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FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 2012

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Final bills come in for January storms

Cities work with county on animal control

BY TJ MARTINELL

Animal control services contract negotiations continue with county

tmartinell@covingtonreporter.com

The final bill for the January snow and ice storms for Covington and Maple Valley. The total price tag for cleaning Maple Valley was $87,000 and roughly 80 percent of the cleanup has been completed. In Covington, however, the storm cost the city $200,000 and much of the debris is still being removed, according to City Engineer Don Vondran. “We’re still doing some cleanup and assessing the costs because there’s still areas we’re picking up debris,” he said. At the same time, however, both cities have filed for reimbursement through FEMA, which would help cover some of the costs for the storm, albeit it is not certain how much that amount might be. “It’s an emergency, so you really don’t budget for them,” Vondran said. “They evaluate what’s reimbursable. That happens later on, several months down the road.” Vondran stated that when the crews first cleared the roads during the actual storm, they swept debris and fallen trees off to the [ more STORMS page 5 ]

BY KRIS HILL khill@covingtonreporter.com

Ben Fisher sings during a rehearsal for the school’s upcoming drama production My, What A Deep Tahoma’s “Into the Woods.” Fisher plays two roles. TJ MARTINELL, The Reporter To view a slide show go to www. Voice You Have maplevalleyreporter.com and to buy photos go to the website and click on the photo reprints tab.

Maple Valley foundation helps keep a promise BY TJ MARTINELL tmartinell@maplevalleyreporter.com

Tiger, an elderly Uganda man, was furious. Rather than greet Suzy Gillies inside of his internally displaced person (IDP) camp, he began shouting at her in broken English. Having survived the horrors of the Lord’s Army Resistance insurgency, which had engulfed the northern region of Uganda for 18

years, he couldn’t understand why the outside world still remained seemingly oblivious to their plight in 2008, three years after the war had ended. “He pleaded with us to tell the (American) people of what was happening in his country,” Gillies said. “He asked us ‘What are you going to do? Are you going to go back and tell your people?’ I made a promise that I would.” Two years later, when Gillies

King County will continue to provide animal control services for Covington, Maple Valley and Black Diamond — for now. Council members from all three cities met Feb. 23 at Covington City Hall to learn about a proposed alternative that would sever ties with the county and create a coalition among them to provide animal control services. Derek Matheson, Covington city manager, provided information about the current negotiations for a three year contract extension with the county as well as the alternative known as the Southeast option. Both Covington and Maple Valley have contracted with the county since incorporation as cities in 1997 while Black Diamond has used the county since it became a city in 1957. “Prior to 2010, to be perfectly honest, we were riding the gravy [ more CONTRACT page 4 ]

returned to the Gulu district in northern Uganda, she and her companions inadvertently arrived at the same IDP camp that she had originally met Tiger. With an interpreter in tow, they were able to eventually locate Tiger, who was brought to them on a motorcycle. Finally, Gillies was able to tell him personally that she had kept his promise. After she returned to the states in 2008, Gillies, a substitute teacher in the Tahoma School District, created the African Promise Foundation (APF). The APF serves as both a humanitar[ more PROMISE page 5 ]

Tiger, a Ugandan, with Suzy Gillies, President of the African Promise Foundation two years after they initially met at an internally displaced person camp. Courtesy photo


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March 2 , 2012 [3]

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MAPLE VALLEY NATIVE EARNS PROMOTION Tahoma High graduate Danny Evans, who serves in the infantry in the United States Marine Corps, was promoted to the rank of sergeant Feb. 1. Evans has served in the Marine Corps for four and a half years. He is currently deployed to Afghanistan with the 2nd Battalion of the 5th Marine Division. His first tour in the Middle East was with 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Division with a Marine Expedition Unit in 2009, while his second tour was with the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Division, to Afghanistan in 2010. He is the son of Rick and Karen Evans of Maple Valley and the brother of Matt, who graduated from Tahoma in 2004, and Becky, who was a member of Tahoma High’s class of 2011.

worship services but also sees the gorgeous outdoor setting to promote other ways for his congregation to connect with one another and God. “What could happen in this space, the rush BY KRIS HILL of hearing hundreds of voices singing the same khill@maplevalleyreporter.com song or two people in prayer on a bench or a family going on a hike after church,â€? Murray teve Murray has a different idea about said. “I want to create a warm, inviting place church. where people can pursue spirituality outdoors‌ Murray, pastor of Real Life Church which I want it to spill out of the chapel.â€? meets at Kentlake High, has been working to Murray and his staff have done the best they make his vision of church become reality. can to create that environment at Real Life, which was established in Kentlake, using the Performing Arts 1998, bought 90 acres of property near Center for worship then heading Black Diamond about five years ago in to the commons afterward to share order to make his ideas a reality. a meal as well as fellowship, but he A new opportunity arose in Decemwants to go beyond that. ber that surprised Murray and changed Converge NW, formerly Swedish the vision he had for the land near Baptist Conference, has run the camp Black Diamond. for decades. In the fall Converge NW “From the very beginning I’ve wanted launched Adelphia Bible School at to create an environment, I’ve wanted to Lake Retreat Camp and have decided do more than just build a building,â€? he to focus on its mission to develop said. “I wanted people to not just hear “We wanted to leaders. create a place where about God or scripture‌ we wanted As part of the change, Murray expeople to experience Him. We wanted families could come plained, the group’s board of directors together, where the decided to sell the property. to create a place where families could come together, where the community community could They approached Real Life leaders could come together and disconnect come together and in December. from technology and hear God speak disconnect from “They came to us and said, ‘We unto them.â€? technology and hear derstand you have a vision to combine It seems like the opportunity to God speak to them.â€? a church with a camp atmosphere. purchase Lake Retreat Camp, which is Steve Murray Our denomination is going in a difa five minute drive on Kent-Kangley ferent direction and we would like to Road east of Four Corners, would know if you’d like to buy our facility,’â€? fulfill the vision Murray has long had for his Murray said. church. The pastor’s initial reaction was to decline. It And Murray said he and his staff knew church was too far away, Murray said, but then one of would need to change going forward because the church staff members encouraged him to people can download worship music from the drive out for himself and have look. Internet, they don’t have to go to a service to He discovered it was five minutes from Four seek God, so a different approach had to be Corners and may even be closer for many developed. members of his flock than the six minute drive “I need to go to church to experience a to Kentlake. spiritual community,â€? Murray said. “When you “Once I realized it could work, I started find people like that, there’s inclusiveness, there’s bringing people out here,â€? Murray said. “I saw forgiveness.â€? people coming alive. I decided we should at least Lake Retreat Camp and Conference Cenattempt it. I still don’t know how we’re going to ter was established in 1946 by a few Swedish do it.â€? Baptists, Murray explained, who had a vision Several years ago, Murray said, they had of their own about using the Christian camping discussed with previous staff of the camp the experience as a dynamic way of reaching people idea of the property in Black Diamond being an about their faith. extension of Lake Retreat Camp. Since its establishment, the camp has grown “Now we have an opportunity,â€? he said. “I’m to cover 60 acres and 60,000 square feet, with a looking for people who want to help preserve it, number of buildings that can be used for sumpeople who worked here or went to camp here, mer residential camp, business conferences, I believe they’ll come out of the woodwork to church retreats and then some. There is a boat help us renovate it and help us maintain it as a house, a dock on Lake Retreat, a chapel, a dining spiritual place.â€? hall and more. The trick going forward will be finding financMurray envisions renovating the chapel for ing.

Church leaders work toward purchase of Lake Retreat Camp

S

Community Note Contact and submissions: Kris Hill khill@maplevalleyreporter.com khill@covingtonreporter.com or 425-432-1209, ext. 5054

There will be a discussion about developing a public art program for the city from 5:30-7 p.m. on Thursday, March 8 at the Lake Wilderness Lodge.

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The meeting activities will include a presentation by 4Culture on how other communities have structured public art programs and facilitated small group discussions about the possible membership and role of an arts/cultural commission for Maple Valley. The Lodge is located at 22500 SE 248th St. Maple Valley. The meeting will be held in the Maple Room. For more information, contact Willow Fox at 206.205.8024 or Willow.Fox@4culture.org.

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Thus far, Murray said, two friends of his who are pastors at other churches have pledged to help with donations. But, owning a property where the church can hold worship services as well as host its other programs and community groups, is also practical. Murray noted in a document he shared with the Reporter that over the years, Real Life has spent more than $1 million in rent for office space and worship services, in addition to the work it takes to set up and tear down each week. “The camp has infrastructure in place to support virtually all of our needs,� Murray wrote in the document. Real Life staff members have done their due diligence, Murray noted, in checking out the camp and the feasibility of the purchase. The camp would continue to be operated as a separate entity from the church. Groups that currently use it would continue to have access it and Real Life would welcome more groups from the community to use it. But, Murray added, in the attempt to purchase the camp his church will not be able to go it alone. “We want to look at all options,� he said. “We’re looking to the community to help us get creative because it’s beyond what Real Life Church can do by itself. We’re exploring financial options and seeking generous donors, people who could finance this for us.� According to the executive summary document Murray provided, the payment on the camp’s first mortgage is roughly equivalent to what the church now pays in rent, but Real Life will need help for the additional costs that will come the purchase so it isn’t financially overextended. Real Life staff have delivered a letter of intent to purchase Lake Retreat Camp, sent out requests for help with financing, and an offer on the property which includes finance contingencies sent on March 1. Converge NW’s board, according to the executive summary, has set a target date of May 1 to close the sale. And while the purchase of Lake Retreat Camp is attractive because it has all the components Murray has envisioned for his church, particularly when Real Life bought the 90 acres near Black Diamond, that doesn’t mean that land will be abandoned. Currently, it’s home to trails popular with the mountain biking community in the area, and Murray said the church has made a commitment to the community about providing recreation that the staff intends to keep. “Someday we could still build a church building on our 90 acres,� Murray said. “We’ll see. We weren’t expecting this. So, who knows what the next surprise will be.�

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COVINGTON MAPLE VALLEY

LOCAL

New vision of a home for Real Life Church


[4] March 2, 2012 train,� Matheson said. Cities didn’t contribute financially to animal control, which was funded by pet license revenue and heavily subsidized by county funds, Matheson said. But, things changed in 2009 when the interim county executive terminated the contract, which forced negotiation of a new one known as the successor contract. That contract expires Dec. 31 and negotiations

began anew in the fall. Matheson said it was clear early in the negotiation process that a number of cities were simultaneously considering alternatives to the county’s services. Auburn, for example, will definitely strike out on its own and more recently Kirkland as well as Shoreline seem to be quite close to doing the same, Matheson added. Cities located in the north and east portions of the county were pushing for a new cost allocation

formula which would have placed a heavier burden on cities in the southeast, Matheson said. “Our counter argument is the county’s presence of a shelter in Kent causes disproportionately higher system usage here,� Matheson said. “We didn’t think it was fair that the south cities should bear the brunt of that cost.� With deadlines looming for non-binding agreements to be made as well as binding ones coming this summer, it was important to

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brief all three city councils 20 percent of pet owners on the work staff members pay license fees. If everyone had put in the past four paid those fees, Matheson months on developing an stated, animal control alternative to continuing a would pay for itself without contract with the any general county. fund subsidies Matheson outrequired. lined the pros and All three of the cons of sticking city finance direcwith the county tors at the meetcontract as well ings said they as the alternative, didn’t think it was which would have responsible to to be implemented recommend the in nine months, Southeast option giving the elected “There’s nothing at this point. officials much to quite like seeing “To me it’s consider. quite a risk to the power of “Negotiations take on at this three cities. If we were not going time,� said Maple continue with the well for us at all Valley Finance vision of working until we preDirector Tony together to get sented the idea McCarthy. “We’re of an alternative,� things done... we’ll not comfortable be able to get more with the budget.� Matheson said. done down here “To implement And given how the Southeast op- in southeast King lean each city tion by the end of county.� Bill Allison is running, said the year there’s a Maple Valley City long to-do list that Manager David would have to be Johnston, having implemented over enough people to the next few months.� get animal control services Matheson explained up and running would be a the tri-city coalition significant challenge. would cost less than Instead, it would continuing with be wise to take the ANIMAL the contract on a information the long term basis but cities have now would have signifiand start planning cant start up costs. for September 2014, Getting the system when the next round of up and running would be contract negotiations with challenging, however, and the county for animal conwould require contracting trol services would begin. with the Tacoma Humane “We’re setting a stage Society which has its own over the next over the next advantages as well as disad- two years,� Johnston said. vantages. “We’re sending a message to “The cost estimates the county that at least the are highly speculative,� four cities in southeast King Matheson said. “We’ve County are considering never created an animal their options. That’s the bacontrol system and we sis of our recommendation, really won’t be able to pin we could still be a part of those (numbers) down the negotiating game over until we got into the middle the next two years and keep of it. We wouldn’t have it as the county honest, but still an option if it weren’t dokeep our options open.� able but it would require a By the time those refocus of the organization negotiations begin again, to make it happen.� Johnston noted, there will Part of the issue with be data available from cities costs is the fact about 15 to such as Auburn as well as

CONTROL

Federal Way, which started its own animal control service out of its police department in 2010. Armed with that information the cities will be better prepared, Johnston said. All council members at the table expressed support for this strategy. “I think it’s not cost effective to do it at this time,â€? said Covington Councilman Wayne Snoey. “I’m a big fan of regionalism, I’d like to see us partner‌ but I don’t think this is the economy to do it in.â€? Maple Valley Mayor Bill Allison said the regional partnership is “setting a trend.â€? “There’s nothing quite like seeing the power of three cities,â€? Allison said. “If we continue with the vision of working together to get things done‌ we’ll be able to get more done down here in southeast King County.â€? Black Diamond Councilman Ron Taylor asked staff to see if it would be possible to implement an escape clause for the trio of cities if staff are able to put something together before negotiations are set to begin again in 2014. “I do think that we would serve ourselves better by doing it ourselves,â€? Taylor said. “I’m not sure if we could do it by the end of the year.â€? Covington Mayor Margaret Harto suggested working to step up marketing efforts to increase the number of pet owners who pay license fees while Maple Valley Councilwoman Linda Johnson suggested asking the county to offer a license fee amnesty day to encourage pet owners to get licenses for their animal companions. “As much as anything, you’ve gotten King County’s attention that they’re not they only game in town,â€? said Black Diamond Council member Craig Goodwin.

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March 2 , 2012 [5]

XXXDPWJOHUPOSFQPSUFSDPNtXXXNBQMFWBMMFZSFQPSUFSDPN [ PROMISE from page 1] ian effort for the people of Uganda as well as way to raise awareness about the hardships the people of Uganda have endured at the hands of the LRA. APF is composed entirely of volunteers, most of whom are from the Maple Valley area. On its website, APF sells beads and necklaces created by northern Ugandan women, which are also sold at local craft bazaars in cities like Issaquah and Bellevue. While some of the money gives the women a source of income, the profits generated from the sales are used to provide Ugandan children — especially girls — the opportunity to go to school. At first, Gillies sold beads made by Ugandan women to help support a child her family sponsored — and later adopted — but then realized there was not only a strong marker for the beads, but they helped increase awareness about Uganda. “As much as I love donations, I think the beads are a way to connect with people on the other side

of the world,� she said. “Every woman has stories about (their experiences with) the LRA.� Gillies and other APF volunteers are planning a two week trip to Uganda in July, running a soccer camp and building huts, among those volunteers have been her own children, including her 14-year-old son, Benson, as well as her 12-year-old daughter Brinlee, who has been saving up since she was four to pay for the trip. Gillies’s involvement in Uganda first started in 2005 when she worked in Kent with World Relief, an international organization that deals with the needy on a local level. There, she helped a refugee family from Somalia, which

[ STORMS from page 1] side. Now that the storm is over, they are going back to remove the debris from the roadsides, which has necessitated traffic control and flagging on the roads. “We’re hoping to have that done within the next couple of weeks, but I’m not sure of a date yet,� Vondran said. “It’s just getting all the pieces coordinated.� In Maple Valley, Public Works Director Steve Clark said

suffered from malnourishment and malaria. This led her to do research on other African nations. What caught her attention most was Uganda which at the time had just ended the longest running civil war in the continent’s history. The civil war started when the LRA, led by Joseph Kony, sought to overthrow the Ugandan government and establish a theocratic state. In addition to more than 2 million people displaced during the ensuing war, the LRA is also believed to have abducted a total of 66,000 children to fight as child soldiers. This practice led to “night commuters,� Ugandan children in remote areas who walked up to 12 miles to spend the night in towns where they would

be safe until daylight. Gillies said when she discovered all of this she was appalled she hadn’t heard of it in the news. “I thought, ‘This is going on and I don’t know anything about it. I’m not doing as much as I should be,’� she said. “When you know and have knowledge of something you have a responsibility. It’s finding something outside of yourself.� After the north was stabilized and the LRA was ultimately defeated, Gillies went to Uganda as it began recovering from the aftermath. “I didn’t know why, but I just felt like I had to go,� she said. Tiger’s impassioned words at the IDP camp during the trip, she said,

the remaining cleanup work is mostly concentrated over by Lake Wilderness Park, where a substantial amount of trees were damaged due to the heavy snow. He also said they have contracted with several logging companies to come and cut up the debris. He added, however, that work will need to be done on equipment and buildings that were damaged and are in need of repair. According to Clark, the city of Maple Valley has insur-

had a profound effect on her. “It was, aside from the birth of my children and my wedding day, the most impactful moment of my life,� she said. “I realized that I was put on the Earth to help people. It made me realize that there is something bigger than myself.� Having observed a noticeable lack of opportunities for girls, she came back in 2009 with an American girls soccer team under a project called “Goals for Girls,� which she founded with Jackie Skinner, a soccer coach who had lived in Uganda for a summer. Gillies also met former child soldiers, many of whom had extreme difficulties recovering from their ordeals. Forced into

the army, they were forced to kill, while the girls were used as sex slaves by their commanders. Some of them had no hands, while others had had their lips or ears cut off as punishment for their disobedience. Gillies even encountered one woman who had been paralyzed after her children had been forced by the LRA at gunpoint to break her spine. Despite their pasts, Gillies said, they have an unusual degree of faith and ability to find joy in their circumstances. “These people rely on God in a way the people in America don’t know how,� she said. “It kind of goes to show you that wealth can’t buy you happiness.� To learn more about the African Promise Foundation, go to http://africanpromisefoundation.org.

Reach TJ Martinell at 425432-1209 ext. 5052. To comment on this story go to maplevalleyreporter. com.

ance which can cover some of the costs, while simultaneously staff has submitted estimates of cost claims to King County Emergency Management. In King County, there was an estimated $6.2 million in damages during the snow storm, according to Clark.

Reach TJ Martinell at 425-432-1209 ext. 5052. To comment on this story go to covingtonreporter.com.


[6] March 2, 2012

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� Q U O T E O F T H E W E E K : �Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.� William Butler Yeats

Technology and education

In some ways public school education hasn’t changed a bit since I graduated from high school nearly 16 years ago. And in many ways it has changed significantly particularly when it comes to how technology is used in the classroom. Overhead projectors have been replaced with interactive white boards, document cameras and lessons presented via Power Point presentations. In the fall I was walking around at Kentlake High and noticed teachers using iPads to take attendance. It hit me then that must not be the only way teachers are adopting the latest technology tools in their classrooms. But, at the time I was really busy with a zillion other things, I had done a series on teens and technology at the start of the school year so I put the idea in the back of my brain. In early February TJ Martinell mentioned to me a story idea someone from the Tahoma School District had pitched him. Again the use of iPads — the tablet computer Apple unveiled just two years ago which clearly capitalizes on the success of the iPhone and iPod Touch — in the classroom came up. So, I mentioned to TJ some things I had observed in Kent schools such as the use of iPads, as well as the fact the Kent School District deployed laptops to all ninth graders at the start of the school year. It occurred to me that this could be the foundation of a series about how teachers and students are using the latest technology in classKris Hill Staff Writer

OUR CORNER

COVINGTON MAPLE VALLEY

OPINION

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Public notices ensure openness This editorial is provided by Sound Publishing. Citizens should be aware of — and opposed to — House Bill 2801 and the provisions that would allow local governments to cease publishing public notices in their local newspapers. The presumed cost savings to local government is in fact false economy — there is a hidden and very dangerous cost. In trying to save money, local governments would curtail access to the legislative process, and ensure that fewer — rather than more — citizens know what their representatives are up to. The publishing of public notices in newspapers of record dates to 1789, when the first Congress required publication of its bills, orders, resolutions and votes in at least three generally available newspapers. The founders recognized that government should not be the gatekeepers of its own information. So their purpose was to require government to report its actions to citizens in a medium independent of government influence or control: the newspaper. It was good policy then and it remains good policy today. Publishing legal notices in a newspaper of

rooms in Kent and Tahoma schools. We talked it over. TJ started doing interviews. He enlisted Sarah Kehoe, a staff writer from the Kent Reporter, to help him with the Kent schools. Hopefully this series will answer questions like: t8IBUJTJUFYBDUMZUIBUUFDIOPMPHZMFWZ money is used for? t)PXEPUFBDIFSTVTFUIFMBUFTUUFDIOPMPHZUP impart lessons? t8IJDIUFBDIFSTBSFVTJOHUFDIOPMPHZ  t8IBULJOEPGHBEHFUTBSFUIFZVTJOHBOE how? t)PXEPFTUFDIOPMPHZIFMQUFBDIFSTUFBDI better? t)PXEPFTJUIFMQTUVEFOUTMFBSOCFUUFS t)PXXJMMUIFJODSFBTFEVTFPGUFDIOPMPHZ help students out in the real world?

I’m sure some of the answers to these questions will surprise you. From what TJ has told me thus far after he’s done interviews, there are things going on in classrooms that I’ve found surprising, things that I’ve thought, ‘Wow, that is so cool!’ The first part of the series, which will run March 9, will talk about how teachers are using technology. The second part, which will run a week later, will look at how students use technology. We have, OK I admit it was my brilliant idea, come up with the name “Cutting Edge Clasroom� for the series. One of our fabulous creative department staff members has designed a cool banner that will run across the top of page 3 above the story. From here TJ and Sarah will do the rest. I think we will all be pleased with the results.

record ensures that decisions related to public EFCU PSEJOBODFTBOEMBXT [POJOH UBYBUJPO and quality of life — all matters of compelling and perpetual public interest — are made with transparency. Legal notices empower the public to get involved in the process. And they contribute to a reservoir of archived material in a form that cannot be altered, changed, hacked, hidden or manipulated after the fact. This would simply not be true of notices pubMJTIFEFYDMVTJWFMZPOMJOF In publishing public notices in newspapers of record, local government acknowledges that government itself carries the burden of keeping citizens informed, and that it will not shift that burden to the citizens themselves to go hunting for information. To that end, the local, general-interest newspaper remains the vehicle with the widest reach to the widest cross-section of the community. And we can prove it. Sound Publishing, the owner of this newspaper, alone reaches 700,000 Washington households through our print publications. Our colleagues from newspaper organizations around the state maintain commensurately broad distribution within their own communities. This is not “theoretical� reach, a “potential� audience that may or may not find its way to notices posted on a government website. This is actual reach, to readers who are active and interested and engaged in the community around them – and most certainly in local government affairs.

Not all citizens have computers, or smartphones, and not all have access to the web. Indeed, there are cost barriers to entry into, and participation in, today’s world of digital communication. But anyone – everyone – can at any time go down to the public library or the coffee shop, pick up the community newspaper and find out through the public notices what their government is up to. Affordable, egalitarian and very popular, general interest newspapers provide precisely what government needs most – a direct and demonstrable conduit to its citizens. This issue really comes down to a philosophical question: Should government take its information to the people, or should government make the people come looking for that information, through a maze of agency and departmental websites? We believe – and we are confident Washington citizens agree — that government at all levels has an affirmative obligation to take its information to the people — to make that FYUSBFČPSU UPFOTVSFUIBUQVCMJDOPUJDFTBSF not just “available,� but also widely seen and widely read. House Bill 2801 flouts that obligation, and it should be rejected. The Legislature had the wisdom to dismiss similar legislation last session, and should demonstrate that same wisdom today.

Sound Publishing


March 2 , 2012 [7]

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Lila Henderson, Executive Director Staff and Board Members of Maple Valley Food Bank and Emergency Services

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Maple Valley Food Bank and Emergency Services staff and Board of Directors would like to extend our heartfelt thanks to the local businesses, community organizations, schools, churches and citizens who helped bring holiday cheer to local families. We are blessed with an extraordinarily generous community! Our Holiday Meals and Children’s Christmas Gift programs were huge successes as we continue to meet an increased demand. Recipients consistently received your gifts with smiles, hugs, even tears of gratitude. Through the donations we received 551 Thanksgiving and 619 Christmas holiday family feasts were provided for our clients to take and prepare in the comfort of their own homes. These delicious dinners came complete with traditional trimmings including whole turkeys, dressing, potatoes, cranberries, fresh eggs, produce, dairy, pies and the joyful goodwill of supportive volunteers who distributed them! With the generous support of our community, we were also able to create, stock and staff a unique and festive gift center with thousands of new toys and gifts from which registered clients chose items for their children. Over a two-day period, at least four gifts per child plus stocking stuffers were provided to brighten Christmas for 1,009 of our young neighbors from birth to age 15. In preparation for the events, a variety of our familiar collection bins, barrels, flyers, turkey bucks, gift tags, trees and wreaths could be found in businesses and churches all around the greater Maple Valley and Covington areas. Our business supporters include: Bank of America – Wilderness Village & Covington Esplanade branches, BECU – MV Safeway branch, Chevron – Wilderness Village,

City Perk Coffee, Cutter’s Point Coffee – Covington Esplanade, Fire Departments of Maple Valley & Kent, Four Corners Veterinary Clinic, Johnson’s Home and Garden, Junior Junction Day School, Key Bank – Four Corners, Kindercare – Covington, Lake Meridian & Maple Valley locations, Kinderswimmer, King County Library branches of Covington & MV, La Petite Academy, office of Tom Lee, DDS, MV City Hall, MV Community Center, MV Fitness, MultiCare – Covington, Outpatient Physical Therapy – Covington & MV locations, MV Remax, Surfrider Coffee Company, Thrive Community Fitness, UPS Stores – Covington Esplanade & Four Corners, and Village Coffee. Our thanks to many local churches for their faithful support not only during the holidays, but year around. These include: Alliance Bible, Cornerstone United Methodist, Generational Hope Christian Center, MV Presbyterian, MV Church of the Nazarene, New Community Church, New Life Church, Peace Lutheran, Real Life Church, Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran, St. Barbara, and St. George Episcopal. Thanks to our schools in both the Tahoma and Kent districts who, through their teachers’ organizations, PTAs, administrative offices, bus drivers, service or leadership clubs, bands, cheerleaders, dancers, thespians and various other activity groups, hosted food and gift drives on our behalf. Our gratitude to all those involved with the following donations or drives: MV Tree Lighting, MV Holiday Fire Engine, Lake Wilderness Country Club Lights, Bluebills, Bluebirds, Backcountry Horsemen, Costco IT group, Covington Place Senior Apartments, Dance Arts, Data Works Consulting, Friends of Vine Maple Place, Gaylord Security, Kiwanis, Lake Wilderness Villa, Pacific Outdoor Products, Uppercrust Cleaning

...local business

David L. Moe, Attorney at Law

t8JMMT 1PXFSTPG"UUPSOFZ -JWJOH5SVTUT 1SFOVQUJBM"HSFFNFOUT t"EPQUJPOT (VBSEJBOTIJQT 5SVTUBOE&TUBUF"ENJOJTUSBUJPO t&TUBUF1MBOOJOHGPS*OEJWJEVBMT 'BNJMJFT BOE#VTJOFTT0XOFST t--$T $PSQPSBUJPOT 0QFSBUJOH"HSFFNFOUT #VZ4FMM"HSFFNFOUT t3FBM&TUBUF-BX 1FSTPOBM*OKVSZ8SPOHGVM%FBUI$MBJNT Over 30 years in the same Maple Valley location

(425) 432-1277 Wilderness Village, 22128 SE 237th St, Maple Valley, WA 98038

CHLAMYDIA ON THE RISE There’s sobering news about chlamydia, the sexually transmitted disease that currently tops the charts as the most common STD in this country. Not only have more cases been reported to the CDC than ever before, but the belief is that there may not have been an increase in the number of people with the disease, but a better way of screening. This means that many people with the disease, which sometimes has no noticeable symptoms, may not even know it. Both men and women with the disease may have painful urination, anal discharge, pain during intercourse for women, and testicular pain for men. Chlamydia can do longterm damage to a woman’s reproductive organs, leaving her unable to have children. Chlamydia can be treated with antibiotics. Talk to your health care provider about screening for the disease. It is not easy to tell if you are infected with chlamydia as symptoms are not always apparent. But when they do occur, they are usually noticeable within one to three weeks of contact. If you have chlamydia, your doctor will recommend your partner(s) be treated as well to prevent reinfection and further spread of the disease. If you have questions or would like an appointment with a health care provider at Southlake Clinic, please call us at (253) 395-1972. We are located at 27005 168th Place SE in Covington. Saturday appointments are now available. 577637

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Thank you for holiday efforts

a special THANK YOU to our core group of volunteers who come in each week throughout the year. In December, you logged almost 1,300 hours for daily operations. The number of families receiving food bank services now hovers at around 90 each operating day. Your dedication allows us all to serve our neighbors. Finally, we extend our thanks to the Reporter for helping us to publicize our programming, needs and donors.

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E-MAIL: dbox@maplevalleyreporter.com. MAIL: Letters, Covington/Maple Valley Reporter, 22035 SE. Wax Road Maple Valley, WA. 98038 FAX: 425-432-1888

Co, Water Gardens, and Wilderness Village Apartments. Over 1,500 hours of volunteer time were recorded for our special holiday projects alone! Volunteers of all ages and abilities came together to collect, sort, haul, organize, clean, set up, decorate, distribute‌and the list goes on. Due to the incredible response to our needs this holiday season it is impossible to include a complete list of donor names. Please know that your generous offerings are greatly appreciated. We continue to be encouraged and inspired by your demonstrations of care and commitment to our community. We would like to extend

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â—? LETTERS YOUR OPINION COUNTS:


[8] March 2, 2012

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How every home project turns into a time warp bring as many supplies as they need to work on their project, leave it overnight and come back the next day to continue working on them. Dinners are catered, snack are shared. It started at noon on Friday, went until midnight, then started at 9 a.m. on Saturday and went until

midnight. That’s 27 hours of “uninterrupted� time. I put uninterrupted in quotes because that only happens in that parallel world that doesn’t suffer from the time warp of real life. But what is it that makes us think we can get all that we had planned finished in time? Have we ever gotten that much finished before? Do we think sitting in a room with 40 other people we won’t interact with anyone? Will we not stop for sustenance? Sure I got a few things done. I completed our 2011 family photo album. Gretchen Leigh

Living with Gleigh

I think when we begin a project we enter some sort of time warp. Did you ever notice how much you think you can get done is nowhere near how much you actually get done? I just wrapped up two whole days of working on scrapbooking projects at my church’s craft and hobby retreat. I ended up feeling more like I was yelling “Retreat!� “Retreat!� Once a year our church holds this retreat allowing people to

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That is an accomplishment, although I only had one month left of the year to finish. Then I got three years done on my oldest daughter’s “Tot to Teen� album. Three years might sound like a lot, but the whole album was complete with embellishments and I only had to add one picture a year for about ten events. You might wonder why I’m complaining; I did get something done. But what I planned to get done, what I packed in to get done, far outweighs my accomplishments. Friday night I not only brought my family photo album to finish, I brought my personal baby album and some loose pictures of my childhood to put into a photo safe album. I figured I’d get it all done. When I finally finished the family album at 7:30 p.m., I knew I couldn’t finish my personal album, so I packed up and went home. “Retreat!� I figured I’d rest up for my next project. Saturday I brought five huge, double boxes of pictures. I figured it would be a snap and I could simultaneously work on both my daughters’ albums.

But not only did the real life time warp apply, it was too confusing to manage both albums at the same time. When my family joined me for church at 5:30pm, I had expected to send several boxes of pictures I was finished with home with them. I hadn’t even made it through the first box, which was 1995-2000. I should have sent them home with the latter years. But I was still in denial of my abilities. After all it was only 6:30 p.m. when they headed home, surely in five and a half more hours I would be able to complete the rest of the years, even though in eight hours I’d only complete two years of one child’s album. There’s a superhuman trapped inside all of us who makes us continue to over-plan for ourselves. I have actually started major remodeling projects the week before a major holiday. I remember the Thanksgiving I had to call my girlfriend and beg her to have Thanksgiving at her house. I had decided the weekend before would be a good time to tear apart my younger daughter’s room and repaint and reorganize. When Thanks-

giving loomed over me, my daughter’s bedroom was still piled in my living room. I’ve had a birthday party in the midst of a kitchen remodel. We used plywood for the kitchen counter, the bathrooms for water, and my girlfriend took all the dirty dishes home in a laundry basket to run through her dishwasher. I could go on with the list. At least I’m consistent and I’m not the only one. Others were hauling away piles of supplies after minimal accomplishment. What if next year I gather just enough supplies to accomplish a conservative amount of a project? But I probably won’t. Because as soon as I left the event, the project time warp dissipated and won’t show itself until next year or until the next task for which I will ultimately over-plan.

Gretchen Leigh is a stayat-home mom who lives in Covington. She is committed to writing about the humor amidst the chaos of a family. You can read more of her writing and her daily blog on her website livingwithgleigh.com.

Community Notes Do you need extra income? Let me help you whip up some extra cash!

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The Greater Maple Valley Unincor- The Maple Valley Public Safety Oversight Committee will hold a porated Area Council will hold its regular monthly meeting on Mon- special meeting on Tuesday, March 6 at 6 p.m., at Maple Valley City Hall, day, March 5 from 7-9:30 p.m. at Community Development Conferthe Maple Valley Fire Station. ence Room. The station is located at the It is located at 22017 SE Wax Road, northeast corner of the Suite 200, Maple Valley, WA, intersection at SouthThe meeting is to consider east 231 Street and COMMUNITY the discussion of the Public state Route 169. Safety Service Delivery Analysis Report. All members of the public are invited to attend. BUDGET ADVISORY Our special guest will be King MEETING MARCH 7 County Budget Director Dwight Dively. The new Covington Budget Priorities Advisory Committee will hold its first Members of the public can address the Area Council on any local meeting on Wednesday, March 7 at 6:30 p.m. at Covington City Council issue during the open comment period at the start of the meeting. Chambers. The Council Chambers is located at The Area Council is locally elected 16720 SE 271st Street, Covington. and represents all unincorporated Agenda information will be posted area residents living in the Tathe Friday prior to the above meethoma School District. ing on the city of Covington website Please submit any questions or atwww.covingtonwa.gov. comments to GMVUAC, P.O. Box For further information contact 101, Maple Valley, WA 98038, or Finance Director Rob Hendrickson at to gmvac_chair@hotmail.com. 253-638-1110 ext. 2236.

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March 2 , 2012 [9]


[10] March 2, 2012

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STUDENT ART ON DISPLAY

In celebration of Youth Art Month, the seventh annual Student Art Show is coming to the City of Covington during the month of March.. The event showcases the work of local students by displaying their artwork at various locations within the business community. This collaborative effort by students, teachers, art docents and business owners is presented by the City of Covington Arts Commission. Early entries have been received from Grass Lake Elementary School, Mattson Middle School and Tahoma

High School. Do not miss the work of student artists while shopping, working, dining or doing business in Covington! The participating businesses for 2012 are: Arby’s, Bank of America, Benjarong Thai Cuisine, Covington Wellness Center, Covington City Hall, Cutter’s Point Coffee at Fred Meyer, Cutter’s Point Coffee at Covington Esplanade, Daniel Ross Salon, Nail Gallery & Spa, Pinnacle Physical Therapy, U-Top-It Yogurt and Valley Vehicle Licensing.

MARCH CALENDAR OF EVENTS

YOUTH SUMMIT CONFERENCE AND POOL PARTY Come share your thoughts on what Covington needs for teens on Friday, April 6! Join the discussion and help set goals at the Youth Summit Conference from 6:30-8:30 p.m., followed by a teen pool party from 8:30-10:30 p.m. This conference is open to teens aged 13-19 and will be held in the Covington City Hall Community Room. Snacks and beverages will be served! Teens who attend the conference will also enjoy a pool party afterwards at the Covington Aquatic Center with pizza, soda, games and music! This event is sponsored by the City of Covington in partnership with Project U(th). Questions? Call or text 206-795-6559, email barry@ projectuth.org, or find it on Facebook: U(th).

FREE TAX PREP

There is still an opportunity for Covington residents to get help with tax preparation. This program has qualified volunteers that provide free tax preparation services, which will be available on Wednesdays from 5-8 p.m. from March 5 through April 9. Please keep in mind that appointments are required. To schedule an appointment for individual tax preparations, please call Victoria at 253-638-1110 x2237. This service is located at Covington City Hall, Suite 102, 16720 SE 271st Street, Covington (next to Petco).

ARBOR DAY

Join the City in celebrating Arbor Day on Tuesday, March 27 as we plant two Japanese cherry trees in conjunction with the annual Japanese exchange student visit in the Kent School District. The planting will take place in the afternoon (exact time to be determined) at Friendship Park, 15808 SE 254th in Covington. In addition to celebrating Arbor Day, 2012 marks the 10th year that Covington has received the Tree City USA designation. The exact time and more information will be posted soon on the City’s website at www. CovingtonWA.gov.

03/01 – Planning Commission Meeting, 6:30 p.m. 03/08 – Human Services Commission Meeting, 6:30 p.m. 03/08 – Arts Commission Meeting, 6:30 p.m. 03/13 – City Council Special Meeting, 6 p.m. 03/13 – City Council Regular Meeting, 7 p.m. 03/15 – Planning Commission Meeting, 6:30 p.m. 03/20 – City Council Joint Meeting with Covington Water District, 6 p.m. 03/21 – Parks Commission Meeting, 6:30 p.m. 03/22 – Economic Development Council Meeting, 6:30 p.m. 03/27 – City Council Special Meeting, 6 p.m. 03/27 – City Council Regular Meeting, 7 p.m. For more information on any of these events, please contact Karla Slate at (253) 638-1110 x2234 or kslate@covingtonwa.gov A community newsletter produced by the City of Covington for residents and businesses.

588380

March 2012

City of Covington: Unmatched Quality of Life

16720 SE 271st Street, Suite 100, Covington, WA 98042 Tel: 253.638.1110 Fax: 253.638.1122 Website: www.ci.covington.wa.us

Mayor

Council Members

Margaret Harto

Mark Lanza, David Lucavish, Marlla Mhoon, James A. Scott, Wayne Snoey

Mayor Pro Tem

Jeff Wagner

This page produced and paid for by City of Covington


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March 2 , 2012 [11]

Paid Advertisement

City of Covington UPDATE March 2012

COVINGTON AQUATIC CENTER NEWS-SPLASH COVINGTON AQUATIC CENTER CELEBRATES 35th YEAR ANNIVERSARY WITH A FREE PUBLIC SWIM! On March 3, 1977 the Covington Aquatic Center (formerly Tahoma Pool) opened its doors. During these past 35 years, the pool has been a much-loved part of the community as the place many of us learned to swim, the home of our local swim teams, and the place where many of us played on both hot days and rainy days! In recognition of 35 great years, Covington Aquatic Center will have a brief ceremony and FREE Public Swim on Saturday March 3, 2012 from 1-3 p.m. Please come and help us celebrate!

LIFEGUARD TRAINING CLASSES BEGIN MARCH 31st – REGISTER TODAY! Did you know that all lifeguards at beaches and pools must be certified? If you are interested in working as a lifeguard, this class is for you! Participants who successfully complete this course earn certifications in American Red Cross Lifeguarding, First Aid, and CPR-AED training. The class meets Saturday 3/31, 10:00am-noon and Monday 4/2 – Friday 4/6, 8:00am-3:00pm each day. Contact the Aquatic Center for more information or to register.

FOR MORE INFORMATION For more information about the Covington Aquatic Center or to register for activities, visit www.covingtonwa.gov/cac, call 425-413POOL(7665), or visit us at 18230 SE 240th St, Covington WA 98042 (Next to Tahoma High School).

What has changed at the pool between 1977 and 2012? WE’RE YOUR SWIMMING LESSON EXPERTS! Over 3,500 students become better swimmers in Covington Aquatic Center’s lesson program each year! We understand that parents want the best for their children and swimming lessons they can trust. This is why we offer the gold-standard of swim instruction – the American Red Cross Learn-to-Swim program. It combines the best instruction with a strong emphasis on drowning prevention and water safety. Classes are offered year-round for all ages and all abilities. Our instructors are top-notch, and maintain nationally recognized certifications as both swim instructors and lifeguards. Learn from the best and register today! PUBLIC SWIMS ARE FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY!!! Have you checked out our rope-swing recently? How about our “Speedy McBlue� waterslide or our “classic� diving board? During weekday Public Swims, we also put out our “magic carpet�. During weekend Public Swims, you can try to climb to the top of “Big Red� – our inflatable octopus. As you can tell, Public Swims are major fun! Don’t miss out. Bring your family and your friends!

Public Swim Times Sundays........................................................... 1:00-2:00pm Tuesdays and Thursdays.................................. 7:00-8:00pm Saturdays........................................................ 1:00-2:00pm Saturdays........................................................ 2:00-3:00pm

588382

Public Swims are also offered on some non-school days. Please visit our website for the schedule of these No-School Public Swims.

This page produced and paid for by City of Covington


[12] March 2, 2012

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New agreement addresses affordable housing Maple Valley has agreed to partner with other cities on a joint effort to bring more affordable housing to southeast King County. At its Feb. 27 meeting, the City Council authorized City Manager David Johnston to enter the city into the South End Area Regional Coalition for Housing (SEARCH). According to the Feb. 21 meeting agenda, SEARCH is designed to “foster efforts to provide affordable housing by combining public funding with private-sector resources.� Other cities in the agreement include Algona, Auburn, Black Diamond, Covington and Enumclaw.

Additionally, SEARCH “Right now it’s going to would work directly with serve as a forum for cities to private developers, nondiscuss affordable housing profit organizations and and addressing those needs financial institutions to demanded by the public,â€? implement affordJohnston said. able housing projects. Johnston stated Their assistance that Eastside cities would include have similar intertechnical advice local agreements and making surplus but SEARCH will sites available for be tailored to fit affordable housing. the specific needs David Johnston SEARCH will also of southeast King provide recommenCounty cities. dations to the cities “The services regarding public funding there (on the Eastside) are a for affordable housing on heck of a lot different than both a regional and local it is here,â€? he said. “The dylevel. namic on the south end is Johnston stated in a totally different. Historically phone interview that the housing has been a lot more interlocal agreement will affordable‌so we don’t allow the cities to act as a have that same dynamic.â€? single entity. Auburn Community

Service Manager Michael Hurst expressed similar views in a telephone interview. “By joining together cities in an interlocal agreements, we are able to address a variety of topics from development to transpiration to growth management expectations as a larger and boarder community,� Hurst said. “We are not able to merely be a small community of a limited number of people, but eight cities with hundreds of thousands of people where we can sit at a table where money is dispersed and make a broader application and provide a consistency in the development of affordable housing.� Hurst also said that the cities have similar situations when it comes to growth and development. “In a number of instances, south and southeast King County have had what is now termed ‘affordable housing’ for 40-50 years,�

he said. “We have a very different animal down here than, say, what the Eastside is working on and what Seattle is responsible for developing. We have existing housing and our issue is really more preservation.� Although Hurst said SEARCH will use the King County Housing Authority’s definition of affordable housing, the definition is not included in the interlocal agreement, something which Johnston said will need to be resolved when deciding what qualifies as affordable housing. “That’s one of the issues we need to talk about,� he stated. “It’s one of those things where we have to have an understanding of what affordable housing is. There are some people who argue that the recent recession took care of that problem.� SEARCH will be comprised of a quarterly executive board and a citi-

Community Note WASTEMOBILE STOPS IN COVINGTON MARCH 9 All King County and city residents can safely dispose of old car batteries, oil, paint thinner and many other household hazardous items at no cost when the Wastemobile begins its 23rd year of service with a stop in Covington, March 9-11. The Wastemobile will be in the parking lot of Fire Station No. 75, 15635 SE 272nd St., from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Residents can drop off household hazardous waste items including pesticides, oil-based paints, automotive products (oil, antifreeze, auto batteries, etc.), fluorescent bulbs/tubes and other items free of charge. “There is no charge to drop off unwanted household hazardous waste, because the service is paid for through garbage and sewer utility fees,� said Jay Watson, program administrator. Residents are helping safeguard the environment and public health by properly disposing of hazardous these materials and keeping them out of drains and landfills.

zen advisory council. The executive board will consist of one member from each city and presided over by a chair. The citizen advisory board will provide advice to the executive board on land or money resource allocation for these projects. It will have at least 12 members who are nominated and chosen by the executive board. According to its website, King County’s definition of affordable housing “assumes that no more than 25 percent of a homeowner’s income goes to mortgage payments (exclusive of tax and insurance costs), and that no more than 30 percent of a renter’s income goes to rent payments.�

Reach TJ Martinell at 425432-1209 ext. 5052. To comment on this story go to maplevalleyreporter. com

Created in 1989, the Wastemobile was the first program of its kind in the nation. It is operated by King County Solid Waste Division as part of the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program, and travels throughout the county from the spring through fall. For south King County residents, a convenient alternative to the Wastemobile is the household hazardous waste collection site in the northwest parking lot of the Auburn SuperMall, 1101 SuperMall Way, near Sports Authority. It operates every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Looking for reusable household products? The Wastemobile provides free products to the public, such as oil-based paint, stain and primer, plus wood care and cleaning products. These products are subject to availability, and residents sign a release form prior to receiving the materials. For more information about disposal, including acceptable materials and quantity limits, call the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program’s Hazards Line at 206-2964692, Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., except holidays. Recorded information is available after hours, or by visiting the Wastemobile website at http://www.lhwmp.org/ home/HHW/wastemobile.aspx.

Changing the myth of scary dentistry, one smile at a time... Are bad teeth hereditary?

Keith E. McDonald, DMD

Cavities are not just caused by a lack of brushing and flossing or by eating too much candy. A genetic predisposition to cavities can be passed from parent to child. These genetic predispositions include enamel strength, saliva acidity and intraoral bacteria composition. For more information about how to keep your child’s mouth healthy, visit us online at www.akidsplacedentistry.com

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BY TJ MARTINELL tmartinell@maplevalleyreporter.com


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Kentwood bounced by Garfield

SPORTS

COVINGTON MAPLE VALLEY

CASSIDY MEYERS CONQUERS AT MAT CLASSIC Kentwood junior Cassidy Meyers conquered the 118 bracket in the girls tournament at Mat Classic XXIV Feb. 17-18 at the Tacoma Dome. Meyers started out with a technical fall over Olivia Adams of Blaine, pinned Mariana Alvarez of Royal in the second round, narrowly beat Aika Mitchell of Lakeside 8-7 in the semifinals then defeated Taylor Graham of Burlington Edison 4-1 in the final. Meyers placed sixth at state as a freshman and fourth last year. Check out the March 9 issue for an in-depth feature on Meyers.

March 2 , 2012 [13]

Conquerors come up short against Bulldogs in state regional playoff game BY KRIS HILL

khill@covingtonreporter.com

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one of the little things went Kentwood’s way on Feb. 23 against Garfield in the regional round of the boys 4A state basketball tournament at Juanita High. Garfield raced out to a 19-10 lead in the first quarter and though Kentwood battled back, the Conquerors just couldn’t find a way to build on the leads they got against the Bulldogs, losing 63-59. Kentwood had strategies about the little things, head coach Brian Davis explained in an email on Monday. “Against Garfield, often times you go into games like that with specific ideas about keys to the game like controlling the boards, winning the transition battle, and maximizing possessions,� Davis wrote. “For the majority of the game we did a great job. Against a good team like us, or Garfield you must win those areas at critical times. Unfortunately on Friday, those critical moments usually went to them.� Early in the second quarter Austin Benson got

the bucket and the foul. He converted the three point play at the line to cut the lead to 22-17. Taylor Jones drove baseline on the next possession to cut it to three followed by a bucket from Isaiah Malvar to trim the lead to one. With 1:15 left in the first half Malvar took it down the floor in transition and tied the score at 25-25 but Garrett Hopper of Garfield drained a three with 14 seconds on the clock to give the Bulldogs a 28-25 advantage at halftime. Much of the second was a battle of back and forth between the Bulldogs and the Conks. There were eight lead changes and five ties in the game. During the first four minutes of the fourth quarter Kentwood struggled to score. Jones scored with 3:51 left to tie it at 49-49, then Garfield turned the ball over, followed by a bucket and free throw by Austin Weiher to give Kentwood a 52-49 lead. From there, though, Garfield’s Trevaunte Williams and Tucker Haymond took over. Williams had eight of his 16 points in the fourth quarter. Haymond led all

scorers with 19 in the game. Both players are juniors and both are listed at 6-foot-5. Pierre Wright added 12 points for the Bulldogs. “I thought it was a well played game with a high level of energy, tremendous atmosphere, and competitiveness,� Davis wrote. “Both teams really sold out and that is what you want to see.� Jeremy Smith led Kentwood with 18 points, Malvar had 10, Benson chipped in eight and Jones had six. It was a disappointing end to a strong season for the Conks but Davis was proud of the team. “The season went very well,� Davis wrote. “The guys really came on down the stretch of the season (the) last 15 games, last two weeks. Winning a league title, winning 18 games, getting to ‘state’ (regionals) are all great accomplishments. I was really impressed with how our seniors were tremendous leaders and really competed as a unit to show how much it meant to them. They provided great examples for the underclassmen to follow.�

Reach Kris Hill at khill@ covingtonreporter.com or 425-432-1209 ext. 5054. To comment on this story go to www.covingtonreporter.com.

Kentwood’s Austin Benson puts up a shot over Garfield’s Demario Hall in a state regional game Feb. 25. DENNIS BOX, The Reporter To view a slide show go to www.maplevalleyreporter.com and to buy photos go to the Web site and click on the photo reprints tab.


[14] March 2, 2012

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Jackson overpowers Kentwood in regional Timberwolves dominate second quarter against Conquerors en route to 50-37 win pointer put Jackson up by 13 points at halftime, 26-13. Kentwood struggled Kentwood’s girls basketto get going offensively ball team just couldn’t stop and had just one player in Jackson in a state regional double figures, sophomore playoff game on Feb. 25 at Alycea DeLong, who led Kent-Meridian. the Conks with 13. Jackson had a four While the Conks point lead going into were able to make GIRLS the second quarter some headway and that’s when offensively in the the Timberwolves second half it wasn’t stepped it up, outenough as well as scoring the Conquerors their struggles at the 12-3 in the period en route charity stripe going 2-for-8 to a 50-37 victory. from the free throw line Freshman Brooke as a team in the first two Kingma scored all six of her quarters. points in the second quarter Senior Maddison Rankin, when she nailed a pair of who typically chips in threes near the end of the double digit scoring with first half. The second three BY KRIS HILL

khill@covingtonreporter.com

HOOPS

a handful of three pointers, scored three points for Kentwood — all three from the free throw line. Kate Kramer and Sarah Toeaina, both sophomores, added seven points apiece. Meanwhile, sophomore Kelli Kingma put up 12 points, while senior Kristin Stoffel led all scorers with 14 for Jackson. Kentwood loses two seniors — Rankin and Alexis Berrysmith — to graduation this year but returns the other eight players from its roster: seven sophomores and a junior. The Conks finished the season 21-6 overall with a 13-3 record in the South Puget Sound League North.

Reach Kris Hill at khill@ covingtonreporter.com or 425-432-1209 ext. 5054. To comment on this story go to www.covingtonreporter.com. SLIDESHOW ONLINE‌ covingtonreporter.com

Kentwood’s Alycea DeLong dribbles while searching for a teammate to pass to in a state playoff game Feb. 25 against Jackson. DeLong led the Conquerors in scoring with 13 points. DENNIS BOX, The Reporter

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BOYS Kent-Meridian senior Mike Banks was named MVP, while Kent-Meridian’s Brian Lockhart was named coach of the year. First team: Taylor Jones, Kentwood; Jawan Stephney, Kentridge; Jaron Heck; Kentlake. Second team: Austin Benson, Kentwood; Martel Taylor-Barone, KentMeridian; Jeremy Smith, Kentwood; Roddy Hanson, Kentridge. Honorable mention: Isaiah Malvar,

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Kentwood; Joe Kramer, Kentwood; Dalorian Sampson, Kentridge; John Okot-Okidi, Kentridge; Austin Pernell, Kentlake; Bryce Demecilio, Kentlake; Abu Kamara, Kent-Meridian; Denikko Howard, Kent-Meridian; Gary Bailey, Kent-Meridian; Paul Loranger, Tahoma; Coleman Wooten, Tahoma. GIRLS Kentridge girls basketball coach Bob Sandall was named coach of the year. First team: Jenice Johnston, Kentwood; Sara Toeaina, Kentwood; Second team: Aubreyane Anderson, Kent-Meridian, Courtnae Williams, Kentridge.

Summit gymnasts, from left, Jenna Carlson, Elizabeth Lorenz, Emily Gormley and Anya Ameling, competed in the first Trampoline and Tumbling home meet on Feb. 11. Courtesy photo

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Summit hosts first spring meet Summit Gymnastics held its first home Trampoline and Tumbling meet of the spring season, the Freedom Classic, on Feb. 11. Athletes competed in three events: Trampoline (TR), Double Mini (DM), Tumbling (TU). Summit gymnasts placed (according to age group and level) as follows: Anya Ameling: 2nd(TR) 2nd(TU) 1st(DM), Tessa Bocock: 6th(TR) 2nd(TU) 4th(DM), Jenna Carlson: 1st(TR)4th(TU)5thDM), Jolene Carlson: 1st(TR)1st(TU)1st(DM), Bree Caulkins: 1st(TR)1st(TU)2nd(DM), Deni Cook:2nd(TR)1st(DM),

Elizabeth Cook: 1st(TR)2nd(TU)2nd(DM), Emily Cook: 1st(TR)1st(DM), Jillian Curry: 1st(TR) 3rd(TU)1st(DM), Megan Griggs: 1st(TR)2nd(DM), Emily Gormley: 3rd(TR)1st(TU)4th(DM), Saydee Homolka: 1st(TR)1st(DM), Mira Kaufman: 2nd(TR)1st(TU)4th(DM), Isabella Kopp: 1st(TR)1st(TU)1st(DM), Elizabeth Lorenz: 1st(TR)3rd(TU)2nd(DM), Zeah Lucero: 1st(TR)5th(TU) 1st(DM), Makayla Millard: 2nd(TR), Madison Miller: 1st(TR)3rd(TU), Kalani Pinter: 1st(TR)

2nd(TU)1st(DM), Naomi Putney: 1st(TR)7th(TU)7th(DM), Hannah Rayburn: 4th(TR)6th(TU) 3rd(DM), Hayley Rayburn: 1st(TR)2nd(TU)1st(DM), Elsie Rochleau: 4th(TR)4th(TU)2nd(DM), Emma Rochleau: 1st(TR)1st(TU)1st(DM), Emily Toycen: 4th(TR)1st(TU)1st(DM). Megan Griggs and Jolene Carlson took first in synchronized trampoline.

In the men’s category, Kristian Smits took first in all three events and Stephan Millard took first in trampoline and double mini.


March 2 , 2012 [15]

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Report reveals details of Mount Si plane crash The Cessna 172 plane crash that killed Kentlake High School swim coach Seth Dawson smashed into trees on the western face of Mount Si in North Bend during a “personal sightseeing flight� about 20 minutes after takeoff from Renton Municipal Airport. “The airplane fragmented upon impacting trees and up-sloping mountainous terrain, which resulted in substantial structural damage,� according to the preliminary report released Tuesday by the National Transportation Safety Board. The fuselage was found upside down. Dawson, 31; Rob Hill, 30, swim coach at Federal Way’s Decatur High; and Elizabeth Redling, 29, of Federal Way, were killed in the Feb. 15 accident. The three were on a “per-

sonal sightseeing flight,� according to the report. The plane crashed at about 1:54 a.m. after leaving Renton at about 1:35 a.m. The NTSB expects to release a probable cause report by the end of the year, said Wayne Pollack, NTSB crash investigator, during a Tuesday phone interview. “The investigation is still continuing,� Pollack said. “It takes several months to do a final report when we will issue a statement of probable cause when the investigation is completed.� Pollack said examination of the crash site and aircraft are complete. The ongoing investigation will include toxicology reports, additional records on the pilot Hill and further interviews with witnesses. Dawson was in his second season of coaching the Kentlake boys swim and dive team. He coached the Kentlake girls team in

Hearing set for teen rape suspect BY STEVE HUNTER shunter@kentreporter.com

A hearing scheduled for Monday in King County Juvenile Court in Seattle to determine whether a 15-year-old Kent boy charged with rape should be prosecuted as an adult, has been rescheduled to March 26. “The defense requested more time to gather information and prepare for the decline hearing,� said Dan Donohoe, spokesman for the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office in an email. Prosecutors charged the boy Nov. 10 with two counts of first-degree rape and two counts of first-degree kidnapping with sexual motivation in connection with attacks on a 17-yearold girl and a 19-year-old woman on separate nights in late October on the East Hill along Kent-Kangley Road. Prosecutors will request that the boy be tried as an

adult. The boy attended Kentwood High School in Covington, where Kent Police arrested him Nov. 7. The boy remains in custody, Donohoe said. If convicted in Juvenile Court, the boy would be incarcerated up to his 21st birthday, according to prosecutors. The minimum sentence in adult court is 28 to 36 years in prison with a potential maximum sentence of up to life in prison. Because the boy is 15, the Juvenile Court first handled the charges. A Juvenile Court judge must order adult prosecution for the boy and decline the case, which would send it to King County Superior Court. Under Washington state law, an offender who commits a serious violent offense is automatically charged in adult court if they are 16 or 17 years old when the alleged crime occurred. The boy turns 16 March 21.

In each incident, the boy approached the woman and the girl after they had exited a bus, according to charging papers. I n each attack, the defendant allegedly told the victims he had a gun and threatened to shoot them if they did not cooperate and go with him to a secluded spot. He reportedly raped both women while continuing to threaten them with what he said was a gun. The girl and woman provided a similar description of the boy. Kent Police released sketches of the suspect. The drawings generated a number of tips that helped detectives track down the boy.

Reach Steve Hunter at shunter@kentreporter. com or 253-872-6600 ext. 5052. To comment on this story go to www.covingtonreporter.com.

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was heading in a northeasterly direction. “The witness estimated that the airplane’s altitude was about 1,000 feet above ground level. (North Bend’s elevation is 400 to 500 feet mean sea level). The witness stated that the visibility was at least 3 miles. There was an overcast ceiling several thousand feet above the ground, with a few lower elevation clouds. Based upon the flight path drawing provided by the witness, the Safety Board investigator notes that when the witness lost visual contact with the airplane, it was flying toward the Mount Si area and was within 3 miles of the crash site.� At about 1:54 a.m., several people in North Bend called 911 to report having heard an impact sound. “At least one witness reported having observed the lights of a low flying airplane and the sound of its engine suddenly stop following its 1:53 a.m. low altitude easterly direction flight over the city toward Mount Si,� according to the

report. Pollack’s investigation of the accident site and plane wreckage “revealed evidence of multiple broken tree trunks and felled branches on the mountainside in Mount Si’s Natural Resource Conservation Area.� Pollack also wrote in the report about examination of the plane. “Fragmented airframe components, including both crushed wings, were noted below dozens of felled branches on an approximate 120-degree magnetic track leading to the fuselage, which was upside down,� according to the report. “No evidence of pre-impact oil leaks, fuel filter blockage, flight control anomalies, or fire was noted at the estimated 1,950-foot mean sea level crash site.�

Reach Steve Hunter at 253-872-6600. To comment on this story, go to covingtonreporter.com

...obituaries

There will be a community health fair at the Maple Valley Community Center from 5-8 p.m. on Thursday, March 22.

Place a paid obituary to honor those who have passed away, call Linda at 253.234.3506 paidobits@reporternewspapers.com

Grace Christian Fellowship Service Times – Sunday Bible Study 10am Worship Service 11am Wed. – Bible Study 7pm All Are Welcome! 19030 SE 168th St., Renton, 98058 Phone 425-226-0498 Maple Valley Heights Area

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feet and proceeded on an east-southeasterly course. The last radar hit occurred at 1:46 a.m., at which time the aircraft was about 1 mile southwest of the falls, and about 1 mile north of Interstate 90. During the last minute of recorded flight, the aircraft’s ground speed decreased from about 112 to 106 knots.� A witness, who holds a private pilot certificate, told investigators that he was driving along I-90 at about 1:50 a.m. when he saw the plane. “He reported having observed the anti-collision and navigation lights from a low flying airplane that was cruising in a southeasterly direction an estimated 1 mile north of I-90,� according to the report. “The witness stated that when I-90 turned southeasterly, he lost sight of the airplane for a couple of minutes. However, he regained visual contact with the airplane as he and the airplane approached North Bend. At that time, the airplane had altered its course and

588269

BY STEVE HUNTER

the fall. Hill had been the Decatur swim coach for five years. According to the preliminary report, Christiansen Aviation, Inc., of Wilmington, Del., the plane’s registered owner, leased the plane to AcuWings, a Renton flight school. Hill had a commercial pilot license and held a certified flight instructor certificate. The flight originated from Renton Municipal Airport, but no flight plan was filed. Pollack said there is no law that requires a flight plan for a sightseeing personal flight. A review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recorded radar showed the aircraft had an initial climb out of Renton to 2,400 feet mean sea level as indicated by its altitude encoding transponder. “Initially, the aircraft proceeded in a northeasterly direction,� according to the preliminary report. “However, as the aircraft approached Snoqualmie Falls, it descended to 1,500

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[18] March 2, 2012

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PUBLIC NOTICES VALLEY MEDICAL CENTER District Healthcare System NOTICE OF BOARD COMMITTEE SCHEDULES Notice is hereby given that the Valley Medical Center Board of Trustees Executive Committee will be held on the second Tuesday of every month from 11:00-12:00 p.m. in the Board Room of Valley Medical Center. Notice is hereby given that the Valley Medical Center Board of Trustees Joint Conference Committee will be held on the second Tuesday of every month from 12:00-1:30 p.m. in the Board Room of Valley Medical Center. This meeting is excluded from the Open Public Meeting Act pursuant to RCW 42.70.510 and RCW 43.41.200. BOARD OF TRUSTEES (District Healthcare System) By: Sandra Sward Executive Assistant to the Board of Trustees Published in Kent, Renton, and Covington/Maple Valley/Black Diamond Reporters. #589729. VALLEY MEDICAL CENTER District Healthcare System NOTICE OF EDUCATIONAL MEETING An educational meeting of the Board of Trustees of Valley Medical Center will be held 12:00-8:00 p.m. on March 8 and 8:00-12:00 p.m. on March 9 at the Radisson Hotel, 18118 International Boulevard, Seattle, WA 98188. A regular meeting of the board will be conducted from 10:00-12:00 p.m. on March 9 and

a routine Board meeting will occur. BOARD OF TRUSTEES (District Healthcare System) By: Sandra Sward Executive Assistant to the Board of Trustees Published in Kent/Renton/ Covington/Maple Valley/Black Diamond Reporters on March 2, 2012. #589771. CITY OF BLACK DIAMOND PLANNING COMMISSION NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED SHORELINES MASTER PROGRAM 7:00 P.M., TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2012 CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 25510 LAWSON STREET On Tuesday evening, March 13, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., the City of Black Diamond Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing on the proposed Shorelines Master Program. The meeting will be held in the City Council Chambers, 25510 Lawson Street, Black Diamond. The Master Program was drafted with the assistance of a Citizens’ Advisory Committee and has been under review by the Planning Commission since the beginning of this year. The Master Program will apply to Lake Sawyer and its associated wetlands. Written comments may be submitted to the Community Development Department by noon on March 13, 2012 or during the hearing. All written comments will become part of the official record. The proposed Master Program

CITY OF COVINGTON NOTICES

and supporting documents are available for review on the City’s website (www.ci.blackdiamond. wa.us), under the Natural Resources/Parks section. Copies are also available for review at the Black Diamond Community Development Department, 24301 Roberts Drive during normal business hours. For further information, contact Aaron Nix, Natural Resources/Parks Director, (360) 886-5700 or anix@ci.blackdiamond. wa.us. Published in Covington/Maple Valley/Black Diamond Reporter on March 2, 2012. #589775. City of Black Diamond Determination of Non-significance (DNS) File No. PLN12-0005 Description of proposal: Adoption of an update to the City’s Shoreline Master Program, which is a set of policies, regulations and recommendations for modifications of the shoreline of Lake Sawyer. The lake is approximately 285 acres in size and is the fourth largest lake in King County. The total shoreline area subject to the City’s updated Shoreline Master Program is approximately 177 acres, and encompasses approximately 35,000 lineal feet (6.6 miles) of lakeshore. Proponent: The City of Black Diamond Location of proposal: Shoreline jurisdiction for Lake Sawyer and associated wetlands Lead agency: City of Black Diamond The lead agency for this proposal has determined that it

This week’s‌ does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required under RCW 43.21C.030 (2)(c). This decision was made after review of a completed environmental checklist and other information on file with the lead agency. This information is available to the public on request. Responsible official: Steve Pilcher, AICP Position/title: Community Development Director Phone: 360-886-5700 Address: P.O. Box 599, Black Diamond, WA 98010 Date: March 2, 2012 Signature: Steve Pilcher This DNS is issued under WAC 197-11-340(2); the lead agency will not act on this proposal for 14 days from the date above. Comments must be submitted by March 16, 2012. You may appeal this determination at the Community Development Department, 24301 Roberts Drive, Black Diamond, no later than 5:00 p.m., March 16, 2012 by completing the proper appeal form and paying an appeal fee of $250.00. You should be prepared to make specific factual objections. Contact the Community Development Department at 360-886-5700 to read or ask about the procedures for SEPA appeals. Published in Covington/Maple Valley/Black Diamond Reporter on March 2, 2012. #590411.

Ecology’s action on this application, may notify Ecology in writing no later than 30 days of the last date of publication of this notice. Ecology reviews public comments and considers whether discharges from this project would cause a measurable change in receiving water quality, and, if so, whether the project is necessary and in the overriding public interest according to Tier II antidegradation requirements under WAC 173-201A-320.

ALERT

Police Blotter

MAPLE VALLEY

COVINGTON

Feb. 25

Feb. 25 DUMPED: Southeast 263rd Place and 197 Place Southeast. A deputy arrived at the intersection just before 7:30 a.m. to discover a black Honda Civic, which had been stolen and stripped, abandoned in the middle of the intersection. Feb. 23 NICOTINE AND CAFFEINE: 16700 block of Southeast 272nd Street. A patron used a fake $20 bill at the Union 76 gas station convenience store to buy cigarettes and coffee. BREAK IN: 25400 block of 167th Place Southeast. After smashing in a sliding glass door, the suspect crawled through the door, into the house then stole the victim’s laptop. Feb. 22 NOWHERE TO SIT: 16900 block of Southeast 252nd Place. A bench on the front porch of the victim’s home was stolen. The theft was reported in the early afternoon. Feb. 21 CHECKING IN: 19400 block of Southeast 243rd Street. A deputy performed a welfare check on an elderly couple at the request of their children. One daughter claims that her sister is stealing from their parents but the father said that wasn’t true. BURGLARY: 17100 block of Southeast 256th Street. Someone broke into the home through the rear sliding glass door then stole jewelry once inside. Feb. 20

Passed by the City Council of Covington, Washington, at the City Council meeting of February 28, 2012 to take effect five days after publication. PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY NOTICE OF INTENT CONSTRUCTION STORMWATER GENERAL PERMIT City of Covington Public Works Department located at 16720 SE 271st Street, Suite 100, Covington, WA 98042 is seeking coverage under the Washington Department of Ecology’s Construction Stormwater NPDES and State Waste Discharge General Permit. The proposed project is for improvements to vacant land at the southwest quadrant of the intersection of SE 240th Street and 180th Avenue SE in Covington, King County, Washington. This project involves 5.93 acres of soil disturbance for grading and installation of new parking, trail and ballfield facilities associated with development of a community park.

Comments may be submitted to: Department of Ecology Attn: Water Quality Program, Construction Stormwater PO Box 47696 Olympia, WA 98504-7696 CITY COUNCIL NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2012 – 7:00 P.M. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Covington City Council will hold a Public Hearing at its meeting on Tuesday, March 13, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., to be held in the Council Chambers at Covington City Hall, 16720 S.E. 271st Street, Covington, WA. The purpose of the Public Hearing is for the City Council to receive comments, both written and oral, from the public, regarding repeal of Covington Municipal Code 12.55 Street Vacation and replacement with a new CMC 12.55 - Street and Public Easement Vacation procedures. The new street and public easement vacation provisions incorporate the general process, as established by state statute, and includes language that more clearly outlines requirements for submitting an application, verifying petition signatures, processing the hearing examiner’s recommendation, and requiring final action by the City Council. All persons desiring to comment may do so in writing to Sharon Scott, City Clerk, at 16720 SE 271st Street, Suite 100, Covington, Washington, 98042, prior to 5:00 p.m. on March 12, 2012 or by appearing at the public hearing on March 13, 2012.

Stormwater will be discharged indirectly to Little Soos Creek via dispersed overland flow.

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that agenda information will be posted the Friday prior to the above meeting at Covington City Hall and on the City’s web site: www.covingtonwa.gov. For further information, please contact Salina Lyons, AICP, Senior Planner, at slyons@covingtonwa.gov or by phone at 253-638-1110, ext. 2239.

Any persons desiring to present their views to the Washington State Department of Ecology regarding this application, or interested in

Published in the Covington/Maple Valley/Black Diamond Reporter on March 2, 2012. #590409.

To place a Legal Notice, please call 253-234-3506 or e-mail legals@reporternewspapers.com

BOMB THREAT: 23200 block of state Route 169. Someone called a McDonalds and threatened to bomb the restaurant before hanging u p. Feb. 24 BURGLARY: 23200 block of Southeast 239th Street. The suspect broke into the house overnight, stole credit card’s from the victim’s purse, then used the credit cards. Feb. 22 IT STARTED ON THE INTERNET: 23700 block of Southeast 280th Street. A pair of 14 year old girls provoked each other via Facebook and text messages which led up to a meeting at Glacier Park Elementary where the two fought. One of the girls suffered a concussion as a result of the altercation. Feb. 20 CYBER THREATS: 22000 block of Southeast 271st Place. The new girlfriend of the victim’s ex-boyfriend threatened to harm the victim in a message on Facebook. Feb. 13 YOU CAN’T DO THAT: 24300 block of Witte Road Southeast. A driver with a suspended license was caught speeding in a school zone. Feb. 12 CHECK FRAUD: 23000 block of Southeast 247th Court. Two men were duped by a pair of suspects who gave them three checks to cash. One of the victims went to the ATM at his bank and deposited the checks then withdrew cash. The checks were fraudulent.

Community note KING CONSERVATION DISTRICT TO HOLD ELECTION

ORDINANCE NO. 05-12 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF COVINGTON, KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON CREATING CHAPTER 3.80 OF THE COVINGTON MUNICIPAL CODE RELATING TO EXEMPTIONS FROM AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAXATION FOR MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING IN DESIGNATED RESIDENTIAL TARGETED AREAS AND ESTABLISHING RESIDENTIAL TARGETED AREAS FOR THE MULTI-FAMILY PROPERTY TAX.

STOLEN ID CARD: 27100 Covington Way Southeast. While shopping at Costco, someone broke into the victim’s car by popping the lock and stole a city of Auburn key card badge from inside, among other items.

King Conservation District (King CD) will launch its second successive supervisor election enabling more than 1.1 million qualified voters to securely cast a ballot online from anywhere in the world. Web-based voting will take place over a 15-day period starting today and will run until midnight March 13. King CD has again retained election supervisor Election Trust LLC (Bellevue) and Scytl USA (Baltimore, MD) to manage and conduct the 2012 election process. Election Trust, in response to voter feedback from last year’s election, has worked with Scytl to significantly streamline this year’s online voting process. While voters will still be required to submit a signed paper affidavit to authenticate their web ballot, unlike last year, the 2012 voting experience is a ‘one-step’ process where the qualified voter can both apply for, and cast, a ballot in just a couple of minutes during one computer session. Visit www.kingcd. org for more information on the election. For those voters without internet access, computer voting will be available at the King Conservation District office weekdays Feb. 28 - March 12, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on March 13. The King CD office is located at 1107 SW Grady Way, Suite 130, Renton. Otherwise, voters needing a computer and internet access are also encouraged to visit their local library – many King County Library System

locations and the Downtown Seattle Public Library will have a 2012 King CD Supervisor Voter Guide available for reference. One candidate, Christopher “Kit� Ledbetter of Issaquah, is on the ballot for position #3 on King CD’s board of supervisors. Individuals registered to vote in King County (excluding residents of cities that are not members of the King Conservation District: Enumclaw, Federal Way, Milton, Pacific and Skykomish) are eligible to vote. King CD is one of 47 conservation districts in Washington State, with oversight from the Washington State Conservation Commission, an agency created to assist and guide conservation district activities in Washington State. King CD initiated the online voting alternative following the November, 2010 revisions in rules governing conservation district elections in Washington State. The all-volunteer, five-member board includes three elected members and two who are appointed by the Washington State Conservation Commission. The board of supervisors conducts regular public meetings to oversee the district’s budget and provide policy guidance and oversight to district staff. The King CD provides information and technical assistance programs that are available to all landowners within the district’s boundaries on a voluntary, non-regulatory basis. King CD programs are hands-on, site specific, action and results oriented; and it initiates community outreach activities that include workshops, education programs, site visits, farm plans, and consultation on land, water, and wildlife management.


C

March 2012

March 2 , 2012 [19]

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March 8,

Chamber Luncheon Covington Christian Fellowship 28201 180th Street SE Covington, WA 98042 Go to www.covingtonchamber.org for details and to register.

March 23,

“Rockin with Elvis� Annual Chamber Dinner Auction Emerald Downs 2300 Emerald Downs Drive Auburn, WA 98071 Go to www.covingtonchamber.org for details, to donate or to purchase tickets

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REPORTER

COVINGTON | MAPLE VALLEY | BLACK DIAMOND


[20] March 2, 2012

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589607


Covington/Maple Valley Reporter, March 02, 2012  

March 02, 2012 edition of the Covington/Maple Valley Reporter

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