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VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2011 n DAILY UPDATES AT WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM n 75 CENTS

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Staff Reporter

Forecasters say February could be a beast

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erty tax ability from disappearing. “It’s an interesting twist,� says Werner. She loved the positive whirl of last year’s all-ages dance. But this fall’s campaign taps another kind of energy. “The people joining the campaign are enthusiastic. They’re passionate about Si View,� Werner said. “But there’s an edge of nervousness. This will be devastating if it doesn’t pass.� Werner is a leader in the Save Our Si View campaign to restore

Halloween festivities on Mountain Meadows Farm in North Bend could look an awful lot like the start of the zombie apocalypse. The farm will be crawling with blood-spattered undead, slogging through mud, and leaping fire to run after, sometimes ahead of, the living. The prize in this race is not brains or survival, but a medal, a free drink and a party. “The whole thing is just come out and have a good time,� said George Brown, owner of Mountain Meadows Farm which is hosting the first annual Zombie Challenge (www. zombiechallenge.com) on Saturday, Oct. 29. “It’s meant to be a fun start to the Halloween weekend,� Brown added. Like the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Pineapple Express, held at the farm in November, or last summer’s Warrior Dash at Meadowbrook Farm, the Zombie Challenge is a 5K race and obstacle course. Since it’s Halloween weekend, Brown expects people will compete in costume, but it’s not required. “They can come in any costume they want,� he said.

SEE SI VIEW, 6

SEE ZOMBIES, 5

Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Hopefuls for three Snoqualmie Valley School District board positions prepare for a rapid-fire question session Thursday, Oct. 13, at the Mount Si High School auditorium. Speakers, from far left, Geoff Doy and Caroline Loudenback, Carolyn Simpson and Craig Husa, and Stephen Kangas, filling in for Peggy Johnson, and Dan Popp, aired their differences on a number of educational topics and challenges at the PTSA Council-sponsored forum.

Competing visions School board candidates split views on campus, leadership,

Banner snow season, Page 10

WINTER

BY CAROL LADWIG

BY CAROL LADWIG Staff Reporter

Should every school board member support the final decision of the

board, regardless of how they voted on it? Yes, absolutely, came the response. Should student achievement be a factor in teacher evaluations? Again, a full round of yesses. Five of six school board candidates were in overall agreement on some rapid-fire questions put to them during the

Oct. 13 candidate forum at Mount Si High School, but when the moderator reached questions about a proposed freshman campus at Snoqualmie Middle School and support of recent bonds, the unanimous tone disintegrated. SEE BOARD RACE, 3

Saving ‘Our Si View’

INDEX LETTERS 4, 5 8 CALENDAR 8 PUZZLES 17 OBITUARIES CLASSIFIEDS 19, 20 ON THE SCANNER 20

Grassroots campaign ramps up for dual parks district ballot measures BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Vol. 98, No. 21

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Helping at a phone bank, Si View Parks employee Minna Rudd makes a voice-over-IP call to a district resident from her home. While calls can be challenging, Rudd and other dialers with the Save Our Si View campaign often win support.

This time last year, Sara Werner was organizing a “Thriller� flash mob for Si View Metro Parks’ Halloween Carnival. This fall, Werner is managing a different group: The 100-person volunteer effort to mobilize voters and keep the park district’s prop-

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Regional figures to speak at Snoqualmie tourism conference Suzanne Fletcher, Executive Director of the Washington State Tourism Alliance, and Tom Norwalk, President and CEO of the Seattle Convention and Visitors Bureau, will speak at the “Tourism Building Blocks for Washington State� conference and luncheon, noon Friday, Oct. 21, at the TPC Snoqualmie Ridge Clubhouse. This event takes place during the Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce monthly lunch meeting. All are

The cost of cops Carnation’s Prop. 1 would raise taxes to preserve police coverage BY CAROL LADWIG

Look for the 2011-2012 Snoqualmie Valley Resident's Guide and Business Directory in today's Snoqualmie Valley Record. Your year-round reference guide for the latest information about our community

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Staff Reporter

Carnation voters are deciding between saving money or saving police services in the Nov. 8 election. The issue is a 61-cent increase in property tax rates pitted against a one-third cut in police staff. If passed, Proposition 1, would raise the city’s property tax rate to $1.90 per $1,000 of assessed value (to about $570 per year for a $300,000 home, from $387) bringing in about $90,000 to the city for police and public safety. If Proposition 1 fails, the city of Carnation must reduce its police services contract with the city of Duvall by that amount “which would mean an officer,� said CarnationDuvall Police Commander Carey Hert. Carnation currently contracts with Duvall for three police officers, who patrol the city on a varying schedule, Hert said, plus shared administrative costs. Because of the structure of the police shifts and time off, losing one officer from the mix would realistically mean keeping one officer on patrol 12 hours a day, while another is off duty. In other words, Carnation would have a police officer on-duty half the time, explained City Manager Ken Carter. This will be the city’s third attempt in the last four years to increase taxes for police and public safety. In the current budget, public safety is the largest single budget item, accounting for $596,000 of the city’s 1.1 million budget, or 54 percent. Carter noted that public safety included many court costs, not just the police contract, which is estimated at $512,000 next year.

Besides police services, public safety costs include reserving jail beds, prosecutors’ time, and public defenders for citizens who can’t afford attorneys. All of these costs have been increasing, Carter said. “For example, three years ago our district court cost was zero,â€? Carter said. Revenue from fines balanced the costs of prosecution then, but each year since, the costs have increased by about $6,000. “It all adds up...Court costs are the most noticeable.â€? Carter calls the police service his city receives from the Carnation-Duvall department “a doubleedged sword,â€? for that reason. The costs for courts and jails increase as the police make more arrests, but the city benefits from reduced crime. “We were having between one and three DUIs a year under the sheriff’s service,â€? he said, of the city’s contract with the King County Sheriff’s Department before contracting with Duvall in 2004. “Now we have about 16, and that takes more court time to prosecute‌ It’s getting drunk drivers off the street, but boy, it’s spendy.â€? According to the citizens’ supporting statement in the Voters’ Guide, the last time Carnation had only two police on staff, prior to the Duvall contract, the crime rate was three times higher than it is today. In 2004, the city signed an interlocal agreement with Duvall for shared police services, but each city pays for its own officers, cars and equipment. Since then, Carnation has averaged one of the lowest crime rates of any city in the state, along with Duvall. However, in 2008, Carnation began struggling to keep up with the increasing costs of public safety. After much debate, public meetings, and several citizen surveys on budget priorities, the city council voted to put a levy lid lift on the ballot in 2008 and again in 2009. Both narrowly failed. The 2008 vote was 367 to 402, 35 votes short, and in 2009, the margin was even smaller, 223 to 246. SEE POLICE, 22

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Mathematics) curriculum model. Asked about the best ways of implementing statewide curriculum changes, Doy said â&#x20AC;&#x153;The rubber meets the road in the classrooms, so letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ask the teachers.â&#x20AC;? Loudenback agreed that the answer was in helping the teachers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You support a good team,â&#x20AC;? she said. To address the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funding inequityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Snoqualmie Valley receives the fifth least amount of state funding of all the 295 school districts in Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Doy said â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every dollar that we can focus (in the classroom), thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what we need to do.â&#x20AC;? However, Loudenback said it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily bad to receive less state funding, which often comes with additional spending requirements. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good teaching is good teaching,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t about the money.â&#x20AC;?

New campus At the Simpson-Husa table, Gillette asked for the candidates opinions on the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed annexation of Snoqualmie Middle School as a freshman campus of Mount Si High School. Simpson strongly opposed the idea, saying â&#x20AC;&#x153;High school overcrowding issues are not imminent,â&#x20AC;? and calling on the district to honor the votersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wishes when, in 2008, they voted to make Snoqualmie Valley a three middle-school district. Husa stated that the board was reconsidering the decision currently. He still supported the original idea and the twoyear process that originated it, although the timing may not be right now. On whether the school

Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

School board challenger Geoff Doy talks with PTSA member Sarah Burns during an Oct. 13 candidate forum. board has a role in the Day of Silence, Simpson stated that no single cause should have its own day, particularly not in late April when seniors are preparing for exams and finishing up senior projects. She did support a fall-based â&#x20AC;&#x153;Day of Respectâ&#x20AC;? that could focus on all causes, along with yearround teaching of respect. Husa stressed that the event was student-led and the board had no involvement, other than to protect all studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; constitutional rights. He later added that teaching students about respect and diversity should never be limited to a single day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why do bonds fail?â&#x20AC;? drew a response from Simpson about voters soured by unrealistic enrollment projections, and confidence that when the district can truly demonstrate the need for another bond, the voters will support it, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but we need to make sure that our facts are strong, and our assumptions are reasonable,â&#x20AC;? she said. Husa noted that almost no school bonds were

Grange auction, musical evening is Oct. 22 Sallal Grange hosts a fundraiser night with food, live music and a silent auction, 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, at the grange hall, 12912 432nd Ave. S.E., North Bend. The event features an auction, raffle, live music by Down the Road and David Ayers, appetizers, desserts, beer and wine. Auction items include dinner at the Herbfarm Restaurant, a custom built BMX bike, a smoked turkey Thanksgiving dinner and locally-grown beef. Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 at the door, and are available at the Nursery at Mount Si, Twedeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cafe, Carmichaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s True Value Hardware and other locations. To learn more, visit www.sallalgrange.org.

Lions Club hosts inaugural dinner The newly formed Mount Si Lions Club holds an inaugural winemakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dinner, Thursday, Oct. 20 at Boxleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place, 101 W North Bend Way. The fundraiser includes a silent auction, with a preview of auction items at 5 p.m., and the four-course wine dinner begins at 6 p.m. Live music by the Syd Potter Quartet will follow the dinner. Tickets are $45, on sale at Boxleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Hauglie Insurance Agency offices in Fall City or Snoqualmie, Toadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Coffee and Flowers in North Bend, or online at www.mountsilionsclub.com. The Lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club is also seeking donations, volunteers, or members. For more information, send e-mail to mountsilions@gmail.com, or call (425) 831-5721.

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During the second, extended response portion of the forum, the candidates became sharply divided on points of leadership, spending priorities, impact fees, and including community members in school processes. Geoff Doy of North Bend called for well-trained teachers and well-funded classrooms above all else. His District 2 opponent Caroline Loudenback, also of North Bend, directed attention to all of the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s successes, and how they were accomplished. Carolyn Simpson of Snoqualmie emphasized the need for the district to have a strategic plan in her comments, while her opponent and incumbent for director District 3, Craig Husa of Fall City, referred to the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision statement, and existing policies and priorities that governed his actions on the board. Dan Popp, of Redmond, the current school board president, took a personal and humorous approach in talking about his involvement with the school, and his trust in the curriculum experts the district has hired. His approach complemented that of Steven Kangas, who stood in for District 5 candidate Peggy Johnson, who read her written statements. Johnson, of Fall City, was unable to attend the forum because of an out-of-town commitment made months earlier, Kangas said. About 100 community members attended the forum, organized by the Snoqualmie Valley PTSA Council, to hear the candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; views on various issues. Rivals for a board seat were each asked the same randomly-selected question and given two minutes to respond; however, each pair of rivals was asked a different question for each round. Moderator Heather Gillette, WSPTA Region 2 director, led the questions, asking Doy and Loudenback how they would stop the downward trend in district math scores. Both candidates responded that the decline wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t truly a trend. Doy said it varied with age level and at times, depended on the schools the students attended. Some schools had much stronger math scores, and Doy felt a sharing of best practices between those schools and the others would create much-needed improvement in scores. Loudenback added that the district is already working on several programs to improve both math and science courses, including Career & Technical Education classes. The district is also working toward a STEM (Science Technology Engineering and

approved in the past year, in a clear sign that voters were responding to the economy, although the need for a new building was there. The first question to Kangas and Popp was whether theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d support increasing the percentage of 8th graders taking algebra from its current 50 percent. Reading Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statement, Kangas said math class sizes are too large for some students to be successful. More teachers would give students individual attention, leading to more success, leading to more 8th graders in algebra. Popp agreed that class sizes were too large, and he wanted to see more 8th graders in algebra. He also felt that the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility in this matter was â&#x20AC;&#x153;to invest in the right curriculum.â&#x20AC;? To a related question about the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role in setting curriculum Kangas said the board should seek more parent and teacher input, focus on methodology, and eliminate â&#x20AC;&#x153;busywork.â&#x20AC;? Popp felt the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role was in oversight, and the final decision should be left to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;experts,â&#x20AC;? the teachers. Candidates agreed that board members should take a lead role to improve education funding statewide, but differed on the city of Snoqualmieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s withholding of impact fees from the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Johnson thought the city was reasonable to want the fees recalculated, and Popp asserted that the city needed to â&#x20AC;&#x153;step upâ&#x20AC;? and pay. â&#x20AC;&#x153;School districts donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t create growth, but they are tasked with being responsible for every student who comes from growth,â&#x20AC;? he said. The full text of each candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; response is available for download at www.svptsacouncil.org.

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BOARD RACE FROM 1


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SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

LETTERS

Going behind â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;closed doorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Letters to the Editor The Snoqualmie Valley Record welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should be 250 words or fewer, signed and include a city of residence and a daytime phone number for verification. The Record reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Letters should be addressed to:

Letters to the Editor The Snoqualmie Valley Record PO Box 300, Snoqualmie, WA 98065 or email to editor@valleyrecord.com Opinions expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the position of the Snoqualmie Valley Record. Letters should be received by noon on Fridays prior to publication.

VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

1VCMJTIFS William Shaw

wshaw@valleyrecord.com

&EJUPS Seth Truscott struscott@valleyrecord.com



Thank you for your recent editorial regarding the Open Public Meetings Act and the importance of e-mail communications between public officials on matters related to public business. I would also like to thank Jodi Warren and city officials for her foresight on this issue, and the Valley Record for emphasizing the importance of this issue. The evolution of technology has made written communication between individuals, whether personal or business related, subject to scrutiny. Although disclaimers can be placed on e-mails, there is no telling once an e-mail is sent, who it may be forwarded to. Public officials need to understand that e-mails between them are considered matters of public business and are no different than having a meeting behind closed doors. In some cases, e-mails regarding matters of public business are considered public records and can be requested via a public information request. If you ever have a concern about a matter that interests you, I highly suggest making a request for the e-mail information associated with the topic. You may be surprised by what you find. In some cases, you may be surprised at how much business is actually conducted, planned or strategized behind â&#x20AC;&#x153;closed doorsâ&#x20AC;? (or, in this case, computers). Laurie Gibbs Snoqualmie

Mayor supports Si View ballot measures Even though Snoqualmie is outside of the Si View Metropolitan Park Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boundaries, I appreciate the services offered by our sister park agency. I sincerely hope that it does not become the next casualty of this economic recession. In addition to providing recreational programming in partnership with the city of Snoqualmie, the Snoqualmie Valley MPD operates our only swimming pool in the Snoqualmie Valley and offers a wide array of activities for people of all ages and abilities. Unfortunately, the economic decline and associated drop in property values will make it essentially impossible for the Si View MPD to operate if voters donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t act on November 8. With the formula in state law that puts the park district at the bottom of the pecking order when levy rates are adjusted, the park district is in very real danger.

The park district will lose 84 percent of its funding without an affirmative vote of the people for Si View Metropolitan Park District Propositions 1 and 2. Clearly, that kind of cut cannot be absorbed by any government agency. Services will cease. The pool will close. Multitudes of Snoqualmie Valley families will suffer. By voting yes on Propositions 1 and 2, taxes will not be increased, but funding can be secured so these negative impacts can be avoided. Propositions 1 and 2 seek to maintain the current level of funding that support Si View MPD and honor the 71 percent of voters who approved the funding and formation of the park district in 2003. I urge everyone to support the Si View MPDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ballot issues in November. Matthew R. Larson Mayor, City of Snoqualmie

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not lose our law enforcement My immediate gut reaction was to reach for the hunting rifle, channel the Libertarian ideals I inherited from my grand-pappy and yell â&#x20AC;&#x153;No more property taxes!â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let the bad guys

come! Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll fill their bellies full of lead!â&#x20AC;? I was just asked to put a sign in my yard supporting Carnationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s upcoming levy lid lift, a proposition that would raise our property taxes $14 dollars a month (for a $250,000 home), but without which, Carnation would lose one third of its police force. Yes, that is one officer. The last time we only had two officers, we had three times the crime rate that we do now. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to see the levy lift as just another footnote in the big book of national politicsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the old battle of tax cuts against social services. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not. It is real, it matters to our town, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our police officers that we could lose. On top of potential home invasions, there are some things like drug busts that citizens like me arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trained to do. If my child ends up on meth or cocaine because we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t willing to pay for drug enforcement in my neighborhood, then Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be left wondering why I was willing to pay to go to Red Robin one night a month but not pay half that much for the police to take care of drugs in our town. SEE LETTERS, 5

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homecoming week. What is this week all about?

3FQPSUFS Carol Ladwig cladwig@valleyrecord.com

$SFBUJWF%FTJHOWendy Fried wfried@valleyrecord.com

"EWFSUJTJOH David Hamilton "DDPVOU dhamilton@valleyrecord.com &YFDVUJWF  $JSDVMBUJPO Patricia Hase %JTUSJCVUJPO circulation@valleyrecord.com .BJM10#PY  4OPRVBMNJF 8" 1IPOF 'BY XXXWBMMFZSFDPSEDPN $MBTTJGJFE"EWFSUJTJOH 800.388.2527 4VCTDSJQUJPOT $29.95 per year in King County, $35 per year elsewhere $JSDVMBUJPO425.241.8538 or 1.888.838.3000 The Snoqualmie Valley Record is the legal newspaper for the cities of Snoqualmie, North Bend and Carnation. Written permission from the publisher is required for reproduction of any part of this publication. Letters, columns and guest columns do not necessarily reflect the views of the Snoqualmie Record. PROUD SUPPORTER OF SNOQUALMIE VALLEY HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, SNOQUALMIE VALLEY SCHOOLS FOUNDATION, ENCOMPASS, MOUNT SI HELPING HAND FOOD BANK

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Basically itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a big dance where everybody gets together and has fun. Personally, I think Homecoming Week is a little long, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still fun.â&#x20AC;? Amanda Hagen North Bend

â&#x20AC;&#x153;School spirit, coming together, having fun. When you go to Homecoming, you tend to come back every year.â&#x20AC;? Maura Williams North Bend

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just about school spirit, the tradition of it is a lot of fun. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decorating the hallway, the royalty, the dance, and the football game.â&#x20AC;? Megan Ferkovich Snoqualmie

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an excuse to have a good time with all our friends and dress up nice, which we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get to do very often. And I get to take a beautiful girl (Homecoming Princess Sarah McDonald).â&#x20AC;? Reece Karalus (Jester), North Bend


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Bree Loewen Carnation

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with all the tobacco ads? Would you please explain why it is that the Snoqualmie Valley Recordâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which claims to be a youth, family and community oriented newspaperâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; would last week feature a twopage tobacco advertisement? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a little confused: is there

Bill Hayden Snoqualmie

Actions speak louder than words On November 8, three school board positions are up for re-election. The results of that election could change the face and focus of the Snoqualmie Valley School District as we know it. The last school bond would have helped the district address overcrowding in our upper grades by building a new Snoqualmie Middle School on the Ridge, making way for the current SMS to become a future freshman campus for Mount Si High School. It didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t passâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;we were shy one vote. Of Valley residents, 59.99 percent voted in favor of the bond, and 81.9 percent of Ridge residents voted yes on the bond. Ridge residents even spearheaded collection of funds for a recount in our tightest election to date. Several candidates challenging current school board members did not support the bond. Carolyn Simpson was a prominent speaker against the bond at both school board meetings and in chat groups. Depending on how many were swayed by her words, there alone we could have had a different bond election result. Additionally,shedidnotsupport the redistricting boundaries re-drawn this spring for school board members. She and a few others presented a â&#x20AC;&#x153;citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; planâ&#x20AC;? that would unseat two current board

members and create a new seat for which, conveniently, she would be eligible. The district listenedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;some aspects of the citizenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan made sense and were incorporated. Regardless of the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show of collaboration, Simpson filed a legal review of the redistricting boundary decision. This review will require manpower, time and money, all of which are incredibly lean resources in our school district. Causing money, time and energy to be funneled away from our students with needless litigation and not supporting a bond your community fought hard to pass does not stack up to community representationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; or even more important, student representation. The school board is meant to represent all of the SVSD. Board members should have the needs and priorities of all the different communities in mind when making critical decisions about curriculum, programs and school facilities. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about one communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs, or pushing personal agendasâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a position that requires a collaborative and community-minded representative. We have all of that

and more with our current school board. When you ask where they are from, they say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Snoqualmie Valley School Districtâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;not just the quadrant they are districted to represent. They are a well-oiled team, and despite different views or concerns, they come together and have done more with less than ever before. Their approach, relationships and trust with staff and communities are invaluable. In the past few years, the fruits of their labor of love for our students have emerged in many forms: Virtual Academy, the TOSA model, REMS Grant, Student Representatives to the Board, Principal interviews, STEM, Staff Instructional Rounds, Leadership Academy for Principals, etc. Please do your research, know who you are voting for and what they value. The challengers may be articulate and convincing in their arguments, but their actions speak louder than any of their words. Our children deserve the bestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; they deserve the current school board. Re-elect Caroline, Craig and Dan! Anne Stedman North Bend

ZOMBIES FROM 1 â&#x20AC;&#x153;but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very large number of people interested in zombie activities.â&#x20AC;? Zombie walks have become increasingly popular throughout the country, and the website seattlezombie.com lists dozens of zombie fun and games for the month. Capitalizing on another trend, Brown and his son, owner of event coordinator Amazing Events, are also planning a Ninja Dash for next spring. Similar to the Zombie Challenge, the race will be more competitive and, of course, there will be ninjas. Both races will be accommodated entirely on the farm grounds, with free parking, changing areas, hosing-off facilities, and all of the amenities. After hosting the parking for the Warrior Dash in July, and hearing some of the feedback from the event that brought 23,000 competitors into North Bend, Brown said â&#x20AC;&#x153;We thought â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;you know, we can do this better,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; So weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll give them a better course, better beer, and free parking.â&#x20AC;? The course will take advantage of the natural topography of the farm to offer obstacles, Brown said, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;a challenging but doable course, for anybody, in any condition.â&#x20AC;? Some of the challenges include a natural â&#x20AC;&#x153;slip â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n slideâ&#x20AC;? to climb, the aforementioned fire, â&#x20AC;&#x153;significant water obstacles,â&#x20AC;? and lots of mud puddles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get mud early, mud late, and mud in the middle,â&#x20AC;? Brown says, confidently. When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re done, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also get a free beer, free food, and a free party to enjoy throughout the day. In addition to the medals, Brown said prizes would be awarded to the best finishing time, and the best costume. Admission to the race is $60, and Brown said a portion of the proceeds will be donated to a charity. Registration for the event is limited to 4,000 participants. For more information, visit www.zombiechallenge.com, or http://amazingeventsllc.vpweb.com.

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Shoot, if my garage gets broken into, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to have to dedicate the time and effort to investigate it, I just want the perp caught. And Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m certainly not going to be chasing down any speeders, breaking up domestic disputes or going after car prowlers. And if something really big and bad happened, I would want someone to handle it who not only has a gun, but who has better aim than I do. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just vital to keeping my family and my town safe. So after much soul searching, I will vote â&#x20AC;&#x153;yesâ&#x20AC;? for the levy lid lift, because I think police are a good idea, and worth funding to give us a minimum level of safety. I know that times are tough. My family is down to one incomeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in construction. But the question now is: Do we want our town to be unsafe for our children? Do we want our streets to be dangerous? Our houses broken into? Vigilante justice isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the answer, either. Having a police force is. I will vote to pay the property tax increase.

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Fresh perspectives from dueling challengers Q&A with Piper Muio and Ryan Kolodejchuk, candidates for North Bendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s council position 7

W

ith North Bendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Position 7 councilman Chris Garcia vacating his seat this fall, two challengers are facing off for the right to take the council job, effective immediately after the vote is certified. North Bend landscape contractor Ryan Kolodejchuk (pronounced â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call-a-day-chuckâ&#x20AC;?) hopes to bring a great optimism about the future of the city to the job, plus some tenacity at finding facts to solve problems. He says the city could be more business friendly and needs to pursue more grant funding, and hopes to make these changes part of his legacy. Planning Commissioner Piper Muoio (pronounced â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mew-yoâ&#x20AC;?) hopes to bring a fresh perspective to the North Bend City Council. She feels her professional background in process improvement and customer service will serve her well on the council, as she works toward economic development and growth for the city.

Election 2011

North Bend City Council

Ryan Kolodejchuk

Piper M. Muoio

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your background?

What is your background?

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in North Bend for six years, and my wife and I moved to the Valley in 1989, and we love it. We have three children, who have gone or are going through the school system. I know the Valley, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been here 22 years. I(â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ve) supported the local community long-term. I have an award-winning landscaping company, Landwork Enterprises, Inc., and we are in our 25th year of business. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the owner and president.

I have lived in King County for 13 years, in North Bend for five of those years. I have over 20 years of experience as a business and IT professional, working for both public and private companies around the world. I currently work as a consultant for Microsoft, deploying support tools for the Xbox Customer Support Team. I have served on the North Bend Planning Commission for two-plus years.

RYAN KOLODEJCHUK

What are your qualifications for a seat on the council? My ability to dig for information and get the facts, because I have to do this on a daily basis. Being in business for myself, I have a new boss every week. When I go out to meet these clients to give them estimates, I need to be able to hear their wants, likes, and dislikes, and what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to take to solve the problem. The most important thing is, I need to be able to do it within their budget. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve served on the North Bend Parks Commission, presently on the North Bend Parks Foundation. I was on the team that extended the ULID when Tanner was annexed. Most recently I was with Friends of Fire District 38, to get the new fire station. That was just active community membersâ&#x20AC;Ś and we got it done. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m also a Eucharistic minister with the local Catholic church, and consulted with community members on reconstructing the soccer fields at Torguson Park after the sewer extension. I think I know the needs of the community.

What is the primary reason you are running for office? To help the community even more. I can see that having a vote that will countâ&#x20AC;Ś more than as a volunteer. Because it is a paid position, if I see something in the administration I disagree with, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to disagree, whether Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m right or wrong, because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m paid to do. Being in a volunteer position, you have to roll with the punches.

How would you bring jobs to the city? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a business owner, I know about competition. To encourage growth, you need business. If you look at the new annexation area out on North Bend Way, all that (is) commercially zoned property. If thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s their long-term plan, then we need to encourage business.

What other challenges do you see for the city in the coming year? I would like to see them be looking for more grant money. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of grant money out there. I think they really need to be focused on that. Look what the city of Duvall has done, look what the city of Snoqualmie has done, with grant money. That is huge. North Bend has started the process, but I think they need to be looking more directly into that... The downtown bypass is huge, I think they need to get going on that.

I have over seven years of experience in providing community and public services, as a board member (VP & Treasurer) for numerous homeownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; associations, and as a current member of the North Bend Planning Commission.

What is the primary reason you are running for office? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to expand my role in the decision-making process beyond my activities on the planning commission. My expertise in other areas will be encompassed through a seat on the city council, including financial management, operations and general economic development.

How would you bring jobs to the city? The key to bringing jobs is getting to a stable economy. The challenge is how the city can encourage and support new and existing business owners, as well as up-and-coming entrepreneurs. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to think I can bring new ideas for growing the downtown corridor.

How would you resolve infrastructure issues? I am hopeful that my fresh ideas can help bring a new perspective and subsequently new ways to resolve current issues.

What other challenges do you see for the city in the coming year? For our city as others, economic development. We need to look at how we can help current business owners be successful... in the downtown corridor, for their own benefit, but also as a benefit to our citizens and visitors. We need to figure out how to make the downtown a destination.

What is the role of a council member? I see the council member position as a moderator and facilitator for the voice of the citizens of North Bend. It is of upmost importance to me that I act in a manner where citizens feel comfortable sharing their views on city issues with me, so I may consider those views in making decisions as a council member.

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What are your qualifications for a seat on the city council?

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something your neighbors may not know about you?

What do you see as the role of a council member? Asking the hard questions. It comes down to the facts, not speculation, not emotion.... Also, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re stewards. For this council position, this short period on earth, we are stewards. What are we doing for the long-term benefit of the community?

PIPER M. MUOIO


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SI VIEW FROM 1 tax levy ability to the eightyear-old independent parks district. Because of falling property values, tax cap laws mean that Si Viewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s levy will be cut by 84 percent, from 53 cents per $1,000 in assessed value to 9 cents, without voter action. Two ballot measuresâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Prop. 1, a measure to preserve 25 cents of the levy, and Prop. 2, a temporary 1-year restoration of the remainderâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; would put the district back on its feet, preserving programming. Passage of just one measure shrinks programming options. If both measures fail, Si View would essentially become little more than a caretaker for its 70 year old building, Executive Director Travis Stombaugh says. Neither of the propositions would raise Si Viewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax share.

Two budgets Working last week to draw up two separate budgets, Stombaugh will present his financial plan for 2012 to the Si View board of commissioners this Wednesday. One plan assumes that both propositions pass Nov. 8. One assumes that only Prop. 1, with its easier 50 percent majority, will pass. The smaller budget would

make about $470,000 in cuts. Stombaugh proposes to do that by leaving empty positions unfilled, postponing planning and maintenance, and cutting training and tuition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to spread it so that customers would have the least impact,â&#x20AC;? he said. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important, because user fees make up an increasing share of the budget at Si View. While tax revenues subsidize 36 percent of programs and 25 percent of capital funds, the tax cap is being hit at a time when use, and revenues, at Si View are on the rise. Use tripled between 2007 and 2010. Last year, Si View had 110,000 visitors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been growing through earned revenue,â&#x20AC;? Stombaugh said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we can keep our programs going, we can keep that up.â&#x20AC;? Si View has 11 full-time workers and about 40 seasonal staff. Failure of both measures would mean the staff would shrink to little more than a director and a maintenance person. In the event of a total bond failure, Stombaugh expects the pool to close. The beforeand after-school programs, summer camps, youth basketball, adult softball, the annual Halloween and holiday parties and the Si View Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market and summer concerts would also be on the chopping block. There would be fewer staff to help with the Festival

at Mount Si. Most remaining programs would have to be volunteer-based.

Many programs As a contracted dance teacher for Si View, Werner, like all Si View staff, canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t advocate for the measures while on the job. Public disclosure laws limit Si View employees in the use of park district resources to push the voteâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for example, campaigners will be on the sidewalk along Orchard Street, not in the gym, touting Props 1 and 2 during Si Viewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oct. 29 Halloween carnival. Still, the historic community center and the programs it hosts have become symbols of what is at stake. At an Oct. 4 town hall meeting on the measures, hundreds of colored sheets of paper plastered Si Viewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s multipurpose room. Each sheet listed one of the roughly 300 programs and services that Si View provides. Werner and her fellow campaigners are clear about what would happen if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get out the vote. The Halloween carnival, and many other programs, too, could go away. She stresses the need to pass both propositions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to affect all of us,â&#x20AC;? Werner said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use the building itself, your neighbors will feel it. And you will feel it.â&#x20AC;?

Si View Props

In Brief

King County has a $5.90per-$1,000 cap on nonvoted property taxes. As property values have fallen in the county, tax rates have climbed to accommodate existing levies; Since levy amounts donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shrink, rates rise to accommodate. In one of Si Viewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s four separate taxing districts, that cap was hit in 2011 by a rising county rate. As a consequence, Si View lost the ability to levy taxes. Two ballot measures in the November 8 election are aimed at restoring that ability. Proposition 1 would exempt 25 cents of Si Viewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 53-cent levy from the cap, and requires a 50 percent majority at the polls. Proposition 2 preserves the remaining levy amount through a one-year operations and maintenance levy, and requires a 60 percent â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;supermajorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to pass. Si View parks district includes residents of the greater North Bend area as well as parts of King County adjacent to Snoqualmie city limits. t-FBSONPSFBCPVUUIF Save our Si View campaign at www.facebook. com/pages/Save-Our-SiView/170381599703698

Benson Barn to host Harvest Carnival The Benson Barn near North Bend hosts a Family Harvest Carnival, 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23, sponsored by the Mount Si Lutheran Church. The day includes a costume contest, pumpkin carving, chili cookoff, lots of carnival games, Halloween-themed crafts and music. Admission is free, but guests are welcome to bring a non-perishable food item to donate to the Mount Si Food Bank. To get there, follow North Bend Way east, turn onto Cedar Falls Way, then turn right (south) on Maloney Grove/424th Avenue S.E. Follow 424th Avenue, passing under Interstate 90. The Benson Barn is just past the freeway overpass. Follow the scent of hot dogs and chili.

Holiday Bazaar is Oct. 22 at Senior Center Snoqualmie Valley Hospital Auxiliary holds its annual Holiday Bazaar, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, at the Mount Si Senior Center in North Bend. Look for crafts for Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas; a white elephant table; and lots of homemade baked goods. Mount Si Senior Center is located at 411 Main Ave. S., North Bend.

Cascade Theatre airs â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Casablanca Casablancaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cascade Community Theatre will perform an original musical comedy, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Casablanca Casablanca, A Movie Musical,â&#x20AC;? at Cedarcrest High School, 29000 N.E. 150th Street, Duvall. Performances are October 20 and 22 at 7:30 p.m., and Oct. 23 at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for students and seniors, or $48 for a family ticket. Tickets are available at Brown Paper Tickets, Event ID 197881. Discounts are available for advance purchase. For more information go to www.cascadecommunitytheatre. org. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CCT season includes a holiday presentation of â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Christmas Story,â&#x20AC;? by Jean Shepherd, a spring showing of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oliver!â&#x20AC;? by Lionel Bart, and the traditional summer show, an irreverent adaptation of Shakespeare, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twelfth Night.â&#x20AC;?

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CALENDAR SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

Crossword puzzle

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19

Sudoku

ANIME: The teen Anime & Manga Club meets at 3 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. All skill levels welcome. TALES : Young Toddler Story Time is 9:30 a.m. at Snoqualmie Library, for ages 6 to 24 months with an adult. TALES : Preschool Story Time is 10:30 a.m. at Snoqualmie Library, for ages 3 to 6 with an adult TALES: Pajamarama Story Time is 6:30 p.m. at North Bend Library, all young children welcome with an adult. LIVE MUSIC: Open mic is 7 to 10 p.m. at The Black Dog, Snoqualmie. All ages welcome; (425) 831-3647.

THURSDAY, OCT. 20

See answers, page 17

















































































































































    

GAME ON: Teens can play video games, 3 p.m., Fall City Library. TALES: Pajama Story Time is 7 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library, all young children welcome with adult. CHESS GAMES: Snoqualmie Valley Chess Club meets at 7 p.m. at North Bend Library. Learn to play chess or get a game going. All ages and skill levels welcome. STUDY ZONE: Children in grades K-12 can drop in at 4 p.m. at the North Bend Library for free homework help from volunteer tutors.

Across 1. Site of 1956 Summer Games 10. Sorcerers 15. Once more (2 wds) 16. Related maternally 17. Suspends in the air 18. Full range 19. â&#x20AC;&#x153;-zoicâ&#x20AC;? things 20. Cutlet? 21. Litmus reddeners 22. Renal calculus (2 wds) 25. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gimme ___!â&#x20AC;?

FRIDAY, OCT. 21 GAME ON: Teens can play games, 3 p.m., North Bend Library. LIVE MUSIC: Blues and Barbecue is 7 at The Black Dog, Snoqualmie. All ages welcome; (425) 831-3647.

SATURDAY, OCT. 22 BOOK SIGNING: Local author Jerry Mader will present and

(start of an Iowa State cheer) (2 wds) 28. Dust remover 29. Clickable image 30. Present 32. Intermittently (3 wds) 36. Computer info 37. Despotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s duration 39. Length x width, for a rectangle 40. Female employee (2 wds) 42. Academy Award 43. Dressing ingredient

44. Juliet, to Romeo 46. Absorbed, as a cost 47. Unrestrained 51. Kiss 52. Charged particles 53. Alternative to acrylics 57. Express 58. Italian restaurant 60. Change, as a clock 61. Having high regard 62. Amount of hair 63. Female clairvoyants

Down 1. Blemish 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... happily ___ afterâ&#x20AC;? 3. Bulgarian units of money 4. Lively 5. ___ grass 6. Land on Lake Victoria 7. Popularity of TV program based on audience poll 8. Bridget Fonda, to Jane

sign copies of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saving the Soil,â&#x20AC;? his new book on Valley farms, 7 to 9 p.m. at Duvall Books. LIVE MUSIC: Monster Halloween Bash & Costume Party with

9. Lifting to heaven with praise 10. Measure of explosive power 11. Tropical constrictors 12. Street urchin 13. Short composition for a solo instrument 14. Adjusts, as a clock 23. Anger 24. Computer picture 25. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No ifs, ___ ...â&#x20AC;? 26. Wyle of â&#x20AC;&#x153;ERâ&#x20AC;?

27. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gotten ___ you?â&#x20AC;? 31. Crowning achievements 32. Black gold 33. Boat in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jawsâ&#x20AC;? 34. Accomplishment 35. Charge 37. Baltic capital 38. Religious recluses 41. Dark red gemstones 42. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ momentâ&#x20AC;? 44. Kind of seat

45. Heavy overcoat 47. Certain berth 48. Bing, bang or boom 49. 1962 and 1990 Tony winner Robert 50. Sentences 51. Breed 54. Western blue flag, e.g. 55. Ancestry 56. Declines 59. Athletic supporter? (golf)

Professor Fred Hopkins is 8 p.m. at The Black Dog, downtown Snoqualmie. All ages welcome. Call the Black Dog at (425) 831-3647.

LOOK

for theâ&#x20AC;Ś



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GET READY for

PLAN NOW, SAVE TIME LATER Banner snow season, Page 10 Forecasters say February could be a beast

Read the warning signs, Pages 11, 12 Winter storm, flood alerts: What do they mean?

Think ahead for flood safety, Page 13 What to do before, during and after high water

Insurance essentials, Page 14 Lower your risk with early flood coverage

Your winter health, Page 15 Chiropractor offers tips to be safe, have fun

PUBLISHED AS A SUPPLEMENT TO THE SNOQUALMIE VALLEY RECORD


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Wet start, banner snow season for coming winter

Find, fill sandbags when you need them

AccuWeather forecasters are predicting a fairly typical start to the coming winter. But western Washington residents may have to gear up for a frigid February. In February, a core of cold weather is predicted to shift westward over the northern Rockies with colder-than-normal conditions extending all the way to the Washington and Oregon coasts. Not too far away, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia, are predicted to have one of their top three coldest winters in the past 20 years, according to AccuWeather.com Expert Senior Meteorologist and Canadian blogger Brett Anderson. Although February is expected to be a drier month for Seattle and Portland, chances for any snow events would be highest during this month with the colder air in place. In contrast, the earlier part of the season is forecast to feature more moderate temperatures that average near normal. December is likely to be a wetter month for both cities with aboveaverage precipitation. Near-normal precipitation is predicted for January. As for the Cascades, the Long-Range Forecasting Team anticipates nearto slightly above-normal snowfall this season. AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist and Western Expert Ken Clark said this could be a â&#x20AC;&#x153;banner snow seasonâ&#x20AC;?for some of these areas.

When high water threatens, residents can protect their property with sandbags. Bags are typically made available during floods by several agencies in the Valley. Pick-up locations include:

Carnation Old Public Works Shop site, corner of Myrtle Street and McKinley Avenue

Fall City Preston-Snoqualmie Trail parking lot at Lake Alice Road Southeast and Southeast 56th Place

North Bend Public Works Shop, 1155 East North Bend Way Sandbags and sand are available weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. It is a self-service operation, shovels are available. Check in with the office before bagging. Sandbags are available after hours when the Emergency Operations Center is open.

Who to call for help

Snoqualmie City property at Railroad Avenue Southeast and Southeast King Street Currently available only by request. Call Snoqualmie Public Works for an appointment to pick up sand and sandbags, (425) 831-4919.

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'FEFSBM&NFSHFODZ .BOBHFNFOU"HFODZ www.fema.gov 1-800-621-FEMA (3362)

$JUZPG/PSUI#FOE Main office: (425) 888-1211 Public works: (425) 888-0486

,JOH$PVOUZ'MPPE8BSOJOH $FOUFS 1-800-768-7932 or (206) 296-8200

$JUZPG$BSOBUJPO Main office: (425) 333-4192 Public works: (425) 333-4484

3FHJPOBM1VCMJD*OGPSNBUJPO /FUXPSL www.rpin.org

/BUJPOBM'MPPE*OTVSBODF 1SPHSBN www.floodsmart.gov 1 (888) 379-9531

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Prepare for winter in the Northwest Understand the warning system, then get your family, home and vehicle ready for all conditions

W

inter storms in the Northwest can range from drizzly days to heavy rains. We can experience moderate snow over a few hours or blizzard conditions in our mountain passes. The time to prepare is before the rain, snow, or ice starts. First, make sure you understand the warning terms:

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Terry O’Brien of Snoqualmie scoops out his sidewalk after a snowy night. Valley residents should prepare for winter conditions by stocking up on supplies for the car and home.

t4UPSNXBUDI A winter storm watch indicates severe winter weather Be prepared! may affect your area. Before cold weather hits, make sure you have a way t4UPSNXBSOJOH to heat your home safely during a power outage. Keep A winter storm warning indicates severe winter weather a multi-purpose, dry-chemical fire extinguisher nearby conditions are definitely on the way or may be occurring. when using alternative heating sources. Keep extra blankets on hand with extra batteries, t#MJ[[BSEXBSOJOH matches, a first aid kit, manual can opener and special A blizzard warning means larger amounts of falling or blowing snow and sustained winds of 35 miles per hour needs items (e.g., diapers). Stock a few days’ supply of water, required medications, are expected for several hours. Listen to NOAA Weather Radio, local radio and television and food that does not need to be refrigerated or cooked. Dress in several layers to maintain body heat. If possible, stations for weather reports and emergency information. Many injuries occur each winter as people try to keep stay indoors. Winter storms can bring down power lines their homes warm and get around in stormy conditions. and trees, as we experienced last winter in our area. December, January and February are the leading months for home fires and associated deaths in the U.S. Each Prep your car Be sure to prepare your car for winter. Cold weather can year, more than 700 people die of hypothermia (low body temperature) caused by extended exposure to cold tem- be tough on batteries. Make sure your car is equipped with tires that are able peratures, indoors and out. About half of these deaths are to handle tough winter weather. For most motorists, allamong persons age 65 and older.

season tires are adequate for typical conditions. Make sure windshield wipers and defrosters are in working order and fill washer reservoirs with no-freeze windshield washer fluid. In temperatures at or just above 32 degrees, a thin layer of water can cover the ice, causing extremely slippery conditions. Beware of “black ice” that remains on parts of the roadway not in direct sunlight. Use extra caution when driving on bridges; they freeze first. Don’t let frigid temperatures tempt you into starting your car in a closed garage. Carbon monoxide from exhaust fumes is almost impossible to detect and can be fatal when breathed in a confined area. Pay attention. Don’t try to out-drive the conditions. Leave plenty of room for stopping. Know the current road conditions in your area. Keep emergency gear in your car for everyday trips: cell phone, flashlight, jumper cables, ice scraper, blankets and warning devices (e.g., flares, reflectors). Source: Eastside Fire & Rescue

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When waters rise Understand, monitor flood levels to be ready The King County Flood Warning System tracks impending high water, allowing residents to take action and protect themselves. Recorded river gauge readings for the Snoqualmie River can be viewed on the King County website, kingcounty.gov/environment under “Flooding.” You may also call the King County Flood Warning center at 1 (800) 768-7932 or (206) 296-8200. The Snoqualmie River Basin Flood Warning System consists of four phases in increasing order of severity, and are calculated based on the total volume of water, measured in cubic feet per second, passing out of the three forks of the Snoqualmie into the main stem, also referred to as the sum of the forks. The flood warning system tracks conditions through four phases: Phase CFS

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Water shuts down West Snoqualmie River Road in January of 2011. The rural road is one of the first to overtop during river flooding.

Description

Response

I

6000 c.f.s.

2

12,000 c.f.s.

Moderate lowland flooding. Roads that can flood include Neal Road, Reinig Road, West Snoqualmie River Road and Meadowbrook Way.

3

20,000 c.f.s.

Major flooding. Varying depths of high water. Flooded roads may include Fall City-Carnation Road, Tolt Hill Road and Novelty Flats Road.

County personnel are put on alert. The Flood Warning Center is opened. Staff monitor conditions around the clock; Updates are recorded hourly at 1 (800) 768-7932 or (206) 296-8200. Flood investigation crews are sent to monitor flood control facilities, such as levees.

4

38,000 c.f.s.

Extreme flooding. Snoqualmie-Fall City Road is overtopped. Residential neighborhoods may flood.

Phase warnings are issued to police and fire agencies, schools and the news media.

Minor lowland flooding

To better prepare, residents can also subscribe to automated flood warning messages at www.floodzilla.com.

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Better safe than sorry

4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt0DUPCFS t Staff photo

Firefighters and city of Snoqualmie Public Works crews haul flood debris during cleanup efforts in the wake of the 2009 flood. After a flood, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to discard or clean soiled items.

Floods are a fact of life in the Snoqualmie Valley. If you live in a low-lying neighborhood, you should plan ahead for high water. The following tips are ways that residents can plan ahead, stay safe and recover from floods.

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What to do during a flood

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t%POPUUSZUPXBMLPSESJWFUISPVHIGMPPEFEBSFBT8BUFSDBOCFEFFQFSUIBOJUBQQFBSTBOEXBUFSMFWFMT SJTFRVJDLMZ'PMMPXPGGJDJBMFNFSHFODZFWBDVBUJPOSPVUFT*GZPVSDBSTUBMMTJOGMPPEXBUFS HFUPVURVJDLMZBOE move to higher ground. t4UBZBXBZGSPNNPWJOHXBUFSNPWJOHXBUFSTJYJODIFTEFFQDBOTXFFQZPVPGGZPVSGFFU$BSTBSFFBTJMZ swept away in just two feet of water. t4UBZBXBZGSPNEJTBTUFSBSFBTVOMFTTBVUIPSJUJFTBTLGPSWPMVOUFFST t4UBZBXBZGSPNEPXOFEQPXFSMJOFT t*GZPVSIPNFJTGMPPEFE UVSOUIFVUJMJUJFTPGGVOUJMFNFSHFODZPGGJDJBMTUFMMZPVJUJTTBGFUPUVSOUIFNPO%P OPUQVNQUIFCBTFNFOUPVUVOUJMGMPPEXBUFSSFDFEFT"WPJEXFBLFOFEGMPPST XBMMTBOESPPGUPQT t8BTIZPVSIBOETGSFRVFOUMZXJUITPBQBOEDMFBOXBUFSJGZPVDPNFJODPOUBDUXJUIGMPPEXBUFST

What to do after the flood


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Prepare for floods: What you can do now t,FFQBMMGMPPEDMBJNSFMBUFESFDFJQUTJOBXBUFSQSPPG bag and away from risky areas t5BLFQIPUPTPGZPVSIPNFBOECVTJOFTTBTJUJTOPX t-PPLJOUPBMUFSOBUJWFTUPSBHFPQUJPOT TVDIBTSBJTJOHPS moving your property t%FWFMPQBOFWBDVBUJPOQMBOXJUIZPVSGBNJMZ FNQMPZ ees and for your pets t)BWFBMJTUPGJNQPSUBOUQIPOFOVNCFSTBOETBOECBH locations t5FBDIFWFSZPOFIPXBOEXIFOUPTIVUPGGHBT FMFDUSJD ity and water lines t,FFQIPVTFIPMEDIFNJDBMTBCPWFGMPPEMFWFMTUPBWPJE contamination t3FWJFXZPVSGMPPEJOTVSBODFEFDMBSBUJPOQBHF

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Insurance essentials

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photos are the least expensive and most valuable thing you can do in protecting your home and contents before a fire or flood,â&#x20AC;?says Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Insurance agent Angela Donaldson. After a disaster, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not only are you emotionally stressed, but now you have to remember where everything was and what it looked likeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and you have to articulate that an adjustor.â&#x20AC;? All that stress can be saved by having photos on hand.

Preferred risk

Understand risks, plan ahead to avoid a devastating flood loss

W

ith forecasters predicting a hard winter, homeowners should consider flood insurance coverage in the event of a disaster. But insurance alone isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough. Proper planning is also vital to avoid major headaches, extra expense or tragic losses during a flood. Agents with Valley-based Hauglie Insurance advise residents to make a flood plan, which includes making sure family members know how to shut off utilities, get out of the house and neighborhood, where to meet up and how to contact each other. Flood planning also includes readying the home for a disaster. A good exit plan will ensure that contents are protected and valuables removed or stored out of harmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way. Vital medications, for example, should be accounted for early on. If medicine needs to stay refrigerated, have a cooler handy, because floods often mean power loss. Antiques are covered, but only at functional value. That means that your grandmotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s antique table may wind up being replaced by just another new table. Homeowners should ensure that valued antiques are safely high and dry or on the truck out of a flood zone. Homeowners also need to ensure that invoices, receipts and flood claim documentation are kept in a waterproof bag and, if possible, in a fireproof safe. Documentation is needed to prove to FEMA that repairs were completed. Time-stamped photos are also a good way to document before-and-after realities.

Homeowners who live outside a flood zone can still face floods from accidents and human error as well as natural events. The National Flood Insurance Program offers a preferred risk flood insurance policy to provide an extra level of protection for an average cost of $354 for $250,000 of dwelling coverage and $100,000 of content coverage. Early fall is the time to buy a flood policy. Flood insurance has a 30-day waiting period, and Valley storms and floods have been known to hit before Thanksgiving. While the annual premium must be paid up front, agencies typically offer payment options, including a credit card choice, to fit buyersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;budgets. Homeowners should also discuss with their insurance agent whether having their residence surveyed would be of benefit. Separate outbuildings need separate flood coverage. If a homeowner has built a detached office, garage or guest house on his property, that building may need its own policy. Wind and water can also take their toll on fences, which are covered by flood insurance. Fence repair or replacement is handled on a cash value basis, not replacement cost. Lastly, if you have a policy in force, review the names on the policy. If there has been a recent death, marriage, or divorce it is a simple phone call away to modify the policy before a claim. If discovered after a flood loss, it may cause additional delays with claim payments. For more information on flood insurance and emergency preparation, consider attending classes held through the valley this flood season. Many are offered through the cities, Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) and insurance offices such as Hauglie Insurance.

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Beat the rainy day blues Timeless tried-and-true tips to stay warm, safe BY WENDY THOMAS Contributing Writer

-FBWFTUVSO )PNFGJSFTCVSO 'MFFDFBOEGMBOOFM  'SJFOETBOEGBNJMZ #SJHIUFOEBNQEBZT We may be into the really rainy days, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let the grey make you gloomy! Get your good rain gear and Souâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;wester on, go for a walk. Make tea. Cook a big pot of soup or stew. Stoke the wood stove or start the gas or electric fireplace. Plant bulbs outside, or pot-force a bulb inside. Grow herbs on your window sill. Pick out seeds for next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s garden. Plan your elk and deer defense. Preheat covers with a heating pad. Go to bed and wake up early. It always seems darker and wetter at night and when you are tired. Is the power out? Let

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Carmichaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s True Value owner Brian Woolsey breaks out the rain galoshes, just part of a slection of tried-and-true, oldfashioned winter essentials at his store.

your imagination brighten the day and night! Get the flashlights and batterypowered lanterns handed out. Everyone wants their ownâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;who wants to be in the dark? Board games, puzzles, crafts, and

books keep the kids busy while candles and oil lamps are lit, fires are built, and generators (hopefully) start. Get the fondue pot out, pop corn over the fire, bake foil-wrapped apples or potatoes on coals. An old fashioned hot water bottle makes for a cozy nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sleep! Snow days are way better than school days! Be ready with mittens, gloves, hats, boots, hand-warmers, shovels and sleds. Clear the drive and walkway to warm up for sledding. Find a safe hill and have a great ride! Build snow people and animals! Snow forts and igloos are fun too, the summer kids pool can double as a roof! Had enough of the Winter Wonderland? Then slurp hot cider or cocoa, cut out paper snowflakes or trace cookie cutters to color. A warm fire and a hot bath make for the soundest sleep ever. Remember: Without fail, the days will begin to get longer starting on December 23. Soon after, trees will bud and crocus will bloom. Before you know it, it will be spring again. t 8FOEZ 5IPNBT JT DPPXOFS PG Carmichaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s True Value Hardware in downtown Snoqualmie with her husband, Brian Woolsey. You can check out their selection of items to make for a warmer, safer winter, by stopping by at 8150 Falls Ave. S.E.

Winter health Prepare your body for change in the weather BY DR. NATHANIEL SWAN Contributing Writer

We all need to embrace this change in weather, as it is the changing which keeps us flexible and â&#x20AC;&#x153;young.â&#x20AC;? Getting ready for the fall and winter means not only getting your â&#x20AC;&#x153;winter wardrobeâ&#x20AC;? ready, but also preparing your body, as well. It has long been known that as we age, our ligaments and tendons become stiffer, so it is even more important in these cooler days to really warm up prior to any lawn cleanup or light hanging. Core work is always important, as the stronger your abdominals are, the stronger and more protected your lower back will be. Do your outside chores earlier in the day when there is sufficient light to be safe. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in a rush. Take breaks to remain hydrated and to assess your body: Too hot, too wet, too tired? Many accidents either on the slopes or in your yard are caused by â&#x20AC;&#x153;that one last run of the dayâ&#x20AC;? or that one last tree to trim. Watch the sweets, as sugar can weaken the immune system. Doing a nice, safe and gentle body cleanse can go a long way in strengthening the immune system. Probiotics can keep the normal flora in the intestines healthy. Eighty percent of your immune system surrounds your intestine so it again makes good since to treat your body well. Your colon has the square area of over two tennis courtsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a good idea to have that large of an organ unhealthy. If you have been walking around in athletic shoes all summer, be careful if your hiking boots have a little bit of a heel. A quarter of an inch in the heel elevation can cause many low back flare-ups. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all have some fun and have a safe and healthy winter. t /BUIBOJFM 4XBO JT B DIJSPQSBDUPS BU 'BMM $JUZ $IJSPQSBDUJD $FOUFS 4&SE4U 'BMM$JUZ

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Gear up for seasonal needs ACE Hardware ready to help when winter strikes

T

he snow shovels, de-icer and warm mittens are already on the shelves at North Bend ACE Hardware, awaiting customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; needs as Old Man Winter nears. Staff at ACE have prepared a winter preparedness and emergency kit list and are ready to help customers with questions. As October closes and La NiĂąa commences, homeowners should be thinking ahead about how to stay mobile, warm and safe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You want to be prepared for the worst,â&#x20AC;? said ACE Store Manager Chris McCartney, a veteran of 19 Valley winters, including snow storms, floods and prolonged power outages. Storms often mean a run on the store, so smart shoppers will stock up ahead on everything from de-icer to emergency lamps. When gear and supplies are organized and stored in a safe, dry place, homeowners can be ready for Mother Nature. Get together with your family and make a list, ACE staff say. Find a place in the pantry or back of the garage, and safely store needed goods. Water is a must. Some neighborhoods are on electric wells. When the power goes down, so does the water supply. Besides â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;people food,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ACE staff emphasized putting aside extra pet food to ensure animals donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go hungry during outages or other disasters that may cause disruption in supply chains. The storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emergency car kit list includes items that save time and trouble during winter travel. An extra bag of cat litter can also be the ticket (out/home) when your car gets stuck in a snowy ditch. Chemical heating pads and glow sticks can provide light and heat without batteries.

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Also, make sure to use camp stoves and grills safely. Residents should never use coal- or gas-powered items inside the home, as the carbon monoxide they give off is deadly. ACE also recommends foam faucet covers and heat tape to prevent frozen pipes and water leaks. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget about pipes from well houses to the home, as well. Winterization should also include treatments to gasoline engines in the boat or RV to prevent cold damage.

Outdoor fun Winter brings opportunity for adventure. ACE carries a full selection of sporting goods for familiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; camping, hunting and fishing needs. Camping goods can also come in handy during storms and power outages. Old and new products, from emergency thermal blankets and Sterno cans to lamps and hatchets, make roughing it a bit easier. Some customers swear by oil lamps over battery-powered lamps. Oil burns brightly and lasts longer. The store also carries a hand-cranked LED lamp that lasts for up to 12 hours after a firm cranking.

Keep it coming ACE makes an extra effort to stay staffed and stock inventory during big winter events. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We make an extra effort to make sure everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s here,â&#x20AC;? McCartney said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got committed people. They understand weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be here, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll keep operations running.â&#x20AC;? At need, a regional warehouse keeps supplies running. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I tell them what we need, they make it happen,â&#x20AC;? McCartney said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ACE is the helpful place. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here forâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; everybody at the ACE warehouse also understands and supports that whole philosophy.â&#x20AC;? North Bend ACE Hardware is located at 330 Main Ave South in the Mount Si Village shopping center.

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Ready for winter ACE Hardware suggests this winter prep and maintenance gear list: Extension Cords Prest O Logs Wood Pellets Yak Trax (Shoe Ice Grippers) Hand Warmers Weather Stripping Window Seal Kits Tarps and Straps Faucet Covers Heat Tape (water pipes) Water Trough De-Icer Winter Gloves and Hats Flannel/Sweat Shirts Insulated Coveralls Cube Taps Outlet Strips Snow Shovels Lock De-Icer Plastic Sheeting Light Bulbs Heat Lamps & Holders Rakes Leaf Bags RV/Boat Winterization Anti-Freeze Portable Heaters Propane Heater

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Car Kit: Emergency Blanket Wool Socks, Hat, Gloves Rain Poncho Non-Perishable Snacks (nuts, energy bars, canned fruit and a portable can opener) Water Flashlight and Batteries Hand, Feet, Body Warmers Light Sticks Paper Towels Ice Scraper Camp Shovel Jumper Cables First Aid Kit Kitty Litter (snow traction) Portable AM/FM Radio and Batteries Flares and/or Reflective Triangle De-Icer and windshield fluid

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*Limit one (1) incentive per individual: $100 incentive for new personal Sterling Savings Bank Free Checking, $150 incentive for new personal Sterling Savings Bank Premium Checking. To be eligible for the cash incentive, you must enroll in three of the four following products within 90 days of account opening: Bill Pay, Online Statements, Check Card and/or Direct Deposit and meet specific usage requirements in conjunction with opening a new personal Free Checking or Premium Checking account. Usage requirements are as follows: you must meet 3 of the following 4 requirements: be enrolled in Free Bill Pay, enrolled in Online Statements, have a minimum of one (1) incoming Direct Deposit or ACH credit on your checking account within 90 days of account opening or use your Check Card a minimum of three (3) times within the first 90 days of account opening. Check Card transactions can be ATM, point-of-sale (POS) with PIN or signature based transactions. All account owners must be age 18 or older. Underage account owners with an adult cosigner are not eligible. New accounts will be reviewed three full calendar months after account opening and the incentive will be credited to your checking account within four calendar months of account opening upon meeting usage requirements. Incentive is subject to Internal Revenue Service and other tax reporting. Please consult your tax advisor. This offer does not apply to second or multiple checking accounts, existing accounts, or existing accounts that have been closed and reopened. All accounts require a minimum opening deposit of $100. The APY on Premium Checking is 0.15% APY on balances $50,000 and over; 0.10% APY on balances $10,000 - $49,999.99; and 0.05% APY on balances below $10,000.00. All APYs stated are as of September 1, 2011 and may change at any time. Fees may reduce earnings. Offer effective September 1, 2011 and is subject to change without notice.


Glen Horton, 83, of Carnation, died Wednesday, Oct. 12. Glen was born on May 22,

1928, in Southwest Colorado. He was raised by his coalmining parents, worked in ranching and enjoyed outdoor recreation. After a move to Washington, he

...obituaries Juanita Dubey

Juanita Dubey, of Snoqualmie, passed away at Overlake Hospital in Bellevue on Monday, October 10, 2011. She was 87 years old. Juanita was born on June 29, 1924 in Wilder, Idaho the oldest daughter of Anthony Gratzer and Ora McCoy. She was raised in Garibaldi, Oregon and after the age of 13 she moved to Snoqualmie, Washington. There she met her future husband, Neil Dubey, in High School. Neil is the son of the late Jack and Molly Dubey. After their marriage Juanita and Neil moved to the family property on Tokul Creek in Snoqualmie. Juanita loved to golf and enjoyed spending time at Cascade and Mount Si golf courses. She cherished her times of traveling and visiting with family and friends. She was preceded in death by her parents; brothers Tobe Gratzer in 2002 and Calvin Gratzer in 1928. Survivors include her only daughter Dawn (Bob) Kissinger of Easton, WA; beloved grandsons Rob (Heather) Hamerly of Snoqualmie and Ryan (Shannon) Hamerly of Valdez, AK; greatgrandchildren Jack and Lydia Hamerly, Savannah Hamerly and Quentin Cox (Hamerly); sisters Lovina Kemfer of Littleton, CO; Marlene Goss of Tacoma; Pat (Herman) Nettleton of Tacoma, WA; numerous nieces and nephews. At Juanita’s request, there will be no services. Thanks to all that loved her. The family suggests remembrances to worthy charities of the Snoqualmie Valley. Friends are invited to share memories and sign the family’s on-line guest book at www.flintofts.com.

graduated from Bremerton High School. During World War II, he worked at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard as an electrician. He left there for a stint in the Army and served as part of the occupation forces in Japan. After leaving the service, he returned to the shipyard as a draftsman. During that time the avid fisherman met and married the catch of his life, Eileen Kearney, in 1951. Glen and Eileen had three children: Jo Marie, Jim, and Nancy. In 1956 they moved to Los Alamos, New Mexico, where Glen went to work at the lab, rising to the position of senior designer in the electrical division. Ultimately, they lived there for 40-plus years. During that time he raised a family, hunted, fished, and perfected his margarita recipe. He also enjoyed international travel and worked on lots of wood-

working projects. After retirement, he returned to Washington in 1999 and settled in Carnation. During his later years he spent his time fishing, gardening and doing yard work, welcoming visitors, and fretting about the Mariners. Glen is survived by his immediate family, daughterin-law Joyce Horton, son-inlaw Mike Hoyt, and three grandchildren: Tim Horton, and Bryce and Gerilyn Hoyt. A funeral mass will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, at St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, in Carnation.

Rotary raffle helps scholars

Homecoming week at MSHS

The Snoqualmie Valley Rotary is raffling prizes to benefit the Rotary Club of Snoqualmie Valley Student Scholarship fund. Tickets for a drawing to be held Thursday, Oct. 20 could win prizes including a golf trip to the Oregon Dunes, a Seahawks 12th Man jersey, and many other prizes. Tickets are $10. You do not need to be present to win. To learn more, call (425) 941-8795 or visit www.snoqualmievalleyrotary.org/

Mount Si High School is putting on the glitz for Spirit Week and Homecoming, this week. Students started dressing up on Monday for PJ Day. Tuesday was Twin Day, Wednesday is Animal Day, Thursday is Clash Your Clothes Day and Friday is school colors day. The week includes the big football game and royalty ceremony Friday and a dance on Saturday.

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PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE #535774 The Snoqualmie Valley School District Board of Directors will meet to discuss legislative issues with Representative Glenn Anderson and Representative Jay Rodne on Wednesday, October 26, 2011, 7:30 a.m. at the Mt. Si Golf Course Restaurant located at 9010 Boalch Ave. SE, Snoqualmie, WA. Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on October 19, 2011. PUBLIC NOTICE #531091 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF KING In the Estate of: CLIFFORD W. BREITBACH Deceased No: 11-4-05370-6 SEA NOTICE TO CREDITORS EARL ANDERSON, 4254 278th Ave. SE, Fall City, WA, 98024, has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented

within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of first publication: October 5th, 2011. Date of filing: October 3rd, 2011. Law Offices of Ian Macrae Ian Macrae, Attorney for Estate P. O. Box 1329 Fall City, WA 98024 Phone: 425.222.7660 Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record October 5, 2011, October 12, 2011 and October 19, 2011. PUBLIC NOTICE #534488 DETERMINATION OF NONSIGNIFICANCE (ECF11-006) WAC 197-11-970 Determination of nonsignificance (DNS). Description of proposal: City of Carnation amendments to Chapter 15.09 CMC Local Project Review, Chapter 15.18 CMC Land Use Approvals, Chapter 15.40 CMC Permissible Uses and Chapter 15.48 CMC Density and Dimensional Regulations. Proponent: City of Carnation Location of proposal, including street address, if any: City of

Carnation, city-wide. Lead agency: City of Carnation The lead agency for this proposal has determined that it does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required under RCW 43.21C.030(2)(c). This decision was made after review of a completed environmental checklist and other information on file with the lead agency. This information is available to the public on request. [X] This DNS is issued under WAC 197-11-340(2); the lead agency will not act on this proposal for 20 days from the date of First Publication below. Comments must be submitted by November 1, 2011. Responsible Official: Linda Scott Position/Title: City Planner Phone: (425) 333-4192 Address: City of Carnation 4621 Tolt Avenue PO Box 1238 Carnation, WA 98014-1238 Date October 6, 2011 (OPTIONAL) [X] There is no agency appeal. Date Issued: October 6, 2011 Date Mailed: October 6, 2011 Date Published: October 12, 2011 and October 19, 2011 in the Snoqualmie Valley Record. PUBLIC NOTICE #534501 LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF CARNATION -NOTICE OF

PUBLIC HEARINGNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Carnation Planning Board will hold a Public Hearing to receive public comment regarding the following proposed ordinances: • An ordinance amending Chapter 15.09 CMC Local Project Review and Chapter 15.18 CMC Land Use Approvals; amending the City’s Project Permit Matrix to include a designation for minor site development review; revising and clarifying the thresholds and procedures for the City’s adopted site development review regulations. • An ordinance amending Chapter 15.40 CMC Permissible Uses; amending the City’s Table of Permissible Uses to ensure consistency with the City’s Comprehensive Plan and other recent Zoning Code amendments. • An ordinance amending Chapter 15.48 CMC Density and Dimensional Regulations; amending the setback and lot coverage requirements for accessory residential buildings; updating the City’s adopted Table of Density and Dimensional Standards to ensure consistency with the Comprehensive Plan and other recent Zoning Code amendments. The Planning Board will also discuss and potentially adopt findings and conclusions in support of the proposed ordinances. The hearing will be conducted

at the regular meeting of the Carnation Planning Board on October 25, 2011, at 7:00 PM or soon thereafter, in the Council Chambers at Carnation City Hall located at 4621 Tolt Avenue in Carnation. The hearing may be continued to subsequent Planning Board meetings. The hearing is open to the public. All persons wishing to comment on the proposed ordinances may submit comment in writing or verbally at the scheduled public hearing. The full text of the proposed ordinances will be available for public review during normal business hours after Thursday, October 20th, 2011, from the city clerk at Carnation City Hall. It is possible that substantial changes in the proposed amendments may be made following the public hearing. There will be an additional public hearing on this subject before the City Council prior to final adoption. This notice is published pursuant to CMC 1.14.010 & 15.100.040 (B). CITY OF CARNATION Mary Otness, City Clerk Publish 10/12 & 10/19/2011 in the Snoqualmie Valley Record. PUBIC NOTICE #536084 City of North Bend, Washington Notice of Hearing on Final Assessment Roll Utility Local Improvement District No. 6 (Tanner & Truck Town Sewer Project)

NOTICE is given that the final assessment roll for Utility Local Improvement District No. 6 (the “District”) has been prepared as required by law and is on file and open to inspection at the office of the City Clerk at City Hall, 211 Main Avenue N, North Bend, Washington. Pursuant to Resolution No. 1212 adopted August 21, 2007, the City Council formed Utility Local Improvement District No 6 under Ordinances 1293 and 1312 in response to receipt of sufficient petitions from property owners within the ULID boundaries, to construct sewer system improvements along the North Bend Way, Cedar Falls Way, SE 140th Street, and Maloney Grove/ Thrasher Ave corridors from the City’s wastewater treatment plant to Truck Town and to assess in whole or in part the cost and expense of the improvements against the property in that district specially benefited thereby. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that a Hearing Examiner will conduct a public hearing on the final assessment roll at or shortly thereafter 3:00 p.m., local time, on November 10, 2011, at Mt. Si Senior Center, 411 Main Avenue S, North Bend, Washington. This is a re-scheduling of the cancelled hearing previously set on October 20, 2011. Any person objecting to their assessment appearing on the

Continued on next page...


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Barbres welcome twin girls Kamryn and Lauryn

8FMDPNFT%S.BCFM0CFOH Services include  r"FTUIFUJDT  r0CTUFUSJDT   #PUPY  r(ZOFDPMPHZ   +VWFEFSN  r*OGFSUJMJUZ -BUJTTF  r.FOPQBVTF  r6SJOBSZ*ODPOUJOFODF 0CBHJ  r#JPJEFOUJDBM)PSNPOFT  r*OPGĂ DF/PWBTVSFGPSIFBWZQFSJPET  r*OPGĂ DF"EJBOBGPSQFSNBOFOUCJSUIDPOUSPM

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Parents Bryan and Tiffany Barbre of Snoqualmie welcomed twins Kamryn and Lauryn on June 3. Newborn Kamryn Clara Barbre was 5 pounds, 14 ounces and 18 inches long, while sister Lauryn Marie Barbre was six pounds, 14 ounces, and 19-and-a-half inches long. Their big sister is Reghyn. Grandparents are Michael and Wanda Howe of Omak, Sharon Howe and Darryl Moulton of Omak and Cliff and Mary Barbre of Ephrata.

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Kamryn, left, and Lauryn Barbre were born June 3.

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PUBLIC NOTICES ...Continued from previous page final assessment roll for the District is notified to make all objections in writing and to file them with the City Clerk at City Hall on or before November 10, 2011, and to appear at the hearing to present testimony and other evidence. All objections must state clearly the grounds of the objections and should contain lot, block and addition, section, tax number or other identifying description of the property. All objections not made timely in writing and in the manner required by law, shall be conclusively presumed to have been waived. At the time and place fixed for the hearing, the Hearing Examiner will sit as a board of equalization for the purpose of considering objections duly filed, together with all information and evidence in support of those objections, and for the purpose of considering such assessment roll. In order for a protest to be considered valid, it must include proof that the property is not being benefited to the amount of the assessment. At the hearing, or any adjournment thereof, the Hearing Examiner may recommend to the City Council to correct, revise, raise, lower, change or modify the roll or any part thereof, or set aside the roll and order a new assessment. Following the hearing, and recommendation of the

Hearing Examiner, the City Council will confirm the assessment roll by ordinance. When property has been entered originally upon the roll, and the assessment thereon is not raised, no objection shall be considered by the City Council or by any court on appeal unless the objection is made in writing at or prior to the date fixed for the original hearing upon the roll. Susie Oppedal, City Clerk City of North Bend, Washington Posted: October 17, 2011 Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record: October 19 & October 26, 2011. PUBLIC NOTICE #536092 LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF NORTH BEND King County, Washington NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the North Bend City Council will hold a public hearing to receive comments from interested groups or individuals on a proposed water rate increase. The public hearing will take place during the Regular City Council Meeting on Tuesday November 1, 2011, 7:00 P.M., at the Mt Si Senior Center, 411 Main Avenue South, North Bend, WA. Citizens may submit written comments regarding the question of the proposed water rate increase to the City Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office at City Hall, 211 Main Avenue N. (P.O. Box 896), North Bend, WA 98045, up to the close of business, (4:30 P.M.) Monday, October 31, 2011 or verbally

during the public hearing. Further information is available by contacting City Hall at (425) 888-1211. Posted: October 14, 2011 Published in Snoqualmie Valley Record: October 19, 2011. PUBLIC NOTICE #536105 LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF NORTH BEND King County, Washington NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the North Bend City Council will hold a public hearing to receive comments on the 2012 Preliminary Budget. The hearing will take place during the Regular City Council Meeting on Tuesday November 15, 2011, 7:00 P.M., at the Mt Si Senior Center, 411 Main Avenue South, North Bend, WA. Comments may be submitted in writing to the City Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office at City Hall, 211 Main Avenue N. (P.O. Box 896) North Bend, WA 98045, up to the close of business, (4:30 P.M.) Monday, November 14, 2011 or verbally during the public hearing. The Preliminary Budget is available for review at City Hall 211 Main Ave. N., and on the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at http://northbendwa.gov. Further information is available by contacting City Hall at (425) 888-1211. Published: October 19, 2011 and October 26, 2011 in the Snoqualmie Valley Record Posted: October 14, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICE #536218 NOTICE OF DECISION FOR SHORELINE SUBSTANTIAL DEVELOPMENT PERMIT PROJECT: Installation of guardrails along Meadowbrook Way Application #: SH 11-03 Applicant: City of Snoqualmie Property Owner: City of Snoqualmie Submittal Date: August 22, 2011 Date Complete: August 22, 2011 Notice of Application:Published and posted August 31 and September 7, 2011 Date filed with Ecology: October 13, 2011 Project Description: Application SH 11-03 is for a Shoreline Permit pursuant to the Snoqualmie Shoreline Master Program for the furnishing and installing of a guardrail along Meadowbrook Way from Kimball Creek Bridges 1413 B & C up to the Ethan Wade Way Other required permits include, but are not limited to, a Flood Improvement Permit. Project construction is scheduled to begin in November of 2011. Project Location: The proposed project is located in the public right of way Meadowbrook Way to Kimball Creek Bridges 1413 B & C. Projected construction is scheduled to begin upon the completion of the required permits and approvals. Appeals to this decision may be submitted to the Washington State Hearings Board. The appeal period expires after 21 days from the date of

filing of this permit with the Department of Ecology. Appeals should be submitted in writing to: Washington State Shoreline Hearings Board PO Box 40903 Lacey, WA 98504-0903 306.459.6327 Published: October 19, 2011 in the Snoqualmie Valley Record. PUBLIC NOTICE # LEGAL NOTICE -CITY OF CARNATIONNOTICE OF FILING OF THE 2012 PRELIMINARY BUDGET; AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS ON THE 2012 BUDGET AND REVENUE SOURCES. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 2012 Preliminary Budget will be filed with the City Clerk on Monday, October 31, 2011, and made available to the public during normal business hours at Carnation City Hall located at 4621 Tolt Avenue, Carnation, WA. PRELIMINARY BUDGET HEARING: The Carnation City Council will hold a legislative public hearing for the purpose of considering the 2012 Preliminary Budget and Revenue Sources, and possible increases in property tax revenues, at their regular meeting on Tuesday, November 1, 2011, beginning at 7:00 PM or soon thereafter. FINAL BUDGET HEARING: The Carnation City Council will hold a legislative public hearing for the purpose of fixing the 2012 Final Budget at their

regular meeting on Tuesday, November 15, 2011, beginning at 7:00 PM or soon thereafter, and may continue said hearing to subsequent Council meetings. The hearings will be held in the City Council Chambers at Carnation City Hall located at 4621 Tolt Avenue. The hearings are open to the public. Any taxpayer may appear at the public hearings and be heard for or against any part of the budget. All persons wishing to comment on the 2012 Preliminary or Final Budget may submit comment in writing or verbally at the scheduled public hearings. This notice published pursuant to 35A.33.060 RCW & 1.14.010 CMC. CITY OF CARNATION Mary Otness, City Clerk Publish in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on October 19, 2011 and October 26, 2011. #536374.

To place a Legal Notice, please call 253-234-3506 or e-mail legals@ reporternewspapers. com


ON THE SCANNER King County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office

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TUESDAY, OCT. 4

THURSDAY, SEPT. 29

BREAK-IN: At 6:45 p.m., a resident in the 300 block of Southeast 12th Place reported that someone had broken into his home through the garage. The suspect apparently used a screwdriver or other tool to pry open the side door into the garage.

GETAWAY BIKE: At 6:20 p.m., police responded to a theft report in the 100 block of West North Bend Way. A store employee reported that three men had been in the shop looking at bicycles and one of them rode a bike out of the store.

SUNDAY, OCT. 9

SATURDAY, OCT. 1

FLAG THEFT: At 4:30 p.m., police were called to the 400 block of Southeast 10th Street to investigate a series of thefts in the neighborhood. It appears that one or more suspects have been stealing the flags on display in front of peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homes.

STOLEN BIKE: At 1:05 p.m., a resident in the 300 block of Healy Avenue South called police to report that her bicycle had been stolen from the bike rack outside her condo. Someone had used a bolt cutter to remove the lock and steal the bike.

Snoqualmie Police

CAR CAMPING: At 2:19 p.m., police returned to the 38800 block of Southeast River Street to remove two abandoned vehicles that had been tagged the previous day. Both vehicles had been sold recently to a Fall City man, who was found sleeping in one of the vehicles on Oct. 9. He was told to remove the vehicles by noon Monday. Since the vehicles were still there 24 hours later, they were both impounded.

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Real Estate for Sale King County

Apartments for Rent King County 3NOQUALMIE

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Casade Park Senior Apts

Accepting Applications For Waiting List 1 BR Apts, located in the Heart of North Bend. Conveniently located near North Bend Sr Center * Spacious, Affordable Living * Wall to Wall Carpet * Energy Efficient Design * Disabled Access Units * Community Room * Computer/Library Center Contact us for details 440 Main Ave So

(425)888-0410

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Classifieds. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got you Classifieds. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got you covered. 800-388-2527 covered. 800-388-2527

SUSPCIOUS ACTIVITY: At 8:07 p.m., callers in the 9200 block of Merritt Avenue Southeast reported a dark-colored pickup truck in the alley behind a home, with two men carrying flashlights. Police were unable to locate the men.

MONDAY, OCT. 10

Should my child wear a mouth guard?

EastsidePediatricDentalGroup.com

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12

* Members American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry Certified, American Boad of Pediatric Dentistry

EVASIVE ACTION: At At 10:10 p.m., an officer on patrol on Meadowbrook Way near 384th Avenue Southeast observed a vehicle exceeding the 35 mph limit. The officer signaled the vehicle to stop, but the driver refused to pull over. The pursuing officer reported speeds of more than 70 mph, as he followed the vehicle onto 384th, and then River Street, then Park, and across the Meadowbrook Bridge, and onto Reinig. By this point the officer could see a passenger attempting to put his hands out the window, and to open his door. After about 12 miles, the driver stopped, and was restrained. She said sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d fled the officer because she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to get caught driving with a suspended license. She admitted that she had marijuana and two meth pipes in her possession, too.

Out of Area Rentals

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20 ACRE LAND SALE $0 Down, Was $16,900

Now $12,900 Take Over Payments! ONLY $99/mo. Near Growing El Paso, TX, Owner Financing, No Credit Checks, Money Back Guarantee. Free Color Brochure!

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Mount Si V-ball brings down Juanita The Mount Si High School volleyball team continued their strong momentum with a home win Wednesday, Oct. 12, against Juanita. The Wildcats won 25-17, 25-17, 25-22, with standout play by a number of stars. Senior co-captain Sarah McDonald had 15 kills at the net and two service aces, while Lyndsay Carr delivered eight kills and seven aces. In the prime support role was junior Lauren Smith, with 27 assists, seven digs and three kills to her credit. Kailey Capelouto also kept the ball moving with five kills, two aces and 10 digs. Lexie Read and Krista Galloway each contributed a pair of kills, an assist, two digs and a block, and Galloway had one service ace. Mount Si is now 10-1 in league, 13-4 overall.

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Fiery performances by Mount Si trekkers in final senior day meet BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

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Above, Mount Si cross country runners perform a Haka-style dance to rev up their spirits during their Mercer Island/Liberty meet on Wednesday, Oct. 12. Below left, Ben Houldridge and Dom Canady near the finish line. Houldridge was the surprise first Wildcat across the line. Below right, freshman Angelina Belceto crosses the finish line. Belceto has been steadily improving her times this season.

Life on the Mount Si Cross Country team is about way more winning. Spontaneity and team spirit also play a big role in the fall sport. For an example, see the Maori Haka-inspired taunt dance that broke out before both the boys and girls teams ran on Wednesday, Oct. 12, against Mercer Island and Liberty. Or witness girls runner Maddy Esteb’s offthe-cuff use of facepaint on the day of the race. Tribal stripes quickly broke out on everybody’s face. “It’s our last home meet,” the sophomore said. “We had to go all out.” “We should scare off half the teams with this,” said Bailey Scott. After the chant, senior Ryan Olson prepared for the run ahead. This year’s version of the home course is extra challenging, thanks to sharp turns, gravel and paved sections. “It’s brutal,” Olson said. “You’ve got to take corners hard, or you’re going to get stuck… you’ve got to fight through the gravel section.” There are few of the downhill sections that are Olson’s favorite part of cross country. “People aren’t expected to

run PRs (personal records) in here,” he said. While the team is always competitive, “We’re just going to enjoy it. It’s our last time being here,” Olson said. “Good job, Mount Si,” cheered Bailey Scott, who led all Mount Si girls runners and then waited at the finish line. Scott took second overall with 20:13. The sophomore said that was a onesecond personal record on the home course. She was 43 seconds behind Mercer’s Katia Matora. Scott pushed in the last mile to move up from fifth. not quite satisfied, she felt she had saved too much energy for the final mile. “I used all my juice, (but) I need to spread it out more.” Still, everyone’s doing very well, the sophomore said. “They’re all really motivated for league. We’re trying really hard. Shout out to the team.” Next up for the Wildcats, freshman Angelina Belceto took 14th with 21:25. Then came Erin Rylands at 20th SEE SURPRISE, 23

Run for Food is Saturday on Valley trail Help the hungry and enjoy a soft Snoqualmie trail during the 1k/5k Run for Food, Saturday, Oct. 22. The Mount Si Cross Country team and members of Boy Scout Troop 701 will participate and volunteer at the event that begins at Fisher Creek Park on Snoqualmie Ridge with a 7:30 a.m. registration, a kids 1k at 8:30 and a 5k beginning at 9 a.m. The run was started by Spencer Ricks, a Mount Si sophomore and varsity runner on the cross country team who volunteered at the Mount Si Helping Hand Food Bank. Each week, the Mount Si Food Bank provides food for more than 300 families; needs have increased significantly since this time last year. Spencer had been looking for an Eagle Scout project. After talking with assistant director Krista Holmberg, the idea to create a run to help others was a natural, perfect fit. Entry is free with a suggested donation of food. To participate, contact sprex2@gmail.com or visit www.facebook.com/event. php?eid=208970279159583.

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with 22:57, followed by Ashley Jackson with 23:05. Belceto was one of the exceptions that broke Olsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rule. She was also challenged by the course, but tied for her best time. She wants to keep pushing toward her 21-minute goal. Ben Houldridge was the surprise of the day. He wanted to lock in his spot at league, and fought all the way past the front Mount Si runners to take fourth

with a 17:49 performance. Houldridge passed junior Dom Canady on the way to the finished line, beating him by one second. Richard Carmichael claimed sixth with 17:52. Next through for Si was Tom Kirby at 12th with 18:27, followed by Ryan Olson at 13th with 18:38. Libertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nich Knoblich had the medal in the race â&#x20AC;&#x153;I went out hard today,â&#x20AC;? Houldridge said. He stuck with a few Mercer Island runners who were pacing well, then pushed at about two miles left.

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His final 400 meters was an impressive burst. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been training really hard, putting in a lot of extra mileage,â&#x20AC;? Mount Si Coach Christine Kjenner said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been peakingâ&#x20AC;Ś I love the way he races.â&#x20AC;? Kjenner was excited about several other times on the day, including Scottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Everything comes down to league this week. The girls have a good shot at qualifying as a team. The boys may be a closer call. t 5IF ,JOH$P DIBNQJPOships are Thursday, Oct. 20, at Lake Sammamish State Park.

Each year, the city made progressively deeper cuts, as revenues decreased and the recession crushed hopes of a housing boom once the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sewer system went online in 2008. Now city is awaiting the outcome of the Proposition 1 vote, as is the Carnation-Duvall Police Department, which has a current opening in its 15-member department, but wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to fill it if voters reject the proposition. Only a simple majority of voters is needed to approve the measure.

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Snoqualmie Valley Record, October 19, 2011