 0-0 5-4 Oroville 0-1 3-7 Lk Roosevelt 0-1 2-8 *Top 3 qualify for post-season

CWL South Division

League Total Kittitas 1-0 4-5 Riv. Christian 0-0 4-4 White Swan 1-2 1-11 *Top 3 qualify for post-season

Girls Basketball Caribou Trail League

League Total Brewster 6-0 12-0 Chelan 4-1 9-1 Okanogan 4-2 10-2 Cashmere 4-2 6-6 Cascade 3-2 9-2 Omak 1-5 3-9 Quincy 1-5 3-8 Tonasket 0-6 2-10 *Top 6 qualify for post-season

CWL North Division

League Total Oroville 1-0 5-5 Lib Bell 0-0 0-8 Lk Roosevelt 0-1 5-4 Bridgeport 0-1 3-7 Manson 0-1 1-5 *Top 3 qualify for post-season

CWL South Division

League Total White Swan 3-0 7-5 Riv. Christian 0-0 4-4 Kittitas 0-1 4-5 *Top 3 qualify for post-season

Wrestling Caribou Trail League League Duals Quincy Tonasket Chelan Cascade Cashmere Omak Brewster Okanogan

W-L 2-0 1-0 1-0 1-1 1-1 1-1 0-2 0-2

High School Sports Schedules, Jan. 10-19

Big win, tough loss for Tigers Tonasket good learning experience to be in that situation and come through as a team,” Pedregon said. “Everything in the CTL you have to earn. We’re a young team, and we’re still learning that you have to earn it every night.”

By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Coming back from one 13-point deficit wasn’t enough for the Tonasket boys basketball team. The Tigers came back from an early 16-3 disadvantage to pull within two, then trailed again 37-24 just before halftime before bouncing back to claim a 68-62 victory over Omak on Thursday, Jan. 3. “It was deja vu all over again,” said Tonasket coach Agustin Pedregon of the Tigers’ slow start. “We can’t get them to just come out with intensity. We just haven’t gotten there. It’s frustrating because the potential is so much better than what we’ve shown.” Sophomore Ethan Bensing nearly doubled his season scoring output with a career high 19 points (after scoring 27 points through the first 10 games). including three 3-pointers. Bensing hit a pair of treys during a 16-6 Tonasket run to start the third quarter that got Tonasket back in the game. “You can see Bensing has a natural stroke,” Pedregon said. “Hopefully this game will let him see his potential on the offensive side. “He is who I thought he was.” Tonasket led by as many as eight points in the fourth quarter, but Omak awoke to take a 57-56 lead with 3:15 left. Michael Orozco drew a critical charging foul, Colton Leep drained a 3-pointer, and Dyllan Gage hit the go-ahead basket with 35 seconds left to key the Tigers’ final surge in the fourth quarter. “Everybody played the role they needed to, especially since we didn’t have Derek Sund tonight,” Pedregon said. “Orozco ... made good passes, had some steals and made big plays. Trevor Terris was tremendous on the defensive side. I love that he’s a guy who wants to be put on their

Cascade 67, Tonasket 66

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tigers’ Colton Leep draws a foul from Omak’s Juan Medina in the fourth quarter of Thursday’s contest. best player, and then doesn’t care about his points as much as he does about how many he gives up.” He said that Leep’s trey came off a designed play. “We don’t put him that position often,” Pedregon said. “But with (Omak’s Chance) Williams we had to bring him out ... Williams didn’t guard him out there so Leep had the green light.” Gage finished with 25 points, five steals and four assists, while Terris added 11 rebounds and four assists as Tonasket improved to 6-5 (1-4 CTL). “Gage took over (offensively), and that’s something we need from him,” Pedregon said. “We got good minutes from our bench, too. (Roberto) Juarez gave us some boards, and Ian (Young) gave us a spark.” “It was good to be in a close game, a

LEAVENWORTH - Of all the lessons for a young team to learn, playing with a big lead on the road in a league game is one of the toughest. Surpassed only by getting past seeing that big lead get away. The Tigers rolled to a 41-21 halftime advantage over Cascade on Saturday in Leavenworth, but the Kodiaks came back to catch the Tigers at the end of regulation and edged Tonasket in overtime, 67-66. “We need to learn to hold down that kind of lead,” Pedregon said. “Late in the game we had far too many turnovers and didn’t know when to push or when to milk the clock.” That especially was a factor late in the overtime period when, with the score tied, the Tigers had the ball and 35 seconds left. Instead of milking the clock to get off the last shot and, at worst, settle for a second overtime session, the Tigers took a shot early in the possession and set up Cascade’s chance to win the game on a free throw with five seconds remaining. “That was on me,” Pedregon said. “I should have called a time out, but I didn’t want to use our last one. I should have reassured the guys on what our game plan was down the stretch. “It’s a tough one for me to swallow.” The Tigers’ Dyllan Gage lit it up in the first half, drilling five 3-pointers of his own and scoring 19 of his 21 points. Michael Orozco also hit five 3-pointers, four of them after the half, and finished with 18 points.

Oroville pulls out home win By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Connor Hughes and Juan Lopez combined to score 32 points, and Dustin Nigg scored six of his 10 points in the fourth quarter as Oroville shook off a poor shooting night to get past Pateros on Friday, Jan. 4, 48-38. Despite being a low-scoring contest, the game featured seven lead changes through the first three quarters as neither squad could take control. “We weren’t playing good, but we weren’t giving up,” said Oroville coach Allen Allie. “We were fighting for stuff, staying in the game. When things aren’t falling, that’s all you can do.” Carlos Cisneros hit a 3-pointer late in the third quarter to give the Billy Goats a 35-32 lead, and after an Oroville turnover Pateros had an open look at a 3-pointer that could have opened up a six-point lead. That shot didn’t go, and Hughes answered with a 3-pointer of his own to tie it. Pateros scored three points the rest of the way and Nigg three times converted steals into layups during a rough-and-tumble fourth quarter. “Defensively we got a lot of steals, especially the fourth quarter.” Allie said. “Without those we would have lost.” Hughes finished with a game-high 20 and Lopez added 12 for the Hornets (3-6). Lopez’s emergence in the paint as a freshman has added some inside punch to the Hornets’ lineup.

wrestlers win at Warden

By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

WARDEN - Tonasket’s wrestling team brought home its third tournament title of the season on Saturday, Jan. 5, winning three individual championships and edging Mt. Baker and Warden in a tight three-way battle in the nine-team tournament. The Tigers ran up 191.5 points to Mt. Baker’s 185 and Warden’s 183. Kittitas was fourth with 135 and Cascade a distant fifth with 79. “Well, we pulled it off,” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell. “It was a total team effort with all our guys placing in the top six. “It a typical tournament in that we lost some matches that we didn’t expect and we won some matches that we didn’t expect.” Tonasket’s individual winners were Trevor Peterson at 113 pounds; Collin Aitcheson at 120; Austin Booker at 160; Other medalists for the Tigers were Rade Pilkinton (106, 3rd place), Cristian Diaz (113, 4th), Jorge Juarez (126, 2nd), Dyllan Walton (132, 3rd), Derek Rimestad (145, 3rd), Quinn Mirick (152, 6th), Dallas Tyus (170, 2nd), John Rawley (195, 3rd), Frank Holfeltz (220, 4th) and Chad Edwards (285, 2nd). The tournament showed the Tigers’ depth, as well, as starters Jeffrey Stedtfeld, Dalton Wahl and Austin Knowlton didn’t wrestle. The Tigers wrestle Cascade in a Caribou Trail League dual on Friday, Jan. 11, then come back the next day for their home Apple Pie Invitational. Other teams coming for the tourney include Oroville, Okanogan, Kettle Falls, Liberty Bell, Warden, Cascade, Chewelah and Rogers (Spokane).

Hornets take 2 titles at ACH By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Connor Hughes (21) and Pateros’ Jorge Caballero (23) battle for a rebound during their Friday, Jan. 4, contest. “He’s accepting of it and doing it,” said Allie, who said that Lopez had been more used to playing on the perimeter until this past summer. “It’s working, so it’s making easier to accept it. He’s doing a great job.”

Kittitas 71, Oroville 42 KITTITAS - A five hour bus trip didn’t do the Hornets any favors Saturday, as they fell behind early and lost 71-42 at Kittitas. The Coyotes burst out to a 35-13 halftime lead and never looked back. “We played our worst game so far,” Allie said. “Turnovers were our downfall. You

can’t turn the ball over every third time down the court and expect to win.” Hughes scored 22 points but was the only Hornet in double figures. Joe Sarmiento added eight points. “Our shooting continues to plague us,” Allie said. “We just can’t seem to find the bottom of the net while our opponents inevitably have good shooting games against us.” Allie said that he’s still pleased with the Hornets’ approach, if not the results. “These guys definitely are wearing themselves out,” he said. “It’s on me to find the solution to winning.”

ALMIRA - Oroville’s wrestlers picked up a pair of individual champions and two runners-up at the Almira-Coulee/Hartline tournament on Saturday, Jan. 5. There was no overall team scoring at the tourney. “Overall our team showed great improvement at this tournament,” said Oroville assistant coach Erick Cleveland. “If teams were awarded points we would have done well.” Winning their weight classes were Ronel Kee (113 pounds) and Angel Camacho (138). Other placers included Jordan Smith (4th, 106), Leo Curiel (2nd, 132), Charlie Arrigoni (3rd, 160), Taylor Robertson (3rd, 170) and Eric Herrera (2nd, 220). Also competing were Michael Ripley and Corey Childers. The Hornets next wrestle Saturday, Jan. 12, at Tonasket’s Apple Pie Invitational.

Thursday, Jan. 10 JV/Var BB - Bridgeport at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm Var/JV GB - Bridgeport at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm

Hornet girls snag weekend split Tonasket girls can’t

Friday, Jan. 11 WR - Cascade at Tonasket, 7:00 pm

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Saturday, Jan. 12 WR - Oroville at Tonasket Apple Pie Invite, 10:00 am JV/Var GB - Tonasket at Chelan, 4:30/6:00 pm JV/Var BB - Tonasket at Chelan, 6:00/7:30 pm JV/Var GB - Oroville at Riverside Christian, 3:00/6:00 pm JV/Var BB - Oroville at Riverside Christian, 4:30/7:30 pm Tuesday, Jan. 15 JV/Var GB - Tonasket at Okanogan, 6:00/7:30 pm JV/Var BB - Tonasket at Okanogan, 6:00/7:30 pm JV/Var BB - Oroville at Manson, 6:00/7:30 pm Var/JV GB - Oroville at Manson, 6:00/7:30 pm WR - Okanogan & Brewster at Oroville, 7:00 pm Thursday, Jan. 17 WR - Cashmere at Tonasket, 7:00 pm Friday, Jan. 18 JV/Var GB - Cashmere at Tonasket, 6:00/7:30 pm JV/Var BB - Cashmere at Tonasket, 6:00/7:30 pm JV/Var BB - Lake Roosevelt at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm Var/JV GB - Lake Roosevelt at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm Saturday, Jan. 19 WR - Tonasket at Chelan, 7:00 pm WR - Oroville at Newport Invite, 10:00 am

44-40 with about two minutes to play. Pateros got baskets from LeDoux and Ashton Staygell down the stretch to hold off the Oroville comeback. Lily Hilderbrand scored 16 to lead Oroville (4-5), with Barker, Arrigoni and Briana Moralez adding six apiece. LeDoux scored 17 and Wilson added 16 for the Nannies (8-1).

By Brent Baker

OROVILLE - Oroville’s girls basketball team struggled to shake off the rust from a twoweek break in games, and while they played a solid second half against the Pateros Nannies, their early struggles proved too much to overcome. The Hornets trimmed a 12-point fourth quarter deficit to four with just over a minute to play but could get no closer as Pateros held on for a 49-43 victory on Friday, Jan. 4. “I’m encouraged, because Pateros has only lost one game (to Almira-Coulee/Hartline),” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “But (the Hornets) just were so nervous to start the game. If they ever come out and play a whole game like they did the second half they’ll be pretty good.” Pateros used a 12-point run in the second quarter to open up a 24-9 lead and led 29-15 at the half. The Hornets struggled to contain the Nannies’ perimeter shooting in the first half as Katrina Wilson drilled four 3-pointers and Lorie LeDoux added another. “They were hotter than a pistol to start,” Bourn said. “But when we were in our 1-2-2 zone, we just weren’t getting out on their shooters at all. “Pateros was a lot more aggressive at the start. We just stood around and watched (on offense)

Oroville 43, Kittitas 37

Brent Baker/staff photo

Katie Tietje scores against Pateros on Friday, but on Saturday scored 17 points to lead the Hornets to a win at Kittitas. instead of coming to get the ball.” The Hornets looked like a different team in the second half, allowing just one trey and getting their offense untracked. Becky Arrigoni scored all six of her points in the third quarter as Oroville pulled to within seven on several occasions. “Becky is really coming along,” Bourn said. Back-to-back baskets by Callie Barker cut the Pateros lead to

KITTITAS - Kittitas’ strategy against the Hornets was to not allow Lily Hilderbrand to beat them. So Katie Tietje did. Tietje scored a season-high 17 points as Oroville opened its Central Washington League season with a 43-37 victory over South Division rival Kittitas. The Hornets led 18-14 at the half. Kittitas limited Hilderbrand to six points with a box-andone defense, though they weren’t able to keep the sophomore off the glass as she grabbed 15 rebounds. Tietje added eight rebounds and three steals while Brittany Jewett also scored a season-high with eight points. The Hornets (5-5, 1-0 CWL North) return to action Thursday at home against Bridgeport.

sustain strong start By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s girls basketball team couldn’t sustain a solid start on Thursday, Jan. 3, at home against Omak, falling to 57-27 to the Pioneers in their first game of the new year. The Tigers had their offense clicking in the first quarter, trailing 20-15 after eight minutes as Baylie Tyus and Devan Utt each scored six points. But the well ran dry after that as the Pioneers went on a 15-3 run to take a 35-18 halftime lead. “We had a great first quarter but we haven’t been able to sustain it,” said Tonasket coach Mike Larson. “That and missing shots. We haven’t been able to convert on our easy shots, and we just gave up too many offensive rebounds. Instead of blocking them out, they blocked us in to where we couldn’t get in to get the rebound.” The Tigers were unable to make headway in the third quarter and Omak pulled away in the final minutes. “In the first quarter, we weren’t throwing it to the other team,” Larson said. “The ball moved effectively, especially when they were in their man to

man (defense). When they went to their zone, we quit moving it and the ball went stagnant.” Tonasket scored just 12 points in the final three quarters combined. It was the first game since early in the season that Larson had his full roster at his disposal, and the lack of continuity was especially apparent at the offensive end. “Since the second or third game of the season, it seems like we’ve been missing somebody every night,” Larson said. “What I’m trying to get them to do every night is to continue to fight for the whole game even though things aren’t going well, but I didn’t feel like we did that as well tonight.” Utt led the Tigers (2-9, 0-5 Caribou Trail League) with nine points, with Kylie Dellinger adding seven and Tyus chipping in with six. Christmas Break Results Cashmere 67, Tonasket 23 Dec. 21 - Utt 9, Tyus 6. Tonasket 56, Liberty Bell 28 Dec. 28 - Cleman 12, Jackson 12. Brewster 88, Tonasket 24 Dec. 29 - Utt 12, Dellinger 7.


Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 10, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • January 10, 2013

$MBTTJĂ FE %FBEMJOF  /PPO 5VFTEBZ r $BMM  UP QMBDF ZPVS BE

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

13. Formerly known as

37. Device to extract water from wet laundry

21. Cockeyed

41. Casual attire

22. French philosopher, founder of positivism

42. “Darn it!�

25. Farm buildings

44. Adaptable truck, for short

26. Increase

45. Defeat

27. About to explode

47. Those who study the atomic composition of light

28. The fifth of the seven canonical hours

51. Bank offering, for short

29. Grooved on

52. Fishing, perhaps

30. Carries

53. Improper spacial arrangements

31. Bond, for one

59. Operatic villains, often

32. Marsh growth

60. French novelist Pierre

38. Bucolic

61. Wading birds, such as herons or storks

39. “Am ___ believe ...?� (2 wds)

63. Apportion

43. Buy-one-get-one-free item?

64. Corker

46. Tickler of the ivories

65. “___ Smile� (1976 hit) 66. Equals

48. Pride and prejudice, for example

67. Check

49. Saddle seat back

68. Deuce topper

50. Heavy metal

40. Indian coin

WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com 7

6 2 4

2

1 8 5 3 2

4 9 1 5

4

Sudoku

9

7

5 2

3 5 8

1

6

7

4

9

8 3 7 6 1

4 1

2 5 3

6 9 3 7 8

7

3 1

6

9

8

4

6 5

8

9

7 4

2

9

9 3 6 2 5

7 4

9 1 6

4 6 2 7 3

2 8 3 5 4

1 9

5 8 7

5

8 7

2

4

1

6

3

1

8

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 2 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43) The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. 9

6

8

4

5

7

2

7

1

6

Puzzle 10 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

4 1

2 5 3 8 9

9 2 7 4 3 5

6 1

5

3 1 9 8 6 2 7 4

9 8 7 6

5 1 4 3 2

4 6 5 3 7 2 1

9 8

2

7 4

1

5

8

3 9 4 7 5 6

6 1 8 9 2 3

3 2 9 4 6 7 8

1 5

1 5 8

2

4

3

7

6 5 9

8 3 2

6

2

9 1 3 4 6

5 8

5 2 8

6

4

3

7

9 1 7 4

9

6

1

8

4 9

2 7 5 1 3

2 3 5 6 4

8 7

5

7 3 8 4 1 2 6 9

1 3 5 4

9 8 7 2 6

4

2

7

1

8

9

1

6 9 5 7 3 8

4 1

1

9 5

6 7

2

3

3

4 2

9

7

2 4

4

2

5

8 1

2

8

9 1 3 7 6

6

6

1 4 9 2 7

7

1

3 9 1

5 8

5

9

8 2 6 3 4

1

1 6 3

5 7 8 6 3

4

7 8 5

9 4

2 8 7

9 5

Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

8

9 5

1 7

4 2

5

6

3

9

6 3 4 1 2

6

6

2 9 4 1 5 7 8 3

2 9 6 5

7 4 3 1 8

3

9

7 8 1 4

6 2 5

8

5 1 2 9 4 3 6 7

9 1 4 3

3 6 2 8 5

7

4

6

2 5 8

9 7 1

6 3 4 5

1 2

9

4 2 1 5 6 7 8 3

2 8 1 6

7 5 3 4 9

7 6 3 4 9 1 2

5 8

4

9 5 3 2

8 7 6 5

7 6

4 2 6 8

9 2

1

5

4 3

8

1

1

9 3 7

5 7 8

6 4 1 2 3 9

3 2 9

8 1 7 4 6 5

Puzzle 5 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

2 1 8 4

5 9

5

6 5

4

4

5

3 8

2

9

7 6

8

2 9

3

509-476-3602

8

9

Sponsored by

1

7 7

7

3

5 9

8

Easy, difficulty rating 0.43

3

4

2

Puzzle 8 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39)

5

6

Puzzle 4 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39)

2

8 1

4

8 2

9

4

5

4

Puzzle 7 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

7 8

6 7

3 6

9

6

6

8

1

4

9

7

1

8

6

1

5

8

7

1

8

Puzzle 11 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.32)

7

3

6

3

3 7 6 9

6 5 3 2 7 9 8

4 1

9

7 4 8 1 6 5 3 2

7 3 9 4

2 5 1 8 6

1 4 2 3 6 8 9

7 5

5

8 6 7 9 1 4 2 3

3 9 1 6

8 7 2 5 4

4 6 7 9 5 2 3

1 8

Puzzle 2 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

2 7 6

6 4

9

5 1 9 8 2

3

6

4

9 5 1

4 3 7

4

6 3 1 5 7

3

7

1

3 2

9 2 5

6 8

4 6 9 1

2

5 8

7 4 3

8 2 9

1 7 4

5 8 3

2 9

6

5

7 1 8

2

9

7

8

1

5

3

4

8

7

6

1

9

3

4

6

5

2

Puzzle 12 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

4 8 2 9

5 3 6 7 1

1 6 9 8 7 2 3

4 5

7

3 5 4 6 1 9 8 2

6 5 8 2

3 7 1 9 4

9 7 3 1 4

8 2 5 6

2 4 1

5 9 6 8 3

8 2 4

3 1 5

7 6

3

9 6 7 2 4

5 1

5

1 7 6

8 9 4

7

9

8

2 3

Puzzle 9 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

4

3 9 6

5 8 1 7 2

5

1 7 3 2 4 9

8 6

2 6 8 7 9 1 4 5 3

6

7 4 2

3 5 8 9 1

1

2 3 4 8

9 7 6 5

8

9 5

1 7 6 3 2

4

9

4 2

8 6 3

5 1 7

7

5 1 9 4 2

6 3 8

3

8 6 5

1 7 2 4 9

Puzzle 6 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

ANSWERS

3

5

7

4

6

7

4

6

5

8

9

2

2

6

1

3

9

8

8

3

4

7

9

1

8

8 2 5

1 4 3 6 9 7

6 5 3 2

4 9 1 7 8

4 9 2 8 1 7 6

3 5

8

7 1 3 6 5 4 9 2

7 4 9 1

2 8 3 5 6

2 3 6 5 7

4 9 8 1

5 1 8

6 9 3 2 4

7

1 8 5

4 3 2

7 6 9

3

2 7 9 5 6

8 1 4

Puzzle 3 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

9

6 4 7

8 1 5 2 3

www.gazette-tribune.com

2

www.gazette-tribune.com

1420 Main St. l P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 866-773-7818

9

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

6

Start your newspaper subscription today and see the light. Get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

3

9. Paper folded to make eight leaves

9

8. “The Open Window� writer

6

7. All excited

62. “Come to think of it ...�

1

6. Picture-taking device

59. Protestant denom.

8

5. Bloviates

58. “Your majesty�

3

17. Appraiser

4. Wart

57. Alpine transport (2 wds)

5

3. Assist, in a way

7

2. Pasturelands

16. Australian bush high-pitched call

56. Joint problem

1

15. Eastern music

55. Misfortunes

8

1. “___ Cried� (1962 hit)

2

14. Daughter of Zeus

24. Egg cells

www.go2worksource.com

5

Down

23. ___-friendly

Updated list of employment at

4

9. “Come here ___?�

20. According to plan of action

126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

54. “Cast Away� setting

5. Wood sorrels

19. Gown fabric

WorkSource, Okanogan County

53. Drone, e.g.

1. Bohemian, e.g.

18. Crazily

Think Green!

12. Evasive

36. Biochemistry abbr.

2

ď Ź Soy Ink ď Ź Recycled Paper ď Ź Excess paper recycled for gardens, ďŹ re starter & more!

ANSWERS

Across

35. Chief magistrate of Venice

3

We use...

11. Cost to cross

1

Did you know?

34. Away

5

www.gazette-tribune.com

10. Twill-weave silk with a printed design

8

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

33. Surrounding glows

25. Business premises (3 wds)

9

Crosswords

BEFORE THE OKANOGAN COUNTY WATER CONSERVANCY BOARD OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON Notice of Application for Change to add a place of use under Water Right No. G4-34904 and add a point of diversion and place of use under Water Right No. S4-34999. TAKE NOTICE: That on November 14, 2012, Crown Resources of Republic, WA filed application number OKAN-12-01 and OKAN-12-02 with the Okanogan County Water Conservancy Board to add a place of use to G4-34904 and add a place of use and point of diversion to S4-34999. That said right, G4-34904, under priority date of May 21, 2003, authorizes the withdrawal of 100 gallons per minute and up to 12.6 acre-feet per year (years 0 through 7) and 3.34 acres-feet per year (years 8 through 16) from five wells and one underground sump located within the

4

THE STEG FAMILY Want to Thank All for the Expression of Sympathy for John’s Passing.

Public Notices

2

Rick and Peggy Shaw and their family Buck Shaw, Michelle Puckett, Heather Lorenz, Jessica Martin and Autumn Gould would like to extend their deep appreciation to their friends and church family for the love extended to them during the loss of their loved one, Daniel Impelmance. You eased the burden during this very hard time, and we thank you from the bottom of our hearts. God bless each and everyone of you!

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

7

Visit our website.

Announcements

Found

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY STATE OF WASHINGTON Estate of ARDEN D. HALVORSEN Deceased. NO. 12-4-01717-0 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time such claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in section RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: January 10, 2013 Personal Representative: Kathy S. Halvorsen Attorneys for Personal Representative: Roger Hawkes, WSBA #5173 Of HAWKES LAW FIRM, P.S. Address for Mailing/Service: 19929 Ballinger Way, N.E., Suite 200 Shoreline, WA 98155 Tel: 206-367-5000 / Fax: 206-367-4005 Court of probate proceedings Snohomish County Superior Court and cause number: 12-4-01717-0 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 10, 17, 24, 2013 # 447578

1

We’re more than just print!

TONASKET - 1 bedroom house close to town, quiet. $495/ month. 509-486-1682

To apply you may pick up an application from Human Resources at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket or fill out the on-line application a www.nvhospital.org. For more information call 509-486-3185. Applications will be accepted through January 23, 2013.

Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 10, 17, 2013. #448428

9

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

First month free! 2 bedroom apartment for rent in Oroville. 1 3/4 baths, new paint, new carpet/ flooring. Includes W/D, water, sewer & garbage. $520/ month + deposit. Available now! 360-255-3938

NWŸ and SWŸ of Section 24, T. 40 N., R. 30 E.W.M. That said right authorizes water to be used for continuous mining and industrial use (years 0 through 7) and streamflow augmentation from July 1 through September 30 (years 8 through 16) within the S½NWŸ and SWŸ of Section 24; and the NEŸSEŸ and SEŸSEŸ, Section 23; all in T. 40 N., R. 30 E.W.M. That said right, S4-34999, under priority date of March 24, 2005, authorizes the diversion of 0.111 cubic feet per second and 12.6 acre-feet per year for continuous use from three points of diversion located within the NEŸSWŸ and NWŸSWŸ of Section 24, T. 40 N., R. 30 EWM. That said right authorizes water to be used for mining and industrial use within the S½NWŸ and SWŸ, Section 24; and the NEŸSEŸ and SEŸSEŸ, Section 23; all in T. 40 N., R. 30 E.W.M. That the applicant proposes to add a point of diversion to water right no. S4-34999 located in the NEŸSWŸ of Section 24, T. 40 N., R. 30 E.W.M. and add a place of use to both water right nos. S4-34999 and G4-34904 located in Sections 2, 3, 4, and 5; all in T. 39 N., R. 31 E.W.M; Sections 13, 14, 16, 23, 24, 25, 26, 36; all in T. 40 N., R. 30 E.W.M.; Sections 18, 19, 30, 31, and 32; all in T. 40 N., R 31 E.W.M. Any protests or objections to the approval of this application may be filed with the Department of Ecology and must include a detailed statement of the basis for objections; protests must be accompanied by a fifty dollar ($50.00) recording fee and filed with the Cashiering Section, State of Washington, Department of Ecology, P.O. Box 47611, Lacey, Washington 98509-7611 within thirty (30) days from January 17, 2013. Any interested party may submit comments, objections, and other information to the board regarding this application. The comments and information may be submitted in writing or verbally at any public meeting of the board held to discuss or decide on the application. This application will be on the board agenda during its regular meetings to be held on the first Wednesday of each month. Additionally, the Water Conservancy Board, may receive written comments or information through February 4, 2013 at its offices located at 123 Fifth Avenue N., Rm. 150, Okanogan, WA 98840.

6

www.gazette-tribune.com

North Valley Hospital & Long Term Care Division have 3 positions open for healthcare workers. No certification is required, we will train you to become a Certified Nurses Assistant. Starting pay is $9.30/hour and will increase after you become certified. You must have reliable transportation.

3

Subscribe to the...

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Public Notices

7

2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, $710 per month. Electricity included - saving you $75 per month. Big yard. Pets okay. Remodeled in 2008. Call 429-3500.

2 BEDROOM, 2 bath house, $765; Lakefront house, 3 bedroom, 2 bath plus garage, $995; Darling 2 bedroom, 2 bath plus family room, pellet stove and garage, $875; 2 bedroom lakefront apartment, $550; 1 bedroom apartment, $425; Others available. Call Sun Lakes Realty 509-4762121

Public Notices

6

For Rent

Help Wanted

4

Quick cash for Real Estate Contracts and Mortgages secured by real estate in the Tonasket, Omak or Oroville area. Private buyer 509 322 4732

Announcements

5

Real Estate Wanted

For Rent

8

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen


JANUARY 10, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A9

Court, 911 Calls, Jail Bookings Superior Court The court found probable cause to charge Cody James Magruder, 27, with second degree burglary. He received five months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Alan Forbes Price, 40, with taking a motor vehicle without permission second degree. He received two months confinement.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, December 31, 2012 In Okanogan, on Apple Way Rd., there was a report of vandalism inside a hotel. The emergency lights were damaged in the main hall and no longer work. The suspect is not on scene but frequently trespasses. In Okanogan, on Monroe Street, a maintenance worker was told by a male subject that he is in and out of the cabin. There is a .410 shotgun inside. The residence is supposed to be empty and no one is living there. The male subject lives next door. In Okanogan, on Second Avenue North, the reporting party could hear someone trying to open her front door. She called police to her house, but they could find no one. Tuesday, January 1, 2013 In Okanogan, on Rose St., a

male subject was found passed out on the sidewalk in front of the Caribou. In Okanogan, on Second Ave. S., a vehicle parked in a driveway was hit by another vehicle sometime last night. In Oroville, on Hwy. 97, there was an accident with no injury. A car damaged two orchard trees. The driver was not harmed. In Oroville, on Golden St., a woman has been receiving harassing phone calls from an unidentified female subject. Jose Gonzales, 41, was booked for DUI and DWLS third degree. Kai Marcellay, 31, was booked for failure to appear and DWLS first. Brandee Huey, 20, was booked for a minor DUI and DWLS third. Allyssa Williams, 19, was booked for MIP. Lenny Belgrade, 21, was booked for fourth degree assault. Dusty Deibel, 32, was booked for DUI and DWLS first. James Dabel, 28, was booked for unlawful imprisonment. Skylar Walker, 29,was booked for taking a motor vehicle without permission. Justin Meyer, 39, was booked for DUI. Christopher Davis, 25, was booked for vehicle prowling second degree. Wednesday, January 2, 2013 In Okanogan, on Second

REAL ESTATE GUIDE Find The Right

HOME

Avenue South, speakers and other sound system equipment were taken from a man’s house approximately three days prior. In Oroville, on Gavin Road, an unknown male is sending inappropriate text messages to an eleven year old boy. Jose Gonzales, 32, was booked for DWLS third. Johnny Mckibbin, 42, was booked for third degree theft and failure to appear. John Serles, 44, was booked for DUI and DWLS second. Johnathon Hart, 29, was booked for a DOC detainer. Thursday, January 3, 2013 In Okanogan, on Seventh Avenue South, a woman got home and found her front door open and could hear someone talking inside. The person fled out the back door when she yelled inside. Police searched the area but could find no one. In Okanogan, on Conconully Road, a customer at the hotel only paid part of the bill from their New Year’s Eve stay. They also smoked in the room which charges an extra cleaning fee. The owners of the hotel called police to arrange payment from the customer. Jacob Carman, 20, was booked for possession of drug paraphernalia. Dennis Mclean, 56, was booked for DUI and DWLS third. Michael Dennis, 26, was

booked for DUI. Jesse McCash, 37, was booked for harassment and failure to appear. Kelly Nickell, 34, was booked for an outstanding warrant. Friday, January 4, 2013 In Tonasket, on Summit Lake Road, a father and his soon to be ex-wife were living at the location. He called police to ask about his options of evicting his ex-wife who is now harassing his family. David Waddell, 52, was booked for assault fourth. Jeffrey Muellner, 51, was booked for forgery and failure to appear. Alisa Rice, 38, was booked for DWLS third. James Davis, 55, was booked for a DOC detainer. Patrick Sprinkle, 31, was booked for assault second and assault fourth. Saturday, January 5, 2013 In Okanogan, on Seventh Avenue South, an unknown person was just in the residence. There could be two people, a man and a woman. The woman’s bedroom and laundry room were disturbed. Paige Smith, 28, was booked for probation violation and assault second. Dusty Auberton, 18, was booked for possession of marijuana.

www.windermere.com

509/476-3378

The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

83 Chesaw Rd., Oroville – Lake Osoyoos Lakefront – 2 bed, 1 bath: Great location, prime development property on the southern most end of Lake Osoyoos. House with garage and outbuildings, currently in orchard with an operation lease renewable yearly. NWML#149008 $197,000

Sunday, January 6, 2013 In Okanogan, on Rodeo Trail Road, a father assaulted his daughter in her home. Suspect ran toward the river. Police followed and subdued him. In Okanogan, on Conconully Road, a woman’s front door looked like it had been pried open. Nothing appeared to be missing. George Smith, 39, was booked for DWLS third and failure to appear. Kyle Cate, 21, was booked for failure to appear and DWLS third. Dustin Hayes, 24, was booked for DWLS third. Robert Thomas, 45, was booked for DUI.

Marriage Licenses Amber Allenby, age 26 of Oroville, will wed Billy Monroe, age 24 of Tonasket.

Births Colin Matthew Prichard, a boy, was born to Jody Lee Batton and Robert Prichard of Tonasket at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. Diana Reyes Giron, a girl, was born to Adalena Giron and

Dimas Reyes of Tonasket at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket on Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. Quinton Ray Ortega, a boy, was born to Kaila Singh and Jonathan Ortega of Tonasket at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket on Saturday, Dec. 22, 2012. Kamryn Joy Rounds, a girl, was born to Dawn and Scott Rounds of Tonasket at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket on Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012. *

*

*

*

Key DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Missed out on that dream home?

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

SUN LAKES REALTY

If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you.

LOCALS - “HEART OF OUR CITY” Start the Happy New Year with Class & Style. Be on Lake Osoyoos, enjoy granite & tile finishes, high ceilings & long lake views, upscale downtown living. 1 bedroom @ $99,000 and 2 bedroom @ $119,000. Call today for private showing. www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

Kyle Campbell, 24, was booked for a DOC detainer.

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Spectacular, unbelievable, stellar views! Top of the world, 100 mile views of the Cascade Mountains, Cathedral Park, and Mt Baldy ski resort. This cute cabin is nearly finished with 3 bedrooms and 1,000 sq ft on 46.62 acres! Partially timbered, individual well, septic and wood stove... come see this one for yourself! MLS#431344 $96,000

You wouldn’t have if you had read the real estate guide listings in the Classifieds. Find out what property is for sale and lease in your area and much, much more in our real estate listings in the Classifieds.

Check them out today!

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

- 24 Hour Service Licensed & Bonded

509-486-2692

Attorney

RYAN W. GUNN Attorney at Law

Civil Criminal Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620 Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

Pumps

Service & Trades

Got Water? — Fred Cook —

Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s Cutting Edge, Inc. 509-486-4320 LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

Bob

Raymer’s

GUNN LAW OFFICES

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Over 25 Years experience!

Automotive

Advertise where the

Service & Trades Professionals Advertise Call Charlene Helm For Rates & More Info

476-3602 • Affordable Full Color ads • Weekly exposure in newspaper and online

MACHINE WORKS

- Over 35 years experience -

We Build Drivelines

Retubing  Shortening

Only Driveline Balancer in the County!!  Over 400 parts in stock  U-Joint Repair

From Imports to Semi Trucks... We Do it All! Usually 24 hour turnaround! Open Mon-Thur. 8 to 7pm

Building Supplies Quality Supplies Since 1957

Midway Building Supply

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Insulation

Concrete

OSOYOOS READI-MIX

Installed Insulation

Oroville Building Supply 33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

&

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 We Work Saturdays! 11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

509-486-0511 521 Western Ave. S. Tonasket

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Garage Doors  Installed

Fiberglass Insulation Blown & Batt  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced Professional Service

Office: 509-486-2624 Cell: 509-429-0417

Storage

Storage

Well Drilling

Lakeside

OROVILLE

“The Water Professionals”

STORAGE Boat, RV & More! Weatherization with lease Rent unit for project  Contractors store tools / product  Additional Business space available  

Located at: 124 Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-421-7168 lakesidestoreit@gmail.com

Mini Storage & U-Haul

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power n Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

www.orovilleministorage.com

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store  Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Zimmatic Pivots  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com


Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 10, 2013

SPORTS

One last look back at 2012 high school sports highlights By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

There were plenty of highlights for Tonasket and Oroville High School athletes during 2012, and we tried to highlight as many of them as we could. Below are a selection of some of the more memorable moments of the year that just ended. Tigers 5th, Hornets 6th at Apple Pie TONASKET - Tonasket’s wrestling team earned a fifth place finish at its Apple Pie Invitational on Saturday, Jan. 14, while Oroville wrestled to a sixth-place finish. Warden ran up 277 points to win the big apple pie as the team champion, beating Rogers of Spokane by 85 points. Chewelah finished third with 151.5, Liberty Bell was fourth with 147, Tonasket had 135.5 points and Oroville had 82. Rogers is coached by Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell’s son Martin (with Kevin serving as one of his assistants), while Patrick Mitchell is the head coach at Chewelah. Fantastic finish ends CTL streak TONASKET - With one mad full-court dash to cap a desperate fourth quarter rally, four years of frustration ended in sweet, tearful bedlam for the Tonasket boys basketball team. Just as the Tigers cut down a 49-game Caribou Trail League losing streak with Thursday’s 56-55 victory over Omak on Tuesday, Feb. 2, so did they cut down the net as part of an emotional post-game celebration with families and classmates that was more a catharsis than it was pure jubilation. Tonasket’s Jared Stedtfeld medals at state TACOMA DOME - Close matches are the norm at the state wrestling finals, and the four Tonasket wrestlers competing last Feb. 17-18 at the Tacoma Dome seemed to wrestle more than their share of battles that went to the wire. Jared Stedtfeld, the lone senior of the four, was the only one to come home with a state medal. Christian Diaz (106), Collin Aitcheson (120) and Jeffrey Stedtfeld (126) each won a match. Perez, Alvarez lift Hornets to 9th place state finish TACOMA - In the end, a state championship just wasn’t in the cards for Nick Perez. The Oroville senior earned his third straight second-place finish at the Class 1B/2B state wrestling finals in the Tacoma Dome on Saturday as he and Alex Alvarez combined to lift the Hornets to a ninth-place finish in the team standings. Alvarez (160), a state alternate last year, earned his state spot with a second-place finish at districts and third at regionals and wrestled through a difficult bracket to earn a fourth-place state finish. Hornets swarm Crusaders to open district tourney WENATCHEE - The postseason is a new season, and the Oroville boys basketball team is now 1-0 on the road to the state tournament. Playing with both verve and nerve, the Hornets overcame a serious bout of foul trouble and stanched a furious Riverside Christian rally in the fourth quarter to upset the Crusaders 66-52 Monday, Feb. 13, in the opening round of the Class 2B District 5/6 tournament. Raiders end Oroville girls’ season EAST WENATCHEE - The Oroville girls basketball team’s district tournament run came to a swift and decisive halt on Wednesday, Feb. 15, as an angry Lake Roosevelt team dispatched the Hornets 54-15 in a loser-out contest at Eastmont High School. Colfax knocks off Hornets at regionals MEAD - On this night at least, Goliath had his way. Oroville’s Hornets needed to play the game of their lives, and hope Colfax might suffer a letdown after pulling off its own upset in last Saturday’s district tournament, to knock the Bulldogs out of post-season play. And indeed, the Hornets were within shouting range of Colfax midway through the second quarter, trailing 18-10 with possession of the ball. Foul trouble, combined with the Bulldogs’ numerous weapons, ended any chance the Hornets had of springing an upset of their own. Colfax pulled away to a

76-38 2B regional victory that ended the Hornets’ season and earned the Bulldogs a berth in the eight-team state finals tournament this weekend. Note: Colfax went on to win the state 2B championship the following weekend. Tonasket soccer downs Cashmere TONASKET - Luis Rivera scored twice in the opening 12 minutes to give the Tonasket boy soccer team and early lead, and the Tigers went on to defeat Cashmere 3-1 on Saturday, April 21. The victory snapped a 16-game Caribou Trail League losing streak for the Tigers, dating to a 5-4 shootout victory over Omak in May, 2010. Tiger softball nearly breaks streak TONASKET - Tonasket came ever-so-close to breaking its sixyear CTL softball losing streak. The Tigers got everything they could have asked for out of their first game with Cashmere on Saturday, April 21 -- except for the thrill of victory at the end. The Tigers and Bulldogs played a back-and-forth game that featured four lead changes before Lucy Patterson’s two-run double in the eighth inning lifted Cashmere to a 13-11 victory. Oroville wins track sub-district OROVILLE - Oroville’s track and field teams are peaking at just the right time. The Hornets, competing against schools their own size after spending much of the regular season going against larger schools at big invitationals, showed they were ready for the post-season Thursday, May 10, with the girls team winning the Central Washington League North Sub-district meet by more than 50 points. The boys were edged by Liberty Bell in a twoway race for the team title. Tiger soccer upsets playoffbound Bulldogs TONASKET - If the season had to end without a trip to the playoffs, that was the way to do it. Tonasket’s soccer team was already looking to next year after surprising Okanogan on Thursday, May 3, 2-1. The Bulldogs went on to win their district playoff opener on Saturday and now play two seeding games on the way to playing in the state tournament. Hughes makes state golf cut LAKEWOOD - Three Oroville golfers competed at the state 1B/2B boys golf tournament at Oakbrook Golf and Country Club in Lakewood, with Connor Hughes surviving the Day 1 cut to play the second day. Hughes finished 32nd out of 80 participants, tallying a two day score of 188, including 92 on the first day of competition and 96 on the second day. Verhasselt competes at state tennis YAKIMA - Tonasket’s Anthony Verhasselt competed Friday, May 25, at the state 1B/2B/1A tennis championships in Yakima, but bowed out after losing his two matches. Verhasselt, a senior, fell to Keith Bighorn of Goldendale in a firstround match 6-2, 6-1. In a loserout match, Alin Wallis of WilburCreston defeated Verhasselt 6-3, 6-2. Hornets bring home four track medals CHENEY - Oroville’s track and field teams brought home a quartet of medals, at the state 2B finals May 25-26. Callie Barker repeated as state runner up in the pole vault, and Sierra Speiker earned a fourth place finish in the 3200 and was sixth in the 1600 as the Oroville girls finished 14th in team scoring. C.J. Mathews’ school record performance provided the Hornet boys with their biggest highlight of the weekend. Despite scratching on two of his three first round jumps in the triple jump, his one good jump - 42-10.5 -- stood up as the second best jump of the day. Tonasket runners just short of medals CHENEY - Tonasket’s state 1A finals representatives ran the races they wanted to last weekend. It wasn’t enough for Damon Halvorsen or the boys 4x100 relay team to bring home a medal, but both came close on May 26.

Halvorsen finished one spot out of the medals, despite running a race that was nearly identical to his regional-winning performance a week ago. His time of 9:58.23 was a couple seconds off his PR. The 4x100 relay team of Zach Villalva, Smith Condon, Jake Hickman and John Stedtfeld finished seventh in their preliminary heat 44.8) but 10th overall. The Tigers had the misfortune of being in what was by far the faster of the two heats. As Stedtfeld later pointed out, the Tigers would have been fourth in the other prelim and might have had a shot at breaking into the medals. Tiger soccer team bounces back with historic win TONASKET - What a difference a few days makes. The Tonasket girls soccer team, stung by Tuesday’s shootout loss to Omak, righted their ship in a hurry with a 2-1 victory over Cascade on Saturday, Sept. 22. It’s believed to be the first time the Tigers have ever beaten the Kodiaks in girls soccer, and certainly the first time in at least a decade. Victory nets Hutchinson school career wins record WINTHROP - Outplayed for three quarters and shorthanded due to injuries, Oroville’s football team bounced back with a big fourth quarter comeback to keep its playoff hopes alive with a 28-27 victory at Liberty Bell on Friday, Oct. 5. Trailing 27-6 after three quarters, thanks largely to Liberty Bell’s big play ability, the Hornets made critical plays on defense and special teams, and the offense took advantage of its late opportunities to pull off the stunner. In addition to giving the Hornets a critical win in the playoff race, the victory gave Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson the school record for career wins with 55, surpassing Rick Guenther’s mark. Tonasket rocks Omak TONASKET - A long month of playing the top teams in the Caribou Trail League -- which are also some of the best 1A teams in the state -- came to a happy end for the Tonasket football team Friday, Oct. 19, as the Tigers pulled away from Omak in the second half to claim a 36-12 Senior Night victory. It was the first Tonasket win over the Pioneers since 2007. Hornet volleyball claims longawaited victory OROVILLE - Four years of frustration came to an end for the Oroville volleyball team as the Hornets swept past Manson in three sets on Tuesday, Oct. 23. The victory snapped a 45-game losing streak in best-of-five matches dating to Oct. 20, 2009, as well as a 32-game streak in league play. Tigers bow out of playoffs OKANOGAN - If the Tonasket girls soccer team’s season had to end, this was probably the best way to do it. The Tigers gave Okanogan everything the Bulldogs could handle Tuesday, Oct. 30, withstanding a huge early barrage before playing on even terms for most of the afternoon. It wasn’t enough as Okanogan moved on with a 1-0 victory. Speiker wins state title PASCO - Distance runners are their own breed, so it shouldn’t be all that surprising that Sierra Speiker’s first words after winning her second Class 1B/2B state cross country title in three years were self-critical. The Oroville junior, who won her first championship as a freshman and took second last year, pulled away to a 10 second victory over Anna Henry of Northwest Christian (Colbert) with a time of 18:58.4. W-P outscores Oroville in state playoff contest PASCO - Waitsburg-Prescott wasn’t able to stop the Oroville offense very often. Problem was, the Hornets couldn’t stop the W-P offense at all. The Cardinals, trying for their second straight state 2B championship, ran over, around and through the Oroville defense to a 54-26 victory in Friday’s opening-round playoff game at Pasco’s Edgar Brown Stadium. Hornet girls grind out win over Tonasket TONASKET - It was by no means pretty, but it was certainly

exciting. Briana Moralez drained a 3-pointer to break a tie with 40 seconds remaining and the Oroville girls basketball team held on for a 35-33 victory at rival Tonasket on Friday, Dec. 8.

basketball team shook off stubborn Oroville with a huge run in the third quarter, outscoring the Hornets 26-9 to break the game open on the way to a 70-47 victory on Friday, Dec. 7.

iday season by winning Oroville’s North Okanogan Holiday Invitational, easily out-pointing second-place Liberty Bell by 58.5 points. The Tigers ran up 179.5 points to the Mountain Lions’ 121, followed by Selkirk (113), Okanogan (108) and Omak (107). Oroville’s 68 points put the Hornets in eighth place.

Tigers win NOHI; Hornets 8th OROVILLE - Tonasket’s wrestling team warmed up for the hol-

Tigers use big third quarter to swat Hornets TONASKET - Tonasket’s boys

Okanogan Valley CHURCH GUIDE

TFR’s 2013 BiBlical Discipleship conFeRence presented by The Father’s Ranch Ministries & The Biblical counseling center of okanogan

January 26, 2013

at the Tonasket Free Methodist Church, Tonasket, WA This conference is provided for free with donations gladly accepted

*addiction…sin or sickness, addiction…The Dark Descent, addiction…The Biblical Model for change, addiction… The Biblical Model contrasted and practiced*. For more information please contact The Father’s Ranch Ministries (509) 486-8888 or secretary@thefathersranch.com

OROVILLE Oroville Community Bible Fellowship

Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 a.m. Men’s Meeting 9:45 Sunday School (2-17 yrs) • Life Skills (18+) 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Bible Study (13+) Pastor Claude Roberts

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10:30 a.m., Worship & Youth Sun. School Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church?

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 10, 2013  

January 10, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 10, 2013  

January 10, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune