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GOOD TO GO! | State Department of Transportation to start selling 520 toll stickers [5]

Scouting out the Reporter | Local boys visit the Kirkland Reporter Two in a row | LW boys look for a second FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2011 consecutive state basketball tourney berth [14] office to earn badges [7]

A DIVISION OF SOUND PUBLISHING

State: 520 tolls an ‘emergency’ BY NAT LEVY Reporter Newspapers

I

t may be a matter of weeks before motorists face tolls on the SR 520 bridge as two bills debuted recently in Olympia to set the rates. House Bill 1887 and Senate Bill 5700 were

submitted with an emerprogram in April. Bill gency clause that will allow sponsors include 45th them - once signed by District representatives the governor - to Deb Eddy and Larry take immediate Springer, and Sen. BILLS ON effect to meet Ross Hunter. the Washington The State TransState Department portation Commisof Transportation’s sion voted in favor goal of beginning the of a set of variable toll

FAST-TRACK

rates Jan. 5 with peak rates of $3.50 per trip during the morning and evening commute hours. But the passage of Initiative 1053 last fall required the Legislature to have final say over all fee increases. As the legislative process [ more 520 page 4 ]

Kirkland Eclectics club members listen to fellow Toastmasters’ speeches during a regular meeting at Merrill Gardens on Jan. 13. The Kirkland club recently celebrated its 45th anniversary. ALYSHA ALIBHAI, UW News Lab

Toastmasters Club is more than public speaking BY ALYSHA ALIBHAI UW News Lab

International Ballet THEATRE Kirkland’s International Ballet Theatre will perform the quintessential romantic ballet, “Giselle,” at 7:30 p.m. March 11-12 and 2 p.m. March 13 at the Meydenbauer Theatre, 11100 N.E. Sixth St., in Bellevue. The oldest continuously-performed ballet in history, Giselle first premiered in 1841 at the Theatre de l’Académie Royale de Musique in Paris, with choreography by Coralli and Perrot. It was re-choreographed in the Russian style by Petipa for the Imperial Ballet at the turn of the century. While studying for her masters in choreography in St. Petersburg, Russia, IBT’s Artistic Director Vera Altunina had the privilege of learning from professors who were pupils of Petipa’s dancers. Wellknown Seattle guest artists Mara Vinson and Le Yin will grace the stage as the leads, Albrecht and Giselle. Tickets are $50 adults; $40 students/ seniors; $25 children. Call 800-838-3006. PHOTOS BY REX TRANTER

Find us at KirklandWindermere.com 737 Market Street Kirkland, WA 98033 | 425-823-4600 462103

Every meeting of the Kirkland Eclectics Toastmasters Club begins with the MC. In terms of the the Pledge of Allegiance, members, said Ade, “we are but every session is differas diverse as it gets.” Mement. And the membership is bers originate from all over as diverse as the topics that the world, work in various speakers cover each week. fields and reflect a broad Raul Munoz, for examrange of ages, he said. Ade ple, spoke encouragingly on is a real estate agent with how to get more involved Coldwell Banker Bain and in American democracy of German descent. on Jan. 13. After he spoke, “I came tired, but now Shanika Weerasundara deI’m inspired,” reflected Ade livered an animated speech on the parting words of a about developing strategic recent guest of the Toastlistening skills. masters Club, “We like being There is no such together and we as he welcomed thing as “a dull have a good time. everybody into or uninteresting It’s something to do the multi-purtopic, there are pose room of the and get involved in.” only uninterestMerrill Gardens Sharon Rice ing people,” began retirement home Weerasundara. in downtown “Find an interKirkland. est in the topic,” she added Toastmasters Internaenthusiastically, and “it will tional is a public speaking enable you to become a club, open to all members more effective listener.” of the community. Every week, differThe Kirkland chapter ent speakers address the celebrated its 45th anniverclub on different topics. sary in 2010 and currently After the speeches, selected has about 50 members. On members evaluate them, of- Thursdays, club memfering praise and construcbers and guests gather to tive feedback. become better speakers and Gerhard Ade was listeners, practice public Toastmaster of the evening, speaking and learn new which means he served as [ more ECLECTICS page 2 ]

Windermere Real Estate/Central, Inc.


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[ ECLECTICS from page 1] things. However, the club is much more than that. “We like being together and we have a good time,” said the club’s secretary Sharon Rice, who has been a member for two years. “It’s something to do and get involved in.” Glen Rollman, who has been a member for 38 years, values the club for enabling him to “speak without fear.” He enjoys the Thursday evening meetings because they’re “the cheapest entertainment around, and you can participate,” he said in an interview. “(Members) also learn how to express themselves,” said Paul Yarbrough, who attributes his main source of inspiration to the weekly meetings, which he has been regularly attending for 15 years. The club has won the “President’s Distinguished Club” 10 years in a row, said immediate past president Vi Duong. In addition, out of a pool of 170 clubs in the Puget Sound region, the club was recently honored as the Most Inspirational Club of the Year. What is truly inspirational is when members give “speeches in their second language,” said Ade. English is the second language for many club members, and the club is an arena

Above, immediate past president, Vi Duong, gives an evaluation of a speech during a recent Toastmasters meeting. Above, Toastmaster of the Evening, Gerhard Ade, addresses the Kirkland Eclectics. ALYSHA ALIBHAI, UW News Lab to become comfortable and confident when speaking, which is enabled by the “incredible support system” that club members provide, he added. “Club members are dedicated, engaging members who volunteer for many tasks to keep the club healthy and growing,” said Duong, who

added that the club has been growing by more than three members per month. When asked what attracted her to the club, new member Danielle Blackburn said she had read that some of the most influential people in the world have been Toastmasters. After looking into

this, she found that “the most important friends they had and all of the most uplifting people they had ever met had been through the Toastmasters Club.” Blackburn decided to “give it a shot,” and when she attended the first meeting in Kirkland, she said she was “blown away.” The club is “so supportive and friendly,” said Xuewei Wen, vice president of public relations, who added that it is also a great way to network and make friends. Wen said this is why the Kirkland chapter is so popular. Members and visitors often leave Merrill Gardens feeling enriched and inspired. Not to mention, said Rice, “it’s very fun, and you feel safe and welcome.” While the club is about public speaking, said Yarbrough, “it’s really about your whole life, it’s self improvement, and when you improve one area of your life you improve all areas.” Meetings are every Thursday evening at Merrill Gardens, 201 Kirkland Ave. For more information visit http://kirklandeclecti. freetoasthost.us/.

Alysha Alibhai is a student in the University of Washington Department of Communication News Laboratory.

Springer idea could slash annexation costs Counting the people who will be added to the City of Kirkland by the June 1 annexation will cost Kirkland taxpayers an estimated $225,000. But much of that money could be saved if the Legislature listens to Rep. Larry Springer and allows the count to be based on the new federal census. An estimated 33,000 people will be annexed to Kirkland on June 1, but state law requires a specific and expensive process for counting residents in annexed areas. The counts are used to share state revenues from the gas tax, liquor profits and other sources. House Bill 1336 would reduce duplicate counts and taxpayer costs when recent federal census numbers are available.

Eddy’s proposal could mean lower utility bills statewide For more than a

decade, Eastside residents have benefitted from an innovative partnership of the area’s cities and water districts known as the Cascade Water Alliance. The partnership has allowed the local governments to provide essential water services and conservation programs far more efficiently than on their own. It’s proven to be a successful and cost-efficient model of governance that other cities and municipalities are hoping to emulate. But costly and time-consuming legal limitations restraint its usefulness. That’s why Rep. Deb Eddy, D-Kirkland, has introduced a bill to make it easier for municipalities to come together and jointly provide essential water, sewer, storm water and flood control services by authorizing a partnership that does away with the legal problems. The bill was heard recently in the House Committee on Local Government.

more story online… kirklandreporter.com

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February 18, 2011 [3]

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Community

Kirkland Performance Center

BRIEFS

Kang artwork featured in exhibition

Kirkland student named to dean’s list Kirkland resident Sabrina Grandke-Bawab was named to Montana State University Billings’ Fall 2010 Dean’s List. The Dean’s List is an honor roll of undergraduate students who earn 12 or

gary stroutsos Sunday, February 20 ∙ 4:00 pm World flute expert & master storyteller. Above, Artist Katie Murray created “Waiting” using ink on paper. Right, Artist Rosalyn Johnson created “Octo World,” a mixedmedia work, using ink, charcoal and pastels. Both art pieces were selected to be on display at George L. Fox University in Oregon. CONTRIBUTED

slide to freedom Friday, February 25 ∙ 7:30 pm Appalachian Blues by Doug Cox meets Indian Slide Guitar by Salil Bhatt.

more credits and who earn a grade point average of 3.50 or better.

Student travels to Ecuador with Hamilton College Kristin Forgrave, the daughter of Kathryn and Robert Forgrave of Kirkland, recently traveled to Ecuador with the Hamilton College Outing Club. Forgrave, a graduate of Lake Washington High School, is a junior at Hamilton.

ken waldman

from kirkland to kodiak Eight Hamilton students and Assistant Director of Outdoor Leadership Sarah Jillings traveled to Ecuador over winter break for a three week hiking trip in the Andes Mountains. The group hiked through the Amazon rainforest up to the summits of the glaciated, volcanic peaks of Cotopaxi (19,344 feet) and Cayambe (18,996 feet).

Saturday, March 5 ∙ 8:00 pm Alaska's Fiddling Poet celebrates the Pacific Northwest's Alaskan ties.

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This fall Lake Washington High School art students joined hundreds of students from Oregon, Washington and Idaho in submitting their works to the annual High School Art Northwest juried art exhibition at George L. Fox University in Oregon. The LW Visual Arts program announced that Lake Washington seniors Katie Murray and Rosalyn Johnson were selected to have their artistic achievements honored in this exhibition. Murray is best known for her exquisite line work and subtly layered textural detail. Johnson expresses her passion for the arts through her bold use of color and daring compositions. The show runs through Feb. 20.


[ 520 from page 1] progresses, WSDOT continues putting in place the equipment for tolling. WSDOT Tolling Director Craig Stone said it will take 30 days to get everything operational. WSDOT hasn’t been able to name an opening date thus far because the results of the Legislature remain unclear. “We’ve been saying spring 2011 because we’re still waiting on the Legislature to see how things will come together,” he said. State Sen. Curtis King (R-Yakima), one of the Senate bill’s sponsors, said the plan is to pass the bills by the end of the month. It still has to make it out of several committees, before going through the

www.kirklandreporter.com House and Senate. “I think the hope is we will have this process done through the Senate and through the House and through the governor some time before the end of February, so DOT has 30 days in which to inform the public and do all the due diligence needed to start tolling the first of April,” King said. The bill endured its first hearing in front of the Senate Transportation Committee Feb. 8, with all speakers in favor of tolling. Construction unions with unemployment between 30 and 50 percent urged the committee to move forward and put some of their men back to work. Representatives from WSDOT

warned the commission that without the toll money to back bonds the project would have to be delayed, and the state would lose millions on cancelled contracts. It remains unclear exactly how much revenue the tolls will produce, Stone said, though $1 billion of bond proceeds are projected to be repaid through tolls. The bill was also scheduled for a public hearing in the House Committee on Transportation on Feb. 16, after the Reporter’s deadline. The effectiveness of the tolls will shape future policy. Should tolls fall short of expectations, the bills contain authorizations for the Transportation Commission to

The 520 floating bridge from the west side of Lake Washington. MATT PHELPS, Kirkland Reporter

raise rates to pay off bonds. in case regulation is needed if State Transportation Chair drivers spurn SR-520 for the Judy Clibborn (D-Mercer free-to-cross I-90 bridge. Island) said this would not Clibborn added that the extend beyond the amount of Legislature may go to the votthe project tolls are expected ers with a new revenue packto pay for. age in the next few years, part With toll revenue, the of which could go toward $4.65 billion project still faces filling the funding gap. a nearly $2 billion gap. King “Existing gas tax is bonded said the Legislature for 25 years,” she “Existing gas tax said. “We’re tapped will not likely deal is bonded for 25 out. We could be with the funding years. We’re tapped putting part of that gap in this session, out. We could be statewide package but nothing is putting part of that toward 520.” certain. statewide package Stone said The Legislature the decisions on has already dealt toward 520.” funding can be with tolling SRJudy Clibborn put off until 2014, 520 once when it consistent with an passed ESHB 2211 SR-520 work group’s recomin April 2009 to authorize mendation. Should no viable charging to pay for improvesolution surface before that ments. That bill passed the time, the discussion on tollHouse 52-43 and 32-16 in the ing Interstate 90 will begin. Senate, and called upon the Clibborn has also asked for Transportation Commission information on several difto set variable rates. Propoferent types of tolling for I-90 nents of 1053 wanted the

decision to come back to the Legislature so the decisions, and the accountability for those decisions, can be traced back to elected officials. King said tolling represented the clearest option. Tolling has been used throughout the state to pay for bridges in the past. “I think it’s about the only solution we have considering the economic climate we’re in,” he said. Toll rates on SR-520 would fluctuate based on the time of day, and the $3.50 peak price will apply to drivers who have an installed a Good-to-Go transponder on their vehicle. Those who don’t have a transponder will have their license plate photographed and received a bill for driving across the bridge with an additional $1.50 charge. Those who initiate the extra payment receive a 50-cent break. Toll prices on the weekend, a time when many infrequent users will cross the bridge, will decrease significantly. According to project documents, the cost will be $2.20 (during the 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. peak) for transponder users and $3.70 for the pay-by-mail option. The decision features exemptions for emergency vehicles and transit, but not for any type of carpool. Tolls will not apply between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m.

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Account sign-ups for Good To Go! pass, SR 520 tolling Good To Go! passes for upcoming State Route 520 tolls are now available online, by phone and at two new customer service centers, one of them in Bellevue. The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) also is deploying mobile customer service centers to help bring Good To Go! directly to drivers before toll collections begin on the SR 520 floating bridge this spring. The Bellevue Good To Go! center is located at 13107 NE 20th St., Suites 3 & 4. It is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Tolling is a critical funding source for replacing the vulnerable 520 bridge,� Washington Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond said at a press conference Tuesday morning. “Starting tolling this spring helps keep project costs down while improving the safety and reliability of this vital corridor.� Construction of pontoons for a replacement bridge begin next month in Grays Harbor. Good To Go! is the new statewide electronic tolling system. It allows tolls to be collected on all vehicles at highway speeds with no

stopping or slowing. The SR 520 floating bridge will be the first bridge in the state to use all-electronic tolling, with no traditional cash collection toll booths. WSDOT also announced a special introductory offer at the Tuesday launch event. Drivers will receive a $10 credit towards SR 520 tolls if they purchase a Good To Go! Pass and activate an account by April 15. There are five new passes available ranging in cost from $5-$12. Among the new passes are smaller and movable options. Beginning Friday, Feb. 18, the Standard Sticker pass, costing $5, will be available at 84 participating Safeway stores throughout Puget Sound. Proposed toll rates will vary by time of day, encouraging some drivers to use off-peak hours, alternative routes and other modes of travel – which reduces traffic congestion on the floating bridge during the busiest travel times. To encourage this shift, 130 daily bus trips have been added to 600 existing trips in the corridor. Customers purchase a Good To Go! pass, set up a prepaid account and mount the Good To Go! pass in their vehicle, or register their license plate for photo identification. When driving

on a tolled facility, the pass is scanned or the license plate is photographed and the correct toll is deducted from the prepaid account. Automatic account replenishment is available. Drivers are encouraged to set-up a pre-paid Good To Go! account if they use the SR 520 bridge more than once a month. For drivers without a Good To Go! account, cameras will

take photos of the license plate and a bill will be mailed to the registered owner of the vehicle. Under the proposed toll rate schedule, the Good To Go! toll rate might be $3.50 during peak periods, compared to $5 for users who pay by mail. More information about Good To Go! including a complete list of retail locations and incentives, go to www.goodtogo520.org.

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This is great news for your wallet if your furnace is over eight years old. Because, yes, it’s absolutely true, you can actually replace your old (and probably very inefficient) furnace and air conditioner as a package for at least $2,159.00 less than you would have to pay at any other time. Please allow me to explain. Every year, the months of January, February, and March can “destroyâ€? my business. I end up losing a ton of money during these “business destroyerâ€? months and it can take me the remaining nine months to make up for them. I’m looking for the same thing to happen this year. That is why‌ My Problem Is An Excellent Opportunity For You I employ great people and I want to keep them working during these long hard months. That is why I’ve decided to give up trying to make a proďŹ t during the “business destroyerâ€? months. If I can only minimize my losses during January, February, and March, I will come out ahead of the other nine months. Here’s how this (admittedly daring) offer came about: Every year, the big manufacturers of air conditioners have to guess how many to build to meet the demand. Of course, they’re never exactly right. So, they always have some inventory that must holdover until next summer season. I went to one of these companies, Coleman and contracted for the purchase of 64 premium air conditioners and furnaces in the four most popular sizes used in Seattle. And, because of the quantity and time of the year, I was able to buy them at drastically reduced, dirt cheap, “out of seasonâ€? prices. They are brand new models and they are NOT the seconds or “blemsâ€? or standard “builderâ€? models. They are factory-fresh, premium air conditioners and furnaces and have full factory warranty. Keep Reading To Learn How To Get A Furnace For Peanuts By putting this furnace and air conditioner package together (then “jaw boningâ€? the factory) and committing to a do-or-die purchase agreement of 64 systems. I was able to buy both the furnace and air conditioner for less than anyone should have a right to pay! So, if you buy one of these normal 64 new, premium air conditioners (but only if one of the four sizes I have will ďŹ t your house, of course), I am “givingâ€? you the furnace and all I ask for is the $541.00 in labor it cost to have your furnace installed. Perfect Fit For Your Home Just call me at (425)562-5162 anytime. I will come out and measure your home (and determine the availability of the proper size). Don’t forget, I only have 65 matched systems in four sizes. When they are gone, this remarkable offer ends also. I will show you the “real worldâ€? price on the air conditioner that ďŹ ts your home. Then, I will show you the substantial savings. And it will include all labor and installation materials. Nothing is left out. What A Really Simple Concept By letting you win big now, I will win at the end of the year. I’m betting that if I make you an offer that is “irresistibleâ€? (at least it should be if your furnace or air conditioner is over 8 years old) and barely mark it up above the price I paid, I will accomplish two things: 1. I can pay my professional staff of nine employees to work instead of paying them or not paying them to sit at home. 2. I will cover my rent, utilities insurance and taxes in the “business destroyerâ€? months. If I can accomplish these two objectives, I will minimize my losses and the rest of the year, I can be a winner. Absolutely No Obligation Even after I completely explain the installation, there is absolutely no obligation. If you decide you don’t want to take advantage of the spectacular savings, that’s okay. I will give you a surprising gift worth $100.00 because you are kind enough to read this letter and give me a chance to solve my challenge. I want you to think well of OutToday. Com even if you don’t buy. You Can Buy With NO Cash You don’t even have to pay me right away. I have set up a terriďŹ c bank rate ďŹ nancing plan. I even decided not to mark up the interest rate like some companies do. Consider this; if you decide to make monthly investments instead of paying cash, the entire amount of your payments might be more than off set by the savings on your utility bills. It’s like “having your cake and eating it too.â€? In some cases you can receive up to $250.00 or more in tax credits and rebates. Why This Offer Can’t Last You must act before March 15th. Here are two reasons why: 1. I can only have sixteen of each of the four sizes. When all of the air conditioners are sold and all the furnaces are “givenâ€? away in a particular size, that’s it. There are no more at this price. 2. If I have any of the 64 systems left on March 15th (although I doubt I will), this offer still ends. Here’s why‌ The only reason I am making this virtually no proďŹ t (for me) offer is because of the “business destroyerâ€? months. My business always starts to improve in April and because furnaces cost me so little, I can sell them at 2011 prices next November and December and still come out ahead. Give me a call now at: (425) 562-5162 and I will set an appointment for your no obligation survey.

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[6] February 18, 2011

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February 18, 2011 [7]

www.kirklandreporter.com the Air Force.

Community

BRIEFS

Cub Scout Pack 595 visits Reporter

Van Komen graduates from basic training

CRIME

This week’s‌

ALERT

Police Blotter The blotter feature is both a description of a small selection of police incidents and a statistical round-up of all calls to the Kirkland Police Department that are dispatched to on-duty police officers. The Kirkland Reporter Police Blotter is not intended to be representative of all police calls originating in Kirkland, which average about 800 per week. Between Feb. 4-10 the Kirkland Police Department reported 481 traffic violations (five DUIs), 17 traffic accidents, 10 noise complaints, seven thefts, seven domestic violence calls, 19 alarm calls, one car prowl, 12 cases of civil disturbances, three burglaries, nine disturbances, five cases of fraud and five harassment calls. At least 40 people were arrested.

Feb. 10 Warrant arrest: 4:50 p.m., 12300 120th Place N.E. A 27-year-old Seattle man and his girlfriend were contacted in the Joe’s parking lot for a verbal argument. No crime occurred but the man was arrested for an outstanding warrant out of Seattle.

Feb. 9 Domestic: 7:39 p.m., 100000 N.E. 130th Lane. Police contacted a 22-yearold Kirkland woman in response to a domestic disturbance. The woman was in an argument with her brother when she was pushed and kicked. The 26-year-old man was arrested.

Feb. 8 Warrant arrest: 4:07 p.m., 14500 124th Ave. N.E. An officer was conducting a search for a burglary suspect. The 19-year-old Kirkland man had a $200,000 burglary warrant from King County. The man was told that he was arrested on his warrant and for escaping work release, to which he replied, “I was on work release? I don’t know anything about that.�

Feb. 7 DUI: 1:50 a.m., 12500 132nd Ave. N.E. A 26-year-old Everett man was stopped for his erratic driving. He smelled of intoxicants and had no shirt on. He submitted a blood alcohol sample of .218.

Feb. 6

Cub Scout Pack 595 visit the Kirkland Reporter office to complete their Bobcat Badge on Jan. 27. CARRIE WOOD, Kirkland Reporter ing in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness and basic warfare principles and skills.

Warrant arrest: 11:16 p.m., 12000 124th Ave. N.E. A 33-year-old Spokane man was stopped for a burned out headlight and was found to have a misdemeanor warrant out of King County. Minor, Liquor violation: 2:01 a.m., 25 Lakeshore Plaza. Two juvenile boys were contacted in the parking lot behind K-Town. Both were arrested for being in possession of drug paraphernalia and consuming alcohol.

Feb. 5 Weapons violation: 12:21 a.m., 6000 126th Ave. N.E. A 43-year-old Arizona man was arrested for brandishing a firearm, reckless endangerment and possession of a firearm without a license. Assault: 4:20 a.m., 12000 N.E. 62nd Street. Two Kirkland females, 24- and 25-years-old, reported that a 23-yearold Kirkland man assaulted both of them. Police went to the man’s apartment but there was no answer. Police forced their way into the residence and took the man into custody.

Feb. 4 DUI: 8:52 p.m., 11700 98th Ave. N.E. A 47-year-old Kirkland man was arrested on DUI. False information: 11:16 p.m., 52 Lakeshore Plaza. A 16-year-old Kent boy was arrested for providing a false name to police. It was found that the boy was trespassing on K-Town due to a theft that had occurred. Assault: 3:30 p.m., 8500 block of 122nd Ave. N.E. A 50-year-old Bellevue man and his 40-year-old girlfriend got into a physical altercation in a parking lot. Three witnesses saw the couple exchange multiple blows to the face. Based on the investigation, the man was determined to be the aggressor.

Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of

Lake Washington High School students Marco Torres, Merlin GranadosMolina, Roat Eang and Tewit Srisomboon load buckets of gravel to repair erosion damage on the Cotton Hill Park stairs as part of their senior project. The stairs are heavily used by joggers and kids walking to Kirkland Junior High and Peter Kirk Elementary. SUBMITTED BY KAREN STORY

Seniors repair park stairs

Kirkland halts impact fees for existing buildings to boost business REPORTER STAFF

The Kirkland City Council unanimously adopted legislation at its Jan. 18 meeting that suspends transportation impact fees charged to a business when the use of an existing commercial building is changed. The temporary suspension applies city-wide and will be in effect until Dec. 31, 2013. The council’s goal for the suspension is to fill vacant storefronts and offices in Kirkland as the vacancy rate has risen to between 25-30 percent. “Tenant improvement and other costs are substantial when moving into an existing space; impact fees were a significant deterrence to choosing Kirkland,� notes Ellen Miller- Wolfe, Economic Development manager. “The city has now removed a major hurdle for new ventures to locate here.� The council’s action was prompted partly

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The Kirkland Reporter is published every Friday and delivery tubes are available FREE to our readers who live in our distribution area. Our newspaper tube can be installed on your property at no charge to you. Or the tube can be provided to you to install at your convenience next to your mailbox receptacle or at the end of your driveway. Pick up your FREE tube at our Kirkland office, located at 11630 Slater Ave. NE, Suite 9, Kirkland during regular business hours. (Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

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from a “Competitive Assessment� conducted in 2010 by Berk & Associates which recommended ways for Kirkland to remain competitive and reduce vacancy rates during recessionary times. One specific recommendation was to suspend transportation impact fees for changes in use that do not involve

adding new square footage. State law authorizes the collection of impact fees to help defray the costs of new transportation infrastructure. Currently, the city collects impact fees on all new development including development/redevelopment of an existing structure from one use

(e.g. furniture store) to another use (e.g. auto parts store). The temporary suspension does not affect the collection of impact fees for new development or the enlargement of existing buildings. The fee suspension will be reviewed when the city conducts an impact fee study in 2013.

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Air Force Airman 1st Class Jeremii W. Van Komen graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. Van Komen earned distinction as an honor graduate of the course. He graduated from Juanita High School in 2001 and received a bachelor’s degree in 2007 from Brigham Young University, Utah. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included train-

Ten Tiger cub scouts from Pack No. 595 visited the Kirkland Reporter, where Editor Carrie Wood spoke about the importance of newspapers in the community on Jan. 27. Wood also showed the boys how a newspaper is put together. During the visit, the cub scouts learned how to copy edit and even made their own newspaper. The visit to the Reporter was the scout’s last outing they needed to complete their Bobcat Badge. Following the visit, the cub scouts received their final bead for the badge.


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KIRKLAND

OPINION

[8] February 18, 2011

● QUOTE OF NOTE:

“Find an interest in the topic and it will enable you to become a more effective listener.“ Shanika Weerasundara

EDITORIAL

Sound off on Reporter survey

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?

Vote online: www.kirklandreporter.com

Last week’s poll results: “Would you support a levy or tax increase for a “lid” over 405 in the Totem Lake neighborhood to improve connectivity and lend more green open space to the area?” Yes: 43% No: 56%

You said it!

Dear Mrs. Brooke, I’m trying to decide if I should put my daughter in a full-day or half-day kindergarten program. What are the differences in the schedule and curriculum? What type of child can “handle” a full day? Do the first grade teachers see a difference in the kids that come to them from having gone for a full day versus a half day?

Mimi Henderson

Dear Mrs. Henderson, KIRKLAND .com

REPORTER

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the community? It will also help your local businesses better market their goods and services. Questions include reader preferences for local news and other media; consumer preferences for local and regional

shopping; household purchasing plans for goods and services; your family choices for entertainment and travel; and basic household demographic information. We ask you to log on to our Web site to take the survey. All responses will be kept confidential.

Pros and cons of full-day or half-day kindergarten

Your child is entering school for the first time and you have spent much of your time as a parent raising your young child to be an independent and lifelong learner. Like most parents, I am sure you want your child to love school and a great beginning can definitely help foster that love of learning. I wish I could tell you that there was a clear body of research that supported the half-day kindergarten or the full-day program. There are many different studies out there that show students who attend full-day kindergarten often do better in first grade and on standardized tests. However, there are also studies that show data that by the end of fourth grade there is no difference and children who took more time to play, create, and imagine, actually had better higher level thinking skills long term. There are other studies that say

students in full-day experienced more behavior issues compared to those in half day, but then others that said children’s lack of sleep or family involvement were the major factors in poor school behavior. I have consulted preschool teachers, kindergarten (both half-day and full-day) teachers, and first grade teachers and there are of course many opinions. When it comes down to it, most educators agreed that it really depends on the child and the family situation. All agreed the biggest factor of students being socially, emotionally, and academically ready for first grade was not that they had attended a full-day or a half-day program, but that the child had a very involved family. After teaching first and second grade for 10 years, I agree that family involvement is a big factor in determining if a child is ready for first grade, or any grade for that matter. As a half-day kindergarten teacher now, I am obviously a huge advocate of the half-day program. Our typical day is two-anda-half hours compared to a six-hour day. Students in half-day kindergarten must meet the same state and district standards as students in full-day kindergarten and take the same district-wide assessments. Because of this, there is a lot to learn in a small amount of time, but we do! In my classroom we have reading, writing and math workshops, some science, art and social studies, music Joy Brooke

“Do you plan to purchase a Good To Go! pass when tolling begins on the 520 floating bridge?”

ASK MRS. BROOKE

Question of the week:

n today’s Kirkland Reporter, we’re asking you, our readers, to tell us what you want from your hometown newspaper. And more. The survey will help us shape our product, and understand how our community does business as we partner with local merchants and other advertisers to foster a strong local economy. Share your views with us, and you will be entered for a $1,000 cash drawing and a $500 gift certificate for Fred Meyer. “This information is critical as we strive to provide the best product to our community ,” said Mike Walter, publisher. “Our readers’ input will guide us in adapting to an ever-changing environment.” Partnering with us in our market research is Pulse Research of Portland, Ore., an independent firm that works with media and retailers nationwide. The survey is on our Web site at kirklandreporter.com, and will provide valuable feedback to the Kirkland Reporter staff : What do you enjoy about your newspaper? What would you like to see changed? How can we better serve

and library once a week, and most of all fun! For five and six-year-olds, developmentally a half-day program is a perfect balance. I am the first to admit that sometimes I wish we had more time, but then I think of all the wonderful experiences my students are having in the afternoon – playing with younger siblings, creating, imagining, visiting museums, zoos, and parks, having play dates, and spending quality time with family. These experiences are those that I could never give and lessons that I could never teach. Children rise to meet expectations, but do you want your child to “handle” kindergarten or do you want them to “love” it? If you are fortunate enough to be with your child in the afternoon, what is the rush to get your child into a full-day program? They will be attending school for at least the next 12 years, so allow that extra time for them to read, write, move, explore, create in their own ways, experience new places and practice socializing with friends. As I continue to remind myself, our children are only young for so long, so why not truly treasure every moment. Many studies also show when we rush our children too soon, too fast, much of the joy of learning is lost. One thing is clear, in whatever program, joy and fun should be a part of a child’s day for a child’s love of learning to continue to grow. Now, I understand most families do not have the luxury of one parent at home, both parents work and so half-

day kindergarten many times is not a choice. In that case, we are fortunate in this community because there are wonderful full-day kindergarten programs in many of our schools. We have incredible educators who hold high expectations for students, yet understand the developmental needs of children and so offer a balanced full-day kindergarten program. For more information, you may find the kindergarten handbook on the Lake Washington School District Web site helpful. Kindergarten registration is underway and I know many parents of soon-to-be kindergartners share these same concerns. As a parent, I understand the pressure to get your child “kindergarten ready.” Everyone is feeding you different advice. No matter what I say, your neighbor, the preschool teacher, listen to your heart. In the end, you know your child best and whatever your decision, enjoy the days ahead in the magical land of kindergarten. And always remember, you are your child’s first and most important teacher.

Contact Mrs. Brooke by e-mail at dearmrs.brooke@gmail.com with any questions regarding your child’s learning. Joy Brooke lives in Kirkland with her husband and two children, and teaches AM kindergarten at Ben Franklin Elementary. The opinions provided in this column do not reflect that of the LWSD.


February 18, 2011 [9]

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● L E T T E R S . . . Y O U R O P I N I O N C O U N T S : To submit an item or photo: e-mail letters@kirklandreporter.com; mail attn: Letters, Kirkland Reporter, 11630 Slater Ave. N.E., Suite 8/9, Kirkland, WA 98034; fax 425.822.0141. Letters may be edited for style, clarity and length.

(In response to the Feb. 11 letter “Abortion is a fancy way to say selfish”). As a mother who is now past childbearing age, I know from experience that there are many reasons why a woman over 40 might appreciate that the laws of this country allow her to make her own health decisions, including those regarding abortion. For most women, terminating a pregnancy is not a choice that is made lightly and for merely selfish reasons. I have never had to make this choice but have a concern about a very real problem that exists in our modern society that might have caused me to seriously consider it. Many medicine bottles have a warning to consult a doctor if you are pregnant. No one knows how many drugs may actually affect the fetus in the first two months of gestation, a time when many women are still unaware they are pregnant. Most people would agree that it is immoral for scientists to undertake double blind studies

involving drugs that are suspected to be the cause of serious birth defects using pregnant women. The decision to accept or refuse a prescribed medication that has known side effects, including those that cause damage to a potential fetus, is one that women make every day. In the past, giving up all prescription medications on the infinitesimal chance that I might become pregnant with a third child would have had a significant impact on my health. When a woman considers whether or not to terminate a pregnancy due to health concerns, would you accuse her of selfishness? There are choices in life that an individual needs to make in private, according to her own conscience. I believe this is one of them. Fortunately, most woman do chose to carry a pregnancy to term. However, this means that many children will have health challenges related to the use of legal medications. My hope is that the children born with the myriad of birth defects and mental disabilities caused by a mother’s use of drugs will receive the voting public’s support for increased funding for

programs that improve the lives of children and adults that need special care. I wish those who spend time opposing abortion would instead put their energy into making sure that every child in the foster care system in this country is adopted into a loving family without regard to their physical or mental health.

Margarette Bull, Kirkland

What is best use of rail corridor? The “Summary of Interests” within the Eastside Rail Corridor Draft Interest Statement is a very good wish list of reasons why citizens should focus on the future use of the BNSF Corridor. However, it does not provide solid arguments to support its conclusion: “Ultimately, the best use of the corridor is as the site of a welcoming, transportationoriented facility for pedestrians and bicyclists and a high capacity transit system that connects Kirkland to the region.” This is a major flaw that leaves aside all the known technical, economic and potential commuter considerations.

Shawn Etchevers, Kirkland

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or a $500 gift certificate to Simply go to

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[10] February 18, 2011

Heart Disease. Did you know it’s the No. 1 killer of Americans, taking more lives than the next five causes of death combined? One person in this country dies of heart disease every 37 seconds. That’s the bad news. The good news is, heart disease can be prevented and treated. That’s why there is Hope. The Hope Heart Institute is a local 501(c)(3) nonprofit committed to serving humanity through cardiovascular research and education. We have a 50+ year history of revolutionary advances in medicine and educational curricula. Most everyone knows someone who has had a bypass, but many may not know that Seattle’s Dr. Lester Sauvage was one of the pioneers of bypass graft surgery. It changed the way heart disease was (and is still) treated around the world, and his founding of The Hope Heart Institute played a significant role. Dr. Sauvage taking notes Dr. Sauvage, now retired, is known as a caring cardiovascular surgeon who went the extra mile to care for his patients. Beyond their hearts, he cared about their happiness, too. He’d often ask a patient before surgery, “When we save your life, what are you going to do with it?” Dr. Sauvage gave hope to his patients, and helped them think positively and plan to live long lives.

Patients like Allen Sinear and his wife Virginia know what that feels like. “We are ever grateful for the pioneering and compassionate work of Dr. Sauvage & The Hope Heart Institute. A triple bypass in 1975 gave us 35 more years together, and after traveling seven continents hand in hand, the experiences and love we share continue to grow.” Begun in 1959 in Seattle, Dr. Sauvage founded what was originally called the Reconstructive Cardiovascular

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Research Center a time when heart disease treatments were taking an exciting turn. New discoveries each year brought better life-saving therapies and surgeries to patients, and Dr. Sauvage was at the forefront.

Today, The Hope Heart Institute carries on the strong legacy through the area’s top cardiologists, scientists, and health educators.

At The Hope Heart Program at the Benaroya Research InIn the 1970’s, a standardized method was developed for stitute at Virginia Mason, Hope scientists study angiogenusing a patient’s own blood to “pre-clot” artificial grafts. esis, cell and molecular biology of the vascular This process prevents extra cellular matrix to explore internal bleeding and new avenues of combating He’d often ask a patient before surgery, helps healing after grafts heart disease. are implanted. A patent “When we save your life, what are you Cardiologists with The Hope was granted for Sauvage Heart Clinical Research Progoing to do with it?” Dr. Sauvage gave Grafts - improved artigram participate in trials of the ficial grafts made from hope to his patients, and helped them latest medical breakthroughs synthetic fibers - now in think positively and plan to live long lives. – cutting-edge treatments use worldwide. Dr. Sausuch as a medical device or vage poured the royaldrug therapy. We have more ties back into The Hope Heart Institute. than twenty cardiologists who conduct research with us. By the 1980’s, HOPE publications launched. Today, Our mission also includes prevention of heart disease The HOPE Health Letter is the most widely read health through education programs that reach students from elpublication in the world. Proceeds from the sale of the ementary through high school, and community groups. newsletter through corporations is a significant source of Our Take Heart™ programs are in schools during the funding for The Hope. In 1988, legendary entertainer Bob classroom day, where they align with state learning stanHope lent his name to the institute, in honor of his close dards, and in neighborhoods, shopping malls, hospitals, friend Bing Crosby, and churches for people of all ages. who suffered from February is Heart Month, a perfect time to take stock of heart disease. your heart health. Here are just a few things you can do Dr. Sauvage took to prevent heart disease and take care of your heart. his last case in 1991 at age 65. He perFive Ways to Care for Your Heart formed more than from The Hope Heart Institute 5,000 heart surger1. Get 30 minutes of daily brisk exercise ies and 5,000 major blood vessel sur2. Stop smoking Dr. Sauvage with Bob Hope geries in his career. 3. Aim for a blood pressure of 120/80 or below Dr. Sauvage turned to 4. Eat a low-fat diet writing, and in the late 1990’s published The Open Heart: Secret to Happiness (stories of hope and healing) with a 5. Lose extra weight foreword written by Mother Teresa, and his second book, The Hope Heart Institute wishes you a wonderful Heart You Can Beat Heart Disease: Prevention and Treatment Month and good health for a lifetime. For more, visit (how to live a longer, healthier life). Dr. Sauvage shared www.hopeheart.org or phone us at 425-456-8700. Domessages from his two books during numerous national nations may be sent to The Hope Heart Institute, 1380 112th Ave NE, Suite 200. Bellevue, WA 98004. radio and television talk show appearances.

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February 18, 2011 [11]


[12] February 18, 2011

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...healthy living

Want local produce in the middle of winter? Get back to your roots

Giving Families

Matthew DiMeo

and seasonal produce. The tourist then remarked about how Europeans, “just get it� when it comes to the slow food movement. I chuckled to myself realizing the distance between us Americans and the foods we eat. If we want tomatoes or peaches in January, most of us don’t care where they came from, how they got here, or how good they are - just give them to us! After all, a peach is a peach, right? Well, not exactly. A peach in a February supermarket market might resemble a

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

L

ately I’ve been asked about the movement sweeping the nation to eat locally and seasonally. Farmer’s markets have sprung up in almost every town in western Washington and more chefs and home cooks are proud of using the seasonal products produced by local farmers. The funny thing is that eating local, seasonal food in most other countries is simply called “eating.� On a recent trip to Italy, I overheard an American tourist say how “neat it is� that rural Italians cook and eat local

peach, but it’s a far cry from a ripe Washington grown peach plucked from a tree in late July. Now it seems our eating philosophy has reverted back to a time without supermarkets, and all of a sudden, eating seasonally is hip! We know that nothing is more fulfilling and wonderful than strolling through the local midsummer farmer’s market and ... Yeah, yeah, yeah, we know, but what do we do in the dead of winter? Ever had a really great rutabaga? Root vegetables of all sorts are grown in Washington and are readily available all year around. It’s true that the

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potato is the work horse of the root vegetable family, but there are numerous different tubers and taproots grown in Washington. Turnips, parsnips, and rutabagas may be a child’s worst nightmare, but peeled, large diced and tossed in some good olive oil, sea salt and chopped rosemary, and then roasted in a hot oven for 20 minutes and you will have a hearty and nutritious side dish that everyone will enjoy. Root vegetables are very high in nutrients, including complex carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and fiber. They will release their natural sugars adding sweetness through caramelization, given a little time in a hot oven. Try peeling, chopping and boiling some parsnips, then mash them with a little horseradish, fresh parsley, salt, freshly ground black pepper (and maybe a little butter or cream) for an interesting mashed potato replacement. Beautiful local beets are

Winter Wellness Extravaganza!

For the third consecutive year, Evergreen Hospital Medical Center has been ranked among the nation’s top 5 percent of hospitals and named a Distinguished

Root vegetables are high in nutrients, including complex carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and fiber. MATTHEW DIMEO, For the Reporter in the markets all winter as well. Some say they don’t like beets but could it be that they haven’t had one prepared correctly? Rub some golden Washington beets in olive oil and roast in a 350 degree oven covered with foil for 30-40 minutes or until soft all the way through. Cool, peel and slice them and then toss in a sharp vinaigrette of your choice. Pair those beets with some creamy River Valley Ranch Farmstead Chevre, a

Hospital for Clinical Excellence. The award was based on a study of mortality and complication rates by HealthGrades, the nation’s leading independent health care ratings company. Nearly 5,000 hospitals were included in the study. Evergreen is one of only three hospitals in Washing-

crusty baguette from Kirkland’s own French Bakery and a glass of Steven’s Winery “Another Thought� sauvignon blanc for a real treat, trust me. So if you really want to eat local, seasonal foods in the gray mist of a Washington winter, get back to your roots! Root vegetables that is.

Matthew DiMeo is a chef and teacher at Lake Washington Technical College.

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...healthy living Endometriosis, a growing disease

Janet Kennedy, MD

lining of the pelvic cavity, and the outer surface of the uterus. Growths from endometriosis can also exist in the vagina, bladder, bowel, and cervix. Symptoms may include pain in the lower back, abdomen, and pelvis especially during the menstrual period. Other symptoms can be pain during or after sex, intestinal pain, painful urination or bowel movements during menstruation, spotting between periods, and an inability to get pregnant. Some women with have no symptoms at all. When a woman is diagnosed with endometriosis, the symptoms are categorized in two ways: pelvic pain, which most often occurs during the menstrual cycle, and infertility. According to the Cleveland Clinic, approximately 30 to 40 percent of endometriosis patients develop infertility as a consequence of their condition. A diagnosis of even minimal or mild endometriosis can negatively

ON HEALTH

A

merica is bulging at its waistline and according to the Centers for Disease Control, nearly one-third of women in the United States are heavy. As girth increases, a woman’s chances of getting endometriosis, a painful disease of the reproductive organs, proportionately rises. Being overweight is one of many factors that may contribute to having endometriosis. Endometriosis is a common health problem in women. In fact, according to the National Women’s Health Information Center, endometriosis is prevalent in women, affecting up to 5 percent of women of childbearing age. Endometriosis is a condition in which the tissue lining the uterus or womb, known as the endometrium, implants and begins to grow outside the uterus on other nearby organs and surfaces. It is most often found on the fallopian tubes, ovaries, the

affect a woman’s ability to get pregnant. There are three potential approaches to the treatment of endometriosis. Some doctors may recommend ibuprofen for pain relief. It may also effectively be treated with medications that decrease estrogen, but this approach can only be used in women who do not want to get pregnant. The third approach to treatment is surgical. To reduce your chances of getting endometriosis, The National Women’s Health Information Center recommends exercising regularly, avoiding excessive use of alcohol and caffeine, and keeping a lower amount of body fat. If you have symptoms, talk to your OB/GYN. Your doctor may recommend a pelvic exam, ultrasound, or laparoscopy to determine the presence of endometriosis.

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[14] February 18, 2011

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KIRKLAND HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMERS PREPARE FOR STATE MEET THIS WEEKEND Members of the Juanita and Lake Washington boys swim teams spent the week preparing for this weekend’s state tournament, after competing in the SeaKing district tournament the weekend before. As a team Lake Washington finished in 12th place at the district meet, while Juanita finished in 13th place. Both will be represented at the state meet this weekend at the 3A state finals, which will be held at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 19 at the King County Aquatic Center in Federal Way. During the district meet Lake Washington’s Alex Coffey finished in fifth place in the diving competition, with a score of 265.9. He was also a member of the 10th place 400 freestyle relay team, which included Ethan Petz, Robert Krossa and Isaac Smith. They finished the race in 3:43.24. Juanita diver Josh Reyes was eighth overall with a score of 217. The Rebels 200 yard freestyle relay team of Mark Stevens, Max Peterson, Mikal Boyer and Jake Helsel finished in 12th place with a time of 1:38.46. In the 400 freestyle relay, Juanita’s team of Evan Ellefsen, Boyer, Kyle Grchel and Helsel were 11th with a time of 3:44.08.

REPORTER STAFF

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fter making the state tournament last season, the Lake Washington boys looked to repeat their success with early wins in the district and KingCo tournaments. The Kangs beat Lakeside in the first round of the district tournament on Saturday, Feb. 12 with a 67-63 win. The team lost, 78-71, during the first round as they faced O’Dea, the top seed out of Metro, on Tuesday night. The loss moves the team into the consolation semi-finals to face Rainier Beach at 7 p.m. at Bellevue College. The top five teams in districts move on to the state tournament, which begins next Friday, Feb. 25. Against the Lions, Darien Nelson-Henry had 22 points, while Matt Staudacher picked up 14 and Guy Lynott had 13. During the KingCo tournament at the beginning of the month, the Kangs lost to Bellevue in

the semi-finals 68-64. After falling behind 14 points at the half, the team slowly chipped away at the lead, ending regulation time with a 54-54 tied match. The two squads battled through the first overtime tied again, before Bellevue pulled away in the second extra period. With the loss, Lake Washington moved into the consolation bracket to fight for district seeding against Mount Si. The Kangs beat the Wildcats on Thursday, Feb. 10 62-56 for the No. 3 seed at districts. While Mount Si had a lead through most of the game, Lake Washington found its rhythm late in the match to earn the comeback win. Staudacher had 18 points, while Lynott also had 18 during the win. Nelson-Henry added 10 to the game, with Mike Hanson picking up eight. Robert Reyes had four, while both Cody Bernstein and Kramer Taylor each added two.

Lake Washington center Darien NelsonHenry drives to the hoop against Bellevue during the semi-finals of the KingCo Tournament played at Bellevue College. CHAD COLEMAN, Kirkland Reporter

Prep sports

BRIEFS Three wrestlers headed to state Three members of the Lake Washington wrestling team and two members of the Juanita team are headed to this weekend’s state competition after earning top placings at the regional meet. As a team, Lake Washington took 10th at the regional meet at Glacier Peak High School. The top four wrestlers in each weight bracket moved on to state.

Now Se rv Hard L ing iquor

Mercer Island’s TJ Blackburn wrestles Lake Washington’s Jack Michels during the regional tournament last weekend. Michels is one of three Kang wrestlers competing in this weekends state tournament. RACHEL KNEBEL, Contributed photo Joel Navas was second in the 125 division, but had to forfeit the finals match due to an injury sustained during the semi-finals. Teammate Jerry Petrechko

was third in the 171-pound weight class after pinning his opponent from Mountlake Terrace in the third round. Jack Michels was third in the 215 division.

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JHS girls earn top honors The entire starting line up

for the Juanita girls basketball team was named to the KingCo team. Junior Kate Cryderman and sophomore Mikayla Jones earned first team selections, while Molly Grager was picked for the second team. Taylor Paddock and Bre Carter each earn honorable mentions. Head coach Sam Lee was named the conference Coach of the Year.

JHS girls move on in district tournament After earning a No. 3 seed coming out of the KingCo tournament last week, the Juanita girls moved into district play, hoping to secure a top five [ more PREPS page 15 ]

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From Juanita, Logan McCallum finished the regional tournament in second place after being pinned by Phil Frazier of Mercer Island in 3:24. Teammate Jeremiah Laufasa will also represent the Rebels at the state meet. The state wrestling meet begins on Friday at the Tacoma Dome. The first session will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., followed by the second session from 4 to 9:30 p.m. The third session will be held on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2:15 p.m., which will include the third through eighth place matches. The championship rounds will begin at 5 p.m.

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KIRKLAND

SPORTS

Lake Washington boys look for state basketball berth

Companies represented include: Liberty NW, Safeco, CNA, Travelers, Hartford, NSM Homebuilders, Progressive, Unigard, Encompass, Kemper, Chubb, Zurich


February 18, 2011 [15]

www.kirklandreporter.com [ PREPS from page 14] placing to make the state cut. The Rebels beat Franklin on Saturday, Feb. 12 in the first round of the SeaKing tournament 51-49 and faced the top-seeded and top-ranked team in the state, Holy Names, in the semi-finals. Against Tayler Lloyd had four the Cougars the Rebels while Bre Carter had lost 74-41. With the loss three. the Rebels move to the After losing to Liberty, consolation semi-finals Juanita faced Mercer on Friday, Feb. 18 at 8:30 Island to decide seeding p.m. at Bellevue College. for districts. The Rebels They will face the loser avenged an earlier season of the Liberty, Lakeside loss to the Islanders with matchup. a 69-60 win at Bellevue At the KingCo tournaCollege. ment, the Rebels lost to Juanita led the match Liberty 53-44 on Feb. early in the game, but 10. Liberty controled the ended the half down by game from the first two to the Islanders. quarter, getting That lead grew to up 19-12 in the 47-40 in the third PREP first, followed by quarter and was a 13-9 outscoring extended even furof Juanita in the ther in the fourth. second. While the Mikayla Jones Rebels had an 18 point had the game high of 28 third quarter, it wasn’t points, thanks to a huge enough to erase the first second half, including a half and give the team the 15 point third quarter. lead. Kate Cryderman had 17 Molly Grager had 12 points for the Rebels, points in the game, while and Molly Grager picked Kate Cryderman and Miup 11 in the match. Bre kalya Jones each put up Carder had nine, while nine for the team. Taylor Destry Seiler scored four Paddock had seven and for the Rebels.

Kirkland sports

BRIEFS

Kirkland soccer team earns state title The Crossfire select 99 McLaughlin team recently won the Washington Youth Soccer Founders Cup state championship in the girls under 11 division. The team had a 7-0 recording in the tournament, outscoring its opponents 24-5. They also finished first in the 2010 fall league, and were undefeated in the NPSL gold division with a

record of 10-0-2. While most of the team resides in Kirkland, Lauren Perla is from Sammamish and KileyWhitney and Kaelan O’Neill live in Redmond. The Crossfire Select 99 McLaughlin team, based in Kirkland, recently won the Washington Youth Soccer Founders Cup state championship in the girls under 11 division. The team includes: Grace vonSheliha, Jaeda McCormick, Kaysha Walford, Haimanot Hansen, Lauren Perla, Angela Noffsinger, Molly McLaughlin, Taylor Byrne, Kiley Whitney, Kaelan O’Neill, Carlee Bettermann, Samantha Kramer and Cassady Barnes.

Northlake Church hosts dream workshop The public is invited to participate in any of three dream-focused events from February 25-27 at Northlake Unitarian Universalist Church, 308 Fourth Ave. South, Kirkland. Workshop leader Jeremy Taylor, an ordained Unitarian Universalist minister, has worked with dreams for more than 30 years. He blends the values of spirituality with an active social conscience and a Jungian perspective. Founding member and past president of the Association for the Study of

Dreams, he has written four books integrating dream symbolism, mythology, and archetypal energy. The latest is: “The Wisdom of Your Dreams: Using Dreams to Tap Into Your Unconscious and Transform Your Life.� Join a free public lecture from 7-9:30 p.m. Feb. 25 and an Understanding Your Dreams workshop from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Feb. 26 (limited to 50 participants; $75 registration fee). Taylor will present the Sunday morning sermon at Northlake’s worship service at 10:30 a.m. on Feb. 27. Everyone is welcome. To register, go to northlakeuu. org or e-mail: workshop@ northlakeuu.org.

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[16] February 18, 2011

Community

BRIEFS

Sound off on Eastside Rail Corridor The City of Kirkland

www.kirklandreporter.com has long been interested in the future development of the Eastside Rail Corridor. Through public comment gathered since last summer, the Kirkland Transportation Commission has authored a Draft Interest Statement about the future development of the corridor. The commission seeks

to hear from community residents and businesses whether the Draft Interest Statement accurately reflects the ideals and goals of the Kirkland community about the corridor’s future development. To read the statement and take the online survey, go to www.ci.kirkland.wa.us/

eastsiderailcorridor and submit your comments by Feb. 28. The statement will be used to gauge the compatibility of future development proposals for the corridor. The statement contains 13 separate interests that are intended to function as a whole.

For background information on the Eastside Rail Corridor and to view summaries of public comment, go to www. ci.kirkland.wa.us/eastsiderailcorridor or contact Dave Godfrey, Kirkland Public Works, at 425587-3865 or dgodfrey@ ci.kirkland.wa.us.

Dentist offers help to parents As many as one in five children in King County may now be going without very basic dental care, according to Dr. Lindsay Barry of Kirkland. “As the economy suffers many families can no longer afford the very basics, including dental care. This means that common childhood dental problems go undiagnosed, which then only makes that dental problem much worse down the road,” said Barry. Barry’s answer to the problem was to help create a new national network of reduced fee dental services called Quality Dental Plan (QDP). Kirkland was one of the first cities in the nation to fully implement this plan, which includes free basic dental checkups for children and their parents when they first join. “We looked at the costs associated with giving quality dental care to our patients and we saw that we could significantly reduce our treatment rates if we saw patients early in the process and encouraged the whole family to take part in good and ongoing care,” said Barry. She points out that many common dental health problems, especially among children, are easily addressed, but become much more costly and time consuming if left unattended. “When a kid is in pain they miss school. Even worse, the cost to treat a painful situation can be three or four times more expensive than it would have been if the problem had been diagnosed a few months earlier.” QDP has begun to receive national attention for its innovative approach to health care, with Barry being one of the first in the nation to understand the significance.

For more information, visit QualityDentalPlan. com.


February 18, 2011 [17]

www.kirklandreporter.com

Howard/Mandville Gallery: Introducing seven new artists to the gallery: Larry Bracegirdle, Sydney Brown, Alfred Currier, Renato Muccillo, Timothy Norman, Anne Schreivogl and Kim Matthews Wheaton. The winter showcase runs through Feb. 27 at Howard/Mandville, 120 Park Lane, Suite D. For information, visit www.howardmandville.com or call 425-889-8212. Parklane Gallery: Guest artist David Varnau offers his unique bronze sculptures through February at Parklane Gallery. Also, the gallery will present “Local Color,” a juried art show with local artists depicting local scenes, from March 8 through April 3. The gallery is located at 130 Park Lane, Kirkland. For information, call 425-827-1462.

Calendar submissions: The free community calendar is published Fridays on a space-available basis and includes free and non-profit local events and groups. Submit items at least a week in advance of publication dates to: calendar@kirklandreporter.com

EVENTS Feb. 19 Meet Pet Sitters, Dog Walkers: Nature’s Pet Market in the Houghton Center invites pet owners to meet local pet sitters and dog walkers from 12-3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 19 at the store, 10635 N.E. 68th St., Kirkland. This is a great opportunity for pet owners to meet local pet sitters and dog walkers and learn about the services each has to offer. For more information, call 425-298-4480. Simplicity Decor 5th Anniversary: Simplicity Decor will celebrates its fifth anniversary with a party from 12-7 p.m. Feb. 19 at 126 Park Lane. Fabulous prizes and giveaways, plus snacks and beverages. Everything in the store will be 15-75 percent off. For information, call 425-803-0386.

Feb. 25 Kirkland Transit Center Opens: Join city and county officials for the Kirkland Transit Center ribbon cutting at 11 a.m. Feb. 25 at Third Street and Park Lane. Buses will begin running from the new transit center on Feb. 26. For information, visit www. soundtransit.org.

Feb. 26 Free Electronic Waste Recycling Event: Bring your old, broken, or used electronics for recycling to Metropolitan Market Kirkland parking lot from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feb 26. Drop off for free: TVs, computers, monitors, laptops and cell phones. Other electronics, small recycling fee applies. For more information, call 425-239-4118 or e-mail sales@e-wastes. com.

March 7 Kirkland Cachet Award: Join fellow members of Kirkland’s creative community for the presentation of the first annual Kirkland Cultural Council and Mayor’s Cachet Award from 5:30-7:30 p.m. March 7 at Heritage Hall, 203 Market St., Kirkland. Enjoy a musical performance by celebrated electric six-string violinist Geoffrey Castle and a special heritage presentation by Loita Hawkinson, Kirkland Heritage Society president. Light hors d’ oeuvres will be served. RSVP to Julie Huffman at jhuffman@ci.kirkland.wa.us or 425-587-3012.

Portrait in Oil Workshop: Discover how to paint a portrait in this two-day workshop from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feb. 26 and March 5 at the Kirkland Arts Center. Cost is $110 members; $130 non-members. To register, call 425-822-7161 or visit www.kirklandartscenter.org. Exploring Your Sketchbook Workshop: Explore your sketchbook with Larry Calkins, who just returned from Italy, where he explored the artworks of the masters. In this mixed media workshop you will learn how to get in the habit of drawing and creating a dialog with your sketchbook. Runs from 6-9 p.m. March 12-13 and March 16 at the Kirkland Arts Center. Cost is $170 members; $190 non-members. To register, call 425-822-7161 or visit www.kirklandartscenter.org. Palete Knife Painting Workshop: If you like textured painting this class is for you. Happens from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 12-13 at the Kirkland Arts Center. Cost is $130 members; $150 non-members. To register, call 425-822-7161 or visit www. kirklandartscenter.org. Over Again: For their Kirkland debut, New York-based Alison Brady and DC-based Sarah Knobel present a two-person exhibition of photography and video, “Over Again” through March 3 at the Kirkland Arts Center, 620 Market Street, Kirkland. Both artists work primarily in photography, creating personal and darkly humorous revisions of such classical formats as the portrait and the female nude. For information, call 425-822-7161. Sunday Life: Work from a live model during this drop-in drawing, painting or sculpting session that runs from 1-4 p.m. March 13 and 20 at the Kirkland Arts Center. Open to the community; registration not required. Cost is $8 model fee per session. For information, visit www.kirklandartscenter.org. Early Music Fridays: Early Music Fridays, presented by Northlake Unitarian Universalist Church and the Early Music Guild location, will be held at 8 p.m. at Northlake Unitarian Universalist Church, 308 4th Ave S, Kirkland. Tickets are $20 general, $15 seniors, $10 Students and NUUC members. More information is available at 206-3257066 or www.earlymusicguild.org. The next

Artluck!: On the last Friday of each month, artists come to Kirkland Arts Center to share a meal, view new work, and discuss current art issues. Each month features a short presentation or exercises to boost creativity. Potluck begins at 6:30 p.m. at KAC, 620 Market St. Kirkland Arts Center Store: This is the place for unique, affordable, quality work in 2-D, ceramics, jewelry, sculpture, fiber arts, glass, and more. Conveniently located at 336 Parkplace, Kirkland Arts Center’s store is open seven days a week, and offers art-making activities for kids and special in-store events. Store hours are MondaySaturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information call 425-827-8219. Live Guitarist: Guitarist Jake Olason takes requests from 7-10 p.m. every Wednesday at St. James Espresso, 355 Kirkland Ave. For information, visit www.kirklandsbestcoffee.com.

BOOKS Book Launch Party: Join community members as Parkplace Books celebrates the release of Bob Neir’s newest book, “Silent Guns,” a historical suspense story set in the Pacific Northwest filled with intrigue and fast moving action. A long-time Kirkland resident and former Kirkland mayor, Neir is also the author of “A City Comes of Age: Political History of Kirkland 1965-1995.” Join the party at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 19 at Parkplace Books, 348 Parkplace Center. For information, call 425-828-6546. Reading Circle: The group will discuss “In the Heart of the Canyon,” by Elisabeth Hyde at 7 p.m. Feb. 22 at Parkplace Books, 348 Parkplace Center. Open to all.

graph on “What the Library Means to Me.” The first 35 who submit their entries before March 15 will be invited to a Fancy Dress Up Tea Party at the Kirkland Woman’s Club in the afternoon of March 26. Entry forms are at the library.

Intervention Classes: Residence XII is offering a free intervention class from 6:308 p.m. March 14 at 12029 113th Ave. N.E., Kirkland. Call 425-823-8844 to register.

Libraries Closed: Closed for President’s Day Feb. 21.

Free Legal Clinics: Eastside Legal Assistance Program, a nonprofit that provides free and low-cost legal services in King County, announced that its volunteer attorneys are offering a free legal consultation clinic at the Kirkland/Northshore Hopelink. The clinics, which are designed to help low-income residents of east King County understand and assess civil legal issues, will take place twice a month. To make an appointment, call 425-747-7274. Free Break Dancing for teens: Practice your freezes, flexes, spins, pops and locks and get rock-solid footwork as you develop your own unique break-style. Classes are held from 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Kirkland Teen Union Building. No previous dancing experience required. Visit www.ktub.org/programs/.

LIBRARY The following programs happen at the Kirkland Library. For information, call 425-822-2459: Fancy Dress Up Tea Party: The Kirkland Woman’s Club and the Kirkland Library invite children ages 4-12 to write a para-

Norman Rockwell and the American Dream: Art Historian Susan Olds documents the major accomplishments of one of America’s best-loved illustrators as well as a glimpse of Rockwell’s personal life at 2 p.m. Feb. 19.

Preschool Story Time: Happens at 11 a.m. Feb. 22. Baby Story Time: Begins at 1:30 p.m. Feb. 22. Hopelink ESL Lab: Come to the free ESL Talk Time Lab to practice your English speaking or writing skills at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 22. Wonderful Ones Story Time: Happens at 10 a.m. Feb. 23. Family Story Time: Begins at 11 a.m. Feb. 23.

Toddler Story Time: Happens at 10 a.m. Feb. 22.

Talk Time: Improve your speaking and listening skills in this English conversation group at 5 p.m. Feb. 23.

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST

Lake Washington Christian Church Worship Sunday: 10:30 AM

Northlake Unitarian Universalist Church

343 15th Ave, Kirkland

Sunday Services: 10:30 am Children’s Classes: 10:30 am

425-822-4637

www.lwchristian.org

308 4th Avenue S. www.northlakeuu.org

Rev. Marian Stewart

To advertise in this Worship Directory Please call Johanne Lund 425-822-9166 Ext. 1550 or email: jlund@kirklandreporter.com

Crossword Puzzle Answers next week

Knit Too Readers: The group will discuss “Cutting for Stone,” by Abraham Verghese at 3 p.m. Feb. 27 at Parkplace Books, 348 Parkplace Center. Open to all. “Words @TheWoodmark”: The series is designed as a complimentary author happy hour featuring an author discussion, Q&A and a book signing. The next series is 10 a.m. Feb. 26 at The Woodmark Hotel, 1200 Carillon Point. Robin Preiss Glasser, illustrator of the “Fancy Nancy” book series, will read from the newest book in the series. Also, from 6-7:30 p.m. Feb. 28, Author Joseph C. Piscatella will discuss his book “Prevent, Halt & Reverse Heart Disease: 109 Things You Can Do.” Space is extremely limited. RSVPs are required and will be accepted at 425-827-1986 or rsvp@ thewoodmark.com.

BUSINESS Kirkland First: This free service offered by the City of Kirkland gives local businesses and consumers the opportunity to connect and do business locally. Kirkland businesses or non-profits are invited to create a free listing on the Web site or search for local Kirkland businesses quickly in one place, at Kirklandfirst.org. For information, contact Elizabeth Ordos at 425-587-3013.

CLASSES Free Rain Garden Workshop: Join

PUBLIC NOTICES To place your Legal Notice in the Kirkland Reporter please call Linda Mills at 253-234-3506 or e-mail

PUBLIC NOTICES

Across 1. Electronic money 6. Campus area 10. Fancy marbles 14. Isuzu model 15. “Do ___ others as...” 16. Advil target 17. “Remember the ___!” 18. Clickable image 19. Can of worms? 20. Area above home plate 22. “Major” animal 23. Cutting tool 24. Thin and slippery 26. George or Ira

31. Caribbean, e.g. 32. Sundae topper, perhaps 33. Decorated, as a cake 35. Big name in cheese 39. Computer type 40. Honorary title for Muslims 42. Asian nurse 43. Abominable Snowmen 45. Impose, as a tax 46. ___ function 47. “Bingo!” 49. Sluggish feeling 51. Lug

55. “The Matrix” hero 56. Boast 57. Private secondary school 63. Ashcroft’s predecessor 64. Airport pickup 65. Kind of anchor 66. Aroma 67. Arabic for “commander” 68. File 69. Jerk 70. Small, rectangular paving stone 71. Affirmatives

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ARTS

Skylight Open Studio: Kirkland Arts Center students and members are invited to enjoy free weekly drawing and painting sessions from 1-5 p.m. Fridays in the Skylight Room at the Kirkland Arts Center. For information, visit www.kirklandartscenter.org.

Stewardship Partners for this free evening workshop and learn how to build your own rain garden to help soak up rainwater from downspouts, driveways and sidewalks while protecting our local waterways. The workshop runs from 6-8 p.m. March 8 at Kirkland City Hall, Council Chambers, 123 Fifth Ave. Receive a free rain garden manual and additional materials. Advance registration appreciated by contacting Stacy at 206-292-9875 or e-mailing sg@stewardshippartners.org.

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Fighting Homelessness KITH Luncheon: Join KITH for its second annual luncheon to fight homelessness from 121:15 p.m. March 11 at The Woodmark Hotel, 1200 Carillon Point, Kirkland. Featuring keynote speaker Bill Block, project director, Committee to End Homelessness, a regional coalition hosted by King County. There is no cost for the luncheon. The suggested minimum donation is $100. For information, visit www.kithcares.org.

concert is March 11 and features The Lonely & Broken Cellist: Music for Unaccompanied Cello from and inspired by the Baroque.

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KIRKLAND

CALENDAR

March 11

Down 1. “-zoic” things 2. Stallion, once 3. Jewish month 4. 18-wheeler 5. Lewis Carroll’s caterpillar had one 6. Odd 7. Remarkable 8. Agreeing (with) 9. Recipients 10. Blank slate 11. Mites 12. Beat together 13. Bristles 21. Astronomer Hubble 25. 100 qintars 26. Bloody 27. Ashtabula’s lake 28. Medical advice, often 29. Promotes welfare of children 30. Kind of post 34. Large sofa 36. Gulf V.I.P. 37. Canine tooth 38. He and she 41. Memory units 44. “___ Cried” (1962 hit) 48. Gala, e.g. 50. Field or ice 51. New England catch 52. Belief 53. Accept 54. Choice 58. Give off, as light 59. Blood pigment 60. Horace volume 61. Shrek, e.g. 62. Tin and lead pewters


[18] February 18, 2011 Evening Story Time: Ages 3-6 and their families. Happens at 7 p.m. Feb. 23.

www.kirklandreporter.com Chinese Language Story Time: Ages 2-6 and their families. Begins at 11 a.m. Feb. 24.

Sudoku

Answers next week

3

6

8

2

7

9

4

5

1

2

7

4

8

1

5

6

3

9

5

9

1

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4

6

2

8

7

6

8

9

5

3

1

7

2

4

4

2

5

6

8

7

1

9

3

7

1

3

4

9

2

5

6

8

8

3

2

7

5

4

9

1

6

9

4

6

1

2

3

8

7

5

1

5

7

9

6

8

3

4

2

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3x3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9.

Early Literacy Party in Spanish: Spanishspeaking families with children newborn to age 5. Happens at 6 p.m. Feb. 24.

Overeaters Anonymous: Meets at 7 a.m. Tuesday at Bellevue Alamo Club, 12302 N.E. 8th St. All are welcome.

SUPPORT GROUPS

ONGOING

GFWC Kirkland Woman’s Club: The woman service organizations meets twice a month at noon the first Thursday of each month and 1 p.m. the third Thursday of each month at the Kirkland Woman’s Club, 407 First St., Kirkland. For reservations, call 425-829-7720.

Free Assessments: Residence XII, a nonprofit alcohol and chemical dependency treatment center for women and their families in Kirkland, offers free assessments to women who are considering seeking treatment for their addictions. Residence XII’s assessment and referral counselors are available 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday-Friday. To make an appointment, call 425-823-8844 or 800-776-5944. To learn more about the assessment, visit www.residencexii. org/assessment.html.

Eastside The Compassionate Friends: For any parent who has experienced the death of a child, at any age, from any cause. The group meets the second Thursday of every month from 7:30-9:30 p.m. at the Holy Spirit Lutheran Church, 10021 N.E. 124th St., Kirkland. For information, call 425-325-0357. The Eastside Welcome Club: Meets the first Wednesday of the month at 10 a.m. in members homes and on various days of the month for other activities and outings. If you are new to the area and want to meet new people and join in different interests and social groups, please contact Sharon at 425-836-9224.

Difficulty level: 18

...obituaries

Kirkland Moms Network: An on-line support group for stay-at-home moms (or dads) who live in or near the Kirkland area. The group meets several times a month for outings and play dates. For more information, visit http:// kirklandmomsnetwork.groupsite.com.

Augusta (Moree) Scott

456753

Augusta (Moree) Scott, 94, of Wichita, KS, retired teacher and Montessori school director, passed away Wednesday, February 9, 2011. The service was held on Saturday, February 12, at Downing & Lahey Mortuary East,Wichita. Preceded in death by husband, Norval A. Scott, siblings, Eileen Foster,W. E. Moree, Fyrn Crites,W. C. Moree and Melvin Moree. Survivors: daughters, Jane Icke (Russ) and Naomi Scott, both of Wichita, KS; sister-in-law, Mrs.W. C. Moree and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Memorials to: Sharon Baptist Church, 2221 S. Oliver, Wichita, KS, 67218. Tributes via www.dlwichita.com

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JOB FAIR

Saturday, February 19, 10AM – 1PM We are a busy aerospace supplier seeking to expand. We offer top pay and a full benefits package to include medical, dental, vision, and employer matching 401k. Come in and meet our crew or send in a resume/application. Whether you are a journeyman or an apprentice, we want to talk to you!

      

Eastside Community Aid Thrift Shop: ECA is an all-volunteer non-profit organization that raises money through its thrift shop. All profits are donated back into the Eastside community through grants. No experience needed. Fun way to give back to your immediate community. Open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Volunteer a couple of hours, half a day or all day once a week. Call or visit ECA Thrift Shop at 12451 116th Ave. N.E., Kirkland. For information, call 425-825-1877. Kirkland Arts Center: KAC relies on volunteers with all skill levels for special events, gallery, outreach, and arts education programs. Interested persons should contact Ashley Baldonado, volunteer coordinator, at 425-822-7161. Kirkland Performance Center: Each performance at KPC is staffed with volunteers who help take tickets/ usher, manage concessions and assist with pre- and post-performance needs. Front of house volunteering at KPC is a great way to see shows and become more involved in the community. Visit www.kpcenter. org/volunteer.htm to sign up, or for further information about ushering or other front of house duties, please contact the Box Office Manager at info@kpcenter.org. Evergreen Hospice and Palliative Care: Volunteers are needed to serve patients and families throughout King and Snohomish coun-

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ties. The hospice and palliative care volunteers provide service to the patient and family by providing companionship, life review, compassionate presence, light household help, running errands, or providing respite so the primary caregiver can have a break. To learn more about the volunteer program, call 425-899-1040 and/ or apply online at www.evergreenhealthcare. org/hospice.

Kirkland. Guests are welcome! For information, contact Paul Yarbrough at 425-822-1428.

MEETINGS

Job’s Daughters: The organization seeks girls 10-18 years old to join the youth organization of Job’s Daughters. New friendships, leadership and fun. Call for more information: 425-821-3992.

Kiwanis Club of Kirkland: The group meets from 12-1:15 p.m. every Wednesday at the Crab Cracker in Kirkland. The global organization of volunteers is dedicated to changing the world one child and one community at a time. Kiwanis Club of Kirkland: The group meets from 12:15-1:15 p.m. every Wednesday at the Crab Cracker in Kirkland. The global organization of volunteers is dedicated to changing the world one child and one community at a time. Rotary Club of Kirkland Downtown: Weekly meetings held on Tuesday mornings at the Crab Cracker restaurant in Kirkland begin with coffee, conversation and a buffet breakfast at 7:15 a.m. For information, visit www.RCKD. org. Rotary Club of Kirkland: The club meets at 6:15 p.m. Mondays at the Woodmark Hotel, 1200 Carillon Point. For information, contact Barb Seaton at: tbseaton@comcast.net or 206-782-3815. Weekly Roundtable: Join community members to discuss “Local Perspectives on Market Uncertainty: How are we feeling about the markets and why.�The group will informally discuss how volatility in the markets affects each of us, and participants can share ways for others to feel positive about making decisions during turbulent times. Open to all over 21, but sign-up required as room space is limited to six each week. The free roundtable runs at 6 p.m. Wednesdays at 2205 Carillon Point, Kirkland. Call Chris at 425-766-8797. Kirkland Eclectics: Kirkland Eclectics, a Toastmaster Club, meets from 7-9 p.m. Thursday evenings at Merrill Gardens Retirement Community, 201 Kirkland Avenue in downtown

Announcements

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Employment General

Soroptimist International BellevueMetro: Business meeting is at 6 p.m. the second Wednesday of each month. Call for location. Program meeting is at noon the fourth Wednesday of each month at the Bellevue Library, 1111 10th Ave. N.E., Bellevue. For information, call Sherry Schuler, 425-614-2749.

NEIGHBORHOODS North Rose Hill Board Meeting: Meets at 7 p.m. Feb. 21 at Fire Station 26, 9930 124th Ave. N.E.

CITY MEETINGS Houghton Community Council: Meets the fourth Monday of each month at 7 p.m., City Hall. The next meeting is Feb. 28. Design Review Board: Meets the first and third Monday of each month at 7 p.m., Kirkland City Hall. The Feb. 21 meeting is cancelled. For information, call 425-587-3229. Ethics Task Force: Meets at 4 p.m. the first and third Monday of each month at Kirkland City Hall, Houghton Room. For information, call 425-587-3030. King County Fire District No. 41 Commissioners Meeting: Meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at 3 p.m., 520 Kirkland Way, Suite 400. The next meeting is Feb. 22. For information, call 425-587-3662. Planning Commission: Meets the second and fourth Thursday of each month at 7 p.m., City Hall Council Chambers. The next meeting is Feb. 24. For information, call 425-587-3227. Employment General

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Eastside Genealogical Society: 7 p.m. the second Thursday of the month. All are welcome to attend and learn how to search for family. Also free genealogical help available: 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays and 1-3 p.m. Wednesdays. All at Bellevue Regional Library, NE 12th St and 110th Ave. NE, Bellevue.

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Kirkland Reporter, February 18, 2011  

February 18, 2011 edition of the Kirkland Reporter

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