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EARLY DEADLINE

Kid’s Fishing Day at Bonaparte Lake

News and display ads in by Friday, June 29 & classifieds in by 12 p.m. on Monday, July 2

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SERVING WASHINGTON’S

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Kay Tracy is Grand Marshal for Fourth of July Rodeo BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

CHESAW – Katherin Tracy, a true daughter of the Okanogan Highlands, has been chosen as Grand Marshal of this year’s Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo. Known to most people at this end of the valley as “Kay,” or “Mrs. Sutton” to those she taught at Oroville Elementary, Katherin (Sherling, Sutton) Tracy grew up near Molson. She attended the Lone Star School on Mary Anne Creek for her first two years, riding horseback the two miles with her brother Kal. The next six years she attended the Molson School, later moving to Omak where she graduated in 1938. After high school she married Bill Sutton and they moved to the Molson area to farm with her family, the Sherlings. In 1944 they moved to Chesaw and it was then that her husband became a charter member of the Chesaw Rodeo Club. “In those days there were no benches/ bleachers so people sat or leaned on the fences that formed the arena,” said the

July 4th events in North County

She’s Grand

Grand Marshal through her daughter Sharron Cox, who supplied the information for this article. The Grand Marshal recalls that wild horses were rounded up by local ranchers and they also provided cows for the various events. Kay managed the rodeo hamburger stand which was across the street from Mack’s store. She recalls the entire celebration was done by volunteers, much as it is today. In those early years she even played piano for many of the dances. At age 46 she entered Eastern Washington University and in 1968 she started her ten-year career of teaching at Oroville. She retired from teaching to marry Glenn Tracy, the man she met at a Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo dance that summer. It was an exciting time for her, traveling and following Glenn’s employment. Although she lives in Tonasket now at North Valley Extended Care, she can often be seen at events that take place in the highlands, and recently attended the Molson Midsummer Festival with family members by her side.

Chesaw Rodeo, dance, fireworks and barbecue BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

Submitted photo

Grand Marshal Kay Tracy

New EMS director brings years of experience to job

Getting some rays

“We also wanted someplace rural where we could fit in, with a lot of community involvement. My goal was for her TONASKET - Michael Greene and his to come up with a ‘top three,’ and then I’d wife retired to Tonasket last November go have a look. She did a huge amount hoping to focus their efforts on doing of research, everything from the sense of community to the soil conditions and volunteer work in the community. That all changed when EMS director water levels.” The Greenes, who have two adult (and Tonasket Elementary principal) Jeff Cravy resigned this spring. Suddenly, the sons, bought their property with plans of Greenes’ new community needed a new gradually putting in infrastructure and a home. EMS director. That all changed last fall when Michael And Greene, with 37 years of experihad a heart ence in fire and attack. EMS service, “Boom, my was a man in the career got cut right place at the short with a right time to fill near-fatal carthe position. diac even that “My goal was got solved with to be able to a pacemaker,” volunteer in the he said. “We c o m m u n i t y ,” decided we’d Greene said. “The move up here position I see as early, and I another opporreally like the tunity to help community.” the community. At the I didn’t come up Brent Baker / staff photo time, Greene here going, ‘Gee, was in his I want to be the New Tonasket EMS director Michael Greene fourth year as Tonasket EMS director.’ I was very happy with Jeff being the Sierra Fire Protection District fire the director. I was very disappointed that chief, in Reno, Nevada. But with a fire/ he’s leaving. I’d only asked what I could EMS department that included 66 paid employees and 120 volunteers, as well as do to help.” Greene had been volunteering for the stresses of strapped finances resulting three or four paramedic shifts a month from Nevada’s deep recession, it was time with Lifeline in Omak “to keep my skills to accelerate the retirement plans. Prior to his final stint in Reno, up,” he said. The timing might have been a bit of Greene, who estimates he’s been out on a coincidence, but the Greenes’ desire approximately 30,000 calls in his career, to move to Tonasket was not. As they served a variety of positions in Western prepared for retirement, Barbara Greene Washington. He owned an EMS consulting and spent countless hours researching a place training company that he ran from 1984to retire. “My wife’s job was to search through 94 and was a firefighter and paramedic Oregon and Washington to find the right for eight years in Olympia, where he met combination of things for us,” Greene Barbara. He took over as assistant fire chief said. “She’s very interested in permaculture and organic farming, and there is a in Belfair, a town of about 6,000 on the lot of that in this community.

NORTH COUNTY – The Independence Day Holiday traditions continue in the North County with the annual Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo celebrating 70 years, fireworks in Oroville and Tonasket and a barbecue. The Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo, features local cowboys and cowgirls competing in bareback and saddle bronc events, cow riding, cattle roping and barrel racing. The small sports start at 10 a.m. The rodeo begins at 1 p.m. During the rodeo events the younger cowpoke can take a turn at riding a calf. There’s also the wild cow milking, as well as the wild action where the kids are set loose in the arena to try their hand at catching a speeding chicken to take home. The cost to get into the rodeo is $5. “The books for entry in the rodeo were just opened this morning,” Millie Leslie, with the Chesaw Rodeo Club, said last Monday. “Those that want to enter should call (509) 485-3223.” The fun in Chesaw really kicks off this year on Tuesday, July 3 with the

Bring a lawn chair or blanket to view the fireworks show.

BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

SEE GREENE | PG. A3

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 108 No. 26

Photo by Gary DeVon

Several painted turtles were taking advantage of a handy log to sun themselves at Forde Lake in the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area last Friday afternoon.

$25,000 to improve lake water quality LOA to raise weevils to fight eurasian milfoil BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

KELOWNA, B.C. - Proceeds from last fall’s Osoyoos Lake Water Science Forum will be split between representatives working on each side of the border to improve lake water quality. The money, $25,000, will be equally divided between the Town of Osoyoos and the Oroville-based Lake Osoyoos Association. “Osoyoos Lake, and all those who depend on its clean water, are the beneficiaries of funds to improve the lake’s water quality thanks to last fall’s successful Osoyoos Lake Water Science Forum,” announced Corrine Jackson, a spokeswoman for the Okanagan Basin Water Board, a Canadian group. An international forum was held in Osoyoos last September to discuss the

future of the lake, which straddles the Canada/U.S. border. The discussion brought together scientists, townspeople, agencies and politicians from the U.S. and Canada. The forum steering committee - with representatives from the International Joint Commission (IJC), Environment Canada, the Okanagan Basin Water Board (OBWB), Washington State’s Okanogan Conservation District, the Town of Osoyoos, and the Lake Osoyoos Association - voted to direct the proceeds of the conference to water quality improvement projects for the lake. The Town of Osoyoos will receive $12,500 to provide grants for projects on the Canadian side, and the Lake Osoyoos Association (a registered non-profit) will manage $12,500 for projects on the U.S. side. This is a one-time funding opportunity. “The committee was very pleased to be able to direct the funds this way,” said Anna Warwick Sears, Executive Director of the OBWB. “Osoyoos Lake spans both

SEE LAKE | PG. A3

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Country Western Dance between 9 p.m. and 1 a.m. Powder River band will be performing. Children age ten and under get in for free at both the dance and the rodeo, according to Leslie. Independence Day in Chesaw will start out with a Cowboy Breakfast sponsored as a fundraiser for the Sitzmark Ski Club. It begins at 6 a.m. Although preregistration is not required for the parade at 12:30 p.m. prior to the start of the rodeo, it is appreciated, Leslie said. Everyone is welcome to participate in the parade and to preregister call (509) 485-2103. In Oroville, the Community Fireworks Show takes place at Deep Bay Park after dusk and Greg James owner of Topix Entertainment is lead sponsor again this year, according to Dane Forrester, who has been organizing the show for well over a dozen years. He suggests people bring their lawn chair or a blanket to stretch out in the grass at the park. The pyrotechnics are brought to the community through donations from businesses and local donors. There will be $5000 in fireworks again this year, but the show is always working a year ahead. Donations are always appreciated so they can put a deposit down on the next year’s show, said Forrester. Donations can be sent to Oroville Community Fireworks, c/o Dane Forrester, P.O. Box 370, Oroville, WA. 9884. There are fireworks in Tonasket as well, along with a barbecue at the North Valley Assisted Living. The barbecue of hot dogs and burgers takes place on July 4 between 5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. with the fireworks beginning at dusk. Organizers suggest that participants bring a lawnchair so they can enjoy the fireworks in comfort. A $5 donation is suggested by organizers.

Community A2-3 Letters & Opinions A4 Valley Life A5-6

Community Bulletin A6 Sports/Outdoors B1 Valley Life B2

Police Stats/Obits B3 Classifieds/Legals B4-5 Valley Life B6


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 28, 2012

Hirst-Pavek loses appeal of murder and manslaughter convictions

Last year George Thornton led a native plant hike at Lost Lake as part of the Okanogan Highlands Associations Summertime Highland Wonders educational series. This year Thornton will take a group into the secluded cedar groves northeest of Buckhorn Mountain.

Cedar ecology hike in the Okanogan Highlands on July 7 the Native Plant Hike at Lost Lake, also lead by George Thornton, you won’t want to miss the Cedar Ecology Hike. Thornton opened the first Highland Wonders series by sharing his knowledge and photos of unique and rarely seen Okanogan Highland plants, and later he walked the Lost Lake wetland fringe and woods with us, describing native plants in three dimensions. After the Cedar Ecology hike, there will be a potluck snack picnic (finger foods only, please). Due to the nature of the outdoor event, participation is limited, and priority registration will be offered for OHA members. A waiting list is being generated on a first-come, first-serve basis. To begin or renew your OHA membership and be first in line to register for the summertime events, please visit www.okanoganhighlands.org/support, or contact OHA for more information. Contact OHA to sign up, for time, meeting place, and carpooling options. OHA is a non-profit that works to educate the public on watershed issues, and the Highland Wonders educational series features the natural history of the Okanogan Highlands and surrounding areas. OHA’s Education Program, which is offered free of charge, is designed to build the capacity of the community to steward natural habitats and resources, by helping to develop an informed and empowered population. Donations are always welcome. Details are provided on OHA’s website: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education.

SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE OHA CONSERVATION COORDINATOR

CHESAW - On Saturday, July 7, local botanist, George Thornton, will take a group into the secluded cedar groves northeast of Buckhorn Mountain, where an extraordinary ecosystem thrives because of the shade, stable soils, organic matter and habitat provided by the Western Red Cedar. The Cedar Ecology Hike is part of the Okanogan Highlands Association’s Summertime Highland Wonders educational series. It will explore the Cedar Creek drainage, where higher elevation life begins to transition from the semi-arid rain shadow caused by the North Cascades, into the greener, lush regions found to the east. This is the OHA’s first outdoor Highland Wonders event of the summer. The ecologically valuable cedar was heavily harvested during the early 1900’s for Kettle Valley Railroad ties, but is recovering well, providing important habitat for a variety of plants and animals. This unique remnant cedar forest reminds us of past climatic times, and of indigenous traditions, as Indian trails traversed this area for access to local flora and fauna. During this summer’s field trip, Thornton will help unlock the mysteries of the ecology associated with Western Red Cedar, and provide a window into the life that flourishes because of it. If you enjoyed Botanical Gems of the Okanogan Highlands and

BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OKANOGAN – Lacey Kae Hirst-Pavek, found guilty as an accomplice in aggravated first degree murder and first degree manslaughter in the death of Michelle Kitterman, has lost an appeal of those convictions. Hirst-Pavek contended that the trial court erred in concluding she had no reasonable privacy expectation in her employment and vehicle rental records, according to Washington State Court of Appeals documents issued June 12, 2012. In their ruling, the Court of Appeals agreed with the Okanogan County Prosecutor’s office that Hirst-Pavek “was consumed by her husband’s affair with Michelle Kitterman and Ms. Kitterman’s resultant pregnancy. Ms. HirstPavek wanted Ms. Kitterman to terminate the pregnancy. Her animosity toward Ms. Kitterman is amply shown by her frequent disparaging comments to others, her deteriorating work performance at Sunrise Chevrolet and her attempts to have Ms. Kitterman arrested for drug dealing and driving Ms. Hirst-Pavek’s truck without a license. Ultimately, Ms. HirstPavek contacted and facilitated others to confront Ms. Kitterman, resulting in Ms. Kitterman’s homicide and the death of her unborn child.” Okanogan County Prosecutor Karl Sloan said the issues raised in the appeal and the decision of the Appeals Court went the way his office thought they would and the way the prosecution argued them. “There was no new ground broken...they didn’t find any significant issues, it is clear when you read the decision by the Appeals Court,” said Sloan. “In one issue the appellant argued that the jury was advised that they didn’t have to find her intent to convict. Clearly she had the intent, but it wasn’t required to find her guilty. She just needed to have the knowledge to facilitate the crime.” Another issue, were the records for the rental vehicle from Sunrise Chevrolet that Hirst-Pavek is said to have rented for her accomplice Tansey Mathis, a methamphet-

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Lacey Kae Hirst-Pavek reads over her court papers while waiting for her sentencing hearing to begin in 2010. Hirst-Pavek was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole for the murder of Michelle Kitterman and 126 months in prison for the manslaughter of Kitterman’s unborn child. amine dealer from Spokane who On Feb. 25 she met Mathis again tence of 78 to 102 months plus was acquainted with both Hirst- and she the next day she rented a an additional 24-month enhancePavek and Kitterman. 2008 Chevy Trailblazer from her ment for possession of a deadly “One of the other issues raised employer. Brent Phillips, who weapon. For count three, kidnapby the appellant was that the trial confessed to his role in the mur- ping in the first degree, Mathis court should have suppressed der, testified that he and Mathis received the top range of a senadmission of the rental car and drove to a house south of Tonasket tence of 51 to 68 months plus an employment records. Even though near where Kitterman was liv- additional 24-month enhancethe court of appeals indicated the ing and persuaded Kitterman to ment for possession of a deadly records were not the type of record leave with them promising drugs weapon. Finally, for count four, that revealed intimate details (i.e. among other things. They drove tampering with physical evidence, were not records where there is an to a location on Stalder Road near she received one year. expectation of privacy), they ruled Republic and Phillips beat and For Richards’ first count of secthey did not even have to reach choked Kitterman and Mathis ond degree murder he received that question, because Sunrise began stabbing her with an ice a mid-range sentence of a 165 to employees, other witnesses, and pick belonging to David Richards, 265 month sentence range, which the defendant’s statements estab- who was also convicted in the comes to 215 months plus an addilished the same facts independent killing with Mathis and Phillips, tional 24-month enhancement for of the records, making the privacy although he was not present. possession of a deadly weapon. question about the records moot,” The Hirst-Pavek murder trial For his conviction of manslaughsaid Sloan. was moved out of Okanogan ter of an unborn child, Richards Hirst-Pavek now has 30 days County and she was convicted by was sentenced a mid-range sento decide whether she will seek an Douglas County jury on Nov. tence from the range of 111 to review of her case by the state 16, 2010 and later sentenced to life 147 months plus an additional Supreme Court, according to without parole on the first degree 24-month enhancement for posSloan. murder trial and 126 months in session of a deadly weapon. “A defendant convicted of a the death of Kitterman’s unborn The third suspect, Phillips, 39, felony has the right to appeal. She child. of Spokane, plead guilty earlier to appealed and she lost. If she asks On April 22, 2010, after less first degree murder and testified at the Supreme Court to rule then than 24 hours of deliberation, an the trial of Mathis and Richards. it is up to that court to decide Okanogan County jury found Prosecutor Sloan said that whether they will review the case. Mathis, 30, guilty of aggravated Phillips guilty plea means he is If they don’t accept the case then first degree murder, first degree unable to appeal his conviction, her right to appeal her conviction manslaughter of an unborn child, however, Mathis and Richards is pretty much over,” Sloan said. first degree kidnapping and tam- have the right to appeal. Sloan said In late January or February of pering with evidence. Richards, their first appeals were rejected 2009 Hirst-Pavek was said to have 34, of Spokane, was found guilty by the appeals court, but they are met with Mathis in Spokane and of second degree murder and currently sitting and waiting on asked her if she could “get her first degree manslaughter plus the a decision by the state Supreme (Kitterman) to go away.” Hirst- enhancement of being armed. Court on a case that is similar to Pavek is said to have later told On the first count Mathis theirs. a co-worker she had gone to received a sentence of life in prison “Because the issue is similar Spokane to hire someone to “take without the possibility of parole. their appeal is being held off until care of ” Kitterman, but couldn’t On count two, first degree man- a decision is made on that issue “go through with it,” according to slaughter of an unborn child, she before they address it. That’s not court documents. received the top range of a sen- uncommon,” said Sloan.

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June 28, 2012 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

American Legion Riders

By Rolly Clark, Commander Post 84

The American Legion Riders, Oroville Chapter 84, had a motorcycle run to collect teddy bears for local law enforcement. They had Riders from Brewster, Moses Lake, Spokane, Pasco, Tonasket, Okanogan and Oroville. The Assistant Director of Oroville Chapter, Rolly Clark, said they had a good group of Riders. Every Rider donated one teddy bear. They collected 363 teddy bears. The teddy bears will go to The Okanogan County Sheriff Dept., Oroville Police Dept. and Brewster Police Dept. to be handed out to children involved in emergencies. If you would like to join the American Legion Riders, The meetings are the third Saturday of each month at 10 a.m., at American Legion Post 84, Oroville, or contact Post 84 for more information. Thanks to all you fellow Riders and community for your support!

LAKE | FROM A1 sides of the border, so any actions that are taken on the lake affect the people, the animals, and the natural areas of the lake as a whole. It was a unanimous decision that the funds be shared to improve lake quality on both sides of the border, recognizing that all will benefit from the work.” Interest in cross-border collaboration is especially high this summer, according to the OBWB, as both countries enter into public consultation for the renewal of the Osoyoos Lake Operating Orders, under the Boundary Waters Treaty which expires in February 2013. The Orders spell out rules of operation for lake levels in summer and winter, and how these change in drought years. A report with recommendations from the International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control will be posted on the IJC website within the coming month, and public meetings are scheduled for July 24 and 25 in Oroville and Osoyoos, respectively. The report is expected to address drought and flood control issues, climate change concerns, and the need to protect the health of the sockeye salmon run. A full 80 percent of the sockeye returning to the Columbia River Basin (U.S. and Canada) are born in the Okanogan system, according to Jackson. Meanwhile, the Lake Osoyoos Association has been trying to get a handle on the milfoil problem on the lake. The plant thrives as temperatures start to rise and clogs boat props and impacts swimming and beach areas. In a recent newsletter Ford Waterstrat writes that harvesting, a technique preferred on the Canadian side of the lake, does not work as it doesn’t kill the plant and each part of a plant not collected can float downstream and start a new patch of milfoil. Hand pulling works better, but is time intensive and rototilling has much the same problems as harvesting. “Using herbicides needs to be repeated and repeated much like an addiction. In fact just recently the Sandpoint Idaho city council voted not to use herbicides in Lake Pend Oreille around the Sandpoint area due to strong public response against the use of chemicals,” writes Waterstrat. “Lake residents and members of the Lake Pend Oreille Waterkeepers Association noticed that the use of herbicides in the long run was not effective. They

plan to use, ‘...non-toxic, sustainable approaches rather than herbicides.’” Toward the same end the group has received a $4000 grant from the state Department of Ecology for a weevil pilot project. “We are moving forward with this pilot,” Waterstrat writes. “We will be purchasing 20-gallon fish tanks, tank aerators, bright lights and possibly fish tank heaters -these items are relatively inexpensive. We will be following an Army Corps of Engineers protocol for raising weevils.” The association is looking for help, including collecting some of the weevils already in the lake. Representatives from Ecology and Osoyoos will teach volunteers how to do this. They also need help monitoring the weevils in the fish tanks, as well as with release into the lake after they have been propagated. In addition, the group is looking for a space with controlled environment and electricity to set up the fish tanks. “This will take place the beginning of July for collecting weevils and the middle of August for placing them back into our lake,” Waterstrat writes. “With your help we can carry forward with this pilot. We can judge the effectiveness of using a native weevil as a sustainable method to control milfoil and compare our results over the long run with harvesting, and herbicides treatments to selected sites on the U.S. side.” To help email Waterstrat at fs.waterstrat@gmail.com or Mike Cantwell at mcantwell22@gmail. com. The LOA is looking for new members and dues are $20 annually and can be paid to the Lake Osoyoos Association, P.O. Box 412, Oroville, WA 98844. Dues and donations are tax deductible.

GREENE | FROM A1 Kitsap Peninsula about 20 miles from Bremerton/Port Orchard, in 1991. He was promoted to fire chief there within a few years. During his tenure as chief, the department won six state management excellent awards and one national award for management excellence. He left for Reno in 2007 after being sold on the position by some old friends at a reunion. “I’m a big believer in making the fire department a big part of the community,” Greene said. “I think the pillars of the community are the fire department/EMS, police, churches, schools and service clubs. One of the things I work at is forming community partnerships and encouraging community participation. And volunteers are very effective force multipliers.” Greene’s interest in EMS dates back to his high school days, when he and his family encountered a serious auto accident while on vacation.

“I had the presence of mind,” he said. “But I didn’t have the skill set. When we got home I went back to my local fire department asked if I could learn First Aid. “They said not really, but I got a group of my friends together, they taught us First Aid and we became cadets and volunteered in that fire department.” He went on to college in San Diego and earned his history degree with the intent of moving on to law school, while working through school fighting wildfires for the government. “When I got ready to graduate...I thought, you know, I sure enjoyed the fire department more than I would arguing with people all day,” he said. “So I took a position in the fire department and it’s been my career ever since.” He spent his first five years after school as one of the first paramedics in northern Nevada. Greene moved to Washington

after surviving an airplane crash that killed everyone else on board. “I was the only survivor,” he said. “We had gone on a medical flight to pick up a patient and crashed coming in in a snowstorm. I broke my back and broke my ribs, had to crawl out to the highway and marked my way to the highway with debris. “The nurse that was with me died the next day, and we had just changed seats a couple of seconds before the impact. I thought, you know, I’ve been working here so hard for so long, it’s time to make a change. “And that’s what first took me to Washington even though I didn’t know anyone.” Now, while taking over in Tonasket, Greene has already started planning for the future, including a levy renewal election coming up in 2014. “I really enjoy helping develop future planning,” he said. “I’ve interviewed all of our volunteers and identify what I see as some organizational needs to help develop some strategic

plans. We’re forming an idea of what we want our EMS to look like in five years. “We’re in a reactive business, but I like to be proactive. I like working with the community and advisory board and decision makers to see what we can do to enhance our service.” And as he has in the past, Greene plans on emphasizing community involvement as he looks to the future of the department. “We need more volunteers, and there’s a lot of ways people can help out other than on the front lines,” he said. “We’re looking to things like fundraising for education, an EMS support group, I’d like to add IV training. Covering 1,600 square miles is a big burden.” Greene said, for example, that he’s excited about a new group of EMTs in the Aeneas Valley. “They just completed their course,” he said. “I’m very excited about that. I’m looking forward to working cooperatively with them to reduce our response times to that area.”

Fireworks illegal in National Forests

By Robin DeMario

USFS Public Affairs Specialist

WENATCHEE - As the Fourth of July approaches, fire officials want to remind forest visitors that fireworks are illegal in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. “The use of fireworks on national forest lands is a major concern to us,” said Fire Staff Officer Keith Satterfield. “Fireworks of any kind are illegal on all national forests.” Forest Service personnel will be on the lookout for the illegal possession or use of fireworks in the national forest. “Our folks have been instructed to confiscate any fireworks they discover,” Satterfield said. There are monetary penalties for fireworks possession on the national forest. Violators can be subject to a citation and fine with a maximum penalty of $5,000 or up to six months in jail. Anyone who starts a wildfire can be held liable for suppression costs. Those costs can

be substantial, often running into hundreds of thousands of dollars or more. “Although we’ve had a colder spring, grasses growing in the lower elevation areas have already started to dry out and could easily spread a wildfire ignited by fireworks. Also, the forecast for July and August is for hot summertime weather conditions which will cause fire danger to increase,” said Satterfield. Forest visitors are encouraged to enjoy local fireworks displays and save their fireworks for New Year’s Eve. “We want people to enjoy the holiday but we also want them to leave their fireworks at home,” he said. Fire officials are also concerned about campfire use on the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. It is not uncommon for firefighters to extinguish one or two abandoned campfires almost every weekend. Campers must ensure their campfire is completely out

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Thank You

The families of Franklin Nelson

would like to express their gratitude and appreciation for all the kind & thoughtful gestures during their time of loss. Thank you to the Chesaw Rodeo Club who provided the luncheon for the family after the funeral, it was greatly appreciated.

Wanda, Brian, Holly, Rocky & Betta

When you put your campfire out: •     Drown it with water. •          Stir the embers after they are covered with water and make sure everything is wet. •     Feel the coals and embers with your hands.  They should be cool to the touch. When you think you are done, take an extra minute and add more water.

E VO T Henry (Hank)

RAWSON Okanogan County Superior Court Pos. 1

JUDGE

 Okanogan

County District Court Judge Municipal Judge (2002-Present)  Graduate of Washington State Judicial College  District & Municipal Court Judges’ Assoc. (Member)  36 Years Criminal & Civil Law Experience  19 Years Judicial Experience  Omak

EXPERIENCE  INTEGRITY www.gazette-tribune.com

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and cold to the touch before leaving campsites. Remember, if you are going to have a campfire: •     Use an existing fire ring or construct a fire ring out of rocks. •     Clear all vegetation away from the ring and don’t build a campfire underneath low hanging tree branches. •     Keep water and a shovel nearby.

HONEST  FAIR

www.rawson4judge.com Paid for by Henry Rawson for Superior Court Judge, PO Box 1092, Okanogan, WA 98840 Treasurer Richard E. Rawson

Have a Safe, Happy 4th of July! Summertime...

the smell of the BBQ, the roar of holiday crowds at events throughout the land, family, picnics and the lake. It’s America’s annual birthday party and everyone is invited!

4th of July Events OROVILLE:

4th of July Fireworks Celebration at Deep Bay Park starts at Dusk!

TONASKET:

4th of July Fireworks Celebration at North Valley Assisted Living. BBQ at 5 to 7:30 p.m. Hot dogs & burgers will be served! Fireworks begin at dark.

CHESAW:

4th of July Chesaw Rodeo. *Small Sports 10 a.m. *Parade 12:30 p.m. *Rodeo 1 p.m. Country Western Dance Tue., July 3 from 9 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.

Come join the 4th of July Celebration! Annual 4th of July BBQ Hot dogs & burgers will be served! BBQ: 5 to 7:30 p.m.

Fireworks begin at dark! $5 donation suggested Bring your lawn chair and enjoy a spectacular fireworks show!

North Valley Assisted Living “Growing Healthcare Close to Home”

Tonasket: 118 S. Whitcomb Ave. Ph. 509-486-3121 www.nvhospital.org

70th Annual

4TH of JULY CHESAW RODEO COUNTRY WESTERN DANCE! Music by

Country Western BanD Tue., July 3rd 9:00 p.m - 1:00 a.m. $5 admission to Rodeo & Dance Children 10 & under FREE SMALL SPORTS 10:00 A.M. PARADE 12:30 P.M. RODEO 1:00 P.M. For information: 509-485-2204, 509-485-3941 or 485-3041 Parade pre-registration contact: 485-2103 Presented by CHESAW RODEO CLUB


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 21, 2012

THE TOWN CRIER Changes and improvements taking place in downtown Oroville A friend said with all the bickering about the Oroville School Board, maybe it would be a good idea to write about some of the “good things” going on in Oroville. He’s right. Although we endeavor to cover all the positives, sometimes they go unnoticed yet it might be hard to miss the improvements taking place, especially in the downtown area (we’ve captured a few in photos on B3 this week). Perhaps the biggest change is to the look of Frontier Foods, with new siding and paint as well as river rock accents on the front of the store. The rock is continued around the base of the poles that hold up the cover over the sidewalk. If Oroville has a theme that ties many of the buildings together, it seems to be river rock and it is a good look. Frontier has a bright new sign on the side of the building that looks to be visible from about three blocks and the grocery is also getting a new roof. Rancho Grande in the old Peerless building looks good inside and out. The paint color on the exterior really makes the building stand out and we’ll have a new business story about them when they’re ready to open. A few of the Oroville Chamber Board members got a quick tour of the inside several weeks ago and the murals, tile and other interior work is really Out of pleasing. The Camaray Motel continues to make My Mind strides in its appearance and is now at the top Gary A. DeVon of our list when we recommend a place to stay in Oroville. The friend also mentioned a couple non-businesses that have had some improvements of late. These include the Mini-Park in front of Expressions Espresso. The Oroville Streetscape Committee has taken the park on as their own and combined with the hanging baskets, flower pots and everything else the committee does it always gives the town a welcoming look. We might also mention that there have been some changes at VIP Insurance and at Mark Hancock Accounting. Mike Bourn has moved his insurance crew out of the VIP Professional Building and across the street to Mark Hancock’s office in the old Oroville Realty building. The new digs offer more space for the business. Hancock has moved back into his old office, just to the west, where he had been living. Word is he and wife Gloria still have an apartment in back. Now we have an empty space at the VIP building for rent and hopefully it will be filled soon. Last, but not least, my unnamed friend suggested we mention the yellow house at 1660 Main next to the Chen’s Dental Clinic. We don’t usually talk about what people have been doing to their private homes, but this unique house has been somewhat neglected over the past dozen or so years. One year it even fell victim to a wind storm that toppled a tree onto the porch. Well, all the trees that seemed to be crowding the fine old home out have been trimmed and other improvements continue to be made and it’s worth keeping an eye on.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818/ Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. Devon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Production/Classifieds Abby Gardner agardner@gazette-tribune.com Circulation Abby Gardner (509) 476-3602 | 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley GazetteTribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley GazetteTribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: 5 p.m. Friday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE, TONASKET & OKANOGAN COUNTY

PUD plans for Similkameen a boondoggle Dear Editor, Did you know the PUD is carrying a $39 million debt? This year we will pay a debt service of $3.5 million, $1.5 million toward principle and $1.9 million in interest. The 2012 budget will spend $2.7 million on the Enloe Dam Proposal, mostly on outside consultants and engineering firms. How many millions of our dollars have been spent since 2005 when this latest plan was hatched? Imagine if all those millions had been applied toward principle on the $39 million we owe. The risk of borrowing $30-$40 million for a new powerhouse at Enloe Dam on top of $39 million already owed will double the PUD debt, increase debt service fees to $7 million annually, could raise our rates higher, and will negatively impact our tourism, fisheries and recreation, and leave us all poorer than we are now. Does this proposal make economic sense to ratepayer? No! The Chinook Salmon and upper Columbia Steelhead running strong, and a wild Similkameen River flowing beside the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail will benefit Oroville and Okanogan County far more than a powerhouse at Enloe Dam. All the issues of water temperature and dissolved gases are solved by no powerhouse and improved planting of more trees to shade the water and provide habitat for birds, insects and other biodiversity. More energy would be made available by improved insulation, more efficient heating/cooling systems and better insulated doors/windows, than this power plant will produce. The PUD has a low interest loan program of up to $10,000 available for energy savings investments like windows, heat pumps, solar and wind systems. It is low interest, paid back over five years and could transform residences and businesses into power producers feeding energy back into the grid. Our PUD is not required by I-937 to produce 15 percent of its energy from green sources until we grow

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR from 20,000 meters currently to 25,000 meters which is many years ahead. By then, energy efficiency, solar and wind will meet our needs without this very expensive, burdensome project. Joseph Enzensperger Oroville

Gun sales a slap in the face Dear Editor, Just a heartfelt comment about the executive privilege initiated by Obama regarding the Congressional hearings involving the Department of Justice and particularly, Attorney General Holder. Fast and Furious guns have killed not only border patrol agent Brian Terry and many Mexican citizens, but also possibly ICE agent Jaime Zapata. The Department of Justice’s refusal to provide the most important documents required to determine the truth about who authorized Fast and Furious gun sales to the Zetas Drug Cartel is a slap in the face to every American who has ever served in law enforcement as well as every individual who cherishes truth and justice. At this moment, we should look long and hard at what the real reason is for Obama to declare executive privilege in this matter. The most likely reason -- that the President himself had knowledge of the gun sales to criminals. Mitch Spears Nighthawk

Can’t mend a broken heart Dear Editor, You cannot mend a broken heart! They will tell you that you can. Time will heal. It is all a lie! Those that have had their hearts broken, their souls ripped from their bodies, all they love and treasured destroyed in one faulty moment will tell you it is not true! We will continue our lives, those of us wounded beyond help, continue to appear normal, all is well, but inside we continue to bleed,

hemorrhage, unbeknownst to the outside world. Walking shells of our former selves. Life more meaningless than before. We laugh, work, carry on as though all is well but in the late night hours it all comes to a head again and again. We hemorrhage tears, sobs of uncontrollable grief, no silence for us, no helping hand as none could console us. Our souls reaching out for those we have lost. Still needing, wanting, moments in time. What of the world? What of us, you would ask, perhaps in a moment of concerned interest. Is there not a way to reverse this? Yes we would answer. Reverse time, bring back all we have lost, let us begin again before all was taken from us! Let us breathe again! Our grief is like a prison! Release us! Hold your arms out to me! Begin again! Why did you leave me behind so broken! Unable to move! Unable to feel, breathe, function! Did you really think I would be okay? You feel n pain now. Weightless. Pure energy. A soul drifting toward eternity. I cannot see, hear or fell you now in this life of mine I must continue alone. I need to hear your voice, have your arms around me, smell you, taste you, feel your warmth against me, your love engulfing me. My rock, my escape from all this madness we call our life but you’re not here! I have no escape now. Only my nonstop grief and pain in my heart. Tears are easy now. I was never one to cry before but a broken heart will do this to you I suppose. Do you see? Do you hear me where you are? Continue your journey without me for now but I will join you someday and my soul will be whole again as our souls merge as one. I’ll be okay they tell me. In memory of my beloved Ken, Vivian Taylor, Oroville

You can’t serve two masters Dear Editor, Today I’m writing because on Father’s Day one year ago my Dad, Jerry Rounds, gave me advice that

I will never forget. We were out by the horse pen. I was leaving for Montana, knowing in my heart that this would be the last day I’d see him in awhile. He told me, Sabrina, you can’t serve two masters. It’s either one but not both. you see he knew that I was too ashamed to tell him out loud. Our fathers know what are don’t always say. I have a wise dad! Anyway, that day I remember so well because it was not only Father’s Day but my mom, Evelyn’s birthday, June 19 as well. She passed on at the age of 40 due to a drowning accident, alcohol was involved. Needless to say this day last Father’s Day was the last day I took a drink or drug. That day I was on my way to Montana to face my fate for the next 15 months of a 5 year sentence. I was ready to go. I had seen the truth and Jesus was with me. I needed time to overcome the disease that I was bound by. I knew I had to jump off the fence and serve one Master... Jesus Christ. Matthew 6:24: “No one can serve two Masters. Either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and mammon.” Now community, the reason I’m sharing this with you is because what my Dad gave me was a gift of wisdom given to him by his Dad, Ed Rounds. We chase after worldly treasures and in the end find that nothing compares to the gift our father in heaven offers us. Hope of salvation! I want you all to embrace your freedom today. I love my Dad for all his advice he’s given me and I’m glad that I was listening when I was. My gift to my Dad and myself as well as many others was to choose life over death. And community meth and alcohol is death just as bitterness and vain conceit is death. Look around and see the beauty of life. Don’t worry but trust in God. He’ll take care of everything. He’s taken care of my Dad, me and my family. Choose life a gift our father in heaven offers. I hope your Father’s Day was wonderful! God Bless, Sabrina Rounds Missoula, Mont.

Be courteous when you curse OPINION BY LAURIE SCHLOFF

Cursing is controversial. Some believe that people who utter four-letter words are immoral, others call them crude, and still others view those who have a foul mouth as uncivilized and annoying. The town of Middleboro, Massachusetts was fed up with the spate of teen cursing on downtown streets and passed an ordinance that fines public cursers 20 dollars for each “bad word” they say in public. On the opposite end of the cursing controversy, linguistic libertarians believe words are neither bad nor good. They believe free speech, including the right to verbalize rudeness, is guaranteed in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and that the only bad words are the ones that threaten to cause physical harm to listeners (yelling bomb

on board, for example). No matter where you stand on swearing, communication specialists recommend that sensitivity to others is the key factor to consider if you have the urge to say anything stronger than “darn” or “shucks.” Here are three things to consider before you curse in public: 1. Know who’s listening to you. Cursing serves as a verbal expression of anger, frustration, or disappointment, but your issues are not everyone’s business. Particularly, if you’re on the phone call with a friend or a client, think before you use an expletive. The salesperson who instinctively blurts out the “s-word” when she breaks a fingernail during a call with prospective customer can cost herself more than the price of a manicure. 2. Err on the conservative side at work. All things consid-

ered, even if everyone’s “doing it,” it’s better to be called a prude than to prove yourself profane or just at a loss for more descriptive words. If you are focused on career growth, your linguistic flexibility in forming ideas, not expletives, will be a major factor. If you need a thesaurus, by all means, get one … and learn new ways of expressing yourself in a professional setting so that others don’t worry about whether you’d be an appropriate candidate for a promotion (or, these days, even for keeping your job!). 3. Save it for later. If you truly must let loose with your cussing, consider waiting until later, when you’re surrounded by your buddies, to vent. At other times, when you’re in public, restrain yourself. There are always gentler, kinder words you can use, so adjust your vocabulary accordingly when you’re in

mixed company. Since swearing can be a wellhoned habit, it will help if you find alternatives. Squeeze your fingers together, make a fist, or tighten your toes when you feel a curse coming on. If you must mouth off, have a few milquetoast alternatives ready such as darn, shoot, rats or fudge. Or be creative and develop your own customized curse word— one busy bartender says hockey puck to let off steam. The folks in Middleboro, Massachusetts may be onto something. They know that exposure to excessive cursing can offend, and as a wise professor of speech once said, “Freedom of speech is not always free.” Laurie Schloff is a Senior Coaching Partner with Brookline, Massachusetts-based The Speech Improvement Company. Visit her online at www.speechimprovement.com.


June 21, 2012 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A5

Okanogan Valley Life Another month down the tube. That much closer to November and something to listen to on TV besides who is the best (or worst) to be elected president. It is the time of the year for summer outings and many look forward to camping. I once told someone, who couldn’t understand why I didn’t like camping, that I camped for 16 years and when I FINALLY got to the place in my THIS & THAT life, that I could flip a Joyce Emry switch and light up the whole room, and could turn a little chrome faucet and have water,

even HOT, without having to carry water from a well or spring, (always up a hill) that was my idea of living. Not out in the dirt, fighting mosquitoes and other bugs and then sleeping on the hard ground at night, and you know what? I have not changed my mind one bit. A picnic, is good, but camping, no thanks. Maybe I’d feel differently if I lived in a big city and had to fight the daily traffic...maybe. I received an e-mail telling how to fix corn on the cob, which will be ready before we know it. (And if you’ve never tasted the wonderful corn that Lynn Eder fixes for the freezer, you haven’t had the best) I have not tried the method, but a friend did and she said it really worked. Put two ears of corn, in the shuck, in the microwave, for eight minutes. Using protection for your hands, (oven gloves if you have some) cut off the large end of the ear,

going through all the layers of husk, hold by the small end and give it a few shakes and wa! la! Out comes the corn, totally free of silks. Once again proving, “We never get too old to learn something new”. As summer arrives I think we all like easy cooking. For a dessert that is SO GOOD and so easy, try this peach cobbler. Pour a large can of peaches in a 9x13 pan. Pour a dry cake mix over the peaches. (white, yellow or whatever) Get the lumps out, if there are any. Melt a stick of butter with 1/2 cup of brown sugar, and pour over the dry cake mix. Put a 1/2 cup of chopped nuts over the top. For variety add 1/2 cup coconut. For a “peachier” cobbler use a small can along with the large can. Bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees. So easy and so quick. Of course a scoop of ice cream doesn’t hurt anything when you serve it, but it’s

good without. Another hint I haven’t used, but it sounds plausible. To extend the life of fresh raspberries and strawberries, rinse them in a mixture of one part vinegar to five parts water, drain and refrigerate and they won’t mold as quickly, so the helpful hint says. Beverly Lee has had her other hip replacement. Hopefully, she can now get out and do some of the things she’s had to postpone due to the pain she was enduring. Remember the Red Cross Blood Draw July 11 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the United Methodist Church. Have you stopped in at the “rock shop” located next to Hometown Pizza? They have some unusual rocks and other fun stuff. Maybe you need a gift...there’s a lot to chose from. Name of the shop: World of Agia, owned by Cecilia (Ray) Wesphal and her husband,

and most of the business is done by mail order. How many people do you know that order a pound or two of rocks? They are interesting folks and enjoy telling you “their story”. Cecilia is the daughter of Eva Ray, and I’m sure she is happy to have her near by. Stop in and say “Hello”...they might even give you a pretty polished stone. We’ve had some busy carpenters at our house and now we have a nice new covering on the deck, which will keep the snow off next winter and does make a more finished look to the house. I have to admit, I was wrong in my not wanting it, and it’s taken five years to convince me. And carpenters are busy at the big house by the dentist office. I refer to it as the Priebe house, as that’s who lived in it in the forties when I came, then later John and Dorothy Mears occupied the place and it has been empty and

getting covered up by so called trees of heaven. It’s such a neat old place and how nice that it is going to be given some TLC and make it special again. Another group of veterans flew out of Spokane, recently, on the Honor Flight, to go to Washington D.C. to see the World War ll Memorial, and other interesting sights. Thanks again to Justin Peterson for his tremendous fund raising to help more guys get to go. I know Clayton really enjoyed the trip, and his grandson, Jason Haney, did as well. For Jason’s BIG 40 birthday his family gave him a nice surprise...a ride in an open cockpit airplane in Seattle. Another nice thing to put in his memory bank. To achieve inner peace, we must finish what we start. Today I finished two bags of chips, a bottle of wine and a box of chocolates...I feel better already.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

ing at home but has managed to play bingo with the Bingo Bunch last Thursday and was seen at the potluck on Sunday to play their strange game of pinochle. She is doing much better after her fall last month. Howard Cumbo is doing much better and showed up to play pinochle last Saturday evening. A thank you to his family for bringing him up and taking him

back to his home away from home. It was good to see him out as he spent much of his time, prior to his fall, at the Center whether it was playing pool or setting up the tables for Saturday evening pinochle. And one in a while, he could

be seen working on a puzzle, as Doris Hughes always has one in process. Don’t forget that the Senior Building Fund Auction is July 14. Pinochle scores for June 23: The door prize was won by Ted Zachman; most pinochles won

by Ted Thorndike. First high went to Evelyn Dull and second high went to newcomer, Dominic Scaggiori, who is staying with his daughter for the summer and she told me that he was a very good player. His score shows it. More next time.

By Dolly Engelbretson

Summer has finally arrived but doesn’t seem sure of itself. It still acts like spring, with hints of summer. We will soon be celebrating the anniversary of the birth of our country, so be cautious around fireworks and more traffic. Better yet, take in the rodeo in Chesaw and come watch the fireworks By Marianne Knight

The BIG count - down has begun. The rodeo is only a week away. The grounds are almost ready and next Sunday will be the rock picking day in the arena. The Rodeo Club has been working hard to get things ready and in good shape for the July 4th Rodeo. Our Rodeo is one of the best family rodeos around. The admission fee is only $5 for adults and kids 10 and under are free. The books opened June 25 and entries will be accepted 7 a.m. - 10 p.m. Phone (509) 4853223. Books close when events are filled. Fees must be paid by 2 p.m. July 1. Small sports start at 10 a.m. with no entry fee and has events for all ages. No sign – up. The Parade starts at 12:30 p.m. All are welcome. Prior sign up is rec-

display at Deep Bay in the evening. But, let’s not forget the reason for the holiday. Midge Minyard is convalesc-

HILLTOP COMMENTS ommended by the parade committee. Call Marianne at (509) 485-2103 or e-mail Hehama@ Bossig.com. Kids Events: Calf Scramble, no entry, for 12 and under. Junior Events: Cow Riding, Calf Roping, Barrels. Senior Events: Cow Riding Saddle Bronc-Bareback with entry fee of $20 each. Men’s Wild Cow Milking: $20 entry/team. Open Barrel Racing: $10 entry. Don’t miss the dance on July 3. Powder River will provide the music, $5 admission. 9 p.m. to 1a.m.

Food concessions will be provided by the Knob Hill Home Economics Club serving: Walking Taco’s, Corn Dogs, Popcorn, Snow Cones, and Cotton Candy. The Sitzmark Ski Area will provide breakfast till about 10 a.m. then switch over to burgers, dogs and fries. The Chesaw Tavern will have Linda of Linda’s Bakery fixin’ a country breakfast. And, rumor has it that there may be chicken and steak on the barbecue later. WOW! Did you see and hear that big storm last Friday night? What an experience. We can wait a long time before we get another one like that. Welcome to all of the visitors that we will have over the holiday. See you all at the parade and the rodeo.

Former area doctor named Family Physician of the Year cine,” as he clearly relishes his role as a teacher, in particular introducing students to the challenges WAFP Membership and rewards of being a rural pracBELLEVUE - The Washington tice doctor. Indeed generations of Academy of Family Physicians UW medical students chose family medicine (WAFP) has named and entered Spokane physician, a rural John McCarthy, MD practice as a as Family Physician direct result of the Year for 2012 of working and welcomes him as with him. Washington Academy D r . of Family Physicians McCarthy Foundation President. grew up in The prestigious award Ta c o m a . is given annually by He received WAFP to a family phyhis BS in sician who exemplifies Biology at a compassionate comSanta Clara, mitment to improving and later the health and well received being of people and his MA in communities throughCounseling out Washington. f r o m According to the Dr. John McCarthy Gonzaga in WAFP, Dr. McCarthy has been described as “a doc- 1985, followed by counseling work in Alaska. He completed tor’s doctor” who demonstrates a remarkable blend of clinical excel- his MD at the UW School Of lence, community service, and Medicine in 1990, followed by resiprofessional leadership. He has dency at Tacoma Family Medicine, also been described as “the quint- a program focused on care for essential teacher of family medi- rural and underserved patients. For Submitted by Lynette Faye

the next 14 years he practiced full spectrum rural family medicine with a small group in Tonasket and provided service to outreach clinics in Oroville as well. “Loved by both communities, he was known by his patients as the one who delivered their babies, treated their work injuries, performed preventative exams, (and with a subspecialist), journeyed with them through serious illness. He is effective because he listens to other people, cares about their needs, and is driven by a constant concern to improve care, health, and medical education,” write the WAFP in a recent news release. Dr. McCarthy received the award at the WAFP’s annual meeting on May 11, 2012 in Cle Elum. With over 3000 members the WAFP is the largest medical specialty professional organization in Washington.

At the

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AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 136 min PG 13 ACTION/ADVENTURE/FANTASY STARRING ANDREW GARFIELD, EMMA STONE, RHYS IFANS

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312 S. Whitcomb

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Happy 4 of July th

celebrating 236 years of freedom and Independence!

Tues., 7/3: 6:30 & 9:45 Wed., 7/4: 6:30 & 9:45 Thurs., 7/5: 6:30 & 9:45

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter

ACTION/FANTASY/HORROR. Starring Benjamin R Walker, Dominic Cooper, Rufus Sewell 105 min

Fri. 6:45 & 9:30 Sun. *4:15, 6:45 & 9:30

Sat. *4:15, 6:45 & 9:30 Wkdys: 6:45 & 9:30

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Starts 106 min Fri. Comedy, Fantasy...from creator of Family Guy

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Fri. 6:45 & 9:30 Sat. *4:00, 6:45 & 9:30 Sun. *4:00, 6:45 & 9:30 Wkdys: 6:45 & 9:30 Adults $7.50 Kids 11-under & *Discount Matinee-kids/adults $5 ea

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

Call today and see your ad in this space next week!

Call Charlene at 476-3602


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | June 21, 2012

Okanogan Valley Life Okanogan Valley Church Guide Local Food Banks

OROVILLE – The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more information, call Jeff Austin at 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 4762386. TONASKET – The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy 97 N. For more information contact Jack Gavin at (509) 486-2480.

Farmer’s Market Flea Market and Community Yard Sale OROVILLE – The Oroville Public Library will host a special Farmer’s Market, Flea Market and Community Yard Sale on Saturday, June 30 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Space is available and the vendor fee helps to support the library. Call (509) 476-2662 for information.

End of the Road Show and Flea Market CONCONULLY – The Conconully Museum will host The End-of-the-Road Show and Flea Market Saturday, June 30 at the Community Hall. Hours are 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Throughout the day a team of counselors will be available to discuss care, history,

By North Valley Community Schools

OROVILLE Oroville Community Bible Fellowship

Sunday Service, 10:00 a.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 a.m. Men’s Meeting 9:45 Sunday School (2-17 yrs) • Life Skills (18+) 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Bible Study (13+) Pastor Claude Roberts

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826 Youth Pastor Matthew Valdez

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10:30 a.m., Worship & Youth Sun. School Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every other Sun. Rev. David Kuttner • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

Submitted

There will be no Aerie meeting on Wednesday, July 4 due to the holiday. Initiations will be on Wednesday, July 18 at 7 p.m. We have Bingo every Friday at 7 p.m. There is over $12,000 in prizes available to be won and the buy-in is very low. Come on in and try your

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church? To place information in the Church Guide call 476-3602

OSOYOOS – The Osoyoos Festival Society presents the 64th Annual Cherry Fiesta 2012 on Sunday, July 1 from 12 p.m. to 10 p.m. Everyone is welcome.

Fourth of July Parade CHESAW – Attention all Community Royalty that wants to participate in the Fourth of July Parade in Chesaw. Everyone is welcome. Prior sign up is recommended by the parade committee. Call Marianne at (509) 485-2103 or email hehama@bossig.com It’s a lot easier if you sign up now for the line up on the 4th.

Closure Notice OROVILLE - The Oroville City Hall and City Shop will be closed Wednesday, July 4 in observance of the 4th of July. Customers with a Wednesday garbage collection day will be picked up on Thursday.

Argentine Tango TONASKET – Learn the art of Argentine Tango at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. Join Greg Thomsen and Gery Rudolph of Seattle on Monday, July 2 and Friday, July 6 for lessons, guided practices and a dance at 9 p.m. Classes begin at 6:30 p.m., no partner neces-

THE LEARNING TREE come a great distance to do so. We appreciate our students, many of whom are dedicated to taking classes even in the most inclement winter weather. To the businesses who display our catalogs and flyers, a big vote of thanks. You provide our best advertising. To the businesses and individuals who have helped fund the program through the purchase of advertising or by offering generous donations, your support is so

TONASKET EAGLES luck. You might be the next big winner! The kitchen is open every Friday from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and has a different special each week. We have Pinochle every

The Tonasket Community Theater & Community Cultural Center of Tonasket wish to thank everyone for their support of our recent production, The Fantastics! Our sincere thanks especially go to these businesses and individuals for their sponsorships.

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Cherry Fiesta

THANK YOU

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

Tonasket Community UCC

Church of Christ

Our final 2011-12 class for Community Schools was on June 26, but by no means is it the end of the year for the Board of Directors and other volunteers. We are already working to come up with classes never before offered, qualified instructors to teach them, and new ways to publicize the program. In the coming year you will find classes that are always popular and instructors you have come to know, as well. Watch for special events such as the 50’s Dance and Musical Jams. We owe a great deal of thanks to our many instructors who share their skills and talents and often

markets and security of antiques, collectibles and family treasures. There is no admission charge for the show. For more information call (509) 826-1435.

sary. There will be a nominal fee charged. Come learn the elegant, sexy dance for all ages. Preregistration is necessary and class size is limited so sign up early. The CCC is located at 411 Western Ave., Tonasket. Call the office at (509) 486-1328 (Tuesdays or Thursdays) for more information or to register.

Judicial Candidate Forum OKANOGAN – There will be a Superior Court Judicial Candidate Forum sponsored by the Okanogan County Dispute Resolution Center in conjunction with the Okanogan County Bar Association. It will be held on July 12 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Okanogan PUD Auditorium, 1331 2nd Ave N., Okanogan. Please come with general questions on a 3x5 card to be handed to the moderator to ask all the candidates.

Shine Morrison in Concert OSOYOOS – Shine Morrison will perform in concert at Osoyoos Christian Centre, 42 Finch Creacent, Osoyoos, B.C., on Sunday, July 15 at 10:30 a.m. For more information contact (250) 495-2550.

Meeting Cancellation TONASKET – The Tonasket American Legion Auxiliary #82 will cancel their July meeting. Please call (509) 486-2620 for more information. very much appreciated. Program funding is always a challenge, and your support helps to keep us in business. Winter Quarter will start in September with, we hope, 40 or more classes. There is always something for everyone, including children. Classes range from geology to estate planning, and from pine needle baskets to henna art. It’s a chance to get out of the house as the weather becomes less inviting for outdoor activities, to learn something new or to get better at a craft or skill you already have. Look for the fall catalog in stores around Oroville, Tonasket and surrounding areas toward the end of August. Summer is here enjoy it! Sunday at 1 p.m. The scores from last Sunday’s month end tournament are: First - Betty Paul and Gib McDougal, Second - Dale and Cindy Byers, Low Score - Lyle Anderson and Penny Smith, Last Pinochle - Bill Maple and Wanda Sutherland. We wish anyone who is ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless you all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

Did you know? We use...

 Soy Ink  Recycled Paper  Excess paper recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

Think Green!

Bob Pellegrini-Upper Valley Disposal Upper Valley Realty, LLC Okanogan Family Faire Omak Clinic North Valley Family Medicine, Tonasket-Oroville Dr. Carlton Roos Anonymous Midway Building & Rental Supply Grant’s Market Edward Jones Investments - Doug and Jackie Sklar

Thom Speidel Karen Schimpf Dr. Andrea Black Fernne and Roger Rosenblatt

Claire & Ed Jeffko PT Works Roy’s Pharmacy

Farmers’ Insurance Group, Maryann Blystone Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op Wells Fargo Whistlers Family Restaurant Wild Rose Floral Design Dr. Gary Bramer, DDS Prince’s Foods Little Shop of Yoga Beyers Market Lee Frank Mercantile Tom & Linda Black Tory Shook & Dosch Koreis The Split End Superior Auto Parts Inc. The Junction, Inc Family Chiropractic Clinic Baker’s Acres Nursery Fiona Gallery at Chesaw Eden Valley Guest Ranch

Castelda & Castelda U.S. Bank Tonasket Interiors Dr. Robert N. Nau Montie & Scott Smith

Thanks Again...

We couldn’t have done it without you!

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com


june 28, 2012 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page B1

sports and outdoors

Tonasket’s Trevor Terris gets LEAP bid Tonasket’s Trevor Terris was selected as one of six high school juniors to join the WIAA’s LEAP committee for the next two years.

Three-sport athlete is one of six incoming juniors statewide chosen for WIAA student representative committee By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Trevor Terris’s long-range goals involve being involved with sports. So when he found out he was selected as one of six incoming juniors across the state to be on the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association’s LEAP (Leadership through Education, Activities, and Personal Development) committee), Terris saw it as a part of his big picture. “I know I want to do something in sports,” he said. “This is a first step. “I applied for it and figured if it didn’t work out, then it didn’t work out. But I was really happy that I got it.”

Brent Baker / staff photo

To apply for a position on the commit- championship event as a student worker. tee Terris had to complete an application, LEAP is a two-year commitment. collect three letters of recommendation, “Part of being on LEAP is finding out write an essay and submit a video. ways to help out at these events,” Terris “I wrote about how sports are important said. “I would probably go to football or in every aspect of a kid’s life,” basketball, if I get to choose. Terris said. “They help with self I’ll also have to be involved in esteem, and they help keep peoanother WIAA activity, like disple from having problems with tricts or regionals.” obesity. They really help you get The incoming group from through high school.” Terris’s Class of 2014 will replace He’s taken that to heart, parthe outgoing half dozen in the ticipating in football, basketball Class of 2012, while the Class of and tennis, as well as T-Club, Trevor Terris ‘13 will serve for another year. FFA (where he went to state as a Most of the representatives are freshman) and is on the captains’ from larger schools, though the council at school. outgoing group included Madeline Isaak “I’ve always been in ASB and wanted of Almira/Coulee-Hartline. to take the next step,” Terris said. “This Terris said his video focused on the involved sports, so it sounded exactly like importance of having small school represomething I wanted to do.” sentation on the committee. LEAP provides a voice from the stu“I saw that most of the other kids were dents’ perspective to the WIAA’s execu- from big schools,” he said. “I explained tive committee, as well as taking part in a why I thought it was important for them number of volunteer activities. Terris will to have someone from a small town be required to attend at least four meet- included. ings at the WIAA’s home office in Renton. “So I’ll be there, representing Tonasket He’ll also have to attend at least one state and our school.”

REELING ‘EM IN

Submitted photo

John Hall of Cresent Bar caught this 19-inch rainbow, weighing 2.1 lbs. from off the bank at Liars Cove Resort.

Liar’s Cove reports mixed fishing results Submitted by Gene Bussell

Liar’s Cove Resort

CONCONULLY - They are having mixed fishing results on Conconully Lake. The resort had one couple, James and Jeanie Whitton of Grant Falls, that were trolling for Kokanee and filled their limit in about 90 minutes each day they were here. They started at three feet and as the day got warmer went to seven feet, then at 10 feet. They were using a pink Wedding Ring and white corn and were trolling at about 1.4 miles an hour. All of their fish were between 15 and 17 inches long. John Hall from Crescent Bar caught a 2.1 lb. 19-inch rainbow off of our bank using white Power Eggs and chartreuse Power bait and Mike’s Anise oil Lunker Lotion. He said to rub the oil on your hands before you bait your hook. Must work. We have had a lot of fish caught, but not as many as last year. The water in both lakes is super clear, but I still think people are fishing too deep.

Submitted photo

Mike Bourlier from Maple Valley caught an 18-inch rainbow trolling using a silver flasher and a wedding ring with white corn. UPDATE: We are still fishing and catching Kokanee and rainbows. Most all of the people trolling are using Wedding rings with white corn. Marsha Edin fishes off of our dock everyday and catches two or three rainbows. She uses power bait and night crawlers. Both lakes are still really clear and the water is nice.

Double winner

Submitted photos

Top, more than 120 kids and their families trekked to Bonaparte Lake on June 16 for Kids’ Fishing Day; bottom left, Carson Coe enjoys her new fishing poll and tackle box at Bonaparte Lake; Austin Bell shows off his catch.

Kids’ fishing draws more than 120 to Bonaparte Lake Submitted by Oroville Sportsmen’s Club

TONASKET — Over 120 kids and their families participated in the 18th annual fishing day event held at Bonaparte Lake on Saturday, June 16. Participants were all smiles as they took advantage of the opportunity to catch fish, build bird nesting boxes, and learn about the natural food choices for fish. The fish, donated specifically for the event, were kept close to the dock using net pens. Almost 250 fish went home with young anglers and for many it was a first-time experience.

The largest fish, a 19-inch rainbow trout, was caught by Holland Pratt. Alex McKenzie, Hallee Chilmonik and Seth Austin all caught fish over 18 inches in length. “This event is for youth,” said Mike Daharsh, President of the Oroville Sportsmen’s Club. “It promotes wildlife and education for kids and adults. We are proud to have been involved with Fishing Day over the years and look forward to many more years of watching the joy on everyone’s faces as they participate in this family-oriented event.‚“ Participants in this year’s event went home armed with new fishing gear, courtesy of the many donors. Lunch for the kids was also

provided thanks to the many donors and volunteers. The Kids Fishing Day event began in 1994 and rotated between Lost Lake and Bonaparte Lake for a few years before settling in at the Forest Service fishing dock on Bonaparte Lake. It occurs each year, no matter the weather, and is sure to be a day filled with smiles as children and their families from across the state come to enjoy the day. “The ongoing coordination and commitment of so many groups, organizations and individuals has been key to continued success for this event,” said Daharsh.

Submitted photo

Jordan Montanye of Tonasket won the Heat Race and the Main at the Republic race track over the weekend.

Moose on the loose

Bob Roel / submitted photo

Bob Roel captured this photograph of a bull moose that was running around Sawtell Road in Oroville last week. The moose was in a field by the new farmworker housing.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 28, 2012

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Christensen’s celebrate 50th Anniversary Submitted photos

Before Dolly and Sonny married Dolly was a nanny for the Steven’s family in Tonasket. During that time is when Sonny was introduced by a friend. From that moment on he was a persistent pup! After a few dates Dolly knew this was the man she was going to spend the rest of her life with. A year later, Sonny and Dolly married in Tonasket on June 30, 1962. They made their home in Oroville. Sonny worked at Oroville’s Zosel Lumber until he retired. Dolly worked at Oroville’s Valley Vap for many years until they closed their doors. She moved on them to work at Bin and Pallet. She also worked the local orchards around town (she loved being outside) to name a few: Bob Reese, Bud Clark, Stan Nelsen, Richard Forrester and Perry Blackler. As time went by she could no longer climb those ladders so she took up housekeeping for different ones – that kept her busy and out of Sonny’s hair! Sonny and Dolly love to travel and

Several improvements around Oroville’s Main Street

Photos by Gary DeVon

The owners of Frontier Foods have invested a lot in improving the exterior of their store, including new siding and paint, a reworked overhang out front, new river rock accents and a new sign (seen reflected in the window). A new roof is also being installed. still do! They’ve been burnin up and down that highway for many years from north to south, east to west. Traveling in their camper with Sonny’s parents, aunts, uncles, cousins and friends, camping and fishing...they just loved being outdoors and on the open road. Speaking of traveling, Dolly flew to Maui, Hawaii in 2006 and 2007 to visit her daughter, JoAnne and granddaughter, Natika. Sonny’s not a frequent flyer so he stayed home to do his own laundry. Let’s just say he knows how to use bleach! Living in Oroville most of their lives Sonny and Dolly have developed many friends, some close enough to be called family. They are also members of the family in Christ at the Valley Christian Fellowship where they continue their faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. Sonny and Dolly would love to see all their friends and family at their 50th wedding anniversary celebration at the Oroville Grange Hall (6th and Fir) on Saturday, June 30 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Although new bright paint has freshened the look of Rancho Grande in the Peerless building, most of the renovations are taking place inside with murals and decorations reflecting a south of the border theme for the new Mexican Restaurant which will be opening soon.

Harnasch’s celebrate 70 years of marriage

Submitted

This classic house at 1606 Main is getting a new roof and the trees that were hiding it from the street have been thinned out or removed all together. The house has gone several years without a renovation other than fixing the porch when a tree blew down on it a few years back.

Verle and Norene (Sherwood) Harnasch of Oroville will celebrate 70 years of marriage on July 4, 2012. Verle and Norene married on July 4, 1942 and have spent most of their married life in Oroville. Together they have two children: Marsha Kuntz of Kennewick, Wash., and Nancy Harnasch of Redmond, Wash.; four grandchildren and six great grandchildren.

McGuire’s celebrate 50 years

Submitted photo

Friends and neighbors of Bill and Sharon McGuire, Okanogan, are invited to help celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary, Saturday, June 30, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Cornerstone Christian Fellowship Church, at Riverside and Locust St., Omak. Bill McGuire and Sharon Pickering were married June 30, 1962 at Oroville. Their children are Jeff and Amber McGuire of Spokane and Shannon and Jeff Milsten of New York. They have six grandchildren: David, Madison and Kepley McGuire and Keegan, Rebecca and Alex Milsten. No gifts please.

The Oroville Streetscape Committee has been working on the mini-park in front of Expressions Espresso and Lake Crest Winery. The park, which was originally built by volunteers, has been taken care of by Ken and Boni Mathews for the past several years.

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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june 28, 2012 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page B3

obituaries/Police stats Top Honors (4.0) Sixth Grade: Zachary Clark, Nicole Juarez Zelaya, Taylon Pilkinton, Jesse Ramon, Joseph Schell and Camille Wilson. Eighth Grade: Madeleine Graham, Trevor Peterson, Rade Pilkinton and Jaden Vugteveen. Honor Roll with Distinction (3.7 - 3.99) Sixth Grade: Megan Bolich, Chadwick Bretz, Jessie Burks, Rycki Cruz, Burgandy De Anda, Mikah Haney Williamson, Katie Henneman, Elsbeth Hjaltason, Maya Holmes, Chyna Kinkade, Justin McDonald, Nicole Moritz, Riley Morris, Emily Otis, Kallysta Ray, James Silverthorn, Morgan Tyus and Ruby White. Seventh Grade: Elijah Antonelli, Thomas Kennedy, Ally Mershon, Tawan Murray, Amanda Padilla, Seth Smith and Johnna Terris. Eighth Grade: LeighAnne Barnes, Omar Calderon, Janelle Catone, Pablo Chavez, Esmeralda Flores, Bailey Griffin, Baillie Hirst, Jordan Hughes, Rachel SEINIORS 4.0: Jodi Arroyo, Michelle Timmerman and Anthony Verhasselt. 3.5-3.99: Dakota Bogart, Ashley Booker, Dylan Fewkes, Kyndra Dellinger, Dakota Fry, Damon Halvorsen, Kablina Kochsmeier, Cayla Monroe, Russell Perry, Miranda Slagle, Toni Smith, Trenton Turner, Cierra Williams, Brandi Wilson, Melody Wolen and Dillon Zemtseff. 3.0-3.5: Kayla Andrews, Rosa Bugarin, Elverta Conrad, Jasmine Grangroth, Emmaline Hickman, Adine Johnson, Amy Johnson, Raul Lagunas Jr., Sheridan McDonald, Lacey Montanye, Rodolfo Ornelas, Gabriel Rainey, Adrian Ramos, Robert Salazar and Emily Smith. JUNIORS 4.0: Michaela Newton, Shea Smith, Claire Thornton and Johanna Wilcox. 3.5-3.99: Jesus Alvarez, Megan Beyers, Rebecca Biernacki, Kelly Cruz, Breanna Howell, Sierra Hughes, Courtney Jones, Grace Maldonado, Wyatt O’Brien, Jessica Puente, Derek Rimestad, Zachary Villalva, Dalton Wahl, Tashia West and Zachary Zanoni. 3.0-3.5: Samantha Baillie, Bianca Carrera, Ameerah Cholmondeley, Alicia Edwards, Xochitl Flores, Raven Goudeau, Devin Hamilton, Karlie Henneman, Angela Jones, PULLMAN, Wash. – The following students have been named to the WSU spring 2012 President’s honor roll. The President’s Honor Roll recognizes students who stand above the rest with excellent academic performance. To be eligible for honor roll, undergraduate students must be enrolled in a minimum of nine graded hours in a single term at WSU and earn a grade point average of 3.75 or earn a 3.50 cumulative GPA based on 15 cumulative

TONASKET MIDDLE SCHOOL HONOR ROLL Silverthorn, Jenna Valentine and Rosared Walts. Honor Roll (3.0 - 3.69) Sixth Grade: Griselda AlvarezTorres, Daren Bowers, Sydney Breshears, Jared Brown, Cinthya Calderon, Madeliene Close, Elijah Harris, Meri Hirst, Kyle Holborn, Hayley Larson, Marisa Lopez, Sandra Magdaleno Espinoza, Maria Merida, Bryan Nolan, Joseph Ogborn, Rodrigo Ornelas, Jesus Palomares, Maria Polito-Vazquez, Erin Quinlan, Zoe Rodriquez, Carmela Salazar, Logan Thompson, Alina

TONASKET HIGH SCHOOL HONOR ROLL Sadie Long, Sarina McBride, Hans Rabenold, Dustee Sapp, Christina Southerland, Dylan Sprague and Kaleb Steinshouer. SOPHOMORES 4.0: Savannah Clinedinst, Leslie Iniguez, Brisa Leep, Lupita Ornelas, Norma Ramos, Cassandra Spear and Jamie Wilson. 3.5-3.99: Phillip Aitcheson, Kathryn Cleman, Selena Cosino, Makalapua Goodness, Elizabeth Jackson, Parker Kenyon, Claudia Luca, Christa McCormick, Amber Monroe, Norma Ornelas, Marchand Renald, Lindsay Rhodes, Marcelino Ruiz-Martell, Levi Schell, Trevor Terris, Madison Villalva and Kjeld Williams. 3.0-3.5: Yazmin Cervantes Orozco, Anna Chavez, Jenna Davisson, Tyler Farver, Jeffery Fry, Tanner Good, Michael Goudeau, Sarah Green, Abigail Gschiel, Diante Haney Williamson, Sara Holan, Amanda Johnson, Walker

WSU Spring 2012 President’s Honor Roll hours of graded work. OROVILLE: Bryce Vale Woodruff LOOMIS: Stella D Columbia TONASKET: Joshua K.

Vlahovich, Brooklynn Ward, Samantha Whitney and Myhe Williams. Seventh Grade: Brenden Asmussen, Alejandra Avilez, Zion Butler, Lorena Cervates, Taundra Chaska-Webber, Beau Cork, Lalayna Danforth, Trinity Dejong, Samantha Ehrhard, Victor Flores, Vance FrazierLeslie, Timothy Freese, Alexia Gavin, Cheyan Kinkade, Breann Nolan, Brenda Perez, Wyatt Radke, Austin Rimestad, Paola Rivera, Sadie Rojas, Yovany Rosas, Lucas Scott, Hunter Swanson, Suzan Van Dyck, Jacob Villalva, Katlen Wagner and Lexie Wahl. Eighth Grade: Daisy Alcauter, Micala Arnesen, Madison Bayless, Nicholas Crandall, Kendra Davisson, Samantha Earley, Cayden Field, Jonathan Freese, Christian Garcia Herrera, Dallin Good, Jevonti Haney Williamson, Bryden Hires, Alexee Howell, Ashley King, Shyane Lewis, Alyssa Montenegro, Ulyses Morales, Sarah Quinlan, Brennon Ramsey, Ryan Rylie and Kyra Whiting. Marks, Emily Mills, Tucker Pardue, Michaela Rampley, Chance Stucker, Baylie Tyus and Pete Valentine. FRESHMEN 4.0: Jesse Holan, Colton Leep, Alexander Mershon, Mary Naylor, Abraham Podkranic, Anna St. Martin and Aspen Verhasselt. 3.5-3.99: Abran Alvarez, Deoha Braggs, Kahlil Butler, Devyn Catone, Hilda Celestino, Smith Condon, David Curtis, Allison Glanzer, Yessica Gomez Chavez, Colt Hatch, Nicholas Haywood, Brock Henneman, Frank Holfeltz, Jesse Manring, Kallie Mirick, Haley Montowski, Brooke Nelson, Adrian Palomares Garcia, Cheyenne Rainey, Maria Salas Ramirez, Antonio Sanchez Jimenez, Dalton Smith, Shoshanna Thomas-McCue, Lucas Vugteveen and Alissa Young. 3.0-3.5: Elvira Alvarez, Ethan Bensing, Cassandra Blaney, Amber Burton, Travis Deggeller, Chad Edwards, Tiffany Ferdon, Diego Goudeau, Adam Halvorsen, Blaine Hirst, Keeton Hoines, Cheyenne Kammeyer, Devin Kingsbury, Maria Larios, Rosemary Luna, Lloyd Morisch Jr., Morgan O’Brien, Jose Ortega, Cesar Reynoso, Jensen Sackman Charlie Sanchez, Darbee Sapp, Timmarica Spellman, Michael Timm, Alyssa Warner and Conner Williams. Lofthus, Kristi Michelle Ogborn, Veronica Puente, Tyler Dell Thornton OKANOGAN: Austin Greggory Baker, Rachelle Lee Gaines, Kailey Elizabeth Grattan, Natalie Ann Hardy, Quincee Catherine Heindselman, Kelsey Renee Hinger, Brent Lane Olson, Kathryn Lee Olson, Kaylee D. Ray, Darius Fox Thorne, Nora Suzanne Waller OMAK: Christian Bryan Behymer, Angela Kay Caryl

OBITUARIES Spokane. Arthur was a Vietnam Veteran with the United States Army and a member of the American Legion in Oroville. He enjoyed fishing at Palmer Lake and taking trips to Montana to visit family. Art also loved spending time with his children and grandchildren. Art is survived by his daughter, Heather (Castonguay) Davis of Oregon City, Ore.; his son, Taylor (Castonguay) Cosby of

Wenatchee; and his grandchildren: Hunter and Benjamin; many family members in Montana and his girlfriend, Linda Patterson. Art was preceded in death by his parents: Virginia and William Castonguay; and his beloved dog Rudy. A potluck luncheon to celebrate Arthur’s life will be held on Sunday, July 1, 2012 at 11 a.m. at the American Legion in Oroville. Please bring your favorite dish to share.

Court & Police Report Superior Court Criminal The court found probable cause to charge Stewart J. Fling, III, 39, Twisp, with Theft 2nd degree and Vehicle Prowling 2nd degree. Bail was set at $5,000. The court found probable cause to charge Jamie BL. Sarazin, 25, Omak, with Failure to Register as a Sex Offender and Possession of 40 grams or less of Marijuana. Bail was set at $25,000. The court found probable cause to charge Tammy V. Brewer, 34, Omak, with Theft 2nd degree and Vehicle Prowling 2nd degree. Bail was set at $10,000 The court found probable cause to charge Erick Arballo, 39, Okanogan, with Intimidating a Witness. Bail was set at $25,000. The court found probable cause to charge Fawn J. Abrahamson, 37, Omak, with Attempting to Elude Pursuing Police Vehicle, DWLS 2nd degree, and DUI. Bail was set at $25,000. The court found probable cause to charge Richard L, Hester, 49, Omak, with Burglary 2nd degree and Theft 3rd degree. Bail was set at $5,000.

Juvenile A 17 year-old juvenile from Tonasket pled guilty to Burglary 2nd , Theft of a motor vehicle, and theft 1st. He was sentenced to 20 days confinement and 12 months of community supervision. A 16 year-old juvenile from Okanogan pled guilty to Burglary 2nd and Malicious Mischief 3rd. He was sentenced to 15 days confinement and 12 months community supervision. A 15 year-old juvenile from Nespelem pled guilty to Escape 2nd. She was sentenced to 30 days confinement and 12 months community supervision.

Decrees of Dissolution James L. Thacker filed to dissolve his marriage with Pamela Kay Thacker.

911 Calls Sunday, June 17 A report from Kernan Rd in Oroville of dogs barking all night, an on-going problem. A report from Hwy 7 in Tonasket of Assault. Caller was assaulted by a female subject while at his friends house. A report from Sagebrush Tr. In Omak of Intoxication. Juvenile males appear to be intoxicated and falling in the ditch. A report from 1st Ave in Okanogan of Theft. A big green dumpster has been taken sometime during the night. A report from 2nd Ave in Okanogan of Domestic Dispute. Caller reported that her boyfriend threw a child’s toy car at her vehicle and dented it. A report from Highland Dr. in Okanogan of a weapon Offence. Caller reported hearing a “popping” noise behind the residence toward the orchard, possibly a small handgun. A report from 2nd Ave in Okanogan of Malicious Mischief. Caller reported a man in small black truck with a small trailer ran over callers merchandise. Monday, June 18 A report from GayesPoint Rd. in Oroville of Animal Noise. Dogs barking for over half hour. On-going problem.

A report from Howell Canyon Rd. in Tonasket of an injury accident. Dodge ram broke loose and rear-ended a Subaru, pushing it through a cabin and injuring one person, transported to NVH. A report from Redneck Dr. in Oroville of Trespassing. Caller reported neighbor trespassing on his property, line got disconnected. A report from Cartwright Dr. in Tonasket of Violate Order. Caller reported that neighbor is standing at fence watching her. A report from Railroad St. in Tonasket of an Accident. Teen bike accident, victim unconscious. A report from Norway Pine Dr. in Tonasket of a 911 hang up. Call back spoke with 8 yr old male reported it was an accident. A report from Giveout Cr. Rd in Wauconda of a civil matter. Caller heard dynamite go off, thinks neighbor blew up his abandoned well. A request from Meadow Dr. in Tonasket of a welfare check. The caller has not heard from her 5yr old daughter since may and mother-in-law is not following through with visitation order. A report from Loomis Post Office of found property. Someone left their wallet at the pay phone. A report from Hwy 20 in Wauconda of weapon offence. Several juveniles with BB guns are shooting randomly, hitting the callers rear vehicle window. A report from Riverside Eastside Rd. of theft. Caller reported liquor and cigarettes taken from location and windows broken out of shed. A report from Old Riverside Hwy. in Omak of Malicious Mischief. Callers vehicle windows possibly shot out by BB guns. A report from Cameron Lk. Rd. in Okanogan of disabled vehicle. The vehicle is not blocking traffic, will be removed later. A report from Queen St. in Okanogan of Threats. Male subject threatening callers family. A report from 5th Ave. in Okanogan of Sex Offence. Caller reported neighbor of pleasuring himself while looking at a group of girls walking by. Tuesday, June 19 A report from 4th Ave. in Okanogan of suspicious activity. Caller reported a cream colored Toyota Tundra in parking lot shining lights towards residents. Then moved location across the street. A report from Riverloop Rd. in Tonasket of burglary. Caller reported a pair of $300 binoculars taken off the table while the door was open. A report from Havillah Rd. in Tonasket of Assault. A report from Airport Rd. in Tonasket of suspicious activity. A car with broken out windows is occupied by 4 people. A report from Aeneas Valley Rd. in Tonasket of Fraud. Caller reported that someone has opened an account at Barkley Bank. A report from Foggy River LP. In riverside of Burglary. Residence have been out all day and came home to their big screen T.V. and jewelry missing. A report from Hanford St. in Omak of Trespassing. Subject would not leave location after eating food without the ability to pay. A report from Omak River Rd. in Omak of theft. A blue 2007 Yamaha YZ85 dirt bike was taken. A report from Riverside Eastside Rd. of Assault. Caller and her boyfriend in a dispute, verbally and physically. A report from 4th Ave in Okanogan of harassment. An Intoxicated unknown male is harassing residents in the apartments. Wednesday, June 20 A report from Molsom Lk. In

Oroville of harassment. Caller reported a male subject harassing her. A report from Hwy 20 in Tonasket of Fraud. Online charges made to credit card. Bank required incident number. A report from Airport Rd. in Tonasket on a civil matter. Caller reported a tenant is cutting down trees on his property. A report from Cartwright Dr. in Tonasket of Weapon Offence. Female shooting a .22 at a target, aiming gun toward the residence. A report from Hwy 20 in Tonasket of Malicious Mischief. Callers 1999 Blazer windows have been broken out by an identified male subject. A request from Pine Cr. Rd. in Tonasket for a welfare check. Callers husband did not show up for visit. A report from Aeneas Valley Rd. in Tonasket of Suspicious Activity. Caller reported a vehicle came to the location with lights off and 1hr later seen flashlight and heard a gunshot. A report from Cameron Lk. Rd. in Okanogan of Aircraft accident. Airplane possibly hit power poles. A report from 2nd Ave in Okanogan of a parking problem. Underage tenant keeps parking in the handicap stall. A report from Engh Rd. in Omak of Assault. A fight in progress in front of Home Depot. A report from Omache Dr in Omak of a Missing Person. A report from Green Lk. Rd. in Okanogan of a DUI. A yellow vehicle ran off the road. A report from 1st Ave in Omak of Suspicious Activity. Caller reported hearing pounding on the side of the building and a truck parked outside that was not there before. A report from Engh Rd. in Omak of Child Abuse. A 6yr old child is afraid to go home with the Uncle. Thursday, June 21 A report from Cayuse Mtn. Rd. near Tonasket of noise. Someone trying to remove a vehicle that was broken down, driving around erratically. A report from Tonasket Shop Rd. in Tonasket of Theft. Windows and screen taken from a camp trailer and windows shot out of parked vehicles. A request from Ruby Two Moons Rd. in Tonasket for a welfare check. Caller is worried about her 3 grandkids. A report from Pine Cr. Rd in Tonasket of an Abandoned vehicle. Vehicle has been at location for 4 days A report from Havillah Rd. in Tonasket of Trespassing. A report from North Kirkpatrick Rd. in Omak of DUI. Female in a Cavalier is in callers driveway, highly agitated. A report from Elmway Rd. in Okanogan of theft. Visitors across the street took items, when the caller confronted them they took off in a blue station wagon. A report from Riverside Eastside Rd. in Omak of Assault. Caller reported her boyfriend hit her. A request from 8th Ave. in Okanogan for a welfare check. A female has threatened to harm her grandmother at the residence. A report from Omak River Rd. in Omak of Threatening. Caller reported that subject threatened him for taking the subjects grandmother to Seattle with him. Marriage Licenses Jeannie Marie Cook age 23 from Tonasket will wed Christopher William Austin age 26 from Tonasket. Angelina Marie Osborne age 25 from Okanogan will wed Cleveland Jones Jr. age 29 from Okanogan. Barbara Genevieve Anderson age 41 from Omak will wed Patrick George Nanamkin age 35 from Omak.

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Arthur Allen Castonguay Arthur Allen Castonguay, age 62, of Oroville, passed away on Sunday, April 29, 2012 at Sacred Heart Medical Center in

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Saturday. July 7th 9-5pm • Gala Concert Event 6-9pm Sunday. July 8th 10-4pm The City Park, 1st and Calispel in Newport, WA Admission: $5 for adults; Children 12 & under FREE Enjoy juried artists, artisans and growers while shopping 75 booths in a shady, relaxed atmosphere.

Lavender Demonstrations Wine and Microbrew Garden. Unique items for sale at the Festival Store. Children’s art activities and fairies. lavenderfestival@live.com www.povlavenderfestival.com

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OKANOGANValley VALLEYGazette-Tribune GAZETTE-TRIBUNE| •june June 28, 28,2012 2012 Okanogan

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale FOR SALE: 80+/- Acres Scenic Ranch. Split-Level Single Family Residence w/ multiple Improvements. Private & quiet, Abundant Wildlife. 1536 N Pince Creek Rd. Phone/web 5092979292.com - Book Auction Co. OWN A PIECE OF HISTORIC NIGHTHAWK!

For Rent

For Rent

Lakeshore Apartments: 1 bedroom $325; 2 bedroom $375 + Deposits. W/S/G included. Lake access and good storage. No dogs. 509560-3624

Cottage in Molson $350 + $350 damage deposit. No smokers, no pets. 485-3241

Very nice large 1 bedroom apartment. Upstairs, no pets, no smoking. $400. 509-476Relaaax in the country! Nice 3145. views from deck! Bright, newer 1 bedroom cottage in Ha- Oroville: 4 bedroom 2 bath, villah. Creek runs through jacuzzi tub, fenced back yard property. Garden space. $950 + deposit. Lease option. Washer/ Dryer, storage shed 509-560-0461 included. $345/ month available 7/1/12. 509-476- On Lake Osoyoos, 1 bed2195 room, furnished. Water + trash paid. Garage parking. smoking preferred. Nice 2 bedroom/ 2 bath $475/ No month. Nice 3 bedroom/ 2 $425/month. 509-476-3944 bath $695/ month. 1st month + deposit. Tenant pays Nice 2 bedroom on lake. GarSeniors 55+ utilities. Application fee ap- age. Henderson plies. HUD or Section 8 Ok. $675/month. Call River Oaks RV and Mo- Apartments 509-476-2449 or 509-476-3214 bile Park 509-476-2087 Enjoy fabulous lake views from your spacious private balcony! Airy 3 bedroom in Oroville. New carpets, paint and blinds. Washer/ Dryer, AC included. Mountain view from rear deck. $695/ month + deposits. No pets. 509-4206766 Available Aug. 1: 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Appliances, A/C, pellet stove $650/ month + $400 deposit. References. 509560-3520

Hillside Apartments

Beautiful River Frontage, Charming Cabin, water, power, septic. $64,500. SUN LAKES REALTY Call 509-476-2121.

VERANDA BEACH JEWEL

Accepting Applications! Income eligible

509-486-4966 TDD 1-800-833-6388 515 Tonasket Ave. Tonasket, WA

Charming water, NOW cabin, RENTING power, septic. $64,500. NEW, NEW, NEW! 1 & 2 bedroom condominiums. “The Duke� most desirable comfortable floor plan. 2 verandas, knock out price $359,900. SUN LAKES REALTY Call 509-476-2121.

Washer / Dryer l Beach Access Large Patios with Lake Views For further information call

253-261-9251 or 509-560-9471

St. Charles Place Apartments 207 Main St., Oroville, WA

ATTENTION:

Waterfront home 4 bedroom 3 bath double garage $1195; 2 bedroom home in town $735; Lakefront 2 bedroom apartment $625; Large 2 bedroom apartment $565; 1 bedroom apartment $400 and others. Call Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121.

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

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– Family & Singles – Now accepting applications for Low Income Housing.

“A place to call home�

509-476-4057 TDD# 711

email: stcharles@gdicom.net Equal Housing Opportunity

Happy 50th Birthday July 4th Love from your family!

Advertise your farm favorites in our classified section!

2

$ .00

per week 15 words or less

CALL TODAY!

n Produce n Eggs n Livestock n Chickens n Plants n Tamales n More!

A Great Opportunity to Advertise your Season Favorite!

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Help Wanted Certified Medical Assistant (1 Full Time) North Valley Family Medicine- Tonasket Provides service to patients across the lifespan including newborns, children, adolescents, adults and geriatric age groups including interviewing patients, taking and documenting vital signs, preparing patients for exams, phlebotomy, assisting medical staff with exams and procedures, scheduling studies, reception and ancillary duties, etc. CMA certification required, experience preferred. Please apply online at www.wvclinic.com Looking for an independent contractor to deliver newspapers to the Oroville and Tonasket Post offices, as well as to retail outlets throughout Oroville, Tonasket, Riverside, Omak and Okanogan. Will receive base pay, plus mileage from Oroville. Contact (509) 476-3602 or email gdevon@gazette-tribune.com. Part-time help at Oroville Cherry Orchard. Various duties. High school age okay. Call Ed at 509-476-2350

Wanted Paying cash for Gold & Silver coins, Buillion, Jewelry. By appointment. Call Spence (509) 429-4722

Garage & Yard Sale

Garage & Yard Sale TONASKET HUGE GARAGE SALE 233 E. 2nd St. 9:00am- 4:00pm Saturday, June 30 New bike, cake baking, photo supplies, material, sewing machine, washing machine, pots, pans, dishes, large men’s/ women’s clothes, hammock, coffee table, lawn chairs, cement forms, planters, furniture, Lg Christmas decor, tire chains, antique scale, so much more!

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF JUNE 25, 2012 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-483-4429. www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 6343838 for more details. FINANCIAL

Annual Catholic Church Yard Sale July 6-7. Friday 8:00am6:00pm, Saturday 8:00am1:00pm. 1715 Main St., Oroville. Basement, rain or shine.

LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (800) 563-3005. www.fossmortgage.com

Auction July 14 10:00am Fundraiser for Senior Center Addition Tools, tool chest, furniture, pictures, wine, silver ounces, snow blower, bikes, tea cart. More donations are needed! Call Spence 509-429-4722

HELP WANTED

Don’t miss out! Friday 6/28 & Saturday 6/29 9:00am- 5:00pm No Early Sales please! 124 State Frontage Rd., Tonasket. Furniture, misc., clothes, good CLEAN things! Proceeds: Tonasket Community Church UCC- Thanks Ivetta!

Dept of Homeland Security Customs and Border Protection U.S. Border Patrol Spokane Sector 10710 N. Newport Hwy Spokane, WA 99218

INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL Exchange Representative: Earn supplemental income placing and supervising high school exchange students. Volunteer host families also needed. Promote world peace! www.afice.org/reps HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS DRIVERS --New Freight lanes in your area. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Flexible hometime. Modern Fleet of trucks. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-4149569 www.driveknight.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $135. $165 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com divorce@usa.com

Janitorial Contract Oroville, WA

The United States Border Patrol is seeking price quotes from interested parties to provide custodial services, grounds maintenance, snow removal, and pest control to the new U.S. Border Patrol station located at: 21 Shirley Road, Oroville, WA 98844. Dates will be from September 1, 2012 to March 31, 2013 with possible options to extend from April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2017. Quotes must be received at 10710 N. Newport Hwy, Spokane, WA. 99218, No Later Than 4pm July 20, 2012. Quote must be for the work described in the “Statement of Workâ€?. Evaluation factors will be rated. The factors are: price per month; past performance; experience; equipment; quality assurance plan; reliability. You may obtain a copy of the “Request for Quotesâ€? and “Statement of Workâ€? from your local U.S. Border Patrol ofďŹ ce at: 1105 Main St, Oroville, WA 98844; (509-476-3622) or Contact: U.S. Border Patrol, Attn: Procurement, 10710 N. Newport Hwy, Spokane, WA 99218; PH: 509-353-2747. A site visit of the new facility will be scheduled. Special consideration will be accepted for businesses that are registered with the US Small Business Administration such as; disabled veteran, HUB Zone, 8a, etc. The winning bidder will be required to have: Federal Tax ID number, obtain a Dunn and Bradstreet number, and register in the governments Central Contact Registration (CCR). A local business license may also be required if your local city or county requires one. Direct/electronic deposit of your payments will be required. The winning bidder and all employees are subject to a criminal history and background investigation. ALL of this will only be required IF YOU ARE AWARDED THE CONTRACT.

Aerospace Electronics Wenatchee Valley College is training electronics workers for careers in aerospacerelated fields. Gain skills in manufacturing and servicing of all types of electronic equipment. 6-mo. and 1-yr. certificate options are available. Classes start this fall. To learn more: www.wvc.edu 877-WVC-4YOU x.6847 rmorgan@wvc.edu

Public Notices Basic Service Annual Ad Skyline Telecom is a quality telecommunications services provider that provides basic and enhanced services at reasonable rates within its service territory. Basic services are offered at the following rates: Single Party Residence Service, Monthly Service Charge, $19.50; Single Party Business Service, $25.00; Federal Subscriber Line Charge – Single Line, $6.50. Touch Tone Service: Touch Tone service is provided as a part of local service rate. Toll Blocking: Available at no charge; Emergency 911 Services: Surcharges for 911 services are assessed according to government policy. Low-income individuals may be eligible for Federal and State Lifeline telephone assistance programs that include discounts from the above basic and local service charges. The federal Lifeline program is undergoing some changes in July 2012 and the amount of assistance may differ on your bill. Basic services are offered to all consumers in the Skyline Telecom service territory at the rates, terms and conditions specified in the Company’s tariffs. If you have any questions regarding the Company’s services, please call us at (888) 782-4680. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 28, 2012.#400075 Buckhorn Project Community Advisory Board REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: The Buckhorn Mountain Project is an underground gold mine located near the community of Chesaw in Okanogan County, Washington. The project consists of an underground mine, a borrow area for backfill material, and roads that connect the mine to the existing Kettle River Mill and provide access to the site. The Kettle River Mill is located near Republic, Washington. Kinross Gold worked with the local community to establish the Buckhorn Community Advisory Association (BCAA) and the Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA). The BCAA is requesting proposals from qualified consultants to facilitate the on-going work of the BCAA and the GNA. This work includes but is not limited to: meeting facilitation, note taking and record keeping, website maintenance and other coordination as needed. For a complete copy of the RFP, interested parties should contact Jim Schumacher, Co-Chair of the Buckhorn Community Advisory Association, PO Box 973, Republic WA 99166, (509)775-2921, (509)779-4039. Responses to the RFP must be received by the BCAA no later than 4:00pm PDT, August 1 st, 2012. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 28, 2012.#400188 CITY OF OROVILLE REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS The City of Oroville is requesting statements of qualifications from consulting firms to provide the City with engineering services with respect to the Central and Cherry Streets Resurfacing Project, a State and Federally funded project. The City of Oroville reserves the right to retain the services of the successful Consultant for any and all subsequent phases for the above referenced project. Consulting work may include the development of plans and specifications, planning, right of way appraisal, construction inspection and construction management. Statements must include descriptions of experience with Design and Construction of State and Federally funded street projects and criteria, references and resumes of proposed project engineers. Fees and project scopes will be negotiated. Four copies of the qualifications must be submitted to the City of Oroville no later than 4:00 p.m., Friday, July 6, 2012. The top three firms will then be scheduled for a telephone interview for final selection process on Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The City of Oroville , in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprise as defined at 49 CFR Part 23 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. For further information, contact Rod Noel, City Supt., at 509-476-2106 or Kathy M. Jones, Clerk-Treasurer, 509-4762926. Mailing address is P.O. Box 2200, Oroville, WA 98844. The City of Oroville is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer and encourages minority and women owned firms to apply. ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 21 and 28, 2012.#398231 Holm SP 2012-5 Application and SEPA Exemption Mike Holm submitted a short subdivision application in order to divide approximately 19 acres into 2 lots. Lot 1 includes an existing home. Access is provided by Twisp Carlton Road approximately 2.5 miles South of

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Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 28, 2012.#400162

Twisp, WA. The physical address is 46 Beaver Pond Road. Tax parcel numbers are 3322210137 & 3322220187, within Sec. 21 & 22, T33N, R22E, Willamette Meridian. The Okanogan County SEPA Responsible Official issued a final SEPA determination identifying this project is exempt from SEPA review in accordance with WAC 197-11. The comment period for this project ends at 5pm on July 30, 2012. Comments must be submitted in writing. Direct questions and comments to: Ben Rough, Senior Planner, Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-7122. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune and Quad City Herald on June 28, 2012.#400167

Notice of Application under the Shoreline Management Act Bonaparte Creek Area Sewer Extension & Water System Improvements TON SDP 12-1 DATE OF NOTICE: 6/28/2012 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Tonasket, Washington who is the lead agency for the project, has filed an application for a shoreline substantial development permit, floodplain development permit, critical areas authorization with the City of Tonasket Building & Permits Department and has also filed for a HPA with WDFW, a 401 Water Quality Certification with WADOE and various other authorizations for infrastructure improvements to include: •Two utility pipe crossings of Bonaparte Creek (1 water, 1 sewer) •Installation of sewer pipes (mains and services) and water pipe replacements (mains and services) within designated shoreline and within 200 lf of the shoreline, including associated appurtenances and surface restoration. Installation of gravity sewer mains and services: 1.Approximately 600 lf of 8 and 10inch sewer main adjacent to US 97 (extending from south side of creek, crosses the creek, then north-east on the highway). 2.Approx 2,400 lf of 8-inch-diameter sewer mains adjacent to Bonaparte Creek 3.Approx. 2,800 lf of 4 and 6-inch diameter sewer services adjacent to Bonaparte Creek. Water main replacements: 1.Approx. 1,800 lf of 8 and 12-inch diameter water main replacements adjacent to Bonaparte Creek. 2.Approx. 1,000 lf of ¾-inch diameter water services adjacent to Bonaparte Creek. The above is part of a larger project that that also includes installation of approximately 23,200 lineal feet of municipal water and sewer utility pipe. This project will occur in the Bonaparte Creek residential area at the South edge of Tonasket on either side of Bonaparte Creek along Bretz Rd. and Bonaparte Ave and adjacent to U.S. 97/Whitcomb Avenue in Section 16, Township 37 N., Range 27 E.WM., Okanogan County. The complete applications, related drawings and environmental documentation are available for inspection and/or copies may be obtained by request at the City of Tonasket Clerk’s Office during normal business hours. Said development is proposed to be within the Rural and Suburban Environments of the shoreline of Bonaparte Creek and/or its associated wetlands. Any person desiring to express their views on this proposal or attain party of record status and be notified of any subsequent record decisions on this application should notify in writing Christian Johnson, Permit Administrator, Box 487, Tonasket WA 98855 or cjohnson.oroville@nvinet.com Written comments must be filed no later than close of business July 26, 2012. Issued this date: June 20, 2012 Christian D. Johnson, Permit Administrator Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 28, 2012.#400203

Tuesday, August 7, 2012 A county wide Primary Election will be held for the purpose of submitting to the voters for their approval or rejection the following candidates. United States Senator, 6 year term; Representative in Congress, 4th Congressional District, 2 year term; Governor, 4 year term; Lieutenant Governor, 4 year term; Secretary of State, 4 year term; State Treasurer, 4 year term; State Auditor, 4 year term; Attorney General, 4 year term; Commissioner of Public Lands, 4 year term; Superintendent of Public Instruction, 4 year term; Insurance Commissioner, 4 year term; State Representative District 7, Position 1, 2 year term; State Representative District 7, Position 2, 2 year term; State Senator District 12, 4 year term; State Representative District 12, Position 1, 2 year term; State Representative District 12, Position 2, 2 year term; County Commissioner, District 1, 4 year term; County Commissioner, District 2, 4 year term; Supreme Court Justice, Position 2, 6 year term; Supreme Court Justice, Position 8, 6 year short and full term; Supreme Court Justice, Position 9, 6 year term; Court of appeals, Division 3, District 1, Position 1, 6 year term; Superior Court Judge, Position 1, 4 year term; Superior Court Judge, Position 2, 4 year short and full term The registration deadline for online registrations, mail-in registrations and transfers is July 9, 2012. Any qualified elector who is not registered to vote in the State of Washington may register to vote in person at the Auditor’s Office up to and including July 30, 2012. You can register or obtain registration forms at the Auditors Office, on line at www.vote.wa.gov, and Department of Licensing. The Okanogan County Auditor’s Office, 149 N 3rd, Room 104, at the County Courthouse, will be open so voters may obtain replacement ballots, drop off voted ballots, obtain provisional ballots, and use the Accessible Voting Units, at the following times. Monday – Friday 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM – July 20 – August 6, 2012. On Election Day only, August 7, 2012, 9:00 AM - 8:00 PM. Drop boxes are going to be installed in 3 locations around the county. At this time they have not been installed. Check to see if drop boxes are installed before you plan to drop off your ballot. Drop boxes, if installed, are open July 20 – August 7, 2012 at the following locations: Tonasket – Tonasket City Hall/Library Complex, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket Omak – Next to Police Station, 8 N Ash, Omak Pateros -180 Pateros Mall in parking lot, Pateros On Election Day only, if drop boxes are not installed yet, there will be a drop off site at the Omak Public Library, 30 S Ash, Omak, from 9:00AM to 8:00PM. Voters needing additional information or assistance with voter registration forms or voting may call (509) 422-7240. Voters unable to use the mail-in ballot may use the Accessible Voting Unit available at the County Auditor’s Office. Ballots require sufficient first class postage and must be postmarked by the day of the election. Check with your local Post Office for deadlines to have your ballot postmarked properly. For additional information on the election or regarding voter registration. okanogancounty.org, search for Auditor then Elections vote.wa.gov, select MyVote, or Online voter registration Local newspaper, radio, and TV Meetings of the Okanogan County Canvassing Board are open, public meetings and shall be continued until the activities for which the following meetings are held have been completed: Wednesday, August 15, 2012 at 11:00 AM to determine the status of any provisional or challenged ballots Tuesday, August 21, 2012 at 11:00 AM to canvass the votes cast and certify the election This notice is in accordance with RCW 29A.52. Dated at Okanogan, Washington this 21st day of June, 2012. Laurie Thomas, Okanogan County Auditor and Ex-Officio Supervisor of Elections /s/: by Mila M Jury, Chief Deputy and Certified Election Administrator Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune and Quad City Herald on June 28, 2012.#400060

Public Hearing Six Year Transportation Improvement Program City of Tonasket The Tonasket City Council will hold a public hearing at the regular Council meeting on July 10, 2012 at 7:00 pm in the City Hall, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. Tonasket, WA. The purpose of the hearing is to review and possibly adopt the Six Year Transportation Improvement Program for the years 2013 - 2018. Interested persons are invited to attend. Persons with special language, hearing or access needs should contact City Hall at 509-486-2132, prior to the hearing. Alice J. Attwood City Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 28, 2012.#400201

Estate of: JOHN S. LARSON, Deceased. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: The above Court has appointed me Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against Decedent must present the claim: Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and in the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: By filing with the foregoing Court the original of the signed Creditor’s Claim, and By serving upon or mailing by first class mail to me at the address provided below a copy of the signed Creditor’s Claim. The Creditor’s Claim must be presented by the later to occur of: Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice to you as provided in RCW 11.40.020(3), or Four (4) months af-

ter the date of first publication of this Notice. If the Creditor’s Claim is no presented within the foregoing time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: June 14, 2012 /s/: Diane Larson, Personal Representative Address for Mailing of Service: c/o Joshua F. Grant, P.S., Attorney at Law, PO Box 619, Wilbur, WA 99185 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 14, 21 and 28, 2012.#396272

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR LINCOLN COUNTY PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) No. 12-4-0037-7

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Notice of Primary Election Okanogan County, State of Washington

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SIX YEAR TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Notice is hereby given that the Oroville City Council will hold a public hearing for the purpose of reviewing and adopting the Six Year Transportation Program for the years 20132018, at 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, July 3, 2012 in the City Council Chambers. ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 21 and 28, 2012.#398241

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Meeting Cancellation The Oroville Planning Commission has canceled their Wednesday, July 4, 2012 meeting. Regular meetings are held the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at 4:30 pm in the City Council Chambers. If you have any questions, please call JoAnn Denney at 476-2926 ext 13.

Notice of Final Decision M2-Whitefish Island Habitat Improvement Project SE 2012-9 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Chris Johnson, Methow Salmon Recovery Foundation (MSRF) has submitted a Joint Aquatic Resource Permit Application (JARPA) for an Okanogan County Shoreline Exemption. The M2-Whitefish Island Habitat Improvement Project objective is to restore natural processes to the greatest degree feasible while adding sustainable features that immediately improve habitat based on reach-level goals. The project primarily targets rearing juvenile fish during low water, but project features are also intended to provide benefits for both juvenile and adult fish during all flows. The project is located on the Methow River adjacent to 16 Witte Rd on parcels 3421130029, & 3421130026 approximately 1 mile southerly of the Town of Winthrop, WA within Okanogan County, T. 34, N, R, 21 EWM. S. 13. Direct questions and comments to: Charlene Schumacher, Senior Planner, Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-7113. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune and Quad City Herald on June 28, 2012.#400192

SIX YEAR TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Notice is hereby given that the Oroville City Council will hold a public hearing for the purpose amending the Six Year Transportation Program for the years 2012-2017, at 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, July 3, 2012 in the City Council Chambers. ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 21 and 28, 2012.#398237

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each Puzzle 1 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.67) column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

8

LEGAL NOTICE NEGOTIATION OF STATE LEASES WITH EXISTING LESSEES BETWEEN AUGUST 2012 AND OCTOBER 2012 EXPIRES: DECEMBER 2012. 10-A56701-GRAZING- ALL of Section 36, Township 36 North, Range 26 East, W.M. 10-C59951GRAZING-Gov Lot 2, SW1/4SW1/4, Section 7, Gov Lot 3, Gov Lot 4, SW1/4NE1/4, W1/2NW1/4, SE1/4SW1/4, NW1/4SE1/4, S1/2SE1/4, Section 18, E1/2NW1/4, Section 19, all in Township 38 North, Range 27 East, W.M. Written request to lease must be received by July 27, 2012, at Department of Natural Resources, 225 S Silke Rd, Colville, Washington 99114-9369. Each request to lease must include the lease number, the name, address and phone number of applicant, and must contain a certified check or money order payable to the Department of Natural Resources for the amount of any bonus bid plus a $100.00 deposit. The envelope must be marked “Sealed Bid” and give lease number, expiration date of lease applied for and give applicant’s name. The applicant must be prepared to purchase improvements that belong to the current lessee. Persons wishing to bid to lease any of these properties can obtain more details, bid packet, and qualification requirements by contacting the Colville office or calling (509) 684-7474. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 28, 2012.#400070

Notice of Final Decision M-2 WDFW Floodplain Habitat Improvement SE 2012-10 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Chris Johnson, Methow Salmon Recovery Foundation (MSRF) has submitted a Joint Aquatic Resource Permit Application (JARPA) for an Okanogan County Shoreline Exemption. The M2-WDFW Floodplain Habitat Improvement Project seeks to restore natural processes to the greatest degree feasible while adding sustainable features that immediately improve habitat based on reach-level goals. The project is primarily targeted at improving habitat availability for rearing juvenile salmonids during low flow periods. The project also includes features intended to provide benefits for both juvenile and adult fish during all flows. The project is located on the Methow River north of 100 Witte Rd on multiple parcels approximately 3 miles northerly of the Town of Twisp, WA within Okanogan County, T. 34, N, R, 25, 30 EWM, S. 25, 30, Direct questions and comments to: Charlene Schumacher, Senior Planner, Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-7113. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune and Quad City Herald on June 28, 2012.#400198

Sudoku

9

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY NOTICE TO CREDITORS NO. 12-4-00036-0 In re the Estate of: BETTY JEAN VANDYCK, Deceased. The DONALD VANDYCK has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceeding were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: June 18, 2012. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: June 28, 2012. /s/: Anthony Castelda, WSBA# 28937 Attorney for VanDyck Estate PO Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 28 and July 5 and 12, 2012.#398221

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY NOTICE TO CREDITORS NO. 12-4-00034-3 In re the Estate of: DAVID A. FARRAR, Deceased The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any personal having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within that later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: June 11, 2012 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: June 21, 2012. /s/: ASHLEY FARRAR Personal Representative /s/: Anthony Castelda, WSBA# 28937 Attorney for Farrar Estate PO Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 21, 28 and July 5, 2012.#398246

Statement of Nondiscrimination Skyline Telecom is the recipient of Federal financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The USDA prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individuals income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-9410, or call (800) 7953272 (voice), or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). “USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender”. The Equal Employment Opportunity Coordinator is responsible for coordinating this organizations nondiscrimination compliance efforts and may be contacted at Skyline Telecom PO Box 609, Mount Vernon, OR 97865, (541) 932-4411. Any individual, or specific class of individuals, who feel that this organization has subjected them to discrimination may obtain further information about the statutes and regulations listed above from and/or file a written complaint with this organization; or the Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington DC 20250; or the Administrator, Rural Electrification Administration, Washington , DC 20250. Complaints may be filed within 180 days after the alleged discrimination. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 28, 2012.#400154

Across 1. Lying, maybe 5. Junk E-mail 9. Strong woody fibers obtained from the phloem of various plants 14. Checker, perhaps 15. Easter flower 16. Depth charge target 17. “-zoic” things 18. Something expected 20. Game keeper? 22. Auction offering 23. White ___ 24. Large, densely populated urban†areas

28. Describe 29. “The Joy Luck Club” author 30. Auspices 34. “A jealous mistress”: Emerson 35. Beam 37. European capital 39. Ethical or moral codes that apply more strictly to one group than to another 42. Golden ___ 43. The “A” of ABM 44. Criticize, slangily 45. Coaster 46. “Walking on Thin Ice” singer 47. Assayers’ stuff 49. Magical†spells 54. ___ Today 57. A hand 58. Volcanic island in the Tyrrhenian†Sea at the north end of the Bay†of†Naples 59. Bin for rubbish 63. Honky-___ 64. Smallest detectable sensation 65. Chill 66. Fungal spore sacs 67. Short poems descriptive of rural or pastoral life 68. Baltic capital 69. “___ go!” Down 1. Elite military unit 2. Roll†in which the plane follows a spiral course 3. Quality of being exact 4. Render harmless 5. “The sweetest gift of heaven”: Virgil 6. Snaps 7. Matterhorn, e.g. 8. White fatty substance attached to a computer in order for it to use protected software 9. Montana city

10. “The ___ Daba Honeymoon” 11. Princes, e.g. 12. ___ Bell 13. Charon’s river 19. Comedian Bill, informally 21. Electronic†device that must be attached†to a computer in†order for it to use protected software 25. “Miss ___ Regrets” 26. Flowering†shrub 27. “Buona ___” (Italian greeting) 31. Used to watering a lawn 32. Not clearly defined 33. Back talk 34. Bothers 36. ___ judicata 37. Atlanta-based station 38. Expressions whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make†them up 40. Dwell 41. Any day now 46. “My!” 48. Of or involving the rectum 50. Leavened breads baked in a clay oven in India 51. Butt 52. Skin problem 53. Small arboreal monkeys of tropical South†America 54. ___ fruit 55. Aforementioned 56. ___ brat 60. ___ cant 61. Computer Generated Imagery 62. Calendar abbr.

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1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

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PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 28, 2012

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE ROYAL NEIGHBORS OF AMERICA $5! The most oft asked question is does the winner win the entire display of items and certificate? The answer is Yes! There will be only one winner. The drawing will be held and the winner called, Saturday, July 21 on the veranda at the Depot Museum. If you have not purchased your tickets, we will be at the Farmer’s Market this Saturday, June 30, Princes on July 12 and at other local spots between now and Heritage Days or call the number listed below. Royal Neighbors is also sponsoring an event at the Veterans Campground on Friday, July 20 beginning at 6:30 p.m. Storyteller/ historian, Arnie Marchand will be speaking about “the Okanogan Indians and life in the valley” years ago. Bring a chair or blanket, come join the campers and learn about what makes our corner of the world special. Our members will be there and light refreshments will be served - we look forward to seeing you! It is our hope that this event will lead to providing summer programs regularly in the park for residents and visitors to enjoy. Our local chapter of Royal

BY JOANNE MORRIS

The end of June and the start of the Fourth of July holiday week is quickly approaching - somehow “Mother Nature” has not gotten the message “it’s summertime”; the sun should be shining and we should be complaining about the heat. The only positive as I see is that the heater/air conditioning is off and those PUD bills are much lower...oh boy I have digressed! You may have noticed members of our organization at Princes and Farmer’s Markets in Oroville and Tonasket over the past several weeks selling tickets for our “Lazy Daze of Summer Survival Kit Raffle”. The funds raised through this raffle will become part of our 2012 matching funds program which benefits the Oroville Parents Teacher Organization. Our “Summer Survival Kit” includes a small portable Weber barbecue, 36 quart igloo cooler filled with summer reading provided, gift certificates for dinners out, golf in Oroville and Osoyoos plus oh so much more. Total value of raffle items is $800 - $1000. The tickets are $1 dollar each or six for

Neighbors of America strives to “make a difference” in the community. “Kite Day” in late March, the “Community Coat Closet” in early November, providing emergency clothing to the North Valley Hospital ER and school throughout the year plus the See’s Candy sale for the matching funds program are the major programs we oversee. Like any organization, membership is crucial and we would welcome new members! If you are interested in learning more about Royal Neighbors of America or attending a meeting, please call me at (509) 476-3882.

R E A L E S TAT E G U I D E

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

SUN LAKES REALTY

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville  509-476-4444

Beautiful country setting! This spacious home is well laid out and features a large 24x36 shop with concrete floor. Gated entry, fenced and cross-fenced for horse pasture. Full RV hookups with 50 amp service. Modern, functional kitchen with lots of counter space. This home is a must see! MLS#372007 $182,000

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon or Carrie Rise

— HOLIDAY SPECIALS —

HANNA RE AL TY D H -B ,D W A .B &G G AVID

ANNA

ROKER

UANE

ILSON

SSOC

ROKER

LEN

ROVE, AGENT

Where good deals are not extinct! 509-486-4528 An attractive 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home with shop, located just outside of Tonasket with views of the beautiful Okanogan Valley. The home is very well maintained, warm and rich with thoughtful details throughout the house. The yard is set out nicely and has mature landscaping and a fun Koi pond. Outdoor benches are situated to take advantage of the views and the covered deck invites one to rest a while. $176,000 MLS #311855 PICTURES - www.hannarealty.com email: dave@hannarealty.com 306 Hwy. 7 S., Tonasket Toll Free 1-877-593-7238

www.windermere.com The coffee is always on!

509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson (Designated Broker) & Ron Peterson (Broker), Owners Mary Curtis, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee (Brokers)

WAUCONDA CABIN. Well. Power. Septic. Phone. 1.99 Acres. Weekend Retreat or Year-round Living. $72,500.00 1/2 mile to State Hwy - 1/2 mile to Natl. Forest. Possible Owner Contract. 40 ACRES. 11 miles Tonasket. Good Access. Big Views. Scattered Trees. Phone. $39,500.00 Owner Contract. 40 ACRES. 2-bdrm, 1 1/2-Bath Home. Garage/Shop. Fenced. Tree Farmed. Lush Pasture. Riverside area. $199,900.00 TONASKET Commercial Building. Hwy 97 Frontage. Former Restaurant. Equipment still there. Lots of Parking. $140,000.00. Possible Owner Contract. 67 ACRES m/l. About 50 irrigated Alfalfa. 2 Domestic Wells. Power. Septic. 40x60 Shop. Riverside. $229,500.00 Owner Contract. 20 ACRES. Riverside. Building Site. Domestic Water. Views. Good Access. Power Close. $39,500.00 Owner Contract. OKANOGAN Commercial. 5 Acres. Former Livestock Market. Edge of City Limits. City Water. Corrals. Panels. Gates. 15-ton Scale. Outbldgs. Busy Restaurant. Near Sports complex. $300,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

210 ft Classy Waterfront Estate, gorgeous lake view! 3700 sq ft, 3 bdrm, 4 bath, bonus carriage house.

$699,000.

$379,000.

DELUXE WATERFRONT, COUNTRY CRAFTSMAN, Resort Cottage, Room for All, Golden Beach.

115A Eastlake Rd, Oroville Cute little summer cottage 1 bed, 1 bath, with a really great view of Lake Osoyoos. 138 ft. of waterfront. NWML# 363066 $350,000

LAKEFRONT STUCCO

Soccer Size Lot, Imagination, TLC, What A Beach!!

$209,000

Lake Osoyoos Mini-acre, Loads of Waterfront, Live Big!

$429,000

– PRICE SLASHED –

WATERFRONT LOT, sandy beach, sewer, water, power installed. Build or RV? $299,000.

BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY Call Charlene at 476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Services Directory

AIR CONDITIONING

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

- 24 Hour Service Licensed & Bonded

509-486-2692 P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

AUTOMOTIVE

BUILDING SUPPLIES

We’re more than just print!

Quality Supplies Since 1957

MACHINE WORKS

Midway Building Supply

- Over 35 years experience -

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Retubing  Shortening

Oroville Building Supply

We Build Drivelines

Only Driveline Balancer in the County!!  Over 400 parts in stock  U-Joint Repair

From Imports to Semi Trucks... We Do it All! Usually 24 hour turnaround! Open Mon-Thur. 8 to 7pm

Start your newspaper subscription today and see the light. Get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

l Plumbing l Electrical l Roofing l Lumber

l Plywood l Windows l Doors l Insulation

www.gazette-tribune.com

CONCRETE

INSULATION

OSOYOOS READI-MIX

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Installed Insulation &

Suppliers of: Quality Readi-Mix Concrete & Aggregates

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 We Work Saturdays! 11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park Serving Oroville, Tonasket and area!

Garage Doors l Installed Fiberglass Blown & Batt

Insulation

l Residential

& Commercial Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified l Experienced Professional Service l Green

Office: 509-422-0295 Cell: 509-429-0417

PUMPS

PUMPS

WELL DRILLING

Got Water?

OROVILLE

“The Water Professionals”

— Fred Cook — Over 25 Years experience!

Pump Installation Domestic Hook ups Pump Repair Lawn Sprinkler Systems All Supplies Available

Cook’s

1420 Main St.  P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602  866-773-7818

Visit our website.

33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

509-486-0511 521 Western Ave. S. Tonasket

SUBSCRIBE

VISIT THE WEB

Mini Storage n Power

n Fenced

n Covered

RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

509-560-0166 or

Cutting Edge, Inc.

509-560-0367

509-486-4320

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

LIC. & BONDED #COOKSCE931CL

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington... l Water

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

Well Drilling Systems Treatment l Full Service Store l Free On-Site Estimates l Pump l Water

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

l Free Water Analysis l Zimmatic Pivots l Hydrofracturing l Geothermal Heat

Systems

Loop

Colville l Spokane l Republic Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, June 28, 2012  

June 28, 2012 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune