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VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011 n DAILY UPDATES AT WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM n 75 CENTS

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How their garden grows

It’s quiet, inside, too, until about a half-dozen cars and people stop in at the storefront on the end, the Kind Alternative. They’re gone almost as soon as they came, but those cars and people have had a powerful effect on at least one shop in this small community. Just months after opening its doors last March, the Kind Alternative in Preston expanded, hugely, and with hardly a growing pain.

Preston’s Kind Alternative medical marijuana collective enjoys growth spurt BY CAROL LADWIG

Wildcats don’t say die in rough homecoming Bellevue battle Page 8

& NOW

THEN

It’s mid-afternoon on a Monday, and things are quiet outside the cluster of businesses along High Point Way in Preston. No one is parked at the Subway, and only a car or two are at the Shell Station.

SEE GROWS, 22

Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Bud-tender Danielle, an employee at the Kind Alternative collective in Preston, fills a plastic bag with marijuana vapor for a patient in the Goin Glass Lounge. The newly opened, members-only lounge is a place where patients can partake of cannabis vapor, and requires a doctor’s recommendation for entry.

Mount Si’s royal acclaim

A Spotlight on historic Snoqualmie Valley Businesses

HISTORY

PUBLISHED AS A SUPPLEMENT TO THE SNOQUALMIE VALLEY RECORD

Valley police call take-backs on prescription drugs in three cities, this Saturday

Record’s new ‘Then and Now’ section looks at local past Pages 9-16

By Valley Record Staff

INDEX LETTERS 4 5 OPINION 6 BUSINESS 18 CALENDAR 18 MOVIE TIMES ON THE SCANNER 20 CLASSIFIEDS 19, 20

Vol. 98, No. 22

Stop abuse, clean out the medicine cabinet

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Newly crowned Mount Si High School homecoming royals, Queen Dana Pecora and King Jake Rouches, react to their election Friday night, Oct. 21. The full homecoming court includes senior princes and princesses Anthony McLaughlin and Sarah McDonald, Henry Owens and Megan McCulley, Alex Pease and Eden Altwies, and Josh Mitchell and Rissy Past. Reece Karalus was the jester. The junior prince and princess were Aaron Tevis and Drew McKeen, sophomores were Tristan Schattler and Halle Parker, and freshmen were siblings Lucas and Emma Currie.

Aiming to keep unused, unwanted prescription drugs off the street, North Bend and Snoqualmie police will take them off locals’ hands at a semi-annual special event. Police hold a second ‘Drug TakeBack Day’ for 2011, Saturday, Oct. 29, at two locations. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. residents can bring their unused or unwanted prescription medicines to the North Bend Park and Ride at East North Bend Way and McClellan Avenue, or the Snoqualmie Fire Station on Snoqualmie Parkway. The King County Sheriff’s Office will staff a drop location in Redmond Ridge, in the QFC parking lot at 23475 Novelty Hill Road. This national event, developed with the Drug Enforcement Agency, gets rid of tons of potentially dangerous, expired or no-longer-needed prescription drugs. SEE DRUGS, 3

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Si View pumpkin patch swim Si View Community Center in North Bend hosts three different events for a variety of ages. Just like the drive-in, but wetter, Si View’s Dive-In Movies event and Pumpkin Patch Swim is 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, at the Si View Pool. This event is suitable for all ages, but children age 6 and younger should have an adult in the pool with them. Families are encouraged to register at (425) 831-1900. Cost is $5 per person. Space is limited.

The scary version of Si View Haunted House runs 6 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, at the Community Center. Enter at your own risk! This event is rated 3G for gory, gruesome and graphic, and is not recommended for the very young. Admission is $3. For additional information about Si View Metro Parks programs and activities, call (425) 831-1900 or visit www.siviewpark.org.

‘Dark Trail’ group making Halloween fun again, for all ages BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Haunted garden

The zombies look hungry, the psycho clown is suitably disturbing and the Jawas have their chatter down pat. Now, all that’s needed are some singing, dancing vampires. “Calling all vampires,” floats Mark Hennig’s voice from across the room. A few minutes of vampirewrangling later, and Hennig and fellow Night on a Dark Trail organizer Stephanie Merrow are instructing a group of women in sultry steps and creepy looks. All in black, Ashley CarrollFeider smiles under her pallid makeup. They may look charming, but Hennig assures you that “They’re not nice people.” Their song is meant to lure folks off the trail. Whatever happens, don’t follow. The vampires are among an 100-person cast in Night on a Dark Trail, an outdoor haunted house that will spook a suggested fourth-grade-throughadult audience, Friday, Oct. 28, on Snoqualmie Ridge. Hennig, a Snoqualmie resident, founded ‘Dark Trail’ as a way to give Valley residents, especially teens, something fun and productive to do on Halloween. “The trouble with Halloween is that when you reach sixth, seventh, eighth grade, you don’t get to trick or treat anymore,” Hennig said. But teens still need a spooky outlet. Hennig’s providing just that, channelling Halloween spirits in a positive direction. The event is also an

Come to the Kokopelli Korpse Tour of Terror for the scare of your afterlife! The event, a fundraiser for the Riverview Youth Council, is 7 to 9 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 29, at Kokopelli Gardens, 14520 284th Ave. NE, Duvall. Walk through twisting paths in the dark of night while your greatest fears come alive. The event is designed for young teens and older, so leave the little ones at home. Admission is $5.

Red Oak Residence trick-or-treat Enjoy safe trick-or-treating, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31, at Red Oak Residence of North Bend, 650 East North Bend Way. SEE FUN, 7

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Made up as four zombies and one vampire, Codee Bishop, Vivian Gatte, Ashley Carroll-Feider, Emma Gilmartin and Erin Graves are among the all-ages crew behind ‘Night on a Dark Trail.’ outlet for the creative edge of Hennig and many others.

Teen zombies Faces painted, teen zombies Codee Bishop, Vivian Gatte, Ashley Carroll-Feider, Emma Gilmartin and Erin Graves sat in a row as Merrow gave them their motivation. In the scene, they sit on a log, looking down at electronic devices in their hands. “You’re completely into this video game,” Merrow instructed. “If any noise comes out of you, it’s deep, guttural. I don’t ever want to hear any high

Halloween Train Live M usic wear your costume and get $2.00 off the price of your ticket when you ride the halloween train october 29th & 30th www.trainmuseum.org Prizes for everyone in costume Old fashioned cider press in action Free cookie at George’s bakery

pitched screams… You’ve sat there and played video games for so long, you’re dead.” The girls have watched enough zombie movies to know what to do. Their vacant eyes, ratted hair and rippedup clothes convey a suitable undead vibe. Zombies are neat, they say, because they don’t seem all that farfetched. “You can picture a zombie apocalypse actually happening,” said Graves. The girls were very much looking forward to scaring people. Parent Darla Gatte, mother of Vivian, had no qualms about her undead daughter. As a zombie, she looks “very teenager-like,” Darla said. The event seems well organized, and the teens are very excited, she added.

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There is plenty of spooky and family-friendly doings afoot in the Snoqualmie Valley on Halloween weekend Teens, young children and grown-ups can find something to do in several neighborhoods, including:

I was a teenage zombie

Si View’s Triple-G Haunted House

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Lots of spooky fun in the Valley

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

In line with Hennig’s vision, ‘Dark Trail’ blended talents of all ages. Among the ‘Ladies in White,” ghostly specters who haunt a pumpkin patch, Autumn Dukich, age 14, joins Danielle Newcomer, age 41. “Sad, forlorn, lonely” is how Newcomer describes her character. But personally, she takes a lot of glee in the idea of her

A dark night Night on a Dark Trail is 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, on Snoqualmie Ridge. The trail starts at the east parking lot of the Trailside Building, located at 35131 S.E. Douglas St., three buildings down from the Snoqualmie Police Station. The trail is appropriate for ages 10 and older. Admission is a suggested donation of $6. Proceeds benefit the Mount Si Helping Hand Food Bank. Learn more about Night on a Dark Trail at http://nightonadarktrail.weebly.com/. haunting, anonymous under her white veil. “That’s the beauty of it,” Newcomer said. Will she give someone the shivers? “I can only hope!” Besides Autumn, the Dukich family includes a Jawa son and a ‘spirit guide’ dad. Mom Heidi, who happens to be the director of the Mount Si Food Bank, is a ‘Weird Sister.’ She calls ‘Dark Trail’ an opportunity to get involved, have fun and give back. Night on a Dark Trail has received support from the Snoqualmie Tribe, Ridge Owner’s Association, Snoqualmie Parks Department, Nintendo of America and Church on the Ridge.


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Council hopefuls differ on annex Q&A with Jeff MacNichols, Kevin Ostrem, candidates for Snoqualmie City Council, position 2 Snoqualmie residents have two choices to make in city council races this fall. One contested race pits incumbent Jeff MacNichols, in his eighth year on the council, against challenger Kevin Ostrem. Both candidates share concerns about growth, the economy and quality of life, but differ on some priorities, notably the planned Snoqualmie mill annex. Ostrem sees a lot of good things in today’s Snoqualmie. But the challenger for Snoqualmie City Council’s position 2 seat also has his eye on some new directions. A former small businessman and current Microsoft employee, Ostrem wants to strengthen the city’s economy and do more for young people. He takes a cool view on annexation plans at the former Weyerhaueser mill. A responsible fiscal plan, energetic businesses and citizen-friendly growth—these priorities were on Jeff MacNichols’ list when he first ran for elected office in Snoqualmie in 2003. Today, the law firm owner seeks his third term on the council, and has much the same priorities. But MacNichols, who has guided Snoqualmie through such momentous changes as the 205 flood control project and the growth of the Ridge to today’s annexation debate, says he still has promises to keep. Eight years later, his priorities remain fiscal health, business infrastructure and a stable city character.

Election 2011

Snoqualmie City Council

Jeff MacNichols

Kevin Ostrem

What’s your background?

What’s your background?

I have lived in Snoqualmie since 2002. I have served as a council member since 2004, including a year as mayor pro tem. I have been practicing law since 1997. I own a law firm called Stewart Beall MacNichols & Harmell, Inc., P.S., and I employ 10 lawyers and four staff.

I have lived in Snoqualmie with my wife Christa and our two children for 11 years. I have worked at Microsoft for 17 years, 12 as a full-time employee and five as a contractor. I am primarily a project/ program manager and currently work in the Macintosh business unit in Redmond.

What is the main reason you are running for office?

JEFF MacNICHOLS

I have spent the last eight years endeavoring to deliver on the promises that I have made to voters. Snoqualmie has accomplished numerous notable achievements during my tenure on the Council, including Army Corps 205 Flood Mitigation Project, a new city hall, economic sustainability, downtown infrastructure improvements, numerous new businesses and open space, and a new Community Center, to name a few. I want to build on these achievements by continuing to ensure that Snoqualmie is economically strong, that our businesses are viable and that our unique city character is maintained.

What do you think Snoqualmie’s biggest challenges are today? Snoqualmie’s biggest challenge is remaining financially sustainable during these difficult economic times. Over the past few years, I have participated in council decisions that have financially prepared our city for these tough times. Our future challenge is to remain diligent in maintaining lean budgets, while delivering a high level of service to our citizens. Also, we must maintain our high level of infrastructure, while setting aside funds for future infrastructure repair and replacement.

How will you meet resident and business concerns in the Mill Annex? The Mill Annex area presents a compelling challenge to the city. The benefit of the proposed annexation is giving the city control over the destiny of this land that is historically linked to our community. The rally car school is also a unique opportunity to lure tourists and create economic development. However, annexation should not occur unless the land owners, not the city, are responsible for the environmental liabilities on the site. Also, the city should not be burdened with the economic liability of repair costs for current county (non-city) infrastructure such as road and bridge maintenance.

How would you ensure transparency to the public on the council? Transparency is achieved by (1) all decision-making occurring in a public forum, not on e-mail or in private; (2) all information available to the council for decision-making is available to the public; (3) proper notice to the public for all meetings and discussions; (4) request public input on all decisions and at all stages; and (5) incorporating the city site and social media.

KEVIN OSTREM

What is the main reason you are running for office?

I was a small business owner prior to Microsoft, so I understand what our small business owners are going through and I can bring a lot of experience to the table that would benefit the city.

What do you think Snoqualmie’s biggest challenges are today? The biggest challenge we face today and in the future are lack of involvement from residents. Go to council meetings, ask questions, get involved. I’ve attended council meetings where there are one or two residents and the rest of the people are city employees. We won’t see eye to eye on every issue but community involvement can help overcome challenges we will face in the future.

How will you meet resident and business concerns in the Mill Annex? This is the hot topic issue right now, and I have a unique view on the whole thing. I grew up near the Bremerton raceway and as the raceway grew, property values went down, and quality of life went down as a result. The road getting to the raceway hasn’t changed in 40 years, there aren’t sidewalks and you can forget about a bike lane. I have fond memories as a kid riding my bike with my friends late into the summer nights. I also had a few terrifying close calls with vehicles speeding on their way to the track. I will listen to the pro-annex folks, but it would take a lot to convince me this is a good idea. I ‘m of the opinion (that) annexation will quickly overwhelm our city resources and negatively impact our quality of life.

How would you ensure transparency to the public on the council? Our city is amazingly transparent, just call and ask one of the city employees any question you have. I’m currently in the Snoqualmie Citizens Academy, which I highly recommend by the way, and I feel we sometimes forget city administration and employees are fathers, mothers, sons, daughters and parents. Many of these people live in the community and have a vested interest in making Snoqualmie a great place to live. If anything, I’d like to see the council debate the issues a little more at meetings and, if elected, would encourage more of this. Other than that I feel the city encourages transparency very well.

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LETTERS

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SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

The Snoqualmie Education Association has interviewed all school board candidates, attended the PTA candidate forum and interviewed individuals who have worked with all candidates. We enthusiastically endorse Craig Husa, Dan Popp and Caroline Loudenback. Teachers support Dan Popp as a school board member because he represents our community as a whole. Dan wants our students to be prepared for the future. He has demonstrated a strong ability to collaborate with district administrators, teachers, students and community members. Craig Husa has earned district teacher support as a school board candidate because he sees the big picture and listens to the views of all community members. Craig continues to demonstrate a team-player attitude and depth of compassion. In her position on the school board, Caroline Loudenback has proven to be an effective listener and is thoughtfully able to look at all sides of an issue. Caroline bases her decisions on what is best for all students. She has proven her commitment to the district by working collaboratively with teachers toward a continuous improvement plan in teaching and learning. What these three candidates bring to the school board is a positive view of the work we have accomplished to better improve teaching and learning along with the commitment for continued improvements. Their challengers are focusing on what is “wrong� with our school district and have offered uninformed, easy answers to very complex challenges such as continued funding cuts from the state and unfunded mandates. There are no easy answers! I have been a teacher in the Snoqualmie Valley for 32 years, I have encountered many school board members during this time and the present school board clearly are the most professional during my career. All three have proven track records of effective leadership as school board members. We have much to be proud of with recent school achievement awards, greatly expanded Advanced Placement classes, high school classes with college credit, technology innovation, high number of National Board-certified teachers and very successful cocurricular activities. We need to celebrate these successes while collaborating on our continuing work to improve teaching and learning. Art Galloway President, Snoqualmie Valley Education Association

Snoqualmie needs to be heard on the school board I have heard so many people from North Bend and Fall City say the Snoqualmie Valley School District school board members represent all the children in the Valley. I’ve also been told “We don’t need anyone from Snoqualmie on the school board.� Are your children going to four different elementary schools? The kids in Snoqualmie are. Do you have a middle school? One that is getting state-wide awards to boot? Snoqualmie’s middle school is being dissolved and we will not have one. The kids in Snoqualmie will be bused to Fall City or North Bend. Snoqualmie is the fastest growing city in the state of Washington, per the 2010 census. Carolyn Simpson has lived here during that growth. She’s had two kids that have graduated from this district and are now at the University of Washington. She knows firsthand what our district’s needs are. And she’s willing to fix what’s broken. I read Mr. Popp’s quote, “I believe the city of Snoqualmie leadership is putting property developers first. They need to put children first.� This couldn’t be further from the truth. The Snoqualmie City Council is currently working with the school board. And I can assure you, Snoqualmie is a family-oriented city that puts the needs of our children first. The current SVSD school board members reside in Fall City, Redmond and North Bend (three from North Bend). Carolyn Simpson will help balance our school board, which will be a benefit to our district and our children. If you’d like to see some balance on the school board, vote for

The Snoqualmie Valley Record welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should be 250 words or fewer, signed and include a city of residence and a daytime phone number for verification. The Record reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Letters should be addressed to:

Letters to the Editor

The Snoqualmie Valley Record Carolyn Simpson. I’ve known PO Box 300, Snoqualmie, WA 98065 her for years and have personor email to editor@valleyrecord.com ally worked with her on many Opinions expressed are those of the author and projects here in the Valley. do not necessarily reflect the position of the Snoqualmie Valley Record. She’s done amazing things for Letters should be received by noon on Fridays our SVSD student’s growth, prior to publication. development and academics. She is the only person from Snoqualmie that is running and will definitely work for the best interest of all the kids in the Valley. We have an opportunity to have an A+ School Board. I am voting for Simpson and Doy. And trust me—I have done my homework.

be having as good a time as me, visiting and singing. I want to give a special thanks to Alison, Gloria, Linda, Roseanne and Judy, my granddaughters, who flew in from Virginia to surprise me. A very special thanks for Harley and his music. They all made it a perfect day. Also, to friends and relatives who jumped in and cleaned and put things back in their places. No, Anna, I didn’t forget you. It was quite a job and effort to make it to the party. I really appreciated it, and I’ll keep you for another 60 years as my daughter. Betty Vaughan North Bend/Issaquah

VOTE FOR

RYAN K.

for North Bend City Council Position 7

Lanice Gillard Snoqualmie

Pollard brings change to hospital It’s high time for a change at the Snoqualmie Valley Hospital. Gene Pollard will bring that change. Gene has decided, and many of us agree, that our hospital has lost its way. It is not a hospital. It’s a nursing home and a few medical clinics, all of which compete with the private sector. Our taxes have paid millions of dollars for this hospital. The hospital has lost those millions, and gone broke three times. Millions have been lost opening and closing medical clinics. The agreement between the hospital and Leisure Time Resorts would not have been signed if Gene Pollard was involved. This agreement cost the district (you and me) $7 million! The recent comment that it would just be too expensive to build on the Leisure Time property is baloney! They didn’t build the hospital on the property because the county refused to change the zoning on the property. The hospital was stuck with a contract they couldn’t get out of. If it wasn’t for the taxes, that are squeezed out of us every year, this hospital would have closed years ago. We need Gene Pollard! Vote for common sense! Vote for oversight! Vote for Gene Pollard, hospital commissioner! Herschel Backues North Bend

Views don’t match hospital reality I am responding to a candidate’s statement in the most recent King County Voter’s Pamphlet. My concern is that newcomers to the area may not realize that Gene Pollard’s rants relating to his running for hospital commissioner simply don’t match reality. He has chosen to use the voter’s pamphlet, a tax-supported public document, to bash a local business. Meanwhile, local school board and city council members and their staff and veteran political watchers are familiar with Gene’s antics and will tell you he has no credibility—just ask them. The Snoqualmie Valley Hospital is a vibrant, financially health and growing organization recognized throughout the state for its leadership in its swing bed program, regionally for its cooperation and collaboration with other healthcare institutions and locally for providing quality care with a personal touch through its operation of a 25-bed critical access hospital, 24/7 emergency room, local clinics and community outreach. You are welcome to learn more about the hospital district by contacting me directly at fritz.ribary@gmail.com. Fritz Ribary North Bend

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A wonderful birthday I wish to thank everyone for helping celebrate my 90th birthday. What a sensational party it was! Everyone seemed to

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Husa, Popp, Loudenback have proven themselves

Letters to the Editor

$PNNJUNFOUt*OUFHSJUZ Common Sense Dedicated to Listening and to Serving the Community. 'Ryan has the drive, determination, and business background to make a difference in helping North Bend take the next step in it’s future. He has demonstrated his leadership abilities, and his willingness to roll up his sleeves and “get to work� He’s honest, straightforward, and is ready for the challenges facing our community'. - Fritz Ribary, former Mayor of North Bend, and former Director of Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce. 'Ryan is committed, and when elected will work with every organization to make North Bend a better place, especially for families with children. In this down economy, he understands without a sincere cooperative effort in supporting each other, our city would not meet the needs of the families who live here'. - Bud Raisio, North Bend resident, President Snoqulamie Valley Youth Soccer Association "Ryan provides knowledge and experience that is valuable to the citizens of North Bend. His participation and serving in the community with many organizations gives Ryan a "boots on the ground" understanding of a vast spectrum of issues facing North Bend. Ryan will bring integrity, character and commitment to the City Council on behalf of the people of the City of North Bend." - Sherwood B. Korssjoen, Valley businessman, former North Bend Planning Commissioner Endorsed by Joint Council of Teamsters No. 28

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VALLEY VIEWS

SNOQUALMIE

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Both Si View props deserve our support

I

VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

t was a bittersweet moment, watching and listening to Minna Rudd dial up support for Si View Metro Parks District. To be sure, watching one of our last remaining democratic rituals unfold is a heartening sight. In today’s increasingly impersonal, vote-by-mail environment, the phone banks that folks like Rudd run are one of the last person-to-person connections remaining between and among voters. But it was also a moment of tension. A lot is riding on Si View’s two ballot measures, Props 1 and 2. The two measures—one of which requires a challenging 60-percent supermajority— would preserve the parks district from massive cuts due to the state property tax cap. And yet Rudd’s tool that night—a SETH TRUSCOTT county registered Valley Record Editor voter call list—was an imperfect one. So many of the voters had moved, dropped their land lines, even died, that many of numbers that Save Our Si View volunteers were calling were useless. Still, the volunteers pressed on, wading through the bad numbers, occasionally apologizing to the confused recipient. It was worth it when they got through to a living, breathing voter. Most were sympathetic to Si View’s plight. Of course, it often took some explaining to understand why Si View is going to the polls. Let’s start with the property

tax cap: In Washington, there is a limit to how much property tax you can pay. The cap is $5.90 per $1,000 of assessed value. Si View was created eight years ago by a vote of local residents. It’s a junior taxing district. That means it has the lowest priority to claim taxes, after things like fire districts and hospitals. According to the King County Assessor, the amount of property tax you pay depends on the cost of government—all the schools, roads, fire districts, hospitals and libraries around you. To determine your tax rate, officials divide the total amount of money needed for each district by the total value of property in your district. As property values have fallen in the recession, tax rates have risen to compensate. Think of it as a balancing scale, or a teeter-totter: since taxes are calculated based on your value, if the value falls, and the total tax burden is the same (or in some districts, larger), the rate

goes up, in order to bring in the same amount of tax. For Si View, the $5.90 cap has been met in one of its four subdistricts. The rates there can’t rise any higher. Si View must charge the same tax rate across its entire district. So, as a result, Si View loses the ability to seek its whole levy across all of its subdistricts, because the legal capacity in one area has been met. It’s important to note that Si View is not asking for more money. It is attempting to preserve the funding it’s got today. I support the Save Our Si View campaign, and urge district residents to do so with their votes. You should know that both Prop. 1 and Prop. 2 need to pass in order to maintain Si View at the status quo. Prop. 1 preserves part of the existing levy from the cap, and requires a simple majority to pass. Prop. 2 has the harder row to hoe. That measure is a temporary, one-year operations and maintenance levy that

would backfill the remainder of the Si View budget. It needs a 60 percent “supermajority� to pass. If Prop. 2 doesn’t pass, Si View’s backup plan involves unfilled jobs and postponed maintenance and training, keeping cuts at arm’s length from you, the user. But that outcome should sound undesirable to anyone familiar with Si View as a vibrant, growing place, a resource that should be nurtured to grow, not left to wither on the vine. If there is a heart to North Bend, it’s probably Si View. That community center, that pool and those fields have been the recreational backdrop for three or even four generations of Valley residents. It provides a yearly round of activities that mean a lot to the health and vitality of our community. Let’s not see that end. Now that you have received your ballot, please vote for both propositions in the Nov. 8 election. Keep the heart of North Bend beating strong.

Publisher William Shaw

wshaw@valleyrecord.com

Editor Seth Truscott struscott@valleyrecord.com

How are you preparing for a hard winter?

Reporter Carol Ladwig cladwig@valleyrecord.com

Creative Design Wendy Fried wfried@valleyrecord.com

Advertising David Hamilton Account dhamilton@valleyrecord.com Executive Circulation/ Patricia Hase Distribution circulation@valleyrecord.com Mail PO Box 300, 4OPRVBMNJF 8" 1IPOF 'BY www.valleyrecord.com Classified Advertising: 800.388.2527 Subscriptions: $29.95 per year in King County, $35 per year elsewhere Circulation: 425.241.8538 or 1.888.838.3000 The Snoqualmie Valley Record is the legal newspaper for the cities of Snoqualmie, North Bend and Carnation. Written permission from the publisher is required for reproduction of any part of this publication. Letters, columns and guest columns do not necessarily reflect the views of the Snoqualmie Record. PROUD SUPPORTER OF SNOQUALMIE VALLEY HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, SNOQUALMIE VALLEY SCHOOLS FOUNDATION, ENCOMPASS, MOUNT SI HELPING HAND FOOD BANK

“I bought extra everything, pellets, candles, canned food, a couple of extra flashlights, and we serviced our generator. I don’t like getting caught, like we were caught a couple of years ago.� Mary Likes North Bend

“I got candles, headlamps, some bottled water. I guess that just about does it for us.� Bill Olsen North Bend

“I got new tires, gas for the generator, but I’m from here, so I just kind of go with it. I don’t think we have really hard winters here.� Beth Anderson North Bend

“My preparation for the winter includes planning a trip to a sunny destination in about March.� Barrie ReinThunemann Snoqualmie


BUSINESS

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Coverage kudos

Prudential, Lions help fill food bank

News, writer of the year awards for Valley Record team

YMCA plans job fair The Snoqualmie YMCA is hiring for a number of open part-time position. Job fairs are planned for 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 29, and 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3, at the Snoqualmie Fire Station, 37600 S.E. Snoqualmie Parkway.

Hunters braving a snowstorm to thin out the Valley’s burgeoning elk herd. Breadwinners out of work for months or years, struggling to make ends meet. Medical patients turning to a legalized but still controversial pain remedy. They were the faces of a vibrant, real Valley. All we did was report on them. Judges with the Washington Newspaper Publisher Association’s annual Better Newspaper Contest, however, liked our coverage enough to hand out strong kudos at the contest awards night on Friday, Oct. 7, in Everett. Valley Record Staff Reporter Carol Ladwig capped the honors list, netting a second-place finalist spot for News Writer of the Year. The award recognizes the top tier of writers among all competing papers, of any size, in Washington state. Ladwig got the nod for several of the pieces she covered in her first five months on the job. Among the pieces considered in her entry was “Alternative medicine,” a look at Preston’s recently opened medical marijuana collective; “A growing hunger,” a December 2010 look at the needs met by three Valley food banks; and “Out of work,” a January 2011 look at life as lived by Valley residents on long-term unemployment. Judges commented on Ladwig’s eye for good topics. One noted, “If I were a regular reader, I’d watch for this byline.” Ladwig’s “Alternative Medicine” story won her a third-place award for best long news story, while “A Growing Hunger” netted her a second place award for best short news story. Judges praised Ladwig’s appreciation of the details, saying she “really humanizes the faces of hunger.” Editor Seth Truscott garnered a third-place award for best short news story for “Hunting to save the herd,” a Dec. 2010 look at how master hunters were thinning the local elk herd in hopes of putting the animals on a more sustainable footing. Judges said he did a good job explaining the reasons behind the project to non-hunters.

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Rick and Bill Gildersleeve help handle hundreds of pounds of food donated in a recent Prudential Global Volunteer Day drive. Generous North Bend QFC shoppers donated 264 pounds of food and $551 cash to the Mount Si Helping Hand Food Bank during the drive, held Saturday, Oct. 8. Rick Gildersleeve of Prudential Northwest Realty and members of the Snoqualmie Valley Lions Club thank all who donated and showed their support. The Snoqualmie Valley Lion’s Club also matched all money collected, adding $551.55. To learn more, call Gildersleeve at (425) 283-2217.

Internet service could help needy families The Record’s trio of awardwinning 2010-11 stories.

Comcast is providing low-cost Internet service, affordable computers, and free digital literacy training to members of households with children who receive free school lunches at local schools. To learn more, visit www.InternetEssentials.com or call 1-855-8-INTERNET (1-855-846-8376).

A VOTE FOR CAROLYN SIMPSON IS A VOTE FOR THE FUTURE OF OUR COMMUNITY, OUR SCHOOLS AND, MOST IMPORTANTLY, OUR KIDS t CAROLYN is dedicated to raising the bar on student success and ensuring each child has the tools and assistance needed to succeed. t CAROLYN understands the current economy and will support new school construction provided it is purposeful; supports our students and teachers needs; and is economically supportable by the community. t CAROLYN is committed to developing successful and well planned bond proposals that take into account ALL kids and do not displace overcrowding to other areas. t CAROLYN promotes transparency and two-way communications between the public and the Board. She wants to hear all sides of every issue. t CAROLYN believes the board should be representative of the entire community it is entrusted to serve. Better decisions and support come from listening to all sides of every issue, even those you may not think you agree with. t

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FUN FROM 2 Snoqualmie treat Harvest Bring the little ones to the annual Treat Harvest, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31, in Historic Downtown Snoqualmie. Children age five and under can wear costumes and gather treats from store to store. Look for the balloons at participating merchants.

Fall City carnival The Fall City Masons host their first annual Halloween Carnival, Sunday, Oct. 30, at the Masonic Hall, 4304 337th Place S.E., Fall City. Come in costume and bring your own pumpkin for carving at 4:30 p.m. The event also includes raffles and prizes. Admission is $5 per child or $25 per family. Adults are free with an accompanying child. Bring an item of non-perishable food and get $1 off admission to help the Fall

City Food Pantry. Proceeds help the Fall City Masonic Hall building fund. The carnival is appropriate for children ages 3 to 11. To learn more, call F.J. Schumacher IV at (425) 533-9634 or e-mail to mason-fjsiv@trashmail.net.

Moose parties for grown-ups, kids The Snoqualmie Valley Moose Lodge hosts a Halloween Costume Party & Dance for adults, 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29. The night includes a costume contest and music by The Little Hurricanes Then, at noon Sunday, Oct. 30, the Moose hold a Children’s Halloween Costume Party & Carnival, open to all young people. The day includes a complementary lunch, costume parade, carnival games and prizes, face painting, animal balloons and a cakewalk. Snoqualmie Valley Moose Lodge is located at 108 Sydney in North Bend, in the green brick building at the corner of Sydney and North

Bend Way. For information, call (425) 888-0951.

Treats at the outlets

Grinning gourd

North Bend Premium Outlets celebrates Halloween from 5 to 8 p.m., Monday, Oct. 31. Many stores will have goodies for trick or treaters, young and old alike.

Arts film party Fall City Arts will present its third annual community Halloween party, potluck dinner and film screening, 5 to 9 p.m., Monday, Oct. 31, at the Masonic Lodge in Fall City. The film is “Alone,� directed and produced by Fall City youth Samantha Jensen and Ethan Seneker. The movie will be shown every half-hour. People are invited to bring a dish to share for the potluck or stop by during their trick-or-treating for an evening of food, music, and socializing. Donations to the food bank will also be collected.

William Shaw/Staff Photo

Julie Johnson shows off the spooky-faced, 250-pound green “Hester� variety pumpkin, an heirloom breed, growing at her Snoqualmie home. Johnson has been growing monster squashes for the past 10 years.

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Spook train rides from Valley depot Gather the family, suit up in your costumes and take part in the fall festivities at the Snoqualmie Depot. Take the Halloween Train on a scenic excursion through the Cascade foothills of the Upper Snoqualmie Valley, aboard the Snoqualmie Valley Railroad Oct. 29 and 30. Receive $2 off when dressed in costume. Everyone in full costume will receive a prize. Trains depart every 90 minutes beginning at 11:01 a.m. from the Snoqualmie Depot at 38625 S.E. King Street and at 11:26 a.m. from the North Bend Depot at 205 McClellan Street. Roundtrip fare is $8 for children (2-12), $12 for adults, and $10 for ages 62 and up. See the historic depot decorated for the season. Enjoy live music. Watch an old-fashioned cider press in action and sip hot apple cider. Craft a keepsake. While in North Bend, visit George’s Bakery. Show your Halloween Train ticket and receive a free cookie.

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SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

SPORTS

Gardunia, Ballsmith take ‘Cats to districts in season finale Mount Si High School’s top boys golfers narrowly missed a state appearance in district play last week. Seniors Mitch Gardunia and Sean Ballsmith represented the Wildcats at SeaKing District golf championships, Monday, Oct. 17, at Willows Golf Course in Redmond. Gardunia missed qualifying for state by a single stroke. Ballsmith was three strokes shy. The two leaders went to districts after a strong run on the Mount Si team. Ballsmith was the finesse player, all about control on the course; Gardunia was the long hitter, strong at distance. Scores were high and weather was brutal when the two played at the league championships, held Tuesday, Oct. 11, at Redmond’s Willows Run. Ballsmith and Gardunia got qualifying scores of 79 each.

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Mount Si defensive linemen face off against a Bellevue offense in the second quarter of the Wildcat homecoming game, Friday, Oct. 21. Despite a hyped home crowd and a three-point early lead, Mount Si fell in the contest, but keeps its postseason momentum.

Holes-in-ones keep stacking up at Mount Si Golf Course Golfer Troy Thomas made a hole-in-one Friday, Sept. 30, at Mount Si Golf Course. The 170-yard shot, with a six-iron on hole 17, was a first for the 36-year-old. Then, Bruce Klein made a hole in one on Monday, Oct. 17. Klein, age 55, used a threewood to ace 184-yard hole 17. It was his first ace. Mount Si Golf Course is located at 9010 Boalch Ave. S.E., Snoqualmie.

Tennis road ends at Skyline, Kingco championships

Strength in adversity When the first quarter wrapped up, it looked like Mount Si High School’s homecoming crowd might watch the varsity Wildcats be the upsetters to Bellevue. After all, Mount Si had beat Bellevue onto the boards, using a Wolverine fumble to march downfield and put junior Cameron Van Winkle in position for a 31-yard field goal. The quarter ended with Mount Si in the lead at three, but the Wolverines woke up and began a punishing rhythm in the second that continued

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Senior night The Mount Si varsity football senior class includes: t3ZBO"ULJOTPO 2# t$IBDF$BSMTPO ,1 t+PSEZO#VZFST -# t+PIO&EFOT -# t$POOPS%FVUTDI -#%# t&MJKBI.BZGJFME '#-# t+VTUJO)FOBL 5&-# t5ZMFS)VUDIJOTPO -# t4IFSNBO)VUDIFSTPO  0-%t$BZNPO(SBOJMMP 0-%t+PTI.JUDIFMM 0-%t#SJBO$PQFMBOE 0-%t,PMUPO"VYJFS 0-%t;BDI4MFUUFO 0-%t"+#SFWJDL 5&%& ence didn’t faze him; Mitchell said they’d want to take a look at his teammates, too. “I just play like I normally do,” he said. “That’s all I want to do.”

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through the fourth. The final score was 35-3. Still, Mount Si seniors had a big night. “Win or lose, I think we played really well,” said senior Connor Deutsch. “In a game like this, there’s nothing to lose.” As running back, Deutsch did a lot of the heavy lifting, providing a number of good carries before rolling his ankle late in the fourth. Ankle taped, Deutsch planned to be back in action ASAP, looking forward to Mount Si’s Friday, Oct. 28, matchup with Sammamish, and then the postseason after that. “We’ve just got to keep fighting, bounce back,” senior lineman Josh Mitchell said. “We’ve done it this whole year. We can’t hang our heads on this loss.” “I feel like I gave my all,” added the senior, who pushes everyone else not to quit. Mitchell, a Corvallis signee, was aware that two Oregon State University coaches were in the stands, in town for a Washington State-vs.-Beavers matchup in Seattle. Their pres-

Wrapping up last week, the Mount Si tennis team sent six to league and had their winningest season in at least seven years. The season ended with two team wins over Liberty this season, and with a strong contingent heading to the KingCo 3A playoffs Tuesday, Oct. 18, at Skyline High School. Senior Azhar Khandekar started off against number-one seed and tournament finalist Zach Kosanke of Bellevue, falling 6-0, 6-0. He went out after a better showing against Liberty’s Michael Pavant, 7-6, 6-2. Senior Jordan Koppa was draw no. 8, AZHAR playing draw no. 9, Connor Ross of Lake KHANDEKAR Washington. He fell 6-0 in two sets, then went out against Bellevue’s Will Hwang. In doubles, junior Josh Hamann and freshman Matthew Griffin were draw no. 2, playing Justice Canley and Tyler Le of Liberty, falling 6-3, 6-1. Hamann and Griffin then played Starr Wen and Dion Sagafi of Bellevue. Seniors Alex Pease and Nate Popp were draw no. 8, playing Lake Washington’s Jake Nash and Ryan Lustgarten, falling 6-2, JORDAN KOPPA 6-2. The duo fell to Alex Wallin and Ethan Ludlam of Juanita, 6-4, 6-3. Mount Si’s boys were strong in their final season meet, Oct. 13 at Liberty—particularly the singles players, who led the Wildcats to a 4-3 win. Hamann, in the number-one spot, bested Patriot Michael Payant, 6-1, 6-1. At number two, Popp fended off Brandon Yan, 7-5, 6-2. At number three, Khandekar handled Liberty’s Blake Reeve, 6-4, 6-2. In doubles, the duo of sophomore Kevin McLaughlin and Griffin bested Jacob Lindstrom and Brian Linnenkamp, 6-4, 6-2. Head coach Jim Gibowski praised his strong senior class, which included three-year players Jordan Koppa and Khandekar, Jake Rouches, Jake Miller, Pease, Clint Christensen, and Popp, who was on junior varsity last year but bloomed as a player and became the number-two singles figure. “This was a really good group of kids,” Gibowski said. Next year, the team looks to be even deeper, and the Wildcats could compete with Liberty, Juanita and Sammamish. The most important thing, Gibowski said, is that the teammates improve their game and build a lifelong love of the sport.

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North Bend’s Unity Lodge turns 100

Courtesy photo

The vanished North Bend military service rolls still stand in front of Lee’s store in this 1945 photo. The roll monument was one of a number of temporary and permanent service memorials built in the Valley.

A legacy of remembrance Editor

Autumn sun warns the young sycamore in its new surroundings, a ring of boulders. The 15-foot tree will someday grow into a giant, a Legacy Tree overshadowing the stones that now sit at the Snoqualmie Valley Veteran’s Memorial. On this October day, the memorial project is still a work in progress. Gravel, bare earth, electrical conduit and concrete foundations await the finished monument stone and flags, but organizers say everything should be in place by Veteran’s Day, 11-11-11. The opening of the new veterans monument remains on track, committee president Chris Chartier said. Congressman Dave Reichert, Washington’s ‘First Husband’ Mike Gregoire, State Rep. Jay Rodne and Snoqualmie Mayor Matt Larson have been invited to speak at the dedication at 11:11 a.m. on Veteran’s Day. Members of the Snoqualmie Tribe will also bless the occasion. “The whole purpose of the memorial is hoto nor all our vets,” Chartier said, “specifically those who were killed in the line of duty. It’s important to have one place that we can go to visit and honor our veterans.” Ground was broken on Veteran’s Day, 2008, on land next to the Snoqualmie American Legion Post, donated by the city of Snoqualmie, directly across from City Hall. Committee members considered places like Tollgate Farm, Meadowbrook Farm and the Fall City roundabout, but chose the Snoqualmie site for its easy access, association with veteran’s groups and purchase price—free. Plans call for a central stone monument surrounded by seven flag poles, benches and a brick plaza. Stone columns under the poles will display the emblems of military branches. Part of the stone will be carved with a tribal symbol reflecting Snoqualmie Tribal members’ sacrifices for the larger nation. In 1855, Snoqualmie warriors fought on the side of Washington territory’s white settlers. “There were losses,” committee member Dave Battey said. “Nobody knows who they were. But we still want to honor them.” The central stone will terminate in a three-dimensional carving of Mount Si. That helps viewers find “their” Mount Si, Battey said.

The new memorial under construction is only the latest in a long line of temporary and permanent reminders of local military service and sacrifice. According to Cristy Lake of the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum, the first local memorial went up in 1908, when the Great White Fleet, the United States’ white-painted global naval expedition, came to Seattle. Citizens of Fall City built a commemorative arch when several of the fleet’s naval commanders visited Snoqualmie Falls. After World War I, Preston residents planted four trees in honor of the young Preston men killed in the war. Fall City started its own veteran’s memorial at the local cemetery some time after World War I. That memorial, which did not have any names, lasted until World War II. The historical society has found photos of local American Legion members holding Memorial Day commemorations. SEE MONUMENTS, 14

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Unity Masonic Lodge No. 198 of North Bend, 100th installation Washington has a long is open to all history of serving the Unity Lodge holds its 100th Snoqualmie Valley. This installation of officers at 10 year marks the Lodge’s first a.m. Saturday, Dec. 10. century of service. The installation is open to the The fraternity first met public and appropriate for all as a Lodge in North Bend ages, provided children are in 1912, and was granted accompanied by an adult. an official constitution from The ceremony will take place Grande Lodge in 1913. at the North Bend Masonic Little did they know, Center, 119 W. North Bend those few good Masons who Way, North Bend, WA. For gathered together in the more information or to RSVP, North Bend railway depot email to secretary@unity198. in January of 1912, that they org, or phone (425) 351-2447. were making history. But a century later, their dream of If you are curious about creating a permanent lodge Freemasonry, or just want to in North Bend continues. observe the installation, this Eleven men pledged $1000 is a grand opportunity to see each to the construction and a Masonic Lodge in action. furnishing of an appropriate You can learn more about Lodge building; that equates Unity Lodge at http:// to nearly $23,000 in today’s unity198.org/. currency, each. The building has since been recognized as one of the oldest buildings in North Bend. Unity Lodge was not only where the men of the town met; it also supported all the Masonic groups in the area: Eastern Star, Demolay and Rainbow Girls. It was also the dance hall for the town and all the local mill workers around the Valley. Today, as well as continuing as the meeting place for Unity Lodge and various non-profits, the building is home to the Valley Center Stage Theater and SingleTrack Cycles.


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Many lives for Snoqualmie’s $1 City Hall

See the changes at Tolt Museum The Tolt Historical Society has been making some changes this fall at its museum at Carnation Farm. The new displays and exhibits can be viewed at an open house, 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29. New displays include a button collection and a doll collection. Items have been added to the Tolt Fire Department display and the Carnation Farm display. The Tolt Historical Society is dedicated to the researching and preservation of local history and artifacts for the perpetuation and development of knowledge. Since it formed in 1982, the all-volunteer society has grown its collection of vintage photographs, artifacts and memorabilia representing more than 100 years of history in Tolt and Carnation. Today, the museum holds more than 1,000 items. The museum is open by appointment only for now. Call (425) 333-4436 to schedule a tour.

Welcome to 109 River Street, once a financial HQ, now a visitor hub BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Jennifer Osborn’s daily job immerses her in a cube of light. Business manager for the Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce, Osborn comes in each morning and sits at her desk under eight-foot-tall windows of antique French glass and an 18-foot ceiling. Modern lamps and celestory lighting accent a wide-open room, offset by a dim, thick-walled vault and spindled balcony. Osborn’s surroundings are some of the oldest, and most charming, in Snoqualmie. Where bank tellers once stood handling money and growing the financial roots of the community, she now directs visitors hungry for local attractions. “I feel so blessed to work in this building,” Osborn said. “It’s an absolute gem.” The building at 109 River Street has had many lives. The most recent incarnation began this past May, when the Snoqualmie Valley Chamber moved in from small second-floor digs down Falls Avenue. The building’s bones are those

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Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce staff Jennifer Osborn, Gregory Malcolm and Susan Livingston hold old photos of their office, a former city hall and bank (Below, circa 1950).

of a bank. When the Snoqualmie Falls Lumber Company mill opened across the river in 1917, the local economy began to grow. In April 1919, W. L. Peters and Associates founded the Sate Bank of Snoqualmie. By 1923, the Peters enterprise had coupled with several Eastside banks, and decided to construct a new headquarters in Snoqualmie. The brick building had walls a foot thick, with a 14-foot-wide balcony and a eightby-12-foot vault with 18-inch walls. In 1929, local banker C. Beadon Hall bought the State Bank of Snoqualmie. He and his sister Isadore had founded the Duvall State Bank in 1912. Local historian Dave Battey writes that they “carefully added seven more banks to their chain until they covered the Eastside all the way to Bellevue.” Hall, or C.B., as he was known, worked to bridge together the varied Valley communities. A Mason and an American Legion commander, Hall looked after his Valley all his life, according to Battey. When Hall consolidated the chain as Washington State Bank in 1943, the Snoqualmie building was his headquarters. Hall’s chain was purchased by Seattle First National Bank in 1956. Seafirst continued operations in Snoqualmie and became Bank of America in 2000.

The Snoqualmie branch closed in 2005. In the early 1970s, SeaFirst decided to build a new Snoqualmie branch. This modern building, now vacant, was finished in 1976. But long before it was finished, the city of Snoqualmie began negotiating with the bank for control of the old River Street building. When the new Snoqualmie SeaFirst was dedicated in July of 1976, the donation of the old brick building became part of the ceremony. Mayor Charles Peterson pulled a dollar bill from his own pocket to pay SeaFirst for the building. As city hall, it survived until the administrative offices moved to a former credit union building down the street. The planning department then moved in, departing when the purpose-built City Hall opened in 2009. Today, the chamber is helping the building find its new role. Besides the chamber businessdevelopment functions, the place is now a budding art gallery and visitor’s center. To Susan Livingston, operations manager of the chamber, the building remains a surprising draw. “It’s a hub,” she said of the building. “It’s a visual symbol of what the chamber offers. It’s a gathering place.”

Serving good times since 1910 1940

1956

The building was erected in 1916. It was used as a barber shop for many years. In the old days, loggers came in the back to take a bath before getting a haircut and beard trim at the front of the shop. The space is now used as a clinic. When Dr. Allen bought the building, she donated the large barber shop mirror to the Tolt Historical Society. She also worked to return the appearance of the front to its original design, including exposing and restoring the transom windows that had been boarded up for many years. Dr. Allen is committed to providing community based medical care in the model of the old town doctor. Like Dr. Cheney who served this Valley for many years, she uses natural medicines and makes house calls. Dr. Allen is a naturopathic physician who integrates modern medicine and natural therapies to provide the best of both worlds.

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Flying Frog owner collects the toys you remember From Donnie and Marie to Doctor Who, Mike Condit sells fun from every era BY CAROL LADWIG Staff Reporter

In a place where chaos seems to reign, where Donnie and Marie are grouped with Young Frankenstein, where Galactic Empire TIE fighters battle World War II-era fighter planes, and where Aliens hang out with the Tinkertoys, even in a place like this, there are rules. The first rule at Flying Frog Antiques and Collectibles, is to have fun. The rest of the rules aren’t as important. “I think that’s my niche,� says shop-owner Mike Condit. “People come in here, and it brings back memories, and they’re happy.� Condit invites customers into his shop at 8112 Railroad Ave. to look around and enjoy themselves, whether they buy anything or not. Some of his items are older than 35 years, passing the milestone to become collectibles, and a few might even be at the 100-year milestone that makes them antiques, but all of them are the stuff of childhood memories. “It’s not the age of the toys, it’s what people remember,� he said.

Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Surrounded by toys, Mike Condit thinks his niche is to give people happy memories. Condit is the owner of the Flying Frog toy and curiosity shop in downtown Snoqualmie. Classic toys mingle with kitsch on his shelves, but he’s not the one to decide which is which. When he was a child, he loved science fiction toys. “Anything that goes ‘beep beep’ and ‘boop,’ I loved to play with it,� he said. But he knew that wasn’t for everyone. Condit has owned Flying Frog since 1994, when it was more of a thrift store, but he’s always

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had a sense of what interested people. Working as a close-out buyer for a Midwest retailer, he started learning from other sellers about all kinds of collectibles, what was valuable, and what wasn’t. Mainly, though, he says, “I just found out what people were interested in.� So, when he opened his own shop, then located by the Snoqualmie Railway Museum depot, he added toys to appeal to the many children who visited him each summer. When he relocated to his current spot on Railroad, he added in some of his own interests, such as fossils and rock collections. Other favorites of his, Red Dwarf and Doctor Who miscellanea, also crept into the display cases. Some of his prized items are two antique fire trucks, a “Doctor Who� record album, and an autographed poster of Scotty from Star Trek, especially meaningful, since Star Trek got him into the collectibles business. His first collectible sales were made from a Grand Piano during a Star Trek convention in Seattle, selling off Data figurines that had never been released to the market. His top-seller at the store is an old-fashioned $6 item displayed on his counter. The statue of a little boy sprays water at any unsuspecting person who does as the sign suggests, and pulls his pants down. “It surprises people, and then they laugh, and then they have to have one,� he explained. “They buy them as gifts, because it’s funny. It gives them a memory.� Gifts account for most of his sales, Condit estimates. People buy long-sought collectibles as gifts for themselves, or to complete a spouse’s set, typically, but also just because they want something. “We’re always trying to make ourselves happy,� he said. “I sell people what they want.�

A Fall City collector’s item Every holiday season, the Fall City Historical Society sets up shop at the local holiday bazaar, shares its mission and memories— and in the process, creates a new collector’s item. This year, the item in question is a beverage glass showing a local historic icon: The 1888 Fall City Hop Shed. Pioneer George Rutherford built the shed at a landing on the Snoqualmie River, a short distance upstream from Fall City. It was used to dry hops, an herb used in beer brewing, during that crop’s heyday in the Northwest. After the market for hops crashed, the shed was sold and later moved to its current location in Fall City Park. Few people get a chance to explore the structure— sometimes, historical society volunteers host tours during Fall City Days—but you can still see the shed, and walk up for close look, at the park. Items from the collection will also be on display during Fall City’s Holiday Market, Saturday, Dec. 3.

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Residents of North Bend conduct a 1924 Memorial Day service at the North Bend Cemetery. To this day, Valley veteran’s associations continue the memorial tradition in May and November.

During World War II, citizens of North Bend, Fall City and Snoqualmie Falls each built wooden memorials in honor of their soldiers. All three structures were torn down by the early 1950s. At the Snoqualmie Falls mill, a wooden monument to employees in the service overlooked the grounds. Built of wooden slats marked with the names of everyone at the mill who was drafted or volunteered in World War II, the monument showed the surprising amount of patrio-

their names were published in the newsletter, which became an important connection between soldiers and the folks back home. In North Bend, a wooden monument stood in front of the Lee Brothers store, the main grocery store in town—and the logical place for a memorial, Battey said. The names were in the front and center, and a U.S. flag waved above. Historians with the Snoqualmie Valley museum would like the community’s help in pinning down exactly when these monuments went away.

tism and service from such a small community. A photo from that era shows 102 employees’ names emplaced on the sign. One of Dave Battey’s uncles, George Swenson, was remembered on it. George had enlisted and was in training when the war ended. Another, more ephemeral local remembrance came in the Snoqualmie Falls Lumber Company newsletter. When mill workers began to enter the service,

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The veteran’s memorial committee is still selling memorial bricks, as a fundraiser for the project and as a way to flesh out the paved plaza. Bricks can be inscribed with the name of any loved one who served their country, regardless of whether the Valley was their home. Bricks cost $100. To order a memorial brick or get involved, contact Chris Chartier at (425) 888-9152 or by cell at (425) 802-5174.

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After the war, Carnation built a stone and bronze memorial for Tolt’s fallen soldiers. Someone also erected a flagpole in the Mount Si Cemetery in North Bend. The Mount Si High School class of 1966 built a memorial for their classmates killed in action. However, this did not include other students killed in the line of duty. Recently, Eric Levi Ward, a Marine Lance Cpl. who was killed in February 2010 during the Afghanistan conflict, was added to that memorial There has never been a memorial erected for Korean War veterans. The new monument under construction in Snoqualmie is meant to rectify that, and will include all 70 men, and

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BY CAROL LADWIG Staff Reporter

What’s it like to know that your birthplace, your childhood home, isn’t around any more? For some of the Snoqualmie Falls Hospital babies now living at Red Oak Apartments in North Bend, it’s just life. A lot of the things they grew up with are gone, now. The hospital where Tom Thoreson, Kathleen Peterson and Rose Larson were born is only the first thing to disappear. The mill town, and the mill where Rose worked pulling lumber, Thorseon’s furniture store, and each of their respective high schools, have all disappeared or been replaced. It took a little longer for the accompanying high school rivalries to disappear. “There was always a big rivalry between North Bend and Snoqualmie, and Fall City,” said Thoreson, who grew up in North Bend. “And we were the best,” added Larson, a Snoqualmie girl all her life. Peterson grew up in Fall City and was just happy to reminisce about the tennis victories that earned her a school letter. “We beat them, no, that’s not the right word, we overwhelmed them.” Since the high schools all merged into Mount Si starting in the mid ‘40s, that competitive spirit has faded, gradually. “When we first opened Red Oak, we had people who wouldn’t sit at the same table, because they were from rival schools,” said Laure Anne Wilbert, director of the Red Oak assisted living complex. Today, though, residents from the Upper Valley and even Carnation — Tolt, they corrected, it used to be called Tolt — gathered around the table to share their memories. Larson was the only child in her family to go to work at the company town of Snoqualmie Falls, pulling the smaller pieces

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be a businessman, attending the University of Washington, then opening Thoreson’s Furniture in North Bend. Erland worked at the sawmill, and left the area only once, to serve in the U.S. Air Force for five and a half years. His tour included Hawaii’s Pearl Harbor, during the 1941 bombing. From about half a mile away, he said, “we watched the second set of bombs hit the Arizona.” He tried to hide in a latrine, which turned out to be a mistake, but a small one. When his service ended in 1947, he was happy to return to the Valley, his family, and the setting for most of his good memories. “I haven’t found any place better than this one,” he said.

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of lumber into the mill on a team of eight women, while the men handled the heaviest logs. Thoreson’s father was killed while working at the mill, so he was forebade to get a job there, which really cramped his earning ability “When I was growing up, there was no other place to work!” he said. Harold Erland Sr., a North Bend resident since age 4, agreed. “You were either a sliver-picker, or a stump-jumper.” Like most area residents, though, Thoreson still enjoyed the dances and other community events at the company town. With its own school, store, and hospital, “Snoqualmie Falls was like a community center for the whole Valley,” he said. He grew up to


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PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE #538702 Legal Notice City Of Snoqualmie King County, Washington 98065 Notice Is Hereby Given That the Snoqualmie City Council, on the 24th day of October, 2011 passed the Following Ordinances: Ordinance No. 1085 Ordinance Amending Ordinance No. 1071 Adopting The 2011 Budget Ordinance No. 1086 Ordinance providing for zoning to become effective upon annexation of certain real property within the City of Snoqualmie urban growth area in the Mill site planning area Copies of these Ordinances in complete text are available at the City Hall located at 38624 SE River Street between 9 AM and 5 PM, Monday through Friday, on the city website www.ci.snoqualmie.wa.us , or by calling the City Clerk at 425-888-1555 x 1118. Matthew R. Larson, Mayor ATTEST: Jodi Warren, MMC City Clerk Publish/Post : 10/26/2011 Effective Date: 10/31/2011 Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record October 26, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE #536105 LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF NORTH BEND King County, Washington NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the North Bend City Council will hold a public hearing to receive comments on the 2012 Preliminary Budget. The hearing will take place during the Regular City Council Meeting on Tuesday November 15, 2011, 7:00 P.M., at the Mt Si Senior Center, 411 Main Avenue South, North Bend, WA. Comments may be submitted in writing to the City Clerk’s Office at City Hall, 211 Main Avenue N. (P.O. Box 896) North Bend, WA 98045, up to the close of business, (4:30 P.M.) Monday, November 14, 2011 or verbally during the public hearing. The Preliminary Budget is available for review at City Hall 211 Main Ave. N., and on the City’s website at http://northbendwa.gov. Further information is available by contacting City Hall at (425) 888-1211. Published: October 19, 2011 and October 26, 2011 in the Snoqualmie Valley Record Posted: October 14, 2011 PUBIC NOTICE #536084 City of North Bend, Washington Notice of Hearing on Final Assessment Roll Utility Local Improvement District No. 6 (Tanner & Truck Town Sewer Project) NOTICE is given that the final assessment roll for Utility Local

Improvement District No. 6 (the “District�) has been prepared as required by law and is on file and open to inspection at the office of the City Clerk at City Hall, 211 Main Avenue N, North Bend, Washington. Pursuant to Resolution No. 1212 adopted August 21, 2007, the City Council formed Utility Local Improvement District No 6 under Ordinances 1293 and 1312 in response to receipt of sufficient petitions from property owners within the ULID boundaries, to construct sewer system improvements along the North Bend Way, Cedar Falls Way, SE 140th Street, and Maloney Grove/ Thrasher Ave corridors from the City’s wastewater treatment plant to Truck Town and to assess in whole or in part the cost and expense of the improvements against the property in that district specially benefited thereby. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that a Hearing Examiner will conduct a public hearing on the final assessment roll at or shortly thereafter 3:00 p.m., local time, on November 10, 2011, at Mt. Si Senior Center, 411 Main Avenue S, North Bend, Washington. This is a re-scheduling of the cancelled hearing previously set on October 20, 2011. Any person objecting to their assessment appearing on the final assessment roll for the District is notified to make all objections in writing and to file them with the City Clerk at City Hall on or before November 10, 2011, and to appear at the hearing to present testimony and other evidence. All objections must state clearly the grounds of the objections and should contain lot, block and addition, section, tax number or other identifying description of the property. All objections not made timely in writing and in the manner required by law, shall be conclusively presumed to have been waived. At the time and place fixed for the hearing, the Hearing Examiner will sit as a board of equalization for the purpose of considering objections duly filed, together with all information and evidence in support of those objections, and for the purpose of considering such assessment roll. In order for a protest to be considered valid, it must include proof that the property is not being benefited to the amount of the assessment. At the hearing, or any adjournment thereof, the Hearing Examiner may recommend to the City Council to correct, revise, raise, lower, change or modify the roll or any part thereof, or set aside the roll and order a new assessment. Following the hearing, and recommendation of the Hearing Examiner, the City

Council will confirm the assessment roll by ordinance. When property has been entered originally upon the roll, and the assessment thereon is not raised, no objection shall be considered by the City Council or by any court on appeal unless the objection is made in writing at or prior to the date fixed for the original hearing upon the roll. Susie Oppedal, City Clerk City of North Bend, Washington Posted: October 17, 2011 Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record: October 19 & October 26, 2011. PUBIC NOTICE #537597 City of Snoqualmie King County, Washington 98065 LEGAL NOTICE Please take notice that the City of Snoqualmie Parks and Recreation Department proposes to adopt Parks and Recreation Administrative Rules as follows: Authority to adopt rules: SMC 2.05.030 Summary description of proposed rules: Parks and Recreation field rentals and park procedures – Rule Number 1.04.21 The text of the proposed rules are available at the City hall located at 38624 SE River Street between 9AM and 5 PM, Monday through Friday, on the city website www.ci.snoqualmie.wa. us or by calling the Parks and Recreation Department at 425831-5784. The city will receive written comments on the proposed rules for twenty-one (21) days after the date of publication (11/15/2011). Comments should be directed to Gwen Voelpel, Director of Parks and Recreation PO Box 987 Snoqualmie, WA 98065 gvoelvel@ci.snoqualmie.wa.us Publish/Post: 10/26/2011 Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on October 26, 2011. PUBLIC NOTICE #534249 The Board of Commissioners of King County Fire District 38 will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, November 1, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. in the North BendTrain Depot, 205 McClellan Street, for the purpose of disclosing the Revenue Sources under which the District operates. Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on October 26, 2011. PUBLIC NOTICE #536374 LEGAL NOTICE -CITY OF CARNATIONNOTICE OF FILING OF THE 2012 PRELIMINARY BUDGET; AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS ON THE 2012 BUDGET AND REVENUE SOURCES. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 2012 Preliminary Budget will be filed with the City Clerk on Monday, October 31, 2011, and made available to the public during normal business hours at

Carnation City Hall located at 4621 Tolt Avenue, Carnation, WA. PRELIMINARY BUDGET HEARING: The Carnation City Council will hold a legislative public hearing for the purpose of considering the 2012 Preliminary Budget and Revenue Sources, and possible increases in property tax revenues, at their regular meeting on Tuesday, November 1, 2011, beginning at 7:00 PM or soon thereafter. FINAL BUDGET HEARING: The Carnation City Council will hold a legislative public hearing for the purpose of fixing the 2012 Final Budget at their regular meeting on Tuesday, November 15, 2011, beginning at 7:00 PM or soon thereafter, and may continue said hearing to subsequent Council meetings. The hearings will be held in the City Council Chambers at Carnation City Hall located at 4621 Tolt Avenue. The hearings are open to the public. Any taxpayer may appear at the public hearings and be heard for or against any part of the budget. All persons wishing to comment on the 2012 Preliminary or Final Budget may submit comment in writing or verbally at the scheduled public hearings. This notice published pursuant to 35A.33.060 RCW & 1.14.010 CMC. CITY OF CARNATION Mary Otness, City Clerk Publish in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on October 19, 2011 and October 26, 2011. PUBLIC NOTICE #537784 LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF NORTH BEND King County, Washington NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the North Bend City Council will hold a Public Hearing to receive comment regarding renewal of a Moratorium on the Establishment of Medical Marijuana Dispensaries. The public hearing will take place during the Regular Council Meeting on Tuesday November 15, 2011, at 7:00 P.M., at the Mt. Si Senior Center, 411 Main Ave. S., North Bend, WA. Citizens may submit written comments regarding the Moratorium to the City Clerk’s Office at City Hall, 211 Main Avenue N. (P.O. Box 896), North Bend, WA 98045, up to the close of business, (4:30 P.M.) Monday, November 14, 2011 or verbally during the public hearing. North Bend does not discriminate on the basis of disabilities. If you need special accommodation, please contact City Hall within three business days prior to the public hearing at (425) 888-7627. Posted: October 20, 2011 Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record: October 26, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICE #537196 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the Si View Metropolitan Park District will hold a Public Hearing to receive comments on the 2012 Budget and Revenue Sources. The hearing will take place during the Regular Commission Meeting on Wednesday, November 16th, 2011, 6:30 P.M., at the Si View Community Center, 400 SE Orchard Dr., North Bend, WA 98045. All persons interested are encouraged to participate in this public hearing by making comments, proposals, and suggestions on matters for the Board of Commissioners to consider during preparation of the Si View Metropolitan Park District 2012 Budget. Comments may be submitted in writing to the Si View MPD, P.O. Box 346, North Bend, WA, 98045 up to the close of business (5:00 pm) on November 9th, 2011, or verbally during the public hearing. The 2012 Preliminary Budget will be available for review at the Si View Annex Office, 400 SE Orchard Dr, beginning November 2nd, 2011. Further information is available by contacting the Si View Metropolitan Park District at 425-8311900. Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record October 26, 2011 and November 2, 2011. PUBLIC NOTICE #537795 LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF NORTH BEND King County, Washington NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the North Bend City Council will hold a public hearing to receive comments on setting the Property Tax Levy for 2012. The hearing will take place during the Regular City Council Meeting on Tuesday November 15, 2011, 7:00 P.M., at the Mt Si Senior Center, 411 Main Avenue South, North Bend, WA. Comments may be submitted in writing to the City Clerk’s Office at City Hall, 211 Main Avenue N. (P.O. Box 896) North Bend, WA 98045, up to the close of business, (4:30 P.M.) Monday, November 14, 2011 or verbally during the public hearing. Further information is available by contacting Finance Manager Stan Lewis at (425) 888-7631. Posted: October 20, 2011 Published: October 26, 2011 in the Snoqualmie Valley Record. PUBLIC NOTICE #537592 LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF NORTH BEND King County, Washington Notice is hereby given that the North Bend City Council at its October 18, 2011 City Council Meeting adopted the following

Ordinances. The summary titles are as follows: Ordinance No. 1441 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF NORTH BEND, WASHINGTON, AMENDING NORTH BEND MUNICIPAL CODE SECTION 20.06.005 TO CLARIFY REQUIREMENTS FOR STANDING TO INITIATE APPEALS UNDER NORTH BEND MUNCIPAL CODE 20.06; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE Ordinance No. 1442 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF NORTH BEND, WASHINGTON, AMENDING THE NORTH BEND ZONING MAP AND NORTH BEND MUNICIPAL CODE SECTIONS 18.10.025, 18.10.030 AND 18.10.050 TO CREATE A LIMITED COMMERCIAL OVERLAY DISTRICT IN THE HDR ZONE The full text of the above Ordinances may be viewed on the web at http://northbendwa.gov, at the North Bend City Hall, 211 Main Ave., N. or to request a copy by mail please contact the City Clerk at (425) 888-7627. Posted: October 19, 2011 Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record: October 26, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE #538278 The Snoqualmie Valley School District Board of Directors will hold a Work Session on Thursday, November 3, 2011, 6:00-7:15 p.m., for the purpose of receiving a report on and discussing student enrollment and demographic information. The Work Session will take place in the District Administration Office Boardroom located at 8001 Silva Ave. SE, Snoqualmie, WA. Published: October 26 and November 2, 2011 in the Snoqualmie Valley Record. PUBLIC NOTICE #537952 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS CITY OF NORTH BEND, WA Comprehensive Garbage, Recyclables and Compostables Collection Contract Due Tuesday, January 3, 2012 by 4:30 p.m. Pacific Standard Time (PST) The City of North Bend (“City�) is soliciting Proposals from qualified firms for solid waste collection services. These services include: residential and commercial garbage, recycling and compostables collection, and the processing and marketing of collected recyclables and compostables. The initial contract term will be for seven years and eight months, from June 1, 2012 to February 29, 2020. Interested firms must mail or hand-deliver five (5) paper cop-

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CALENDAR SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

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WEDNESDAY, OCT 26

TALES: Pajamarama Story Time is 6:30 p.m. at North Bend Library, all young children welcome with an adult. COMPUTER HELP: One-onOne Computer Assistance is 6 p.m. at Fall City Library. A KCLS volunteer instructor offers help. ANIME: The teen Anime & Manga Club meets at 3 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. Watch anime movies, eat popcorn and practice your anime drawing. All skill levels

...obituaries In Loving Memory

Bobbi E. Haley

August 4, 1952 – October 16, 2011 Service: Duvall Church - October 29th at 2:00 Following the Service, the Family Welcomes Everyone to Come Celebrate Bobbi’s Life at Vincent’s School House: 810 W. Snoqualmie Valley Road NE, Carnation, WA 98014 Bobbi is survived by her husband Ray Haley, son Raymond Haley, daughter Robin Haley Lindsay, son-in-law Michael Lindsay, granddaughters Haley and Addison Lindsay, mother Alice Allen, sister Terry Allen, and brother Bill McClurg. She had been battling breast cancer for the past 14 years and died at home with Ray by her side. Bobbi was born in Regina, Saskatchewan to Robert and Lois McClurg. She was adopted by Wayne and Alice Allen at the age of 12 where she moved to the U.S. and attended Redmond Jr. High (where she first met Ray). Shortly after graduation from Redmond High School, they got married, Ray joined the service and moved to San Diego where they lived with his brother Joe and Shellie Haley. They then moved to Camp Lejeune, North Carolina and became proud parents to Raymond and Robin Haley. They ended up settling in Duvall where they raised their family and built a home on Lake Margaret. Bobbi went to cosmetology school and became a hair dresser. She had an infectious personality which drew people wanting to be around her. Ray and Bobbi were truly soul mates and along with her children, they all called her their best friend. One of her favorite phrases were “Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away�. She lived an amazing life, always surrounded by family and friends. She loved to travel, hold her grandchildren, laughing until she cried, listening to music, and going to the ocean. Her grandchildren were her pride and joy and undoubtedly kept her so strong and fighting for all of these years. She was the most beautiful, caring, thoughtful, sensitive, strong, loving, giving, wife, mother, grandmother, daughter, sister, aunt we’ve ever known. She was truly an amazing person. Thank you for all of the wonderful memories. You will always and forever be LOVED and MISSED by all. “Until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of his hand� 537739

Place a paid obituary to honor those who have passed away, call Linda at 253.234.3506 paidobits@reporternewspapers.com Paid obituaries include publication in the newspaper and online at www.valleyrecord.com All notices are subject to verification.

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welcome. COMPUTER ASSISTANCE: Do you need extra help on the computer? A KCLS volunteer instructor can give you one-on-one assistance, 1 p.m. at the North Bend Library. NETWORK: Snoqualmie Valley Community Network Board meeting is 6:30 p.m. in the Riverview School District boardroom. LIVE MUSIC: Invitational youth open mic for ages 10-21 is 6 to 8 p.m. at Slider’s Cafe, Carnation. Call (425) 333-0577 to sign up. LIVE MUSIC: Open mic is 7 to 10 p.m. at The Black Dog cafe, Snoqualmie; (425) 831-3647. All ages welcome.

THURSDAY, OCT. 27 THE GREEN BIRD: Oregon Shadow Theatre tells a story with music and shadow puppets, 7 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library for children ages 4 and older with an adult. A boy is transformed into a fortune-telling bird by an evil magician. The performance is held in a dark room and is not appropriate for very young children. GAME ON: Teens can play video games, 3 p.m. at Fall City Library. CHESS GAMES: Snoqualmie Valley Chess Club meets at 7 p.m. at North Bend Library. Learn to play chess or get a game going. All ages and skill levels welcome. STUDY ZONE: Children in grades K-12 can drop in at 4 p.m. at the North Bend Library for free homework help from volunteer tutors. LIVE MUSIC: Adult Acoustic Open Mic is 7 to 9:30 p.m. at Sliders CafĂŠ, Carnation.

FRIDAY, OCT. 28 GAME ON: Teens can play video games, 3 p.m. at the North Bend Library. LIVE MUSIC: Bluegrass band Artichoke Ridge plays at 7:30 p.m. at Sliders CafĂŠ, Carnation. LIVE MUSIC: MAD and Minority Child play at 8 p.m. at The Black Dog, Snoqualmie. All ages welcome.

SATURDAY, OCT. 29 LIVE MUSIC: Halloween party with the Howdy Boys bluegrass band, costume contest is 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Sliders CafĂŠ, Carnation. LIVE MUSIC: Jessica Lynne and Rachel Rae play at 8 p.m. at The Black Dog, Snoqualmie. All ages welcome.

ies and one electronic copy of their proposal to: Duncan Wilson City of North Bend City Administrator 211 Main Ave N P.O. Box 896 North Bend, WA 98045 Responses whether mailed or hand delivered must arrive no later than 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, January 3, 2012 and be contained in a sealed envelope. No submittals will be accepted after that date and time. The City will not be liable for delays in delivery of responses due to handling by the

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Crossword puzzle

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To place a Legal Notice, please call 253-234-3506 or e-mail legals@ reporternewspapers.com

48. Dorm room staple

9. Prison guard, in slang

16. Ancient

US Postal Service or any other type of delivery service. Faxed or emailed submittals shall be rejected. The full RFP and Draft Contract are available online at the City of North Bend website at http:// northbendwa.gov under Public Notices. Posted: October 26, 2011 Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record: October 26 & November 2, 2011

46. Magnetic induction units 53. Method of examining in minute detail (3 wds)

SUNDAY, OCT. 30

PUBLIC NOTICES ...Continued from previous page

Sudoku

60. Clare Booth ___, American playwright

12. “To ___ is human ...� 13. 25th letter 21. Begin (2 wds) 22. Colorado resort 25. Kind of ticket 26. ___ bean 28. Clear, as a disk 29. Hindu queen 30. ___ squash

18. Sundae topper, perhaps

61. ___ dark space (region in a vacuum tube)

19. Auto pioneer Citroen

62. Effort

33. Type of embroidery stitch (2 wds)

20. Habitual procedure (2 wds)

63. Long, long time

34. ___ Today

64. Golden Horde member

36. Branch

23. Determined beforehand

65. Bind

24. Backless seats with three legs

66. Quaker’s “you�

27. Treatment of illness

Down

31. Baby’s first word, maybe

1. ___ at the bit

32. Cottontail’s tail 35. Dash 36. Affectedly creative 37. Unacceptable diplomat (3 wds)

32. Bristles

37. “Check this out!� 38. Care for 39. Role for Dana

2. Work 3. Avoid 4. Unborn offspring 5. Peanut butter choice 6. Dwell

40. Ancient colonnade

7. Arch type

41. ___-friendly

8. Christian name

42. BBs, e.g.

9. Ramshackle hut

43. Adage

10. Complex unit

44. More beneficial to the environment

11. Message transmitted by wireless telegraphy

44. Male goose 45. Heir’s concern 47. ___ Evans, “Dynasty� actress 49. Enthusiastic approval 50. Not smooth 51. Host 52. Corpulent 54. Fastidious 55. Assortment 56. Farm call 57. ___ Tuesday (Mardi Gras) 58. Biochemistry abbr.


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chest pain. EMTs and paramedics ruled out a heart issue. She was able to drive herself to Swedish Hospital in Issaquah for evaluation.

MONDAY, OCT. 17 HEART PROBLEM: At 11:06 a.m., Fall City Fire Department and Bellevue Paramedics responded to the 32900 block of Southeast 42nd Street for a 55-yearold woman experiencing an irregular heart rate. Evaluating EMTs and paramedics ruled out a heart issue. A private ambulance transported her to Swedish Hospital in Issaquah for evaluation.

4BUVSEBZQNr4VOEBZ BN 39025 SE Alpha St. Snoqualmie, WA 98065 rXXXPMPTPSH Rev. Roy Baroma, Priest Administrator .BTTBU4U"OUIPOZ$IVSDI $BSOBUJPO 4VOEBZTBUBN 4QBOJTI.BTTBUQNFWFSZUI4VOEBZ rXXXTUBOUIPOZDBSOBUJPOPSH



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CAR CRASH: At 3:12 p.m., Fall City Fire Department, Eastside Fire and Rescue, and Snoqualmie Fire Department responded to the 38400 block of Southeast North Bend Way for reports

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Prices subject to change without notice - All prices do not include sales tax Snoqualmie Tobacco & Liquor Company promotes the responsible use of Tobacco products. If you are interested in quitting smoking please visit http://www.smokefree.gov/ to learn more about the resources available to you or call 1-800-quit now.

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Come visit us next to the Snoqualmie Casino Store Hours: Open Late 7 Days a week 7am - 10pm Daily SUNDAYS TOO!

Directions:

I-90 Eastbound take Exit 27 turn left (North). Follow North Bend Way around curve.

I-90 Westbound take Exit 31 (North Bend). Follow signs to the reservation.

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GROWS FROM 1 The medical marijuana collective moved to a new space in the same complex, tripling in size. It added a vivid storefront and a range of new products from teas to tinctures, and it just opened a companion business, the Goin Glass Lounge, for which they have high hopes. While other facilities like the GreenLink Collective in Issaquah are being hindered by city moratoriums, and some outside of city limits are struggling, the Kind Alternative simply had to expand, it had so many patients. “We were unable to support ourselves over there,” says Shane, a collective member of the old location. “The waiting room was full, we had

people lined up outside.” He is overwhelmed by this good fortune, and by the support he feels from all of the Snoqualmie Valley. “We’ve never had anything bad come out of the community, there’s been no specific incidence of crime,” he said. “I’ve still only had one person… that was not for us being here.” At the Shell station, however, manager Sung Kim has heard from a different section of the community. Some of his customers were not happy about the arrival of Kind Alternative last spring. They worried about what their children would be exposed to, and potential crime. “Nobody liked it,” Kim said, “but the landlord, it was their decision.” Landlord Y & J Development

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ownsboththeKindAlternative’s former site and its new one, and Shane said they have always welcomed the collective, since before it opened in March. The landlords are currently out of the country, and could not be reached for comment. Community concerns about crime so far have been unfounded, however. Neither the Kind Alternative nor the King County Sheriff’s Office report a growing trend in crimes in the area, and a series of recent home burglaries in Preston appears unrelated. Speaking from personal experience, Kim said “I haven’t noticed anything myself, but I’m kind of worried about (crime).” Security is a priority at the Kind Alternative. Members often used aliases in working

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Kind Alternative member Shane places a bud sample under a magnifying class, so patients can see the quality of the drug. with patients, and no marijuana or cash was kept in the old storefront overnight. Today, the group has a built-in security system, as well as security staff.

The greater security is needed now since the supply of marijuana on hand is larger. Under the state law revised in last spring’s special legislative session, the Kind Alternative is operating as a collective garden. These cooperatives can have up to 10 members, with enough marijuana on hand for their needs, limited to 45 plants, and up to 72 ounces (4.5 pounds) of dried flowers. Keeping within the legal limits can be a challenge, Shane admits. It’s illegal to sell marijuana, even in the collective, but the Kind Alternative can request donations for product, and those donations can include plants, dried flowers, or other marijuana products from members. They sometimes have the opposite problem, too, running low on the drug.

However, Shane said they can usually call another member to fill their needs on short notice. “We’re just helping coordinate people and their collective gardens,” Shane said. “We’re just providing a meeting place for people, really. If they have excess medicine, they can leave it here. If they have certain needs, they can get it here. If they need certain information, we provide it. If they need help in any area, we try to assist them.” The Kind Alternative currently works with five referring doctors, he said, and with other clinics. If a patient needs something that they don’t have, he’s happy to refer them to another collective that might have it. “We’re not afraid to send somebody away from us. We’re here to help people. It’s not about the money,” he said.

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The Goin Glass Lounge opened about two weeks ago next to the collective and will have a grand opening on Saturday, Oct. 29. In front, there’s an ATM, and a glass shop selling a variety of glass pipes, many made by patients. Behind the glass shop is a plush lounge, with warm colors, overstuffed furniture, and a bar, but only for patients of the collective. To get past the swinging doors, visitors must show their valid physician’s recommendation for using marijuana medicinally. Once in, patients can enjoy the relaxed atmosphere, or selfmedicate, using one of the table vaporizers to smokelessly incinerate their drugs and inhale the vapors. Smoking is not allowed in the lounge, but vaporizers enable patients to inhale the drug, still the most effective delivery method. There is also a “bud-tender” on duty to help patients with the vaporizers. “Is that even legal?” wonders Kim, who’d heard that the Kind Alternative was opening a smoking lounge. Smoking marijuana in the lounge would be illegal, Shane says, because smoking anywhere indoors in Washington is. Vaporizing, though, is smokeless, and therefore perfectly legal. It’s healthier, too, claims, bud-tender Danielle. “A lot of doctors say, if you’re going to do it, this is the way to go.” Eventually, collective members hope to use the lounge for support groups, classes, or just to meet with patients and help them determine if medical marijuana will work for them. They’ve also considered accupuncture and massage demonstrations, and other programs focused on patient care. These goals will keep Shane busy, but that’s fine with him. “It’s overwhelming, both good and stress related,” he said. “I’d never think that we’d get this much support. It’s more than I ever imagined, really.”


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1997 Ford Thunderbird LX (26502A) ............ ..$4,971 1990 Lincoln Town Car (26663N) .................. ..$4,995 1997 Eagle Vision TSi sedan (R11551A) ....... ..$5,871 1996 Subaru Legacy AWD (R10794A) ........... ..$6,871 2005 Hyundai Elantra sedan (26294B) ......... ..$6,871 2005 Dodge Neon SXT (26437A) .................. ..$7,271 2004 Mercury Sable LS sedan (26647A) ....... ..$7,871 2003 Oldsmobile Bravada 4x4 (26247P) ...... ..$7,971 2004 Toyota Corolla S sedan (26153D) ........ ..$7,971 1967 Chevrolet El Camino cab (26749A)...... ..$7,995 2003 Chevrolet Venture AWD (4024B).......... ..$7,995 2005 Chevrolet Impala sedan (R11003N)..... ..$8,571 2006 Chevrolet Impala LT 3.5 (26016A) ....... ..$8,871 2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer 4WD (R10863B) .....$8,971 2002 Ford Explorer XLT 4WD (V8745B) ............$8,971 2005 Chevrolet Uplander 4 dr (26613) .......... ..$9,471 2004 Chevrolet Colorado 2 dr cab (26634) .. ..$9,571 2005 Chevrolet Impala sedan (R11081A)..... ..$9,871 2004 Dodge Neon SXT sedan (R11356A) ..... ..$9,871 2006 Ford Freestyle SE SUV (26724A) .......... ..$9,871 2001 Toyota Camry 4 dr sedan (R10560A) ... ..$9,871 2003 Chevrolet Suburban 1500 4x4 (3984A)...$9,971 2005 Pontiac Grand Prix sedan (26510) ....... ..$9,971 2009 Chevrolet Aveo 4 dr sedan (3976N) .... $10,571 2005 Dodge Caravan SE Wagon (V8556N) ......$10,571 2005 Toyota Corolla CE sedan (R11448B)........$10,971 2002 Ford Explorer Ltd 4WD (V8255A)............$11,371 2002 Honda Civic LX sedan (R11382A)............$11,971 2006 Chevrolet Trailblazer 4WD (V4506B) ......$11,971 2006 Chevrolet Impala LT sedan (26661)......... $12,671 2002 Audi A4 Avant Quattro (V8602A) ............ $12,871 2009 Kia Spectra EX sedan (26543) ................. $12,971 2006 Buick LaCrosse CXL 4 dr (26595)............. $13,471 2006 Chevrolet HHR LT 4 dr hatch (26438N) ... $13,871 2008 Chevrolet Uplander LS (26518) ...............$13,871 2003 Chevrolet Avalanche 1500 (26500B) .... $14,771

A DRIVING COMMITMENT

2009 Kia Optima LX sedan (26542) .................$14,771 2009 Ford Focus SE sedan (26497) ..................$14,871 2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee Ltd 4WD (4033A).$14,971 2003 Chevrolet Tahoe 4WD 4 dr (V8553B) .... $15,871 2005 Volvo XC90 AWD SUV (V8206A)..............$15,871 2007 Chevrolet Trailblazer 4x4 (3998A) ..........$15,971 2010 Kia Soul 4 dr wagon (26641) ..................$16,371 2008 Nissan Altima 4 dr sedan (R10959A) ......$16,371 2011 Nissan Versa hatch (26395B)................. $16,871 2006 Pontiac Solstice Roadster (V8294A) ..... $16,971 2010 Mazda 3 sedan (26544) ......................... $16,971 2006 MINI Cooper hatch (R11448P) .............. $16,971 2009 Chevrolet Malibu LT (26540) .................. $17,371 2008 Kia Amanti Sedan 4 dr (26742) .............$17,971 2007 Subaru Outback 4 dr wagon (26253A) . $17,971 2008 Hyundai Santa Fe 4 dr (26431A) ..........$18,871 2004 Ford F-150 SVT Lightning (26586A) .....$19,771 2006 Mustang GT conv (26428A) ..................$19,871 2009 Subaru Legacy AWD sedan (26549) .....$19,871 2008 Cadillac DTS 4 dr sedan (26336A) ..........$21,971 2009 Volkswagen Tiguan SUV (V8166B) .........$22,871 2007 Toyota Tacoma PreRunner (26528A) ......$22,971 2006 Toyota Tacoma dlb cab (V7965B) ...........$24,871 2008 Lexus IS250 AWD 4 dr sedan (26695) ....$25,871 2010 Toyota Prius 4 dr hatch (26698) .............$25,871 2006 Porsche Boxster Cabriolet (V8429N)......$25,971 2007 Nissan Armada 4 dr SUV (26535A).........$26,871 2011 Subaru Legacy Ltd sedan (26492) ..........$26,871 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe 1500 (4009A) ..............$28,971 2008 Infiniti EX35 AWD (26577) ......................$29,871 2008 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 (26785) .........$31,971 2010 Chevrolet Suburban 1500 LS (26692) ....$32,375 2009 Chevrolet Corvette 2 dr cpe (26574) .....$37,171 2010 GMC Sierra 1500 Denali (26472B) .........$42,871 2009 Audi A5 Quattro 2 dr cpe (26700A)........$42,971 2009 Cadillac CTS V 4 dr sedan (4047A)..........$53,871

2011 Chevrolet Equinox

4 cylinder, AWD. Good gas mileage

$

Your Price

25,555*

STK #4045

NEW 2011 Chevrolet Camaro 2SS Convertible, SS/RS, fully loaded

$

Your Price

42,355*

STK #4000

NEW

2011 Chevrolet Malibu

Automatic, bluetooth

$

Your Price

22,850*

STK #4035

NEW

2011 Chevrolet Cruze LS

A/C, CD, tilt steering, ONSTAR, bucket seats, satellite radio

$

Your Price

17,173*

STK #3944

Pre-Owned pricing expires 11/9/2011

*Prices include manufacturer rebate until 11/9/11. Expires 02.04.2011.

CHEVYOUTLET.COM ASK US ABOUT A FREE LOANER CAR

NEW

451193

425.888.0781

CHAPLINS DEPT. CHAPLINS SERVICE SERVICE DEPT

ASK US ABOUT OUR FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY SERVICE

Mon-Fri 8:00am - 5:30pm 4BUBNQN .PO'SJBNQNt4BUBNQN .PO'SJBNQN 4Sat 8:00am-2:00pm SERVICEMOST MOST MAKES MAKES &&MODELS WEWE SERVICE MODELS

WINTER SPECIAL Brake Special

$129

Coolant Front or Rear 95 Flush + TAX

$229

Includes power flush & replacement of fluids

99

Expires Exp 4/13/11 Expires 2/15/11

+ TAX OIL CHANGE SPECIAL

$39

95

r Replace Front Brake Pads or Rear Visit our Brake Shoes r Machine Rotors or Drums quick lube r(Most Check Connections and Lines for Vehicles) Leaks r Adjust Parking Brake r Add Brake Fluid as Needed

WIPER BLADES

Oil changes must be completed at North Bend Chevrolet

Expires 11/9/11

$1500

Packing of wheel bearings caliper/wheel cylinder service additional charge. Includes GM cars and 1/2 ton pickups. Some models may be slightly higher. Non-GM vehicles may incur extra charge. Coupon must be presented when vehicle is dropped off for service. Not good with any other offer. Expires 11/9/2011.

plus Installation Most vechicles

WE’RE E’R REREYOUR ALL YOUR YOURTIRE TIRENEEDS NEED NEEDS WE YOURLOCAL LOCALSOURCE SOURCE FOR FOR ALL 106 Main Ave. N, North Bend • 425-888-0781 • www.chevyoutlet.com

pair


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Snoqualmie Valley Record, October 26, 2011  

October 26, 2011 edition of the Snoqualmie Valley Record