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Marysville celebrates Strawberry Festival BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

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SPORTS: Top jet skiers hail from Marysville. Page 8

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The Marysville Strawberry Festival Senior Royalty cruise down State Avenue on their float during the June 16 Grand Parade.

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SCHOOLS: Mountain View graduates look toward future. Page 10

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CLASSIFIED ADS 11-14 LEGAL NOTICES

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Vol. 120, No. 13

SEE FESTIVAL, PAGE 2

Marysville Getchell celebrates graduates BY KIRK BOXLEITNER

INDEX

MARYSVILLE — Overcast skies that opened up in the afternoon might have quelled some enthusiasm for some events on Saturday, June 16, but spirits stayed strong for the Marysville Strawberry Festival’s climactic weekend this year. Marysville’s Khoosnam Commissariat brought her daughter Ava, 19, and son Cyrus, 14, to this year’s Funtastic Carnival in the Marysville Middle School playground, as she has done for the past decade, and the mother even beat her two kids at one of the games to win a prize. “I like all the games and the rides,” Khoosnam Commissariat said. “I just love that Marysville has

something like this.” The Portland Royal Rosarians also paid their compliments to the Marysville Strawberry Festival during their roseplanting ceremony in the Totem Middle School rose garden at 3 p.m. that day, which saw Maryfest President Debbie Libbing honored with the planting of Royal Rosarian roses to commemorate the latter group’s 100th anniversary this year. Aivars Saukants, royal gardener for the Portland Royal Rosarians, explained that his group travels across the Pacific Northwest to bestow similar honors on various festivals throughout the region, and cited his own connections to the local community.

EVERETT — The four Small Learning Communities of Marysville Getchell High School marked their first commencement ceremony independent of Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Wednesday, June 13, as the Everett Community College Fitness Center hosted graduating seniors from Marysville Getchell for the first time that evening. The MGHS Class of 2012 was heralded by a host of speakers, including not only valedictorians and senior class officers from each of the four SLCs, but also reflection speeches by two SLC principals, one of whom will not be returning to the school in the fall.

Academy of Construction and Engineering Valedictorian J.D. Talamayan has already learned the importance of connections as a fulltime Running Start student during high school. “Staying connected has helped me get to where I am today, and in the future it will help as well,” Talamayan said. “After graduation, while you are getting a job or attending college or doing whatever else you choose to do, make as many connections as possible. You never know how the connections you make will resurface in your life.” Bio-Med Academy Valedictorian Celeste Bryant believes that the life SEE MG, PAGE 2

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

Marysville Getchell High School Class of 2012 graduates throw their caps in the air at the close of their commencement on June 13 in the Everett Community College Fitness Center.

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June 20, 2012

lessons provided by the high school experience are at least as essential as its academics. “After graduation we will be able to take our newfound creativity and courage and apply it to finding our special place in the world,” Bryant said. “We have learned to be honest with ourselves, to ask questions and to not fear the consequences of telling people that, after 12 years of school, we still have no idea what we want to do with our lives. This selfrespect and fearlessness in speaking our minds did not exist that first day of high school so many years ago.” International School of Communications Valedictorian Kali Burnside touted not only the growing that she and her peers have done during high school, but also the diversity of skills they’ve gained from it, which she urged her fellow graduating seniors to apply to their adult lives in an exceptional fashion. “Let’s go into this world with an attitude aimed

toward achievement,” Burnside said. “Let’s make ourselves known for our accomplishments. One day, we can look back and think, ‘Boy, high school wasn’t my glory days, because [the days I’m living now] are the days that I will remember, and the ones that deserve recognition.’” School For the Entrepreneur Valedictorian Chris Rasmussen read a poem he’d composed in honor of the occasion, whose call to action echoed those of his fellow speakers. “While we were once a part of ACE or SFE or Bio-Med or ISC, now we have the opportunity — the opportunity to create, the opportunity to connect, the opportunity to leave our school with a lasting effect,” Rasmussen said. “But it starts with you, and it starts with me, so lets take what we’ve learned through these past four years, and seize our opportunities.” SFE Principal Dave Rose credited the leadership of the MGHS Class of 2012 with coordinating “the first commencement ceremony that doesn’t involve any red,” as well as with starting

several school traditions that he expects will grow with classes to come. “In school, you learn in order to take a test, but in life, you take a test in order to learn,” Rose said. “I have seen many of you in class. You study and take that test trying to earn the best grade you can. But now, after tonight, you will be testing yourselves and learning from those tests. This is called ‘life.’ So I challenge you, from this day forward, to test yourselves, put it on the line, and discover what you are really made of. You never know until you try.” Bio-Med Academy Principal Judith Murdock is retiring this year after nearly 50 years in education, the last three years of which have been spent at Bio-Med. She praised the graduating seniors of all four SLC’s for choosing their own courses toward adult careers and connecting with the community outside of Marysville Getchell High School. “We all have relationships at the center of our schools,” Murdock said. “We are four small schools and one campus graduating tonight.”

FESTIVAL FROM PAGE 1 “We’re always glad to be here in Marysville,” Saukants said. “I’ve personally planted three of these roses with my fellow Rosarians, in 2007, 2010 and again this year. I even remember when this ceremony took place at the ‘Red Caboose’ just a few blocks south of here, before its tragic demise. It’s gratifying to see that, while the fire may have soured a few of the roses, they’ve still grown wonderfully well on the whole.” While that Saturday saw more sparse traffic at the Marysville Kiwanis Beer Garden on Seventh Street north of the Market in Asbery Park, it was bustling the day before, on Friday, June 15. “I don’t know if it’s the weather or what today,” Marysville Kiwanis Treasurer Mike Ferri said on June 16, just before the rain began to fall. “We didn’t know quite what to expect anyway, this being our first beer garden and all.” “People came in, sat down and just visited with each other,” fellow Marysville Kiwanian Penny Ploeger said. “We’ve even been able to offer a nice wine tasting, thanks to John Bell’s Willis Hall Winery.” In spite of the full-on downpour that had let loose by its 5 p.m. judging, that Saturday’s Kiddies Parade drew so many participants that they had to huddle under the eaves of Totem Middle School as shelter from the storm before marching down State Avenue at 6 p.m. “Even though everyone got wet, we all still had an amazing time,” said Bobbi

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

Sophia Byrnes as Dorothy and Tanner Ratynski as the Tin Man walked off with fifth place in the group category for the Marysville Strawberry Festival Kiddies Parade on June 16. Easley, who organized the Kiddies Parade for the second time this year. “Families still took the time to participate, and all the entries were pretty creative.” Brooke Klein, 5, was named this year’s overall winner for dressing up as Strawberry Shortcake, a costume that she’d worn last Halloween. “It fit the theme of the Strawberry Festival perfectly,” said Stephannie Claphan, one of the volunteer judges. “Plus, she was energetic and had a fresh new look.” By the time the Kiddies Parade entrants had been judged in Comeford Park, the precipitation had dwindled to a few drops, allowing audiences to enjoy a mostly dry Grand Parade from 7:3010 p.m., which managed to pack in more than 140

entrants this year. Debbie Hjort and her daughter LaRosa, 19, didn’t trust the clearing skies and remained bundled under their shared blanket on the sidewalk. “It’s always exciting and fun,” Debbie Hjort said of her family’s 15th Strawberry Festival Grand Parade. “It gets better every year. We’re sad that there weren’t any trike races this year, though. Hopefully they’ll be brought back for next year.” While Lauren Riley, 6, enjoyed sitting on her father’s shoulders to watch the action and expressed her fondness for the sweets she got to eat that day, dad Mark Riley was content to soak up the atmosphere. “I like being part of a community that does things like this,” Mark Riley said.

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June 20, 2012

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

Ebey Slough Bridge farewell a family affair

BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleiner@marysvilleglobe.com

MARYSVILLE — Robert Rasmussen Sr. was the first bridge tender of the Ebey Slough Bridge, whose construction was completed in 1927, back when roads were built to accommodate Ford Model-T’s. Robert’s direct descendants returned to the bridge 85 years later on Thursday, Jan. 14, to join members of the public in taking one last walk on the old bridge before its dismantling begins, as the new Ebey Slough Bridge continues to be built alongside it. The bridge tender’s son, 87-year-old Robert Rasmussen Jr., fell prey to a quavery, emotion-choked voice as he recalled meeting his father at the Ebey Slough Bridge in 1946, after the younger Rasmussen had come back from fighting in World War II. “You had to cross this water in a rowboat before this bridge,” Robert Rasmussen Jr. said. “Dad got himself a good job here with the state. We had indoor plumbing and everything. He worked a lot of swing shifts here, because he would tend to animals on farms, so I didn’t see him much during the days. He was always out doing something.” The grandsons of Robert Rasmussen Sr. are all in their 60s now, and as they joined Robert Rasmussen Jr. in checking out the aged structure, they recalled the time they’d spent with their grandfather as he faithfully executed his duties. “I remember he had all

these big tools here,” said Leonard Stanton, a 66-yearold grandson of Robert Rasmussen Sr., who currently lives in Smokey Point. “He had this one wrench that just seemed huge to me at 7 or 8 years old, and these fivegallon buckets of grease for the gears.” “I remember it being stinky,” laughed Dennis Rasmussen, a 63-yearold grandson of Robert Rasmussen Sr. and a cousin of Stanton, who lives in Bellingham. “My classmates all used to jump off this bridge to dive into the water below, but I couldn’t because my dad worked here and all the other bridge tenders knew me.” While Robert Rasmussen Sr. once worked in the bridge tender house, Harry Sidler had his own reasons for feeling a sense of ownership over the old bridge. “It took our five-man crew, including my brother Jake, about a month to repaint the underside of that bridge more than 40 years ago,” Sidler said. “The inspector checked out work with a dental mirror. One of my masterpieces is going down,” he laughed. During the ceremony marking the old Ebey Slough Bridge’s end of service, Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring noted how rare it is for the Washington State Department of Transportation to carry out official decommissioning for the structures that it puts out of service.

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Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

From left, Dennis and Keith Rasmussen, Robert Rasmussen Jr. and Leonard Stanton all reminisce about the time they spent on the old Ebey Slough Bridge with its first bridge tender, Robert Rasmussen Sr. “We’ve come here today to say goodbye to an old friend,” Nehring said on Jan. 14. “As you walk out there, take some time to ponder the history beneath your feet.” Nehring noted that Marysville’s population has gone from less than 1,400 in 1927 to enough that 17,000 cars and trucks a day commute across State Route 529 between Marysville and Everett. WSDOT Northwest Region Administrator Lorena Eng added that the new $39 million Ebey Slough Bridge that’s replacing the old one will not only be wider and offer

more vehicle, bicycle and pedestrian lanes, but it’s also being built to current seismic safety standards. She credited the employees and elected officials of the cities

of Marysville and Everett with fighting to keep this project on the books for the past 20 years. The dismantling of the old Ebey Slough Bridge began

on Monday, June 18, and is expected to continue into early 2013, at which point the new bridge’s remaining lanes should finally open to traffic.

Clifford “Cliff” E. Gallaugher businesses and home life. Cliff is survived by his brother Harvey and Inez (Shultz) Gallaugher, nieces Marilyn, Nancy and Pamela; brother John Gallaugher (who has since passed, March 2012) his wife, Patty and daughters. Sisters: MaryAnn (Gallaugher) Oliphant and sons and daughters, Alice Dill and daughters, and also his long-time trail partners Al Latch and Merle Kleen. His brother Harvey, traveled from Spokane many times to enjoy the ranch and building projects with Cliff. The family is having a memorial gathering for friends and family at the Orofino VFW, on Saturday, June 23rd at 10:30 a.m. The funeral will be held in Lewiston, ID at the Normal Hills Cemetery at 2 p.m.

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C l i f fo r d “Cliff ” Gallaugher, 82 of Peck, Idaho passed away on Friday, December 23rd, 2011, at the Orofino Hospital. Cliff was born on June 20th, 1929 in Arlington, WA, to the late Harland and Annie (Jorgensen) Gallaugher. Cliff enlisted in the Air Force and was honorably discharged in 1951. Following his discharge, Cliff met his wife June where they married in Snohomish, WA. In his travels, he purchased a restaurant in Denver, CO, a restaurant bar in Elk City, ID, an outfitting company: Bugle Point Outfitters, and the Ho Hum Motel in Lewiston. He then moved to Peck, ID where he retired to the ranch. He used his trade as a carpenter and sheet metal worker in


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The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

June 20, 2012

Treaty rights are civil rights

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he tribes’ fight to preserve and protect the salmon and our treaty fishing rights has mirrored the civil rights struggle in the United States. That’s because treaty rights are civil rights, just like your right to vote, and they are protected under the U.S. Constitution. When we were fighting for our treaty rights in the 1960s, we marched with Dr. Martin Luther King. Returning home, we continued the struggle by protesting, getting arrested, getting out of jail and starting over again. On Sept. 9, 1970, we had a fish camp under the Puyallup River Bridge near Tacoma. The state of Washington came down on us that day, just like they had done many times before, to stop us from exercising our treaty right to fish. They gassed us Indians and threw us all in jail. But someone else got gassed that day, too. His name was Stan Pitkin, the U.S. Attorney for western Washington. He was part of the crowd that gathered that day to watch the event unfold. Troubled by what he witnessed, Pitkin quickly took the first steps to file the U.S. v. Washington court case that would lead to the 1974 Boldt decision. With the support of the Justice Department and U.S. Attorney’s office, we were successful in defending our treaty-reserved fishing rights. Under the Boldt decision we were affirmed as co-managers of the salmon resource with the state of Washington. We are responsible for managing half of the salmon returning to western Washington every year. But since the Boldt decision we have seen a steady decline of the salmon resource. After a long, difficult battle, we are seeing our hard-won treaty rights slip away because salmon and their habitat are being lost faster than they can be restored and the state refuses to enforce its own laws to protect the resource. We may once again need the help of

BEING FRANK

BILLY FRANK, JR. the Justice Department to protect our treaty rights. Last summer we launched our Treaty Rights at Risk initiative to call on the federal government to take charge of salmon recovery in western Washington. We took this strong step because we are losing the fight for the salmon. The federal government has both the obligation and authority to recover salmon and protect our treaty rights. We want the government to align its agencies and programs to lead a more coordinated effort and get us back on the path to recovery. We are encouraged by the early response from the federal government. We all agree about the need to strengthen the tribal and federal relationship to address obstacles to salmon recovery. We’ve already developed recovery plans and identified habitat barriers in most watersheds. Now we need a commitment from the federal government to coordinate the effort to tackle the most pressing obstacles in each watershed. In the end, that effort can only be as effective as the decisions we make and the actions we take. We sure don’t need more talk. We don’t need more process. We need action. That’s why I think the Department of Justice needs to take a hard look at the damage being done to salmon habitat and the threat to our treaty rights. That may seem like strong medicine, but for us Indian people, nothing less than the heart of our culture is at stake.

Billy Frank Jr. is the chairman of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. THE MARYSVILLE

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Our new neighbors

e were short on fruit and veggies so I went shopping at one of my favorite windows on the world, WINCO. It’s a place where no race or ethnic group is a majority so we shoppers were a happy mix of minorities. With strong accents, foreign tongues, some traditional attire and every skin tone from pinkish-white to dark chocolate, it’s like a miniUN. Somalis, Iraqis and Ghanaians share space with immigrants from most Latin American nations. Each spoke two or more languages when they got here and are now trying to add English. Being third-generation American I assume I’m a native. And being steeped in this society from birth I haven’t the slightest notion of the challenges my grandparents faced when debarking at Ellis Island. Or what it took to gain a foothold in their economy. So while pushing a cart down aisles crowded with freshly arrived immigrants I can’t help but wonder how it must feel to be newly arrived on our scene. We call them immigrants, which says little more than that they came here to live from some other place. There’s much more to their stories. Each is an adventurer when compared with neighbors they left back home. They’re the ones with enough guts to abandon everything held dear in pursuit of opportunity. Imagine their first days here. They know little of the language, don’t understand the law, folk-ways or economy. The best they can do is call on earlier immigrants for tips on how to get along. Maintaining these links is why Koreans congregated in West Seattle, Norwegians in Ballard and Asians in south Rainier Valley. The word, immigrant, isn’t weighty enough to express a newcomer’s situation. Exile, however, sounds snappier and is far richer in meaning. Its definitions cover more space in dictionaries than do entries for immigrant and I have a strong feeling for that difference because I was once an exile.

OPINION

BOB GRAEF

My dictionary says, Exile: absence from one’s own country, whether forced or self-imposed; a citizen from one country who chooses or is forced to live in another; to separate from home and country. One can even be exiled at home, as when so many Native Americans were uprooted from home-areas to be transplanted onto reservations. Some religious groups exile members through shunning. As to my exile, my family lived on the grounds of a college in Nigeria. The school’s students were Nigerians, evenly split between Christians and Muslims. We were one white American family adjusting to stay afloat in a sea of blacks. We were voluntary exiles like most of my fellow shoppers at WINCO. Like them, I was challenged to learn something of the local language. Even more so than blacks in America, I knew the impossibility of blending my pale face in to a black society that would never be my own. Since I wasn’t born into it, I had to struggle to understand what makes West African minds tick. Some immigrants see the U.S. as a land of opportunity. Others flee from hunger or oppression. Shiites fleeing from Sunnis, Sunnis fleeing from Shiites. Reasons for coming here are as many as the immigrants. Once here, Americanization takes place rapidly. I talked with three Somalis at Trinity College’s recent conference on Islam about challenges of adjusting to life here. One said his big problem was getting his coach to give him enough minutes on the soccer field. The second’s challenge was how to finance a new car. The third told of difficulty getting his son admitted to a university. Some of us believe that immi-

grants displace American workers while depressing wage rates. They cite reports of immigrant mothers collecting support for babies left south of the border and there is some truth to that. Such issues caused the Economic Policy Institute to conduct a 2010 study to analyze whatever effect immigrant labor might have on home-grown workers and the economy. The results were surprising. Immigrant labor was found to have a small positive effect. In fact, the presence of immigrant labor bumped up wages of native born workers by 0.4 percent. Oddly, while college-degreed workers benefited by 0.4 percent, workers with some college got boosted 0.7 percent and wages of those with high school or less rose only 0.3 percent. While the numbers vary, other studies confirm that immigrant labor serves to boost both employment and wages for native born Americans. Some other findings: A greater proportion of immigrants start businesses than native born citizens. (Council of Economic Advisors) Taxes drawn from immigrant workers yield a positive effect on public budgets. (CEA) Social Security withholdings from immigrant workers account for a small offset against the imminent problem of baby-boomers breaking the system. (CEA) No significant correlation has been found linking jobs lost to native-born workers and immigration. (Pew Center research) Immigrant children value education more highly than nativeborn children. (Harvard University study) But facts don’t seem to matter because, like seniors hazing freshmen, entrenched societies continue the tradition of blaming and harassing newcomers. Maybe that’s what makes them so strong.

Comments may be addressed to robertgraef@comcast.net.


June 20, 2012

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

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Mayor Nehring declares June 23 as Henken memorial set for June 23 360 Break Dance Competition Day BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

Courtesy Photo

DJ Preston Dwoskin, left, receives a proclamation declaring June 23 as Marysville Family YMCA 360 Break Dance Competition Day from Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring. team-building and management skills it provides to the young people who plan, promote and run the event. Doors open for 360’s 10th anniversary at 5 p.m. on June 23 at Totem Middle School, located at 1605 Seventh St. in Marysville, while the prelims are set to start at 6 p.m. Admission is $10 and crew-versus-crew battles are limited to 10 dancers each. The grand prize this year is $3,600.

ARLINGTON — John Henken, a longstanding member of the Rotary Club of Arlington, will be remembered by those who knew him at two separate events on Saturday, June 23. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, located at 415 S. 18th St. in Mount Vernon, has scheduled a memorial service for Henken at 10 a.m. that day, while fellow Arlington Rotarian Dave Duskin will speak about Henken’s battle with cancer at the Arlington Relay For Life, which kicks off that afternoon at 1 p.m. Duskin received permission from Henken’s widow, Mylene, to add her husband as a posthumous member of the Arlington Rotary’s Relay team, to honor Henken’s membership in the Arlington Rotary since 1981, which included a stint as its president from 1988-89. “He was part of the group that went up to Canada to study how a Rotary Club’s

him to miss meetings. “We could always count on a story or joke from John at our meetings,” Duskin said. “His sense of humor was great, but often there were groans as well as laughter at his jokes and stories.” The Arlington Rotary Board moved unanimously to make Henken an honorary member, and Duskin described it as a “no-brainer” to make Henken an honorary member of the Order of the Duck as well, which is usually reserved for those who have sported the costume. “He always sported that Disneyland duck hat while he was out selling tickets,” Duskin said. “I know that it was John’s dream to see his plans for an Island Crossing commercial center come to fruition before his death. It’s too bad that the economy turned bad about the time his efforts to get the area annexed to Arlington and rezoned got accomplished, or else I think he would have seen his dream come true.”

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its winners, was created to help keep young people off the streets and out of crime, and to provide them with a safe, welcoming place to express themselves creatively through dance. At the June 11 Marysville City Council meeting, Nehring lauded the event for providing a real-life venue for bringing diverse groups together to work toward achieving a common goal. He went on to note the leadership development opportunity,

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MARYSVILLE — Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring recently signed and presented to DJ Preston Dwoskin a proclamation declaring Saturday, June 23, as Marysville Family YMCA 360 Break Dance Competition Day. This proclamation honors the 360 Break Dance Competition, a popular regional event started at the Marysville Family YMCA, which will take place this year at Totem Middle School on June 23. The annual event is staged by the Marysville YMCA’s Minority Achievers Program, and is purported to be the second-largest break-dancing event in Washington state, drawing upwards of 800 competitors, DJs, volunteers and spectators from throughout Snohomish County and Washington state, and even, in some cases, from across the country. Last year’s event alone had dancers from Oregon, California, New York, Alaska and even Korea. The competition, which awards monetary prizes to

‘duck derby’ was done,” Duskin said. “He and Mike Jarboe chaired our first race.” The British Columbia Rotary’s rubbery duck derby was adopted by the Arlington Rotary to meet the $10,000 it had pledged toward at the construction of an Arlington community youth center for the Boys & Girls Club in 1987. “John was very active in the Chamber of Commerce,” Duskin said. “He and Pat Pittson were tireless members of the Good Roads Committee, and attended statewide meetings to make sure that monies were spent on our local highways, such as state routes 530 and 9.” Duskin went on to recall that Henken remained one of the Arlington Rotary’s top sellers of Duck Dash tickets, and in 2001 was the single top seller of Duck Dash tickets. According to Duskin, Henken also had a nearly perfect attendance record at Arlington Rotary meetings, and as such was greatly missed when his health eventually forced


June 20, 2012

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Worship Directory Index

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Et nisl inissim volummo luptat. Dui blan ullumsa ndiat, quisit, si tie venim iliqui tio conullaor iurer sed minci tio od do core mod diam nullamet prat in utationsequi tations equipsum eliquip elis exer iustrud tem zzrit utem dunt ipit, suscill andreetum aliscing elis dolum do con

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June 20, 2012

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

DEATHS (Through June 4, 2012)

LEGAL NOTICES the existing duplex and creation of a new single family residential lot. File Number: SP12-002 Applicant: Matthew Eckerson 5005 109th Street NE Marysville, WA 98271 Contact: Harley C. Pawley, PLS ASPI 4532-B Evergreen Way Everett, WA 98203 Property Location: 5005 109th Street NE Marysville, WA 98271 Property Size: 0.77 acres Date of Completeness: June 12, 2012 A decision on this application will be made within 120 days from the date of completeness. The application and complete case file are available for review at the City of Marysville Community Development Department located at 80 Columbia Avenue, Marysville, WA 98270. For Project Information: A n g e l a Gemmer, Associate Planner 360.363.8240 Written comments on the aforementioned application are solicited and should be forwarded to the City of Marysville Community Development Department, 80 Columbia Avenue, Marysville, WA 98270, no later than June 27, 2012. Published: June 20, 2012. #640449

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Community Development Department 80 Columbia Avenue Marysville, WA 98270 (360) 363-8100 (360) 651-5099 FAX Office Hours: Mon - Fri 7:30 AM - 4:00 PM Notice is hereby given that on June 12, 2012 an application was made to the City of Marysville requesting Administrative Site Plan Approval in order to construct a 36,987 SF maintenance and operations facility for Marysville School District’s Transportation Department. File Number: PA 12017 Applicant: Marysville School District Project Contact: Dennis Erwood Studio Meng Strazzara 2001 Western Ave, Suite 200 Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 587-0588 Project Location: 4300 Block of 134th Street NE APNs: 3 0 0 5 0 4 0 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 , 30050400103000 Date of Completeness: June 14, 2012 A decision on this application will be made within 120 days from the date of completeness. The application and complete case file are available for review at the City of Marysville Community Development Department located at 80 Columbia Avenue, Marysville, WA 98270. Project Information: Chris Holland, Senior Planner (360) 363-8100 cholland@marysvillewa.gov Written comments on the aforementioned application are solicited and should be forwarded to the City of Marysville Community Development Department, 80 Columbia Avenue, Marysville, WA 98270, no later than July 2, 2012. Published: June 20, 2012. #639674

(360) 363-8000. The City of Marysville Amy Hess Deputy City Clerk Dated: June 5, 2012 Published Marysville Globe: June 13, 2012 and June 20, 2012 Special Accommodations: The City of Marysville strives to provide accessible meetings for people with disabilities. Please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (360) 363-8000 or 1-800-833-6384 (voice relay), 1-800-833-6388 (TDD relay) two days prior to the meeting date if any special ac-

7

commodations are needed for this meeting. Published: June 13, 20, 2012. #636876

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Lorraine E Mayer, 91, Marysville, 2/1/1921-5/26/2012 Eddie D Francis, 55, Arlington, 3/1/1957-5/28/2012 Loren C Mann Sr., 86, Arlington, 11/29/1925-5/30/2012 Tim L Spelman, 68, Arlington, 4/14/1944-5/9/2012 Kimberly M Swanson, 50, Marysville, 1/7/1962-5/21/2012 William E Tarbell, 88, Marysville, 1/26/1924-5/30/2012 Charles L Taylor, 88, Arlington, 9/23/1936-5/27/2012

Harold AR Sedgwick, 95, Marysville, 4/2/1917-6/3/2012 Charles E White Jr., 46, Marysville, 8/23/1965-5/29/2012 Louise R Crandall, 90, Arlington, 5/6/1922-6/3/2012 Lawrence J Cook, 72, Marysville, 6/23/1939-6/3/2012 Lyle L Myers, 79, Marysville, 4/20/1933-6/4/2012 Florence L Peper, 88, Arlington, 9/28/1922-6/4/2012 Michael E Thomas, 62, Marysville, 11/10/1949-6/2/2012

Notice of Public Hearing Before the Marysville City Council Notice is hereby given that the Marysville City Council will hold a Public Hearing at 7:00 p.m., on Monday, June 25, 2012 in the Council Chambers of Marysville City Hall located at 1049 State Avenue, Marysville, Washington. The purpose of this public hearing is to consider the following: A Resolution of the City of Marysville adopting a Six Year Transportation Improvement Program (2013-2018) in accordance with RCW 35-77-010. Any person may appear at the hearing and be heard in support of or opposition to this proposal. Additional information may be obtained at the Marysville City Clerk’s Office, 1049 State Avenue, Marysville, Washington 98270,

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that on June 7, 2012 an application was made to the City of Marysville Community Development Department requesting preliminary short plat approval for a two (2) lot short plat with retention of

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8

THE SPORTS PAGE The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

Top jet skiers hail from Marysville BY LAUREN SALCEDO lsalcedo@arlingtontimes.com

MARYSVILLE — A local Marysville family is making waves this summer by competing in several annual statewide jet ski racing and freestyle race competitions. Angela Clements, of Marysville, and her son Nathan, 12, both achieved high awards on June 9-10, during the Lava Lap Regatta at Soap Lake. Angela Clements placed second in the Novice Women’s Runabout and the Novice Runabout Limited on June 9 and she took first place in the same races on June 10. Clements first tried racing jet skis only a year ago and is already a top performer. “I started racing last year, and this year is my son’s first official year,” said Clements. “A friend of mine was doing it so I tried it and met a lot of people that way. They convinced

me to try racing, and I won my first race last year.” Her first race was part of the Apple Pie Jamboree, which hosted two races per day for one weekend. “I won three of the four races and took the win for the weekend,” said Clements. Jet ski racing competitions are traditionally broken up into divisions based on experience, age, gender and type of jet ski. The race is usually set up slalom style where racers maneuver through buoys and complete a certain number of laps around them. Nathan Clements watched his mom race last year, and then tried racing in an exhibition race. “He tried it and loved it,” said Clements. “He decided he wanted to race, but we told him he had to support his sport.” Nathan took the challenge. He has saved his money from chores and holidays

for the past year and began running fundraisers where he made arts and crafts to sell. “He’s diabetic and he’s had a lot of challenges,” said Angela Clements. “This is him showing the world, ‘I can be a normal kid.’ It’s definitely building up his self confidence.” With the money he raised, Nathan was able to buy his very own jet ski for $650. There are additional costs to the sport that includes maintenance and gas, so the Clements are looking for someone to sponsor Nathan, who took first place in the Junior Ski 10-12 Stock Lites race twice during the Lava Lap Regatta. “He is looking for sponsorship to help defer the cost of the sport,” said Angela Clements. “We are hoping that a small local business will want put their name on his ski and help support a local kid.” Clements also noted that

June 20, 2012

Courtesy photo by Roger Harnack/Northwest Jet Sports Association

Marysville’s Nathan Clements, 12, passes a buoy during the Lava Lap Regatta on Soap Lake on June 9. she hopes to make the sport more popular among locals. “If we can encourage people to get out there, and try to get more youth into

it, it is really a great sport,” she said. “The community is really supportive and will always help you out. It’s good exercise and it’s a good

water activity.” For more information on sponsoring Nathan Clements, call Angela at 425-346-3709.

Powder Puff teams prepare for July game BY LAUREN SALCEDO lsalcedo@arlingtontimes.com

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

Powder Puff football moms Jessica Hoffman, No. 23, and Kym Gallo, No. 73, lead players from Marysville and Lakewood in the June 16 Strawberry Parade.

MARYSVILLE — The Strawberry Festival Grand Parade on Saturday, June 16, featured hundreds of local people supporting their own causes including dozens of Powder Puff football players who strolled through the parade selling tickets for their upcoming Powder Puff football match-up on July 20. The “Cougar Mamas” are a team made up of mothers of Lakewood football players who are set to face the “Tomamamas” — a team of Marysville football moms. Despite their upcoming rivalry, the two teams banded together on Saturday to help raise funds for both the Lakewood Youth Football Athletic Association and the Marysville Youth Football League. “This will be our third year playing the Marysville team,” said Dawn Taylor, organizer for the Cougar Mamas. “One of the things we do to raise money is charge $5 for a single entry and $10 for family.”

The game is set for July 20 at 7 p.m. on the MarysvillePilchuck High School football field. Those who want to support the Lakewood team pay on the Lakewood side of the field and those who want to support Marysville pay on the opposite side. “Each side gets to keep the money raised,” said Taylor. Concessions are being sold during the game and money raised from them also goes to support the football associations, to be divided evenly between Lakewood and Marysville. The teams are also finding creative ways to support youth football as well as local businesses. “We’ll do a program for the night of the game and people who would like to place an ad can buy one to go in the program,” said Taylor. “Everyone who attends will get a free program, so the businesses will get exposure that way.” In addition to raising money through ticket sales and advertising, the Powder Puff teams are planning other audienceinvolved fundraisers for the

day of the event. “We are also going to have some fun activities,” said Taylor. “We’ll do a 50/50 raffle and an eating contest.” Last year, the Lakewood team raised more than $5,000 and the Marysville team raised more than $4,000 that went straight to Lakewood and Marysville football. Despite the clear goal of raising money for youth athletics, the Powder Puff match-up is still a fiercely competitive game. “Women are out there everyday at practice,” said Taylor. “We take winning the game very seriously.” The game is also a way of bringing people together over friendly competition. “It’s such a great night,” said Taylor. “It’s really cool when whole communities come together. People are surprised by how much fun it is.” Pre-sale tickets for the game are available by contacting any team coach or player. The Arlington Eagles and Stanwood Spartans are set to face each other on July 28 at Haller Middle School.


June 20, 2012

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

9

Festival Fashion Show features local styles

lsalcedo@arlingtontimes.com

MARYSVILLE — Locally made strawberry topped cupcakes were a fitting end to the Strawberry Festival’s Fashion Show and Luncheon at the Leifer Manor on June 12, which featured a number of styles from local shops, displayed by local models. “If you want to be involved with something fun that brings the community together, come work for the Strawberry Festival,” said Beckye Randall, an organizer for the event. Close to 200 fashion show attendees served themselves a pasta lunch from Christiano’s in Marysville, before sitting down to enjoy watching models strut their stuff in fashions chosen from a variety of Marysville and Tulalip retailers. “This is Project Runway, Marysvillestyle,” said Jim Ballew of the Marysville Parks and Recreation Department,

who served as the event’s master of ceremonies. “It’s nice to be celebrating what Marysville has to offer.” Simply Caketastic in Marysville baked Strawberry Festival-themed cupcakes for the event, which were served by organizers during the show. The show kicked off with the father-daughter model combination of Greg Jensen, a Lakewood School Board member and his daughter Ariel Jensen, this year’s Strawberry Festival President’s Marshal. The two donned T-shirts and Bermuda shorts from the Eddie Bauer store at Seattle Premium Outlets in Tulalip. Garments from the locally owned Trusty Threads in Marysville were modeled by two individuals, including Patricia Schoonmaker, the owner of the shop. Schoonmaker modeled a vintage-style gingham print summer dress complete with a matching sunhat. During the show, Randall

helped the Strawberry Festival Junior Royalty princesses draw the winners of the show’s raffle, which included prizes such as a bucket of strawberries, a Fashion Bug gift certificate and movie passes for four to the Olympic Theatre in Arlington. Pat Olson and Jean Wilson, volunteers at the Ken Baxter Community Center, modeled casual styles from the Fashion Bug in Marysville. “We went down to the Fashion Bug and they had a whole bunch to choose from,” said Wilson. “We’ve had a lot of fun,” said Olson. Other garments featured in the show were donated by Nike, Fred Meyer, Cabela’s and Banana Republic. “We donated three garments,” said Debbie Moore of the JCPenney in Marysville, whose store manager Cheryl Shane modeled a little black dress, jewelry and pumps from

her store and was escorted through the runway by Doug Buell, public information officer for the city of Marysville. Buell was not the only face from the city of Marysville to try his hand at being a model — Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring modeled a white tuxedo with a red tie while escorting Wendy Messarina, of the Marysville School District, who donned a black and white print dress and hot pink accessories. Nehring’s tuxedo came from the Tux Shop in Marysville, while Messarina’s garments were donated by JCPenney. “This is only the second time I’ve modeled in my life,” said Nehring, who was a model in the 2011 Strawberry Festival Fashion Show. “It’s fun. It’s something different.” Buell, who was also modeling for his second time, agreed. “The fashion show is just a fun and different way to celebrate the Strawberry Festival.”

Lauren Salcedo/Staff Photo

Patricia Schoonmaker, owner of Trusty Threads in Marysville, models one of her store’s garments during the Strawberry Festival Fashion Show on June 12 at Leifer Manor.

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BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

MARYSVILLE — The MarysvillePilchuck High School auditorium came alive with footsteps, instruments and song on Thursday, June 14, at the Marysville Strawberry Festival Talent Show once again took to its stage with 30 contestants. While breakdancer Shonn Anderson had won the overall award during last year’s Talent Show, this year that distinction went to seven of his fellow alums of the P2Dance Studio in Marysville, who showed up in coordinated graffiti-covered hoodies and pants to breakdance to the appropriately named “Graffiti.” Victoria Wade, Shayne Anderson, Albee Abigania, Chloe Bosse, Matt Dixon, Khayla Shipman and Ellie House not only demonstrated the dance moves they’d practiced together since September of last year, but also set themselves apart with a set piece that made them appear to be part of a graffiti-tagged wall. “Our costumes and dances allow us to express ourselves artistically,” Abigania said. The P2Dance Studio crew also took first place in the Vocal, Dance and Instrumental Ages 13 and Up category. In the other categories, Taylor Bradshaw’s sassy jazz dance to “Fabulous” earned her first place in the Vocal and Dance Ages 4-8 category, while Victoria Steward took first for singing and playing piano to “Someone Like You.” First place in the Dance Ages 9-11

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Building Trust Since 1935 Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

From left, Marysville P2Dance Studio crew members Ellie House, Matthew Dixon, Shonn Anderson, Albee Abigania, Chloe Bosse, Victoria Wade and Khayla Shipman proudly show off their prize basket as the overall winners of this year’s Marysville Strawberry Festival Talent Show on June 14. category went to DeQuira Parker, December Brickey, Abby Welborn, Emma Bosse and Wyatt White for jazzdancing to “Runaway Baby,” while Elsa Mastrude nabbed first in the Vocal and Piano Ages 11-12 category for her piano solo of “Toccata.” In the Vocal and Dance Ages 11-12 category, Brianna Jason scored first place for her singing of “Notice Me Horton,” while Courtney Klawuhn did the same in the Vocal Age 13 category for singing “Beautiful.” A ribbon dance to “Pure Pizazz netted Makenzie Ferguson, Tamara Sevao, Shyann Young and Casmir Canares first in Vocal and Dance ages 14-18,

and returning performer Nate Pitocco’s singing and piano-playing of Tom Petty’s “Breakdown” — which he wryly dedicated to his ex-girlfriend — nabbed him first in Vocal and Instrumental Ages 16-19. In the Vocal and Instrumental Adult category, the Ferguson Family Band edged out fellow returning performer Les Lorang, as well as Marvin Fritze, by bringing guest bass guitarist Jim Erdmann on board to perform the Monkees’ “I’m a Believer.” Isabel Hulme, who received third place in Vocal and Piano Ages 11-12 for singing “Good Girl,” won the $25 prize for selling the most tickets to the Talent Show.

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June 20, 2012

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

Mountain View graduates look toward future tainly going to miss hanging out with friends and participating in school activities, but has plans for the future. “I’m going to get a full-time job and start saving money for college.” Jessica Weisinger, agreed with Van Noten. “I’m nervous,” she said. “But it’s a good feeling.” Weisinger’s favorite part about high school was the interesting coursework. “I liked it when we did labs with everybody. They were always bringing weird things in,” she said. Following her graduation, Weisinger is going to focus on taking care of her threemonth old daughter Keira. She is hoping that she can use the skills she learned in school and put them toward getting a job at Boeing. Carmen Twombly echoed the sentiments of her classmates by saying she was both nervous and excited. “But I was already fin-

Xxxxx Yyyyyy/Staff Photo

Mountain View High School graduates prepare to receive diplomas during the class of 2012 graduation and awards night ceremony at Cedarcrest Middle School on June 12. ished six months ago,” said Twombly, who finished her coursework in the winter.

Like Weisinger and Van Noten, Twombly said she would miss both people and classes. “I really like the science experiments,” said Twombly. She plans to go to beauty college after graduation to focus on cosmetology.

There is one part of graduating high school that will take some getting used to. “I will miss seeing my friends every day,” she said. The graduation ceremony was followed by a reception where refreshments were served.

639178

MARYSVILLE — Graduation and Awards Night for Mountain View High School’s Class of 2012 was filled with a sense of pride and accomplishment from all those who made it there. The Cedarcrest Middle School commons was filled with teachers, students, family and friends of those who graduated on June 12. Liz Poole, Cassie Hairston, Brandon Dekoning and Josh Fitzgerald were all graduation speakers during the event and spoke out in support of Mountain View’s teachers and the pride they share in their graduating class. Several of the graduates

were presented with scholarships. The Marysville Rotary presented Mariah Canell, Sara McCaulley and Parmindejit Kaur-Mann with scholarships. Haley Spooner received scholarships from Marysville’s Soroptomist International and the National Technical Honor Society. A total of 51 students graduated from MMVHS and the S.O.A.R. Program this year. Principal Dawn Bechtholdt presented the class and diplomas were presented by staff and Marysville Superintendent Dr. Larry Nyland. “I am pretty nervous,” said Chantel Van Noten, before the ceremony began. “I’m excited though, I’m definitely excited.” Van Noten said she is cer-

639645

lsalcedo@arlingtontimes.com

123456

BY LAUREN SALCEDO

639056

10


June 20, 2012

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

Naval Station Everett plans ‘Freedom Fest’

EVERETT — Naval Station Everett will once again host its “Freedom Fest,” on Saturday, June 30, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., to

Ship tours will be offered on a first-come, first-serve basis, starting at 11 a.m. and continuing throughout the event every halfhour. Due to a limited number of tours available throughout the day, at approximately 100 per half-hour, one ship tour per guest will be allowed. Parking and bus trans-

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Super Flea! Call 866-825-9001 or Announcements email the Super Flea _ ADOPT _ A young at theflea@ successful married busisoundpublishing.com. ness owner (at-homeApartments for Rent Snohomish County ARLINGTON

Real Estate for Rent Snohomish County MARYSVILLE

3 BR, 1.75 BA HOME on culdesac. Features security system, fireplaces, double garage & fenced yard. No smoking/ pets. $1,100/ month, $975 deposit. 425-258-1985.

1 BEDROOM Apar tments and Studios. Great downtown locations! Call for details: 360-913-2496 or 360435-5707

$160,000

Nice 3 bedroom 2 bath home in a park like setting on 1.21 acres. This home features vaulted ceilings, an open floor plan and a kitchen with lots of counter and cabinet space. Outdoors you'll find a wrap around entertainment size deck. The two car garage/shop, is set up with a bathroom, office and wood burning fireplace.

Wendy Smith 425-319-5036

parent) & nurse yearn for precious baby. Expenses paid. 1-800-5628287

PNWHomeFinder.com is an online real estate community that exposes your profile and listings to two million readers from our many publications in the Pacific Northwest. Log on to join our network today. Employment General

DELIVER THE MARYSVILLE GLOBE OR ARLINGTON TIMES

HUD HOMES!!!

$150,000

2 & 3 BEDROOM apartments in town. All appliances including washer & d r y e r. Fr o m $ 8 7 5 month plus deposit. 360435-3171, 360-435-9294

Office/Commercial South Everett guest house, 2 BD, 2 BA, frplc, Jacuzzi tub in master, Marysville Prime Retail/Office d e ck , s i n g l e g a r a g e . Mountain & valley view. 1640 - 2500 Sq/Ft New paint & carpet. Lots Safeway Plaza Real Estate for Sale of cabinets. All appl to Manufactured Homes High Traffic Location incl W/D, disposal. Elect from $1.00/SF + NNN & water furnished. NonOAK HARBOR 425-971-8053 CLEAN 2 BEDROOM IN smoking, no pets. Max 888-984-5213 occ. 2. Min 1 yr lease. 1st & last, plus damage Need extra cash? Place & cleaning dep. $1,350/MO. (425)346- your classified ad today! Call 1-800-388-2527 or 6008 Go online 24 hours a Sell it for FREE in the day www.nw-ads.com.

Split level home on large almost quarter acre lot ready for you to make your own! Built in 1999, this home features 1484 sq ft, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, and spacious living room with a gas fireplace. Lots of room to garden in the fully fenced back yard.

This charming home appears much larger than its 1705 square footage. Its open design allows for a large functional kitchen with generous counter tops and plenty of cabinet space.

LEXARHB*905RF

such as firearms or knives. n Explosives, such as fireworks or ammunition. n Coolers or alcoholic beverages. No liquids will be permitted on board the ships. Information and updates will be available through the base information hotline at 425-304-5665 or online at www.cnic.navy. mil/everett/index.htm.

ARLINGTON

REAL ESTATE MARKET

$87,900

COME VISIT OUR SHOWROOM IN BURLINGTON!

Real Estate for Rent Snohomish County ARLINGTON

FREELAND/ LANGLEY

Call for appointment:

All visitors and vehicles should expect random airport-type screenings and should be prepared to present a photo ID upon entry. The following items are prohibited on base: n Backpacks or bags larger than purse-size. n Pets, excluding service animals. n Weapons of any kind,

OAK HARBOR

THE RENTERS GUIDE

12'-0" x 10'-6"

Real Estate for Sale Lots/Acreage

COUPEVILLE

click! www.nw-ads.com email! classified@soundpublishing.com call toll free! 1.888.399.3999 or 1.800.388.2527

DINING

portation will be available at the Everett Transit Station, at the intersection of 32nd Street and Smith Avenue, or at the Everett Marina, at the intersections of 13th and 18th streets along W. Marine View Drive. Due to very limited parking on base, carpooling and public transportation are highly encouraged.

601367

To be included in this Directory call 360-659-1300

559964

celebrate our nation’s independence with ship tours, food and family entertainment. Entry to the event and ship tours will be free and open to the public. Visitors will have the opportunity to tour a U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer, an Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate, or a U.S. Coast Guard cutter.

Public invited to tour ships, celebrate nation’s independence

11

Earn extra income working only one day per week delivering the Marsyville Globe or Arlington Times. Call 1-888-8383000 or email circulation@marysvilleglobe.com if interested. Please include your name, telephone number, address and best time to call. These are independent contract delivery routes for Sound Publishing, Inc. GAS STATION CASHIER NEEDED 12-18 hours per week. Must be 21, independent worker, with great customer ser vice. Duties: stocking, cleaning, cashiering. Will train. Arlington. Call 213-9956125, lv.msg.

Employment General

CIRCULATION MANAGER Sound Publishing, Inc. is currently accepting applications for a Circulation Manager at the Marysville Globe/Arlington Times and north end Little Nickel publications. The primar y duty of a Circulation Manager (CM) is to manage a geographic district. The CM will be accountable for the assigned newspaper as follows: Recruiting, contracting and training independent contractors to meet delivery deadlines, insuring delivery standards are being met and quality customer service. Position requires the ability to operate a motor vehicle in a safe manner; to occasionally lift and/or transport bundles weighing up to 25 pounds from ground level to a height o f 3 fe e t ; t o d e l i v e r newspaper routes, including ability to negotiate stairs and to deliver an average of 75 newspapers per hour for up to 8 consecutive hours; to communicate with carriers and the public by telephone and in person; to operate a personal computer. Must possess reliable, insured, motor vehicle and a valid Washington State driver’s license. Based in Poulsbo and Bellevue, Wash., Sound Publishing, Inc., owns and operates 38 community newspapers and 14 Little Nickel publications in the greater Puget Sound a r e a . S o u n d P u bl i s h i n g ’s b r o a d household distribution blankets the greater Puget Sound region, extending northward from Seattle to Canada, south to Salem, Ore., and westward to the Pacific Ocean. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer and offers a competitive benefits package including health insurance, 401K, paid vacation, holidays and a great work environment. We recognize that the key to our success lies in the abilities, diversity and vision of our employees. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. If interested in joining our team, please email resume and cover letter to: hreast@soundpublishing.com

OR mail to: Sound Publishing, Inc. 19426 68th Avenue S, Kent, WA 98032 ATTN: HRCM

Extra auto parts bring in extra cash when you place an ad in the Classifieds. Open 24 hours a day www.nw-ads.com.


June 20, 2012

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

Bottomless Garage Sale Ads All you can say and more! No word limit for only $37! Advertise your upcoming garage sale in your local community newspaper and online to reach thousands of readers in your area.

Call: 800-388-2527 Fax: 360-598-6800 or log on: www.nw-ads.com

How to Sell Your House Without An Agent

- If you've tried to sell your home yourself, you know that the minute you put the "For Sale by Owner" sign up, the phone will start to ring off the hook. Unfortunately, most calls aren't from prospective buyers, but rather from every real estate agent in town who will start to hound you for your listing. Like other "For Sale by Owners", you'll be subjected to a hundred sales pitches from agents who will tell you how great they are and how you can't possibly sell your home by yourself. After all, without the proper information, selling a home isn't easy. Perhaps you've had your home on the market for several months with no offers from qualified buyers. This can be a very frustrating time, and many homeowners have given up their dreams of selling their homes themselves.But don't give up until

Employment General

you've read a new report entitled "Sell Your Own Home" which has been prepared especially for homesellers like you. You'll find that selling your home by yourself is entirely possible once you understand the process. Inside this report, you'll find 10 inside tips to selling your home by yourself which will help you sell for the best price in the shortest amount of time. You'll find out what real estate agents don't want you to know. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 11-800-270-4033 and enter 1017. You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Get your free special report NOW to learn how you really can sell your home yourself.

This report is courtesy of Jeff Latham KW NWRE. Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently under contract. Copyright © 2012

CHILD CARE & SCHOOL DIRECTORY

To be included in this directory call: 360-659-1300 A Christian atmosphere with a positive influence on children’s growth

360-654-9819

NOW ENROLLING FOR 2012-13

Bethlehem Christian School

PRESCHOOL AND KINDERGARTEN TEACHING CHILDREN FOR 38 YEARS

NOW ENROLLING FOR 2012-2013

www.smokeypointlutheranchurch.org email - preschool@SmokeyPointLutheranChurch.org

Kelly Stadum, Director . 360-653-2882 www.bethlehemlutheran.com

601330

627255

601324

601316

A Stable Beginning Preschool 'LVMWXMER4VIWGLSSPERH4VI/JSVEKIW

'IVXMJMIH8IEGLIVW†%KI%TTVSTVMEXI'YVVMGYPYQ %JJSVHEFPI8YMXMSR† 0EVKI3YXHSSV -RHSSV4PE]%VIEW † &VMKLX 'LIIVJYP'PEWWVSSQW† 7QEPP'PEWW7M^IW † 8SHHPIV'PEWWIW

601322

1424 172nd NE • Arlington

615012

CERTIFIED TEACHERS . NEW FACILITIES Indoor/Outdoor play area

637152

AM & PM Classes Available

601306

12

1IPSH](I0ETTI(MVIGXSV†

 559959

ADVERTISING SALES CONSULTANT Are you good at sales? Do you want to s t o p wo r k i n g we e k ends and holidays? Are you creative and t h r i ve o n s u c c e s s ? Would you like to earn $40,000 or more per year in salar y, commissions and benefits? Are medical, dental, life insurance and 401k benefits important to you? If your answer is yes, we want to talk with you! Sound Publishing, Inc. has an immediate opening for an Advertising Sales Consultant at our Little Nickel office located in south Everett at Paine field. You will sell multiple media products, including on-line advertising and special sections so you must be motivated and take the initiative to find ways to grow sales and income with new prospective clients as well as existing customers. Ideal candidates will: • Excel at providing exceptional customer service • Have strong interpersonal skills, both wr itten and oral • Have retail or food sales experience (advertising sales ex p e r i e n c e i s a plus!) • Possess proficient computer skills with Word, Excel and utilizing the Internet Position requires use of personal cell phone and vehicle, possession of valid WA State Driver’s License and proof of active vehicle insurance. Compensation package is salary-pluscommission. Additionally, we offer a competitive benefits package including health insurance; 401K with Employer Match; paid vacation after 6 mos; paid holidays; and a great wor k environment. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer and recognize that the key to our success lies in the abilities, diversity and vision of our employees. Women and minor ities are encouraged to apply. If you are customerdriven, success-oriented, self-motivated, well organized and have the ability to think outside the box, then we want to hear from you! Please email us your cover letter and resume hreast@sound publishing.com or MAIL to: Sound Publishing, Inc. 19426 68th Avenue S. Kent, WA 98032 ATTN: HR/ISLNN

Employment Transportation/Drivers

COURIER DRIVER Sound Publishing, Inc. is looking for a Part-Time Courier Driver to deliver interoffice mail and small commercial jobs as needed. Position is 2-3 days per week and route is 150 or more miles per day. Must possess and maintain a valid WA St. D r i ve r ’s L i c e n s e a n d good driving record, be able to lift 50 lbs and load/unload deliveries. Must have knowledge of the Puget Sound area. M u s t p r ov i d e c u r r e n t copy of driving abstract a t t i m e o f i n t e r v i e w. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer and offers a competitive benefits package including paid vacation, h o l i d ay s a n d a gr e a t work environment. We recognize that the key to our success lies in the abilities, diversity and vision of our employees. Please email your resume and cover letter to hreast@soundpublishing.com

or mail to Sound Publishing, Inc., 19426 68th Ave S, Kent, WA 90832 ATTN: HR/CD Driver…

MBM Food Service is growing in Sumner!! Has several openings for Class-A Regional Food Delivery Drivers Average Earnings 1st year = $60-$65K plus generous Benefits!!

• • • •

1-3 Day Regional Routes. Deliver and Unload Custom Food Orders to Restaurant Chains. CDL-A, 1 Yr. Exp. Req. Good Driving/Work History. Apply Online TODAY!

MBMcareers.com

360-421-4371 425-238-5377 Looking for your dream house? Go to pnwHomeFinder.com to find the perfect home for sale or rent. Business Equipment

BUSINESS OR Fund R a i s i n g O p p o r t u n i t y. Softball, Baseball, Football, Soccer? Does your team need to raise money for uniforms, travel, e t c ? T h e n c h e ck t h i s out! Fully equipped, ready to serve, Concessions Trailer for sale by local non-profit, $28,500. Dick at 253-631-4931 Cemetery Plots

(2) CEMETERY Spaces, side by side, in Sunset Hills Memorial Park, Bellevue. Spaces 11 and 12 in Lot 25 in the Garden o f A s s u r a n c e. Q u i e t , Peaceful Setting. Asking $22,000 each. Call Dawn at (360)757-1476 3 GORGEOUS VIEW Plots at Washington Memorial in The Garden of Communion. Well kept, lovely & year round maintenance included. Friendly, helpful staff. Section 15, block 232, plots B; (2, 3 & 4), near Veteran section. Asking below cemeter y price, $1,500 each! 206-2460698. Plots located at 16445 International Blvd.

COFFEE STAND FOR LEASE. Pioneer 76 Station. 21010 67th Avenue NE, Arlington, 98223. Call ACACIA Memorial Park, 425-770-3830 “Birch Garden”, (2) adjacent cemetery plots, #3 Home Services & #4. Selling $4,000 Hauling & Cleanup each or $7,500 both. Located in Shoreline / N. Seattle. Call or email Emmons Johnson, 2067 9 4 - 2 1 9 9 , eaj3000@msn.com

FREE

DROP-OFF & Pick-Up’s: Appliances, Scrap Farm Equipment, ALL Kinds of Metal 425-314-9417

Gil Schieber, Plantsman

Janitorial Employment

Borealis Landscape & Design

has part time and fill in positions covering Camano Island to Marysville area. Auto, auto insurance and valid d r i ve r ’s l i c e n s e r e quired. Call (360)629-2470

Gaona’s Lawncare Experienced with Tree Pruning, All Phases of Yard Work & Clean Up!

Business Opportunities

Build up your business with our Service Guide Special: Four full weeks of advertising starting at $40. Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad today.

LOCAL CLEANING COMPANY

Home Services Lawn/Garden Service

Home Services Landscape Services

Fine Gardening and Landscape Design With

borealislandscapedesign.com

206-679-6576

Place an advertisement or search for jobs, homes, merchandise, pets and more in the Classifieds 24 hours a day online at www.nw-ads.com.

C E M E T E RY P L O T Prestigious Greenwood Memorial Park in Renton. One plot available in beautiful Rhododendron section. Purchased in 1966 among Renton families and veterans. This section is filled, lock in price now! $3000. No fee for transfer. For more details, call Alice: 425-277-0855 EVERGREEN - WASHELLI Cemetery, on Aurora Avenue in Seattle. 2 p l o t s a va i l a b l e , w i t h head stones, in the sold out Pacific Lutheran Section 5. $5,000 each or best offer. 206-2482330 SUNSET HILLS Memorial Park in Bellevue. 2 C h o i c e S i d e by S i d e Plots in The Garden of Rest, Lot 83, Spaces 11 and 12. $10,500 each. Contract Possible - Lets Ta l k ! C o n t a c t m e a t : hauser.kip@gmail.com or 425-890-7780


June 20, 2012

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe Dogs

WASHINGTON MEMORIAL Park in Seatac. 1 plot in Section 20, Row K-3. Year round maintenance. Nice, peaceful s e t t i n g n e a r r o a d fo r easy access. Pr ice if purchased from Cemetery: $3,795. Asking $2,800. Call: 206-3269706 BEAUTIFUL AKC English Cream Golden ReFree Items triever Puppies. Have Recycler had 1st shots and health c h e ck u p. T h ey h ave been raised in the beautiful country, are well socialized, and are good with little children. Parents temperaments are calm, loving, and smart. Price $800. For more information: 360-520-9196 or www.mountainsprings kennel.weebly.com

FREE! Wood pallets for firewood or ? (Does not include 48x40 size)

Spas/Hot Tubs Supplies

BICHON FRISE puppies. AKC Registered. Taking deposits. $900 e a c h . Fo r c o m p a n i o n only! Will be vet checked and have first shots and be dewormed. Call for infor mation: 360-8747771, 360-621-8096 or go to website to see our adorable puppies! www.bichonfrise puppies4sale.com www.bichonfrisepuppies4sale.com

Sell it for FREE in the Super Flea! Call Wanted/Trade 866-825-9001 or W A N T E D : R A D I O email the Super Flea Tu b e s , H a m R a d i o , at theea@ Phone Equipment, Large soundpublishing.com. Speakers. Cash Paid! 503-999-2157 Dogs

AKC GOLDEN Retriever puppies! (2) light golden color. (4) medium golden color. Males $650. Females $700. Pedigree p r ov i d e d . Pa r e n t s o n site. Born April 23rd. Absolutely adorable! Great for children and hunting! Shots & dewormed. Call W i l l i a m o r Ta t i a n a a t 360-642-1198, 901-4384051 or 901-485-2478. Long Beach, WA.

AKC POMERANIAN Puppy. Ver y cute, out going little guy! Loves people! Black 5 month male. High energy with a super personality. Socially/ basic trained. Intelligent & not a barker! Great family dog. Vet check and shots up to date. 100% housebroken. $795. Bellevue. 425644-1110. Newfoundland Puppies, 4 Females, 5 males, pare n t s o n s i t e . Ve r y H e a l t hy. P r i c e N e g o tiable. Call for Details (425)512-8029 Pomeranians Male & Female. $250. Teacup, Mini & Toys. Various Colors. 8wks & up. Shots, Wormed, Health records. Cash! (425)420-6708

Employment General

Tack, Feed & Supplies

Fir Island Trucking Company E Shavings E Sawdust E Hog fuel E Playground Chips 1 Deliveries from 1 45yds-125yds

www.mountainspringskennel.weebly.com

exposes your proďŹ le and listings to two 425-355-0717 million readers from our many publications ext. 1560 in the PaciďŹ c Northwest. Ask for Karen Avis Log on to join our Sell it for FREE in the network today. Super Flea! Call 866-825-9001 or email the Super Flea at theea@ soundpublishing.com.

L OW E S T P R I C E S o n quality hot tubs! New hot tubs starting @ $2995, spa covers from $299. Saunas as low as $2195! Filters & parts, pool & spa chemicals. Service & repair. Financing available, OAC. Hrs: 10-6 Mon.-Sat.. SpaCo 18109 Hwy 9 SE, Snohomish, (5 minutes Nor th of Woodinville) 425-485-1314 spacoofsnohomish.com

GREAT DANE

GOLDEN DOODLES F1B Puppies! Low allergen, low shedding and long lived companions! Home raised. Parents are smar t, gentle and tested for hips, knees and eyes. Vet check with first shots & wor med. Ready for homes mid July. Will range from 35 t o 6 5 l b s. 5 B l a ck . 1 Cream. 2 Beige/ Apricot. 2 Black Females. Starting at $975. 206-4633844. www.vashonisland PNWHomeFinder.com goldendoodles.shutter fly.com is an online real estate allison@dancingleaves. community that com

Call Today!

Dogs

vashonislandgoldendoodles.shutterfly.com/

allison@dancingleaves.com

Find what you need 24 hours a day.

360-659-6223 A K C G R E AT D A N E Puppies. Now offering Full-Euro’s, Half-Euro’s & Standard Great Danes. Males & females. Every color but Faw n s , $ 5 0 0 & u p. Health guarantee. Licensed since 2002. Dreyersdanes is Oregon state’s largest breeder of Great Danes. Also; selling Standard Poodles. www.dreyersdanes.com Call 503-556-4190.

Fax (360)659-4383

Extra auto parts bring in extra cash when you place an ad in the ClassiďŹ eds. Open 24 hours a day www.nw-ads.com. Garage/Moving Sales Skagit County MOUNT VERNON

MULTI FAMILY Garage Sale & Liquidation! Saturday June 23rd, 9am till 5pm. Chimney, pipe, fittings, all types of materiSell it for FREE in the als, pellets, fireplaces, Super Flea! Call furnaces, heaters, stoves, inserts, electric 866-825-9001 or fireplaces, household email the Super Flea i t e m s & m u c h , m u c h more! Everything from A at theea@ Z! Handy’s Heating, soundpublishing.com. to 17737 State Route 536.

Garage/Moving Sales General

Estate Sales

Marine Power

MARYSVILLE

J U N E 2 3 rd F R O M 10am till 6pm at 2926 71st Ave NE. Items include Bayliner powerboat, Vespa scooter, furniture, household & much more! No Checks, Cash Only!

60 YEARS OF STUFF Sale! June 22nd thr u 24th, 9am-6pm, 13312 81st Ave NE, Arlington, WA Arts & crafts, fishing, t o o l s, b o a t s, f ra m e s, g l a s sw a r e , t e a s e t s , dishes, medical, Marine figurines, furniture, appliPower ances, nice holiday decorations, music boxes, nautical novelties & displays, ceramic dolls, toys, crib, play pen, office, scuba, antiques, sporting goods, jewelry, automobile, books, movies, boating, clothing, drum set, changing table, baby/kids clothing, sewing, sor ted equipment, lots of odds & end Like New, 14FT fiberstuff! Cash Only Sale!!! glass boat, EZ LOADER TRAILER, 30HP EvinReach the readers rude. Lic thru June, 2013 the dailies miss. Call Includes Many extras. 800-388-2527 today L a k e o r r i v e r r e a d y. $5995 360-403-0143 to place your ad in leave message. the ClassiďŹ eds.

ULTRA PRISTINE 2003 56’ Meridian 580 Pilothouse Motoryacht. Meticulously maintained and moored in freshwater since new! Only 723 hours; twin 635 HP Cummins. Includes 1800 GPD, watermaker, furnace, 14’ Avon dinghy with 50 HP Yamaha, full electronics! Too many options to list! Only $598,000. Mercer Island. Call Dale 503-519-4235.

Place an advertisement or search for jobs, homes, merchandise, pets and more in the ClassiďŹ eds 24 hours a day online at www.nw-ads.com.

Circulation Manager

Sound Publishing, Inc. is currently accepting applications for Circulation Manager positions in East, South and North King County. The primary duty of a Circulation Manager (CM) is to manage a geographic district. The CM will be accountable for the assigned newspaper as follows: Recruiting, contracting and training independent contractors to meet delivery deadlines, insuring delivery standards are being met and quality customer service. Position requires the ability to operate a motor vehicle in a safe manner; to occasionally lift and/ or transport bundles weighing up to 25 pounds from ground level to a height of 3 feet; to deliver newspaper routes, including ability to negotiate stairs and to deliver an average of 75 newspapers per hour for up to 8 consecutive hours; to communicate with carriers and the public by telephone and in person; to operate a personal computer. Must possess reliable, insured, motor vehicle and a valid Washington State driver’s license. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer and offers a competitive benefits package including health insurance, 401K, paid vacation, holidays and a great work environment. If interested in joining our team, please email resume and cover letter to: hreast@soundpublishing.com OR send resume and cover letter to: Sound Publishing, Inc. 19426 68th Avenue S Kent, WA 98032 ATTN: CM

CIRCULATION MANAGER

Sound Publishing, Inc. is currently accepting applications for a Circulation Manager at the Marysville Globe/Arlington Times and north end Little Nickel publications. The primary duty of a Circulation Manager (CM) is to manage a geographic district. The CM will be accountable for the assigned newspaper as follows: Recruiting, contracting and training independent contractors to meet delivery deadlines, insuring delivery standards are being met and quality customer service. Position requires the ability to operate a motor vehicle in a safe manner; to occasionally lift and/or transport bundles weighing up to 25 pounds from ground level to a height of 3 feet; to deliver newspaper routes, including ability to negotiate stairs and to deliver an average of 75 newspapers per hour for up to 8 consecutive hours; to communicate with carriers and the public by telephone and in person; to operate a personal computer. Must possess reliable, insured, motor vehicle and a valid Washington State driver’s license. Based in Poulsbo and Bellevue, Wash., Sound Publishing, Inc., owns and operates 38 community newspapers and 14 Little Nickel publications in the greater Puget Sound area. Sound Publishing’s broad household distribution blankets the greater Puget Sound region, extending northward from Seattle to Canada, south to Salem, Ore., and westward to the Pacific Ocean. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer and offers a competitive benefits package including health insurance, 401K, paid vacation, holidays and a great work environment. We recognize that the key to our success lies in the abilities, diversity and vision of our employees. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. If interested in joining our team, please email resume and cover letter to: hreast@soundpublishing.com OR mail to: Sound Publishing, Inc. 19426 68th Avenue S, Kent, WA 98032 ATTN: HRCM

Name: Simon Animal ID: 15422984 Breed: Dom. Short Hair Age: 9 years - 8 mos Gender: Male Color: Black Tan & White Spayed/Neutered: Yes

Toby has a goofy personality and will play with anything he can get my paws on, so please make sure you have plenty of toys around! Not to brag, but I'm an impressive cat tree climber and a professional cat napper. Toby is currently living with cats and enjoys sleeping and playing with them but Toby doesn't like dogs and will need to go to a home that doesn't have dogs. Toby is currently in foster care and I can be reached at fostereas@gmail.com

Name: Loki Animal ID: 16303875 Breed: Rottweiler Age: 7 years Gender: Male Color: Black/Tan Spayed/Neutered: Yes

Hi! I'm a swell guy looking for someone who will let me lick their face! I love to give kisses. I like to chew on treats and chew toys so I'll need plenty of those. I love to go on walks and when I do, I like to hold the leash in my mouth to make sure we are together. I love to play tug with you, it is my favorite. I also love interactive toys such as Buster Cubes for mental exercise. I really am a swell guy & would love to go with you!

All animals adopted from EAS are neutered, microchipped, vaccinated, wormed and treated for fleas. All cats are tested for FIV/FeLV.

See us and other pets at the

333 Smith Island Rd • Everett, WA 98205

425-257-6000

NOTE: If the particular featured pet is not available, we have many great animals to choose from and you are sure to find the perfect pet for you.

559952

Dogs

DO YOU HAVE A FIRST AID KIT FOR YOUR DOG? A well-stocked first aid kit for dogs includes:

t3PMMDPUUPOt4PNFDPUUPOCBMMTt(BV[FQBETt(BV[FUBQF t)ZESPHFOQFSPYJEF DIFDLUIFFYQJSBUJPOEBUF t)ZESPDPSUJTPOFPJOUNFOU t4DJTTPSTt&ZFXBTIt4JMWFSOJUSBUFt5XFF[FST t0SBMTZSJOHFTt1FEJPMZUFÂĽPSPUIFSCBMBODFEFMFDUSPMZUFGMVJE t#BCZGPPEoNFBUGMBWPSTXPSLCFTUt-BSHFUPXFMt&YBNHMPWFT tJODIXIJUFUBQF JOBEEJUJPOUPHBV[FUBQF t3PMMTPGFMBTUJDXSBQ t&NFSHFODZJDFQBDLt5IFSNPNFUFS(both oral and rectal thermometers can be used rectally)

Sponsored By:

590797

Cemetery Plots

MARYSVILLE t 1340 State Avenue t 360-658-7817

13


June 20, 2012

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

No need to break the bank.

The Classifieds has great deals on everything you need.

Automobiles Automobiles Classics & Collectibles Classics & Collectibles

1 9 7 9 R A L LY S P O RT Camaro. 350 V-8 needs ove r h a u l , 2 0 1 3 t a b s. N e e d s T L C bu t g o o d project car for folks that can work on cars. Good tires and new exhaust system. Has been sitting last 10 years. Don, 253941-5108 donald10@comcast.net

BUSINESS DIRECTORY To be included in this directory, contact 360.659.1300 to speak to a sales rep.

2008 CHRYSLER Sebring Touring Hardtop Convertible. Black, 6 cylinder, Automatic Transmission, Air Conditioning, Power Equipment, AM/FM/XM/CD. 25,000 miles. Excellent Condition. Includes Maintenance Contract. Always Garaged. $15,500. Call: 253-237-5018

H A N D Y M A N

Automobiles Lexus

614230

2010 LEXUS RX450 AW D H y b r i d . 8 , 6 0 0 Miles. Price Reduced! $41,950. Original Owner! Automatic! Every Option Available! AC/Climate Control, ABS, Dual Side Air Bags, Cruise Control, Sunroof, Overhead Luggage Rack, Xfiniti Stereo Sound Syst e m w i t h 6 D i s c C D, Navigation System, Dual Back-Up Cameras, Anti Theft. Aluminum/Alloy Wheels, Remote Keyless Entry, Dual Control Heated Seats, Power : Windows, Doors, Locks. Garage Kept and Smoke Fr e e. 2 5 3 - 2 3 5 - 5 4 7 8 Federal Way

E S T

R O O F I N G

614263

C

L

626881

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A N D S C A P I N G

and all other landscaping needs 1-Time or Year Round Service Commercial/Residential Licensed/Bonded/Insured

Lic. # JDKLA**983LEV

559957_BizDir0620.indd 1

A W D U S T

Landscaping SPRING CLEANUP

SOD, RESEED, WEEDING, MOWING, PRUNING, HEDGE TRIM, BARK, THATCHING, ROTOTILLING, RETAINING WALL, PAVER INSTALLATION, SIDEWALKS, DRIVEWAYS, FENCES, PRESSURE WASHING & GUTTER CLEANING

FREE ESTIMATES

FAMILY OWNED 21+ YEARS

360-659-4727 425-346-6413 Lic. #GDLANC927MG

2 0 0 7 N I S S A N T I TA N King Cab. Death in the family, must sell, I just don’t dr ive it. Only 3 5 , 0 0 0 o r g i n a l m i l e s. Sleek Charcoal with grey i n t e r i o r. L o o k s s h a r p driving down the road. Pe r fe c t c o n d i t i o n ! A l l The Bells & Whistles including tow package & h i t c h ! $ 1 4 , 5 0 0 o b o. Enumclaw. Days 360825-5628. Evenings 206-375-2457.

S

G&D

Licensed • Bonded • Insured

Pickup Trucks Nissan

Reach the readers the dailies miss. Call 800-388-2527 today to place your ad in the Classifieds.

& S

H A V I N G S

Auto Service/Parts/ Accessories

1964 ½ - 1973 MUSTANG PARTS

Large Inventory Guaranteed Lowest Price 614241

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1986 F-250, 4x4, X cab, d i e s e l , a u t o, r u n n i n g b o a r d s, m a ny ex t ra s, new batteries & radiator, good shape $1,795/OBO (425)238-1816

614259

Check Us Out!

Free Estimates Mowing • Sod • Edge Fertilizing • Pruning Trimming • Weeding Aeration • Thatching Bark • Seed • Haul Retaining Walls

Please Call 360-659-6735 425-232-2662

Pickup Trucks Ford

A N D Y M A N

614257

A N D S C A P I N G

Automobiles Others

559957

614248

✔ Us Out!! L

O N T R O L

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A N D S C A P I N G

1973 DODGE Charger. One owner, engine rebuilt to approx. 340, automatic transmission, complete service records, original paint and top. New Edelbrock carburetor, radiator, alternator, electronic ignition, power steering p u m p , b a t t e r y, r e a r spr ings. Great dr ive. Many other items rebuilt or replaced. $15,500. Contact Al 360-6780960 Whidbey Island Automobiles Chrysler

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614233

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6/15/12 9:46:36 AM

RICK’S PONY PARTS 360-435-9323


June 20, 2012

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

GET READY! Arlington Fly-In Special Section Coming July 4.

Be sure to check out our

www.marysville.com/green_editions

We Have the LARGEST Inventory of Liquor In the Area With Brands You Won’t Find Anywhere Else!

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GREEN EDITIONS online at:

www.arlingtontimes.com/green_editions

Office hours 9:00 - 5:00 Mon-Sat

Earlier & Later Retail Hours • Open 7 Days a Week! 622661

Closed Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day & New Year’s Day

630828

Monday ~ Thursday 8 am - 10 pm Friday & Saturday 8 am - 11 pm Sunday 9 am - 8 pm

NO Membership or Club Card REQUIRED

TULALIP

Liquor Store & Smoke Shop

Exit 200

I-5 Exit 199 Marysville

Exit 199

Quil Ceda

Tulalip

360-716-3250 QUIL CEDA Liquor/Wine Store & Smoke Shop

630355

Liquor • Cigarettes • Tobacco

637178

360-716-2940

637324

I-5 Exit 200 Marysville


June 20, 2012

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

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Marysville Globe, June 20, 2012  

June 20, 2012 edition of the Marysville Globe