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Examiner The Whidbey

News from the Heart of Whidbey Island

THURSDAY, July 26, 2012

VOL. 17, NO. 51

Spending, Rain, rain, go away public safety debated at forum By Elisabeth Murray Staff Reporter

In a few short weeks, the five candidates vying for the Dist. 1 commissioner’s seat will be whittled down to two. At the three primary forums held during the past week, the candidates had the opportunity to sway potential voters to their cause. In the July 19 forum in Freeland organized by the League of Women Voters of Whidbey Island, the candidates responded to questions that they knew about in advance. With about a minute to respond, they spoke about such issues as the role and function of government, the environment and water quality, and when they would support a tax increase. Democrat Helen Price Johnson, the incumbent, spoke of her experience serving Island County residents as the current commissioner. “When I first ran for county commissioner in 2008, the quality of life I enjoyed here was being threatened,” Johnson said. “Now serving in this role for four years, I have the experience, knowledge, and proven record of leadership and smart solutions.” Johnson said she brought to the job her 25 years of small business experience as well as her family experience as the mother of four children, now adults. Jeff Lauderdale, one of Johnson’s two Republican challengers, said his experience as a Navy commander managing the $21 million Trident missile program has primed him for the position. Lauderdale, who has been attending commissioner meetings on a regular basis for about three years, said learning more about county government also peaked his interest in serving in elected office. “Whidbey Island is the place I want to take my last breath,” Lauderdale said. “I’ll work very hard to protect it.” Ensuring that the county’s law and justice departments are well funded is a part of that effort, he said, adding that See FORUM, page 5

Elisabeth Murray / The Whidbey Examiner

Clark Bishop of Ebey Road Farm bales hay last week ahead of rain forecasted to set in the next day. This summer’s cool, wet weather has damaged hay grown at a number of Central Whidbey farms.

Farms impacted by summer rains By Elisabeth Murray Staff Reporter

Farmer Clark Bishop grabs a fistful of hay grown at Ebey Road Farm just outside Coupeville, looking closely to evaluate its quality. Fog and the recent heavy rains – unusual for this time of year – have wreaked havoc on the alfalfa and grass and put a significant dent in its market value to this family farm in the heart of Ebey’s Prairie. Originally destined for the bellies of alpaca, goats and sheep, the second cutting of hay mown in the family’s fields is now fit only to be used as bedding or as “feeder hay” for less-discriminating herbivores such as cows. Bishop estimates the financial loss has been between $50,000 and $70,000. “It is what is is,” said Bishop, whose family owns 535 acres and

farms about 650 acres just south of Coupeville. The alfalfa was cut on July 4 and left to dry in the fields, where it would later be baled and delivered to the farm’s customers. To get the highest quality hay, a stretch of sunny weather – about a week – is needed. But for weeks now, fog has shrouded the fields, adding moisture to the hay. And then heavy rain and hail during the July 13 thunderstorms, followed by more rain the next week, slowed the drying process. Moisture leaches out the nutrient content and can cause the hay to mold.

Trying to save the hay, Bishop went out into the fields on his tractor to pick it up and fluff it – a way to help dry it faster. The effort was time consuming and used a lot of fuel, Bishop said. “This has been an abnormally wet year,” he said. “The question is if it is going to stop or keep going.” So far this year, the Bishop farm has gotten about 16 inches of rain. This is fast approaching last year’s record rain fall: almost 18 inches for the entire year. But after six generations of farming See FARMS, page 9


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The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, July 26, 2012

Greenbank Farm garden teaches water management By Elisabeth Murray Staff Reporter

The Washington State University Master Gardeners arrived at the Greenbank Farm on Saturday, June 9 ready to learn about rain gardens. And while the gardeners gained valuable lessons from their class, they left behind a visible and lasting legacy: an oval-shaped demonstration rain garden near the tractor barn and swing sets at the farm that covers a 95-square-foot patch of land. Rain gardens capture rainwater from roofs, sidewalks and driveways and filter pollutants out rather than having them enter local watersheds as stormwater runoff. Under the guidance of professor Martin

Greenbank Farm photo

Master Gardener Marcia Nelson was one of 12 volunteers who installed a demonstration rain garden at Greenbank Farm. Quigley of the University of Denver, a national-

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ly known expert in rain garden installation, and Rob Hallbauer, natural resources planner at the Whidbey Island Conservation District, they spent the morning in the classroom engaged in training. In the afternoon, they grabbed shovels and reached for plants to place into the prepared soil. Greenbank Farm had prepared the site using farm equipment, removing about two feet of soil. “The planting was relatively easy,” Master Gardener Marcia Nelson said. The spot for the rain garden was then filled with a mix of about 60 percent compost, 40 percent sand – a reversal of what is usually recommended by Washington

State University but appropriate for this location, said Tim Lawrence, director of Washington State University Island County Extension. Installing a rain garden is not exactly rocket science, Lawrence said. That is, until something goes wrong. For example, selecting the wrong plants can lead to the area remaining too wet for too long. Plants set into the wrong conditions can also die off, he said. But by getting good advice before installation, property owners can prevent or solve common problems that might crop up. Two local resources offer expert advice for anyone who wants See GARDEN, page 11

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Thursday, July 26, 2012  •  The Whidbey Examiner

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New Clinton market channels community energy By Betty Freeman Staff Reporter

If you go

The sun shone brightly on opening day of Clinton’s new Thursday Market as 25 produce, food and craft vendors gathered on a grassy area behind the Dairy Queen in Clinton. “We want it to be a weekly party for the community,” said Carol Flax, director of the new market, which began its inaugural season July 5. She said she was pleased with the initial response from vendors and community members who enjoyed the market’s casual atmosphere, live music, and the tantalizing colors and smells of good, local food. “We’ve got room for about 40 vendors,” said Flax, who said she is hoping more local businesses will join the market. The late afternoon market is scheduled for 4 to 7:30 p.m. every Thursday in July and August. Vendors offer fresh produce and eggs along with crafts, jewelry, plants, Guatemalan textiles, baked goods, chocolates and services such as massages, pedicures and haircuts from local businesses. On opening day, Good Cheer Food Bank and the Friends of the Clinton Library had booths at which they promoted upcoming events. An unusual feature was the large slot-car track that can be rented for parties. Hotly contested slot-car races added to the party atmosphere. Island County Com-

What: Clinton Farmers Market When: 4 to 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through August. Where: Just north of the ferry dock on the green at Clinton Square.

Betty Freeman photo

Vanessa Chang, Tracy Lor, Bao Lor and Stacey Lor sell flowers and fresh vegetables at their booth at the Thursday Market near the Clinton ferry dock. missioner Helen Price Johnson, who attended the first Clinton Market and got a massage, bought some produce and chatted with shoppers, applauded the efforts of market organizers. “It’s so great to have a weekly event like this to bring people together and boost Clinton,” she said. The first market featured live music from the Tim Donovan Band, sponsored by Whidbey Island Bank. Organizers plan to have live music at each market, including local jazz saxophonist Danny Ward, the Marimbas and a repeat performance by the Tim Donovan Band. As for food, choices, Tres Gringos plans to serve a different Mexican menu each week, while volunteers from the American Legion

Examiner The Whidbey

Kasia Pierzga, Publisher & Editor Published since 1995, The Whidbey Examiner is the official newspaper of record for Island County, Washington. The Whidbey Examiner (USPS 015276) is published weekly by Sound Publishing, Inc. ADVERTISING: Media kit available at whidbeyexaminer.com. DEADLINES: Advertising: Display: 4 pm Friday; Classifieds: 4 pm Friday; Legal Notices: Noon Tuesday; News, Events & Letters: 5 p.m. Monday. Annual subscriptions are $19.50 in Island County; $23 outside Island County. Periodicals postage paid at Coupeville, WA 98239. CONTACT US: news@whidbeyexaminer.com The Whidbey Examiner, 107 S. Main St., Suite 101, Coupeville, WA 98239

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cook up traditional summer barbecue fare. Anchor Books and Coffee provides cold drinks along with treats made by Whidbey Island Ice Cream. “Our intention is that people will stop by the market and have dinner on Thursday nights,” Flax said. “We’ve got

picnic tables near the bandstand so people can enjoy the music while they eat. We’re also hoping to get permission to have a beer garden at future markets.” L & L Properties, which owns the adjacent Sound Storage complex, donated the use of the property for the market.

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Ample parking is available in Clinton Square next to the market site. Two Sound Storage customers opened their units for garage sales during the first market – another draw for the fledgling enterprise. The Clinton Thursday Market is the first big project resulting from the community’s Future Search Conference held in late January at the Clinton Community Hall. More than 75 Clinton residents and business owners attended the conference, taking part in brainstorming sessions that generated ideas for improving infrastructure and transportation, attracting new businesses and sup-

porting existing ones, making the neighborhood more attractive and strengthening its sense of community. After the conference, several action committees were formed, and work began in earnest to “get Clinton active.” “The expectation we left with is that we will participate in the life of our community,” conference organizer Sherryl Christie-Bierschenk said. “As a group, we agreed to actively create a future for Clinton’s central core that will enable our community to thrive,” she said. The Clinton market, an outgrowth of the Economic Development Committee’s agenda, is one way that energy is being channeled into an enjoyable, shared community experience. “So come on down to the market on Thursday nights and party with us,” Flax said with a grin. “Let’s keep the momentum going!”

Art with a View! Artists Invasion

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Market Basket giveaway: Saturday, August 4! No Market Aug 11th during Coupeville’s Arts & Crafts Festival

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Page 4

Government is not a business After attending four candidates’ forums in the past two weeks, one thing is clear; most of the “challengers” believe the county should be run like a business. Government is not a business! It is designed to provide services that “business” is either unable or unwilling to provide. Business has a profit motive. Government has a service motive. The two county commissioners, Homola and Price Johnson, have done the best job possible to balance the budget and provide the services mandated by law in light of the present fiscal challenges. I’m voting to retain them in office. – Jack Tingstad Coupeville

Vote to elect Lauderdale We are all aware that the economy is in trouble. That means that we are all in trouble. It is important to understand why the economy is in trouble and then to do what is needed to fix the problems. Jeff Lauderdale understands the problems and has the intelligence and experience required to solve our problems as our county commissioner. We continue to spend more than we earn. We try to regulate more than we can afford to administer. We make earning a living in Island County unnecessarily difficult. Our youth are moving away. We deny adequate funds to support public safety and the essential ministerial functions of county government. Our two incumbent county commissioners up for re-election have demonstrated their lack of experience, will and ability to fix the problems. Our incumbent county commissioners have played defense almost exclusively for over three and a half years. When they attempted offense, in the form of asking the public to raise property taxes, they lost the confidence of the voters by over 70 percent. They have raised taxes and fees, without a vote of the people, in the belief that making it cost more to live here will improve the economy.

viewpoints We cannot afford such seriously flawed thinking any longer. We desperately need Jeff Lauderdale’s intelligence, personal discipline, and proven leadership to correct the dangerous path Island County government is on. Please vote for Jeff Lauderdale. – Rufus Rose Clinton

Johnson gets my vote I am writing to express my support for the re-election of Helen Price Johnson as Island County commissioner. She was first elected in an extremely trying period of reducing revenues for all levels of government operations. During this period, her leadership and innovation has resulted in successfully reducing operating costs by 20 percent while maintaining priority county services. Those priorities center on preserving public health and safety and the community’s safety net. Helen has personally contributed as well by freezing her own salary, cutting her own health benefits and foregoing the travel stipend that has historically been available to commissioners. Her accomplishments over the past four years have been significant. Aside from maintaining services and a balanced budget, Helen has led the way in opening up county government visibility and bringing public access into the 21st century. Technology has been utilized to allow Camano residents unprecedented access to commissioner and other public meetings in Coupeville via interactive TV at the Camano Annex. The county website has been completely renovated and now contains maps, assessor information, video and audio records of commissioner meetings, minutes of these meetings with links to supporting documentation, citizen committee openings and land use information. Helen also chairs the Lodging Tax Advisory Committee and serves on the Joint Tourism Board. These activities have focused on culinary agriculture as one means of economic growth and expanding jobs. Lodging-tax revenues have grown by 30 percent in three years. Her interests and energies extend as well to participating with the Town of Coupe-

Whidbey Examiner online poll

The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, July 26, 2012

ville to develop guidelines and code for protection of the Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, to our county parks and trails systems and she serves as co-chair of the Coastal Caucus of Puget Sound Counties. A primary characteristic of Helen’s is that she is a good and thoughtful listener, an attribute that facilitates her communication with her government partners as well as with the public. She has demonstrated a high level of evenhandedness and respect in her interactions with county residents and with colleagues, which contributes to her effectiveness as a commissioner. I encourage your vote for Helen Price Johnson for Island County commissioner. – Bill Thorn Former Island County commissioner, Camano Island

Self-righteous people spread fear, distrust Last Monday, our Board of Island County Commissioners adopted a resolution supporting a Constitutional amendment to overturn the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in the Citizens United matter. Commissioners Helen Price Johnson and Angie Homola displayed great courage and foresight in their support of the resolution. Our small, local resolution may not count for much in the big scheme of things. Nevertheless, Homola and Johnson deserve our thanks for acting decisively to defend the voice of average citizens in our local, state, and national elections. Commissioner Kelly Emerson, in casting her dissenting vote, delivered a fearful rant describing how overturning the Supreme Court’s decision will lead to tyrannical government and ruin. What Emerson fails to understand is that what happened at that meeting was the result of average folks mounting a sober, measured pushback against political extremism. Make no mistake: Whenever the rights of average citizens are threatened, whether by over-powerful government or by over-powerful corporate interests, the people will not stand idly by. Fear, Ms. Emerson? I fear self-righ-

teous, patronizing ideologues much more than I fear the consequences of getting corporate money out of politics. Democracy must never be for sale to the highest bidder. – Paul Thompson Langley

One down, two to go I have read with great interest the reasons why our current county commissioners, up for election, should be retained. I’m sure that some believe, but I think that the sportsmen and their families may disagree when they think back to the decision that was made by the three in power at the time concerning hunting on Deer Lagoon. The residents of the area set out to create an environment for their own personal use, and not share this natural resource with the sportsmen of the island who had been using the lagoon long before many of the residents built and moved to the island. It was a good appeal, but not with solid facts, and was also bought into by the two remaining commissioners. Now I see that commissioner Homola brought up the lagoon in an article in The Whidbey Examiner concerning target shooting on private property (“Neighbors clash over nearby target shooting,” July 12). It seems that she is proud that she voted against Island sportsmen. During the already-decided hearing on Deer Lagoon in Freeland, there were many folks wearing camo hats who are voting residents. Maybe, just maybe, these voters were the ones who voted former Island County Commissioner Dean out of office. As the old adage goes “What goes around, comes around.” I know my friends and other sportsmen and their families have a long memory, and I am sure that they will know what to do with their votes at the primary elections for commissioners. One down, two to go. – Al Lindell Coupeville

Got an opinion?

Send letters to the editor to news@ whidbeyexaminer.com.

Last week’s Examiner online poll question:

To cast your vote, visit the Examiner online at www.whidbeyexaminer.com and look for the poll at the bottom left side of our home page. The poll isn’t scientific, but safeguards are in place to keep people from voting repeatedly from the same computer, and all votes are cast anonymously.

How do you feel about the expansion of the solar-energy project at Greenbank Farm? How our readers voted:

This week’s question:

q I like that it has an educational component that encourages the use of solar energy.

• With the recent mass shootings, how do you feel about possible changes in gun laws?

q I think it’s a good idea, but it must be promoted more if it’s going to be a tourist draw.

Poll results will appear each week in the Viewpoints section of our print edition. Log on and vote!

q I’m concerned about the cost to taxpayers, and the return on the investment. q I’m not wild about its impact on the pastoral beauty of the farm.

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Thursday, July 26, 2012  •  The Whidbey Examiner

Page 5

Forum: Candidates; from page 1

Voters should have received their ballots in the mail for Washington’s Aug. 7 primary election. Anyone who did not receive their ballot, or who has had a change of address, should contact the Island County

Auditor’s Office at 360679-7366 or elections@ co.island.wa.us, or in person at 400 N. Main St., Coupeville. Ballots were mailed earlier this month to members of the military who are serving overseas.

Elisabeth Murray / The Whidbey Examiner

District 1 county commissioner candidates Curt Gordon, Ed Jenkins, Helen Price Johnson, Jeff Lauderdale and Wayne Morrison prepare to answer questions at a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Whidbey Island last week in Freeland. The five candidates are vying for the commissioner seat currently held by Johnson, a Democrat. find jobs that can sustain them on this island.” Unlike a presidential debate in which there is extensive back and forth with pointed barbs, most of the prepared responses were directed at the audience. Each candidate had challenge cards they could use to refute claims made by opponents, and Jenkins in particular made frequent use of them to criticize Gordon’s record as a commissioner for the Port of South Whidbey. Gordon was elected to that office in 2009. The port is in the process of expanding the Langley marina, a move that Jenkins suggested would use up virtually

all of the port’s capacity to borrow money. Gordon said that this is not the case. Instead, the marina project is “the biggest tool to provide jobs in the district,” he said. As an independent, Gordon said he is “beholden to no party’s agenda,” and he is “here to work for you.” Jenkins said that instead of raising taxes, Whidbey should become a year ’round destination for tourists, with more sales-tax dollars coming into county coffers from the wallets of off-island visitors. Jenkins said he doesn’t need the $75,000 paycheck for the commissioner job. He would

instead use two-thirds of the money to market Whidbey Island, and the rest for advertisements in the local newspapers to explain what county government is doing. The legal notices, which are printed in small type and tucked in the classifieds section at the back of the paper, are published in what Jenkins described as arcane language, he said. Such notices are not user-friendly for ordinary people, he said, adding that the advertisements he would buy with his own money would help remedy that. Ballots already have been mailed for the upcoming election, set for Tuesday, Aug. 7.

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his first step in finding more money would be to do a complete “scrub” of the planning, health and roads departments. “When backup for violent acts is 45 minutes away, this is unacceptable and unsafe for officers and for citizens,” Lauderdale said. “We need to look very hard at how we structure county government.” But Johnson does not believe there is much, if any, money left in the budget that can be shifted to those services. She said the commissioners “scrubbed and scrubbed and scrubbed,” and that they reduced funding in every department before asking for cuts in law and justice. “We need to have a community conversation about what level of law and justice we want to have,” Johnson said. Business experience also figured prominently on the resumes of Republican Wayne Morrison and independent candidates Ed Jenkins and Curt Gordon. Morrison is the chairman of the Island County Economic Development Council. “All parts of government are making it more and more difficult for business to survive,” Morrison said. “I obviously advocate for a business climate.” During his final remarks, Morrison closed by saying, “My vision is for people to be able to

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The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, July 26, 2012

Meet the District 1 commissioner candidates Curt Gordon

Age: 55 Education: Langley High School; Western Washington State College, 2 years; University of Washington, 2 years Years on Whidbey: 53 Previous elected office: Elected commissioner of South Whidbey Park and Recreation District in 1987. Served for 18 years as an elected official and one more year appointed

to fill in for Matt Simms while he was in Iraq.   Elected in 2009 commissioner of the Port of South Whidbey. Biggest challenges facing Island County: The dramatic drop in salestax revenue and the services that provides, and the needed shift from construction-type businesses to other types of businesses. The need to attract and retain family-age residents is also a challenge.   Both of these issues can be significantly addressed by transporta-

OBITUARY Earl O. Lane

Earl O. Lane, age 77, longtime resident of South Whidbey, died peacefully on Sunday, June 10, 2012 after an extended illness. Mr. Lane was born in Philadelphia, Penn.,on April 10, 1935. His family moved to Seattle when he was ten years old. He graduated from Lincoln High School in Seattle in 1953. In January, 1955 Earl joined the US Air Force and served his country for 23 1/2 years, attaining the rank of CMSgt. He was stationed at various bases in Washington, California and Alaska. He also did a tour in Thailand during the Vietnam War. After retiring from the Air Force, he and his family remained in Alaska for an extra year and then settled on South Whidbey, in 1979. He managed the boat launch at Bush Point for a couple of years and then returned to the aerospace industry at Boeing. He is a retired Batallion Chief of the Bush Point Fire Station. He was a patient teacher and mentor to many young men and women he worked with. Earl married Beverly Shanrock on Jan. 6, 1957. Together they raised a family and traveled with their children extensively and supported every activity they were involved in. When they had grandchildren, they followed their activities with the same care and passion. He is survived by his loving wife, Beverly; his children and their spouses, Cheryl and Larry Hardie, Nanette and David Streubel, and Terry and CJ Lane; by his grandchildren, Marc and Alex Hardie, Amanda and Nicholas Streubel and Lindsey and Casey Lane; his beloved chocolate lab, Sassy; and by various nieces

tion improvements. What I stand for: The political parties have created distractions with their agendas that have stalled county government. As a proven nonpartisan elected official in our community for over 25 years, I’m offering a unique opportunity to elect an experienced leader not beholden to party agendas. Make local government about people, not politics. Tell us something we don’t know about you: I love all kinds of music and currently listen to Def Leppard and Deadmau5. Most recent book read: “Warmth Disperses and Time Passes,” by Hans Christian Baeyer, a reader-friendly book on the basics of thermodynamics that was suggested to me by my kid the aeronautical engineer.

Ed Jenkins

Earl Lane and nephews and friends. He was predeceased by his parents, Earl and Edith Lane; his brother, James Lane, and his son, Earl Richard Lane. Earl loved the outdoors. Camping, hunting and fishing were an integral part of his time in Alaska. He loved to fish for pike at Lake Minchumina, as well as Copper River Salmon in Chitina. He also had his light aircraft license and loved to fly to places you could not get to by car. Services will be held at Tahoma National Cemetery in Kent on Thursday, Aug. 16, at 1:15 p.m. There will also be a memorial barbecue held at the Greenbank Progressive Club in Greenbank on Saturday, Aug. 18, at 1 p.m. Please come join us and feel free to share stories you may have about Earl with the family. Earl will be missed, not only by his family, but by his countless friends! The family would like to extend their heartfelt thanks and appreciation to Jody, Kevin and Mary-Ann Bailey of Cottage by the Cove Adult Family Home for their loving care of Earl; and also to the nurses at Whidbey General Home Health Care and Hospice. In lieu of flowers, remembrances can be sent to WAIF, PO Box 1108, Coupeville, WA 98239.

Age: 67 Education: Enough Years on Whidbey: 8 Previous elected office: None, but very involved in local, state and federal races in Southern California. Biggest challenges facing Island County: Putting Island County on a new revenue path that does not depend on property values constantly increasing to fund vital services like law and order.   I will listen closely to the other candidates for any real programs or actual new jobs. I will run Island County like a business. I have no debts to investors and have the most diverse and successful business background to get results quickly. What I stand for: I live like most of you: simply and on a budget. I have a simple, inexpensive plan to make Whidbey a year ’round tourist destination that would bring a quantum leap in salestax revenue. I would bring new low-impact, high-tech, living-wage businesses to Whidbey. Services would not only be restored, but law and order and senior services would increase rather than be cut. Tell us something we don’t

know about you: I am actually a nice guy and get along well with people who do not lie to me and have their hand in my wallet while shaking my hand. I have been poor, fairly well off and everywhere in between. I have devoted the 20 years of my retirement to helping others by mentoring small businesses, single mothers and nonprofits. Most recent book read: “The Alphabet vs. the Goddess,” by Leonard Shlain.

Jeff Lauderdale

Age: 61 Education: Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, University of

Idaho. Years on Whidbey: 11 Previous elected office: None. Biggest challenges facing Island County: Moving away from ever-growing, increasingly powerful, centralized government and returning to a system that respects and rewards individual achievement and the concept of private property. Island County’s challenge will be to establish a government of adequate size and scope in an environment of state regulation that encourages unbridled government growth.   The solution to the challenge will be leadership that is willing and able to make critical priority decisions and successfully negotiate with state and federal governments to convince them to release their grip of unfunded mandates. In the near term, we must make thoughtful budgetary decisions that prioritize the safety of Island County citizens. What I stand for: I am committed to smart government that budgets resources wisely, sets priorities and deals with the most important first; works with citizens not against them; and a government that is sustainable. I am committed to restoring fiscal responsibility and local control to our Island County government. As a Navy commander, I am a proven leader who

can analyze issues, provide direction and foster the unity and teamwork necessary to solve problems with available resources.   For the past two years I have attended hundreds of Island County commissioners meetings, hearings and other government activities.   I know our county government and I am ready to provide practical solutions to the budgetary and other problems that must be addressed by our county commissioners. Tell us something we don’t know about you: I am an avid gardener. Most recent book read: “Best Laid Plans,” by Randal O’Toole.

Wayne N. Morrison

Age: 63 Education: Western Washington University, Bachelor of Science in Business with a minor in Economics; Chartered Property and Casualty Underwriter (CPCU); Associate in Risk Management (ARM). Years on Whidbey: 23 Previous elected office: President, vice president several times for local community organization; Republican precinct committee officer; president of the Island County Economic Development Council Biggest challenges facing Island County: Meeting the needs of the public with quality services given the scarce financial resources. We need a balanced budget and yet provide for uncertainties. What I stand for: I stand for fairness, common sense, pragmatism, a level playing field and growth with the environment in mind. I like smaller government, property rights, less bureaucracy and less process. You should vote for me as I have extensive experience with Island County obtained over 23 years in business.   My business experience is not matched by any other candidate due to my years in corporate senior management. Tell us something we don’t

know about you: I am a glassblower. Most recent book read: “In the Garden of Beasts,” by Erik Larson.

Helen Price Johnson

Age: 53 Education: Langley High School, 1 9 7 6 ; Bachelor of Arts in Administration and Legal Processes, Mills College, 1980; Continuous post-graduate training through professional associations. Years on Whidbey: 47 Previous elected office: South Whidbey School Board, 2001-2008; Island County Commissioner, 2008-present. Biggest challenges facing Island County: Stretching public resources to meet growing demands will continue to be a challenge. To preserve public health and safety, protect our quality of life, and support our local economy, being a good steward of public resources is my priority. What I stand for: I believe in our local community and that building resiliency in our citizens will save money and help to leverage limited public dollars.   Safety is increased when neighbors work together to support each other in a balance of public and private prevention, early intervention and treatment programs.   Our islands need leaders who understand the needs of our small businesses and families.   As a 25-year business owner and mother of four, I bring that perspective to the commissioner’s table. We must be good stewards of our precious natural resources and balance the pressures of development with the preservation of our environment. Tell us something we don’t know about you: I was on my college swim team. Most recent book read: “Land Use, Environment, and Social Change: The Shaping of Island County, Washington,” by Richard White.   Washington’s primary election is set for Tuesday, Aug. 7.


Thursday, July 26, 2012  •  The Whidbey Examiner

Meet the District 2 commissioner candidates James (Jim) M. Campbell

Age: 76 Education: University of San Francisco (about three years) Years on Whidbey: 12 Previous elected office: Oak Harbor City Council, 2005 to present. Biggest challenges facing Island County: The critical items are returning the staffing level at the sheriff’s and prosecutor’s offices to a point where they can do the job of protecting citizens.   Second is the number and quantity of taxes the citizens are paying today. And we need to get more proactive in recruiting living wage jobs to settle in Island County. What I stand for: It matters to me that people are safe. I believe governments primary responsibility is to provide protection services.   It matters that people can live their lives with as little outside interference as possible. It matters that the governing body be flexible in its job. It matters that we have unity in reaching solutions to problems. When there is unity in what matters, we will have attained true freedom.   I am a retired chief petty officer and a retired senior manager from Lockheed Martin Aerospace Co. I have experience developing specifications, budgets, and tasks related to contracts that ran from $125 million to $300 million. I

have a strong and demonstrated background in leadership, management, the ability to work through complex problems and I have good people skills. The simple truth is experience matters and I have an enormous amount of experience in those things county commissioners are called upon to do. Tell us something we don’t know about you: I am 76, but most people are surprised by that fact because I defy their stereotypical view about a person this age. Most recent book read: “How the Scots Invented the Modern World,” by Arthur Herman.

Phil Collier

Declined to respond.

Angie Homola

Age: 52 Education: Bacherlor of Science in Architecture, Washington State University (cum laude); WSU Architecture Program at London Central Polytechnic; Associate of Arts in General Studies and Architecture, Pierce College Years on Whidbey: 16 Previous elected office: Island County Commis-

sioner 2009-present Biggest challenges facing Island County: Large scale: Water quality and quantity, transport of people and goods, population age diversity i.e. challenges for keeping working families and school age children a part of our community fabric and economy, preservation of natural resources (Island County is at 97 percent risk of forest loss; the highest in the state).   All other scales: Finding diversity of employment outside of the current key drivers; loss of forest and agriculture land to development; adequate revenues for Island County public services and life safety functions. What I stand for: I became a commissioner because I discovered a misappropriation of nearly a quarter of a million dollars of taxpayer money.   I believed there was a lack of transparency and communication between city, county and citizens and I believed the statusqua model of build-orbust was not sustainable fiscally or environmentally.   The recession hit hard, the banks collapsed and construction sales tax revenues dried up. Building our way out of this problem is not a sustainable fix.   Under my leadership, and with the help of colleagues and amazing staff, local government retracted efficiently yet vulnerably because people are still here and they expect and deserve ade-

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quate services.   In my first term, transparency has improved greatly, department functions are more efficient, water is being protected, veterans are getting help, and hungry senior citizens and children are getting food.   I continue to encourage a collaborative process between city and county on long-range plans for what we want our islands to look like in 30-50 years and how we will get there. Tell us something we don’t know about you: I do not know boredom; everything intrigues me from complex machinery to the lacy wings of an insect. My deepest desire is for days to go on for many more hours so that I can obtain more knowledge and experiences. Most recent book read: “Better, Not Bigger,” by Eben Fodor.’

ing our revenue base or expanding programs? Are our resources used to sustain public safety or are they used to fund continued environmental studies?   Both of these things have a place, but in tough economic times, it is important to remember that the next four years will be defined by choices, and it is imperative that voters elect someone who reflects their values.   To me, this election is simply about electing a decision maker who is able to put the needs of the county before the politics of personality, partisanship or any other agenda. What I stand for: I believe in sound public policy that encourages economic growth, effective government spending and prioritizing pro-

Jill Johnson

Grafitti, a break-in and an unwanted dog

Age: 41 Education: Oak Harbor High School, 1989; Bachelor of Arts in Communications, minor in Economics, Central Washington University. Years on Whidbey: 30 Previous elected office: None. Biggest challenges facing Island County: Prioritization: how it chooses to spend its scarce resources and where it focuses its energy. Are policy decisions focused on grow-

Recent calls to the Coupeville Marshal’s Office: Tuesday, July 10 10:42 p.m. - A woman on S. Main Street reported someone kept walking around outside and stopping at her bedroom window. Thursday, July 12 11:43 p.m. - A woman called wanting to know her options for surrendering a dog she had adopted from WAIF in June.

grams that focus on the core services of county government that we all deserve and expect.   I believe it is time we change the tone of leadership from confrontational and accusatory to trusting and collaborative. Tell us something we don’t know about you: I was the coach of the Oak Harbor High School swim team for one year.   It was the very first year team members qualified for State. Of course, I would like to believe it was my coaching, but deep down I know that those girls swam their hearts out. It was a privilege to be a part of that moment. Most recent book read: “Coop,” by Michael Perry.

Friday, July 13 4:22 p.m. - A caller reported her residence had been broken into sometime in the two previous days. The door was found open and the residence was ransacked. Sunday, July 15 10:43 a.m. - A caller reported the bathrooms and some signs at Coupeville Town Park on N.W. Coveland Street had been spray painted. The caller said the paint wasn’t there the previous day.

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Page 8

The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, July 26, 2012

Ainsley Nelson, 11, of Clinton makes a run through the 4H agility course with her dog Maslow, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel.

Steven Chen of Bellevue celebrates his third-place win in the pie-eating contest Saturday. At left are Ryan Madden of Seattle and Nicholas Larus-Stone of Seattle; at right is Julia Laurence of Seattle.

Loganberry Festival fun! Photos by Elisabeth Murray

LEFT: Jones Walther, 5, of Coupeville enjoys watching balls disappear in a whirlpool at the kinetic water sculpture created by Tom Lindsey. BELOW: Stacey Neumiller, left, Connie Lloyd and Sarah Cassatt participate in the quadrille performance dressage in which the team of four horses and riders followed choreographed movements accompanied by music.

Annie Philp, 8, of Langley plays the fiddle while keeping a Hula-Hoop whirling around her hips. Philp performed with members of the Island Strings group.


Thursday, July 26, 2012  •  The Whidbey Examiner

Page 9

Farms: Raspberry U-pick; from page 1 on Ebey’s Prairie, this isn’t the first time the family has faced crop loss. And Bishop said there’s still time for the farm to recover. His family’s farm is fairly diversified, with crops that include plants for seed production such as grasses, beets, and peas. He said he is hopeful the grain he’s planted will bring a good price later in the season. “There is loss in any given year,” Bishop said. “But something’s got to be good. We keep going.” Pulling a baler behind his tractor on a sunny afternoon last week, Bishop begins the process of bundling the grass, salvaging whatever can be saved. He said he’ll be lucky if he can get $4 per bale – a drop of more than $10 per bale from the price for high-quality hay. Bishop was not the only Ebey’s Prairie farmer to start up his baler that day. Neighbor Don Sherman of Sherman Farms was also busy in his fields, trying to get ahead of the rains expected the following day. “Everybody was moving pretty fast to get the hay hauled off the fields,” Sherman said. “This has been a challenging year for hay making.” Even though an untimely rainstorm can hurt one crop, the water

Sound area. About a mile further south on Hwy. 20, at the raspberry farm owned by Debra Meek and Juanita Youderian, the weather has blessed the fields. The raspberries are bigger and plumper, Meek said.

More lavender

Elisabeth Murray photo

Clark Bishop examines second-cutting hay grown at Ebey Road Farm near Coupeville. Wet, cool weather affects the quality of the hay. is needed for other crops growing in the fields. Local farmers typically don’t irrigate their crops, instead relying on rain to keep them watered. Sherman said he is hoping his orchard grass and alfalfa still growing in his fields will yield a good return. “With this run of weather, we have good moisture to grow,” Sherman said. “The bright spot is that we may have better-than-average yield for the third cutting (of hay) if the weather decides to behave.”

Raspberries delayed

The cool, wet weather that devastated the hay fields had mixed impact on Coupeville’s commercial raspberry farms.

Elisabeth Murray photo

Ana Luvera, left, and Christine Fields pick raspberries at Mile Post 19 Farm southeast of Coupeville. The farm’s U-pick operations are currently not in operation because of the berry type and weather’s impact on berry ripening. The Mile Post 19 Farm on Hwy. 20 southeast of Coupeville has delayed the opening of its U-pick operations until more berries ripen. The Meeker raspberries grown on the farm usually bear fruit later than some other varieties grown in the area, but the weather further delayed the peak ripening time. “We have plenty of berries. They’re just not easily accessible yet,” said Kimberly Jaderholm, who owns the farm with her husband Jerry. The Jaderholms will

wait until more green berries ripen before they open the fields to recreational pickers. In the meantime, the farm’s picking crew – made up of local teens – carries clear plastic bins between the rows, plucking big, sweet berries off canes that visitors are unlikely to reach. So far, the farm has not had problems with mold, although it would likely become a problem if the picking teams were not keeping up with the ripening fruit. “We are picking everything that is ripe,

thus we don’t have fruit on the vine which could mold,” Jaderholm said. The raspberries they pick meet the demand for fresh and frozen berries sold at the farm’s store, and will be used in professionally processed goods like jams and syrups that are sold at 10 retail locations, including Prairie Center Red Apple in Coupeville and the Goose Community Grocer near Bayview. The farm’s raspberry jam also will soon be on the shelves at the four Made in Washington stores in the Puget

The lack of sunshine and increased precipitation also is having an effect on a different crop growing in the commercial fields at Lavender Wind Farm just off of West Beach Road north of Coupeville. The increased rain has made the lavender plants more prolific, producing more flowers. Visitors to her farm during this weekend’s Artists Invasion event will be rewarded with spectacular views of rows of purple flowers, set off by the snow-capped Olympic Mountains in the background. But as the plants absorb more moisture, the amount of fragrant oil in their flowers is reduced. The plants produce more lavender oil when under stress, such as during dry conditions. Farm owner Sarah Richards said that with more flowers, but less oil per flower, she is hoping she will still end up with about the same amount of oil overall. She will know for sure once harvesting the lavender has been completed next month. “It is wait-and-see,” Richards said.

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The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, July 26, 2012

whidbey island’s community calendar Free home-gardening advice, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturdays at the Coupeville Farmers Market, Alexander and 8th streets (behind the library). Offered by Island County Master Gardeners. 360-678-2949. Educational Series: Buddhism, 7-8:30 p.m. Thursday, July 26. Tahoma Zen Monastery, 6499 Wahl Road, Freeland. Speaker is Victor Sogen Hori. Free. Donations accepted. 360-331-4142.

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Get Your Head in the Game, 3 p.m. Friday, July 27, Freeland Library, 5495 Harbor, Freeland. Teens can spend the afternoon gaming on Xbox360 Kinect and creating a styrofoam head sculpture. Free. 360- 331-7323; sno-isle.org. Star Party for Help House, 7 p.m. to midnight, weather permitting, Friday, July 27, Windjammer Park, Oak Harbor. Island County Astronomical Society members will answer questions and collect donations of canned food or money for North Whidbey Help House. All ages welcome. Free. 360679-7664; icaspu@juno.com; icas-wa.webs.com. Performance Society Open Microphone Night, 7-9 p.m., Friday, July 27, Whidbey Playhouse Star Studio, 730-A Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. Free. 360-679-2237. “Outsider,” by local playwright/actor Gail Fleming, 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 4 p.m. Sunday, July 27-Aug.5, Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, 565 Camano Ave., Langley. Part of Whidbey Island Fringe Festival. Tickets: $12. 360-221-8268; 800-638-7631; WICAonline.com.

sudoku

Artists Invasion, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, July 28 and Sunday, July 29. Lavender Wind Farm, 2530 Darst Road, Coupeville. Local art, food and entertainment. Free. 360-6780919; lavenderwind.com. SKIMusicFEST, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday, July 28, Double Bluff Beach, Freeland. Free. Skimboarding event with live music, food. jackdskimboards.com. Clinton Library Open House, 2 p.m. Saturday, July 28, 4781 Deer Lake Road, Clinton. Free. 360-341-4280. Decorate cupcakes and enjoy live music by Susan Hanzelka and Chelsea Bonacello. Bring a small item that reflects 2012 to put into a time capsule. Island County Democrats SummerFest, 3-7 p.m., Saturday, July 28, 4632 Tompkins Rd., Langley. $20 adults; $15 ages 17-21; $12 for children 16 and under. Enjoy Mexican buffet with beer, wine and strawberry shortcake. Meet, mingle and talk with candidates. islandcountydemocrats.wordpress.com. Winery Rocks! Summer Concert, 6 p.m., Saturday, July 28, Whidbey Island Winery, 5237 Langley Rd., Langley. Featuring Massy Ferguson, roots and Americana. Tickets: $20 (includes glass of wine for 21 and older); $18 Wine Club members; $15 10-20 years old; 10 and under free; brownpapertickets.com. Reservations: 360-221-2040. Photography Lecture with David Julian, 7 p.m., Saturday, July 28, Pacific NorthWest Art School, 15 NW Birch St., Coupeville. Free. 360-6783396; www.pacificnorthwestartschool.org. Veterans of Foreign Wars Breakfast, 10 a.m. to noon, Sunday, July 29, Veterans of Foreign Wars, WhiteheadMuzzall Post, 3037 N. Goldie

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Rd., Oak Harbor. Cost: $7 adults, $4 seniors and kids under 12. Call 360-675-4048; vfwpost7392.org. Watoto Mission Presentation, 3 p.m., Sunday, July 29, Oak Harbor Lutheran Church, 1253 NW Second Ave. Free. See photos and listen to a presentation by Dr. Skip Lycksell on the church’s mission to Uganda. Desserts and appetizers at a reception following.360-679-1561. Job Club, 10-11:30 a.m., Monday, July 30, Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Dr. Learn how to write cover letters. Free. 360-675-5115. Tween Film Festival, 2 p.m., Monday, July 30, Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Dr. See “The Muppets.” Free. 360-675-5115; sno-isle.org. Opera Preview, noon-1 p.m. Tuesday, July 31, Freeland Library, 5495 Harbor Ave. Seattle Opera director of education Sue Elliott gives a multi-media presentation on the history, music and stagecraft of the opera “Turandot.” Free. 360331-7323; sno-isle.org. As You Wish, 1 & 3 p.m., Tuesday, July 31, Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Dr. If you had three wishes, what would they be? Free. 360-6755115; sno-Isle.org. As You Wish, 1 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 1. Coupeville Library, 788 N.W. Alexander St. If you had three wishes, what would they be? Free. 360-678-4911. Summer Street Dance, 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.1, Bayview Cash Store, 5603 Bayview Rd. Langley. Bahia plays at free, family-friendly street dance. 360-321-4145. Good Vibrations, 1 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 2, Freeland Library, 5495 Harbor, Freeland. School-age program by Pacific Science Center using tuning forks, musical instruments and more to learn about sound. Free. 360-331-7323; sno-isle.org. Refraction Action, 2:30 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 2, Freeland Library, 5495 Harbor Ave. Observe the behavior of laser light as it interacts with different materials to understand reflection and refraction. For school-age children and families. Free. 360-331-7323; snoisle.org.

Disabled American Veterans Chapter 47 meeting, 7 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 2, Oak Harbor Library Room 137, 1000 SE Regatta Drive. 360391-9435. American Roots Music Series, 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4, Deception Pass State Park, 41020 Hwy. 20, Oak Harbor. Hank Nelson and Bob & Mike Antone perform music and stories from Northwest timber communities. Free. Discover Pass or payment required for parking. 360-675-3767; parks. wa.gov/events. WineryRocks! Summer concert, 6 p.m., Saturday, Aug.4, Whidbey Island Winery, 5237 Langley Rd., . Featuring Camille Bloom, folk rock. Tickets $20 (includes glass of wine for 21 and older); $18 Wine Club members; $15 10-20 years old; 10 and under free; brownpapertickets.com. Reservations: 360-221-2040.

p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4 at the home of sculptor Georgia Gerber and musician Randy Hudson. Food by Kristine Phillips; music by the Rural Characters. Tickets $75. 360-221-6314. whidbeyislandnourishes.org. Sunday Market, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 5, Greenbank Farm, 765 Wonn Rd., Greenbank. Free. Kettle corn, beef jerky, perennials, art, jewelry, woodworking and more. jimrowley3731@gmail.com. “Rebecca: The Story of Rebecca Ebey,” performed by storyteller Jill Johnson, 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5, Crockett Barn, Coupeville. Presented by Island County Historical Society Museum. Tickets $10. 360-678-3310. Job Club, 10-11:30 a.m., Monday, Aug. 6, Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Dr. Topic: Resumes. Free. 360675-5115; sno-isle.org.

Whidbey Island Triathlon, Saturday, Aug. 4. Registration is open at whidbeytriathlon. com; active.com. Call South Whidbey Parks and Recreation District, 360-221-5484.

South Whidbey Alzheimer’s Association Caregiver Support Group, 10 a.m.-noon, Tuesday, Aug. 7, Bayview Senior Center, 14594 Hwy. 525, Langley. Free. 360-477-5511.

Earth Sanctuary Guided Tour, 10 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 4. Led by founder Chuck Pettis. Meet at parking area at 5536 Emil Road, Freeland. $14 adults; $7 children. Dress for the weather. 360-331-6667; cpettis@earthsanctuary.org.

Tween Film Festival, 2 p.m., Monday, Aug. 6, Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Dr. See “Cars 2.” Free. 360-6755115; sno-isle.org.

Meet Artist Bev McQuary, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat. Aug. 4 or Tuesday, Aug. 14 at Penn Cove Gallery, 9 Front St., Coupeville. Wearable art using Lampwork glass beads and wire-working techniques. 360-678-1176. South Whidbey DUI/Underage Drinking Panel, 12:45 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 4, Trinity Church’s Grigware Hall, Hwy. 525, Freeland. Required for driver’s ed. 360-672-8219; idipic.org. Saturday Matinee for Teens, 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4, Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Dr. Free. See the film “War Horse.” 360-675-5115; www.sno-isle.org. Barbara Mearing Art Reception, 5-7 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 4, Whidbey Art Gallery, 220 Second St., Langley. Pastels, acrylics, colored pencil. Free. whidbeyartists.com. Vegissimo IV, benefit for Whidbey Island Nourishes, 6

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DIY Teens: Window Art Mosaics, 2 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 7, Coupeville Library. 788 NW Alexander St., Coupeville. Free. All supplies provided. Space is limited; call to register. 360678-4911; sno-isle.org. Transcendental Meditation, 6:30 and 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 7, Freeland Library, 5495 Harbor Ave., Freeland. Annie Skipper leads group meditation for those who practice TM at 6:30 p.m. and lectures about TM at 7:30 p.m. Free. Ann Rappaport, 360-221-8065. Disney Double Feature, 1 and 3 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 8, Coupeville Library, 788 NW Alexander St. Screening two Walt Disney films. 360-6784911; sno-isle.org. Teen Scavenger Hunt, 2 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 8, Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Dr. Free. Clues available at the library at 2 p.m.; return by 4 p.m. for prizes and refreshments. 360-675-5115; www.sno-isle.org. As You Wish, 2:30 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 9, Freeland Library, 5495 Harbor. If you had three wishes, what would they be? Ages 5 and up. Free. 360331-7323; sno-isle.org. Race the Reserve, 8:30 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 11, Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Coupeville. Registration fees: $55 Half Marathon; $40 10K Run/Walk; $25 5K Run/Walk. Proceeds support a safe and sober graduation night for seniors at Coupeville High School. racethereserve. com.


Thursday, July 26, 2012  •  The Whidbey Examiner

Page 11

Ferry house picnic benefits grant fund

Garden: From page 2 to build a rain garden, Lawrence said. “The Whidbey Island Conservation District knows a lot about rain gardens from the engineering perspective,” he said. “The Washington State University Extension Master Gardeners know a lot about plants.” And the Master Gardeners who attended the rain garden course, which counted toward their required 10 hours per year of continuing education, know about plants suitable for rain gardens. “The first step in plant selection is determining which ones are hardy enough for this climate,” Nelson said. Then the plants need to be selected based on their ability to tolerate water – and lots of it, she said. “The plants will be very wet for a period of time until the rain garden drains,” Nelson said. Plants located at the bottom of the rain garden need to be the most moisture tolerant, she said. The best place to install a rain garden is in an area where the water naturally flows, either at the bottom of a slope or natural depression. Making sure the garden drains properly is important, Lawrence said. “If the water drains away in two to three days, there is no problem with mosquitoes,” Lawrence said. “You don’t want the water sitting around for too long.” Some soils may have a low infiltration rate, or speed at which the water seeps deeper into the

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University of Denver professor and rain garden expert Martin Quigley talks to local Master Gardeners about rain gardens at Greenbank Farm. ground, making some areas unsuitable for a rain garden. Installation over septic systems or underground utility lines should be avoided, as well as placement too close to the foundation of a building. The Whidbey Island Conservation District helps property owners with technical assistance for low-impact development projects, like rain gardens – at no charge. Hallbauer of the conservation district donated his time for the rain garden design. The money for the project at Greenbank Farm came from a grant from the Russell Family Foundation. Plants, soil, and other materials added up to about $1,000, Lawrence said. The plants were purchased from local businesses and include a mix of small and large sizes. WSU Island County Extension plans to install three additional demonstration rain gardens, including one at Meerkerk Rhododendron Gardens in Greenbank and one at a real estate office on Camano Island. The fourth location has yet to be determined. At Greenbank Farm,

the new rain garden provides a learning opportunity for local residents as well as visitors. “The rain garden will enhance Greenbank Farm aesthetically, and there is an educational component as well,” Lawrence said. People already have begun to notice it, said farm Director Judy Feldman. And it’s also helping to draw more attention to the businesses at the farm. “The galleries love the rain garden,” she said. “When people look at it, they also look towards the galleries. The Audubon Society, which visits monthly, is also really impressed.” In the long-term design, the rain gardens will blend in as a natural feature, Lawrence said. Lawrence said that some rain gardens may take on a cupcake or donut shape, but at this location the slight depression will look more like a garden landscape, he said. Flowering plants like iris, daylily and fuchsia have been planted along with grasses like evergold sedge and slough sedge, and shrubs such as variegated red twig dogwood.

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The historic Ferry House in Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve is the setting for A Summer Evening Picnic on the Prairie, set for 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18. The event is a fundraiser for the Ebey’s Forever Fund, a project that provides grant money for historic preservation projects within the Reserve.

Tickets for the picnic are $75 and include dinner,entertainment by local musicians, a raffle and a docent-guided tour of the Ferry House, an extraordinary opportunity to learn about one of the oldest buildings in Washington. Tickets are available online at ebeysforeverfund.org as well as through Bayleaf in Coupeville, Blooms

Winery Taste for Wine at Bayview Corner, the Wind and Tide Bookshop in Oak Harbor, and at the Jacob Ebey House visitor center and the Trust Board office, both of which are just off Cemetery Road near Coupeville. For information, visit ebeysforeverfund.org or call the Reserve Trust Board office at 360-6786084.


Page 12

The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, July 26, 2012

Local author helps you organize your mushrooms For those of you who object to fairy rings popping up in your pristine lawns, it’s not a bad idea to know how to deal with some of the ever-present fungus among us in this often damp and sometimes chilly climate. On the other hand, there are many people who speak fondly of mushrooms – and usually in the same sentence with the words sauté, garlic and butter. I admit I’m one of those. To me, there are more important things to know about the fungi I find growing nearby than how to eradicate them. Like, what is it? And can I eat it? With perhaps thousands of species of mush-

sowin’ ’n’ the trowel toni grove rooms in Washington, knowing when it’s absolutely safe to eat a wild mushroom can be difficult. Now there’s a tool mushroom hunters can use to help identify mushrooms that are new to them and remember where they’ve found edible mushrooms in the past. “The Mushroom Journal: Keep Track of Your

Mushrooms,” is the brainchild of Coupeville native Justin Rothboeck, who admits he comes from “a very fungiphobic family.” His passion for mushrooms, he says, was born out of frustration. While staying with a friend in a cabin in the Oregon Cascades about seven or eight years ago, he became intrigued by all the different mushrooms he saw growing around him. After collecting several, he attempted to identify them using an old, out of print, mushroom book he found in the cabin. “A big part of the obsession came from not being able to do it easily,” Rothboeck says. He dug his heels in

Source: Island County WSU Cooperative Extension

WhIdbEy WEathEr SUmmary

July 16-July 22, 2012

HI Temp

LO Temp

Wind MPH

Rainfall

Fawn run, Bachert

72

52

0.73

18.93 17.23

Fort Casey, Barnes

76

51

0.51

17.36 15.32

greenbank, Mercer

72

52

0.75

17.92 16.54

naS Whidbey, Weather Desk

66

50

41

0.71

14.02 14.69

West beach, Marion

68

51

0.49

16.03 14.56

Crockett Lake, Haglund polnell point (records begin April 9, 2012)

79 77

50 51

15 12

0.48 0.52

17.93 16.09 17.68 —

rEportIng StatIonS

YTD Rain

Last Year

To advertise in this directory, call the Examiner at 360-678-8060 simple

relational

relevant

ALWAYS a PLACE for YOU THE

COMMUNIT Y

CHURCH

Coupeville Oak Harbor Pac Rim Institute OH Senior Center 180 Parker Rd One Church . . . 2 locations 51 SE Jerome St Sunday 9:30 am www.ctkonline.com/whidbey Sunday 11:00 am THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH ON WHIDBEY ISLAND WELCOMES EVERYONE!

in-the-Woods

Shantina Steele, Director of Christian Formation Nigel J. Taber-Hamilton, Rector

Child care available at 10 am Youth programs at 10:30 am Sept - June 5217 S. Honeymoon Bay Rd Freeland • 360-331-4887 www.staugustinesepiscopalchurch.org

The Rev. Paul Orritt SUNDAY SERVICES 8:00 am • Solemn Eucharist 9:30 am • Sung Eucharist 11:11 am • Eucharist Celebration www.StephensAnglicans.org

ISLAND VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH Pastor James Gallagher 6-7:30 pm Sunday Nights www.IslandVineyard.org

2 CHURCHES • 1 BUILDING 555 SE Regatta • Oak Harbor • 679-3431 www.ststephensanglicans.org

~ Sunday Services ~

St. Augustine’s Sunday Eucharist 8 & 10:30 am

ST. STEPHEN’S ANGLICAN

S T. S T E P H E N ’ S A N G L I C A N C H U R C H

Whidbey Island Worship Guide

S T. S T E P H E N ’ S A N G L I C A N C H U R C H

What’s up with the weather? Check out george haglund’s blog at whidbeyexaminer.com!

to learn about these, his first mushrooms, and discovered he had a genuine interest in knowing more. Now he’s become not only a mushroom expert who can routinely find edible fungi on walks around town, he’s put together a handy journal to help others become better mushroom hunters. The first part of “The Mushroom Journal,” which costs $15 though Amazon.com, contains charts on which to catalog all the information you collect on mushrooms you want to identify. Where was it found? What color is it? Does it have a ring or gills? Is there an odor? What does the stalk look like? You can record this information and more, as well as attach a spore print you will have made – if you’re a diligent mushroom identifier! Once you’ve gathered as much information as you can on an unknown species, you can use a mushroom book that provides a good dichotomous key to “key out” and identify your mushroom. If you’ve never used a dichotomous key, it’s like biology’s answer to bina-

16604 SR 20 (Just south of Coupeville)

(360) 678-3713 or (360) 969-5155

Pastor Mike Coleburn

Adult & Children’s Classes 10am Morning Worship & Children’s Church - 11am Please call for information regarding Small Group meetings.

“Nothing is too hard for God”

ry code. You’re asked a series of questions and, depending on whether the answer is yes or no, you’re guided to the correct identification of a plant or, in this case, a fungus. Rothboeck recommends “Mushrooms Demystified,” or “All That the Rain Promises, and More…” both by David Arora. The second half of the journal provides charts in which to keep track of where, when and under what conditions you found those edible mushrooms you’d like to find again someday. “I think it’s difficult to remember where we found morels three years ago, and I think this journal is going to help that,” Rothboeck says. “You can keep it all in one place,” he said. “And the unknown mushroom section prevents you from missing important details.” Rothboeck encourages everyone to go out and collect mushrooms for the fun of identifying them, and to join a mushroom club to meet other fungus fans. He wants people to know they can’t be poisoned just by touching or handling a mushroom.

Coupeville United Methodist Church

Contemporary Service 8:45 a.m. Sunday School 10 a.m. Traditional Service 11 a.m. Child care available

Pastor Jin Ming Ma • Will Strong, Youth Director 608 N. Main St. • 360-678-4256 WELCOME TO

St. Mary’s Catholic Church

MASS SCHEDULE

Sundays • 11:15 am & Thursday • Noon 207 N. Main St., Coupeville • www.staugustineoh.org

Come join us for Lutheran Worship Services in Coupeville! Pacific Rim Institute St. Mary’s Church Sundays • 6:30pm Oak Harbor Lutheran Church invites everyone to experience a casual evening of prayer, worship and friendship in Coupeville. Call 679-1561 for information.

However, he says, “when you decide to start eating mushrooms, you’ve got to be very careful.” He suggests cooking all mushrooms and to watch out for what he calls “LBMs” – Little Brown Mushrooms – because they can be found anywhere and are so easily confused with one another and misidentified. His most important advice? “When in doubt, throw it out,” he says. There’s no guarantee you’ll be rolling in morels or chanterelles if you use “The Mushroom Journal,” but you’ll have a huge leg up on collecting the important data needed to correctly identify mushrooms. Plus you’ll have the information needed to return to that prized patch of mushrooms again and again. Even though he grew up in Coupeville and has lived much of his 30 years in the Pacific Northwest, Rothboeck is a somewhat reluctant mossback. “Mushroom hunting is one of the things that has helped me come to terms with this weather,” he says with a laugh. Rothboeck recently relocated to the Big Island of Hawaii, where he’s getting some of that sun he’s been craving. He’s also getting used to the fact that Hawaii lags far behind Washington in mushroom species. I have to wonder if the rain and all it promises will someday draw him back home.

Free preschool available Skagit Valley College ECEAP preschool is now enrolling for the fall session. ECEAP – the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program – is a state-funded program. Children must be at least three years old by Aug. 31. Income guidelines apply and breakfast and/or lunch is provided. Parent activities and educational opportunities are also available. Classes are located in Oak Harbor, Coupeville and in South Whidbey. Call 360-679-5348 or 360-321-0696 ext: 5348.


www.nw-ads.com

PNW

MarketPlace!

click! www.nw-ads.com email! classified@ soundpublishing.com call toll free! 1.888.399.3999 or 1.800.388.2527 Real Estate for Sale Island County COUPEVILLE

Real Estate for Rent Island County OAK HARBOR

3

OAK HARBOR

OFFICE SPACE

231 SE Barrington Starting @ $425/mo 735 SF ~ $765+nnn 605 SF ~ $745+nnn

BEDROOM, 3/4 BATH Cute & Clean! Country setting duplex. Washer/ dr yer hookups. Large fenced yard and storage. Water and sewer paid. $675 plus deposit. 360.240.8938. Oak Harbor

DECEPTION PASS. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car g a r a g e , h o t t u b. N o s m o k i n g , d o g o k a y. Oak Harbor B E A U T I F U L 2 0 0 1 $1150 month. 360-675M o d u l i n e M o d u l a r 0548 Home. 1011 SF, Open OAK HARBOR Floor Plan, 2 bedroom, 2 WONDERFUL 3 BR, 2 bath, shed. In Top Rated BA home in Oak Harbor. 55+ Park. $59,000. 360- 5 minutes to town and NAS. Large wood play 675-0962. set with swings! SpaReal Estate for Sale cious deck, fenced yard Other Areas and 2 car garage. Rent 20 Acres- Only $99/mo. is $1,245/ month plus $0 Down, Owner Financ- deposit. Pets negotiable. i n g , N O C R E D I T Call 360-632-8434 for CHECKS! Near El Paso, additional information. Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Money Back Apartments for Rent Island County Guarantee! Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953Â Oak Harbor www.sunsetranches.com 1,025 SF, 2 BEDROOM, 1.5 bath with water view Real Estate for Rent f r o m M a s t e r ! Q u a l i t y Island County 2-story townhouse style. CLINTON Includes fireplace, dish3 B E D RO O M , 2 b a t h washer, washer/ dr yer w i t h W / D h o o k u p, i n hookups. $750 month. Scatchet Head commu- 360-675-9596 or 360n i t y. $ 8 7 5 m o n t h + 914-0379 Whidbey Resiutilities. First, last, de- dential Rentals Inc. posit. 360-321-4314 www.whidbeyrentals.com COUPEVILLE

OAK HARBOR

OAK GROVE

1,600 SF, 2 BR lower level of home with fireplace, in nice neighborhood! Newer kitchen/ appliances. Large laundry room, lots of storage cabinets, newer washer/ dryer! All utilities including trash, cable & intern e t . Pe t s o k ay. $ 9 7 5 month plus deposit. Must see! Available 9/1. 805-573-9261 COUPEVILLE

MOVE-IN SPECIAL 1/2 month rent + $300 deposit. Call 360-675-4002

65 SW 3rd Ave, Oak Harbor

WA Misc. Rentals Condos/Townhomes OAK HARBOR

2 BEDROOM, 1 bath. Clean. 1 Car Garage. Great Location Near NAS! $750 month. Text or call: 360-3201543 WA Misc. Rentals Want to Rent

FABULOUS Fur nished or Unfurnished 2 bedroom contemporary beachfront home on Pe n n C ove. 3 bl o ck s from the Historic Waterfront of Coupeville. Prefer long term lease. Pets negotiable. $1300 month. Available September 1st. 360-9903332 OAK HARBOR

3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH on large lot. 1,800 sq.ft. unique barn house! Hardwood & tile flooring. Maple cabinets with granite counter tops. N a t u r a l g a s f u r n a c e. Close to base. $1,100/ month plus deposit. 360.240.8938.

OAK HARBOR/ COUPEVILLE

FURNISHED HOME Wanted from August until mid- October, 2012. Light traveling, quiet, snow bird couple with 2 well behaved small dog companions. References. Cash friendly. 509675-4383.

Lost

LOST: CAMERA. Silver Canon PowerShot SD 1400IS Digital Elph. July 22nd around 6pm, while b i k i n g a r o u n d E b ey ’s Landing. Possibly fell out of bag on Ebey Road or from roof of car on Hill Road, near Ebey’s Landing or 1st Street in Langley. If found, please call 206-390-8757 REWARD Employment Finance

206-715-9000

www.LeasingRealEstate.com

Vacation/Getaways Rental CLINTON

3 BEDROOM, 2 bath in beautiful Shangri La. Private community par k/ pier with ammenities including fishing, crabbing and clam digging. 2 car g a ra g e, l a r g e m a s t e r suite, open and bright kitchen, mud/ laundr y room, large corner lot. REDUCED PRICE: $207,000. 360-678-4798

July 26, 2012 Page13

www.whidbeyexaminer.com Commercial Rentals Office/Commercial

Branch Manager 836 NE Midway, Oak Harbor

Are you looking to make great things happen in your community? At U.S. B a n k , o u r e m p l oye e s and our company share a strong tradition of joining forces to build great LEASE PURCHASE. 3 places we call home. bedroom, 2 bath, 989 SF, 2 story. Come vaca- The ideal candidate will tion on Whidbey Island. interact with customers Wa l k t h e c o m m u n i t y to build deeper relationbeach. Go swim, fish, ships; lead/super vise hike, kayak the sound. p e r s o n n e l ; g e n e r a t e Only $1075 month, $50 leads; build partnerships toward purchase. Refer- with branch support; enences needed. Call now! courage volunteer ism 360-579-3655 or tall- within community; and man@ whidbey.com for expand your customer more info. base through effective mar keting. Candidate General Financial will have a Bachelor’s d e gr e e o r e q u i va l e n t Accept Credit Cards on work experience; proven y o u r S m a r t P h o n e . performance in leading a F R E E e q u i p m e n t . N o sales and customer sermonthly fees. No month- vice team; experience in ly minimums. No Cancel- outside business calling; lation Fee. Takes only 5 strong leadership and m i n u t e s t o s i g n u p . organizational skills. w w w. s m a r t p h o n e s wipe.net To become a part of our energetic team CREDIT CARD DEBT? apply now at: LEGALLY HAVE IT REwww.usbank.com/careers MOVED! Need a Minimum $7,000 in debt to U.S. Bank is an Equal Opportunity qualify. Utilize Consumer Employer. Member FDIC. P r o t e c t i o n A t t o r n ey s. Call now 1-866-652-7630 Employment for help. General SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. CONFERENCE W I N o r Pay N o t h i n g ! DIRECTOR: Start Your Application In T h e W h i d b e y I s l a n d Under 60 Seconds. Call Writers Conference is Today! Contact Disability seeking a director for its Group, Inc. Licensed At- 2013 conference. This is torneys & BBB Accredit- a part-time, contracted ed. Call 877-865-0180 position. Event planning, volunteer coordination, Announcements fund-raising experience req’d. For complete job application, contact: _ ADOPT _ Active, allan@whidbey.net yo u n g , m a r r i e d A c countant and Teacher yearn to give 1st baby Health Care Employment General a l i fe o f L OV E a n d l a u g h t e r. E x p e n s e s paid. 1-855-521-5376 Certified ADOPTION- Happily married, financially secure, loving Chr istian couple yearn to adopt a newborn to complete our family. Expenses paid. Please call Doug & Ellen. 1-877-742-6061.

ADOPT: Loving 1st time mom & successful dad promise your baby a secure, happy life. Expenses paid. Jill & Irv 1-866440-4220 PELVIC/ TRANSVAGINAL MESH? Did you undergo transvaginal placememnt of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence between 2005 and the present time? If the patch required removal due to complications, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727

Medical Assistant Full Time

Oak Harbor Naval Hospital HS diploma or GED cer tificate, 1 yr exp within last 3 yrs, MA cer tification. Reply with resume to sabina@caseproinc.com EOE

CHARGE NURSE Full or Part Time. Please apply in person Monday - Friday, 8am - 4pm: Careage of Whidbey 311 NE 3rd Street Coupeville, WA. 360-678-2273

DENTAL ASSISTANT WANTED

N ew s p e c i a l t y d e n t a l

practice opening. PreviAdvertise your ous experience in front upcoming garage office and dental insusale in your local rance a plus. Note: As new practice is under community paper constr uction, Dr. Kaland online to reach lander has graciously ofthousands of households fe r e d t h e u s e o f h i s in your area. building for the interview Call: 800-388-2527 ,OOKINGĂĽFORĂĽAĂĽNEWĂĽPLACEĂĽ process. Please handdeliver your resume to #HECKĂĽOUTĂĽ Fax: 360-598-6800 WWWPNWHOMElNDERCOM his office at 20 SW 8th Go online: nw-ads.com FORĂĽLOCALĂĽĂĽNATIONALĂĽLISTINGSĂĽ Ave. Oak Harbor

Health Care Employment

General

MED NURSE

Full or Part Time. Please apply in person Monday - Friday, 8am - 4pm: Careage of Whidbey 311 NE 3rd Street Coupeville, WA. 360-678-2273 Business Opportunities

Make Up To $2,000.00+ Per Week! New Credit Card Ready Drink-Snack Vending Machines. Minimum $4K to $40K+ Investment Required. Locations Available. BBB Accredited Business. (800) 962-9189 1-888-545-8647

Food & Farmer’s Market

Miscellaneous

SAVE 65 Percent & Get 2 FREE GIFTS when you order 100 Percent guaranteed, delivered to the door Omaha Steaks Fa m i l y Va l u e C o m b o N O W O N LY $ 4 9 . 9 9 . ORDER Today 1- 888697-3965 use code 45069TLS or www.OmahaSteaks.com/value75

FOR SALE! Asko Washer/ Dryer. High quality Swedish made. Water conserving $400. Efel oil stove/ heater, effiecient! $350. All very good condition! 206-604-5757. ,OOKINGĂĽFORĂĽAĂĽNEWĂĽPLACEĂĽ #HECKĂĽOUTĂĽ WWWPNWHOMElNDERCOM FORĂĽLOCALĂĽĂĽNATIONALĂĽLISTINGSĂĽ

Free Items Recycler

Garage/Moving Sales Island County

WINDOWS, 7 total, you haul, free. Located in Clinton. 360-321-4804 Heavy Equipment

Clinton

BARN SALE

at Waxwood Farm. 11th annual. 12 vendors. Antiques, furniture, tools, books, pottery, primative, vintage lighting, clothing and jewelry, and more. Something for everyone! 4280 Deer Lake Rd., Clinton, Whidbey Is. Saturday July 28th, 9am-5pm.

MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year Money-Back Guarantee Schools & Training when you buy DIRECT. AIRLINES ARE HIRING- C a l l fo r t h e DV D a n d Train for hands on Avia- FREE Good Soil book! tion Maintenance Career. 866-969-1041 FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualifiedHome Furnishings Clinton Housing available. CALL ISLAND PICKER’S SpeAviation Institute of Maincialty! Furniture, clothes, tenance (877)818-0783 and 5 decades of tools. ATTEND COLLEGE ONSaturday July 28th and LINE from Home. *MediSunday July 29th, 9amcal, *Business, *Criminal 5pm, 7044 Cultus Bay Justice. Job placement Rd. assistance. Computer CLINTON available. Financial Aid MULTI FAMILY! NEAT if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-488-0386 LAZY BOY COUCHES! Stuff! Outdoor furniture One reclines on both and lots of treasures! www.CenturaOnline.com th burgandy/ green/ Saturday, July 28 , from You’ll ďŹ nd everything ends, tan plaid. Also, Sleeper 8:00am- 2:00pm at 6638 you need in one sofa, 4â€? queen size ma- Anderson Rd. tress, barly used. Both in Clinton website 24 hours a excellent condtion! $400 SAT JULY 28th, 10 am day 7 days a week: each or best offer. Oak 2 pm. Household items, nw-ads.com. Harbor. Call after 5pm misc office items, home furniture, moving sale. 360-675-3271 8189 Sandy Hook Drive. Electronics From SR 525, south at Mail Order light on Cultus Road, DISH Network. Starting past Baileys Corner, turn at $19.99/month PLUS ATTENTION DIABETICS r ight onto Cultus Bay 3 0 P r e m i u m M o v i e with Medicare. Get a Road (do not stay on Channels FREE for 3 FREE Talking Meter and Possession Road). FolMonths! SAVE! & Ask diabetic testing supplies low neighborhood street About SAME DAY Instal- at NO COST, plus FREE to beach area, home is lation! CALL - 877-992- home delivery! Best of on the right. 1237 all, this meter eliminates GREENBANK Stop Paying too much for painful finger pricking! MOVING SALE! FurniTV! Satellite is CHEAP- Call 888-903-6658 ture, tools, car par ts, ER than cable! Packages Attention Joint & Muscle lawn equipment, sports from $19.99/mo- FREE Pain Sufferers: Clinically e q u i p m e n t , a l l a g e s movies, FREE upgrades proven all-natural sup- clothing, toys & more! & FREE HD: Limited Of- plement helps reduce S a t u r d ay, 7 / 2 8 , 9 a m fer- CALL NOW! 800- pain and enhance mo- 4pm, 4080 Junco Rd, 371-7386 bility. Call 888-474-8936 Greenbank, on the uphill to try Hydraflexin RISK- side of Classic Road. Firewood, Fuel Rain or shine. Cash only FREE for 90 days. & Stoves

FIREWOOD, seasonal, split. Call today! Maple/ Alder/ Fir. Cord and/or bundles. Delivery always available! Steve Benson for pricing 360-416-3227 Flea Market

14� BAND SAW, floor model. Runs great! $150. 206-459-5922 B E AU T I F U L D I S H E S, N i p p o n To k i K a i s h a , porcelien china, over 50 years old, 6 piece setting of 12, complete with 8 extras. Makes an elegant presentation. $150. Coupeville. (360)6788377 Dryer; GE; $75. Pellets; 21 bags; $3.50 each. 360-221-8785 Man’s First Gear motorc y c l e p a n t s, s i ze 3 6 , $50. 360-720-4549. Planters, (2), very large. 18� by 18� by 16� high, $15 each. Plant ladder, 17� wide by 41� high, $ 1 0 . Key b o a r d w i t h stand, older Technics, $60. 360-672-5577 Oak Harbor WALKER/ Wheelchair Combo $25. 360-6784404. WASHING MACHINE, Hot Point, great shape $ 9 5 . M i c r o w ave $ 2 5 . 360-221-8785 Z I N C S T R I P S, s t o p s moss in its tracks! Brand new, 2 total, 2� x 50’, $15 each. Coupeville. (360)678-8377.

Garage/Moving Sales Island County COUPEVILLE

HUGE SALE! Friday & S a t u r d ay, Ju l y 2 7 t h & 28 th from 9am to 5pm and Sunday, July 29 th from 9am to 1pm. Queen size brass bed frame, hundreds of ya r d s o f w h i t e t u l l e , men’s racing bike, bike rack, American Girl doll clothes, antiques including large oak teachers desk and 200 year old rocking chair. Stamps, HO gauge model train, amazing selection of women’s clothes from petite to plus sizes, 3 rattan bar stools, vintage Tandberg reel to reel tape deck and tapes, Nakamichi cassette d e ck , ya r d s o f gra p e vine garland, compost bins, electric piano, tiki bar and stools, patio furniture, wire fencing, holiday items, Singer sewing machine with cabinet, two vintage leather Aviator jackets, games, jewelry, rototiller, lots of books including many cook books, dishes, glasses, free TV and lots more! Located at at 777 Nature Lane. 1 and a 1/2 miles South of Coupeville, off Jacobs Road. Look for yellow signs! OAK HARBOR

GARAGE SALE! Recliners, chairs, dresser, end tables, Schwinn stationary bike, classic Nordic Track, lawn mower, bicycle, clothes (adults & girl teen), leather jackets, artificial Christmas tree, 3’ high Sinterklaas (Santa Claus). Electronics; including 2 TV’s. Books, CDs, records, VHS tapes, kitchen items, & more. Friday- Saturday, Ju l y 2 7 t h - 2 8 t h , 8 a m 2pm. No early birds. Located at 1292 Swantown Road; across from Whidbey Golf & CC. Oak Harbor

YA R D S A L E . L o t s o f Home Decor : Rugs, Lamps, Pictures, Etc. Lots of Good Junior Size Clothes and Shoes. Litt l e G i r l s S i ze 1 0 - 1 2 . Tools, Small Furniture and Lots More! Friday, July 20th, 9am - 2pm. Saturday, July 21st, 9am LANGLEY - 12pm. 880 Ackley BUIDLING, HOUSE and Lane, Take Left Side of camping stuff, toys and D r i vew ay O n To D i r t lots more! Saturday, July Road. 28th from 9am to 2pm at 5841 South Langley Road. Look for signs. Miscellaneous Autos C a s h o n l y. N o e a r l y birds.

ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS with Medicare. Get FREE C PA P R e p l a c e m e n t Supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 866Professional Services 993-5043 Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. C a l l To d a y 8 8 8 - 4 5 9 9961 for $25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping Diabetes/Cholesterol/ Weight Loss Bergamonte, a Natural Product for Cholesterol, Blood Sugar and weight. Physician recommended, backed by Human Clinical Studies with amazing results. Call today and save 15% off your first bottle! 888-470-5390 Over 30 Million Woman Suffer From Hair Loss! Do you? If So We Have a Solution! CALL KERANIQUE TO FIND OUT MORE 888-481-2610 Medical Equipment

TWIN TEMPERPEDIC Bed. Adjustable head and foot. Massage feature included. $1,000. Easy lift chair, 3 months old, $500. Excellent condition! 360-678-4404.

Legal Services

Oak Harbor

A N N UA L M A R I N E R S Cove Sales. Saturday, July 28th, 8am. Furniture, Household, Fine China, Tools, Fishing/ Boating Gear, Sporting Goods, Books, Art and Antiques. Crescent Harbor past Polnell, Look for Signs and Balloons! OAK HARBOR

G A R AG E S A L E ! A n tiques, men’s clothign, dishes, pots, pans, tupperware container, various kitchen items, dual control King Temerpedic bed, sheets, pillow cases, comfor ter, various penguin items, TV’s, office supplies, tools, coputer desk, queen size captain water bed (heater & sheets included) and much, much more! Friday, July 27th & Saturday, July 28 th from 9am to 3pm at 923 Deer Park. Oak Harbor

GARAGE SALE. Saturday, July 28th, 9am 3pm. Lots of great hard goods. Old radios, slot m a c h i n e, p i n b a l l m a chine, pool table plus more. 401 SW 6th Avenue, Oak Harbor, across from middle school.

2000 INTERNATIONAL 4700 TRUCK with tuck away lift gate. Engine -- Diesel - T 444E -- 195 HP. 5 speed m a nu a l t ra n s m i s s i o n . Box -- 24’L x 102’H x 96’W. Roll-up door. Mileage 195,600. Well Maintained. $14,000. Call Karen, (425)355-0717 Ext.1560 Located in Everett. Vehicles Wanted

CASH FOR CARS! Any M a ke, M o d e l o r Ye a r. We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Tr u c k T O D AY. F r e e Towing! Instant Offer: 1-888-545-8647 DONATE YOUR VEHICLE Receive $1000 GROCERY COUPONS. UNITED BREAST CANC E R F O U N D AT I O N . Fr e e M a m m o gra m s, Breast Cancer Info w w w. u b c f. i n fo  F R E E Towing, Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted. 1- 800-728-0801


Page14 July 26, 2012

www.whidbeyexaminer.com

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR ISLAND COUNTY IN PROBATE In the Matter of the Estate of TAPPE, GALE WILLAM Deceased. NO. 12 4 00148 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed and has qualified as personal representative of this estate. Persons having claims against the decedent must, prior to the time such claims would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the attorneys of record at the address stated below a copy ofthe claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets.

the Island County Shoreline Master Program in compliance with the Shoreline Management Act and 2003 current state shoreline management guidelines. The update includes revised goals and policies that will amend the shoreline element of the Comprehensive Plan; revised shoreline environment designations; a restoration plan; and an amendment to replace the existing Chapter 17.05 ICC in its entirety with a new Chapter 17.05A ICC, to be known as the Shoreline Master Program Regulations and Procedures. LEGAL NO. 408230 Published: The Whidbey Examiner July 26, 2012

Persons requiring auxiliar y aids/services should call Island County Human Resources, 6797372, 629-4522 ext. 7372, or 321-5111 ext. 7372 (use whichever number is applicable for the area) at least 24 hours prior to the meeting.

Legal No. 405371 The Island County Planning Published: Commission will conduct public Whidbey Examiner workshops with the same Agen- July 19, 2012 and July 26, 2012 da and presentation at three different locations. August 14, 2012 - 6:00 p.m. Commissioners Hearing Room 1 NE 6th Street Coupeville, WA. August 16, 2012 - 6:00 p.m. Trinity Lutheran Church Gym 18341 State Rte 525 Freeland, WA. August 21, 2012 - 6:00 p.m. Camano Community Center 606 Arrowhead Rd. Camano Island, WA. The agenda shall include: roll call, approval of minutes, items from the public, and a public workshop to discuss the proposed comprehensive update of

All interested persons may appear at said hearing in person, or by their duly appointed representative, and be heard for or against the granting of said franchise. Dated this 9th day of ly, 2012.

Ju-

Persons requiring auxiliar y aids/services should call Island County Human Resources, 6797372, 629-4522 ext. 7372, or 321-5111 ext. 7372 (use whichCOUNTY ever number is applicable for COMMISSIONERS the area) at least 24 hours prior NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING to the meeting.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGTON

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING In the matter of application for transfer of Franchise No. 30, Lee Enter prises NW, Inc. to Merton and Nancy Gribble for an existing sewer transport system located portions of Wagner Road and Gough Road situated in Section 31, Town-

LEGAL NOTICES

ship 31N, Range 3E, W.M., Island County, Washington NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, by the Board of County Commissioners of Island County, Washington, that they have set August 6th, 2012, at the hour of 10:15 a.m. at their usual meeting place in the Cour thouse Annex in Coupeville, as the time and place for a public COUNTY hearing in the matter of granting COMMISSIONERS of said franchise. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGTON

In the matter of application for the transfer of Franchise No. 371 from David and Carol Moe to Habitat for Humanity of Island County for an existing sewer transport DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA- line located in the Plat of Harbor Sands situated in Sec. 2, Twp. TION: July 26, 2012 29N, Rge. 2E, W.M., Island County, Washington /s/ JOAN MARIE TAPPE JOAN MAIRE TAPPE, Personal NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, Representative by the Board of County ComMcPHERSON & McPHER- missioners of Island County, Washington, that they have set SON, P.L.L.P. August 6th, 2012, at the hour of at their usual /s/ JOAN H. McPHERSON, 10:15 a.m. meeting place in the Cour tWSBA#14141 Attorney for Personal Represen- house Annex in Coupeville, as the time and place for a public tative ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR hearing in the matter of granting of said franchise. SERVICE: P.O. Box 1617, One NW Front All interested persons may apStreet pear at said hearing in person, Coupeville, Washington 98239 or by their duly appointed representative, and be heard for or LEGAL NO. against the granting of Published: 408330 said franchise. The Whidbey Examiner July 26, August 2, 9, 2012 Dated this 9th day of July, 2012.

NOTICE OF SPECIAL SESSIONS ISLAND COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION

LEGAL NOTICES

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Legal No. 405367 Published: Whidbey Examiner July 19, 2012 and July 26, 2012

LEGAL NOTICES SITUATED IN ISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGTON Tax Parcel No: S8390-00-00042-0, commonly known as 1097 GREENWOOD S T R E E T, O A K H A R B O R , WA. The Property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 2/28/2007, recorded 3/8/2007, under Auditor’s/ R e c o r d e r ’s N o. 4 1 9 6 1 2 2 , records of ISLAND County, Washington, from EDWARD A DENMON, EUFEMIA E DENMON, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor, to CAL_ WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR FIDELITY MORTGAGE A DIVISION OF DELTA FUNDING CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which is presently held by HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2007-2. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 5/1/2011, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Amount due as of May 25, 2012 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2011 1 payments at $1,100.00 each $1,100.00 12 payments at $1,101.06 each $13,212.72 (05-01-11 through 05-25-12) Late Charges: $378.00 Beneficiary Advances: $3,106.25 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $17,796.97 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $194,268.82, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expenses of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on August 24, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by August 13, 2012 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before August 13, 2012, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after August 13, 2012, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to t h e B o r r owe r a n d G ra n t o r at the following addresses: EDWARD A DENMON, 1097 GREENWOOD STREET, OAK HARBOR, WA, 98277 EDWARD

To request notice of hearings, or receive a copy of the decision or final threshold determination or appeal procedures, mail your In the matter of application for written request to the before the renewal of a fran- mentioned address. chise submitted by Fircrest Water Association for an existing FOR PUBLICATION IN THE water distribution system locat- JULY 26, 2012 OF THE WHIDed in the Plat of Fircrest Es- BEY EXAMINER. tates and along a por tion of Jones Road situated in Sec- LEGAL NO. 408322 tion 7, Township 33N, Range Published: 2E,W.M., Island County, The Whidbey Examiner July 26, 2012 Washington NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, by the Board of County Commissioners of Island County, Washington, that they have set August 6th, 2012, at the hour of 10:15 a.m. at their usual meeting place in the Cour thouse Annex in Coupeville, as the time and place for a public hearing in the matter of granting of said franchise.

ISLAND COUNTY

VENDOR LIST All interested persons may appear at said hearing in person, or by their duly appointed rep- State laws adopted in 1991 resentative, and be heard for or and Island County Code, against the granting of C h . 2 . 3 0 A . 0 2 0 a n d said franchise. 2.30A.060 provide that adDated this gust, 2012.

6th

day of Au-

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGTON Persons requiring auxiliar y COUNTY aids/services should call Island COMMISSIONERS NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING County Human Resources, 6797372, 629-4522 ext. 7372, or In the matter of application for a 321-5111 ext. 7372 (use whichfranchise submitted by John ever number is applicable for Guichard for a sewer transport the area) at least 24 hours prior system located in the Plat of to the meeting. Beverly Beach and along a portion of Brainers Road Legal No. 405369 situated in Sections 23 and 26, Published: Township 30N, Range 2E,W.M., Whidbey Examiner July 19, 2012 and July 26, 2012 Island County, Washington NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, by the Board of County Commissioners of Island County, Washington, that they have set August 6th, 2012, at the hour of 10:15 a.m. at their usual meeting place in the Courthouse Annex in Coupeville, as the time and place for a public hearing in the matter of granting of said franchise. NOTICE OF APPLICATION All interested persons may appear at said hearing in person, Island County has received the or by their duly appointed reprefollowing applications for review. sentative, and be heard for or This may be the only time to against the granting of comment. said franchise. Dated this 9th day of July, File Number: 174/12 SDP 2012. Applicant: Sally Ann Foote BOARD OF COUNTY COM MISSIONERS Proposal: Installation of drainISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGage system for capturing & routTON ing stormwater from top of bluff to beach. 8” diameter pipe will Persons requiring auxiliar y terminate at OHWM. Project aids/services should call Island site is within or near: MFWHCA, County Human Resources, 679Flood & Geo Hazard Area, 7372, 629-4522 ext. 7372, or Steep Slopes 321-5111 ext. 7372 (use whichever number is appliLocation: 3975 Converse Dr, cable for the area) at least 24 Freeland hours prior to the meeting. Staff Contact: Jennifer HagenLegal No. 405344 ow, j.hagenow@co.island.wa.us Published: Whidbey Examiner FILES AVAILABLE FOR REJuly 19, 2012 and July 26, 2012 VIEW: The application files are available for inspection and copies will be provided at the cost Finding what you of reproduction in a timely manwant doesn’t have ner.

to be so hard.

LEGAL NOTICES received by 4:30 p.m. on August 25, 2012 mail to Island County Community Development, P.O. B ox 5 0 0 0 , C o u p ev i l l e, WA 98239; deliver to 6th & Main Street, Coupeville, WA between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday; by FAX to (360) 679-7306. .

ver tising and competitive bidding may be dispensed with for purchases of services, materials, equipment, supplies and leases between $5,000 and $25,000 by soliciting competitive quotes from vendors who have submitted their business information to Island County for inclusion on the Vendor List. Any vendor desiring to be placed on the Vendor List or to have their current information updated may obtain a Vendor List Application Form by contacting the Island County Auditors Office at 360-679-7369. A for m may also be obtained from Island County Auditors Office, Attn: Michele Tefft, 1 NE 7th Street Suite 103, Coupeville, WA 98239; you may also download a form at www.islandcounty.net LEGAL NO. 407685 Published: The Whidbey Examiner. July 26, 2012

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a) (2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: 01ALT-001884 I N OT I C E I S H E R E B Y GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION, will on August 24, 2012, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at THE MAIN ENTRANCE TO CITY HALL, 865 BARRINGTON DRIVE F/K/A 3075 300TH WEST, OAK HARBOR, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal proper ty (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of ISLAND, State of Washington: LOT 42, PLAT OF WEST RIDGE, DIVISION NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN VOLUME 11 OF PLATS, PAGE PUBLIC COMMENTS: must be 17, RECORDS OF ISLAND C O U N T Y, WA S H I N G TO N .


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July 26, 2012 Page15

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LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

A DENMON, 270 SOUTHEAST BARRINGTON DRIVE #B306, OAK HARBOR, WA, 98277 EUFEMIA E DENMON, 270 SOUTHEAST BARRINGTON DRIVE #B306, OAK HARBOR, WA , 9 8 2 7 7 E U F E M I A E DENMON, 1097 GREENWOOD STREET, OAK HARBOR, WA, 98277 by both first class and certified mail on 2/16/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 2/16/2012, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee’s Sale will be held in accordance with Ch. 61.24 RCW and anyone wishing to bid at the sale will be required to have in his/her possession at the time the bidding commences, cash, cashier’s check, or certified check in the amount of at least one dollar over the Beneficiary’s opening bid. In addition, the successful bidder will be required to pay the full amount of his/her bid in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check within one hour of the making of the bid.The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. X NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceeding under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with section 2 of this act. DATED: 5/21/2012 Effective Date: REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By:MELISSA HJORTEN, ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com A-4249334 07/26/2012, 08/16/2012

CANDICE PERUELO Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN FINANCIAL RESOURCES, INC., A NEW JERSEY CORPORATION Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 4229111 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 8/24/2012, at 10:00 AM At the main entrance to the City Hall located at 865 SE Barrington Drive, Oak Harbor WA 98277 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of ISLAND, State of Washington, to-wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF ISLAND, STATE OF WASHINGTON, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 151, PLAT O F S H A N N O N F O R E S T, D I V. N O. 4 , AC C O R D I N G TO T H E P L AT T H E R E O F RECORDED IN VOLUME 13 OF PLATS, PAGES 174 AND 175, RECORDS OF ISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGTON. TAX ID: S8152-04-00151-0 More commonly known as: 1554 SW 7TH AVENUE, OAK HARBOR, WA 98277 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 5/13/2008, recorded 5/22/2008, under 4229111 records of ISLAND County, Washington, from DAVID G P E RU E L O A N D C A N D I C E PERUELO, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantors), to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN FINANCIAL RESOURCES, INC., A NEW J E R S E Y C O R P O R AT I O N , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, I N C. , A S N O M I N E E F O R AMERICAN FINANCIAL RESOURCES, INC., A NEW JERSEY CORPORATION (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $35,105.72 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $257,935.92, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 11/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 8/24/2012. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 8/13/2012 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 8/13/2012 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are

paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 8/13/2012 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): DAVID G PERUELO AND CANDICE PERUELO, HUSBAND AND WIFE 1554 SW 7TH AVENUE, OAK HARBOR, WA 98277 by both first class and certified mail on 4/18/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 5/18/12 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington,

as Trustee By: Timothy Donlon, Assistant Secretary For NonSale, Payoff and Reinstatement info Quality Loan Service Corp of Washington 2141 Fifth Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 (866)6457711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com For Ser vice of Process on Trustee: Quality Loan Service Corp., of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)6457711 A-4239923 07/26/2012, 08/16/2012

through 05-25-12) Late Charges: $378.00 Beneficiary Advances: $3,106.25 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $17,796.97 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $194,268.82, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expenses of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on August 24, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by August 13, 2012 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before August 13, 2012, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after August 13, 2012, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to t h e B o r r owe r a n d G ra n t o r at the following addresses: EDWARD A DENMON, 1097 GREENWOOD STREET, OAK HARBOR, WA, 98277 EDWARD A DENMON, 270 SOUTHEAST BARRINGTON DRIVE #B306, OAK HARBOR, WA, 98277 EUFEMIA E DENMON, 270 SOUTHEAST BARRINGTON DRIVE #B306, OAK HARBOR, WA , 9 8 2 7 7 E U F E M I A E DENMON, 1097 GREENWOOD STREET, OAK HARBOR, WA, 98277 by both first class and certified mail on 2/16/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 2/16/2012, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee’s Sale will be held in accordance with Ch. 61.24 RCW and anyone wishing to bid at the sale will be required to have in his/her possession at the time the bidding commences, cash, cashier’s check, or certified check in the amount of at least one dollar over the Beneficiary’s opening bid. In addition, the successful bidder will be required to pay the full amount of his/her bid in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check within one hour of the making of the bid.The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130.

Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. X NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceeding under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with section 2 of this act. DATED: 5/21/2012 Effective Date: REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By:MELISSA HJORTEN, ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com A-4249334 07/26/2012, 08/16/2012

Legal No.: CEX 2680 Published: The Whidbey Examiner July 26, August 16, 2012

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE - PERUELO NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED C O D E O F WA S H I N G TO N CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. TS No.: WA-11-490884-SH APN No.: S8152-04-00151-0 Title Order No.: 110609246-WA-GSI Grantor(s): DAVID G PERUELO,

Legal No. CEX 2681 Published: The Whidbey Examiner July 26, August 16, 2012

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a) (2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: 01ALT-001884 I N OT I C E I S H E R E B Y GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION, will on August 24, 2012, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at THE MAIN ENTRANCE TO CITY HALL, 865 BARRINGTON DRIVE F/K/A 3075 300TH WEST, OAK HARBOR, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal proper ty (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of ISLAND, State of Washington: LOT 42, PLAT OF WEST RIDGE, DIVISION NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN VOLUME 11 OF PLATS, PAGE 17, RECORDS OF ISLAND C O U N T Y, WA S H I N G TO N . SITUATED IN ISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGTON Tax Parcel No: S8390-00-00042-0, commonly known as 1097 GREENWOOD S T R E E T, O A K H A R B O R , WA. The Property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 2/28/2007, recorded 3/8/2007, under Auditor’s/ R e c o r d e r ’s N o. 4 1 9 6 1 2 2 , records of ISLAND County, Washington, from EDWARD A DENMON, EUFEMIA E DENMON, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor, to CAL_ WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR FIDELITY MORTGAGE A DIVISION OF DELTA FUNDING CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which is presently held by HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2007-2. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 5/1/2011, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Amount due as of May 25, 2012 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2011 1 payments at $1,100.00 each $1,100.00 12 payments at $1,101.06 each $13,212.72 (05-01-11

LEGAL NO. 407701 Published: The Whidbey Examiner July 26, August 16, 2012

Easy as ABC… Selling? Buying? Call: 800-388-2527 E-mail: classified@ soundpublishing.com or Go Online: www.nw-ads.com to place an ad in the Classifieds.


Page 16

The Whidbey Examiner  •  Thursday, July 26, 2012

Jury: Huden guilty of first-degree murder An Island County Superior Court jury Monday morning found James Huden guilty of the Christmastime 2003 murder of Russel Douglas. Superior Court Judge Vickie Churchill read the verdict at 11:15 a.m. Monday. The jury found Huden guilty of first-degree murder with a weapon and a particularly vulnerable victim. The jury ruled that Douglas was vulnerable

Sad ending for a once-proud vessel

at the time because he was seated and buckled in his Chevrolet Geo Tracker when he pulled onto a driveway off Wahl Road in Freeland, where Huden shot him in the head. Huden, 55, will remain in custody in Island County jail without bail until the sentencing hearing at 1:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24. The prosecution will seek an sentence of 240 to 320 months, or about 25 years.

Public lands map available People interested in identifying state, federal and local major public lands in Washington can obtain an updated version of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources State Trust Lands map. Updated every five years, it’s the only statewide map that details the 3 million acres of state trust lands. The map also locates major parks, natural areas, federal forests and other lands under public ownership.

Both sides of the 24 by 41 inch map are filled with information showing the extent, distribution and location of land ownerships. The narrative side of the map includes photos with brief features on DNR activities providing information about new conservation areas, habitat improvement projects, fire fighting, creosote log cleanups, and more. View and order the map online for $3.50 at dnr.wa.gov.

Kerry Walsh / Global Diving & Salvage

Workers at Stabbert Yacht and Ship in Seattle finish dismantling the Deep Sea, the derelict crabbing boat that burned and sank in Penn Cove in May, prompting a multi-agency oil-spill and recovery response that cost some $2.5 million. The vessel has since been removed from drydock and sent off to the scrap yard. The Deep Sea hasn’t always been an unwelcome vessel. An August 1947 Time magazine article on the vessel described it as the boat that opened the American king crab fishing industry. The first American trawler to commercially catch king crab, the Deep Sea was outfitted with specially designed and patented freezing equipment to allow the crew to process their catch while still at sea. The Japanese fishing fleet had previously monopolized that fishery.

Quil Ceda Village just got easier!

Discovering something fun to do

Seattle Premium Outlets

Legendary Brands, Real Savings

Quil Ceda Village is conveniently located on the I-5 corridor. Use exits 200 and 202 and turn west. For more information call 360-716-5010.

Cabela’s

World’s Foremost Outfitter

Amphitheatre

Tulalip Concert Series and More

Tulalip Casino

Be the First to Play the Newest Slots

One location, Quil Ceda Village www.quilcedavillage.com

Whidbey Examiner, July 26, 2012  

July 26, 2012 edition of the Whidbey Examiner

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