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The Year in News and Sports

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Sitzmark Open for Skiiers & Snowboarders

Sitzmark Ski Area opened up on Thursday, Dec. 27 to a big crowd with many families like Carl Bjeland’s (above) who were skiing last Saturday. Calvin Sutton, age 5, of Tonasket (left) gets fitted out with a helmet and other gear at the ski hut. It’s a quick ride to the top on Sitzmark’s modern chairlift (far left). Operating days and hours are Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays and Monday holidays from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. You can find out more about Sitzmark on their website at http://gositzmark.org or by calling (509) 485-3323. Gary DeVon/staff photos

Looking back at 2012: This week we take a look at some of the stories that graced the front pages of the Gazette-Tribune in the first six months of 2012. We hope you enjoy this look back as much as we do. We will bring you the second half of the year next week.

January Canadian official denies border closing – Canadians were abuzz about reports that the daytime-only border crossings at Midway and Chopaka (Nighthawk) were scheduled to be closed. A Canadian official denies the closures released in a “leaked” report. Meanwhile, the U.S. was investing $6 million on a brand new Nighthawk crossing. Juveniles arrested for burglarizing Tonasket business – Three juveniles were arrested in connection with a burglary at the Blue Bird warehouse, as well as the theft of an ATV and pickup truck. Oroville students to receive musical instruments – Oroville Elementary and High School students are the recipients of a grant from the Mr. Holland’s Opus Foundation and will receive $72,000 to purchase new instruments and make repairs to others. County holds meetings on Recreation Plan – Representatives with the county planning office held a meeting in Oroville to discuss efforts to update the recreation plan and the results of an online survey. The largest number of survey takers came from the Methow, with Oroville returning the second highest. NVH, other Critical Access Hospitals face budget axe – Proposed cuts to state Medicare and Medicaid funding have

North Valley Hospital District officials concerned about the future of health care in the region and the impacts to the hospital. Parking issue stays on Tonasket Council Radar – Night time parking within the city limits continued to be an issue with the council as it heard feedback on recent efforts to enforce parking ordinances in some parts of town where off-street parking is limited. Oroville asked to annex Balmes Road properties -The council accepted a letter of intent to annex several properties just north of the city limits across the Okanogan River. The city also approved a moratorium on pot dispensaries and growing operations. Study casts doubts on profitability of Enloe Dam hydro project – Several conservation groups are calling Okanogan County PUD’s attempts at restarting hydroelectric power generation at Enloe Dam a money losing proposition. Commissioner Ernie Boltz says it’s too early to predict final costs. Bob and Jane Thompson are Citizens of the Year – The Tonasket Chamber of Commerce names the couple Citizens of the Year at their annual officer installation and awards banquet.

February Tonasket and funeral service in negotiations on crematory – The city council will begin negotiations with Bergh’s Funeral Service for a long term lease of property adjacent to the cemetery for a crematorium and columbarium. Suspect sought in connection with

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 01

several burglaries arrested – An Oroville man sought in numerous burglaries and theft charges in Oroville and Tonasket, including a theft at the Okanogan Eagles, was arrested in East Wenatchee. According to Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers, the then 20-year-old had told several people prior to his arrest, “… it’s going to be a new year and he was going to burglarize and steal as much as he can until he is caught.” Title IX raises questions for Oroville School Board – The fact post season tournaments for boys and girls wrestling are held at two different locations raised questions of whether a volunteer coach could stand in the corner for the girls and still meet federal Title IX requirements. Superintendent Steve Quick said a review of the regulations had raised a “red flag.” Ballots for North County school levies due back by Tuesday – Voters in the Tonasket and Oroville School Districts are being asked to replace expiring twoyear Maintenance and Operations levies. Judge Burchard won’t seek return to the bench – After 19 years on the bench, Superior Court Judge Jack Burchard said he will not seek a sixth term. May Festival Queen Candidates – Ali Miller and Dayna Roley, both juniors at Oroville High School, have thrown their hats in the ring in the hopes of trading them for a queen’s crown in this year’s May Festival. School levies fare well with voters – Voters sent local school districts a Valentine Tuesday, Feb. 14 by approving Maintenance and Operations levies by well over the margins needed to pass.

With a simple majority of 51 percent of the vote needed to pass, Oroville District voters returned 63.5 percent in favor and Tonasket District voters, 59.4. Anglers get skunked, but Ice Fishing Fest awards over $2000 in prizes – The 8th Annual Northwest Ice Fishing Derby finished on Saturday, Feb. 18 with the awarding of cash and prizes. Unfortunately no fish were caught for the second year in a row.

March Ali Miller selected as May Festival Queen – Ali Miller, the daughter of Scott and Benie Miller, was chosen as this year’s Oroville May Festival Queen at the Selection Night ceremony held at OHS. Her princess, Dayna Roley, is the daughter of Ross and Neysa Roley. Kinross donates to help buy reader board – Kinross Gold Company and the Oroville Booster Club have donated $22,000 to the Oroville School District towards the purchase of a new programable electronic reader board to replace the current sign at Oroville’s Triangle Park. Councilman raises privacy concern – Tonasket Councilman Scott Olson has concerns about video surveillance being used in town without a policy in place and while his motion to curtail such surveillance until a policy is in place failed, he hopes his point was made. Tonasket Chamber looks at future of RV Park – Tonasket Chamber president Dale Crandall said that after examining options for the future of the Tonasket RV Park, attempting to make it legal for ten-

SEE SIX MONTHS | PG. A3

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

ants to stay for longer than a month at a time would be inadvisable. Oroville Chamber learns about saving energy, money – Chamber members learned they may be eligible for grants and utility incentives to replace old equipment, reduce energy costs and even generate power on-site. Cravy, Braman resign – Resignations by Tonasket Elementary School Principal Jeff Cravy and high school varsity basketball coach Glenn Braman were accepted by the Tonasket School Board at its meeting on Monday, March 12. Tonasket Council updates on projects – The Tonasket City Council provided updates on a number of civic projects that are progressing through the planning stages, including the Mill Drive/ Bonaparte Creek Sewer project. Former Oroville Principal killed – Former Oroville High School Principal Frank Motta died from injuries sustained while trying to help a neighbor whose Spokane area home had been overrun by a teenage party. No pot grows, shops in Oroville – The state might say its legal, but as far as the feds are concerned marijuana, medical or otherwise is still verboten – a public hearing on a moratorium on these issues drew little comment at the city council’s March 20 meeting. STP grant for Oroville’s Cherry and Central streets -Oroville will receive over $400,000 from the Federal Highway Administration to improve Central and Cherry Streets through the Surface Transportation Program. STP funds are to be used to improve streets that serve

Obituaries 2012 In Pictures Letters/Opinion

A2 A4 A5

Valley Life A6 2012 Sports Pics A7 Classifieds/Legals A8

Real Estate Police Stats Sports

A9 A9 A12


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 3, 2013

Obituaries

Dennis Robert Lorz

Dennis Robert Lorz Dennis Robert Lorz, 64, of Tonasket, beloved son, husband, father, grandfather and friend passed away suddenly on Dec. 22nd 2012. Dennis was born on July 1st, 1948 to Cameron ‘Bob’ and Rosalie Lorz in Tonasket, Washington. They lived on Spectacle Lake and Dennis went to school in Tonasket through the first grade. The family then moved to Oroville where they remained until Dennis graduated from Oroville High School in 1966. Dennis began working in orchards and other odd jobs when he was fifteen. Shortly after graduation he went to Texas and worked in the shipping yards. After a brief stay in Texas he went to Alaska where he worked on the fishing boats, found his love for logging and several years later, his love for Frances Crunk. They married on April 18th, 1975. Dennis, Fran and their three girls moved back to Washington State in 1979 and settled in Tonasket where he started his lifelong career as an orchardist and logger. Dennis loved his family, logging, fishing, hunting, and actively participating in the Tonasket Gun Club. The greatest of these loves were his grandchildren. Known by all as Papa Dennis, there was rarely a time throughout their lives he didn’t have one, two, three, or more, in tow. He taught most of them to fish, hunt, shoot, ride bikes and drive. Dennis tried never to miss a game, concert, match, meet, skating competition or performance and often wondered what he would do with the time on his hands as the kids were beginning to grow up and graduate. Dennis was passionate about the outdoors whether he was working or playing. If he was outside he was a happy man, probably why he enjoyed logging and being an orchardist. Many of his cousins had the pleasure of working in the woods with him. For years he was the master hunter and even served as an unofficial guide on many hunting trips for

people from out of the area. He could be found on many Sundays at a trap shoot and spent the last two years as president of the Tonasket Gun Club. He especially enjoyed Wednesdays when the FFA kids came to shoot. Dennis loved fishing and was always happy to receive an invitation for a fishing trip. Countless hours were spent in the little green fishing boat with family and friends. Dennis enjoyed having coffee with folks at the coffee shop. He was a big help to all his neighbors whenever they needed him. He visited his Mom regularly and enjoyed helping her with all the outside work. The yearly camping trips were a highlight for Dennis, especially family reunions. Dennis was loved and admired by all who met him. He was a mentor and a hero. His death came as a shock and the family and community are feeling a deep sense of loss, but as a friend said, “our loss here on earth with such a blessing in heaven.” Dennis is survived by his mother, Rosalie Lorz of Oroville, wife of 37 years, Fran Lorz of Tonasket, three daughters Robin (Jeff) Stedtfeld of Tonasket, Chris (Rob) Burke of East Wenatchee and Kira (Mark) Super of Riverside; five siblings, brother, Emmett (Pat) Lorz of Valley, sister, Mary Lorz of California, sister, Rusty (Andy) Anderson of Oroville, brother, Tom (Laury) Lorz of Everett, brother Jordan Lorz of Seattle as well as 12 grandchildren and many nieces, nephews, cousins, aunts and uncles. He was preceded in death by his father Cameron “Bob” Lorz. Memorial Services will be held on Saturday, Dec. 29, 2012 at 2 p.m. at the Oroville Free Methodist Church with Pastor Rod Brown, officiating. Please share your memories by signing Dennis’ online guest book at www.berghfuneralservice.com.

ite spots such as Palmer Lake, Molson Lake, Similkameen River and Myers Creek. He attended schools in Oroville and graduated from Oroville High School in 1980. Rick also attended Spokane Community College and Wenatchee Valley College. Rick was known for helping other people and rescuing animals. Rick lived near Chesaw for over 30 years and loved the wildlife roaming in and out of his yard. Rick is survived by his twin brother Dick (Elizabeth) and family of Laredo, Texas, his sister Peggy (Robert) Kirk of Wenatchee, his nephew Brayden Kirk of Wenatchee, niece Kindall (Joseph) Wilbur of San Marcos, Calif. and many cousins and lifelong friends. Rick was preceded in death by his parents Gary and Lory Allen of Oroville. At Rick’s request there will be no service. Friends and family who wish may make memorials to the Oroville Ambulance Fund. Arrangements are by Bergh Funeral Service.

just stopping by to express your condolences, it was greatly appreciated. Neil was a private man, however, he enjoyed many things life had to offer and until the end of his life he always had dreams that needed to be fulfilled. Here is a small outline of Neil’s background. Born in Vancouver, B.C. and was the only child of Percy and Phyllis Cuff. He attended school in Vancouver and completed university at UBCV faculty of Physical Education. Neil started coming to Oroville in the mid-60’s so was no stranger to this area. He had fond memories of coming with his best friend and became like the fourth child of his friend’s family. Camping started at the State Park and then ended up on the east side of the lake once the family purchased a lake front lot. Water skiing an fishing were highlights and due to the daily overuse of the boat it soon became evident that Neil had mechanical talents as he was the kid who could fix just about anything. Neil was blessed with an abundance of talents. His intellect offered him the gift of being any-

thing he wanted to be but he chose a lifestyle that was just plain and simple. His kids would always say he was the most brilliant dumb guy they had ever met! Many of you were aware of his love of cars – he had dreams of finishing his collection. He always enjoyed talking to those who shared the same love of restoring the old classics and he most enjoyed teasing many of you about what you had in your garage. Cooking was also a passion, hard to believe, but he was a very accomplished cook. Every night was a new dish and when asked how did you make this he would torment me by saying “it’s a secret.” Neil’s gift with kids was easy to recognize. He loved knowing his children’s friends and always had time for them in whatever they needed. Coaching sports started with a baseball tam in Oroville, taking kids who know very little about the sport and turning them around to be a force to recon with. Neil took over coaching the Premier League in Penticton and was honor to lad many teams into the B.C. Provincials. The most important and big-

gest highlights for Neil were his children. He was a terrific and loving Dad, his kids came first in his life and he was always there for them in good and bad. He has supplied them with many life long examples of what a loving parent is and should be and it will now be there turn to pass on his legacy to their children. Their sorrow is deep as they were very close to their Dad and will miss him dearly and no one will ever fill those big shoes with the love and generosity he expressed daily. In closing, I know Neil made an impact on life and those around him and for that I am very proud. He felt we were all placed here for a purpose and to make our lives count and to live in God’s word. Neil’s passing has made us sad, however he has moved on and we know for a fact that he is happy and very content in his new life. So when you see a restored old classic car, one from the 60’s, drive by just make sure you give it a glance to see who is behind the wheel. Thanks again to all of you who shared his humor, wit and friendship. With love, Lynn and family.

Neil Cuff

Neil Cuff Oct. 1950 - Dec 2012: Writing this obituary has not been an easy task. You would think after 35 years of marriage I would know just what to say, however, putting pen to paper makes it difficult to know just where to begin. I would like to start off with thanking those of you for the cards, flowers, phone calls and

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Page A3

LOOKING BACK AT 2012 First Six Months | FROM A1 as minor collectors for county roads.

April Hospital looks at space options – In an effort to take care of two needs at once, the North Valley Hospital Board is evaluating whether or not to convert several of the rooms in its Assisted Living Facility into office space. Hwy. 97, sidewalk work for Tonasket – The state Department of Transportation will do a “mill and fill” on Whitcomb and bring sidewalk ramps to ADA requirements. Rather than just doing a chip seal they will grind the old pavement out and fill with hot asphalt, something that has been requested from the DOT for a number of years. Oroville Reman & Reload plans $10 million in upgrades – The wood products manufacturer says these include a stateof-the-art high speed moulder, which will be a showpiece among moulders in North America. Revenue was up at the Canadianowned plant and the manufacturer credits the heavy haul corridor and the three $5.5 million dry kilns they added in 2011. School Board offered ‘pep talk’ – The Oroville School Board met to consider reorganizing the board and to evaluate the superintendent. They were also offered a pep talk from a teacher asking them to focus on education. Former County Clerk Bradley dies in accident – Jackie Bradley, who served nine 4-year terms as Okanogan County Clerk, died in a fatal car accident. The former clerk and head of the Democratic Party in Okanogan County, was lauded by the governor and U.S. Senators alike. She had recently received the Warren G. Magnuson Award for lifetime achievement. LOA to use weevils to reduce milfoil – The Lake Osoyoos Association will try and control Eurasian Watermilfoil through the use of weevils, rather than herbicides due to concerns from across the border about their use. Tonasket School day to be extended – It won’t happen all at once, but the Tonasket School District will begin the process of lengthening its school day after the board of directors approved Superintendent Paul Turner’s plan at their April board meeting.

May Mayor floats sewer idea – Sewage tends to be a stinky subject, even when it’s being discussed in the city council chambers. That didn’t stand in the way of Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb who wants to study the possibilities of charging others, such as those that transport portable outhouses – to dump into the Tonasket treatment facility. Barker says he’ll resign – Phil Barker said he will resign from the Oroville School Board at their

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next meeting. The board chairman wrote a letter to the editor citing his principals and speculating that his “John Wayne style” might not be suitable for politics. Dee and Doris chosen as 2012 May Festival Grand Marshals – The Meyers twins, better known locally as Dee Patterson and Doris Reynolds, have been selected to be this year’s grand marshals for May Festival. Pipe bomb found, defused at Fancher Lake Reservoir – A Spokane County Sheriff ’s Office bomb disposal unit destroyed a pipe bomb found at the edge of Fancher Dam Reservoir, eight miles west of Tonasket. Who planted the device is still unknown. Clark is TES principal – Jeremy Clark says his interview process with the Tonasket School District was as much about him getting a feel for the staff, administration and community as it was about him being interviewed. Clark will replace Jeff Cravy as the principal at Tonasket Elementary. Local vets honored by ‘First Mike’ – It’s not often one’s work gets recognized, but local veterans Mike Stewart and Dale White found out sometimes that work does get noticed. The two were recently invited to the governor’s mansion where the governor’s husband, Mike Gregoire, presented them with certificates of

appreciation. May Festival was ‘Simply Enchanting’ – The front page featured photographs from the May Festival parade, including Queen Ali Miller and Princess Dayna Roley on the community float, locals and Canadian visitors watching the parade from the sidelines, the Tonasket High School band and Grand Marshals, twin sisters Dee Patterson and Doris Reynolds. More scenes from the day’s events were featured throughout the paper. Lunch with local legislators – State Reps. Joel Kretz and Shelly Short sat down over lunch with the G-T for an interview about the recently concluded “too long” legislative session, saying too little was accomplished in the way of budget cuts. George and Patti Hill are Founders Day Grand Marshals – The Tonasket couple are featured in a story about their lives in the Tonasket community and how they didn’t believe it when they first heard they were chosen as the Grand Marshals during the chamber banquet in January.

June Strike up the band for Founder’s Day – Photos from the Tonasket Founders Day Parade are featured on the front page. These include a photo of the high school band, Grand Marshals

George and Patti Hill riding on a John Deere tractor and the Sweet Potato Queens. More photos of the parade and rodeo were featured inside. Public Works Board will extend Eastside Sewer loan – Okanogan County will get some relief from the state Public Works Board in paying back the loan they took to construct the Eastside Sewer Project on the east side of Lake Osoyoos. Hospital battles rise in warrants – Multiple factors have led to recent rise in North Valley Hospital’s warrants. Warrants have climbed to $2.4 million after having been trimmed to $1.5 million, from a high of nearly $3 million. A combination of more belt tightening and an expected infusion of cash is hoped to bring the hospital back on target. Ambulance ride-alongs debated at Oroville Council – Having recently completed the EMT course, Chris Allen approached the council and asked why he couldn’t participate in “ridealongs” anymore. Ambulance supervisor Debra Donahue said she was following North Central Regional Care Council’s guidelines which limit ride-alongs to EMT’s and current trainees. Tonasket planner suggests forming ‘Friends of the Pool’ – City Planner Kurt Danison reported on a variety of topics at the Tonasket Council Meeting, including the formation of a Friends of the Pool group to focus

on a new or renovated city pool. PUD updates on licensing efforts for Enloe Dam – Representatives from Okanogan County PUD made a presentation at the Oroville Chamber of Commerce meeting on the utility’s efforts to license Enloe Dam to once again generate hydroelectric power. $25,000 to improve Osoyoos Lake water quality – Proceeds from last fall’s Osoyoos Lake Water Science Forum will be split between representatives work-

ing on each side of the border to improve water quality. The money will be equally divided between the Town of Osoyoos and the Oroville-based Lake Osoyoos Association. New EMS director brings years of experience to job – Michael Greene and his wife retired to Tonasket hoping to focus on doing volunteer work for the community. Greene, with 37 years experience, has been chosen to be the new EMS director.

OROVILLE – The January meeting of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce will discuss owning and maintaining your own business website., Did you know that for about $60 a year you can own and maintain your own website and domain from several different online vendors? Oroville Chamber President Clyde Andrews will present some options, as well as when it might

be best for you to hire someone to do this for you. If you already do this, then you will certainly be welcome to share your experiences and tips. The chamber will meet at 1 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 10 at the Plaza Restaurant. “Come a bit early to get your order in if you want to eat. We will start as close to 1 as possible,” said Andrews.

In the District Court stats section of the Dec. 20, 2012 issue of the Gazette-Tribune it was erroneously stated that Dennis Rawley, 72, Tonasket, was charged with DUI. What it should have stated was Rawley had successfully completed his deferment on

a DUI charge from 2007. It is this newspaper’s policy to try and provide accurate information and to make corrections and clarifications when necessary. The Gazette-Tribune regrets the error.

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Page A4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 3, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life 2012 THROUGH THE LENS

Gary DeVon/staff photo

May Festival, Oroville’s biggest event of the year, is all about the community coming together with family, friends and neighbors, including a large contingent from Oroville’s neighbor to the north, Canada. They were camped outside the G-T offices to watch the Grand Parade and promoting Yank/Canuck togetherness.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Kaylee Clough performs “The Glow” at the Variety Show and Auction presented by Dollars for Scholars and the Oroville High School Music Department last March in the high school commons. The eight-year-old has been taking ballet for five years and recently performed at the Seattle Dance Workshop Competition and took a silver medal.

Brent Baker/staff photo

One of the many highlights of the year at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket was a performance during the spring by Dr. Kaboom, who entertained kids and adults alike with his hands-on science and German madscientist persona. “Spider Man” Charbel was one of the helpful associates he plucked from the crowd.

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Submitted photo

Performers at one of last year’s It’s Showtime! events. This year they will take place throughout January at the Back Door Club at Vicki’s Unique Boutique on Saturday evenings. Sandy Vaughn and Doug Wilson and Mariliz Romano. Many thanks to our generous sponsors this year: Princes Department Store, House of Gaia, Leah Cathryn Day Spa, Camaray

Motel, Hometown Pizza, Trino’s Restaurant, Windermere Realty, ReMax Realty, Alpine Brewery, Community Auto, Esther Bricques Winery, Betta’s Services and Frontier Foods.

     Upload Video or Pictures  Badge link to Facebook/Twitter pages  Prominence on “nearby” map searched

*All listings include basic listings on the Recreation-Land mobile Site that Member - $200/yr. includes directory listing, phone number and map link.BasicSilver listing plus...   User administration  Link to Website  Top of search (alphabetical)  Upload Video or Pictures

Full Page............................ $900.00 1/2 page..............................$525.00 1/4 page............................. $300.00 1/8 page..............................$187.50 Inside Front Cover.............$1125.00 Back Inside Cover.............$1125.00 Back Cover........................$1350.00 $75 Directory Listing

ADVERTISING DEADLINE March 9, 2013

Full page: Half page: 1/4 page: 1/8 page:

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or Pay by April 2, 2013 and receive 5% discount off regular pricing. CONTACT: Charlene at 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712 / Fax: 509-476-3054 CONTACT Charlene: charlene@gazette-tribune.com 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712 Fax: 509-476-3054


JANUARY 3, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER Taking the time to look back at 2012 With the start of each year we like to take a moment to look back at some of the news stories that made the front page of the GazetteTribune. While not every story is earth-shattering there were some that stick in our minds and some that make us say oh yeah, that happened back then. The year started out with rumors that the Canadians were going to close the daylight borders at Chopaka (their side of the Nighthawk crossing) and at Midway. These rumors were spurred on by a Canadian government report that was hitting the newspapers in B.C. and elsewhere. To us it seemed ridiculous, especially when the Nighthawk side was getting a new $6 million state-of-the-art crossing facility. The rumor was persistent and finally went away when a Canadian official stated their government had no intention of closing the two ports – it was all because of an outdated study the Canadians did on cost-cutting measures. One of our sister publications shared their coverage Out of from north of the border with us. My Mind While the county and local governments conGary A. DeVon tinued to struggle in a down economy, trying to make up for cuts in federal and state monies, they seemed to be staying afloat, somewhat better than last year anyway. There’s not much meat left before these governments hit bone though. Our hospital district just seems to go from one crisis to the next. Even though it’s a Critical Access Hospital, which used to guarantee getting a little more than what it costs to treat Medicare and Medicaid patients, that guarantee has disappeared. The district continues to struggle trying to pay down its warrants. After some controversial meetings of the Oroville School Board it seems to have settled down to doing the people’s business. Hurt feelings still linger among some. However, educating the kids and maintaining a qualified staff while responsibly spending the taxpayer’s money is the most important thing and always trumps personalities. Oroville’s borders continued to grow, although at a slower rate, with fewer annexation requests and Tonasket got funding to build the Mill Drive/Bonaparte Creek sewer extension. Oroville also learned it will get money to resurface much of Central and Cherry Streets. We also saw the loss of former Okanogan County Clerk Jackie Bradley. She served in that position for several decades. Everyone seemed to like Jackie who led the Democratic Party in the county for many years. Even her opponents respected her. There were a lot of positives in those first six months as well, one being that Oroville Elementary and High School received a large Mr. Holland’s Opus grant to buy and repair musical instruments. And, the Booster Club and Kinross Gold donated $22,000 toward the purchase of the new electronic reader board which has been a great addition to the community. Both schools easily passed their Maintenance and Operation Levies as well. May Festival and Founders Day were well attended and continue to be great representations of both towns. Oroville Reman and Reload continues to be a profitable employer and has expanded operations, meaning more good paying jobs where they’re most welcome. For the newspaper perhaps the biggest change came early in 2012 when we did much to update the look, which we think was a big improvement. Who knows what 2013 will bring?

Pres. Obama is not a Muslim Dear Editor, If you must keep printing letters by Steve Lorz, would you do your readers a favor and ask him why he invariably refers to President Obama as a Muslim? It is a FACT that the minimum requirement for being a Muslim is that one subscribe to the Five Pillars of Islam. The second pillar, salah, requires every Muslim to prostrate himself in prayer facing

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR someone was doing just that and perceived the frequent trips and extra sighs when trying to relieve myself, “in the perverse,” if you know what I mean. And of course once in the gossip stream people are going to want to believe the juicier story. I was totally appalled when I learned of this and it was quite disturbing. The person spreading this delusional chatter worked in this particular estab-

Mayans predicted rebirth, not death

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. Devon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott selliott@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley GazetteTribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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and honor have been fought over since time began and was the main reason for duals in the recent past. Fortunately modern medicine can cure this problem easily if it becomes life threatening, which they did in my case. Rotarooter to the rescue. I only discuss this in some detail because it will effect most men at some point in their lives. And guys, the world only ends if the prostate must be removed due to cancer. Bob Nicholson Oroville

the Kaaba in Mecca five times a day at prescribed times including, at Washington D.C., 12.10 p.m., 2:37 p.m. and 4:54 p.m. Strange that nobody but Lorz has noticed our president ducking out of all public functions to do this. Maybe the Liberal press just suppresses the tens of thousands of pictures that must have recorded these acts. The fourth pillar, sawm, requires that every Muslim refrain from letting any food or drink pass his lips from sunup to sundown during the entire Islamic month of Ramadan. Again, strangely, there have been no witnesses or reports of this very noticeable behavior being engaged in by Mr. Obama. No, my ignorant friend Steve, our president may be an Albigensian, a Baptist, a Jain, a Mormon, a Scientologist, a Zoroastrian or an atheist, but what he provably, demonstrably IS NOT is a Muslim. Disgustedly, John F, Connot Everett, Wash.

Gossip can be outright cruel Dear Gary, Well well ... gossip. Don’t we just love some good juicy gossip. We are all guilty of it, but we should be careful. False things said about people can be outright cruel and in some cases, where it may be in a public setting, it can be criminal. Most of us have been a victim of cruel gossip at one time or another. I guess it makes us feel better when we can belittle someone. A few years back, I was myself the victim of very distorted gossip and would like to show as an example how it can be traumatizing for the person on the receiving end. Guys, if you live long enough, you will all have problems with an enlarged prostate. If or when it does happen to you and you’re in a public establishment, drinking coffee or beer or whatever, I suggest that you watch your bathroom habits. Because, in my case,

lishment and was intent on telling just about every customer that came through the door. I have never dealt with anything like this before and any attempts to correct this person were met with threats to call the police. Gossip about other people I have heard, from individuals you would think were perfectly normal, is just about as outrageous. I suggest that the words delusional and paranoid be revisited in your dictionary. So make sure whatever you’re spreading about someone is at least somewhat accurate, or risk digging a hole that you can’t get out of without yourself becoming the loon or having to make a trip to the courthouse. Ladies, if a guy in his 50’s or more is making frequent trips to the restroom and making sighing sounds, the noise you hear is likely pain, not pleasure. The male prostate is donut shaped and the urethra passes through it. When the prostate becomes enlarged much force is required to go wee wee, and the bladder only gets partially drained. This is the reason for frequent trips to the restroom and the sighs. Anyone who thinks a guy in his 50’s or 60’s, especially someone that some of you have known for as many as 30 years, is going to act like a 15-year-old in a public restroom is in my opinion extremely naive or just a total bonehead. Give me a break! I suppose that if the gossip is in fact true, it’s open season. Good luck finding “anything” in the perverse about myself, if you have nothing better to do. No, I’m not gay either since I have caught that in the gossip stream also. Where do people get this stuff. There are numerous individuals that can verify everything I have stated here. In my opinion this particular incident was a crime committed by a certain person of either public slander or defamation and I do not know how widespread it has become. Consider how you would feel if someone were spreading this kind of garbage about yourself. One’s reputation

Dear Gary, Contrary to popular belief, the Mayans didn’t predict the “end of the world.” Modern man gathered that from reading Mayan history, from their “codex” (books) and their monuments. What they did not believer in was “cosmogenesis,” that the world would be reborn on the winter solstice of 2012 (Dec. 21st). They came to this conclusion from acquiring the knowledge of precession, which is the wobble of the earth, which takes approximately 26,000 years for a complete circuit. As I related a couple years ago, it is just a measurement of time. An extremely long one. They considered the sun to be “first father” and the center of the Milky Way was to them “cosmic mother.” So the alignment of the sun with the “womb” of creation, the black hole at the center of our galaxy, was to therm an insemination, a “rebirth” of our world. And they knew about the black hole, somehow. These jungle dwellers were by no means “mental midgets.” Their astronomy, math and calendars were beyond compare, even at today’s standards. They got their knowledge through “vision quest,” ingesting psychoactive rugs and “journeying” to far off corners of the cosmos to gather info. Modern man is just starting to realize the knowledge that can be gained from such “trips.” I’ver personally known for years the possibilities of such “journeys,” especially through mushrooms. As we look around the world today, there is much “change” afoot. So the Mayan “end” date could very well herald a new “start.” The world could use an enema. As I’ver said before, it’s time to go from dominator mode to partnership. Dec. 21st may have catalyzed that notion. That is the “end” and “start” of the Mayan Long Count. And perhaps those who reject the transition may be in for a rough ride. Peace. Thank you, Dan Dixon Oroville

Life can be a valuable gift Dear Editor, All true Christians, of all dominations, start preparing for an

answer. All people who have spiritual concept, but do not follow any “religion.” All tribal orders start moving in a rhythm as one. Such as the Rainbow Family, Native Americans, Hawaiians and Alaskan natives, including bikers across the nation. Those who believe in a higher power, keep your faith in what you’re seeing. Young men and women do not worry about your future or the shape of things to come. What people do not understand is that we are all connected by the power of essence. The “sense of being” or in the spiritual concept that we are aware that exists. All wildlife, their spirit follows the power that keeps all life in rhythm and in perpetual motion. That power has no beginning or end. Evil is a real power that also works against its light. We see it everyday in our world. Human life is not meant to feel like it has not value, that someone would kill for no reason. Like the young man who killed his mother, then went to the school where she worked and killed innocent children, teachers and their principal – and then killed himself just recently. All life is precious, both the high and the low. It follows a circular motion. Just as the changing of the season or the symbols man, woman, birth, death, infinity. We are all subjects of time, but on time we depend. Good people try to leave a legacy that will live on when they are gone or their book is closed. Then another one will be opened. All you “doomsday” preppers, maybe your world might end, but for many others it will be a new beginning. What some people do not seem to understand or even see is that the world is hardly ever born. When the Book that holds the grace of what we are and what we shall become comes to a close, then it will be entirely open and all mankind will understand the purpose of life and the value of the gift that we were given. Jerry Hutchins Oroville

Response of NVH staff incredible Dear Editor, I would like to extend my thanks to the staff of your local Hospital (N.V.H) for their actions this past Christmas eve. A passenger aboard the Canadian tour bus I was driving to Spokane, was stricken with an acute medical condition as I approached Tonasket. The response of the N.V.H staff to our unannounced arrival (from the desk clerks to the medical staff) was incredible! Your citizens are obviously well served by these professionals as well! Thanks again and Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you all... (Sorry about the temporarily double parked bus on your main street!) Peter (Canada West Coachlines). Peter Schmid Salmon Arm, B.C


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 3, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life

Blood drive Jan. 9 at Oroville HS Bulletin Board So, here we are into the year 2013. And I was out of town for a week, and don’t know much of anything that has happened, in Oroville. The week I was gone was certainly different, weather wise, as the grass was green and the flowers were blooming, people wearing shorts and summer sandals, while others were wearing woolen hats and sweaters. In Port Townsend there are lots of artists and I don’t know that they try to outdo each other in wearing strange clothing, but they surely do a great job of it. It was very nice having the majority of our families there and there was more “iPodding,” texting and what have you, going on, from the older to the very young and the one granddaughter that wasn’t there we had a “Skype” session with her in California. Just a wee bit different from in my youth. Sympathy goes out to Rosalie Lorz and family as death took

her son, Dennis, due to a sudden heart attack. A l s o the death of Dan McDougall was reportto me. THIS & THAT ed I’ll try and Joyce Emry get more particulars, or perhaps there will be an obituary. Dan was a handsome “dude” in high school and could he ever play a mean trombone. He married Betty Priebe, the superintendent’s daughter, but she passed away a few years ago. There is a lot of snow on Stevens pass but the road conditions were very good. There is so much snow, making the trees very beautiful, but also making them very dangerous, as the weight is causing them to break.

There were lives lost due to that fact. It was truly a winter wonderland with the heavily laden branches as they sparkled, especially when the sun was shining. “Only after the last tree has been cut down, only after the last river has been poisoned, only after the last fish has been caught, only then will you find that money can’t be eaten.” That quote is a Cree Indian prophecy. After taking a fall on the ice, it is amazing how many places hurt and turn black and blue and purple and green after a few days have passed. Watch for the ice that is lurking under patches of snow….it’s dangerous. When the doctor asked what I did for exercise, I said pushing 86 was exercise enough. Happiness is like jam. You can’t spread even a little bit without getting some on yourself! It’s cocoa time! Have a cup when you come in from the cold.

BLUE STAR MOTHERS Peace For This New Year Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck

Join us in praying for peace for the New Year. Peace for the world and peace for our children. We praise all the civil servants who have worked tirelessly to keep us safe and protected throughout this past year: armed forces, police force, firemen, emergency responders, patrol, customs and more. War is no longer about battle

field strategy, but now relies upon the new high tech weaponry of psychology. Terrorists rely on the slow poison of terror to cause the death of soldiers even after they have returned safely home. “This past year there were more soldier suicides than combat deaths.” - Stripes.com The war has been brought to the home front. Your neighbor may be fighting this battle. As mothers, families, and friends live out their relationship with their active duty soldiers and live among our veterans, we are perfectly placed to be the new recon

and intel of a potential casualty of war. It would serve our nation well for families to be trained and alert to this secondary danger. This is one of the primary functions of the Blue Star Mothers. We wish a Happy New Year to our troops and to their families. “Grace and peace be yours in abundance through the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.” 2 Peter 1:2-3. Contact us via Facebook at www.facebook.com/ncw.blue.star. mothers, by phone at (509) 4852906 or via email at ncw.bluestars@yahoo.com.

HILLTOP COMMENTS Looks just like a Christmas card By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

Winter is definitely with us now with all of the snow, rain, wind, and ice we have had in the last two weeks. The snow makes

our country look like a Christmas Card. It truly looks beautiful. The winners for the week of Dec. 10 with 32 players were: Highs went to Doug Knight and Judy Bunch with the Lows going to Ed and Boots Emry. Clayton Emry took the Traveling and the Grand Prize went to Judy Ripley. On Dec. 17th I do not know how many were there, but the

winners were: High - Ina Visser and Ray Visser. Low - Rae (Visser) Morris and Harold Harper. Willie wants to know if anybody notices a pattern with the name Visser? Christmas is here and I hope you all have the best Holiday Season ever. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Have you made a list of resolutions for the new year?

THE LEARNING TREE Winter quarter starts Jan. 21 Submitted by ackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

Winter Quarter is underway and our blue catalogs are in stores now. Can’t find one? Check out the NVCS website at www. northvalleycommunityschools. com and review all the classes. You can register online, too. It all starts Jan. 21 with Beginning Guitar and is followed by 34 more classes that take place through February and March. Some have never before been offered; others are popular over and over. Remember, there are several ways to get ahold of NVCS, in

addition to the website. Call Ellen at (509) 476-2011. She’s the information person and will make it easy for you. Email NVCS at comschools@chopaka.wednet. edu. Our snail mail address is P O Box 2075 in Oroville, and we have a Facebook Wall: North Valley Community Schools.

Winter is the time when many of us tend to become couch potatoes. NVCS classes get you off the couch and into something that is interesting, educational, and may even change your life in some positive way. Pick up a catalog, in stores now, and find something new to do!

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32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

As an investor, how can you avoid making mistakes? It’s not always easy, because investing can be full of potential pitfalls. But if you know what the most common mistakes are at different stages of an investor’s life, you may have a better chance of avoiding these costly errors. Let’s take a look at some investment mistakes you’ll want to avoid when you’re young, when you’re in mid-career, when you’re nearing retirement and when you’ve just retired. When you’re young … Mistake: Investing too conservatively (or not at all) — If you’re just entering the working world, you may not have a lot of money with which to invest. But don’t wait until your income grows — putting away even a small amount each month can prove quite helpful. Additionally, don’t make the mistake of investing primarily in short-term vehicles that may preserve your

COPS’ CORNER Submitted by Audra Fuller Tonasket Police Dept

Tonasket Police Department would like to invite citizens to send in any questions you may have that are law enforcement based. Have you had questions about traffic stops? Burglaries? Officers patrolling? Particular laws? This is a chance to get some answers. Send your questions to Officer Fuller at afuller@tonasketpolice.com. All questions will be reviewed and five to eight will be selected to be featured in the Gazette-Tribune.

DENTISTRY

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386. The Food Bank is looking for donations going into the holiday season. The food bank shelves are pretty empty now

Local Loons & How They Survive TONASKET - On Friday, Jan. 4, Dr. Scott Ford, avian medicine and surgery specialist, will share information about the loons of North Central Washington. Their biology and conservation will be

discussed, along with stunning images taken by Dan and Ginger Poleschook, loon researchers and professional photographers. Dr. Ford will discuss where our loons go in the winter, and provide updates on telemetry technology that will allow researchers to better track individual loons from our area in the coming years. “Loons carry a universal appeal— their beckoning cry, their surreal beauty and their dependable presence every summer—but their dwindling presence leaves a noticeable gap,” says Dr. Ford. “Come and be inspired by the beauty of these birds and the challenges they face in a changing world.”

NVCS Winter Quarter Jan. 21 OROVILLE – Winter Quarter with North Valley Community Schools (NVCS) is here! Our first class is Beginning Guitar, starting on Monday, Jan. 21. At the end of six sessions you will know how to pick, strum, and make beautiful sounds with your instrument. You’ll be playing songs for your own, and others, enjoyment. Bring an acoustic guitar. Pick up a blue catalog in stores or call Ellen at (509) 476-2011 for more information and to register.

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Investment Mistakes to Watch For...at Different Stages of Life FINANCIAL FOCUS

Remember a few years, when the kids were little, we’d take a big paper sack from the grocery and put powdered milk, and powdered cream, cocoa and sugar and some other stuff in and shake it up and have our own cocoa mix, and it was pretty cheap. Now, at some stores ya’ have to pay for the paper sack. In my younger days I had long hair (before hair dryers) and I’d fuss because it took so long to dry. Where did all that nice thick hair go? Wish I had some of it now. The fashion item this year is surely the scarf. Long, short, small, large, fluffy, skinny, bright and dark colors, and some of the most beautiful yarns. Red Cross Blood Drive will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 9 at the Oroville High School gym from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. This is sponsored by Markus Rounds as his senior project. Have a Happy New Year!

principal but offer little in the way of growth potential. Instead, position your portfolio for growth. Of course, stock prices will always fluctuate, but you potentially have decades to overcome these short-term declines. Since this money is for retirement, your focus should be on the long term — and it’s impossible to reach long-term goals with short-term, highly conservative investments. When you’re in mid-career … Mistake: Putting insufficient funds into your retirement accounts — At this stage of your life, your earning power may well have increased substantially. As a result, you should have more money available to invest for the future — specifically, you may now be able to “max out” on your IRA and still boost your contributions to your employer-sponsored retirement plan, such as your 401(k), 403(b) or 457(b). These retirement accounts offer tax advantages that you may not receive in ordinary savings and investment accounts. Try to put more money into these retirement accounts every time your salary goes up.

When you’re nearing retirement … Mistake: Not having balance in your investment portfolio — When they’re within just a few years of retirement, some people may go to extremes, either investing too aggressively to try to make up for lost time or too conservatively in an attempt to avoid potential declines. Both these

strategies could be risky. So as you near retirement, seek to balance your portfolio. This could mean shifting some of your investment dollars into fixed-income vehicles to provide for your current income needs while still owning stocks that provide the growth potential to help keep up with inflation in your retirement years. When you’ve just retired … Mistake: Failing to determine an appropriate withdrawal rate — Upon reaching retirement, you will need to carefully manage the money you’ve accumulated in your IRA, 401(k) and all other investment accounts. Obviously, your chief concern is outliving your money, so you’ll need to determine how much you can withdraw each year. To arrive at this figure, take into account your current age, your projected longevity, the amount of money you’ve saved and the estimated rate of return you’re getting from your investments. This type of calculation is complex, so you may want to consult with a financial professional. By avoiding these errors, you can help ensure that, at each stage of your life, you’re doing what you can to keep making progress toward your financial goals. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

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JANUARY 3, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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SPORTS Year in Review IMAGES OF SOME MEMORABLE MOMENTS FROM 2012

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Moonlighter Pulling Team roared into Tonasket to highlight the Comancheros’ third annual Truck and Tractor Pulls. The Moonlighters are slated to return to Tonasket in 2013 on July 20. Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s storied wrestling tradition continued in 2011-12 with a young squad, but it was a senior - Jared Stedtfeld (above) - that brought home the Tigers’ lone medal with a fourth place finish.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Sierra Speiker again proved herself among the state’s best distance runners by competing in meets against schools of all sizes during the 2012 cross country season, then ran away to her second state Class 1B/2B championship in three seasons.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Kelly Cruz and the Tigers qualified for their second straight district playoffs, but the highlight of the season came in late September when Tonasket upset eventual state quarterfinalist Cascade (above), 2-1.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Nick Perez added to his state medal haul in 2012 with his third consecutive runner-up finish. Perez also had one third place finish, as a freshmen, in his high school career.

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo produced its usual share of compelling moo-ments as competitors often found themselves either airborne, or flat on their backs at the mercy of an angry bull, as did Cheyne Olney (above).

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville pole vaulter Callie Barker set a personal best and won a three-way tiebreak with two Willapa Valley athletes to earn a second-place finish at the state 2B track and field meet in May.

Brent Baker/staff photo

After an up-and-down regular season, Oroville’s boys basketball team caught fire in the district playoffs. C.J. Mathews (above) and the Hornets upset Riverside Christian to key a run that didn’t end until Oroville was eliminated at regionals by eventual state champion Colfax.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s boys basketball team celebrated the end of a 49-game Caribou Trail League losing streak in January after John Stedtfeld (10) hit a runnerjumper at the buzzer as the Tigers edged Omak. Michael Orozco (4) also made several key plays down the stretch as the Tigers came back from a big deficit in the second half.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Brent Baker/staff photo

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket hosted KREM television’s Tom Sherry and his “Tom’s Tailgate” traveling road show on September. Sherry had a live chat with Macelino Ruiz Martell in front of a crowd of Tonasket and Okanogan football fans.

Tonasket’s Damon Halvorsen led Tonasket’s track and field contingent to the state 1A track and field finals in May. After winning the regional 1600meter run, Halvorsen finished one spot out of the medals at state.

Luke Kindred (above) and a young Oroville football team advanced to the state playoffs, winning five of its last seven games and giving WaitsburgPrescott a battle before bowing out of the playoffs at Pasco in November.


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 3, 2012 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • January 03, 2013

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Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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Tonasket City Council Meeting Cancelled 1-8-2013 Special Meeting to be held 1-9-2013 The regular meeting of the Tonasket City Council to be held on Tuesday, January 8, 2013 has been cancelled. A special meeting of the Tonasket City Council will be held on Wednesday, January 9, 2013 at 7:00 pm. This meeting will be held as a regular meeting of the City Council. All items on the agenda and any other items that are brought forward may be acted upon. All interested persons are invited to attend and those with special language, hearing or access needs should contact City Hall, 509-486-2132, 24 hours prior to the meeting. Alice J. Attwood City Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on December 27, 2012, January 3, 2013. #446693

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Public Notice Vacant Council Position The City Council of the City of Tonasket will be accepting letters of interest to fill a Council position that will be vacated December 31, 2012. The letters will be accepted until 7:00 pm Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013. The applicants will be interviewed at the January 22nd, 2013 City Council meeting. Applicants must be a registered voter and a resident of the City of Tonasket for 1 full year. For more information, call Tonasket City Hall, 509-486-2132. Alice Attwood City Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on December 27, 2012, January 3, 2013. #446691

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Public Notices

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Across

ant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORCLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 days from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/hom e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National web site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 10/1/2012 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-11-444801-SH P987118 1/3, 01/24/2013 Priority Posting & Publishing O u r Control # 987118 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette. January 3, 24, 2013. #446721

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EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING

Crosswords

Bank, National Association II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $138,683.70 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $661,648.36, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 3/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 2/1/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 1/21/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 1/21/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated at any time after the 1/21/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the Sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME SARA A THOMPSON A SINGLE WOMAN ADDRESS 96 CHEWUCH RD W , WINTHROP, WA 98862 by both first class and certified mail on 7/23/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee, and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property, described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS- The purchaser at the Trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For ten-

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This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS

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STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF DEC. 31, 2012

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

TS No.: WA-11-444801-SH APN No.: 8878120200 Title Order No.: 110235870-WA-GNO Grantor(s): SARA A THOMPSON Grantee(s): WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3121759 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant To The Revised Code Of Washington 61.24, et. seq. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee will on 2/1/2013, at 10:00 AM At the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA 98840 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to wit: THAT PART OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 21 EAST, W.M., OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON, LYING WESTERLY OF THE CHEWUCH RIVER, FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE QUARTER CORNER COMMON TO SECTIONS 34 AND 35, AN ORIGINAL STONE, FROM WHICH THE CORNER COMMON TO SECTIONS 26, 27, 34 AND 35 , AN ORIGINAL STONE, BEARS NORTHEAST 00°03’24� DISTANT 2640.68 FEET; THENCE NORTHWEST 89°47’39� ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER FOR 202.44 FEET TO THE THREAD OF THE CHEWUCH RIVER, AND THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, LEAVING SAID THREAD, CONTINUING ALONG SAID BOUNDARY LINE NORTHWEST 89°47’39� FOR 1082.15 FEET, TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OKANOGAN COUNTY ROAD NO. 1213 (WESTSIDE CHEWUCH ROAD); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTHEAST 00°07’25� FOR 273.42 FEET; THENCE ALONG A CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A DELTA ANGLE OF 08°41’13�, A RADIUS OF 925.00 FEET, FOR A LENGTH OF 140.24 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTHEAST 82°22’08� FOR 561.19 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEAST 89°47’39� FOR 340.00 FEET TO THE THREAD OF SAID CHEWUCH RIVER; THENCE FOLLOWING SAID THREAD SOUTHEAST 14°01’39� FOR 276.15 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEAST 25°47’50� FOR 247.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO KNOWN AS THOMPSON SHORT PLAT, RECORDED IN BOOK A-4 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 4, RECORDED UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 3116373. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 96 CHEWUCH RD W , WINTHROP, WA 98862 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 7/23/2007 recorded 07/27/2007, under 3121759 records of Okanogan County, Washington, from SARA A THOMPSON A SINGLE WOMAN, as Grantor(s), to TRANSNATION TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to JPMorgan Chase

563-3005.

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Statewides

Call Eric at (800) www.fossmortgage.com

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Veranda Beach is currently seeking full time IT professional for employment at their Oroville, WA resort community. Educational requirements for position includes a Bachelors degree in Computer Science; Cisco CCNA or CCNP; Microsoft Certified Professional. Salary DOE. For complete listing of duties and requirements contact: rhonda@verandabeach.com Qualified parties should send resume with cover letter to: Veranda Beach; Attn: Rhonda Hinkley; PO Box 3000; Oroville, WA 98844 or email to rhonda@verandabeach.com

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DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

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Found

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Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

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Announcements

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

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JANUARY 3, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A9

Court, 911Calls, Jail Bookings Compiled by Brianna Ellis Freelance Correspondent

Superior Court The court found probable cause to charge Kyle Allyn Snyder, 21, with second degree burglary and second degree theft. He received three years and one month confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Lynn Marie Arnhold, 36, with third degree assault and resisting arrest. She received eight months confinement. The court found probable cause to charge Kurtis Camron Pugsley Bishop, 25, with attempting to allude, first degree DWLS, obstructing and officer and possession of 40 grams or less of marijuana. He received two years and six months confinement.

Juveniles A Tonasket juvenile, 13, was charged with fourth degree assault. He received nine days confinement. A Tonasket juvenile, 17, was charged with reckless driving. He received five days confinement.

District Court Gabriel Beltran, 18, Oroville, was charged with obstructing a law enforcement officer. He received 180 days and a $808 fine. Reynaldo Beltran, 20, Oroville, was charged with obstructing a law enforcement officer. He received 180 days and a $808 fine. Christina Caroll, 33, Tonasket, was charged with DWLS third degree and operating a vehicle without an

ignition interlock. She received nine months and a $1,553 fine. Maria Contreras, 56, Oroville was charged with theft third degree and hit-and-run with an attended vehicle. She received 18 months and a $1,576 fine. Jeffrey Herschlip, 55, Oroville, was charged with DWLS third degree. He received three months and a $1,483 fine. Chasity Ikeh, 28, Tonasket was charged with DWLS third degree. She received three months and a $818 fine. Alfonso Olcampo, 44, Oroville, was charged with violating a no contact order. He received three months. John Thomas, 60, Tonasket, was charged with harassment. He received six months and a $933 fine.

Jail Bookings and 911 Calls Monday, December 17, 2012 In Tonasket, on River Loop Rd., a man has concerns about a male subject who is incarcerated having guns at his residence. In light of recent events, the male subject wants to make the deputy aware of the number of guns and the incarcerated man’s mental health issues. In Okanogan, near the Okanogan High School, there has been recent information from a parent that a male juvenile is allegedly going to shoot up the school tomorrow. The male juvenile was expelled a few weeks ago after the school received information alleging he was going to shoot up the school on the Dec. 24. The juvenile is said to have mental health issues. Pamela Jones, 47, was booked for third degree assault and DWLS third.

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Russell Gardner, 20, booked for failure to appear, third degree theft. Christopher Johnson, 36, was booked for first degree theft. Matthew Peterson, 41, was booked for FTA, eluding, DUI, DWLS third. Mariah Gallaher, 22, was booked for FTA and DUI. Joseph Dagnon, 46, was booked for fourth degree assault.

Thursday, December 20, 2012 In Tonasket, on Hwy. 97, a neighbor took over a resident’s mailbox by writing his name on it. The mail deliverer called police when this was brought to his attention. Julie Wiley, 50, was booked for DWLS third and failure to appear. Dennis Garcia, 19, booked for failure to appear and MIP. Michael Dennia, 26, booked for DUI. Dylan Mitchell, 28, booked for theft second.

Tuesday, December 18, 2012 Rachelle Stanley, 40, was booked for forged script. Lyle Haukaas, 29, was booked for second degree assault second. Dustin Smith, 26, was booked for a document detainer. Tashina Lukes, 21, was booked for failure to appear and assault fourth. Arturo Ramirez, 34, was booked for child molestation and rape of a child. Arnulfo Cortez, 46, was booked for alien in possession of a firearm. Manuel Gonzales, 26, was booked for USBP hold. Salvador Mendoza, 44, was booked for USBP hold.

Friday, December 21, 2012 Report of an animal problem on Wannacut Lake Rd. near Oroville. Ongoing problem with five horses coming on to reporting party’s property and eating the hay. Horses are extremely skinny. Horses are from Palmer Mtn. Rd. Traffic Hazard on Ellisforde Bridge Rd., just over bridge. Three cows in roadway. Cattle gone on officer’s arrival. Unknown injury accident on Hwy. 97 and Pine Creek Rd. Truck flipped in roadway, occupant advised he is okay. Unknown injury accident on Hwy. 97 near Riverside. One vehicle rollover accident. Driver required tow, refused medical attention. Report from O’Neil Rd. near Ellisforde. A 94-year-old male in a wheelchair hitting his cane on things, subject is hallucinating even though her has taken meds. Refusing hospital care. Request for a welfare check on County Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Officer spoke with man who stated his brother tried to take an overdose the night before. Brother, who is bipolar, said he wanted to die. Okanogan Behavioral Health advised they

Wednesday, December 19, 2012 Gabriel Martinez, 19, was booked for theft third degree, failure to appear, malicious mischief third degree and DWLS third degree. Kacee Webb, 22, was booked for malicious mischief third. Shane Stallcop, 44, was booked for felony DUI. Eli Vanbrunt, 26, was booked for failure to appear, burglary first and theft third. Forrest Knight, 18, was booked for minor frequenting. Amy Engleman, 29, was booked for assault fourth. Heidi Laugue, 20, was booked for

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Saturday, December 22, 2012 Report of a civil dispute at Hwy. 7 and Warnock Rd. near Oroville. Yesterday reporting party’s son was driving his vehicle and was struck by another vehicle. Son and other driver exchanged info and turns out other driver’s was false. Report of an accident on Main St. in Oroville. Driver is unconscious and trapped in vehicle which is on fire. Fire extinguished and coroner called as man is deceased. Report of drugs arrest on Second and Main in Oroville. Subject, who is under 21-years-old, arrested for possession of marijuana. Report of a verbal dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Subject having altercation, standing in front of apartment yelling and screaming. Sunday, December 23, 2012 Request for search and rescue on in Peony Creek Rd. area near Forest Service Rd. 400. Male subject still on FS Rd. 400 in Aeneas Valley yesterday. The 53-year-old male is diabetic. Subject located in Tonasket. Report of a mental health transport from Tonasket Airport Rd. near Tonasket. Neighbor came to reporting party’s home with a pistol and advised that someone was robbing him. Said he had been held against his will for two days, also fired one round into ground. Monday, December 24, 2012

Report of an MIP alcohol offense on Emry Rd. near Oroville. Report of a burglary on Talkire Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Residence broken into some time in the past two months. Surround sound and DVD player taken. Report of an assault on W. Third St. in Tonasket. Brother is intoxicated and insulted reporting party. Agency assist at the Port of Entry. Request for K-9 unit as CBP believe they have a positive methamphetamine find. Tuesday, December 25, 2012 Report of 911 abuse on Chopaka Rd. near Loomis. Report of burglary on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Someone broke in front door. Wednesday, December 26, 2012 Report of a burglary on Wannacut Lake Rd. near Oroville. Antique gun taken some time during the holiday. House searched and only thing taken was the gun. Report of a missing person on Tonasket Airport Rd. near Tonasket. Reporting party came to visit his parent for the holiday and advised the house is empty. Domestic dispute on S. Orchard Loop near Tonasket. Female caller advised in verbal dispute with husband. Civil matter. Report of an assault on Clarkston Mill Rd. south of Tonasket. Reporting party advised that male subject just punched her in the face and should not be in her residence. Male subject in violation of protection order and felony assault. Report of a domestic dispute on O’Neil Rd. south of Oroville. Daughter at location is intoxicated and arguing with everyone. Unable to calm her down.

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will decide if a pick up is needed. Report of stray animal on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Dark horses walking in roadway and reporting party had to swerve off the roadway into ditch. No damage to vehicle. Report of burglary on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Person entered residence and took medication.

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 3, 2013

Sports

Entiat outscores Hornets in fourth By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

ENTIAT - Oroville’s Connor Hughes scored a season-high 31 points to lead the Hornets at Entiat on Dec. 21, but it wasn’t enough for the Hornets as the Tigers pulled away in the fourth quarter to post a 72-63 non-conference victory. Despite the loss, Oroville coach Allen Allie was encouraged by the Hornets’ continued improvement on offense despite moving two players up from the JV squad in the past two games. Freshman Juan Lopez scored 15 points in his second varsity outing, and Jose Barboza hit a pair of free throws in his first game. “We played pretty well considering we have two

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Taylor Robinson had a strong showing at the Hornets’ home tournament on Dec. 22, wrestling to a third place finish at 170 pounds.

Tigers win NOHI; Hornets 8th By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Tonasket’s wrestling team warmed up for the holiday season by winning Oroville’s North Okanogan Holiday Invitational, easily out-pointing second-place Liberty Bell by 58.5 points. The Tigers ran up 179.5 points to the Mountain Lions’ 121, followed by Selkirk (113), Okanogan (108) and Omak (107). Oroville’s 68 points put the Hornets in eighth place. “I’m happy with how we wrestled,” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell. “I think we’re coming along. Obviously, we just want to get better and better as we go. It’s nice to get a trophy in a tournament this close to home. The next couple of weeks we’ll see some really tough guys that we haven’t seen yet.” Collin Aitcheson (126 pounds) and John Rawley (220) won their weight classes. Taking second were Boyd Lorz (106), Jorge Juarez (126), Jeffrey Stedtfeld (132) and Chad Edwards (285). Stedtfeld defaulted his championship match when he had to leave the tourney due to a family emergency, and Edwards lost an injury default when a cut on the back of his head wouldn’t stop bleeding. The Hornets’ Eric Herrera (285) took second, losing to Rawley in their championship match. Other medalists for Tonasket were Rade Pilkinton (3rd place, 106), Trevor Peterson (3rd, 113), Dyllan Walton (3rd, 132), Dalton Wahl (4th, 138), Quinn Mirick (4th, 152), Austin Booker (3rd,

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

BREWSTER - Tonasket boys basketball coach Agustin Pedregon wanted to use the Brewster Christmas Tournament to measure the progress of his team. Other than the final few minutes of the tourney championship game against the host Bears, the reviews were pretty positive. The Tigers fell to Brewster 60-42 in the Saturday, Dec. 29, final after knocking off Lake Roosevelt 71-46 in Friday’s opener. “Brewster was a different show than the first time we played,” Pedregon said. “We did lose by 18, but it wasn’t a blowout. We were in it most of the game.” The Tigers trailed by 10 points with 6:30 to go, but wilted after a Brewster 3-pointer made it a 13-point game. “After that three we kind of gave up,” Pedregon said. “It’s something the guys need to learn is that you need to play right to the end. “The good thing is we made them work for everything. They hit some 3-pointers, but we made them shoot from very deep. (Easton) Driessen and (Timbo) Taylor had to work.”

Thursday, Jan. 3 JV/Var GB - Omak at Tonasket, 4:30/6:00 pm JV/Var BB - Omak at Tonasket, 6:00/7:30 pm Friday, Jan. 4 JV/Var BB - Pateros at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm Var/JV GB - Pateros at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm Saturday, Jan. 5 JV/Var BB - Oroville at Kittitas,

“We just weren’t ready to go,” Bourn said. “We had 11 turnovers in the first quarter and a half, throwing passes six feet over people’s heads or at their feet. “So over break, we’ve been working a lot on not rushing passes, and putting them in the ‘shooting pocket’ so they’re ready to do something with the ball when they get it.” Despite the early turnovers,

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

ENTIAT - Unforced errors had Oroville girls basketball coach Mike Bourn frustrated and his team on the wrong end of a 44-34 score after a Friday, Dec. 21, nonconference road game at Entiat. The Hornets entered a two week holiday break at .500 after the loss.

Oroville trailed just 17-15 at the half. But Julianna Edwards and Taylor Southard keyed a 16-9 Entiat spurt in the third quarter to put the Tigers up by nine. “We couldn’t get back into it,” Bourn said. “I think we’re a better team, but we didn’t play like it.” Lily Hilderbrand scored 18 points and had 10 rebounds for the Hornets (4-4), with Callie Barker adding eight points.

CHURCH GUIDE

Brent Baker/staff photo

John Rawley’s first period pin earned him one of Tonasket’s two championships at Oroville’s NOHI tournament on Dec. 22. The Tigers also won the team title over second-place Liberty Bell. 160), Frank Holfeltz (3rd, 195). Others for Oroville included Michael Ripley (4th, 126), and Taylor Robinson (3rd, 170). The Hornets next wrestle at Almira-Coulee/Hartline on Saturday, Jan. 5.

Tigers 7th at Royal ROYAL CITY - On second thought, a seventh-place finish at the Royal Rumble wasn’t such a bad thing. Mitchell said that wasn’t what was originally on his mind. But considering not only the tough nature of the tournament, but the fact that the Tigers were missing starters Jeffrey Stedtfeld, Austin Booker and Austin Knowlton affected their final standing. “My first thoughts were rather gloomy,” Mitchell said. “But as (assistant coach) Cole Denison

and I talked about it, and I saw the final results, I realized that as a team we are right where we want to be. “Having those three guys would have put us in the top three of the tournament.” Despite not having anyone reach the finals, six Tigers only had one loss on the day (most went 3-1) and three went 2-2. Rawley earned the top finish with a third-place showing at 220. Fourth place finishers included Pilkinton (106), Aitcheson (120), Wahl (132), Mirick (152) and Tanner Good (285). Holfeltz (195) claimed fifth place, while taking sixth were Trevor Peterson (113) and Walton (126). Derek Rimestad and Jorge Juarez also competed. The Tigers next wrestle at Warden on Saturday, Jan. 5.

Dyllan Gage scored 17, Derek Sund added 13 and Trevor Terris and Michael Orozco each tallied 12. Against the Raiders, the Tigers used knowledge gained in their season-opening win. “We knew what they wanted to do and were able to take their guards out of the game better than the first time,” Pedregon said. Orozco paced Tonasket with 18 points. The Tigers (5-5) return to Caribou Trail League play this week at home against Omak on Thursday, Jan. 3.

Cashmere 80, Tonasket 44 CASHMERE - The Tigers found out first hand that life on the road in the Caribou Trail League can be rough, especially when taking on one of the league title contenders. Cashmere (6-2, 3-1 Caribou Trail League) ran up a 50-20 halftime lead over the Tigers on Friday, Dec. 21, on the way to an 80-44 victory. “They’re a better team, and just physically much stronger than us,” Pedregon said. “They came out with a level of intensity that no one else has

6:00/7:30 pm Var/JV GB - Oroville at Kittitas, 6:00/7:30 pm JV/Var GB - Tonasket at Cascade, 4:30/6:00 pm JV/Var BB - Tonasket at Cascade, 6:00/7:30 pm WR - Tonasket at Royal Tourney, 10:00 am WR - Oroville at Almira-Coulee/Hartline Tourney, 10:00 am Tuesday, Jan. 8 JV/Var BB - Quincy at Tonasket, 4:30/6:00 pm JV/Var BB - Quincy at Tonasket, 6:00/7:30 pm

OROVILLE Oroville Community Bible Fellowship

Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 a.m. Men’s Meeting 9:45 Sunday School (2-17 yrs) • Life Skills (18+) 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Bible Study (13+) Pastor Claude Roberts

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

John F. Cleveland II/Quad City Herald

Dyllan Gage puts up a shot during the Brewster tournament. matched. We only got three free throws despite that, so it was a learning experience for us as a team and me as a coach, as far as what you have to deal with on the road.” Tonasket managed just 18 rebounds for the game as a team, led by Derek Sund with 10. Michael Orozco led the Tigers (4-4, 0-4 CTL) with 15 points, with Ethan Bensing and Dyllan Gage adding nine apiece.

Schedules

High School Sports Schedules, Jan. 3-12

Oroville girls finish 2012 at .500

Okanogan Valley

Tiger boys show progress at tourney By Brent Baker

new players who are still learning our offense,” Allie said. “I really don’t expect our team to play to their potential for another couple of weeks until they all get used to each other. “I really can’t complain; they have been improving every week.” The Hornets trailed 39-28 at the half, but outscored Entiat 20-11 in the third quarter to pull to within 50-48. Jeremy Davis scored 15 of his 32 points in the fourth quarter - including 9-of-10 at the free throw line - to lead Entiat’s fourth quarter charge. “Joe Sarmiento also has continued to play well,” Allie said. Sarmiento added 11 for the Hornets (2-6), who next play at home against Pateros on Friday, Jan. 4.

WR - Oroville at Kettle Falls, 6:00 pm Thursday, Jan. 10 JV/Var BB - Bridgeport at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm Var/JV GB - Bridgeport at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm Friday, Jan. 11 WR - Cascade at Tonasket, 7:00 pm Saturday, Jan. 12 JV/Var BB - Oroville at Riverside Christian, 3:00/4:30 pm Var/JV GB - Oroville at Riverside Christian, 3:00/4:30 pm WR - Oroville at Tonasket Apple Pie Tourney, 10:00 am

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School • 11 a.m. Worship Service Call for other events information • 509-223-3542 Pastor Vern Fenton lookingup@wildblue.com

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10:30 a.m., Worship & Youth Sun. School Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To reserve this spot call Charlene at 476-3602 for details.

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church?

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 03, 2013  

January 03, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 03, 2013  

January 03, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune