Page 1

VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2011 â– DAILY UPDATES AT WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM â–  75 CENTS

From Lille to Mount Si: Meet Pierre, visiting teen student Page 6

Hot week for Smith, Nelson, Mount Si boys basketball team Page 9

INDEX OPINION 4 5 LETTERS ON THE SCANNER 11 12 MOVIE TIMES 13 OBITUARIES 13,14 CLASSIFIEDS 15 CALENDAR

Vol. 98, No. 30

Ridge elk hunt on hold

Comfort and joy

Public outcry slows plan to deploy master hunters, kill three elk

Huge effort, dramatic donations to One VOICE, Kiwanis Giving Tree only just keep up with need

BY SETH TRUSCOTT

BY SETH TRUSCOTT

Editor

Editor

A plan to kill three elk near the TPC Snoqualmie Ridge’s 12th tee is on hold, as course owners weigh their options amid a barrage of opposition to the hunt. With damage to the greens caused by a band of about 20 resident elk worsening over the last two years, TPC staff had worked with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife on a plan to deploy rifle-armed master hunters to the course. Specially trained hunters were to kill up to three cows in an effort to push the band off the course. The first day of the hunt would have been Monday, Dec. 12, but the first hunter’s schedule fell through. And as word spread of the hunting plan, announced by the city of Snoqualmie on Dec. 12, opposition grew. By Thursday afternoon, Dec. 15, the hunt had been put on hold at the request of the course, wildlife officials reported. The Snoqualmie Police Department, which had OK’d the hunt, fielded dozens of calls and e-mails, mostly in opposition to the shoot for reasons of safety and humane treatment of elk. Still others supported the hunt, with a handful asking how they could take part.

Sorting toys at the North Bend Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Zoe Thompson, 13, is impressed with the wall of Barbies and babies in front of her. “I was a big fan of baby dolls,� Zoe remembers. She’s not here to play or reminisce, just volunteer, but she smiles as she sorts toys that will soon go out to hundreds of needy families in the Valley. “It warms your heart,� said the Twin Falls Middle School student, who helped drum up support for the Kiwanis Giving Tree toy drive at school. “It makes your own Christmas better.� The Giving Tree is just one facet of the new One VOICE Holiday Event that drew on volunteers from local schools, churches and clubs from across the Valley, and is helping a growing number of needy people in the Valley.

SEE HUNT ON HOLD, 2

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Humbled by the show of generosity to meet still-growing holiday need, Kim Irving and Tami Mills, in back, and Joanne Perry and Diane Garvey, in front, sort toys for the Kiwanis Giving Tree and One VOICE Holiday Event, held Thursday and Friday, Dec. 14 and 15, at the North Bend Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

Shots in the dark Poaching’s impact on local elk herd happens behind the scenes BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

S

hots cracked in the pre-dawn twilight across vacant, wooded land behind North Bend’s Mountain Valley Center. The .22 caliber bullets felled two elk, one a year-old ‘spike’ bull, the other a 3-year-old branch bull. The older

SEE ONE VOICE, 2

bull elk would ‘Shots in the normally be a dark’ is the final fine prize, but story in a two-part at this time and series on the complace, both kills plex presence of elk are wholly illegal. in the Snoqualmie Witnesses heard Valley. The first the shots, and story looked at the the opportunistic volunteer effort shooter never got underway to collar to claim his kills. and track elk. Now, they’re just another difficult poaching case in Chris Moszeter’s file. The dual poachings took place just before 7 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15, and are exceptional because they were noticeable. Such visible, confirmed kills are the tip of a murky iceberg of poaching in the Valley, much of which is never reported.

Eyes on the herd

SEE POACHING, 3

YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER, SERVING THE COMMUNITIES OF SNOQUALMIE â– NORTH BEND â–  FALL CITY â–  PRESTON â–  CARNATION www.lesschwab.com 551335

SPORTS

SCHOOLS

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

&/PSUI#FOE8BZt/PSUI#FOEt


t%FDFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

ONE VOICE FROM 1 The big cultural room at the church was overflowing with goods as volunteers set up the holiday event on Wednesday, Dec. 14. Over the next two days, the One VOICE Holiday Event drew more than 300 families, including some 750 children, to the church, where they could pick up children’s gifts, clothing, household and hygiene items collected by the Kiwanis Club, Encompass, Snoqualmie Valley Alliance Church, Cascade Covenant Church and local businesses and charitable organizations. Leftovers will go to the Mount Si Senior Center, Gift of Apparel, Eastside Baby Corner and the Valley Teen Closet.

“One VOICE umbrellas all of it,� said Stacey Cepeda, a facilitator for the group who works for Encompass Northwest. The group didn’t eliminate other group’s drives, but helped to get them acting in concert. It helped charge up the toy drive, referred families to the Snoqualmie Fire Department for their food drive, and funneled its own food donations to the food bank. “As a group, we can strategize,� Cepeda said. “It prevents people from being overloaded.� “It’s only going to get bigger, smoother, more involving,� added fellow Encompass employee Clay Eals. “Just think about what it will be next year, or five years from now. It’s a sum greater than its parts.� Families are referred to One VOICE through partners

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

including the Mount Si Food Bank, Encompass, the Kiwanis and school counselors. There are no eligibility requirements. Participants simply have to tell someone they need help.

Ongoing need That solid wall of toys that Zoe Thompson and her fellow Twin Falls Key Club members had helped stack was down to nearly bare shelves as the last families arrived Friday afternoon. “It’s getting down there,� Kiwanis Club officer Paul Tredway said. “We’re just hoping we don’t have to go shopping again.� The group had already spent $2,200 to shop for toys. Witnessing the outpouring of donations, Tredway has two reactions: Amazement at the

generosity, and a more sober awareness of the Valley’s growing needs. The list of children in need of holiday gifts rose by about 100 this year. “We keep seeing more need,� Tredway said. At the same time, he is impressed by the triumph that One VOICE represents. “This partnership was incredible,� Tredway said. “It was really the thing to do. From now on, we will keep this going.� Likewise, the North Bend Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Days Saints is the right place for the distribution. “We couldn’t have done it without them,� Tredway said. Not every Giving Tree placard had been taken, but that’s typical, and the group usually

has to do some shopping in the final run-up to distribution. But there’s also an ongoing wave of need that continues up to Christmas. “After today, we will get all kinds of requests,â€? Tredway said. “Hopefully, we will have some donations in after the fact, because we’re real low.â€? “For struggling families, the outpouring of generosity is so big in November and December,â€? Cepeda said. “February is a tough month‌ Transition periods are hard for families. By the time they’re geared up for winter, it’s summer.â€? While there are no answers today about how to meet unending need, the group is already planning ahead. One VOICE will meet in January to

consider 2012’s solutions. If the success of One VOICE’s Holiday Event is any indication, those solutions will continue to happen with unity. “There is the effort of so many people here,� said Diane Garvey, an LDS volunteer who was helping ready the Kiwanis Club’s big toy display. “You have all these other organizations stepping in.� “It’s very rewarding,� added fellow volunteer Joanne Perry. “It’s like a perpetual motion machine. Once you get going, you don’t want to stop.� t 5PZT BOE NPOFZ EPOBtions can be dropped off at the Sallal Water Association’s office through Christmas to help the Giving Tree. The office is located at 44021 S.E. Tanner Rd., Suite E.

Pollard remains winner in recount

551305

Gene Pollard of Snoqualmie is the official winner in the race for Commissioner Position 3 on the Snoqualmie Valley Hospital Board. The hand recount of ballots, completed Tuesday, Dec. 13, resulted in one less vote for each candidate, and two more votes counted as blank. When the results were certified Friday, Dec. 16, by the King County Canvassing Board Pollard won the recount by six votes, 4,612 to 4,606. Of the 13,577 ballots cast in this race, 4,314 were blank, and 45 were cast for write-in candidates.

CELEBRATE

WELCOME TO....

We believe every child should be treated the way we would like our own children to be treated.

OUR LADY OF SORROWS CATHOLIC CHURCH 555479

39025 Alpha St. Snoqualmie, WA PMPTPSHt

Tuesday December 20th 7pm

It is our goal to implement the highest standard of care at every patient encounter whether it is a child’s first visit to the dental office, a teenager who is headed off to college or a special-needs adult patient we’ve been seeing for decades.

JOIN US FOR CHRISTMAS

Simbang Gabi (Filipino Advent Tradition)

Saturday December 24th, Christmas Eve Masses 3pm (church), 3pm (Hall), 5pm (church), 5pm (Hall), 8pm and 12 Midnight

Sunday December 25th, Christmas Day 9:00 am and 11:00 am

Fr Roy Baroma, Priest Administrator

Wishing you a Merry Christmas

WE HAVE 2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

Mount Si Christmas Eve Worship Services Lutheran Church

Saturday, Dec. 24, 2011 7:00 p.m. Praise Candlelight Worship 10:00 p.m. Traditional Candlelight Worship

Christmas Day Worship Service

Now preferred provider for Premera.

Pastor Mark Griffith Mount Si Lutheran Church Located in North Bend 411 NE 8th Street and Ogle 425 888-1322

New Year’s Day Worship Service Sunday, Jan. 1, 2012 9:30AM Worship with Holy Communion

559430

562104

Sunday, Dec. 25, 2011 9:30AM Christmas Worship with Holy Communion Have a Blessed Christmas!


4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt%FDFNCFS t

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

hunter also take part if the hunt does move forward, as the course’s land includes a sacred Tribal burial ground.

HUNT ON HOLD FROM A1 Voices against the hunt Fall City resident Brad Canady was among the dozens of callers who spoke to local wildlife officials, urging them to call off the hunt. Canady applauded the decision to put it on hold. He says hunt planners haven’t exhausted all their options. “The idea of high-powered weapons shooting around people, houses, just seemed absurd,” Canady said. Low risk is still risk, he added. In his own Internet research, Canady said he found promising statistics on birth control drugs for wildlife, which he unsuccessfully urged the wildlife department to consider. “Organizations need to be responsible and understand that they do live in a community,” he said. “I’m glad they’re reconsidering this action and not moving forward with the hunt. I hope they make it a permanent decision.” The Snoqualmie Tribe also spoke out against the hunt. “Sustainable and low-impact development should include ways to co-exist with wildlife,” Tribal Administrator Matt Mattson stated. “The controlled hunt on the TPC golf course is counter to this philosophy, and counter to the wishes of the Snoqualmie Tribe.” However, Mattson also requested that a Tribal master

POACHING FROM 1 Opportunistic shooters Last month’s shooting happened in city limits. The weapon used was illegal for elk hunting, too small a calibre for a humane kill. “In my book, that’s outright poaching,” said Moszeter, an enforcement officer for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. “There’s no rhyme or reason to why they did it,” other than opportunism. Until lawfully harvested, all wildlife is considered the property of the state. The scavenging of animal parts, such as antlers, from animals that die of accidents or natural causes is also illegal. Fines can run into the thousands of dollars. If the Nov. 15 poacher is ever caught and convicted, he would face two counts of unlawful hunting of big game with an unlawful weapon. The fines would start at $1,080, with an additional penalty of $2,000 per animal. Trophy bulls bring even higher fines. Despite the penalties, the Valley’s 400-strong elk population draws poachers along with wildlife watchers, photographers and respectable hunters. Generalizing local poaching is difficult. Poaching can happen at any time—local elk watchers say poachers generally hunt after dusk, and dress in dark colors rather than blaze orange. Shots in the dark can be a give-away, as are strange or out-of-place vehicles in areas elk are known to frequent. Members of the Upper Snoqualmie Valley Elk Management Group have noticed cars occupied by armed men slowly trolling rural Snoqualmie neighborhoods, or heard bad elk calls followed by gunshots at odd hours.

Witnessing poaching Driving home on a late afternoon last September, Kalli Willson saw a magnificent bull elk emerge from a construction site on North Bend’s Cedar Falls Way.

“With elk, you’ve got to intercede at some point.”

they can and cannot shoot,” he said. “They’re held to a higher ethical and safety standard than the average hunter.” Moszeter said the hunters with modern rifles were selected because of their killing power, Safe and quick Chris Moszeter, compared with bows or muzzle-loaders. Chris Moszeter, the Fish and Wildlife WDFW enforcement officer “We want to be as effective as possible,” enforcement officer for the Valley who set he said. “If you tag an animal, we want it to up the hunt, agreed with Snoqualmie police drop dead now, we don’t want it running off. We want this spokeswoman Becky Munson that many callers didn’t fully to be quick, in, out, done.” understand what was supposed to happen, or why. If the TPC hunt hadn’t been publicized, “We could have “We’re trying to change the behavior of the elk by giving been in and out and gone, and nobody would have known the them a predator,” Moszeter said. difference,” he added. Master hunters, who are typically deployed by the state Moszeter denies that the TPC is getting special treatin conjunction with the Upper Snoqualmie Valley Elk ment—he works to help other property owners with similar Management Group, aren’t new to the Valley. problems, recognizing that some places, such as the Nursery In the last few years, master hunters have been sent to at Mount Si, which is plagued by hungry nocturnal elk, have rural neighborhoods like Three Forks or Moon Valley to different challenges. kill small numbers of elk, typically one or two cows. The Moszeter counters Canady’s appeal for population conreason the hunt was approved on the Ridge, Moszeter said, trol drugs, saying that method is “super expensive” and is because the plan was safe and effective. unproven. He says that delays just mean more damage and Master hunters were to hunt only on Mondays, when more cost to the course. the course was closed. Moszeter said their firing area was “With elk, you’ve got to intercede at some point,” he said. tightly-defined, far from homes and faced away from resi- “There are no predators other than cars. Do we really want dential areas. Master hunters go through a rigorous training people colliding with elk on 202 and I-90? We’re sitting here process, and “are confined to a very small window of where waiting for something bad to happen.”

Who to call To report a poaching in progress, call 9-1-1. In a non-emergency situation, call the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-877-933-9847. Turning her car around, the North Bend resident quickly looked to see if there were any other elk in the vicinity. With none in view, she resumed her trip. “Just then, I heard gunfire,” Willson recalled. “Three shots— pow, pow, pow.” Willson, a former member of the Upper Snoqualmie Valley Elk Management Group, knew that she was in city limits. She also knew it was archery season for elk—“there should not be any gunfire.” With her three children in the car, she didn’t care to investigate further. But in her mind, the pieces fit—Willson couldn’t help but think she had nearly stumbled onto poachers. The average person, unaware of hunting regulations, might not have realized what was going on. But Willson, who occasionally hears distant gunfire from her home, knows that illegal hunting happens here, wittingly or unwittingly. “We’ve well publicized that we’ve got a lot of elk in the Valley. That is no big secret,” Willson said. “We’ve created a situation that perhaps, we did not intend.” Elk Management Group member Jim Gildersleeve has witnessed poaching. He knows it happens locally, and feels revulsion at the waste, needless suffering and scoffing of the law. “Frankly, it upsets me,” he said. “There are a lot of respectable hunters out there who do the right thing. Poachers don’t do that.” A few years ago, elk watchers found several dead cows feathered by arrows. “People are repulsed that poachers would so wantonly slaughter wildlife,” Gildersleeve said.

How many elk are poached annually is impossible to verify. Elk watchers believe that about 150 elk go missing every year, either dying of natural causes, road kills, predation, or migrating from the Valley. Legal hunting claims only a fraction of that total. For the entire game management area that includes the Valley, from Rattlesnake Mountain east to the Cascade Crest trail and north to Monroe, hunters take about 50 animals a year. Of the remainder, elk watchers are unsure how much poachers claim. “Most of it goes unobserved and unreported,” Gildersleeve said. “Occasionally, we have arrests and prosecution. It’s very difficult to collect the evidence, catch them in the act, to infiltrate them… exceedingly difficult and time consuming.” Some poachers may have their excuses—elk group member Harold Erland suspects that some may poach simply for food—but some do it for commercial gain. Elk horn, bear paws or gall bladders can fetch top dollar, for example, in medicinal black markets. “A lot of illegal activity is obviously a commercial enterprise,” Gildersleeve said. “That’s what’s so despicable.” The way Erland sees it, poachers deplete a public resource, which helps fund conservation and preserve future hunting opportunities. Hunters “pay for licenses to harvest an animal,” he says. “Poachers are taking animals that legal people would be able to take. They’re taking from honest people.”

Road kills Of course, not everything that looks like poaching is what it seems. The bulk of complaints to the local enforcement officer turn out to be road kills. “Most of the time, what people perceive as poaching is not the case,” Moszeter said. “You have to consider the counterpart that’s occurring on our highways,” Gildesleeve said.

Between Exit 27 and Snoqualmie Pass, as many as 100 elk are killed on Interstate 90 every year. In the Valley, 35 road kills were counted in 2011. But elk watchers have calculated that for every animal that falls by the roadside, three or four stagger away and fall in the wild. Since few people see that carnage, it’s easy to forget or accept. “The waste of wildlife is still there,” though, Gildersleeve said. Such waste is what moves elk watchers to do something about highway accidents and poaching. Right now, their main effort is in understanding the herd. The Elk Group is engaged in a multi-year study of the elk herd’s numbers, habits and movement. This winter, the group will trap around a dozen more animals, then put radio-tracking collars on their necks. The devices, which transmit for one or two years, keep a running log of where the elk are. That data helps elk watchers understand how the animals behave, and gives city and state officials an idea about how elk affect neighborhoods and highways. The Valley’s elk herd is currently stable at about 400 animals. Does the Valley have too many elk? Some property owners whose land is affected by the herds might say so. But folks like Jim Gildersleeve or Harold Erland come down solidly on the side of the law. “If it’s illegal, unethical, it shouldn’t be done,” Gildersleeve said. “That’s the side I’m with.” Gildersleeve and Erland want to see the herd effectively managed and balanced. The intersection between herd growth, legal, accidental and illegal kills “is a complex situation that I don’t think too many people in the Valley think about seriously,” Gildersleeve said. Some residents may know about the ugly side of the Valley’s reputation as prime wildlife habitat. “Is it enough for them to take action?” Gildersleeve asked. “I don’t think so. Only a few of us feel that way.”

Trespassing is problem loophole for some hunters For Chris Moszeter, the Valley enforcement officer for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, flagrant trespassing by hunters is as big a problem as poaching. The problem isn’t necessarily that of safety, but property rights, he said. In a typical violation, a hunter will ask for permission to hunt, a property owner will say no, but the hunter will hunt on their land anyway and accept the ticket, Moszeter said. “A $250 criminal trespassing ticket might be the cost of doing business for that trophy bull,” Moszeter said. “That causes a lot of frustration with homeowners.” Trespassing is a state-law crime, not a hunting violation. That means that even if a person is fined for trespassing, they can keep their deer or elk. The state has tried to close the loophole for years, to little avail—measures have failed to pass in the legislature. Moszeter believes savvy hunters know the ins and outs of the law. Changing it would mean that trespassing hunters would forfeit their kills and possibly their firearms and vehicles. “It hits them where it hurts,” he said.


WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

VALLEY VIEWS

SNOQUALMIE

t%FDFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

Getting ahead of the giving cycle

One VOICE’s first Holiday Event shows what happens when we come together

I

VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

1VCMJTIFS William Shaw

wshaw@valleyrecord.com

&EJUPS Seth Truscott struscott@valleyrecord.com



’ve never seen that many toys in one room before. Even some of the toy and hobby stores that have called the Valley home would have a hard time matching what the big church multipurpose room had amassed for the Kiwanis Giving Tree at the One VOICE Holiday Event. What’s equally amazing is that all those toys had vanished within a day and a half, collected by local families who need help with the basics to make a merry Christmas for their children. Three years SETH TRUSCOTT into the recession, we keep see- Valley Record Editor ing growing need in the Valley. It’s hard to quantify how much the Valley is hurting, but the sheer numbers— more than 700 children provided with presents this season—speak volumes, both about what’s happening locally and in how our Valley’s generosity continues to step up. Holiday drives, giving trees and bell ringers are nothing new here, but the One Voice Holiday Event that started this year is special. The sheer amount of charitable efforts that happen in the Valley can, frankly, be bewildering.

Every group seems to be doing something encouraging for their neighbors. The problem for a newspaper writer, as for a donator, is: Where do you start? One VOICE is attempting to bring order from clutter. They’re doing an amazing job so far; heaps of toys, clothing and goods came in. Now, they turn to the real challenge, meeting the needs of the Valley in the months after Christmas, when the giving slows and the awareness fades. Meanwhile, there is still an effort to meet the needs of the holidays. If you’d like to assist the Kiwanis Giving Tree make holidays brighter for children in these last days before Christmas, contact the Kiwanis Club’s Paul Tedway at Sallal Water Association (www.sallal. com). And when you’re ready to grasp the larger picture of charitable giving and need in the Valley, contact One VOICE (425-888-2777). When we pull together, we go farther.

It’s photo season I was walking down the street the other day when I was struck by the bold blaze of blue in the sky overhead. Early December days were amazingly dry and clear, and that’s enough of a rarity in a Washington winter to take notice. Hopefully, some of you made use of those glorious days to go out and shoot a few scenic winter shots for the 2012 reader Photo Contest. This is the Record’s fifth year of hosting the contest, and as much as you enjoy shooting these photos, we enjoy seeing them, judging them and sharing them with the Valley. Submitted photos should be at least 72 dpi and at least 14 inches wide by 11 inches tall. Limit your submissions to three photos. Entries must be received by Wednesday, Feb. 8. To enter or learn more, e-mail to editor@valleyrecord.com; call the Valley Record office at (425) 888-2311.

OUT of the

1"45 This week in Valley history

5IVSTEBZ  %FD   President Reagan has declared a disaster in Washington, following the destructive flood in the Valley Nov. 23-24.

5IVSTEBZ %FD  North Bend police recovered a stolen car that eluded law enforcement in five states, San Francisco and Seattle, on Dec. 12. The car was stolen from Wyoming. The driver was an 18-year-old man who had several unrelated warrants. He will be turned over to the FBI. t5ISFFMPDBMCVTJOFTTFTSFDFJWFEOBUJPOBM recognition in the 1962 editions of two travel books. The Gateway Cafe & Moritz Room in North Bend, and the Salish Lodge in Snoqualmie were recommended in “Adventures in Good Eating,â€? and the Sunset Motel in North Bend was recommended in “Lodging for a Night.â€?

What was the worst gift you’ve ever been given?

3FQPSUFS Carol Ladwig cladwig@valleyrecord.com

$SFBUJWF%FTJHOWendy Fried wfried@valleyrecord.com

"EWFSUJTJOH David Hamilton "DDPVOU dhamilton@valleyrecord.com &YFDVUJWF  $JSDVMBUJPO Patricia Hase %JTUSJCVUJPO circulation@valleyrecord.com .BJM10#PY  4OPRVBMNJF 8" 1IPOF 'BY XXXWBMMFZSFDPSEDPN $MBTTJGJFE"EWFSUJTJOH 800.388.2527 4VCTDSJQUJPOT $29.95 per year in King County, $35 per year elsewhere $JSDVMBUJPO425.241.8538 or 1.888.838.3000 The Snoqualmie Valley Record is the legal newspaper for the cities of Snoqualmie, North Bend and Carnation. Written permission from the publisher is required for reproduction of any part of this publication. Letters, columns and guest columns do not necessarily reflect the views of the Snoqualmie Record. PROUD SUPPORTER OF SNOQUALMIE VALLEY HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, SNOQUALMIE VALLEY SCHOOLS FOUNDATION, ENCOMPASS, MOUNT SI HELPING HAND FOOD BANK

“I don’t think I’ve ever gotten a bad one.� Dale Waller North Bend

“I’d say a really ugly pink sweatshirt. It had snowmen and kittens on it. I opened it at a party in front of all my friends.� Kyle Sproul Snoqualmie

“The worst thing was my son being on the hospital over Christmas, but I’ve never gotten a bad one. Anything that someone gives you, it’s a gift, it’s special.� Bobbie Sorenson Snoqualmie

“I can’t think of anything I’ve gotten that was bad, but I’m sure I’ve given some bad gifts.� Doug Garnes North Bend


4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt%FDFNCFS t

Jim, Karen and Lynnae McKiernan

Cleaning Authority hears One Voice Paul and Stephanie McMahon and everyone at The Cleaning Authority would like to give a special thanks to all of our customers who donated blankets and coats to One VOICE. It was just about this time last year when we wanted to do something to help out in the community, but being a fairly new business in the Valley, were not sure where to go. So this year, when Jim Jordan of St. Vincent DePaul came to our church and announced that they needed donations of coats and blankets for One VOICE, we knew exactly what we wanted to do. We reached out to our customers, asking for donations for this great cause. We had an overwhelming response and have so far collected 50 coats and 30 blankets. If it wasn’t for the generosity of our customers, we would have never been able to help this much. Thank you for being such wonderful customers. You have made someone’s winter a little warmer. Happy Holidays from all of us at The Cleaning Authority. Paul and Stephanie McMahon North Bend

A wonderful holiday night Another Christmas in Carnation has passed. It was a wonderful, cold night and our community came together for the traditional tree lighting ceremony. The Carnation Chamber of Commerce once again put on a memorable event. This year, things started early. With the city of Carnation having to make major budget cuts, we added, hopefully, a new tradition of having the community to help decorate the Tolt Commons. Also new this year was Breakfast with Santa. Thank you to Sliders and Cowgirls for hosting the event. All the food was donated by local businesses and community members. For a first-time event, this was a huge success! All proceeds from the breakfast benefit the Carnation Chamber. This helps the Chamber put on the

Christmas in Carnation event. The traditional Christmas in Carnation was Saturday, Dec. 3, with wagon rides by Dog Mountain Farm, a parade with elves and Frosty followed by the long-awaited Santa, who arrived on top of the fire truck. Santa was accompanied by the McKenzie Family, Corey, Andrew and their four daughters, Abby, Grace, Lanie and birthday girl Maggie, who turned 2. The family was given this gift by friends who won the honor at the Bridge of Promise Auction in November. The McKenzie Family had the privilege of switching on the lights to end the evening with the tree lighting. The Carnation Chamber of Commerce could not put this event on without the assistance of all the businesses that come out to support this event, either by volunteering or offering up their traditional goodies— Pete’s Club Grill’s chili, Sandy’s Espresso hot apple cider,

Starbucks coffee, and Camp Korey’s S’mores along with the Chamber handing out goodie bags and hot chocolate. Entertainment was by the Cedarcrest High School Band and Choir, Felonious Monk, Cascade Community Theatre, Mikaela and Jack Ballard, and face-painting. We could not put on this event without the help of the City of Carnation. The chamber would also like to thank Ryan Dalziel and Jamus Waters, who outdid themselves once again. Bob Gilbertson, a retired city employee who still lives in Carnation, once again helped out by decorating the Tolt Commons. Thank you to our community for coming out and supporting this event. Mark your calendars for next year, when Christmas in Carnation will be on Saturday, Dec. 1, 2012. Kim Lisk Carnation

IssaquahWomen’sClinic

Dr. Maria Holmes Board Certified in Obstetrics & Gynecology

Services include  r"FTUIFUJDT  r0CTUFUSJDT - Botox  r(ZOFDPMPHZ - Juvederm  r*OGFSUJMJUZ - Latisse  r.FOPQBVTF - Obagi  r6SJOBSZ*ODPOUJOFODF  r#JPJEFOUJDBM)PSNPOFT  r*OPGĂ DF/PWBTVSFGPSIFBWZQFSJPET  r*OPGĂ DF"EJBOBGPSQFSNBOFOUCJSUIDPOUSPM

Evening and Saturday Appointments Available with Dr. Mabel Obeng Call to schedule your appointment 425.651.4338 22500 SE 64th Place r Suite 120 r Issaquah, WA 98027 Dr. Mabel Obeng

549634

Karen, Lynnae and I have to say the last few weeks have been extremely difficult. No parent should have to lose a child, and the process of tying up loose ends, cleaning out his home, making arrangements for a funeral and the occasional tear that comes in a quiet moment was all made much easier because of all of you. I said it at the service, the measure of a person’s life is how many pay tribute after taking that last breath. It was obvious by the amount of love and support, that we have received, that James had a huge impact on the Valley. We are also comforted that you all had such a huge impact on our entire family. We may have moved physically to Moses Lake, but our hearts will forever be in the Snoqualmie Valley. It’s a great place to raise a family, to develop friendships, to get involved, and to make a difference. As Karen and I have talked this last week, we consistently came back to the question, “How are we ever going to thank all our friends?� No words or actions can possibly tell you how much you all mean to us, from the first friends showing up at our house as we were receiving news to the constant calls, Facebook posts, cards, flowers and text messages. You are all very special to us and we will always be there for you. Specifically we have to thank our Walker Warehouse gang. Jim, Cindy, daughters and that close-knit circle of friends that are the pillars of the community. Stephanie Huber, Patti Cabe, Patty Westover, Kelly Moe and the 50-plus people who showed

sports. Organized youth sports were extremely important in developing his character and we firmly believe it made him a much better, compassionate, driven young man. Donations can be mailed to or dropped off at the high school office.

www.issaquahwomens.com r.POEBZ'SJEBZBNQN

JOIN US AT FOR A MERRYY TIME! It's not just the great food and location - it's real people and real fun that make life at Red Oak the perfect choice for you.

Happy Holidays from all of us at Red Oak.

For information or tour, call 425.888.7108 r&BTU/PSUI#FOE8BZr/PSUI#FOE

563004

McKiernans are grateful for Valley friendships

up to help plan the food. Wow, that was amazing. The City of Snoqualmie, providing police escort, fire personnel at attention, fire trucks lining the route to the Fall City cemetery, thank you for making it something special. Our families, which, including extended family, numbered near 50 on Saturday, but most importantly my brother Doug, who has been with us every step of the way. A special thanks to our Blue Lake family, Randy, my pseudo brother and his family, the Gopals, and all the others who made it a special place for James. Thanks to the Jensen family for all their support and friendship over the last three years. Thanks to the pall bearers, all the best of friends. Monty Wright did an amazing job at the service and thanks to Charlie Kinnune for the impact he has had on hundreds of Valley youth, including James. We would be remiss if we didn’t say thank you to the staff at the High School and Snoqualmie Valley School district. For those who attended the service you saw an amazing performer, Austin Jenckes, sing and play guitar. Austin was a fun kid to coach in Viking football and is a gifted performer. He will be famous some day and James loved his music. Finally, thanks to Connell Grain Growers for giving a college graduate a chance, he really loved that job. For those wishing to remember James in a special way, please donate to the James McKiernan Memorial Scholarship fund at Mount Si High School. All the money collected will be used to help young athletes pay for the extra things that go along with wanting to play

551313 0

SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

LETTERS

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM


SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

SCHOOLS

t%FDFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

Korean visit Ten students from Gangjin, Korea, will arrive on January 4 for a student exchange at Mount Si High School.

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Small world French visitor sees small differences from urban home BY CAROL LADWIG Staff Reporter

It’s not the French food that Pierre Perez misses while on his year-long stay in the United States, so much as the ritual that surrounds it. “Really, the food here is fine,” says the 17-year-old Rotary exchange student. It’s just not given quite the same respect that it is at his home in Lille, one of the largest cities in France. At home, every meal is still a sit-down affair with his parents and younger brother Paul, and “in school, we take one hour to eat.” Pierre continues wistfully, “we have plates, knives, forks, glasses, a bottle of water on the table, bread – French bread of course, and des-

Are my eyes causing my headaches?

Rebecca Dale, MD Board Certified Eye Physician & Surgeon

If you are suffering from pain in or around your eyes, or have recently started having headaches, you may wonder if your eyes are the problem. T h e s h o r t a n sw er : Maybe.

sert.” The 30-minute lunch periods at Mount Si High School just don’t compare. Pierre is attending Mount Si for his senior year of high school, and living in Snoqualmie with Brad and Jill Toft and their two children, Wilson and Lauren. He will stay with another Rotary family for part of the year, too. The Tofts were excited to welcome Pierre into their family, especially after talking with other families who have hosted exchange students. “They’ve formed these lifelong relationships with these people in other countries, and become an integral part of their lives,” Brad said. “I would like our kids to be able to… have that experience.” Wilson, 12, has played host and tour guide to Pierre, taking him to various sporting events—Pierre plays soccer and lacrosse. At only a year younger than Pierre’s brother Paul, he’s also been a bit of a little brother, notably when it comes to teasing. “Most of the time it’s been fun, even though I lost my

$BSPM-BEXJH4UBGG1IPUP

The Toft family is hosting French exchange student Pierre Perez for part of his stay in the Valley this year, and learning about French culture, especially around meals together. Pictured clockwise from bottom left are Wilson and Lauren Toft, Pierre Perez, and Brad and Jill Toft. front seat in the car!” said Wilson, grinning. Every member of the family went through an adjustment when Pierre arrived in August. Jill, anxious to show Pierre the beauty of the area, overdid it at first. “I had him hike Mount Si,” she said, embarrassed. “I grossly underestimated the length of that hike!” “It was like his second day here!” added Lauren. The language barrier was quickly overcome on both sides, and Jill told Pierre that she’s seen great improvement in his English

Problems with the eyes--inflammation, elevated eye pressure, dryness and other surface issues, or occasionally a need for glasses--can cause pain in or around the eyes, and can also cause headaches. But the opposite is also true: headaches can generate pain that is felt in or around the eyes, even though the eye exam is normal and the eyes are not causing the headaches. So if you have eye pain, should you see your primary care provider or your eye care provider? Another short answer: Yes (maybe both). That's not meant to be flippant, but simply to say that if you are having new, changing or worsening eye pain or headaches, it is important to have your symptoms evaluated to consider the possibility of severe problems. A careful history evaluating the quality, location and frequency of your pain along with any associated symptoms can help identify the cause, which is the first step on the road to relief.

comprehension lately. Learning English is one advantage Mount Si has, and the main reason that Pierre wanted to have an exchange year through Rotary. His father, a businessman, encouraged him to go so he could improve his English. Ultimately, Pierre hopes to become a doctor, and fluency in English would serve him well, there, or in business, if he can’t get into the medical school he wants. “English is the language of commerce,” he said. “If you want to do economics, or history, you can’t speak French. Nobody else in the world speaks French.” Pierre likes the sevenhour school days at Mount Si, much shorter than the 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. days he spends at home, and he marvels at how cultural differences can affect what stu-

dents are taught. In France, for example, World War II started in 1939, two years earlier than American textbooks state. He laughed when someone asked him if they have Facebook in France. Of course they do, he said. How else could he stay in touch with his friends at home? “There is not a big difference here, but a lot of, lot of small differences,” he said. Most of the time, Brad said, Pierre handles all the change pretty well, but he does get homesick, and loves to talk with his family via Skype, when he can. The technology helps him reconnect to home. “It’s good. My mother can see me, see that I’m healthy, getting enough to eat” he said. “I’m not sure I could do this without the technology that we have today.”

A MODERN DAY MERCANTILE! $PVSUFTZ1IPUP

Old Time Charm!

Seniors from left, Cody Paxman, DJ Bergquist, Ryan Harjo, and Nik Werner, hold up their draft novels.

5PZTt%FDPS

CHS seniors complete full-length novels in worldwide writing challenge

/PWFMUJFTt)PVTFXBSFT )BSEXBSF

425.888.1107

See you soon! — Dr. Dale

(425) 292-0716 www.snofallseye.com

Much more than a hardware store! Located in Historic Downtown Snoqualmie

551370

562107

Carmichael’s True Value . . .

Cedarcrest teacher Amy Blooming announced the success of four of her “brave and slightly crazed creative writing students” who took up the challenge of writing a 50,000-word novel in November. National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) participants Cody Paxman, DJ Bergquist, Ryan Harjo and Nik Werner were among

300,000 student writers to complete the task. “These renegade raconteurs cranked out their tomes, ranging from 55 to over 200 pages long,” said Blooming. “I congratulate them on their amazing accomplishment!” NaNoWriMo is a worldwide event. For more information, visit www.nanowrimo.org.


4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt%FDFNCFS t

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Helping find the new you Staff Photo

The trainers and staff at Mount Si Sports + Fitness offer a variety of classes and one-on-one programs to help you reach your goals. Pictured are from left, front row, Lena Sigelstrom, Bri Dotson, Caryle Lowell, Crystal Kennedy, Ben Cockman, Francie Holland, Luci Coleman, Amber Sharon, Hannah Larson; back row, Samantha Pairis, Jamie Davis, Diann Pattermann, Journie Kirdain, Travis Boothe, Monica Rowland, Heidi Temple, Nedra McAskill, Jeff Scott, Casey Kisch, Lynn Grisham, Brandon Snyder.

Time for a resolution Mount Si Sports + Fitness can help you start a better lifestyle

T

he folks at Mount Si Sports + Fitness love the New Year season. Even though for some people, a New Year’s resolution is something that “goes in one year and out the other,” for many of us, it’s a time when it seems like we can start over

December 2011

and finally become the healthy, fit and productive person we’ve always wanted to be. The trouble is, the enthusiasm to make lifestyle changes, especially with nutrition and exercise, tends to fade once we realize that this is a marathon, not a sprint, and our goals are not achieved overnight. However, there are three things you can do to greatly improve your chance of success in adopting a sustainable, healthy lifestyle.

Adjust your attitude If you have the wrong attitude about fitness, you’re already setting yourself up for failure. Try a different perspective. Try looking at exercise as a break from a stressful workday—a way to immediately boost energy and mood, or perhaps it’s the only time you’ll have to yourself all day. SEE RESOLUTION, 8

VALLEY PROFILE

A Snoqualmie Valley Record Business Profile | Advertisement


t%FDFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

RESOLUTION FROM 7

Adventure Bootcamp allies with Mount Si Sports + Fitness

Implementing a new fitness routine can feel overwhelming, particularly if you haven’t been active in a while. You may be intimidated by the gym equipment or by the idea of exercising in front of others. You may also be over-stressed, not knowing exactly when to fit exercise into your already packed schedule. Don’t let these feelings be a show stopper! Motivation will not magically happen. You have to recommit to your goals each day. You will not always want to exercise and eat healthy. Even the most committed exerciser doesn’t always want to do it. Know that you will have to work on it every day.

Adjust your lifestyle Never forget that getting fit and managing your body weight is a lifetime prospect. You will never stop working on it. Before you start a nutrition plan or exercise program, ask yourself these questions: Can I sustain this nutrition plan for the long term? Is this exercise program something I can do every day? If the answer is “no,� you are wasting your valuable time. Identify your bad habits. Consider keeping a food/activity journal for an entire week. You might be surprised by what you learn. Decide in advance what your meal plan will be each week and don’t succumb to the temptation of fast food. Stock up on breakfast foods you like, keep meal replacement bars in the car or try healthy fruit shakes or smoothies.

Make a plan Set your goals. Write down specific goals you have (not just ‘I want to lose weight’), realistic target dates and what you think will happen and how you will feel when you reach your goal. Finally, make the decision that you will never, ever, give up! Of course, there are no shortcuts to any place worth going, but it is imperative that you believe you can be successful. In order to fully achieve anything, you must believe it is possible at a cellular level. Use visualization—it’s a powerful tool. If you can conceive it, you can achieve it. Visualize yourself participating in activities that add life and provide energy. Picture how good you will feel when implementing your plan. Imagine your new life. Take time to do this each day. You cannot plough a field by turning it over in your mind. To begin, you must begin. Here is where Mount Si Sports + Fitness come in. When it comes to exercise, they have been voted “Best of the Valley� since opening in 2003. The facility is

$PVSUFTZQIPUP

Claire and Lynn Grisham work out out-of-doors at Mount Si Sports + Fitness. spacious and open with a comfortable and inviting atmosphere. Group fitness classes are free, and include Yoga, Spin Cycling, Body Sculpting, Core-Strength, The Monday Night Special, Kettlebells, Zumba and more. For those hardy souls that are so inclined, Mount Si Sports + Fitness has formed an alliance with Eastside Adventure Bootcamp for Women with classes weekdays at 5:30 a.m. To learn more about this activity, send an e-mail to Kimbrough at eastsidebootcamp@comcast.net. The trainers at Mount Si Sports + Fitness are experienced professionals that can help formulate and implement a new exercise program for you. A free training session, valued at $50, is offered to each new member. Adopt an approach to exercise that fits your lifestyle. And remember the story of the race between the tortoise and the hare. The tortoise prevails in the end. Continuous effort—not strength or intelligence—is the key to unlocking our potential. Motivation is what gets you started, habit is what keeps you going. So, cheers to the New Year and another chance for us to get it right! t.PVOU4J4QPSUT 'JUOFTTJTPQFOTFWFOEBZTBXFFL BOEJTMPDBUFEPOMZ minutes from Snoqualmie Ridge at 1546 Boalch Ave. N.W., between North Bend and Snoqualmie. Learn more at www.mtsisports.com.

Women can explore an exciting fitness option in and out of doors, thanks to a new partnership. Eastside Adventure Bootcamp for Women is now holding morning classes at Mount Si Sports + Fitness. Bootcamp owner Kimbrough Kendall moved her fitness group to Mount Si Sports this fall. Classes meet at 5:30 a.m., Monday through Friday. She offers a four-week outdoor program of fitness instruction, nutritional coaching and motivational training. Kendall launched the first Adventure Boot Camp in the Valley in 2004, expanding to Bellevue and Issaquah. Learn more about offerings and schedules at www. EastsideBootCamp.com. Kendall can also be reached at EastsideBootCamp@comcast. net or (425) 890-5037.

Join for FREE! $75 enrollment fee waived* Act Now! Offer ends December 31st.

â—† FREE Group Fitness Classes  :PHBt4QJOOJOHt;6.#"t$PSF4USFOHUIt)BSEDPSF #PEZ4DVMQUJOHt4BUVSEBZ.PSOJOH4QFDJBMNPSF

WE ARE LOCALLY OWNED

â—† 305$5SBJOJOH$PVSTFT #PPU$BNQt,FUUMFCFMM5SBJOJOHt#PEZ"UUBDL  8JOUFS4QPSUT$POEJUJPOJOHNPSF

(425) 831-7782

â—† Eastside Adventure Boot Camp for Women

â—† 5FBDIFST*ORVJSFBCPVUPVS474%&NQMPZFF%JTDPVOU â—† Child Care

Monthly dues only

$39

www.mtsisports.com 1546 Boalch Ave NW North Bend

Hours: M-Th 5am - 9pm Fri 5am - 8pm Sat & Sun 8am - 6pm

* Pay first and last month's dues. No enrollment fee.

$FOUSBMMZMPDBUFECFUXFFO4OPRVBMNJFBOE/PSUI#FOEr0OMZNJOVUFTGSPN4OPRVBMNJF3JEHF

562112

AND OPERATED.


4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt%FDFNCFS t

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

SPORTS

Hot winter nights Smith adds crucial threes in win over Rebels

Sign up for Little League Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Mount Si No. 4 Levi Botten prepares to take a free throw, flanked by Jack Nelson, left, and Jason Smith, right. Botten had seven points, and Smith added nine, including crucial threes.

Quick decision

On Friday, Dec. 9, the Cedarcrest Red Wolves girls’ basketball team hosted Lakewood in the first league game of the season. Cedarcrest pulled away from Lakewood in the fourth quarter to win by 25, 63-38. Cedarcrest was led in scoring by Susan Kenney with 20, Kalee Fowler had 15 and Kailyn Campbell added 14.

’S R A YE ! W NE CIALS SPE Dance and Yoga classes for all ages!

YOUTH PROGRAM: ADULT PROGRAM: FREE RegistraƟon

1/2 Price

for the month of

Unlimited Class Pass! $50 ($100 Value)

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Mount Si’s Tanner Stahl works on Bellevue’s Garret Williams during the closing match of the night, Wednesday, Dec. 14.

563006

Sophomore Tanner Stahl had no trouble describing the moves that went right for him in his three-minute bout. Stahl, who pinned Garret Williams in Mount Si’s Dec. 14 home match with Bellevue, showed good, confident control in the final set of the night. His win helped the Wildcats beat Bellevue, 51 to 28, their second victory of the season. “I just went out there and ran my cross-wrist series,” said Stahl, who is 2 and 2 this season at 126 pounds. “He pinned me last year at 112. It was good to come back this year and pin him... an improvement.” Wednesday’s speedy match was hurried by quick decisions. Heavyweight Josh Mitchell pinned Bellevue’s James Trull in less than half a minute. It took Mount Si 170-pounder Cole Palmer 27 seconds to pin opponent John Manusco. At 182, Wildcat Douglas Knox pinned his man, Alex Palander, in 35 seconds. At 160, Mount Si’s AJ Brevick pinned Sam Bassford in 1:18. At 138, Wildcat Bruce Stuart won by decision over Ben Matteucci. The Bellevue win followed a strong Dec. 8 win against Juanita. The Wildcats are on their way to the Best of the West tournament, Dec. 22 and 23 in Pasco.

Lady Red Wolves rack up Lakewood win

e Serving thie Snoqualmr fo y Valle s! 50+ year

January!

Patty, Bob & Gabe Hogan

Experienced - Professional - Compassionate Care for your animals AT YOUR HOME Exams • Lab Work • Vaccinations • Health Certificates Parasite Control • Micro-Chipping • Supplements • Minor Surgery Behavior Counseling • Euthanasia Dr. Robert Hogan will work in conjunction with your regular vet or be a primary care giver for your animals

3 Large Rooms with Sprung Floors! IGNITE Your New Year!

425.222.5665 • 425.761.0982

IGNITE Dance & Yoga is located in North Bend by QFC 472 East North Bend Way (425) 292-9880

cattle • horses • swine • goats llamas • alpacas • cats • dogs

www.ignitedanceandyoga.com

www.homeveterinaryservices.com

562998

Falls Little League registration is now open for the coming season at www.fallsll.org. Early registration closes on January 8.

Coach Steve Helm never knows who it’ll be. But chances are, someone new will be hot on a given night. Last Tuesday, Dec. 13, it was junior Jason Smith’s turn. Smith, Mount Si’s second-highest scorer in the Wildcats’ 46-44 squeaker over Juanita, added nine, including two crucial threepoint snipes in the game’s final three minutes. “If I’m going to come up big for my team, I’ve got to capitalize on those opportunities,” Smith said. “I feel like I’ve been a spark off the bench the last couple of games.” In those tense final minutes, “Jason came through big for us, really helped us off the bench,” said sophomore Levi Botten. “When someone’s hot like that, you just run plays and try to give them the ball.” “Tonight was a great win,” said senior Anthony McLaughlin, who led with 17 points. “Everybody contributed something. We have so many role players. We’re going to have a guy who’s hot every night. Tonight was his night. He is capable of scoring at will. He’s a great player, and is going to get a lot of minutes.” “We stuck to our game plan,” Botten said of the night, in which Mount Si struck early the second half to win from behind. Jack Nelson, a sophomore, has also had good moments in the early season. An outside shooting threat, small and quick guard, he had eight points in overtime against Interlake. In a team that’s growing its depth, Helm said it can be surprising who turns in key performances. “It’s fun to see who that’s going to be every night,” he said. Mount Si is at the Lahaina Invitational in Hawaii this week.


Happy t%FDFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Come visit us next to the Snoqualmie Casino VISIT US ON FACEBOOK! -FBSO)PXUP&OUFSUP8JO

2 TICKETS

Stop in and check out our

to the SNO FALLS BUFFET. Congratulations to last week’s winners Keith and Vanessa!

Made in Washington Craft Distillery Selection

from

Featuring Soft Tail Vodka, Peabody Jones Vodka, Skip Rock Vodka, Dry Fly Gin and many more fine local products‌

Free Cup of Native KoffeeTM

Skookum Creek $5.00 off

with $10 Purchase

the purchase of any carton

Jäger-Bomb Free 8.3 oz Red Bull

ALL GUM $0.99

with the Purchase of .75 L of Jägermeister

(reg. $1.19 - $1.59)

All Specials are good 12/21/2011 through 12/31/2011.

Trolli Candy $.99

Mrs. & Mr. T’s Mixers 2 for $6.00

4.25 oz. bags - reg $1.49

SMOKELESS TOBACCO WARNING: This product is not a safe alternative to cigarettes

Log Can Log Can Copenhagen Wintergreen ..$9.99.......$1.99 Copenhagen Natural Extra LC $9.99......$1.99 Copenhagen Straight LC ...$9.99......$1.99 Skoal Xtra.................................$9.99.......$1.99 Longhorn ...............................$10.65.....$2.45 Timberwolf ............................$14.99.....$3.09

560395

Open Christmas Day 10am - 10pm STORE HOURS: Open Late 7 Days a week 7am - 10pm Daily SUNDAYS TOO!

Grizzly ............ $14.69 ......$3.29 Husky ............. $15.29 ......$3.45

QUALITY NATIONAL BRANDS Carton Pack Marlboro .......................$58.52....$6.10 Camel ............................ $57.05 ...$5.96 Winston .........................$56.03....$5.85 Newport .........................$58.57....$6.11 Virginia Slim..................$62.12 ...$6.46

Carton Pack Marlboro 72’s ...............$48.54 .............$5.10 Pall Mall Box ...............$53.62 .............$5.61 Amer. Spirit ..................$64.87 .............$6.74 Kool .............................$60.53 .............$6.30 Benson & Hedges..............$70.15 .............$7.27

Prices subject to change without notice - All prices do not include sales tax Snoqualmie Tobacco & Liquor Company promotes the responsible use of tobacco products. If you are interested in quitting smoking please visit http://www.smokefree.gov/ to learn more about the resources available to you or call 1-800-quit now.

SURGEON GENERAL WARNING: Tobacco Smoke Increases The Risk Of Lung Cancer And Heart Disease, Even In Nonsmokers.

From Auburn Take Hwy 18 North to I-90. Head EAST to EXIT 27. Turn left (North). Follow North Bend Way around curve.

Directions: I-90 Eastbound take EXIT 27 turn left (North). Follow North Bend Way around curve.

I-90 Westbound take EXIT 31 (North Bend). Follow signs to the reservation.

4&/PSUI#FOE8BZt4OPRVBMNJF XXX4OP5PCBDDPBOE-JRVPSDPNt425.888.3071


400 block of Mount Si Boulevard. The deceased was found in his vehicle, parked in the rear cargo area.

TUESDAY, DEC. 13

BREAK-IN, NO THEFT: At 10:58 a.m., an employee of a business in the 300 block of Bendigo Boulevard North called police to report that someone had pried open the lock on the business’ detached storage shed the previous evening. Nothing appeared to be missing.

FIGHT AND BITE: At 2:21 a.m., police responded to a fight at a business in the 300 block of North Bend Way. One of the combatants had bitten another in the face, and was charged with fourth degree assault.

MONDAY, DEC. 12 DEATH: At 11:30 a.m., police responded along with aid, to investigate a death in the

$ CASH FOR GOLD, $ Silver & Jewelry

Estate & Auction Jewelry for Sale at Extremely Low Prices

Golden Coin Jewelry and Loan (Pawn) 554286

Open Mon – Fri 11:00 am – 5:00 pm Sat 11:00 am - 3:00 pm

BROKEN WINDOW: At 2:56 a.m., police were called to investigate a broken window in the 300 block of Ballarat Avenue North. An unknown person apparently broke a window in the school building and then left.

Snoqualmie Police WEDNESDAY, DEC. 14 TOOLS TAKEN: At 3:52 p.m., a theft victim called police to report an incident that occurred in the 6500 block of Railroad Avenue Southeast. The man said he’d parked his work van in the lower main parking lot of Snoqualmie Falls Park around 11 a.m., and when he returned at 3:30 p.m., he saw the sliding door of the van was open and about $1,000 worth of tools was missing. He was not sure if he’d locked the van. The stolen tools are all engraved with the initials B.P.B.

SATURDAY, DEC. 10

3BJMSPBE"WFt4OPRVBMNJF 425-292-0694

MAIL THEFT: At 6:12 p.m., a man called police to the Snoqualmie Post Office, where he found that his

MT. SI

FRIDAY, DEC. 9 SOLICITOR: At 12:23 p.m., a resident called police about a man in his early 30s, dressed in black and going door to door looking inside homes. Police located the man, who was a construction contractor, registered with the city for going door to door.

MINI STORAGE

3 Sizes Available

545550

551284

NORTH BEND

r New Patients Welcome

MEDICAL PROBLEM: At 2:33 a.m., firefighters responded to a 50-year-old man with a cardiac arrest. He was also seen by a paramedic unit from Bellevue Fire, and was assisted and left at the scene.

SUNDAY, DEC. 11 PAIN: At 2:03 a.m., firefighters responded to a 26-yearold man who was having abdominal pain. He was given an exam and allowed to stay at home. FALL: At 4:17 p.m., firefighters responded to an 85-yearold man who had fallen. He was assisted up and left in the care of family members.

FRIDAY, DEC. 9 BURN COMPLAINT: At 12:32 p.m., firefighters responded to a smoke burn complaint. On arrival, the fire was discovered to be illegal. It was extinguished by the occupant. BREATHING ISSUE: At 1:25 p.m., firefighters responded to a 60-year-old woman who was experiencing breathing difficulty. She was treated and transported to Overlake Hospital via private ambulance.

PUZZLE ANSWERS FROM PAGE 12

















































































































































WE HAVE A TRUCK TO RENT FOR LOCAL MOVES

Call about our Move-in Special “STORAGE TO MEET YOUR NEEDS�

(425) 888-0001 44800 S.E. North Bend Way, North Bend, WA 98045

The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatrics Dentists recommend that children visit their dentists by their first birthday, as their first tooth comes in between six to Drs. Liu, Quinby, & Lombardi 12 months.

tEastsidePediatricDentalGroup.com 185 NE Gilman Blvd, Issaquah, WA Specializing in Dentistry for Infants, Childrens & Adolescents. Special care for nervous children dental health checkups. We accept most dental insurances. 551352

Our Wonderful Staff at Kelly R. Garwood DDS

Hours: Mon & Tue 7am - 6pm and Thurs 7am - 4pm 421 Main Ave S, PO Box 372, North Bend, WA 98045

Mount Si cheerleaders plan a day clinic this winter to get future cheer members moving, The clinic is 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Mount Si High School commons. Participants will be invited to perform at the Mount Si girls basketball game Jan. 27. To learn more, send e-mail to raisioj@yahoo.com.

Early examination and preventative care can protect your child from early childhood cavities and start your child on a lifetime of healthy dental habits.

r Evening Appts. Available

425.888.0867

MONDAY, DEC. 12

Climate Control & Covered R/V & Boat Storage Video Monitored Security System - Controlled Access Resident Manager Fax/UPS Pickup/Copies/Moving Supplies/Notary

(425) 888-1319

When should my child first see a dentist?

Mount Si plans cheer clinic

Fall City Fire District

New patients always welcome! Members American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry Certified, American Boad of Pediatric Dentistry

547236

THURSDAY, DEC. 15

SUNDAY, DEC. 11

mailbox had been pried open. He wasn’t sure if any mail had been taken, but said he last picked up his mail the previous week. Two other mailboxes had also been pried open. Police contacted the postal inspector, who said each victim would have to notify the U.S. Postal Service during normal business hours. The boxes that had been pried open were 1377, 1368 and 1326. NOT BRIGHT: At 5:59 p.m., two patrol vehicles were following a vehicle that appeared to not have its lights on, on Snoqualmie Parkway Southeast near Southeast Douglas Street. The vehicle’s lights were on, but very dim, and the driver was traveling at only 30 mph in the 40-mph zone. When an officer stopped the vehicle, he smelled freshly-smoked marijuana. The man claimed he had not been smoking in the vehicle, and handed over about a gram of marijuana and his smoking pipe.

551318

ON THE SCANNER North Bend Police

4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt%FDFNCFS t

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM


t%FDFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

She’s a ballet dancer, and a mouse

NORTH BEND THEATRE 4)085*.&4 WEDNESDAY, DEC. 21 t"-7*/"/%5)&$)*1.6/,4 $)*183&$,&% ŷ(Ÿ  1.THURSDAY, DEC. 22 t$)3*45."4$-"44*$4&3*&4  .*3"$-&0/5)453&&5  ŷŸ1.FRIDAY, D23

THURSDAY, DEC. 22 t$)*183&$,&% 1.THU FRIDAY, DEC. 23 t$)*183&$,&%  1.TRIDAY, D23

SATURDAY, DEC. 24 1IPUPDPVSUFTZ1/#

t$)*183&$,&% š(Ÿ /00/ t*54"80/%&3'6--*'&  1.EC. 25

Hannah Munson of North Bend, left, with Zoe Bischoff of Seattle, dance the parts of the baby mice in Pacific Northwest Ballet’s “Nutcracker.�

Hannah Munson of North Bend is one of the youngest dancers in the Pacific Northwest Ballet’s current production of The Nutcracker.� Munson, a third grade student at Arbor Montessori, plays one of the baby mice. “Nutcracker� is on stage at Seattle Center’s Marion Oliver McCaw Hall through December 27. To learn more, visit www.pnb.org.

SUNDAY, DEC. 25

Teen art show planned at North Bend Library

t$-04&%'03$)3*45."4

MONDAY, DEC. 26 t$)*183&$,&% 1.T TUESDAY, DEC. 27 t$)*183&$,&% 1.T

Submissions are now being accepted for a teen art show and contest planned for February at the North Bend Library. The contest is open to teens in grades 6-12; artwork may be dropped off at the North Bend Library by Tuesday, Jan. 31. An opening reception is 3 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3. The contest is sponsored by the Friends of the North Bend Library.

Fall City Masons to install 2012 officers

559420

“Real Skills, For Life� Serving the Eastside Since 1993

KungFuClubIssaquah.com 425-392-4712

The brothers of Falls City Masonic Lodge No. 66 have been quietly serving the Valley community while ‘building better lives and better men’ since 1890. They still meet regularly in the tallest building in Fall City, which has held that record since 1895. Locals get an opportunity to see a little of the inner workings of a Masonic Temple at the installation for the new officers of the Fall City lodge, 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14. To attend, contact the Falls City Masonic Hall; visit www.fallcitylodge.com for the most

current contact information. Business professional attire is appropriate. The installation is expected to run approximately 75 minutes. While Freemasons have been a fraternal organization since the 16th century, their roots go back to 13th century Scotland. Famous Freemasons include George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Meriwether Lewis, Mark Twain, Davy Crockett, John Wayne, astronauts John Glenn and Buzz Aldrin and Presidents Harry Truman and Gerald R. Ford. The slate of 2012 Officers for Fall City is: t8PSTIJQGVM.BTUFS 'SBOL+4DIVNBDIFS t4FOJPS8BSEFO )FOSZ'MFUDIFS*** t+VOJPS8BSEFO $PSFZ#JSDI t4FOJPS%FBDPO .BUIFX.FZFST t+VOJPS%FBDPO ,FO%PET t4FOJPS4UFXBSE 3VTTFM(FPSHF t+VOJPS4UFXBSE $IBE1FUSBLJT t5ZMFS 7JSHJM4DPUU t.BSTIBM 8BSSFO0MUNBOO t4FD %BWJE)BSSJT t"TTU4FD /JDL.JDIBVE t5SFBTVSFS%JDL.FSFEJUI Visitors who would like to stay after to visit with the newly installed officers are welcome to join the new officers in the Carter room at the Falls City Masonic Hall. Both Masons and non-Masons are welcome.

CHESTERFIELD’S REPAIR LOCK SMITH SERVICE 554244

-PDL0VUTt4BGF8PSLt3F,FZJOH &NFSHFODZ4FSWJDFTt,FZ.BLJOH

Mike Chesterfield - 425.222.5085 4903 Fall City-Preston Road - Fall City

562117

Also Offering:

#PPUBOE4IPF3FQBJS 4NBMM&OHJOFBOE-BXO.PXFS3FQBJS

  

 

Ty’s Handyman Service “VOTED BEST HANDYMAN 2011�

 !!!! !!  ! !! ! ! ! ! !!! ! 

Ty Olson

-08$045t0/&$"--t0/&#*--

Home: 425-888-1289 Cell: 425-417-7697

Locally Owned

551300

Buy a Region or the Entire State!         425-888-2311

NO JOB TOO SMALL!!! 5SJNt$BSQFOUSZ %SZ8BMMt1BJOUJOH 5JMFt)PNF3FQBJST 3FNPEFMTt&UD

Regist #TYSHAH945NA

mail: tygheolson@hotmail.com

Sudoku

See answers, page 11

















































































































































    

Crossword puzzle

Across 1. Door feature 5. Christian Science founder 9. New moon, e.g. 14. Control freak 15. Achy 16. Horse opera 17. Aroma 18. Checked item 19. Contemptuous look 20. Energy converters (2 wds) 23. Bridge play (pl.) 24. Map line 28. “Give it ___!� (2 wds) 29. Big ___ Conference 31. French Sudan, today 32. Lawn mower’s path 35. Sits tight 37. End 38. Hit by thunderstorm’s electrical discharge (2 wds) 41. “Is that ___?� 42. Bulrush, e.g. 43. Like some buckets 44. Clickable image 46. ___ bit 47. “Wheel of Fortune� buy (2 wds)

48. Not at all 50. Makes right 53. January 1 to December 31 (2 wds) 57. Strikes with beak 60. Cameron ___, actress 61. Plunge headfirst 62. Fits 63. #1 spot 64. Battery contents 65. Regretful 66. Bungle, with “up� 67. Cravings

Down 1. Comprehend 2. Low point 3. Kind of layer 4. Robin’s tidying spot 5. Former Portugese monetary unit 6. Opportunities, so to speak 7. Blah 8. Abominable Snowman 9. Presents, as a threat 10. Two-wheeled covered carriage 11. Absorbed, as a cost 12. “Comprende?� 13. “To ___ is human ...�

21. Acrobat’s garb 22. Dressed to the ___ 25. Dye with wax 26. Similar 27. Turn red or yellow, say 29. Bit of color 30. Halftime lead, e.g. 32. Assassinated 33. Ham radio response 34. Burning 35. Dwell 36. Habitual drug user 39. Handrail support 40. Time of financial need (2 wds) 45. Neigh softly 47. Blows away 49. Flip, in a way 50. Monroe’s successor 51. Prepare for winter takeoff 52. Small spreading juniper bush 54. ___ cheese 55. “Good going!� 56. 1990 World Series champs 57. ___ de deux 58. “I� problem 59. Blackguard


4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt%FDFNCFS t

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Charles (Charlie G.) Leslie Goodman

Charles Leslie Goodman passed away on December 4, 2011 at Snoqualmie Valley Hospital. Charlie, a lifelong Carnation resident, was born August 26, 1956 at Nelms Hospital in Snoqualmie, WA to Lavern Charles Goodman and Irene Delores Goodman. Charlie lived in and around the Lower Snoqualmie Valley all of his life where he graduated from Tolt High School in 1974 and where he built his business Charlie G Trucking. Charlie was well known to all and love and is remembered for his smile that reached his eyes. He enjoyed life to the fullest and loved to travel. He didn’t just talk about doing things, he did things and went places. His trips included Hawaii, Indiana, Florida, California and Texas. Charlie was preceded in passing by his father, Lavern Charles Goodman and mother Irene Delores Goodman. Charlie is survived by his daughters Lacie Renee Goodman of Carnation, WA, and Desire Tesser and three grandsons, Aristotle, Zane and Elijah of Miami, FL, and Lacies brother Mitch Shepherd; siblings: Rod Goodman, Juanita Gilmore, Linda Thompson, Nancy Benedict and Lois Goodman; nephews: Rick Goodman and Brent Benedict; nieces Teri Totten, Andrea Thompson and Tiffany; and his special friend of the past five years Chelee and many extended family members and friends.

North Bend’s Sallal Grange had a rousing success with its holiday bazaar, held Saturday, Dec. 10. One of the most successful aspects was the bake sale table. The Grange invited the community to make and

Places to Worship

SNOQUALMIE VALLEY WELCOME TO OUR LADY OF SORROWS CATHOLIC CHURCH

39025 SE Alpha St. Snoqualmie, WA 98065 rXXXPMPTPSH Rev. Roy Baroma, Priest Administrator

Join us at our new DT Snoqualmie location

.BTTBU4U"OUIPOZ$IVSDI $BSOBUJPO 4VOEBZTBUBN 4QBOJTI.BTTBU11amFWFSZ1st4VOEBZ

XXXMJGFQPJOUFDPNNVOJUZDPN

Please contact church offices for additional Please contactinformation church offices for additional information

JOGP!MJGFQPJOUFDPNNVOJUZDPN

Open Minds Open Hearts Open Doors Snoqualmie United Methodist Church

Place a paid obituary to honor those who have passed away, call Linda at 253.234.3506 paidobits@reporternewspapers.com

Sunday Worship

549999

9:00 am ~ Bless This House Band 10:30 am ~ the Chancel Choir

Paid obituaries include publication in the newspaper and online at www.valleyrecord.com

DT Snoqualmie since 1889 425-888-1697

38701 S.E. River at Railroad Ave www.snoqualmieumc.info

All notices are subject to verification.

click! www.nw-ads.com email! classified@soundpublishing.com call toll free! 1.888.399.3999 or 1.800.388.2527

8086 Railroad Ave. SE

EVERY SUNDAY @ 8:30AM & 10:00AM

rXXXTUBOUIPOZDBSOBUJPOPSH

Remember your loved one

PNW MarketPlace!

PUBLIC NOTICES "$)63$)'035)&&/5*3&7"--&:

562054

Announcements

real estate for sale Real Estate for Sale Other Areas

,!.$ĂĽ ,)15)$!4)/.ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ ACRESĂĽ ĂĽ DOWNĂĽ MOĂĽĂĽ ONLYĂĽ  ĂĽ NEARĂĽ GROW ĂĽ I N G ĂĽ % L ĂĽ 0 A S O ĂĽ 4E X A S ĂĽĂĽ / W N E R ĂĽ F I N A N C I N G ĂĽ N OĂĽĂĽ C R E D I T ĂĽ C H E CK S  ĂĽ - O N EYĂĽĂĽ "ACKĂĽ 'UARANTEEĂĽ &REEĂĽĂĽ #OLORĂĽ "ROCHUREĂĽ   ĂĽ ĂĽ WWWSUNSETRANCH ĂĽ ESCOM

Bottomless garage sale. $37/no word limit. Reach thousands of readers. Go online: nw-ads.com 24 hours a day or Call 800-388-2527 to get more information.

real estate for rent - WA Real Estate for Rent King County

announcements Announcements

./24(ĂĽ"%.$

02)6!4%ĂĽ ĂĽ BEDROOM ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ BATH ĂĽ ĂĽ CARĂĽ GARAGEĂĽ HOMEĂĽĂĽ FO R ĂĽ R E N T ĂĽ      ĂĽ P E RĂĽĂĽ MONTH ĂĽ WATERĂĽ ISĂĽ INCLUDEDĂĽĂĽ &IRST ĂĽ LAST ĂĽ ANDĂĽ DAMAGEĂĽĂĽ .OĂĽ PETSĂĽ !VAILABLEĂĽ *ANU ĂĽ ARYĂĽ STĂĽ    ĂĽĂĽ    Apartments for Rent King County 3NOQUALMIE

!&&/2$!",%ĂĽ (EALTHĂĽĂĽ )NSURANCEĂĽ FORĂĽ EVERYONEĂĽĂĽ 5NINSUREDĂĽ $ISSATISlEDĂĽĂĽ "EENĂĽ 4URNEDĂĽ DOWNĂĽ #ALLĂĽĂĽ .OWĂĽ 7EĂĽ #ANĂĽ (ELPĂĽ ,I ĂĽ CENSEDĂĽ !GENTSĂĽ 3TANDINGĂĽĂĽ "YĂĽ    !,,)%$ĂĽ (%!,4(ĂĽ CAREERĂĽĂĽ TRAININGĂĽ ĂĽ !TTENDĂĽ COLLEGEĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ ONLINEĂĽ *OBĂĽ PLACE ĂĽ MENTĂĽ ASSISTANCEĂĽ #OM ĂĽ PUTERĂĽ !VAILABLEĂĽ &INAN ĂĽ C I A L ĂĽ ! I D ĂĽ I F ĂĽ Q U A L I F I E D ĂĽĂĽ 3#(%6ĂĽ CER TIFIEDĂĽ #ALLĂĽĂĽ           ĂĽĂĽ WWW#ENTURA/NLINECOM !ĂĽ ,/6).'ĂĽ ALTERNATIVEĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ UNPLANNEDĂĽ PREGNANCYĂĽĂĽ 9OUĂĽ CHOOSEĂĽ THEĂĽ FAMILYĂĽĂĽ FORĂĽ YOURĂĽ CHILDĂĽ 2ECEIVEĂĽĂĽ P I C T U R E S  I N FO ĂĽ O F ĂĽ WA I T ĂĽ INGAPPROVEDĂĽ COUPLESĂĽĂĽ ,IVINGĂĽ EXPENSEĂĽ ASSIS ĂĽ TANCEĂĽ   

Classifieds. We’ve got you covered. 800-388-2527

ĂĽ "%$2//-ĂĽ AVAILĂĽ NOW ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ  0LEXĂĽ INĂĽ 3NO ĂĽ QUALMIEĂĽ ĂĽ MINUTESĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ ,/!.ĂĽ SERVICEĂĽ .OĂĽĂĽ )SSAQUAHĂĽ .OĂĽ SMOKING ĂĽĂĽ CREDITĂĽ REFUSEDĂĽ &ASTĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ NOĂĽ PETSĂĽ &IRST ĂĽ LAST ĂĽ DAM ĂĽ Classifieds. We’ve got you S E C U R E ĂĽ % A S Y ĂĽ O N ĂĽ T H EĂĽĂĽ AGEĂĽ   covered. 800-388-2527 B U D G E T  ĂĽ 0 A Y M E N T SĂĽĂĽ SPREADĂĽ OUTĂĽ OVERĂĽ THREEĂĽĂĽ WA Misc. Rentals !44%.4)/. ĂĽ $IABETICSĂĽĂĽ MONTHSĂĽ 4OLLĂĽ FREEĂĽ   ĂĽ Duplexes/Multiplexes WITHĂĽ MEDICAREĂĽ ĂĽ GETĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ         ĂĽ , O A N ĂĽ 3./15!,-)% FREEĂĽ TALKINGĂĽ METERĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ (ERECOM DIABETICĂĽ TESTINGĂĽ SUPPLIESĂĽĂĽ A T ĂĽ N O ĂĽ C O S T ĂĽ P L U S ĂĽ F R E EĂĽĂĽ &INDĂĽ)TĂĽ"UYĂĽ)TĂĽ3ELLĂĽ)T HOMEĂĽ DELIVERYĂĽ ĂĽ "ESTĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ ,OOKINGĂĽFORĂĽTHEĂĽRIDE ALL ĂĽ THISĂĽ METERĂĽ ELIMINATESĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽYOURĂĽLIFE PAINFULĂĽ FINGERĂĽ PRICKINGĂĽĂĽ WWWNW ADSCOM #ALLĂĽ   ĂĽHOURSĂĽAĂĽDAY Real Estate for Sale Services

,/#!,ĂĽ 02)6!4%ĂĽ )NVES ĂĽ TORĂĽ LOANSĂĽ MONEYĂĽ ONĂĽ REALĂĽĂĽ ESTATEĂĽ EQUITYĂĽ )ĂĽ LOANĂĽ ONĂĽĂĽ HOUSES ĂĽ RAWĂĽ LAND ĂĽ COM ĂĽ M E R C I A L ĂĽ P R O P E R T Y ĂĽ A N DĂĽĂĽ PROPER TYĂĽ DEVELOPMENTĂĽĂĽ #ALLĂĽ %RICĂĽ ATĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ     ĂĽ W W W FO S S M O R T ĂĽ GAGECOM

donate holiday treats for sale, and committed to donating all of the bake sale proceeds to the Mount Si Helping Hand Food Bank. The response from the community was amazing, everything from cheesecakes to artisan shortbreads to Twin Peaks pies courtesy of Twede’s CafĂŠ. “The response was heartwarming,â€? said Grange member Leah Aichele. “The people in this community are very generous, making cookies, cakes and even Hungarian Belish.â€? Items were not priced, instead customers were asked to donate a fair amount. The bake sale brought in $570 and some change, which was donated to the food bank on Dec. 14. The food bank is struggling because of current economic conditions.

Mass Schedule

4BUVSEBZQNr4VOEBZ BN



...obituaries

Grange: Bake sale a big success

42)0,%8ĂĽ 5NITĂĽ ĂĽ "2 ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ "!ĂĽ INĂĽ 3NOQUALMIEĂĽ /NEĂĽĂĽ CARĂĽ GARAGEĂĽ PLUSĂĽ STORAGEĂĽĂĽ 7ASHERĂĽ ĂĽ DRYERĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ MONTHĂĽ &IRST ĂĽ LAST ĂĽ DEPOS ĂĽ I T  ĂĽ          ĂĽĂĽ RONTCC GMAILCOM

#!3(ĂĽ &/2ĂĽ #!23ĂĽ !NYĂĽĂĽ -AKE ĂĽ -ODELĂĽ ORĂĽ 9EARĂĽĂĽ 7EĂĽ 0AYĂĽ MOREĂĽ 2UNNINGĂĽĂĽ ORĂĽ .OTĂĽ 3ELLĂĽ9OURĂĽ #ARĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ 4RUCKĂĽ TODAYĂĽ &REEĂĽ 4OW ĂĽ INGĂĽ )NSTANTĂĽ /FFERĂĽ   ĂĽ  

&INDĂĽIT ĂĽ"UYĂĽIT ĂĽ3ELLĂĽIT NW ADSCOM

PUBLIC NOTICE #562431 Notice of Public Hearing A public hearing before the City of Snoqualmie Planning Commission has been scheduled for Tuesday, January 17, 2012 at 7:00 PM or soon thereafter. The public hearing will be held at the Snoqualmie City Hall Council Chamber, located at 38624 SE River St, Snoqualmie. Topics: To hear testimony on the proposed Snoqualmie Parks Plan, which will become effective upon future adoption by the City Council. Public Comment Period: Verbal comments can be made at the hearing.Written comments may be submitted to the City of Snoqualmie, PO Box 987, Snoqualmie, WA 98065, Attention: Nicole Sanders on or before January 17, 2012 at 5:00 PM. Application Documents: The proposed Parks Plan is available for public inspection at the City of Snoqualmie, Planning Department, 38624 River St

SE Snoqualmie. Publication Date: December 21, 2011 in the Snoqualmie Valley Record.

To place your Legal Notice in the Snoqualmie Valley Record please call Linda at 253-234-3506 or e-mail legals@ reporternewspapers.com

For All Your Recruitment Needs

ASK THE EXPERT

$)6/2#%ü ü üü WITHü CHILDRENü .Oü COURTüü APPEARANCESü #OMPLETEüü PREPARATIONü )NCLUDES üü CUSTODY ü SUPPORT ü PROP ü ER TYü DIVISIONü ANDü BILLSüü """ü MEMBERü   ü ü WWWPARALEGALAL ü T E R N A T I V E S  C O M  D I ü VORCE USACOM Classifieds. We’ve got you covered. 800-388-2527 $/.!4%ü 9OURü VEHICLEüü RECEIVEü ü GROCERYüü COUPONSü 5NITEDü "REASTüü # A N C E R ü & O U N D A T I O N üü & R E E ü M A M M O G R A M S üü B R E A S T ü C A N C E R ü I N F Oüü WWWUBCFINFOü ü FREEü TOW ü ING ü TAXü DEDUCTIBLE ü NON ü R U N N E R S ü A C C E P T E D ü  üü    % ! 2 . ü # / , , % ' % ü D E ü G R E E ü O N L I N E ü O N L I N E üü

- E D I C A L ĂĽ " U S I N E S SĂĽĂĽ

#RIMINALĂĽ *USTICEĂĽ *OBĂĽĂĽ PLACEMENTĂĽ ASSISTANCEĂĽĂĽ #OMPUTERĂĽ AVAILABLEĂĽ &I ĂĽ NANCIALĂĽ !IDĂĽ IFĂĽ QUALIFIEDĂĽĂĽ 3#(%6ĂĽ CER TIFIEDĂĽ #ALLĂĽĂĽ           ĂĽĂĽ WWW#ENTURA/NLINECOM ,/#!,ĂĽ 34$()6ĂĽ 4EST ĂĽ INGĂĽ $IDĂĽ YOUĂĽ KNOWĂĽ YOUĂĽĂĽ CANĂĽ HAVEĂĽ ANĂĽ 34$ĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ S H O W ĂĽ N O ĂĽ S Y M P T O M S ĂĽĂĽ % A R L Y ĂĽ D E T E C T I O N ĂĽ A N DĂĽĂĽ TREATMENTĂĽ CANĂĽ PREVENTĂĽĂĽ P E R M A N E N T ĂĽ D A M A G E ĂĽĂĽ (IGHESTĂĽ LEVELSĂĽ OFĂĽ PRIVACYĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ DISCRETIONĂĽ ĂĽ #ALLĂĽ  ĂĽ   

!44%.4)/.ĂĽ 3LEEPĂĽ AP ĂĽ NEAĂĽ SUFFERERSĂĽ WITHĂĽ MEDI ĂĽ CAREĂĽ 'ETĂĽ FREEĂĽ CPAPĂĽ RE ĂĽ PLACEMENTĂĽ SUPPLIESĂĽ ATĂĽ NOĂĽĂĽ COST ĂĽ PLUSĂĽ FREEĂĽ HOMEĂĽ DE ĂĽ &INDĂĽ)TĂĽ"UYĂĽ)TĂĽ3ELLĂĽ)T LIVERYĂĽ "ESTĂĽ OFĂĽ ALL ĂĽ PRE ĂĽ ,OOKINGĂĽFORĂĽTHEĂĽRIDE VENTĂĽ REDĂĽ SKINĂĽ SORESĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽYOURĂĽLIFE BACTERIALĂĽ INFECTIONĂĽ #ALLĂĽĂĽ WWWNW ADSCOM    ĂĽHOURSĂĽAĂĽDAY

Tiffany Walker Recruitment Solutions Specialist 10 years print media experience 866-603-3213 twalker@soundpublishing.com With options ranging from one time advertising to annual campaigns, I have the products and the expertise to meet your needs. Whether you need to target your local market or want to cover the Puget Sound area,

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED!


t%FD t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE Employment Transportation/Drivers

jobs Employment General

#!22)%2åå 2/54%3åå !6!),!",% ).å9/52åå !2%! #ALLå4ODAY    

$2)6%2 å $R Yå ANDå 2E å FRIGERATEDå 3INGLEå SOURCEåå DISPATCHå .Oå TRACTORå OLD å ERå THANå å YEARSå $AILYåå 0AYå 6ARIOUSå HOMETIMEåå O P T I O N S  å # $ , ! å åå MONTHSå RECENTå /42å EX å PERIENCEå   åå WWWDRIVEKNIGHTCOM

$2)6%23

'ROSSå åMONTHå å0AIDå"ENElTSå 4AKEåTRUCKåHOME #$, ! åYRSå/42å%XPåå 7EEKLYåPAY 'ETåINåTHEå'REEN    

Sell it free in the Flea 1-866-825-901 Business Opportunities

-AKEå 5På 4Oå   åå 0ERå 7EEKå .EWå #REDITåå #ARDå 2EADYå $RINK 3NACKåå 3ELLåITåFORåFREEåINåTHEå&,%! 6ENDINGå -ACHINESå -INI å THEFLEA SOUNDPUBLISHINGCOM MUMå +å TOå + å )N å VESTMENTå 2EQUIREDå ,O å Classifieds. We’ve got you CATIONSå !VAILABLEå """åå covered. 800-388-2527 ! C C R E D I T E D å " U S I N E S Såå 3OUNDå0UBLISHING å)NC  å  ISåCURRENTLYåACCEPTINGåå APPLICATIONSåFOR #)2#5,!4)/. -!.!'%2 POSITIONSåINå%ASTåANDåå 3OUTHå+INGå#OUNTY

å

4HEå PRIMAR Yå DUTYå OFå Aåå # I R C U L A T I O N å - A N A G E Råå  # - å I S å T O å M A N A G E å Aåå GEOGRAPHICå DISTRICTå å 4HEåå #-å WILLå BEå ACCOUNTABLEåå FORå THEå ASSIGNEDå NEWS å PAPERå ASå FOLLOWSå 2E å CRUITING å CONTRACTINGå ANDåå T R A I N I N G å I N D E P E N D E N Tåå CONTRACTORSå TOå MEETå DE å LIVERYå DEADLINES å INSURINGåå DELIVERYå STANDARDSå AREåå BEINGå METå ANDå QUALITYåå CUSTOMERå SERVICEå å 0OSI å TIONå REQUIRESå THEå ABILITYåå TOå OPERATEå Aå MOTORå VEHI å CLEå INå Aå SAFEå MANNERå TOåå OCCASIONALLYå LIFTå ANDORåå TRANSPORTå BUNDLESå WEIGH å INGåUPåTOååPOUNDSåFROMåå GROUNDå LEVELå TOå Aå HEIGHTåå O F å  å FE E T å T O å D E L I V E Råå NEWSPAPERå ROUTES å IN å CLUDINGå ABILITYå TOå NEGO å TIATEå STAIRSå ANDå TOå DELIVERåå ANå AVERAGEå OFå å NEWS å PAPERSå PERå HOURå FORå UPå TOåå å CONSECUTIVEå HOURSå TOåå COMMUNICATEå WITHå CAR å RIERSå ANDå THEå PUBLICå BYåå TELEPHONEå ANDå INå PERSONåå TOå OPERATEå Aå PERSONALåå COMPUTERå -USTå POSSESSåå RELIABLE å INSURED å MOTORåå V E H I C L E å A N D å A å V A L I Dåå 7 A S H I N G T O N å 3 T A T Eåå DRIVERSåLICENSE å

3OUNDå 0UBLISHINGå ISå ANåå %QUALå /PPORTUNITYå %M å PLOYERå ANDå OFFERSå Aå COM å PETITIVEå BENElTSå PACKAGEåå INCLUDINGå HEALTHå INSU å RANCE å + å PAIDå VACA å T I O N å H O L I D AY S å A N D å Aåå GREATå WORKå ENVIRONMENTåå )Få INTERESTEDå INå JOININGåå OURå TEAM å PLEASEå EMAILåå RESUMEå ANDå COVERå LETTERåå TO hreast@soundpublishing.com

/2åSENDåRESUMEåANDåå COVERåLETTERåTO 3OUNDå0UBLISHING å)NC åTHå!VENUEå3

+ENT å7!å !44.å#-å

stuff Antiques & Collectibles

8887"--&:3&$03%$0.

Cemetery Plots

#%-%4%29å PLOTS å å AD å JACENT å 3UNSETå (ILLS å 'AR å DENå OFå 0RAYERå INå "ELLE å V U E å       å E A C H åå  å FORå ALL å ORå BESTåå OFFERå  

$)3(å .%47/2+å LOWESTåå NATIONWIDEå PRICEå åå A å M O N T H  å & R E Eåå ("/#INEMAX3TARZå FREEåå BLOCKBUSTERå &REEå ($ å $62å ANDå INSTALLå .EXTåå '%4(3%-!.%å #EME å DAYå INSTALLå    å T E R Y å I N å &E D E R A L å 7AYåå  'RAVEå  å ,OTå  å 3EC å 02/&,/7%23 å ,OOKINGåå T I O N å $å / N E å $ O U B L Eåå FORå Aå HOLIDAYå GIFTå THATå WILLåå $EPTHå ,AWNå #RYPTå 'RAVEåå REALLYå IMPRESSå å 3PECIALåå 7 I T H å # A R E å $ O U B L Eåå OFFERå å PERCENTå OFFå QUALI å $EPTHå ,AWNå #RYPTå "OX åå FYINGå GIFTSå OVERå å FROMåå 4WOå /PENINGSå ANDå #LOS å PROFLOWERSå å /FFERå ONLYåå INGS å /NEå Xå 'RANITEåå AVAILABLEå ATå WWWPRO å -ARKERå 7ITHå /NEå &INALåå FLOWERSCOMFRESHå ORå CALLåå )NSCRIPTIONå ANDå 3ETTINGåå     &EEå )NCLUDEDå !LLå &ORåå *USTå  å &ORå )NFO åå Wanted/Trade #ALLå  

&INDåITåFASTåANDåEASY WWWNW ADSCOM '2%%.7//$å -EMORI å ALå 0ARKå INå 2ENTONå /NEåå PLOTå AVAILABLEå INå BEAUTIFULåå 2HODODENDRONå SECTIONåå 0 U R C H A S E D å I N å    åå AMONGå 2ENTONå FAMILIESåå ANDå VETERANSå 4HISå SEC å TIONååISålLLED åLOCKåINåPRICEåå NOWå å &ORå MOREåå DETAILS å CALLå !LICEå  å   35.3%4å (),,3å -EMORI å ALå 0ARKå #EMETERYå å 0ER å SONå 0LOTå &ORå 3ALEå 2E å TAILSå &ORå  å !SKINGåå  å 0R IMEå ,OCA å TION å .EARå 4HEå 4OPå /Fåå 4HEå (ILLå )Nå 4HEå 'ARDENåå /Få -EMORIES å ,OTå  åå 3PACEå å !NDå )Så !å $OU å BLEå $EPTHå ,AWNå #RYPT åå .EXTå 4Oå 4HEå 7ALKWAYåå 0ATHå 0LEASEå #ALLå -ARKåå !Tå   Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

!00,%

&IR0INEå&IREWOOD WWWTHEWOODGUYSCOM

'/4å !.4)15%3å 2E å M O D E L å FO R C E S å S A L E å O Fåå         å " E A U T I F U L åå 2ARE å 5NSUALå !NTIQUEåå #HINAå (UTCHå ANDå "UFFETåå 3OLIDå 7ALNUTå WITHå 7ALNUTåå "URLå )NLAYå -USTå SEEå TOåå BELIEVEå %MAILå ORå CALLå FORåå MOREå PICTURESå ORå TOå SETåå UPå APPOINTMENTå TOå VIEWåå 3ER IOUSå INQUIRESå ONLYåå PLEASEå !SKINGå  åå /"/å JOYCEBARRON HOT å MAILCOMå   åå ,AKEå4APPSå!REA

Mail Order



7! . 4 % $ å 9/ 5 2 å $ I A å BETESå TESTå STRIPSå 5NEX å P I R E D  å 7 E å B U Y å ! N Yåå +IND"RANDå 0AYå UPå TOåå       å P E R å B O X åå 3HIPPINGå 0AIDå (ABLAMOSåå ESPANOLå #ALLå    å å å WWW3ELL$IABETIC å STRIPSCOM Miscellaneous

Longview Fibre Paper and Packaging, Inc. Longview, WA 3%%+).'å3+),,%$åå 42!$%3å).å!å5.)/.åå %.6)2/.-%.4

www.nw-ads.com

Dogs

Dogs

!+#å '/,$%.å 2ETRIEVERåå PUPPIESå 'REATå FAMILYåå PETSå "OTHå PARENTSå ONåå SITEå 6ETå CHECKED å FIRSTåå SHOTS å WORMINGå å POTTYåå TRAININGå STARTEDå &RIENDLY åå PLAYFUL å LOVINGå 3OCIAL å IZEDå WELLå WITHå ADULTSå åå MANYå CHILDRENå 6ARIOUSåå SHADESå !VAILABLEå FORåå #HRISTMAS å READYå åå &EMALES å å -ALES åå å "ONNEYå ,AKEå #ALLåå   

&Bå '/,$%.$//$,%3å FORå #HR ISTMASå 3MALL åå -EDIUMå 2EDå ANDå BLACKåå S M A L L å G I R L S å BU F F å A N Dåå BLACKå MEDIUMå GIRLSå ANDåå BLACKå BOYå "LACKSå WITHåå BLUEå SKINå SHINEå 0ARENTSåå AREå  å POUNDS å GEN å T L E å S M A R T å T E S T E D åå #HOOSEå PUPå NOW å BRINGåå HOMEå AFTERå DECORATIONSåå AWAY å MIDå *ANå å STåå S H O T S å V E T å C H E C K åå WORMED http://vashonislandgolden doodles.shutterfly.com/ allison@dancingleaves.com   å

Cats

å &/2$å %80,/2%2åå % D D I E å " A U E R å % D I T I O Nåå 7$å /NLYå ONEå OWNER åå LIKEå NEWå "LACKå EXTERIORåå WITHå LEATHERå INTERIORå &UL å LYå LOADED å NOå ACCIDENTSåå å ONLYå  å MILESå #$åå PLAYER å  RD å ROWå SEATING åå ROOFå RACKå å TOWå PACKAGEåå !LLå MAINTENANCEå RECORDSåå AVA I L A BL Eå       å O Råå " % . ' ! , å + ) 4 4 % . 3 åå BESTå OFFERå "ELLEVUEå 0UR å 'ORGEOUSLYå 2OSETTEDåå C H A S E D å N E W å VE H I C L E åå #ONSIDERå Aå BITå OFå THEåå MUSTåSELLå   h7ILDvå FORå YOURå HOMEåå , I KE å A D VE N T U R E  å 4 H I Såå Utility Trailers MAYå BEå THEå PETå FORå YOUåå WWWSEATTLEBENGALSCOMåå å å 2/,,).'å 3TARåå THENå CLICKå ONå h+ITTENSvå TOåå SEEå WHATSå AVAILABLEå WITHåå #USTOMå #ARGOå 4RAILERåå PRICINGå å STARTINGå ATå åå % X C E L L E N T å # O N D I T I O N åå #HAMPIONSHIPå "REEDER åå  å '672å $UALå !X å 4)#!å /UTSTANDINGå #AT å E L å % L E C T R I C å " R A K E S åå TERY å 4)"#3å "REEDERå OFåå 'OODYEARå 2ADIALå 4RAILERåå $ I S T I N C T I O N  å 3 H O T S åå  0LYå 4IRESå å ,OWå -ILE å (EALTHå 'UARANTEEå 4ERE å AGE å 2EARå 2AMP å 2EESEåå 3WAYå "ARå (ITCHå 3YSTEM åå SA å   ,EVELINGå *ACKSå .Oå )N å T E R I O R å 7 H E E L å 7 E L Låå " U M P S å & L O O R å    åå 5SABLEå 3PACEå )NTERIORåå 9/ 2 + ) %  9/ 2 + 3 ( ) 2 %åå 6å ,IGHTSå  å #ALLåå 4ERRIERå !+#å 2EGISTERED åå 3COTT å   " O R N å / C T O B E R å   S T åå å å (OMEå RAISEDå 7ILLåå 5th Wheels BEå SMALLå APPROXå å TOåå LBSå 6ERYå FRIENDLYå ANDåå å"2 åå"!å).å26å0!2+ LOVINGå PUPPIES å FULLå OFåå %ASYå ACCESSå TOå ) å ANDå åå MISCHIEFå -OTHERå å FA å M I N U T E S å T O å " O E I N G åå THERå ONå SITEå 7OR MEDåå Xå å .U7Aå  THåå TWICEå å FIRSTå SHOTSå &E å 7HEELå INå 0RIVATEå å åå M A L E S å      å A N Dåå 0AR Kå !TTACHEDå Xåå MALES å å #ALLå  å Automobiles ENCLOSEDå DECKå )NTERIORåå  å ORå   å Honda UPDATEDå INCLUDINGå NEWåå  å (/.$!å 0RELUDEåå REFRIGERATOR å HOTå WATERåå !4å !WESOMEå LITTLEå SPORTSåå HEATERå å mOORINGå %VERY å C A R  å / N E å OW N E R å WE L Låå THINGå WORKSå GREATå 'REATåå „™„™„™„™„™„ MAINTAINED å RELIABLEå åå $EALå ONLYå  å 0ARKåå R E N T å O N L Y å     å P E Råå Place any private party O N L Y å       å M I L E S åå MONTHå #ALLå *EFFå  å &7$ å POWERå WINDOWS å åå ad for 2 weeks or more DOORå å SUNå ROOFå 'REATåå   and add a photo or bling C O N D I T I O N  å 7 H I T E å W I T Håå Log on to a website GREYå UPHOLSTEREDå INTERIORåå at no additional charge. 0URCHASEDå NEWå VEHICLE åå that’s easy to navigate. SELLå 7ORTHå   åå Photos are black & white MUSTå SELLå ONLYå  å OBO åå Whether you’re in print and full color M A I N T E N A N C E å R E C O R D Såå buying or selling, the AVAILå !UBURNå   å Classifieds has it all. online.  åHTTPVASHONISLANDGOLDENDOODLESSHUTTERmYCOM

!+#å #().%3%å #RESTEDåå P U P P I E S å M A L E S å  å FE å MALESå å EACHå &IRSTåå SHOTSå GIVEN å å MONTHSåå OLD å ANDå POTTYå TRAININGåå STAR TEDå !LSO å å YOUNGåå ADULTå NEUTEREDå MALESåå å EACHå "OTHå VARIE å TIESå HAIRLESSå ANDå POWDERåå P U F F å ( Y P O A L L E R G E N I C åå #HAMPIONå BLOODå LINES åå GREATå PETS å PERSONABLEåå COMPANIONSå .ONå SHED å DINGå å VERYå OUTGOINGåå 3POKANEå #ALLå *ANICEåå    'REATå$ANE

* Journeyman Millwright * Journeyman Pipefitter * Journeyman Electrician * Journeyman Instrument Mechanic ååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååå

åååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååå

ååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååååå

wheels

'2%!4å $!.%å 0UPPIES åå !+#å -ALESå FEMALESåå %VERYå COLORå BUTå &AWNS åå å å UPå å "LUESå SALEåå Apply online at PRICEDå å å UPå (EALTHåå www.longviewfibre.com G U A R A N T E E å , I C E N S E Dåå S I N C E å     å $ R EYE R S å !PPLICATIONSåMUSTåBEåå DANESå ISå /REGONå STATESåå LARGESTå BREEDERå OFå 'REATåå COMPLETEDåON LINE $ A N E S å ! L S O å S E L L I N Gåå &OLLOWå THISå LINKå ORå CUTå åå 3TANDARDå 0OODLESå 6ISITåå Call 800-388-2527 to å"OTTOMLESSåGARAGEåSALE WWWDREYERSDANESCOM PASTEåINTOåYOURåBROWSERå speak with a customer     #ALLå   https://www1.apply2jobs.com/ !,,å0/3)4)/.3å0!9åå 5.)/.å3#!,%

LongviewFibre/ProfExt/ index.cfm?fuseaction= mExternal.showSearchInterface https://www1.apply2jobs.com/LongviewFibre/ProfExt/index.cfm?fuseaction=mExternal.showSearchInterface

Sport Utility Vehicles Ford

SOLD IT? FOUND IT? Let us know by calling 1-800-388-2527 so we can cancel your ad.

service representative or go to www.nw-ads.com &INDå)Tå"UYå)Tå3ELLå)T ,OOKINGåFORåTHEåRIDE for more information. OFåYOURåLIFE WWWNW ADSCOM åHOURSåAåDAY

From automobiles and employment to real estate and household goods, you’ll find everything you need 24 hours a day at nw-ads.com.

flea market

Cemetery Plots Mail Order

å "52)!,å ,/43å INå 3UN å SETå (ILLSå #EMETERY å "EL å LEVUEå ,OTSå AREå NEXTå TOåå EACHå OTHER å LOCATEDå INåå THEå 'ARDENå OFå 'ETHSE å MANEå 0RIME å DRYå LOCA å TION å  å FORå BOTHåå 0LEASEå CONTACTå   å åIFåINTERESTED #%$!2å ,!7.3 å 2ED å MONDå å 3PACESå å å ANDåå å å &ORå 3ALEå INå %TERNITYåå , O T å   $å " E A U T I F U L åå 0EACEFULå 3ETTINGå 6ALUEDåå ATå  å %ACHå "UTå 7ILLåå 3ELLå "OTHå &ORå  å !LLåå - A I N T E N A N C E å 4A K E Nåå #AREå /Få "Yå #EMETER Yåå   å 7ILLå 0AYåå 4RANSFERå&EE

å 'UARANTEEDå /MA å HAå 3TEAKS å 3AVEå å ONåå THEå &AMILYå 6ALUEå #OLLEC å TIONå .OWå ONLYå åå PLUSå å FREEå GIFTSå å RIGHT å TO THE DOORå DELIVERYå INå Aåå REUSABLEå COOLER å ORDERå TO å DAYå    å ANDåå MENTIONå CODEå 3+3åå O R å W W W  O M A H A S å TEAKSCOMFVC

pets/animals Dogs

! + # å ' % 2 - ! . å 7 ) 2 %åå (AIREDå 0OINTERSå FORå SALEåå (IPS å %LBOWSå #ERTIFIED åå O N å B O T H å D A M å  å S I R E åå #HAMPIONå INå BOTHå FIELDåå T R I A L S å  å H U N T å T E S T Så åå MALES å å FEMALEå &IRSTåå SHOTSå DONEå å EACHåå "ORNå  å AVAILå 3AT å URDAYå å %NUMCLAWåå &ORå MOREå INFOå CALLå "RADYåå   

!44å 5 6%23%å FORå JUSTåå MOå å 3AVEå WHENåå Y O U å B U N D L E å ) N T E R å NET 0HONE 46å ANDå GETåå UPå TOå å BACKå 3ELECTåå P L A N S å å , I M I T E D å 4 I M Eåå # A L L å N OW  å        å Advertise your service 800-388-2527 or nw-ads.com 

Get Noticed! A one-inch photo and 50 words for 5 weeks in your local paper and online at nw-ads.com for one low price

Call today 800-388-2527

Home Services Hauling & Cleanup

Home Services Roofing/Siding

! å(!5,).'

2//&).'å 2%-/$%,).'

7EåREMOVERECYCLEåå *UNKWOODYARDETC &ASTå3ERVICEå å åYRSå%XPERIENCE å 2EASONABLEåRATES #ALLå2ELIABLEå-ICHAELåå



3ENIORå$ISCOUNTS &REEå%STIMATES %XPERTå7ORK   

!MERICANå'ENå#ONTRACTORå "ETTERå"USINESSå"UREAU ,ICå!-%2)'#"

PNWHomeFinder.com is an online real estate community that +./,,å42%%å3%26)#% h4HEå4REEå0EOPLEv exposes your profile and listings to two 4REEå2EMOVAL4HINNING åå million readers from 3TUMPå'RINDING

"RUSHå(AULING å%TC our many publications &2%%å%34)-!4%3 in the Pacific Northwest.    Log on to join our WWWKNOLLTREESERVICECOM network today. ,)#%.3%$ å"/.$%$ å).352%$ Home Services Tree/Shrub Care

å

Want more business this year?

LET ME HELP I can deliver your message to tens of thousands of doorsteps in your market.

Call me today to find out more Jennie Morello 866-296-0380 jmorello@soundpublishing.com Whether you need to target the local market or want to cover the Puget Sound area, WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED!


WEDNESDAY, DEC. 21

TALES: Story Time for Toddlers is 10:30 a.m. at Carnation Library. TALES: Preschool Story Time is 1:30 p.m. at Carnation Library, for ages 3 and older with an adult. COMPUTER HELP: Get extra help on the computer with volunteer assistance, 6:30 p.m. at Fall City Library. TALES: Young Toddler Story Time is 9:30 a.m. at the Snoqualmie Library; For children ages 6 to 24 months with an adult. TALES: Preschool Story Time is 10:30 a.m. at the Snoqualmie Library; for ages 3 to 6 with an adult. ANIME CLUB: Teens who enjoy anime and manga can meet, draw and watch movies, 3 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. COMPUTER HELP: Get extra help on the computer with volunteer assistance, 1 p.m. at North Bend Library.

THURSDAY, DEC. 22 HOLIDAY STORY: Reading of “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas” by special guest Karolyn Grimes, 4 to 6 p.m. at the Salish Lodge at Snoqualmie Falls. Grimes is best known as the character Zuzu Bailey from the classic holiday movie, “It’s a Wonderful Life.” TALES: Pajamarama Family Story Time is 6:30 p.m. at Carnation Library, for ages 3 to 7 with an adult. GAME ON: Teens can play video games at the Fall City Library, 3 p.m. TALES: Pajama Story Time is 7 p.m. at the Snoqualmie Library; all young children are welcome with an adult. PLAY CHESS: Snoqualmie Valley Chess Club meets at 7 p.m. at the North Bend Library. Learn to play chess or get a game going. LIVE MUSIC: Open mic is 7 p.m. at Sliders Café, Carnation.

ANIME CLUB: Teens who enjoy anime and manga can meet, draw and watch movies, 3 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. COMPUTER HELP: Get extra help on the computer with volunteer assistance, 1 p.m. at North Bend Library.

Dark of the moon

THURSDAY, DEC. 29 PLAY CHESS: Chess Club meets at 7 p.m. at the North Bend Library.

FRIDAY, DEC. 30

Courtesy photo

An eleven-year-old astronomy enthusiast named Katrina Kangas got up early on Saturday, Dec. 10, to catch an eclipse of the moon. Kangas, a fifth grader at Opstad Elementary in North Bend, snapped a photo of the rare event.

GAME ON: Teens can play games at the North Bend Library, 3 p.m.

RiverTree Dental Care

FRIDAY, DEC. 23

We are accepting patients of all ages

GAME ON: Teens can play video games at the North Bend Library, 3 p.m. LIVE MUSIC: John White plays at 7:30 p.m. at Sliders Cafe, Carnation.

MONDAY, DEC. 26

551312

CALENDAR SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt%FDFNCFS t

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

LEARN ENGLISH: English as a Second Language (ESL) Class is 6:30 p.m. at the North Bend Library. This is a formal class to learn English grammar, reading, writing and conversational skills. JOB CLUB: Connect with fellow job seekers for support, networking and employment resources, 2 p.m. at the North Bend Library. The group is led by a trained facilitator and is presented in partnership with Seattle-King County WorkSource.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 28

Cosmetic and Preventative Dental Care

Dr. Brian Mayer DDS 425.888.2703

COMPUTER HELP: Get extra help on the computer with volunteer assistance, 6:30 p.m. at Fall City Library.

www.rivertreedental.com 38700 SE River Street Snoqualmie

VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

A DIVISION OF SOUND PUBLISHING, INC.

cover to cover online

! ! E L A S A MEG MAKE AN OFFER

green edition Now you can view our full print editions online ~

cover to cover!

on all Bikes, Helmets, Gear, and accessories in stock thru December 24th.

EVERYTHING ON SALE regardless of profit for Holiday Gifts.

Plus access a treasure trove of previous issues of the Snoqualmie Valley Record & award winning reader features. Want extra copies of the championship game?

Download & print the pdf. It's FREE! Visit www.valleyrecord.com/green_editions today!

STORE HOURS Mon, Tues, Wed, Fri 10-6t5IVST4BU10-5

Closed Sundays

.BJO"WF4PVUItNorth Bend

425.888.0000 P.O. Box 300, Snoqualmie, WA 98065 | (425) 888-2311 | http://www.valleyrecord.com/green_editions

rattlesnakelakecycles.com

547346

24-7

yourpaper


t%FDFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

10:00am - 3:30pm

december 25th

HOLIDAY BUFFET CARVED RIB EYE ROASTED TURKEY WITH CRANBERRY DRESSING HONEY GLAZED HAM LEG OF LAMB WITH BLACKBERRY DEMI STEEL HEAD WITH LEMON BUTTER SAGE AND APPLE STUFFING ~ MASHED POTATOES & GRAVY AU GRATIN POTATOES ~ CANDIED YAMS ~ ROASTED SEASONAL VEGETABLES CRANBERRY SAUCE ~ BREAD PUDDING ~ APPLE PIE ~ PUMPKIN PIE PECAN PIE ~ ASSORTED DESSERTS ~ AFTER 4PM KING CRAB

$26.95

4/026"-.*& 8"tt4/0$"4*/0$0. %3*7*/(&"45* &9*5t%3*7*/(8&45* &9*5

)0634 13*$&4 4$)&%6-& 36-&4"3&46#+&$550$)"/(&8*5)065/05*$& .645#& 50(".#-&

Snoqualmie Valley Record, December 21, 2011  

December 21, 2011 edition of the Snoqualmie Valley Record

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you