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GLOBE THE MARYSVILLE

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Happy Thanksgiving

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Marysville Community Food Bank hands out hundreds of holiday baskets to those in need BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

HAPPY

THANKSGIVING

SPORTS: Marysville trainer takes on ‘Dare Dever.’ Page 10

MARYSVILLE — The Marysville Community Food Bank’s needs for this year’s holiday season have more than equaled those of previous years. Marysville Community Food Bank Director Dell Deierling estimated that as many as 300 families might have received Thanksgiving food baskets, which were distributed by close to 100 volunteer workers during the three hours that the food bank was open to serve them on Friday, Nov. 18. “Last year, we saw 40 percent of our Thanksgiving food basket customers on Friday,”

Deierling said on Nov. 18, as he prepared for the potential need for Monday, Nov. 21, and Tuesday, Nov. 22. “I thought that was just a fluke, due to last year’s snowstorm, since Tuesday is usually our biggest day. We’re open for five hours, rather than three, on the Tuesday before Thanksgiving. If Tuesday turns out to be our biggest day this year though,” he paused, before smiling and saying, “then wow. It’s going to be a real challenge to keep up.” Indeed, Deierling had only anticipated that the food bank would serve Thanksgiving food baskets SEE THANKS, PAGE 2

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

Karen Strand assists a Marysville Community Food Bank client in picking out items for a Thanksgiving food basket on Nov. 18.

Forum focuses on ‘Coal Hard Truth’ BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

INDEX CLASSIFIED ADS 15, 17-18 LEGAL NOTICES 9 8 OBITUARIES 4 OPINION 10-11 SPORTS 13 WORSHIP

Vol. 119, No. 40 Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring argues the economic case against allowing more coal trains through Marysville.

MARYSVILLE — The Totem Middle School cafeteria was packed on the evening of Nov. 17, as area residents heard from representatives of the city of Marysville, the Snohomish County Health District and the Washington Environmental Council on “The Coal Hard Truth” about the potential coming of coal trains through Marysville. Nicole Keenan of the Washington Environmental Council opened by explaining that uncovered rail cars lose about 1 percent of their coal load in transit, due to the amount of coal that’s fine

particulate matter, which she pointed out can add up to millions of tons of coal that can get into people’s lungs. She added that the Gateway Pacific coal terminal proposed by SSA Marine, in partnership with Peabody Energy, for Cherry Point in Bellingham could export 48 million tons of coal per year, the largest load in North America. “It threatens quality of life, tourism and small business to have mounds of coal on the waterfront,” Keenan said. “It threatens the economy because the coal market is volatile. Portland and Los Angeles invested in coal ter-

minals that flopped with the market, and the price of coal has been dropping recently.” Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring objected to the potential addition of 18 coal trains a day to the train tracks that bisect Marysville from north to south, which he noted would further impede the east-west traffic within the city, as well as access to I-5. He and several other mayors throughout the region wrote letters to the governor asking the state Department of Ecology to get involved. As a result of DOE and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers planning to review the process, all the

applicants’ paperwork must be resubmitted, which adds a couple of years to the timeline. “Economic impacts are where this battle will be played out,” said Nehring, who cited the burdens placed on workers, businesses, schools and emergency responders by making the city more difficult to traverse with extra trains. “Right now, it’s cheaper for the Chinese to import coal than to transport it from parts of their own country, but as their infrastructure gets built up, that’s not likely to last. A lot of state and SEE TRAINS, PAGE 2

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SPORTS: W.F. West freezes Lakewood 33-18. Page 10


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November 23, 2011

TRAINS FROM PAGE 1 federal leaders support this coal terminal, but if they saw all of you here, they’d think twice. Phone calls and letters from you carry much more weight with them than phone calls and letters from me.� Gary Goldbaum of the Snohomish County Health District listed the health impacts of coal particulates, whose heavy metals can be absorbed by the lungs and the skin to contribute to asthma and heart attacks, as well as of the additional noise level of the trains, which can raise blood pressure. He likewise noted that slowed or stopped automobile traffic “can make the difference between life and death� for ambulance passengers. Dean Smith of Transition Port Gardner asserted that such coal trains constitute an “immoral� practice due to three factors:

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1. The externalization of the coal industry’s costs. 2. The shipping of energy across long distances. 3. The creation of more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. “We’re paying for the coal industry to remain profitable,� Smith said. “The added wait times at railroad crossings, which would be two hours a day with 18 trains a day, doesn’t add to our convenience.� Smith cited three lawsuits by the Burlington Northern Railroad against coal companies for the derailment of their trains, since coal particulates also escape from the bottom of rail cars and add to the dust under the beds of railroad tracks, eventually forcing the rails out of alignment. Organizers of this forum invited attendees to a followup meeting on Dec. 1 from 6-8 p.m. at Firewheel Books & Beans, located at 2820 Oakes Ave. in Everett. To RSVP or for more information, email Seth. Ballhorn@sierraclub.org.

THANKS FROM PAGE 1 to as many as 700 families over the course of all three days. Fortunately, close to 60 future sailors with Navy Recruiting District Seattle had already collected for local food banks at various Safeway stores earlier in the month, and their hard work yielded heavy results. “We generated about 8,000 pounds for four food banks last year, so we set a goal of 10,000 pounds this year,� said Petty Officer 2nd Class Chris Martin, one of a dozen sailors who showed up in uniform to volunteer at the Marysville Community Food Bank on Nov. 18. “What we actually got was more than 20,000 pounds, which we distributed evenly among the four food banks.� This added up to more than 5,000 pounds of food from the Navy to the Marysville Community Food Bank, where Chief Petty Officer Omar Ozuna was sorting containers of flour on Nov. 18. “We’ve normally done things like this in downtown Seattle, but our

recruiting district is in charge of this sector now,� Ozuna said. “Overall, this has been very well-organized and executed. Hats off to the staff who works here day in and day out.� Michelle Turner is a civilian, but this year marked her first holiday season of volunteering at the Marysville Community Food Bank as well. “I started here around the first of the month,� Turner said. “My husband has been volunteering here for the past year and a half, and now that I’ve got a bit more spare time I’m finally able to join him.� Turner already believed in the value of community service, but working at the food bank has underscored for her the degree of need that exists in Marysville. “These are the working poor,� Turner said. “We need to realize that they’re here, and they’re our neighbors. Even something as small as a couple of cans of corn or some potatoes can make such a difference.� As Deierling looks ahead to the winter holidays, he encouraged donations of turkey and other meats, from turkey breasts to small turkeys and full-sized whole turkeys.

i5IFTFBSFUIFXPSLJOHQPPS 8FOFFEUPSFBMJ[FUIBU UIFZSFIFSF BOEUIFZSFPVS OFJHICPST&WFOTPNFUIJOH BTTNBMMBTBDPVQMFPGDBOT PGDPSOPSTPNFQPUBUPFTDBO NBLFTVDIBEJGGFSFODF� Michelle Turner Food Bank volunteer “Of course, after Thanksgiving, we’ll need to reevaluate our inventory to see exactly where we stand,� Deierling said. “Once we figure out what the holes are that need to be filled, we get to do all of this again next month,� he laughed. The Marysville Community Food Bank is distributing winter holiday food baskets on Monday, Dec 19, and Friday, Dec. 23, from 9 a.m. to noon, and on Tuesday, Dec. 20, from 2-7 p.m. The food bank is located at 4150 88th St. NE in Marysville. For more information, call 360-658-1054, fax 658-1055 or log onto http://marysvillecommunityfb.com.

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November 23, 2011

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Hairport Barbershop opens in Arlington Lori Kirkeby returns to a career she began more than 30 years ago

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Visit www.arlingtontimes.com/green_editions & www.marysvilleglobe.com/green_editions today!

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A.J. Matulovich sits patiently for his haircut by Lori Kirkeby at the Hairport Barbershop in Arlington.

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ARLINGTON — Lori Kirkeby’s career has included jobs as diverse as a distribution engineer for PUD and a city planner for Stanwood, but in all that time, she maintained the skills as a barber that she honed in 1981. The opening of the Hairport Barbershop at 5702 172nd St. NE in Arlington represents a return to the field that she found so fun 30 years ago, in a location that she hopes customers will find convenient during their drives. “I always kept my license and kept practicing,” said Kirkeby, as she trimmed the bangs of young customer A.J. Matulovich in one of her four seats. “We’re strictly a barbershop here. No coloring, perms or chemicals.” A longtime resident of north Snohomish County, Kirkeby already knew many of her customers and reported that traffic has been good for bringing in new faces. While cutting hair allows her to indulge her artistic nature, her nofrills service is tailored to appeal to those who might not feel at home in a beauty parlor. “I wanted a more masculine setting for guys who don’t like sitting around in a salon,” Kirkeby said. “My other barber has 36 years of experience. He’s really old-school.” The Hair por t Barbershop currently sells Woody’s hair products for men, but is looking at carrying other merchandise as well. For more information, stop by the Hairport Barbershop, where walkins are always welcome, or call Kirkeby at 425-4188687.


THE PUBLIC FORUM



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IN OUR VIEW

Shop locally this holiday season

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lack Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, marks the traditional beginning of the SCOTT FRANK Christmas holiday shopping seaMANAGING son and is one of the busiest shopEDITOR ping days of the year. But the continuing economic downturn has impacted many consumers, many of whom have less money to spend this holiday season. So it’s important for them to keep one thing in mind when deciding on where to shop this holiday season — shop locally. Shopping locally benefits everyone — our communities, the local businesses, local non-profits and service organizations, and the people who call Arlington and Marysville home. Local businesses are an integral and important part of our communities and they depend on and deserve our support in these challenging economic times. Local businesses create jobs — if the businesses fail those jobs will disappear. Local businesses make significant contributions to our communities. Look at any activity in our communities, from the Fly-In to the Strawberry Festival, from youth sports to community service organizations, and you’ll find some type of support from our local businesses. If we don’t support our local businesses, they won’t be able to support our communities. Local businesses generate sales tax revenues that help pay for critical services such as police, roads, parks and recreation and more in our communities. When those sales tax revenues fall, cities are faced with making cuts in those critical services which could negatively impact all of us. So when you are deciding where you’re going to be doing your holiday shopping, try to do as much of it as you can by shopping locally. You’ll be supporting our local businesses and our communities. Scott Frank is the Managing Editor of The Arlington Times and The Marysville Globe. He can be reached at 360-659-1300 or sfrank@marysvilleglobe.com.

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Corps’ permit program threatens salmon habitat S

almon are on the same downward trend as the amount and quality of their habitat, and until we turn that around, there’s little hope for their recovery. The tribes believe the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ streamlined nationwide permit system for bulkhead construction and other shoreline changes is making it too easy to damage and destroy important nearshore salmon habitat in western Washington. We think a change is needed. Disappearing and damaged habitat are the main causes for the decline of wild salmon in western Washington. The tribes believe the Corps is encouraging habitat damage and destruction by streamlining the process to allow property owners to in some cases build the very same structures that we are working to remove as part of salmon recovery efforts. That means the federal government is working against itself. It’s why we are calling on the leadership to line up agency action and make salmon recovery a reality. Bulkhead construction, dredging, filling and other shoreline changes are often regulated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers under the Clean Water through a fast track nationwide permit system. As long as a property owner meets the conditions of these permits, they are automatically re-authorized with little public

GUEST OPINION BILLY FRANK JR.

review. There’s also little consideration of how multiple projects in a certain area might result in greater habitat damage. The Clean Water Act says that the Corps can’t authorize the permits if they cause more than minor harm to the marine ecosystem alone, or combined. Yet with little or no study of the possible effects of the program, the Corps is getting ready to allow another five years of fast track shoreline changes. We think that’s wrong and we are calling on the Corps to make a change. We are asking the Corps to take into consideration the special needs of salmon and the loss of nearshore habitat in western Washington. We’re not asking the Corps to stop issuing permits for shoreline work nationwide, but rather for the Seattle District Office to switch to an individual permit system that acknowledges the need to protect and restore salmon habitat in western Washington. We’re not alone. The National Marine Fisheries Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Puget Sound Partnership are all calling for similar change. While we hold no hope for salmon recovery under the federal Endangered Species Act, we believe that aligning the work of federal agencies affecting salmon recovery offers the best chance for success. We also believe that this approach offers the best protection of our treaty-reserved fishing rights, which are based on the fact that there must be salmon for us to harvest. Protecting those rights is the trust responsibility of the federal government. The Corps’ nationwide streamlined permit process might make sense in other parts of the country, but not here. This isn’t the Mississippi River or Florida. They don’t have salmon. We do, and they’re in trouble. If we are going to recover salmon, we have to stop damaging and destroying salmon habitat. The Clean Water Act is clear. By continuing to issue these types of permits for shoreline changes, the Corps is saying that these projects aren’t causing harm, and that’s just not true. We can’t recover salmon if we keep losing and damaging salmon habitat. Billy Frank Jr. is the chairman of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission.


November 23, 2011

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PUD offers assistance for seniors, low-income customers SNOHOMISH COUNTY — In the coming year, Snohomish County Public Utility District expects its energy assistance programs to help more than 19,000 senior citizens and low-income customers struggling with their electric bills. The programs currently provide reductions of 20 percent, 40 percent or 60 percent off PUD electric and water bills. The dis-

count percentage that a customer receives depends on their income level. This low-income discount is available now to PUD customers who have a household annual income that is below 125 percent of the federal poverty level, which is $27,938 for a family of four. Also eligible for discounts are senior citizens who are 62 years of age or older and have a combined

disposable annual income of less than $25,988. For an application or more information about the PUD’s assistance programs, customers should call PUD Customer Service at 425783-1000. Among the additional assistance programs are: ■ Project PRIDE, administered by the local chapter of the American Red Cross, which raises

voluntary contributions from PUD ratepayers. The money goes to low-income customers who need help with their bills. For more information, call the Red Cross at 425-252-4103. ■ Helping Hands, which receives donations from PUD employees to help low-income senior citizens with their winter electric bills. The program is funded in a variety of ways, including

employee payroll deductions, a holiday bazaar fundraiser, recycling drives, coffee funds, book fairs and other events. Snohomish County Human Services helps administer the program by identifying those in need and distributing checks to residents. For more information, call PUD Customer Service at 425-7831000, Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.


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November 23, 2011

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November 23, 2011

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‘Voices’ raises funds for victims BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

TULALIP — Families and Friends of Violent Crime Victims called upon citizens of north Snohomish County for their support at their annual breakfast fundraiser to respond to the “Voices of Victims.” The Orca Ballroom of the Tulalip Resort hosted the event on the morning of Nov. 9, with guests including city officials and law enforcement personnel from Marysville, Arlington and throughout the Puget Sound region, as well as Q13 Fox News anchor and host of “Washington’s Most Wanted” David Rose and Snohomish County Prosecutor Mark Roe. “I’ve worked with many of you in this room,” Rose said. “We all care about community safety and putting the bad guys away, but I support this organization because I also don’t want the victims or their loved ones to be forgotten.” The annual “Voices of Victims” breakfast raises funds for Families and Friends of Violent Crime Victims so that the Snohomish County-based non-profit agency can assist victims of crime — including the loved ones of homicide victims and adult missing persons where foul play is suspected — in navigating the criminal justice system, which it’s done by providing peer support and advocacy for victims of crime since 1975. Marge Martin, interim executive director of Families and Friends of Violent Crime Victims, struggled to maintain her composure as she talked about the long road that led from her sister’s brutal murder 11 years ago to Martin herself joining Families and Friends three

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NEWS BRIEFS Centennial Trail Coalition to elect new officers

ARLINGTON — The Centennial Trail Coalition is set to elect its officers for next year at its next general membership meeting. The meeting is scheduled to start at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 30, in the Arlington Boys and Girls Club. This year saw the extension of the Centennial Trail north of Arlington to Bryant, the completion of “the gap” and the dedication of the Resilience Art Arch and Plaza. If you’re interested in serving as a Centennial Trail Coalition officer and being part of what the next year holds, contact Beth Hill at beth.c.hill@boeing.com.

Make holiday wreaths with the Arlington Garden Club Nov. 26

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Snohomish County Prosecutor Mark Roe urges attendees of the annual ‘Voices of Victims’ fundraising breakfast to skimp on a few of their less essential expenditures to help support Families and Friends of Violent Crime Victims. years ago. “I wasn’t looking for Families and Friends back then,” Martin said. “I didn’t even know it existed. I spent a full year in an absolute fog, not knowing who to turn to. You always think of these things as happening to other people.” Martin told the audience she’s glad she joined Families and Friends, and is proud of the work she’s done with the group, including ongoing outreach efforts to secure much-needed funds and to make more people in the community aware of the program. Myrle Carner, director of law enforcement services for “Crime Stoppers” of Puget Sound, praised Rose and “Washington’s Most Wanted” for the roles they’ve played in helping to apprehend criminals, and seconded Martin’s calls for donors to support Families and Friends of Violent Crime Victims. “We’ve got to have people who can provide compas-

sion and advocacy for those whose lives have been devastated by violent crimes,” Carner said. “These people make society better.” Nancy Hawley, director of victim services for Families and Friends of Violent Crime Victims, described how the typical day of a victim advocate includes catching up with emails and voicemails from victims who “can’t push the memories away,” as well as sitting with victims through court proceedings for emotional support, and fighting for limited resources to provide donated locks for victims of home invasions and ramps for victims who have been rendered paraplegic by violent crimes. “We go to the families,” Hawley said. “We don’t expect them to come to us. We listen to their stories, and we tell them about the services we offer, including our 24-hour crisis line for 10 counties in the state.” Roe recalled how his father had passed away peacefully

last year, after his family had been afforded a long window to say their final goodbyes to him, and pointed out that the loved ones of violent crime victims often don’t get that same chance to say goodbye. “My dad loved baseball,” Roe said. “The last time I saw my father was one of the last games of the World Series. My family buys season tickets to the Mariners. To support this organization, I won’t be chipping in for my tickets, because I got to say goodbye to my father. Those who have lost someone they love to violent crime can’t survive without this organization.” For more information on Families and Friends of Violent Crime Victims, call 425-252-6081 or log onto www.fnfvcv.org.

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ARLINGTON — The Arlington Garden Club is holding its annual holiday wreath-making workshop on Saturday, Nov. 26, at 10 a.m. in the Arlington Boys and Girls Club Community Room, located at 18513 59th Ave. NE in Arlington. For a suggested donation of $4 the Garden Club will provide the greenery and teachers, while participants may bring their own balls of green twine and wreath forms, or purchase them from the Garden Club, at a cost of $4 for the wreath form and $1 for the twine. For more information, call Arlington Garden Club Past President and Workshop Chair Bea Randall at 360-435-3892.

27th Ave. west of I-5 closes Nov. 23 for installation of Everett to Tulalip pipeline

TULALIP — The Tulalip Tribes will briefly close a portion of 27th Avenue, west of the Marysville Fourth Street and I-5 interchange, starting at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 23, and reopening about 12 hours later in the early hours of Thursday, Nov. 24. The construction will support the installation of pipe for the Everett to Tulalip Joint Water Pipeline Project. During this closure, a 1,200-foot 36-inch welded steel pipe will be installed approximately 60 feet below the bottom of Quil Ceda Creek. Temporary traffic controls and detours will be set up to maintain public traffic and local access to all private properties, businesses and I-5. When completed, the Everett to Tulalip Joint Water Pipeline will serve the long-term needs of the Tulalip Reservation, as well as portions of north Snohomish County and a northerly portion of the city of Everett.


November 23, 2011

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City prepares for approaching winter weather

MARYSVILLE — Marysville Public Works, Police and Emergency Management personnel have been training, reviewing and preparing for when the season delivers its first winter storms, and they urge residents and businesses to also be prepared. The National Weather

Service has predicted La Nina weather conditions that spell a colder, wetter winter for Marysville and Snohomish County residents. City Public Works crews mobilized earlier this year for the coming snow and ice by readying snow equipment, stockpiling supplies, training staff for emergency response

and updating the city’s snow and ice routes map. Public Works and Emergency Management staff also hosted and attended pre-snow and ice meetings in October to share strategies and information with other local jurisdictions. “Major snow and ice events in recent years have made

Tina Marie Thomas Tina was born June 12, 1962 in Seattle, WA to Jim and Darleen Maher; she passed away peacefully from cancer on November 14, 2011 at her home in Arlington, WA with her family by her side. She attended St. Luke’s school in Shoreline, WA and Blanchet High School in Seattle. Tina attended Seattle Pacific University and later graduated from the University of Washington majoring in German. She lived and traveled in Europe as part of her schooling. She especially enjoyed Germany and Italy. Tina also worked in a remote lodge near Dillingham, Alaska for (3) summers and always wanted to return to Alaska. Before her children, Tina directed an after-school program at Concordia Lutheran School

in the Wedgwood neighborhood of Seattle. Her family cabin on Whidbey Island was her favorite place to bring friends. She was fully dedicated to home-schooling and raising her two boys and was a devoted full-time mother. Tina loved Jesus Christ and loved people. Her greatest joy was worshiping God and being a

member of several worship teams. Tina is survived by her husband of 20 years, Scott; sons David and Michael; parents Jim and Darleen Maher of Lynnwood, WA; brothers Dave (Vicki) Maher of Woodinville, WA, Greg Maher of Whidbey Island, WA, and Doug (Joy) Maher of Edmonds, WA; numerous nieces and nephews, uncles, aunts, and cousins who also loved her and will greatly miss her. A celebration of her life was held Saturday, November 19, 2011 at Jake’s House church, located at 18824 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington, WA. Please share your thoughts of Tina and sign the online guest register at www.gilbertsonfh.com. Arrangements are under the care of Gilbertson’s Funeral Home, Stanwood, WA.

it clear that it is better to be over-prepared than underprepared,� Mayor Jon Nehring said. “The city is dedicated to delivering public services to the best of our ability and without disruption during severe weather, and to protecting lives and property.� Safety on local roads is the top priority, along with keeping traffic moving throughout Marysville as efficiently as possible, said Kevin Nielsen, Public Works Director. The Street Department maintains 196 miles of streets within the city. Street crews provide 24-hour coverage, conducting periodic sanding and snow-ice removal to mitigate conditions during a severe weather event. An in-house database system tracks the responses to dispatched crews in order to create a more efficient workflow. Marysville’s fleet includes several vehicles equipped for snow and ice control, including three 10-yard trucks for plowing and sanding, and

another 10-yard truck that sands, as well as two fiveyard trucks, a one-ton truck for plowing and sanding, and another that dispenses anti-icing liquid, said Charlie Burke, Streets and Surface Water Manager. The city’s Snow and Ice Removal Plan designates snow and ice routes for sanding and plowing using a zoned system, Nielsen said. Within each zone, a system of priority has been established, taking into consideration topography, traffic volumes and special usage. During events where snow and ice conditions are widespread, street personnel concentrate their removal efforts based on the following: ■ Arterials leading in and out of the city. ■ Arterials located on hills within city boundaries. ■ Fire and police access. ■ All other arterials within city boundaries. That means response is focused on principal routes

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and arterials, such as State, 51st, 67th, 83rd and Twin Lakes avenues, as well as Fourth, Grove, 88th 116th, 136th, 152nd and 172nd streets, the latter west of I-5 in the Lakewood area, and Sunnyside, Ingraham and Smokey Point boulevards. To view the Snow Routes map, visit the city website at http:// marysvillewa.gov. Steep roadways such as 84th Street past Cedarcrest Golf Course are regularly first to close during ice and snow conditions. When “Snow Closure: Do Not Enter� signs and barricades are placed at these locations, in the interests of public safety, motorists are advised not to go around them, said Burke. Pedestrians should stay off the roads, too. City officials are asked often during and after storms why neighborhood streets aren’t addressed. “We strive to make our roads as accessible as possible for the public and commuters heading to and from work or schools, but the city does not have the resources and equipment to plow or sand residential neighborhood streets and cul de sacs,� said Burke. In rare instances, however, crews can respond to other snow and ice removal outside the norm, but only at the request of Marysville Police or Fire personnel. Nielsen added that some roads may be closed by city personnel due to safety concerns. The city Public Works yard is amply stockpiled with sand and de-icer, with a proportion of the materials relocated to a new north satellite storage area near 156th Street to provide quicker response to Marysville’s north end and Lakewood neighborhoods, Burke said. For the most current information online about local emergency or road conditions and preparedness, visit the city website at http://marysvillewa.gov. The site, which was renovated last spring with several new interactive features, now includes an Emergency Alert Center that offers the latest updates. For your added convenience, you may sign up for emergency alerts sent automatically to your email through the site’s “Notify Me� email subscription service. Updates will also be posted on the city’s Facebook and Twitter sites and on Marysville TV21 on Comcast and TV25 on Frontier Communications. You can also call the city’s message-only Emergency Alert Hotline at 360-3638118, said Doug Buell, Community Information Officer. For water and sewer emergencies during business hours, call 360-363-8100 or 911 after hours.


November 23, 2011

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LEGAL NOTICE OF HEARING BEFORE THE MARYSVILLE CITY COUNCIL NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Marysville City Council will hold a public hearing on the 2012 proposed budget at 7:00 p.m., Monday, November 28, 2011, in the Council Chambers of the Marysville City Hall located at 1049 State Avenue, Marysville, Washington at which time and place citizens will have the right to provide written and oral comments and suggestions regarding the 2012 budget as proposed. The public hearing will address revenue sources, including the property tax levy, and expenditures. THE CITY OF MARYSVILLE April O’Brien, Deputy City Clerk Published: November 9, 16, 23, 2011. #543630 CITY OF Marysville NOTICE OF LAND USE APPLICATION AND PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE HEARING EXAMINER File Number: PA11024 File Name: Dick’s Towing Holding Yard Land Use Action: C o n d i t i o n a l Use Permit for establishing an automobile holding yard at a General Commercial (GC) zoned property, and a Variance to replace an existing 8-foot tall fence with barbed wire with a 9-foot tall fence with barbed wire. The variance request is to increase the fence height by one foot and to allow installation of barbed wire in the GC zone. Location: 7404 44th Avenue NE Marysville, WA 98270 Tax Parcel Number: 00497200000301 Applicant: Richard Peterson 3516 Paine Avenue Everett, WA 98201 Contact: Stewart Wood

17104 Marine Drive Stanwood, WA 98292 425-343-5288 Date of Application November 7, 2011 Date of Completeness: November 18, 2011 Public Hearing: Before the Hearing Examiner, Thursday, December 8, 2011 at 7:00 p.m., City Council Chambers (2nd Floor), 1049 State Avenue, Marysville, WA. City Contact: Angela Gemmer, Associate Planner 360-363-8240 or agemmer@ma rysvillewa.gov A decision on this application will be made within 120-days from the date of completeness. The application and complete case file are available for review at the City of Marysville Community Development located at 80 Columbia Avenue, Marysville, WA 98270. Written comments on the aforementioned application are solicited and should be received by December 7, 2011. Any person may appear at the hearing and be heard in support of, or in opposition of the proposed CUP and Variance. Additional information may be obtained at the City of Marysville Community Development Department located at 80 Columbia Avenue, Marysville, Washington 98270, (360) 363-8100. Special Accommodations: The City of Marysville strives to provide accessible meetings for people with disabilities. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at (360) 363-8084 or 1-800-833-6399 (TDD Only) or 1-800-833-6384 (Voice Relay) two days prior to the meeting date if any special accommodations are needed. Published: November 23, 2011. #547616

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THE SPORTS PAGE



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W.F. West freezes Lakewood 33-18

BY JAKE MCNEAL

jmcneal@arlingtontimes.com

MARYSVILLE — Lakewood hosted its 2A state quarterfinal playoff game against the W.F. West Bearcats at MarysvillePilchuck High School’s Quil Ceda Stadium, just seven miles from Lakewood High School, in a frosty affair on Nov. 19. The winner would survive to face the winner of the next day’s match in the semifinal game at the Tacoma Dome on Nov. 25 or 26. The loser would stay home. The Cougars played before a friendly crowd but it was West senior quarterback Mitch Gueller who made himself at home, rushing 22 times for 260 yards and three touchdowns to beat Lakewood, 33-18. The Bearcats stopped Cougar junior running back Donovan Evans short on 4th-and-2 on Lakewood’s first drive to force the Cougars to throw the ball. The Cougars were dominated at the line of scrimmage in the first quarter as Gueller split the Lakewood defense up the middle and off the left tackle with option plays and drilled the

Cougars for a nine-yard score. Junior Bearcat Keylen Steen scored from six yards out five minutes later to put W.F. West ahead 14-0 with under two minutes to go in the first quarter. “Every single one of you better rally up,” Lakewood senior wide receiver/linebacker Riley Reinecke shouted as he patrolled the Cougar sideline after the Bearcats’ second score. “Every one of you.” The Cougars spelled junior quarterback Justin Peterson with junior quarterback Kolby Schueller to open up the spread-formation passing game and catch the Bearcats napping as they played the run and open lanes for the ground game that had brought Lakewood this far. The aggressive tactics moved the chains momentarily, but the Cougars came up short on a 4th down pass early in the second quarter. Gueller wasted no time in holding onto an option and cruising down one sideline, then the other on consecutive plays. His zone read keeper on the drive’s third play put the Bearcats up 20-0 as the extra point failed.

W.F. West drove a bouncing squib kick down the middle on the kickoff to stuff Lakewood’s return, but the Cougars returned it to the Bearcat 40 to amp up the crowd. Evans took a swing pass to the two-yard line and Peterson scampered up the middle to score — and again for a two-point conversion — to put Lakewood on the board, trailing 20-8, with nine minutes left in the half. Lakewood’s surprise onside kick bounced off of a Bearcat lineman, but West managed to recover the loose ball. The Cougars stuffed Gueller for a five-yard loss on 2nd and 10, then stuffed one of Gueller’s backfield companions for five more to force a 4th-and-20 punt, but the Cougars could not turn the stop into points as they failed on another 4th-down pass at the Bearcat 32. Gueller crushed the Lakewood rebellion two plays later with a 56-yard keeper down the left sideline, though the Cougars would block the extra point. The score was 26-8 with 34 seconds until halftime. Lakewood hustled and bustled to attempt a field goal before the end of the half and drew a fortunate

roughing the kicker penalty that put them in range for sophomore kicker Randy Anaya’s second-chance field goal that made the score 26-11 at the half. “It’s not over, baby,” Reinecke said as his team took the field for the third quarter. The Cougars opened the second half with an onside kick to try to take the momentum, but the ball sailed out of bounds. Lakewood held the Bearcats to a 4th-and-1 at the Cougar 42-yard line, but a Cougar encroachment penalty gave Gueller room to burn the defense for 29 yards on the ground to go up 33-11 with eight minutes to go in the third quarter. Lakewood converted a gutsy fake punt on their next possession, but a false start on the next fourth down put their trickery to rest. The Bearcats squeezed the air out of the ball with off-tackle runs to end the third quarter. W.F. West pushed a field goal wide left midway through the fourth. The Cougars went no-huddle and Peterson pushed the ball down the field with a flurry of scrambles and improv passes

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Lakewood quarterback Justin Peterson rolls out as he looks downfield to find an open receiver during the Cougars’ 33-18 loss to W.F. West on Nov. 19. until he found Micheletti in the right corner of the end zone to draw to within 33-18 with two and a half minutes to play. The Bearcats recovered Lakewood’s onside kick and kneeled with the ball to punch their ticket to the Tacoma Dome. “We built this team, baby,”

Lakewood senior running back Christian Melton told his teammates in the Cougars’ post-game meeting, imploring them to hold their heads high and celebrate their 10-win, Cascade Conference championship season, the first in 17 years. “The juniors will build on this season next year.”

Marysville trainer takes on ‘Dare Dever’ BY JAKE MCNEAL jmcneal@arlingtontimes.com

MARYSVILLE — Angie Gooding, professional bodybuilder and owner of Marysville’s INSPIRE Fitness & Training, has a challenge on her hands. Over the next five months Gooding will attempt to turn King 5 TV personality and ‘Evening Magazine’ host Jim Dever into a swimsuit model, as part of Dever’s ‘Dare Dever’ series, to raise money for autism. “I’m flattered that Jim thought of me of all the trainers out there,” said Gooding, who met Dever in the summer of 2011. A spray-tanned Dever will grace a catwalk before 700-800 people, competing against professional models in an event called the Forbidden Fashion Show, on March 31, 2012, wearing a customtailored swimsuit designed by Seattle designer Eduardo Khawam, who runs the Metropolitan Fashion Week and, by extension, the Forbidden Fashion Show. “There’s going to be professional models … and Jim,” Gooding said. To start, Gooding took Dever’s mea-

surements, tested his strength and discussed the ways in which he could improve his nutrition. Dever has already spent more time on this Dare Dever challenge than any other — his most recent dare, learning to ride a horse over a series of jumps, yielded him all of two hours. “I’m surprised how easy it is now to walk right by the plate of donuts in the office,” Dever said of his progress. “Angie told me right from the start — it’s not about being a gym rat, it’s 80 percent nutrition.” As of Nov. 6, four weeks under Gooding’s watch, Dever has lost five pounds. “I made it clear that McDonald’s hash browns are not a good source of complex carbohydrates and that bags of cookies, even small cookies, aren’t suitable snacks,” Gooding said. “I also scribbled all over him, which I never do with my clients, but heck — it’ll make good TV.” Dever will have to cut sugar and processed foods from his diet, Gooding said, if he wants to become a swimsuit stud and complete the challenge,

and will be subjected to sit-up and push-up tests as his training progresses. Dever will target his core, shoulders, back and arms, doing lots of curls and back presses and planks for the torso and the midriff, leg lifts and sit-ups. Fortunately, KING 5 has a weight room downstairs. “At the start Jim could do 15 pushups, but they weren’t necessarily in good form,” Gooding said. Dever and Gooding use correspondence training to track results — checkups via email, Facebook and phone. Gooding plans to travel to Seattle every couple of weeks to take new measurements. Updates on Dever’s transformation will appear on Gooding’s blog, http://angiegooding.com, where readers are encouraged to write in their own fitness and wellness goals to make a difference in their own lives. “I’m very confident,” Dever said, about whether or not his physique will be ready in time for the fashion show. “I make people punch me in the stomach — I think I’m starting to annoy my co-workers.”

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King 5’s Jim Dever receives a colored marker forecast of what his body will look like for the Forbidden Fashion Show in Seattle on March 31, 2012.


November 23, 2011

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11

Local bowlers team up to compete BY JAKE MCNEAL jmcneal@arlingtontimes.com

MARYSVILLE — You’d never know it from talking to a Snohomish County school’s athletics department, but six different schools — MarysvillePilchuck, Marysville Arts & Technology, Lakewood, Lake Stevens, Mariner and Cascade — have bowling teams and several have enough kids to make two teams each. The teams don’t show up in yearbooks because they aren’t funded by the schools. Boys have to call their teams ‘clubs’ and girls are allowed to have bowling teams, but bowling must replace another ‘letter’ sport. So, instead, the boys and girls bowling teams operate independently in co-ed competition. The bowlers, like players on any high school team, must keep their grades up in order to remain eligible. Kids even join bowling leagues

after graduating to stay active in the sport. League matches cost an average of $9, but kids don’t have to pay to practice at Strawberry Lanes — donations take care of it. All skill levels — from first-time bowlers to primetime, competitive players — are welcomed. Amber Maeder of Mariner bowled a 238 in one of Nov. 18’s games and Lakewood bowler Eddie Smith maintains a 225 average. Lake Stevens assistant coach Jane Dye has seen three perfect games bowled in the time she’s been involved. The teams meet at different venues two to three times a week for head-tohead matches that go toward determining a league champion at the end of the season. The teams bowl two regular games and two ‘baker’ games, in which each bowler on the team bowls two frames. The top three teams qualify for the state tournament at the

end of the season. Christine Mair, a teacher’s aide for the Snohomish County School District, attends all matches. Her son, Chance, a student at Marysville Arts & Tech, has been bowling since kindergarten and also plays tennis for M-P. Chance enjoys the competition and the pursuit of his favorite sport. “Bowling fits for a lot more people who aren’t interested in a true team sport,� Christine said. Arts & Tech junior and captain Eli Reed revels in the responsibility of his post. He has to show up at every practice and match, and helps coaches organize the events. Lakewood coach Cindee Dowell started as a coach at Evergreen High School in 1999 before “inheriting� the Lakewood coaching position. “It’s a positive environment with great kids and great sportsmanship,� Dowell said. “I love watching first-time bowlers raise their averages from 75 to 125.�

Local kids can play Brazilian-style soccer BY JAKE MCNEAL jmcneal@arlingtontimes.com

MARYSVILLE — Futsal, Brazilian-style 5-on-5 soccer with four fielders and a keeper on each side, is here to help Marysville’s kids have fun while learning an exciting new sport — all at no cost. Fuerza Football Club serves King and Snohomish counties and identifies Marysville as its hub, but opens its programs to kids from surrounding areas as far as Stanwood. No one who wants to join the program will be turned away. Courses are taught by a coaching staff licensed in Brazilian style of play and training. “The programs are free so that the underserved youth, the ones who really need it, can participate,� Fuerza FC Director of Education Tony Carillo said. Kids who enroll in the courses need no equipment other than the Fuerza FC shirts provided. Fuerza FC has rented the Marysville Boys & Girls Club for eight months and filled up right away as soon

as the Marysville Youth Soccer Association, in addition to sponsorship from Seattle-based realtor Mary Hatch Homes, got involved. A second sponsor is expected as soon as February. “It’s been a big goal of mine for a while — some kids play, then they drop off,� said Carillo, who invested his own dollars into the club, of how kids play youth soccer but cannot afford to join state or regional clubs. “The kids are there. We just have to reach out to them.� Futsal is safer than indoor soccer because it discourages physical play in lieu of creative ball-handling and passing skills. There are no walls to run into as there are in indoor soccer, where balls that careen off the walls remain in play. It’s played at a faster pace on a smaller field and requires more hustle of the four fielders in perpetual backand-forth action. The club avoids the formation of teams, seeking instead to give kids valuable new skills that they can show off to their friends and family — and word of mouth is exactly how Fuerza FC finds

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Katie Banks, mother of Arts & Tech bowler Austin Banks, loves to see how many new friends her son has made in the league. Austin has gotten better and better as the weeks have passed and his scores have gotten higher each time. M-P bowling coach Mike Edenholm ended up as the

Tomahawks’ coach when his daughter got into bowling and the squads needed a coach. He’s coached his teams to state three times, taking fourth in each appearance. Arts & Tech coach Gary Schopf and his wife, co-coach Natialene, who was the assistant M-P coach

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Tony Carillo Director of Education Fuerza FC new kids to join the fun. Parents are welcomed to learn the Brazilian methods and style of play as well. Fuerza provides three levels of training: Soccer School, an introductory course for kids six to 10 years of age; Academy Teams for kids ages 11-17 and organized according to skill to compete in state and regional leagues; and High Performance, started this year, for players 18 years and above to compete on state, regional or semi-pro teams. To become a part of Fuerza FC visit fuerzafc. com, e-mail bfutnw@gmail. com or call 425-530-2849 or 425-216-9110.

before her daughter got the Arts & Tech team running, have bowled for more than 50 years. “All the time we spend here is worth it,� Natialene said. “I love that parents can get involved. We’ve helped a couple of at-risk kids stay out of trouble.�

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November 23, 2011

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Small businesses play key role in communities BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

SMOKEY POINT — While many holiday shoppers are already gearing up for “Black Friday,� the Arlington and Marysville communities are asking that they keep “Small Business Saturday� in mind as well on Nov. 26. “Small Business Saturday� was started last year by American Express to help promote local stores across the country, and representatives of the cities of Arlington and Marysville agree that the small businesses in their towns add up to an economic engine which drives the region’s prosperity. Arlington Assistant City Administrator Kristin Banfield estimated that approximately onethird of the city’s licensed businesses fall under the heading of retail-oriented small businesses. “We probably have 300 to 350 of our 850 licensed businesses that would be considered small businesses, which employ close to 2,000 people, for an average of about five per business,� Banfield said. While the city of Arlington classifies small businesses such as beauty salons and massage therapy under “service� rather than retail, Banfield noted that both types of

small businesses generate sales tax revenues and constitute reinvestment into the local economy. She added that a number of studies have shown the importance of heeding campaigns in Arlington and Marysville to “Buy Local.� “A study from Civic Economics found that, for every $100 spent in local independent stores, $68 returns to the community through taxes, payroll and other expenditures,� Banfield said. “If you spend that in a national chain, only $43 stays here. Spend it online through an out-of-state vendor and very little, if anything, stays home.� Banfield went on to cite the U.S. Department of Labor’s findings in 2009 that, if half the employed population spent $50 each month in locally owned independent businesses, it would generate more than $42.6 billion in revenue. “For every purchase you make, a portion of the 8.6 percent sales tax you pay when you buy something in Arlington stays right here,� Banfield said. “The bottom line is if you buy local, the money stays local and it keeps recirculating, providing our local community with a quality of life that can’t be beat.� Marysville Community Information Officer Doug Buell likewise touted the value of small

    

businesses in funding local government programs and fostering quality of life in the community. “Of the 8.6 percent sales tax rate charged here, one tenth — 0.85 percent and 0.01 percent for criminal justice — becomes city revenue,� Buell said. “This revenue is part of the city’s general fund. That pays for the fire and police departments, senior services, parks and recreation programs, street lighting, safe sidewalks and other critical activities and services.� Buell echoed Banfield’s data that sales taxes are only one way in which local businesses contribute to the community, by pointing to the “multiplier effect� of local business owners and employees shopping for goods and services at each other’s stores. “When you shop locally, you can avoid higher tax rates charged in some other areas,� Buell said. “Shopping locally saves you time, gas and energy.� In addition to contributing to services such as the city’s road and infrastructure budgets for traffic improvements and expanded infrastructure, Buell listed another benefit of small businesses to the community. “They often hire and train young people for their first jobs, and take

pride in offering personalized customer service,� Buell said. Both the Arlington-Smokey Point and Greater Marysville Tulalip Chambers of Commerce reported on the economic returns yielded by their “Buy Local� campaigns. “During the course of and following our 2009-10 ‘Buy Local’ campaign, we found that Marysville had fared better than surrounding communities with respect to the sales taxes returned during this time period,� Greater Marysville Tulalip Chamber Board Chair John Bell said. “Since the vast majority of our local businesses are small, the obvious conclusion is that buying locally from small businesses results in higher sales tax revenue for local government and, thus, with appropriate investment, a better quality of life in our local community.� Mary Andersen, the office manager of the Arlington Pharmacy who’s been active in the ArlingtonSmokey Point Chamber’s “Buy Local� campaign, likewise credited the partnership between the Chamber, the city of Arlington and the Downtown Arlington Business Association with further fostering interest in local small businesses. “We’ve been able to track the interest via our Facebook page,

which has 352 ‘likes,’ and our website traffic, which is always growing,� Andersen said. “We’re fortunate to live in a community with so many residents who understand why it’s important to shop locally, which is why there’s been a minimum impact on the local small business community. However, there’s always room for improvement in spreading our message.� Mary Kirkland, owner of Hilton’s Pharmacy on Third Street in Marysville, sees small businesses as part of the “historic backbone� of the city. “This town started as a trading post, and the small business community remains alive and well,� Kirkland said. “Entrepreneurship still drives the region.� “When people think about shopping locally, it doesn’t really count if you’re just shopping at Walmart,� said Arlington resident Janna Mitchell, co-owner of Marysville Floral. “They should think of us too.� “We might not have as much volume, but our uniqueness can’t be beat,� said fellow Marysville Floral co-owner Nicole Walker. For more information on “Small Business Saturday,� log onto www.facebook.com/ SmallBusinessSaturday.


November 23, 2011

5IF"SMJOHUPO5JNFTt5IF.BSZTWJMMF(MPCF

Worship Directory METHODIST

Marysville Free Methodist Church “Family Oriented — Bible Centered�

6715 Grove St., Marysville • 360-659-7117 Hillside Christian Preschool 360-659-8957 Classic Worship Celebration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:15 A.M. Kidz’ Zone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00A.M. Casual Worship Celebration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00A.M. Oasis Service, Family Style (Wednesday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:00P.M. Student Ministries (Jr. High-Wednesday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:00 P.M. Student Ministries (Sr. High-Thursday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 P.M. Groups for Children, Youth, College/Career, Young Marrieds, Families and Seniors

To be included in this Directory call

360-659-1300

OTHER

Word of Fire Christian Center “Is Not My Word Like A Fire� (Jeremiah 23:29) Meeting at 1059 State St, Suite G Next to Golden Corral Restaurant Sunday School 10:30 -11:15 am Tuesday Night Bible Study 5 pm Pastors: Lee & Flora Rush 360-840-3755

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BAPTIST CHURCH

OF

SUNDAY SERVICE — 11:30am

CHRIST

92nd Street

Church of (Non-Denominational Christ & Non-instrumental) 4226 92nd Street NE, Marysville • 360-653-2578 Sunday Morning Worship Services 10:30 am Dennis Niva, Minister

Hear the Sunday Morning sermon on the web 92ndstchurchofchrist.org

SHOULTES GOSPEL HALL 5202-116th St. NE, Marysville • 658-9822 Sunday Monday Wednesday

Remembrance Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 a.m. Bible Teaching & Sunday School . . . . . . . . . .11 a.m. Evening Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 p.m. Family Bible Hour (Sept.-May) . . . . . . . . . . . 7 p.m. Prayer and Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 p.m.

Non-Denominational • All Welcome

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C OWBOY 360-386-8703 C HURCH

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Wednesday 7 p.m. and Sunday 10:30 a.m.

PASTOR F RED M OORE

BAPTIST

First Baptist Church

Bible teaching, upbeat music, friendly and casual atmosphere

     www.Fbcarlington.com Worship Service ............................................................ 10:30 A.M. Sunday School for all ages .................................................. 9 A.M. Nursery provided: Infants - 3 years old for both services 4VOEBZ&WFOJOHQNt8FEOFTEBZ4FOJPS)JHI:PVUI Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m. 8FEOFTEBZ"XBOBBOE7JTJUBUJPO Wednesday: Awana and Senior High Youth

CTK Arlington – 10:00am Sundays Presidents Elementary - 505 E. Third Street Pastor Rick Schranck 1-888-421-4285 x813 CTK Lake Stevens – 10:00am Sundays Team Fitness - 1109 Frontier Circle East Pastor Cary Peterson 1-888-421-4285 x811

    

    CATHOLIC

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CATHOLIC CHURCH 1200 East 5th, Arlington • 435-8565

Pastor: Fr. Jim Dalton Reconciliation ................................ Saturday 4:30 Vigil Mass ...................................... Saturday 5:30 Sunday Morning Mass .................................. 9:00 Sunday Mass .............................................. 12:00

p.m. p.m. a.m. p.m.

in Darrington at St. John Vianney

FOURSQUARE

Join us‌building Faith, Hope and Love

www.siscoheights.com • 360.435.4384

It really is not important that you are happy with your religion, what is important is that God is happy with your religion. Are you tired of all the hype and materialism found in so many religious groups these days? God has already shown us what true religion is. At the Smokey Point church of Christ we are committed to the open study and honest application of God’s word. It may not be entertaining but it sure brings a rest from the burden of sin. Isn’t that the whole point of religion? Let’s talk about it. 360-939-2080

OTHER

The Smokey Point Church Of Christ

Sundays 10:30am & Wednesday 7:00pm

ARLINGTON COMMUNITY CHURCH Meeting in Seventh Day Adventist Church 713 Talcott • Arlington

LUTHERAN Pastor Rick Long & Pastor Luke Long

Sunday Worship - 8:30 and 11:00 am Weekly Bible Studies Youth Ministry

Simply Christians 8526 – 35th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA, 98223 (7/10 mile north of Smokey Point off of Smokey Pt. Blvd.) Sunday morning classes for all ages .......... 9:30 a.m. Sunday morning worship ........................... 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening worship ............................. 5:00 p.m. Wednesday night classes for all ages ......... 7:00 p.m. METHODIST

Sunday Worship 11a.m. - Noon A new and unique Christian Church designed with you in mind. S ENIORS

ARE

L OVED

AND

W ELCOME !

Pastor G.W. O’Neil • 360-445-2636 • 360-421-0954 NON DENOMINATIONAL Engaging Worship...Encouraging Message

Life Points 9:30AM Sunday

Sundays 10:00 10:30am am

Celebration Service 10:30AM Sunday

360-474-8888

You Are Welcome Here www.falconridgefellowship.com Now meeting at theLutheran old Arlington•HS auditorium on French Meeting at Peace 1717 Larson Rd in Street Silvana

201 N. Stillaguamish Avenue

www.arlingtonassembly.com

Family Focus 7:00PM Wednesday

360.435.8981

Arlington Free Methodist Church 730 E. Highland Dr., Arlington, 360-435-8986

Early Sermon ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌ 8:15 A.M. Sunday School for all ages ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌ 9:00 A.M. Sunday Worship Service ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌ 10:30 A.M. (Signing for the hearing impaired. Nursery Provided.)

Wednesday Dinner ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌ 5:00 P.M. Wednesday AWANA ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌ 6:10 P.M. Wednesday Youth Group ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌ 6:15 P.M.

13


November 23, 2011

Garden City Grange

)S\L:R`:^HW4LL[ Sell your items or shop for that special gift

800 2 4Ut4OPIPNJTI 8B nd

/PW   %FD   BNUPQN

Indoor Comfort Vendors/Crafters Wanted

EVERY SAT. & SUN. 8-5 PM

snohomishholidaymarket.com   WFOEPSTGPPENVTJD 4BOUB4BOUB1JDUVSFT Name Clove Animal ID 14473573 Breed Domestic Shorthair / Mix Age 5 years Gender Female Color White / Grey Spayed/Neutered Yes Declawed No

All animals adopted from EAS are neutered, microchipped, vaccinated, wormed and treated for fleas. All cats are tested for FIV/FeLV.

19010 59th Dr. NE, Arlington Airport

  The Unknown, a young and local

HUGE HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR

Every Wednesday & Thursday Until Christmas 9-6 pm CRAFTERS NEEDED

See us and other pets at the

19010 59th Dr. NE Arlington Airport

Stanwood classic rock band, will be performing British Rock Songs of the Sixties at 8 pm, Saturday, December 3rd at The Sports Station (formerly The Station). Take a step back in time and enjoy songs from such groups as The Beatles, The Who, The Kinks, The Hollies, The Animals, The Yardbirds, as well as others. The Sports Station is located at 8713 271st St NW, Stanwood. $5.00 per person cover. For more information, please call

360-913-8181 333 Smith Island Rd • Everett, WA 98205

425-257-6000

NOTE: If the particular featured pet is not available, we have many great animals to choose from and you are sure to find the perfect pet for you.

DO YOU HAVE A FIRST AID KIT FOR YOUR DOG? A well-stocked first aid kit for dogs includes: t3PMMDPUUPOt4PNFDPUUPOCBMMTt(BV[FQBETt(BV[FUBQF t)ZESPHFOQFSPYJEF DIFDLUIFFYQJSBUJPOEBUF t)ZESPDPSUJTPOF PJOUNFOUt4DJTTPSTt&ZFXBTIt4JMWFSOJUSBUFt5XFF[FST t0SBMTZSJOHFTt1FEJPMZUFÂĽPSPUIFSCBMBODFEFMFDUSPMZUFGMVJE t#BCZGPPEoNFBUGMBWPSTXPSLCFTUt-BSHFUPXFMt&YBNHMPWFT tJODIXIJUFUBQF JOBEEJUJPOUPHBV[FUBQF t3PMMTPGFMBTUJDXSBQ t&NFSHFODZJDFQBDLt5IFSNPNFUFS CPUIPSBMBOESFDUBM UIFSNPNFUFSTDBOCFVTFESFDUBMMZ

Sponsored By:

425-220-5569

EXPERT ADVICE

Are you an Expert in your field? Would you like to share your knowledge with others? Call the Marysville Globe / Arlington Times at 360-659-1300 today, and you could be one of our EXPERTS!

HEATING & COOLING Q:

How long should an estimate take? How many estimates should I get?

A: You should allow for 1 to 1 ½ hours for a Cheri Groves thorough estimate. It is important for us to listen to you Comfort Advisor the Homeowner, how long you will be living in your current home, so many people today forget to listen and it is our number one goal to do that and meet your needs and recommend the right system (s) for you. If you truly feel comfortable it is okay to just get “oneâ€?. Otherwise customers will typically get anywhere from two to three estimates total. If you get more than that it really can get confusing in terms of all the information out there at that point you should be interviewing the company to meet your needs.

PO Box 1041 Everett, WA 98206

MARYSVILLE t 1340 State Avenue t 360-658-7817

425-252-5002

490328

www.nw-ads.com email: classified@ soundpublishing. com Call toll free 1.888.399.3999 or 1.800.388.2527

          

Snohomish Holiday Market

Name Ax Animal ID 14433981 Breed Alaskan Husky / German Shepherd Age 3 years Gender Male Color Tan / White Spayed/Neutered No Size Large

print & online 24/7 Office Hours: 8-5pm Monday to Friday

EVENTS

490312

490330

5IF"SMJOHUPO5JNFTt5IF.BSZTWJMMF(MPCF

PNW MarketPlace!

14


November 23, 2011

5IF"SMJOHUPO5JNFTt5IF.BSZTWJMMF(MPCF

15

Arlington United Church sets out ‘Community Giving Tree’ ARLINGTON — The Arlington United Church aims to provide some holiday cheer for the Arlington Kids’ Kloset with a “Community Giving Tree,� whose gift tags will suggest items to donate. The tree will be placed in the

front of the church, located at 338 N. McLeod, from Nov. 26 through Dec. 18. Those who choose gift tags are encouraged to bring their contributions to a service of dedication on Dec. 18 at the church’s 10:15 a.m. worship. Suggested gift items are:

â–  New athletic shoes in any size from 9 for toddlers through 14 for adults. â–  New socks in individual pairs or packages. â–  Packages of new underwear in sizes from children through adult.

â–  Packages of new boxer briefs for men. â–  Hygiene products including shampoo, soap, toothpaste, toothbrushes, shaving gel, razors, deodorant and hairbrushes. â–  Coats in new or good used

condition, in any size from 4T to adult. â–  Winter hats, gloves or mittens, and scarves. For more information call Arlington United Church Pastor Deena Jones at 360-435-3259.

EARS 2 U Hearing Aid Services 1620 A 4th St Marysville

(360) 653-0335

FREE Hearing Evaluation, Thirty-Day Trial on all New Orders, Hearing Aids Cleaned & Checked, Repairs on all Makes & Models 1JPOFFS)XZt4JMWBOB

2.5 miles west of I-5, Exit 208 north of Marysville

360-652-7188

.PO'SJBNQNt4BUBNQN XXXTJMWBOBNFBUTDPN

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE

"XBSE8JOOJOH %SZ$VSFE)BN

Decorations, Gifts, Furniture, Home Decor

Come In & Feel The Warmth Of The Holidays Hours: .PO'SJ BNQNt4BUBNQN 4VOQNQN

360-652-9393

4QJSBMTMJDFE &YUSBMFBOCPOFMFTT BOE)POFZ"QQMF)BNT"WBJMBCMF

20.00 OFF

8:30-11 am Friday November 25th, 2011

546668

1 Day Only

546284

Georgia Romeos reg 69.99-89.99

K`ghMk>ajkl& ?]lEgj]& Come to Grocery Outlet for incredible bargains and savings on all your holiday needs. 9620-B State Avenue Marysville, WA 98270 360-659-9909 Store Hours: Mon - Sat 8 am - 8 pm Sun 9 am - 7 pm

Marysville

8323 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270

360.659.1236

Steve and Deniece Gates

Arlington

121 South Olympic, Arlington, WA 98223 360.435.3213

Independent Owners/Operators

Everett

2901 State Street, Everett, WA 98201

425.259.5571

Lake Stevens 8329 SR 92, Lake Stevens, WA 98258

360.691.1813

422259

'SPN4NPLFZ1PJOUFYJUHP8FTUNJMFKVTUPWFS SBJMSPBEUSBDLTPOSJHIU‰4FFZPVUIFSF OE4U/&.BSZTWJMMF


November 23, 2011

PNW

MarketPlace!

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click! www.nw-ads.com email! classified@soundpublishing.com call toll free! 1.888.399.3999 or 1.800.388.2527 Real Estate for Sale Island County

Apartments for Rent Snohomish County

Employment General

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Commercial Rentals OfďŹ ce/Commercial

HUD HOMES!!!

$159,000

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$67,000

ADULT SERVICES

Spacious Light and bright two story home located in Gleneagle. This home features 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, a formal living room, family room with gas fireplace and a upstairs bonus room. The kitchen has granite counters. Out back is a fully fenced low maintenance backyard with a large patio. Two-car attached garage.

Wendy Smith 425-319-5036 490314

To be included in this Directory call 360-659-1300

THE RENTERS GUIDE

24 hr care available Dec. 1st For 1 adult in a family setting

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Renovated 2-bdrm, 1-bath

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$825/mo + Deposit & Ref. Required (425) 308-5185 Onsite Mgr (425) 760-9280 Office

NEED GREAT CARE

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MARYSVILLE 5-PLEX

Phone 360-386-8554 For Appointment

announcements Announcements

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Reach thousands of subscribers by advertising your landscaping business in the Classifieds. Call 800-388-2527 to place your Service Directory Ad today.

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jobs

CREATIVE ARTIST

          

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FOR RENT

FREE Credit Check, $100 off 1st month rent

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544280

Cute two bedroom one bath home located in the heart of downtown Stanwood. This home with a charming front porch has lots of potential and with some TLC this home could shine again. This home is close to all amenities and bus lines.

490335

16

The Marysville Globe, a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. has a Creative Artist position available. Position is FT and the schedule requires flexibility. Duties include performing ad and spec design, designing promotional material, providing excellent customer service to the sales staff and clients. Customer service, excellent communication skills, and the ability to work in a fast-paced environment required. Experience with Adobe Creative Suite 2, InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, and Acrobat is also required. Newspaper or other media experience is preferred but not required. Must be able to work independently as well as part of a team. Sound Publishing, Inc. is Washington’s largest private, independent newspaper company. Our broad household distribution blankets the entire Greater Puget Sound region, extending northward from Seattle to Canada, south to Salem, Oregon, and westward to the Pacific Ocean. If you have the ability to think outside the box, are well organized and would like to be part of a highly energized, competitive and professional team, we want to hear from you! No calls or personal visits please. Please email your cover letter, resume, and a few samples of your work to: hreast@soundpublishing.com or mail to: Sound Publishing, Inc., 19426 68th Avenue S. Kent, WA 98032, ATTN: HR/MGA EOE


November 23, 2011

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Home Services Moving Services

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stuff Antiques & Collectibles

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Dogs

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Farm Fencing & Equipment

05'',%å 0UPPIES å LI å CENSEDå BREEDER å HEALTHåå WARRANTY å SHOTSå -OMåå ANDå $ADå !+#å &AWNSåå ANDå BLACKSå -ALESå ANDåå FEMALESå &AMILYå RAISED åå PARENTSå ONå SITEå  å å #HRISTMASå DELIVERYåå AVAILABLEå  

!../5.#%å YOURå FESTI å VA L å FO R å O N L Y å P E N N I E Såå &OURå WEEKSå TOå å MILLIONåå READERSå STATEWIDEå FORåå ABOUTå  å #ALLå THISåå N E W S P A P E R å O R å åå  å  å FORå MOREåå DETAILS Extra auto parts bring in extra cash when you place an ad in the Classifieds. Open 24 hours a day www.nw-ads.com.

Tiffany Walker Recruitment Solutions Specialist 10 years print media experience 866-603-3213 twalker@soundpublishing.com

5th Wheels

å"2 åå"!å).å26å0!2+ 2ESIDEå HEREå ORå MOVEå TOåå YOURå OWNå SLICEå OFå HEAV å ENå Xå å .U7Aåå THå 7HEELå INå 0RIVATEå å åå 0AR Kå !TTACHEDå Xåå ENCLOSEDå DECKå )NTERIORåå UPDATEDå INCLUDINGå NEWåå REFRIGERATOR å HOTå WATERåå HEATERå å mOORINGå %VERY å THINGå WORKSå GREATå 'REATåå $EALå ONLYå  å 0ARKåå R E N T å O N L Y å     å P E Råå MONTHå #ALLå *EFFå  å  

With options ranging from one time advertising to annual campaigns, I have the products and the expertise to meet your needs. Whether you need to target your local market or want to cover the Puget Sound area,

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED!

To be included in this directory, contact 360 659-1300 and speak to a sales rep.

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Cats

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BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

pets/animals

Automobiles Plymouth

    å 4OYO T A å 3 I E N N Aåå !UTOMATIC å #$#ASSETTEåå P L AYE R å    K å      åå # A L L å å å &R E EWAY å !U T Oåå   

Bazaars/Craft Fairs

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ASK THE EXPERT

Automobiles Toyota

garage sales - WA

Cemetery Plots

å #%-%4%29å 0,/43åå 0EACEFULå RESTå FORå YOURåå LOVEDå ONEå ORå YOURSELFåå 'ORGEOUSå ANDå LOCALLYåå OPERATEDå ESTABLISHMENTåå 3UNSETå -EMORIALå 0ARKå INåå "ELLEVUEå 4HEå 'ARDENå OFåå 2ESTå SIDEå BYå SIDEå PLOTSåå SPACESå å å  å LOTå åå  å EAå å  THå 0LACEå3%å   å 3)$%å "9å 3)$%å 3PACESåå INå THEå 'ARDENå OFå $EVO å TION å ,OTå ! å 3PACESåå  å INå 3UNSETå (ILLSå #E å METERYå INå "ELLEVUEå /F å FEREDå BYå ONEå OFå THEå ORIGI å NALå OWNERSå OFå CEMETERYåå # L O S E å T O å F L A G å P O L E åå  å EACHå WITHå DIS å COUNTå FORå MULTIPLESå #ALLåå $ONåATå  

wheels

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3!7-),,3å FROMå ONLYåå å å -AKEå -ONEYå åå 3AVEå -ONEYå WITHå YOURåå OWNå BANDMILLå å #UTå LUM å BERå ANYå DIMENSIONå )Nåå STOCKå READYå TOå SHIPå &REEåå )NFOå å $6$å WWW.OR å WOODå 3AWMILLSCOMå  å   å%XTå. Add a picture to your ad and get noticed 1-inch photo 1-inch copy 5 weeks for one low price Call: 1-800-388-2527 or go online www.nw-ads.com

For All Your Recruitment Needs

Dogs

490316

home services

Cemetery Plots

HOG FUEL PLAYGROUND CHIPS Deliveries from 45 yards to 125 yards

Phone: 360-659-6223 Fax: 360-659-4383

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C L E A N I N G

Serving Snohomish County since 1986

KITCHEN & BATH CLEANING SPECIAL

3hr Service: $75.25 ~OR~ 6 HR CLEANING SERVICE

ONLY: $120.50 425-355-4999

www.housecleaning.com

Handyman Dad “DAD CAN FIX IT”

If in doubt, call to see if Dad can do it ! t'JYBOE3FQBJS*OTJEF0VUTJEF t'JYUIPTF#SPLFO)PVTFIPME*UFNT t3FCVJMEPS3FQBJS ,JUDIFOT #BUIT FUD t$BSQFOUSZ'JOJTI 'SBNJOH %PPST FUD t1PSDIFT %FDLT 'FODFT 3BJMJOH FUD

No Job Too Small

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handymandad@comcast.net

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!#!#)!å -EMORIALå 0ARK åå h"IRCHå 'ARDENv å  å ADJA å CENTå CEMETERYå PLOTS å åå  å   å 3 E L L I N G å     åå EACHå ORå  å BOTHå ,O å CATEDå INå 3HORELINEå å .åå 3EATTLEå #ALLå ORå EMAILåå %MMONSå *OHNSON å  å        åå EAJ MSNCOM The opportunity to make a difference is right in front of you. RECYCLE THIS PAPER

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H A N D Y M A N

GEORGE’S HANDYMAN SERVICE

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November 23, 2011

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Lakewood School Board approves levies for Feb. 14 ballot LAKEWOOD — The Lakewood School District Board of Directors approved two resolutions at their Nov. 2

meeting, authorizing two levy measures both slated for the Feb. 14 ballot next year. The first measure is a

Quil Ceda 360-716-2940 I-5 Exit 200 Marysville

replacement school program and operations levy, which will replace the existing school program and opera-

Tulalip Liquor Store & Smoke Shop 360-716-3250 I-5 Exit 199 Marysville

tions levy that expires at the end of 2012. This replacement levy will run for another four years, from 2013 through

2016 — and will help fund the day-to-day operations of the school district, providing approximately 20 percent of

Visit www.arlingtontimes.com/green_editions & www.marysvilleglobe.com/green_editions today!

Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians

SMOKE SHOPS

38

$

Cigarettes Starting at

75 +tax

per carton

Inside Angel of the Winds Casino 3438 Stoluck#!& "    &  

Just E. of Denny’s on Hwy 530  ey Pt. Blv& "    &  m

OPEN 362 days a year! CLOSED THANKSGIVING, CHRISTMAS & NEW YEAR ’S

Open Mon.-Thurs 8am - 10pm Fri. & Sat. 8am - 11pm and Sunday 9am -8pm

Open Daily!

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Cascade Valley Hospital Skagit Valley Hospital in Partnership for Your Health Cascade Valley Hospital Skagit Valley Hospital

Firefighters collect for food bank

In Partnership for your Health

Introducing

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the district’s total operating revenue. This local levy makes up the difference between the state and federal funding the district receives and what it costs to educate Lakewood’s students. Examples of programs and services not fully funded by state and federal revenues include curriculum, technology, facility maintenance and upkeep, student transportation, new school buses, student athletics and activities, security and emergency preparedness, health and counseling services, services for students with special needs, staff training, teacher and support staff compensation, and benefits beyond state funding level. The second measure the Board approved will replace the current technology levy that expires at the end of 2012 and will run for two years, from 2013 through 2015. This capital projects and technology levy will provide funding for modernization and remodeling projects, including increasing energy efficiency by upgrading heating and ventilation systems, re-roofing school buildings, purchasing new portables, repairs on the district stadium and planning modernizations to Lakewood High School. These capital projects levy funds will also be used to continue the district’s technology plan by upgrading and maintaining the district’s technology infrastructure, replacing and replenishing technology equipment, and technology upgrades and instructional tools for classrooms, students, and staff.

Krista Galitsis, M.D., Ph.D., FAAP Pediatrics

P: 360.651.8365

MARYSVILLE — Marysville firefighters and Santa Claus will once again be teaming up this year to collect for the Marysville Community Food Bank. Santa and the firefighters will be at the Marysville Safeway, located at 1258 State Ave., from 3-7 p.m. on Dec. 5-8, so they encourage you to stop by. During this time of year, the Marysville Community Food Bank relies even more so on the community’s spirit of giving to ensure that families in need can celebrate the holiday season. The firefighters and Santa will accept donations of food, unwrapped toys or cash, and Santa will be handing out candy canes for kids and adults alike.


November 23, 2011

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November 23, 2011

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Marysville Globe, November 23, 2011