Issuu on Google+

VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2011 n DAILY UPDATES AT WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM n 75 CENTS

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Board hopefuls look for change

Saviors of the soil Author drawing attention to Valley farms’ mission for change

Husa, Simpson tout different approaches at Rotary candidate forum

BY SETH TRUSCOTT

Fall blooms at Dahlia Barn with visit from colorful television hosts Page 9

Kicker busts records in a hurry, and he’s only a junior Page 7

Yellow juice drips down Jerry Mader’s beard as he bites into a slice of Yellow Doll. Next to him, orange utility knife in hand, Erick Haakenson cuts another piece from the watermelon, which moments before had been resting at the end of a vine in Haakenson’s field. Spitting seeds, both men slurp the bounty of Carnation’s Jubilee Farm. Mader has spent many hours here, both as a Valley historian, a customer of Haakenson, and as a person who takes food very seriously. “Eating is a political act,� Mader says. By going straight to the farm, “I’m making a statement about the relationship between me and other people.� Jubilee Farm is one of nine Snoqualmie Valley farms documented in Mader’s new book, “Saving the Soil—The New American Farmer.� In it, he uses verbatim oral histories and photographs to show how local farmers are changing the world and getting the message to consumers. SEE SOIL, 5

BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Jubilee Farm owner Erick Haakenson, left, gives Carnation author Jerry Mader a taste of life on the land, exploring a watermelon field Wednesday, Sept. 7. Haakenson’s organic practices are among those of eight other Snoqualmie Valley farms highlighted in Mader’s new book, “Saving the Soil.�

Survival stories

INDEX

North Bend woman shares her father’s story of battling brain cancer, beating the odds

OPINION 4 6 LEGAL NOTICES 9 BUSINESS 10 CALENDAR 12 OBITUARIES 12 PUZZLES CLASSIFIEDS 13, 14

BY CAROL LADWIG Staff Reporter

Vol. 98, No. 17

Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Jenn Clarke recruits her father, Al, a three-year survivor of brain cancer, to help her string together thousands of paper cranes for this weekend’s Seattle Brain Cancer Walk. Jenn and Al have participated in the walk every year, and Jenn is the spokesperson for the walk again this year.

Craig Husa and Carolyn Simpson have contrasting visions for change in local schools. Both candidates for Snoqualmie Va l l e y S c h o o l D i s t r i c t ’s position 3 board seat a n s w e r e d CAROLYN SIMPSON questions at a Thursday, Sept. 15, Rotary Club candidate forum at the Ridge TPC. Husa, the incumbent, stressed his CRAIG HUSA collegiate, managerial approach, while Simpson took aim at weak points in local schools’ graduation and advancement rates and called for change at the top.

Low grad rates?

After his brain tumor was removed, Al Clarke of North Bend lost a few things. His peripheral vision in his left eye was diminished, and the taste for onions and garlic that he shared with his wife and two daughters was just gone. “When he did the chemo, everything tasted bad,� said Jenn Clarke, Al’s oldest daughter, and the spokesperson for this year’s Brain Cancer Walk in Seattle. When he finished his treatment, Al could enjoy food again, except for the onions and garlic. “Now he doesn’t like them,� Jenn said.

Simpson said statistics she discovered through work with the Snoqualmie Valley Schools Foundation paint a troubling picture of the prospects of Valley students. Valley schools have some of the worst rates for drop-outs, on-time graduation and progression on to college of all schools on the Eastside, she said.

SEE SURVIVOR, 3

SEE FORUM, 5

YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER, SERVING THE COMMUNITIES OF SNOQUALMIE n NORTH BEND n FALL CITY n PRESTON n CARNATION www.lesschwab.com

&/PSUI#FOE8BZt/PSUI#FOEt425.831.6300

521131

SPORTS

BUSINESS

Editor


t4FQUFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

    

         $    !       $        $ !     %   #  $ &           $      ' (           & (                   

& (    %       &"          $              # &

       

  

 



('"''  % &  ('' "%%$())$& "(

("(% #   "%%$)($'&'

)'*   & "%%$''$#)"

 % + &++ "  + + + 0+++ & &%++&0++ + " &% 0+& ++ +  + +"+&++(&+ + %+)&+ + +"(+ + &'1%&+  3                   

   $    !      $ $  $    &        $ 

 $        &     & .   +(&&0+)&+75663+! +"$+&#+69+%& +  +) #3+%+)& + +&+++ %% $+& 4+ 0+*)++&)%0+"(+ 0+ (+  "0+& +&+& + %3+ &+ +&%%+$ 3+ +(& + +$+ %+ ++,6+ 3  %+ #&+"0+()+ 0+! 3++7566++ 3+%%++" 3++-288/23635


4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt4FQUFNCFS t

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Smiles, dials for Phonathon Mill annex brings bridge, too BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Courtesy photo

Mount Si High School cheerleaders smile and dial at a phone bank for the Snoqualmie Valley Schools Foundation Phonathon at Twin Falls Middle School. The fundraiser for Valley education and student programs was held September 12 and 13 and raised $15,000. To donate, visit the foundation website, www.svsfoundation.org and click the “Donate” button. For more information, call (425) 281-1224, or send e-mail to svsf@SVSFoundation.org.

SURVIVOR FROM 1 It was a small loss compared with the success of the treatment. He is four years past his initial diagnosis of Stage IV brain cancer, three years past treatment, with almost no loss of brain function, and he sees an oncologist only twice a year. “When he goes to his brain doctor, they say, ‘you look good,’” Jenn said, “and there’s not that many brain cancer survivors out there who get that ‘you look good.’ They’re just lucky to have continued three years with their chemo and radiation and still be alive.” Al had a lot working in his favor when he was first diagnosed, though. A stay-at-home father since Jenn’s birth, he worked out regularly and was fairly health despite a smoking habit. He also had the whole-hearted support of his wife and daughters, who sported “Frankenstein is my friend” T-shirts after his brain surgery, and his extended family. Jenn took a week off school to spend time with her dad, and her mother took a leave of absence from her job at Boeing to help with his recovery. Since starting college, Jenn has decided to live at home, too. She says she’s mainly at home to make sure he eats regularly, but adds “I just wanted to see him more. It’s hard to make that feeling of uncertainty go away ... there’s something really comforting about seeing him and saying good morning every day.” Al had a setback earlier this year, when he developed bladder cancer and tumors in his prostate. He had surgery to remove those in June and is now cancer-free for the first time in three years. Jenn has done lots of reading and research on brain cancer and its treatment since her father’s diagnosis, and she knows that her

dad has beaten the odds. “I just think about how lucky we are, and I’m so sad when people aren’t that lucky,” she said. Her father’s illness is how she became involved in the Seattle Brain Cancer Walk three years ago, but her compassion for other brain cancer patients is what keeps her involved. She and her family hope to raise more than $1,000 in donations in the fourth annual walk in Seattle on Saturday, Sept. 24. In addition to walking with her team, “Al’s Pals,” she has helped plan parts of the event, and is currently stringing together thousands of paper cranes for the Tent of Honor, where patients and families share their stories of love and loss. She is also the spokesperson again for the second year in a row, talking about her own family’s experience to highlight the cause. “Looking at my dad, he seems OK to us, and it’s hard to remember that the research is underfunded and there are only three or four medicines available,” Jenn said. Besides raising funds, the walk is intended to show other brain cancer patients and their families that there is a supportive community of people going through the same or similar challenges. Jenn saw that in the first year of the walk, and it has inspired her. Not only does she say “I couldn’t not do the walk any more,” she plans to pursue some type of fund raising work when she finishes school with her environmental studies degree. “I don’t know how I could ever do something that wasn’t helping other people,” she says. “I just want an answer to be out there.” The fourth annual Seattle Brain Cancer Walk starts at 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, at the Seattle Center fountain. To see a map of the course, donate, or register a team, visit www.braincancerwalk.org. This year’s fundraising goal is $400,000 with a target of 2,500 teams participating.

King County farm tours start this weekend Families can experience local food and the farm economy first-hand during Fall Harvest Farm Tours Sept. 24, 25 and Oct. 1 in the Snoqualmie Valley. Children’s activities, chef demonstrations, wine tastings, pumpkin patches, farm animals, weaving shows and history exhibits are on the tour. Participating local farms include Oxbow Center and Organic Farm, Carnation Tree Farm, Jubilee Farm, Fall City Farms, Baxter Barn, Dog Mountain Farm and Alpacas at Legacy Ranch. A free downloadable guide is at http://county.wsu.edu/king/agriculture/ harvestcelebration

The city of Snoqualmie’s latest tallies on the costs and benefits of annexing the former Weyerhaeuser lumber mill site show an annual balance in the black. But questions remain on how incoming infrastructure like Mill Pond Road and the Meadowbrook Bridge, which must come into city limits as part of a deal with King County, changes the financial equation. Snoqualmie’s current deal with King County brings the 200-acre Mill Planning Area into the city as-is. With no development plan on the table by landowners with Snoqualmie Mill Ventures, the city must base its calculations on current uses and figures from DirtFish Rally School’s first year in operation. Snoqualmie Finance Officer Rob Orton last week presented his assessment of fiscal impact issues. “It’s an assessment to find out, are we going to be in the hole? Is it something that is going to be beyond our means to take over?” he

said. “If I restrict myself to the tangibles—what I know—and compare that to the annual bridge maintenance... it looks like it could be wash.”

Revenues and costs Based on existing use, the city expects annual tax and utility revenues of about $180,000, with the bulk coming from $167,000 in annual stormwater fees. The total also includes $4,400 a year in property taxes and $15,000 in utility fees. Business and occupation taxes are estimated at between $1,300 and $1,900 yearly, and taxes on admission to special events such as the

Global RallyCross races and Boeing Classic parking would amount to about $5,000. Indirect benefits, such as sales made by visitors to the site in existing city limits, have not been calculated, as they would happen with or without annexation, Orton said. He calculates that infrastructure costs from annexation, including road work, bridge repair and police costs, would amount to $12,000 in initial costs and $18,000 per year in maintenance. Future considerations, though, could also include replacement of the Meadowbrook bridge and SEE COSTS, 11

$ CASH FOR GOLD, $ Silver & Jewelry

Estate & Auction Jewelry for Sale at Extremely Low Prices

Golden Coin Jewelry and Loan (Pawn) Open Mon – Fri 11:00 am – 5:00 pm Sat 11:00 am - 3:00 pm

521663

Mill Pond Road could close under deal

3BJMSPBE"WFt4OPRVBMNJF 425-292-0694

NATIVE AMERICAN COMEDIAN

CHARLIE HILL

Admission is always FREE!*

CELEBRATE NATIVE AMERICAN DAY WITH LAUGH-OUT-LOUD COMEDIAN, CHARLIE HILL ON FRIDAY, SEPT. 23 AT 7PM. *Admission is always FREE with your Preferred Players Club Card. Sign up today for free.

Stay

CONNECTED 2402 Auburn Way S. | Auburn, WA 98002 800.804.4944 | www.muckleshootcasino.com


VALLEY VIEWS

SNOQUALMIE

t4FQUFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Saying goodbye to the Boalch bounce

Rural roads crisis needs a fair, long-term solution

B

VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

ouncing down Boalch Avenue the other day, I did a double take when I saw the cyclist headed the wrong way at me along the shoulder. Then I saw the full-size pickup headed my way in the opposite lane. Normally, I rely on sparse traffic and occasionally borrow part of the other lane to thread the cratered surface of the torn-up, wetlandplagued road. This time, it was a slowmotion running of the gauntlet. All three vehicles squeezed by, but I had to wonder whether the cyclist SETH TRUSCOTT was aware of the Valley Record Editor Snoqualmie Valley Trail a few hundred yards north, wide open and welcoming. I’ve been adventure-driving on Boalch for what feels like forever. But the cratered thoroughfare is far from alone in the category of crummy Valley streets. Several streets in Snoqualmie are well and truly cobbled, and until recently, Meadowbrook Way was pretty iffy, too.

When I asked North Bend Public Works Director Ron Garrow what the deal was with Boalch, he gave me a reasonable answer: Basically, ‘we’re working on it.’ When Garrow takes a complaint about the road, he tells people that it’s on the priority list for repairs, part of a long-term road improvement plan. All he needs now is the money to do it. North Bend is floating a 0.2 percent sales tax increase this fall to pay for roads, and only roads. It’s well worth your consideration and probably won’t be noticeable to your pocketbook at about $10 for every $5,000 spent in town.

Broken system Besides traffic dodge ‘em, it seems we’re also in a waiting game. King County gave notice this week of its new five-tiered road safety and maintenance plan, which spells out how road work

will be prioritized by the county— and also sounds an alarm about the government’s road budget. A recent study showed that King County has hundreds of millions of dollars in road repair needs that it can’t pay for. So the new plan, unveiled last week, is to triage—manage the most pressing problems that affect the most people first, with the resources available. Depending on their road, residents in unincorporated areas will see reduced or no storm response and snow removal, road wear and tear, lower speed limits and even road closures. So if you’re at the end of the line, lower your expectations. I understand and accept the concept of triage. Needs must when the devil drives, but prioritization is a sign that the funding mechanism for roads is broken and needs repair. With 1 million daily trips in unincorporated King County, how long will it take before our roads really go to pot?

Half of all drivers on county roads originate from urban areas, but annexations have shrunk the number of people that the county can bond or tax. County Councilwoman Kathy Lambert told me that the cities have taken the people, but the county still has to take care of 73 percent of the roads. That’s not fair, she says. Lambert wants the legislature to consider mandating payment of road bonds by residents in annexed areas. Such residents are now opted out when they become city residents. Spreading out the tax burden sounds like a fair way to fix our road woes. It also sounds like a painful pill to swallow. However, we need ideas that are workable and just. County residents do have a say. Contact the governor’s office or your legislator, and let them know that the Governor’s Task Force on Transportation needs to find a solution that’s fair for all residents.

1VCMJTIFS William Shaw

wshaw@valleyrecord.com

&EJUPS Seth Truscott struscott@valleyrecord.com



3FQPSUFS Carol Ladwig

What’s the worst road in the Valley?

cladwig@valleyrecord.com

$SFBUJWF%FTJHOWendy Fried wfried@valleyrecord.com

"EWFSUJTJOH David Hamilton "DDPVOU dhamilton@valleyrecord.com &YFDVUJWF  $JSDVMBUJPO Patricia Hase %JTUSJCVUJPO circulation@valleyrecord.com .BJM10#PY  4OPRVBMNJF 8" 1IPOF 'BY XXXWBMMFZSFDPSEDPN $MBTTJGJFE"EWFSUJTJOH 800.388.2527 4VCTDSJQUJPOT $29.95 per year in King County, $35 per year elsewhere $JSDVMBUJPO425.241.8538 or 1.888.838.3000 The Snoqualmie Valley Record is the legal newspaper for the cities of Snoqualmie, North Bend and Carnation. Written permission from the publisher is required for reproduction of any part of this publication. Letters, columns and guest columns do not necessarily reflect the views of the Snoqualmie Record. PROUD SUPPORTER OF SNOQUALMIE VALLEY HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, SNOQUALMIE VALLEY SCHOOLS FOUNDATION, ENCOMPASS, MOUNT SI HELPING HAND FOOD BANK

“Probably the road between the golf course and Chinook Lumber Yard. That road, right in that area, is terrible, and a lot of people use that road.� Rudy Edwards North Bend

“The golf course road and Mount Si Boulevard. That’s where all your business are, not just George and I, and they pay a lot of taxes out there. And the North Fork Road.� Sharon Wyrsch North Bend

“The worst is right off 6th. We went to Snoqualmie, on that back road, and as we bounced, my camper went ‘boing’ and hit the roof of my cab. So now I’ve got a nice dent in my Dodge.� Cullen Smith North Bend

“Without a doubt, that’s Meadowbrook Way, from the Milk Barn up to the hospital.� David Kelley North Bend


4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt4FQUFNCFS t

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

schools,� she said. “They’re born with the same potential and we have to encourage that... We need to set these goals and reach for them.�

“These are key indicators that we should be following to find out, are we doing our job as a community to educate young people?� Simpson said. She said she’s never heard the dropout rate discussed at a school board meeting. “Nor have I heard college acceptance rates or how many kids are going to college.� Simpson added that 50 percent of Mount Si graduates either never enroll in college, including community college, or drop out before they get a degree. “I really want to change that, and we can do it with a change in philosophy and a change in curriculum,� she said. “Our kids in the Snoqualmie Valley are not different from kids in the other Eastside

SOIL FROM 1 The new farmers Mader, a six-year resident in Carnation, came to the subject of “Saving the Soil� in a roundabout way. Moving with his wife from Seattle’s Fremont neighborhood, he began to notice longtime residents—Mader describes them as “real characters.� His book “Carnation Verbatim—A Snoqualmie Valley Memoir� told their stories and shared their faces; his photographs still hang in Pete’s Club Grill. -POH DPOTJEFSJOH B Washington farm history, Mader began exploring Valley farms—and more important, meeting the farmers. To him, it’s vital to know where his food comes from and who grows it. Mader was struck by the similarities between the people who were producing the vegetables and meat he eats. “Most of them, with few

Many ways to help Husa agreed that district should seek higher expectations, but said that dropout and college continuation issues are widespread for many schools, and that not all students are the same. “You have to drill under the hood,� he said. He laid out a list of intervention efforts in Valley schools, from special education to programs for struggling learners. “We’ve got Title I programs, Highly Capable, AP and Honors,� he said. “Each of those contribute to various ways of challenging and engaging our students.� He talked about how changes at Two Rivers School—the transfer of Principal Tom Athanases

exceptions, have little or no farming background,� he said. “They’ve all come to this via books, or their own personal or philosophical quest to find a life they want to live.� Most have advanced degrees, corporate backgrounds, suburban origins, “and have turned away... to enter the risky business of being a row cropper,� Mader said. Researching his book, Mader spent a day in the life of the farmers, learning about ways they are eschewing old, big-business practices in favor of preserving the soil’s fertility for the long run. A century or so ago, Mader says, nearly half the population of the United States was engaged in growing food. i-FTTUIBOPOFQFSDFOUPGUIF nation today are farmers,� he said. “Who is going to grow our food 20 years from now?� If Mader’s work is any indication, probably people like Haakenson, who opened Jubilee Farm with his wife

Wendy about 20 years ago. In Carnation, they explore the future of farming, eliminating foreign chemicals while espousing community-supported agriculture, or CSA, agreements, in which customers form partnerships with farmers in exchange for food. During Mader’s latest visit last week, young families wandered the rows, picked produce and gave scraps to a pair of well-fed pigs.

Better practices Erick Haakenson pushed loose straw aside and stuck his hand right into manure. The warm pile, all 100 tons of it, came from pigs, but it will compost over the winter and become black gold to his vegetable fields next spring. “It’s going to enrich the soil,� Haakenson said. “Instead of feeding the plants, we feed the soil, and trust that it will feed the plants.� Near the watermelon vines,

to the district office to oversee intervention programs, and the hiring of Amy MontayneJohnson, an energetic new principal—will help students with challenging situations find success. “There are a lot of things we can do,� he said.

Differences Asked to differentiate himself, Husa praised Simpson for her community work, but agreed that they have different styles. “She comes to board meetings and has great ideas. We don’t always incorporate those ideas... One shouldn’t take offense to that. These are other decisions being made.� Husa said he supports “student achievement and making the district as great as it can be. I have been involved with that, and would like to continue to be involved with that.� Simpson said she shares some traits with Haakenson has tilled a fallow field. Some farms might keep all fields in production and supplement with petroleum-based fertilizers, but Haakenson enriches using time and cover crops like peas. “This is the way people replenished the soil in the past,� Mader said. His research has found that globally, on average, an inch of the world’s three feet of topsoil is eroded each year. It takes natural processes 100 years to create that inch. But farmers like Haakenson can do it in ten. According to Mader, one acre of organic, chemical free farmland can produce ten tons of mixed vegetables, enough to feed 2500 people annually, at 80 pounds per person. He

A life you can relate to . . .

Husa, but sees key differences. She stressed that change needs to come from the top. “We need to change the way our school board operates,� Simpson said. “Our board should be the one setting the policy, developing a strategic plan, monitoring results with the administration. The format of the meetings should be focused on how well we are doing with respect to reaching our goals and holding everyone accountable.� She also repeated her stance on higher education. “We need to start talking to kids about college when they’re in middle school,� she said. “All of them should graduate with the tools in their tool box.. so that if they choose to, they are ready for college.� t -BTU XFFLT GPSVN XBT FNDFFE CZ 7BMMFZ Record Publisher William Shaw. Other Rotary candidate forums may follow this fall.

estimates that preserved farmland in King County could produce 22 million pounds of fresh wholesome food per year, enough for almost three times the combined population of the Snoqualmie Valley, some 300,000 people. Besides soil conservation, farms promoted in Mader’s book also make efforts to preserve the watershed. “A lot of them are salmonsafe farms,� he said. “They’re encouraging the extension service to come out. They’re helping them rebuild buffer zones along the river,� helping with flood control, “everything they can think of doing,� he said. Mader said the time is coming when farming, globally, will change dramatically.

“Sooner or later, we are not going to be able to offer food that comes from thousands of miles away,� he said.

Get involved

This fall is a promising time for Mader’s cause. At 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, he holds a book signing at Carnation Tree Farm. This weekend is the King County and WSU Extension Office’s annual Farm Tour in the Snoqualmie Valley. On Saturday, Sept. 24, SnoValley Tilth holds its annual benefit dinner and auction at Haakenson’s farm. “People are hungry for good food,� said Mader. “They don’t know how to get it. “Go find a farm,� he adds. “Meet the people. Taste the food.�

3/$<(561(('('

0LGGOHDQGKLJKVFKRROVWXGHQWV RQO\6FKRRO¡VRXWHDUO\FRPH KDYHDEODVWSOD\LQJODVHUWDJDW 6L9LHZUDLQRUVKLQH

It's Fun It's Living It's Peace of Mind



)ULGD\6HSWHPEHUUG )ULGD\6HSWHPEHUUG 30 3030 30 &RVW &RVW 

5(*,67(572'$<

ZZZVLYLHZSDUNRUJ

520361

FORUM FROM 1

8FMDPNFT%S.BCFM0CFOH

521132

A caring, friendly environment for independent or assisted living seniors. For information or a tour call

425.888.7108

&BTU/PSUI#FOE8BZr/PSUI#FOE

"DDFQUJOH/FX1BUJFOUT %S)PMNFT #PBSE$FSUJĂ FE JO0CTUFUSJDT(ZOFDPMPHZ

Call to schedule your appointment 425.651.4338 4&UI1M 4VJUFt*TTBRVBI 8" XXXJTTBRVBIXPNFOTDPN

519344

Senior Housing & Assisted Living

Services include  r"FTUIFUJDT  r0CTUFUSJDT   #PUPY  r(ZOFDPMPHZ   +VWFEFSN  r*OGFSUJMJUZ -BUJTTF  r.FOPQBVTF  r6SJOBSZ*ODPOUJOFODF  r#JPJEFOUJDBM)PSNPOFT  r*OPGĂ DF/PWBTVSFGPSIFBWZQFSJPET  r*OPGĂ DF"EJBOBGPSQFSNBOFOUCJSUIDPOUSPM


t4FQUFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Community remembers Sept. 11, 2001 $PVSUFTZQIPUP

$PVSUFTZQIPUPT

Above, inspired by a History Channel program on the rebuilding efforts in the wake of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York City, Jacob Cleven, 14, of North Bend, made a drawing of the scene at ground zero. Cleven made the drawing after talking and remembering 9/11 with his father, Roger.

Right, Fall City resident Cindy Soderman snapped a photo of her 3-yearold grandson Caleb, in a firemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s costume for Halloween, looking at a flag she hung for Sept. 11. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The flag we had hung up for 9/11 caught his attention for a few seconds,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It brought tears to my eyes and anyone that has seen it. Not sure why this all fell together on 9/11/11, but we will always cherish this photo.â&#x20AC;?

Tyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Handyman Service

WE HAVE A TRUCK TO RENT FOR LOCAL MOVES

â&#x20AC;&#x153;VOTED BEST HANDYMAN 2011â&#x20AC;?

521144

Locally Owned

NO JOB TOO SMALL!!! 5SJNt$BSQFOUSZ %SZ8BMMt1BJOUJOH 5JMFt)PNF3FQBJST 3FNPEFMTt&UD

Regist #TYSHAH945NA

mail: tygheolson@hotmail.com

Call about our Move-in Special â&#x20AC;&#x153;STORAGE TO MEET YOUR NEEDSâ&#x20AC;? Climate Control & Covered R/V & Boat Storage Video Monitored Security System - Controlled Access Resident Manager Fax/UPS Pickup/Copies/Moving Supplies/Notary

525053

Ty Olson Home: 425-888-1289 Cell: 425-417-7697

St. Clareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s honors responders

(425) 888-0001 44800 S.E. North Bend Way, North Bend, WA 98045

Members of St. Clareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church in Snoqualmie baked and delivered more than 500 cookies to Snoqualmie Valley police and firefighters in remembrance of the tenth anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks. St. Clareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also created a memorial inside the church honoring each person who died in the attacks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This 9/11 anniversary reminds us to honor those who died in the terrible attacks,â&#x20AC;? said the Rev. Patty Baker, St. Clareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s priest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It also reminds us how much we care for and appreciate the emergency responders who protect and care for us each and every day in our community.â&#x20AC;? Church members arrived at St. Clareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on September 11 to drop off their home-baked treats and pause to gaze at two walls filled with the names of every person who died on September 11, 2001, to offer prayers for peace, and sign a card to be delivered with the cookies. Eight-year-old Quinn Strehle had recently learned about the attacks that happened before she was born. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to see if there is anyone here named Quinn,â&#x20AC;? she said as she looked at the names. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to remember each person who died that day, to pray for each of them and their families and then to do something for our community. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a way we can all heal together from this tragedy and move into a future of peace,â&#x20AC;? Baker said.

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICE #521126 City of Snoqualmie King County, Washington 98065 Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Monday, September 26, 2011 at 7:00 PM or soon thereafter, Snoqualmie City council will be holding a Public Hearing regarding: Amendment to the 2012-2017 State Transportation Improvement Plan The hearing will be held at City Hall in the Council Chambers, 38624 SE River Street. The City, upon request, will provide auxiliary aids to participants with disabilities. Diane Humes Department of Public Works Administrative Assistant Posted: September 13, 2011 Publish: Snoqualmie Valley Record on September 14, 2011 and 21, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE #527292 The Snoqualmie Valley School District Board of Directors will hold a Work Session on Thursday, September 22, 2011, 6:00 p.m., for the purpose of receiving a report on MSP/HSPE assessment scores. The Work Session will take place in the District Administration Office Boardroom located at 8001 Silva Ave. SE, Snoqualmie, WA. Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on September 21, 2011. PUBLIC NOTICE #521193 City of Snoqualmie King County, Washington 98065 Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Monday, September 26, 2011 at 7:00 PM or soon thereafter, Snoqualmie City council will be holding a Public Hearing to receive testimony regarding the sale of surplus city property. The hearing will be held at City Hall in the Council Chambers, 38624 SE River Street. The City, upon request, will provide auxiliary aids to participants with disabilities. Diane Humes Department of Public Works Administrative Assistant Posted: September 13, 2011 Publish: Valley Record September 14, 2011 September 21, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE #526942 LEGAL NOTICE JB STORAGE NORTH BEND WA 98045 NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to auction the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under the Washington Self-Service Storage Facilities Act. The undersigned will sell at public Auction by silent bidding on the 11 of OCT. 2011 from 10 am to 12 am on the premises where said property has been stored and which are Located at JB STORAGE, 46925 SE MIDDLE FORK RD, NORTH BEND WA. 98045, County of King, State of Washington. 1) Elizabeth Johnson unit # 15 North Bend WA 98045 2) Josh Johnson unit # 10 4104 B103 Ave SE, Lake Stevens WA 98258

3) K&M Subway Inc. unit # 101 1035 E Harvest Rd, Queen Creek AZ, 85240 4) Jim Lyons unit #8-140 15109 B Ceader Falls RD SE #B North Bend WA 98045 5) April McCarty unit # 44 PO Box 250 North Bend WA 98045 6) John Shilling unit #43 PO Box 962 Fall City WA 98024 7) Holly & John Searle 8831-371 PL SE unit # 23-25 Snoqualmie WA 98065 8) Cliff Solomon unit # 119 PO Box 2492 North Bend WA 98045 9) Victor Stone unit # 2 lot #40 31502 NE 40th St Carnaton WA 98014 10) Darby Summers unit # 74 8721 - 384 Ave SE Snoqualmie WA 98065 11) TRB Logging & Trucking Todd R Burdulis units # 71-120 PO Box 2088 North Bend WA 12) Dale Wolford unit #4 3435 Auburn Way, Auburn WA 98072-7249 13) Amie Zachry unit #131 PO Box 223 Snoqualmie WA 98065 The purchase must be paid for at the time of the purchase in cash only. All purchased items sold as-is where are and must be removed at time of sale. Sale subject to cancellation in event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Dated this 25th of Sept 2011. Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on September 21, 2011, September 28, 2011 and October 5, 2011. PUBLIC NOTICE #527283 NOTICE OF MITIGATED DETERMINATION OF

NONSIGNIFICANCE (MDNS) Issuance Date: September 14, 2011 Publication Date: September 21, 2011 Applicant: City of Snoqualmie Location: City of Snoqualmie Description of Proposal: The proposed project is for the replacement of existing and installation of new 12-inch, 8inch, 6-inch and 4-inch ductile iron watermain, valves and fittings within approximately 2,400 LF of Railroad Place, Newton and Delta Streets. The project is located entirely within the public right of way. Any existing roads and sidewalks disturbed in construction will be restored. To minimize impact and reduce disruption to train and highway traffic by avoiding open trenching, the pipe crossing at the railroad tracks and highway 202 will be installed via directional drilling. The directional drilling with occur at a depth of nine feet under the train tracks and highway. Threshold Determination: After review of the environmental checklist, the City of Snoqualmie (lead agency for this proposal) has determined pursuant to RCW 43.21C.240 that the requirements for environmental analysis and mitigation measures in development regulations provide adequate mitigation for the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specific adverse environmental impacts and that the above referenced proposal does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment that cannot be mitigated through compliance with the conditions of the Mitigated Determination of Non-Significance (MDNS). An environmen-

tal impact statement is not required under RCW 42.21.030 (2)(c). This decision was made after review of a complete environmental checklist and other information on file with the City. This information is available to the public on request. This MDNS is issued under WAC 197-11-340(2); the lead agency will not act on this proposal for 15 days from the date of publication, allowing time for public comment. Comments on the Threshold Determination: For a complete copy of the MDNS staff report with conditions or if you would like to comment on this Threshold Determination, your written comments should be sent to PO Box 987, Snoqualmie WA, 98065, Attn: Gwyn Berry, Planning Technician, by October 5, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. The City will not take final action on this proposal until the end of the comment period. The issuance of this Mitigated Determination of Nonsignificance should not be interpreted as acceptance or approval of this proposal as presented. The City of Snoqualmie reserves the right to deny or approve said proposal subject to conditions if it is determined to be in the best interest of the City and/or necessary for the general health, safety, and welfare of the public to do so. Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on September 21, 2011. #527283. PUBLIC NOTICE #527291 City of Snoqualmie King County, Washington 98065 NOTICE OF

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Monday, October 10, 2011 at 7:00 PM or soon thereafter, the Snoqualmie City Council will be holding a Public Hearing to receive testimony regarding: 2011 Annual Progress Report for the City of Snoqualmie Floodplain Management and Repetitive Loss Plan. The hearing will be held at Snoqualmie City Hall located at 38624 SE River Street, Snoqualmie, WA. The report will be available for public review September 19, 2011 at Snoqualmie City Hall Planning Department located at 38624 SE River St weekdays from 7 AM to 5 PM and on the City website at www.ci.snoqualmie.wa.us. The City, upon request, will provide auxiliary aids to participants with disabilities. Advance notice please. Jodi Warren, CMC City Clerk Posted: 9/21/11 Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on September 21, 2011.

To place a Legal Notice, please call 253-234-3506 or e-mail legals@ reporternewspapers. com


4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt4FQUFNCFS t

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

SPORTS

Spirit of competition

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Meg Krivanec, Megan Ferkovich, Chloe Villanueva and Dana Pecora are team captains for Mount Si cheer.

Mount Si cheer in stride, showing community focus BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Senior Chase Carlson holds the ball for junior Cameron Van Winkle during practice. Van Winkle, a junior and the varsity kicker since ninth grade, is crushing Mount Si’s school field goal records this season in short order.

The boy with the golden foot

Respect on the pitch Cedarcrest High School’s girls soccer team looks to make strides forward from their middleof-the-pack showing last season. Loaded with plenty of upperclasswomen, the Red Wolves should do well thanks to depth and an atmosphere of respect. “I have an incredible amount of respect for our players this year,” said head coach Evan Hatch, starting his first season with the Cedarcrest women’s team. “Our top priority is to play well as a team,” Hatch said. “We have a number of highly skilled players in the program this year, and we need to work well together in order to bring out the best in each other. Last season, the Red Wolves won and lost about equally, finishing SEE PITCH, 8

BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Records are falling for Mount Si’s Cameron Van Winkle, kicker for the Wildcat varsity football team. In the last two weeks, the five-foot-10, 160pound junior has blown through the career, singlegame and season field goal records for the team, also making the furthest recorded kick. “I feel confident for anything,” said Van Winkle Thursday, Sept. 15, the day before he kicked three against Lake Washington in a 42-0 ‘Cats blowout. His three successful attempts beat the old season record of seven, jointly held by Dale Ottopal and Jsaon McGregor in 1986 and 1990, respectively. And the year is young. Combined with his four kicks Saturday, Sept. 10, in Mount Si’s road game against Bothell, the junior is still building a new career record for the team with 15 field goals. He surpassed the career record set by McGregor during the 1989-1990 sea-

sons. That week, he also beat the Mount Si single game-record; the prior record was three, set by Ottopal in 1986. The same night, he tied with Brett Evetts’ 1981 record vs. Gig Harbor for longest field goal with a 47-yard kick. Last Friday, that record fell again, as Van Winkle kicked a 49-yarder through the pipes in the fourth quarter. “I’ve had my eye on the record books since

freshman year,” said Van Winkle, who hopes to win a scholarship to his favorite school, Stanford University in Palo Alto., Calif., thanks to his feet. Van Winkle makes it clear that his success is a team affair. Specifically, he operates as part of a machine with holder and quarterback Ryan Atkinson, a senior, and snapper Beau Shain, a sophomore. SEE RECORDS, 8

We believe every child should be treated the way we would like our own children to be treated. It is our goal to implement the highest standard of care at every patient encounter whether it is a child’s first visit to the dental office, a teenager who is headed off to college or a special-needs adult patient we’ve been seeing for decades.

WE HAVE 2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

525588

Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Cedarcrest girls soccer senior co-captains are Laura Hisler, left, and McKenna Swanson.

Junior Cameron Van Winkle’s precision kicks shatter team field goal records

In her fourth year as coach, Jessii Stevens is seeing the hard work of her first group of original freshwomen, now seniors, pay off. Last year, Mount Si qualified two teams, Medium Varsity and Non-Tumbling Small Varsity, for the Washington Cheerleading State Championships. Both teams placed second in their divisions. Two seniors, Chloe Villanueva and Meg Krivanec, have come a long way, said Stevens. “Both girls have grown so much,” she said. “Chloe has a lot of great leadership skills that will help lead this group of girls this year, with a strong focus on school spirit and community. She is great team player and very involved and committed to the program.” Other strong returning seniors are Megan Ferkovich and Dana Pecora. Talented underclassmen include Miranda Gillespie, a junior, Kirstie Clark, a sophomore, and Mikaelyn Davis, a freshman. “All the girls have strong tumbling skills, which will be great for competition season,” Stevens said. Freshman Danielle Kraycik and Nicki Mostofi are good dancers, jumpers, bases and bring some tumbling skills, too. The four captains—Villanueva, Pecora, Ferkovich and Krivanec—will all have a great impact on the underclasswomen. “I expect a successful year due to their leadership,” Stevens said. “Chloe, Dana, Meg, Kendall Maddux and Maura Williams are all cheer seniors who are also on ASB. I love to see so many of my Seniors in ASB—which helps ASB and Cheer work hand in hand.”

Now preferred provider for Premera.


t4FQUFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

RECORDS FROM 7

PITCH FROM 7

“If one goes wrong, we all go,” Van Winkle said. “Bad hold, bad snap, bad kick, we all go down.” Van Winkle has always liked the foot action— “Soccer balls, footballs,” but football is his focus. He will play soccer for Mount Si this spring. To reach this level, Van Winkle has traveled to kicking camps all over the nation during his high school career. Next January, he attends the Underclassman Challenge camp in Orlando, Fla. In school, his favorite subject is science. Chemistry is “interesting,” too, Van Winkle said. t .PVOU 4J IPTUT Liberty, 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23.

fifth in the Cascade Conference. The Red Wolves varsity includes 10 seniors, five juniors, one sophomore and a freshman player. Two seniors and a junior are team captains. Senior midfieldEvan Hatch, er Laura Hisler brings captain experience from last season. She Cedarcrest soccer coach leads with focus, dedication, and work ethic. Senior defender McKenna Swanson is a powerful player that leads the team with a strong defensive presence and an excellent ability to communicate on the field. Junior defender Lauren Rodger is a strong athlete with the ability to win challenges in the air and stop opponents from creating scoring opportunities. The Cascade league was full of strong teams last year, and that high level of competition is expected to continue this season. Hatch says the Red Wolves must focus on playing their best in each league game to be competitive in conference and make it to the district and state tournaments. In their first team meeting, players chose to focus on identifying and implementing strategies to respect, appreciate, provide for, and learn from one another. “The team’s commitment to selflessness and teamwork will create an environment of success this year, and we expect to be successful this season,” Hatch said. “My coaching philosophy: If we create an environment where players focus on creating opportunities for their team and their teammates, the teamwork will lead to scoring goals and winning games. Work hard, work for each other, and enjoy the experience.” The junior varsity team, too, made the same choice to focus on teamwork and respect, as opposed to winning and losing, in their first get-together, Hatch added. Amanda Johnson is the assistant varsity coach and head JV coach. This is her first year as well. She is a former graduate and soccer player of Cedarcrest High, and recently finished a successful career with the Seattle Pacific University Womens Soccer Team. She brings a variety of strategic, tactical, and fitness-related expertise, and an intense love for coaching soccer. t'PMMPXUIFUFBNBUwww.chs.riverview.wednet.edu.

“Work hard, work for each other and enjoy the experience.”

Cascade FC’s U-10 boys bring home Island Cup A group of Valley soccer players with Cascade Football Club took home the 2011 Island Cup trophy in the U-10 boys division, in the tournament held August 26 to 28 on Bainbridge Island. “When we began our tournament experience, we were all wondering what direction our fortune would take,” wrote coach Peter Rackers. “This was not only our first tournament, but our first game as well.” They played hard in the final against the Issaquah Soccer Club Gunners. “It was a low-scoring, defensive affair,” Rackers said. Late in the second overtime, team pressure paid off for another late goal. “We held on for a tense few minutes to secure the Island Cup for our division. Pictured are, from left, back row, assistant coach Michael Lucas, assistant coach Ben Britton, head coach Peter Rackers; second row Calvin Leffard, Joshua Laupmanis, Banner Hovinga, Carlos Danysh, George Strunk, Gavin Britton, Dawson Cairns; front row, Rex Rackers, Devin Maeda, Hogan Chase, Trent Lucas and Landon Scott. Not pictured: Stefan Beattie.



$FURVVIURPWKH7UDLQ0XVHXPಧ5DLOURDG$YH

888-2155

U-Cut Now Open Weekends! Hours: Saturday - Sunday 10am - 5pm

 U-Cut/Pre-Cut Dahlia Bouquets $10 per dozen stems

1 mile down Mt. Si Road in North Bend. Please follow the signs!

M on - Thurs 7a - 8p, Fri 7a - 9p, Sat 8a - 9p , Sun 8a - 6p

525695

)UHH:L)Lವ2XWGRRU3DWLR 6SHFLDOW\%HHUವ2UJDQLF(VSUHVVR

521653

Your Local Flower Farm!

The Festival at Mount Si Organizers thank our Financial Sponsors and In-kind Donors:

p

law

Mt. Si

The Ramblin’ Gourmet

North Bend

VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

& The Wyrsch Family

526583

NBECA, North Bend Educational and Cultural Association, who are the organizers of the Festival at Mount Si, would like to thank all who supported our Community event. Thanks to the festival committee, volunteers, sponsors, in-kind donors, vendors and all who turned out to participate. There were wonderful parade participants, bike riders, local music and dance talent, talented pets, blueberry dessert bakers, cherry pie eaters, chili cookers & tasters. We’ll see you all next year!


4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt4FQUFNCFS t

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

The city of North Bend is seeking applicants to fill a vacancy on the Economic Development Commission, Position No. 2, with a term expiring December 31, 2013. The Business and Economic Development Commission consists of seven members with terms of four years. It guides the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future economy, and meets once monthly on Thursday mornings. Anyone interested in serving the community on this important commission can submit an application to the City Clerk, PO Box 896, North Bend, WA 98045. Application forms are available at City Hall, 211 Main Ave. N., or at northbendwa.gov. To have an application form mailed to you, contact the city clerk at 888-7627 or by e-mail at soppedal@northbendwa.gov.

BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Two local television personalities explored the colors of North Bendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dahlia Barn Friday, Sept. 9, and will air their discoveries this week. KING 5 TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evening Magazineâ&#x20AC;? host Meeghan Black and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gardening With Ciscoeâ&#x20AC;? expert Ciscoe Morris met Dahlia Barn owners Jerry and Aimee Sherrill, and their friends and family, at the North Bend business, which sells tubers and hosts self-cut dahlia picking through this month. With the bright late-summer plants now in bloom, Morris and Black got a chance to check out the dozens of varietiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;some grown here in the Valley, most on the Sherrillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acreage east of the Cascades at Thorp. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a work of love, you can tell,â&#x20AC;? said Morris, handling a deep maroon variety. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a definite passion.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We love them. We are so honored that they wanted to visit us,â&#x20AC;? Aimee Sherrill said. Jerry Sherrill got both hosts to sign a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dahlia Barnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; T-shirt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love your dahlias,â&#x20AC;? Black wrote. Morris urged Jerry to eat his Brussels sprouts.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I love about dahlias is the more you cut them, the more flowers you get,â&#x20AC;? Morris said. Morris loves his job, exploring various gardens and horticultural centers around the Northwest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You meet wonderful people, see beautiful things and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really fun making the shows,â&#x20AC;? he said. North Bendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dahlia Barn will be featured on Saturday, Sept. 24, and Oct. 8 on Gardening With Ciscoe. The show airs 10 a.m. Saturdays on KING 5 TV. The Evening Magazine spot aired Sept. 12.

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Friends and family help the owners of North Bendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dahlia Barn, Jerry and Aimee Sherrill, show off the Dahlia Barnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bright colors during a Sept. 9 visit by KING TV hosts Ciscoe Morris and Meeghan Black.

Spe cia$ls00

DRINKS & NACHOS

8FSF$POWFOJFOUGPS:PV

3 $550 $375/ $475

Susan K. Robins, DDS, PS.

Chosen as one of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Top Dentistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by the Consumer Research Council of America - 2009

Make an appointment to experience the Snoqualmie Ridge Family Dental Advantage: tIPVS&NFSHFODZ$BSF"WBJMBCMF t$IJME'SJFOEMZ&OWJSPONFOU t'SFF5FFUI8IJUFOJOHGPSMJGF(See office for details) t4UBUFPGUIF"SU%FOUBM5FDIOPMPHZ

LOS CABOS FAMILY MEXICAN RESTAURANT

1SFGFSSFE1SPWJEFSGPSNPTUJOTVSBODFQMBOT

loscabosnorthbend.com

7719 Center Boulevard SE - Snoqualmie - 425.396.5555 www.SnoqualmieRidgeFamilyDental.com

All Draft Beer 4pm to close EVERYDAY Margaritas EVERYDAY

Deluxe w/ meat added Nachos **SPECIALS IN THE BAR ONLY**

425.888.5256

48.PVOU4J#MWEt/PSUI#FOE

Some Families Go the Extra Mile to Give Their Kids a Great Education. We Call Them Crusaders.

Jerome Renton

Quinn Seattle

Anna Molly Snoqualmie Bellevue

Olivia Kirkland

:LWKPRUHWKDQ$3DQG+RQRUV FODVVHVWZRIXOOWLPHFROOHJH FRXQVHORUVDQGDVWDWHRIWKHDUW FDPSXVLW¡VQRWVXUSULVLQJWKDW IDPLOLHVIURPDFURVVWKHUHJLRQ FKRRVHWRFRPHWR(DVWVLGH &DWKROLF1RZWKDQNVWRH[SDQGHG EXVVHUYLFHLW¡VHDVLHUWKDQHYHU WRJLYH\RXUFKLOGDQ(&HGXFDWLRQ Learn more at our open house. Or, for more information, contact Sarah Dahleen or Charlene Kletzly at admissions@eastsidecatholic.org or 425-295-3001.

Paige Mercer Island

Maxwell Bellevue

Amali Bothell

Claire Bellevue

Cameron Seattle

Matthew Bellevue

504011

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Real Skills, For Lifeâ&#x20AC;? Serving the Eastside Since 1993

KungFuClubIssaquah.com 425-392-4712

Eastside Catholic School WK$YH6(Â&#x2021;6DPPDPLVK:$ www.EastsideCatholic.org

521133

Apply to help guide North Bend economy

TV hosts showcase North Bend grower

527251

BUSINESS

SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

Live at the Dahlia Barn

High School Open House

SUNDAY, OCT. 9 ²SP


t4FQUFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

CALENDAR SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21

COMPUTER HELP: One-onOne Computer Assistance is 6 p.m. at Fall City Library. A KCLS volunteer instructor offers help. TALES : Young Toddler Story Time is 9:30 a.m. at Snoqualmie Library, for ages 6 to 24 months with an adult. TALES : Preschool Story Time is 10:30 a.m. at Sno-

qualmie Library, for ages 3 to 6 with an adult. ANIME: The teen Anime & Manga Club meets at 3 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. Watch anime movies, eat popcorn and practice your anime drawing. All skill levels welcome. LIBRARY PROGRAMS: Friends of the Snoqualmie Library meet at 6 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. TALES: Pajamarama Story Time is 6:30 p.m. at North

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Bend Library, all young children welcome with adult. LIVE MUSIC: Open house is 7 p.m. at The Black Dog, 8062 Railroad Ave., downtown Snoqualmie. All ages welcome.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 22 GAME ON: Teens can play video games, 3 p.m. at Fall City Library. CHESS GAMES: Snoqualmie Valley Chess Club meets at 7 p.m. at North Bend Library. Learn to play or get a game going. All ages and skill levels.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 23

SUNDAY, SEPT. 25

GAME ON: Teens can play video games, 3 p.m. at the North Bend Library. LIVE MUSIC: Oceans of Algebra plays at 7:30 p.m. at the Black Dog in downtown Snoqualmie. All ages welcome.

GET WRITING: SnoValley Writers Work Group meets at 3 p.m. at North Bend Library. Join local writers for writing exercises, critique and more. Contact snovalleywrites@ gmail.com for assignment prior to class. Adults only.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24

MONDAY, SEPT. 26

LIVE MUSIC: Danae Dean hosts a live CD recording, 7 p.m. at the Black Dog. Snoqualmie. All ages welcome.

TALES: Merry Monday Story Time is 11 a.m. at North Bend Library, for children from newborns through age 3 with an adult.

TALES : Afternoon Preschool Story Time is 1:30 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library, for ages 3 to 6 with an adult. TROUBLE-FREE TREES AND SHRUBS: Tired of landscape plants that require pesticide sprays to keep them looking their best? Learn about some woody plants that are beautiful, tough and naturally insect and disease-free, 7 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 27 MEET MUSIC TEACHERS: A reception for Snoqualmie Valley Schools’ new music teachers is 6 p.m. at Boxley’s in North Bend. All are welcome, the party is sponsored by Snoqualmie Valley Friends of the Performing Arts.

GET 2 DEALS IN 1. CenturyLink™ High-Speed Internet

Overlake Sleep Disorders Center

+

If you suffer from… rMBDLPGFOFSHZ

NO TERM COMMITMENT REQUIRED

rFYDFTTJWFTMFFQJOFTT rNFNPSZMPTT rMBDLPGDPODFOUSBUJPO

*When bundled with Unlimited Nationwide Calling plan.

rĚFRVFOUTOPSJOH

5 YEARS. 1 PRICE. 0 CONTRACT. T.

TO P U PS B M 12

Call 866.755.7543 (Español 888.273.8993) | Click centurylink.com/5years | Come In For locations, visit centurylink.com/storelocator

*Offers end 9/30/11. Offer for residential customers activating or adding listed High-Speed Internet and/or voice services in qualifying service bundle. Existing customers will lose current discounts by subscribing to this offer. Locked-In Offer applies only to the monthly recurring charge for the listed service for sixty consecutive months; excludes all taxes, fees, surcharges, and monthly recurring fees for modem/router and professional installation. Listed rate of $19.95/mo. applies to High-Speed Internet service with up to 12 Mbps and requires a subscription to CenturyLink Home Phone Unlimited. One offer only per account. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customer’s modem or router. Offer requires customer to remain in good standing and terminates if customer changes their account in any manner including any change to the required CenturyLink services (canceled, upgraded, downgraded), telephone number change, or change of physical location of any installed service (including customer moving from residence of installed services). General – Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services – including Locked-In Offer – or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions – All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.CenturyLink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges – Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a carrier Universal Service charge, carrier cost recovery surcharges, a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee, a one-time voice service activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Monthly Rate – Monthly rate applies while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are canceled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. High-Speed Internet – Connection speeds are based on sync rates. Download speeds will be up to 15% lower due to network requirements and may vary for reasons such as customer location, websites accessed, Internet congestion and customer equipment. CenturyLink Home Phone Unlimited – Applies to 1 residential phone line with direct-dial local and nationwide voice calling, designated calling features, and unlimited nationwide long distance service, including all U.S. states, Puerto Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands, and Canada; excludes commercial use, data and facsimile services (including dial-up Internet connections), conference lines, directory and operator assistance, chat lines, pay-per-call, calling card use, or multi-housing units. Usage may be monitored and customer may be required to show compliance if usage exceeds 5,000 minutes/mo. or non-compliance indicated. International calling billed separately. © 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

rIJHICMPPEQSFTTVSF rEJĐDVMUZGBMMJOHBTMFFQ

…you may have a sleep disorder. 95% of people who struggle with sleep disorders remain undiagnosed.

1100 - 112th Ave. NE, Suite 320 Bellevue, WA 98004-3819 www.oima.org/sleep_medicine

Board certified sleep physicians:

Dr. Scott Bonvallet Dr. Randip Singh

425.289.3000


4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt4FQUFNCFS t

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Serving the center

COSTS FROM 3 maintenance or even closure of Mill Pond Road. “Roads and the bridge are the two biggest issues,” Orton said. The historic 1921 Meadowbrook truss is expected to last at least another 14 years. King County rebuilt the bridge base in 2005 for $7 million. Orton estimates annual maintenance costs at about $8,300, and replacement, when it comes time, at roughly $10 million. That cost would likely be shared by other governments, he believes. Annexation also requires the city to take over maintenance on Mill Pond Road and parts of Reinig Road and 396th Drive. Those county roads need work to meet city standards. Complete reconstruction of the two miles of Mill Pond and 396th would cost about $700,000.

Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Diane Bradbury, left, presents Ruth Tolmasoff with several gifts from the Mount Si Senior Center Board of Directors at her retirement open house, Friday Sept. 2. Tolmasoff has retired from the center after more than 20 years on staff. She has been replaced by interim director Janet Fosness while the center continues a candidate search.

Quality of life Critics of the annexation, meanwhile, continue to question how the it would affect property values and quality of life. Speaking at a Monday, Sept. 12, city council discussion on a pre-annexation agreement, neighbor Warren Rose urged the city to back off. “This is a lose for the city, plain and simple,” said Rose,

518854

Serving th e Snoqualm Valley forie 50+ year s!

On 396th Drive, a citycounty compromise agreement keeps county ownership until half of all trips come from city limits. At that point, the city would assume responsibility for the drive. According to Orton’s assessment, the city is considering closing Mill Pond Road or turning it into a trail. Closure could be triggered by flooding or intense development in the area, and is subject to future council approval and a traffic study.

SNOQUALMIE RIDGE COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE

Experienced - Professional - Compassionate Care for your animals AT YOUR HOME Exams • Lab Work • Vaccinations • Health Certificates Parasite Control • Micro-Chipping • Supplements • Minor Surgery Behavior Counseling • Euthanasia Dr. Robert Hogan will work in conjunction with your regular vet or be a primary care giver for your animals

Friday, Sept. 23rd & Saturday, Sept. 24th 9am - 4pm

425.222.5665 • 425.761.0982 www.homeveterinaryservices.com cattle • horses • swine • goats llamas • alpacas • cats • dogs

who aired concerns over the opportunity costs—what annexation of the rally school would mean for homeowners. “You’ve got to do a helluva lot better,” he said. Fellow speaker Erin Ericson told the council to look into the value of the strip of residential property on the site, and asked them to consider rally car noise. “You have the casino concerts, and DirtFish on top of that.” Ericson said. “We get some really, really noisy days.” The results of this summer’s noise study of DirtFish, conducted August 4 to 7 by Seattlebased SSA Acoustics, showed DirtFish well within the limits of the law. “The sound levels that were measured at these locations really are in the same range... as ambient,” said SSA technician Alan Burt. Snoqualmie resident Dave Eiffert, whose property housed one of the remote sound monitoring stations, said the results from his home showed a fourdecibel increase during rally school hours. “That’s a 40 percent increase in sound on my property. I want you to consider that and think about your properties,” he told the city council. “A 40 percent increase is significant to my lifestyle.”

On paper, the balance sheet appears to show Snoqualmie with a $166,000 annual profit from the annexation. But Orton said the annex doesn’t follow strict cost-benefit rules, because of the unknowns surrounding the site’s future and the fact that revenues and expenses are from unconnected general and utilities budgets. “Relying on one year’s worth of data from DirtFish and what they think their rally car and retail sales would be—you can’t do that against a bridge that right now is being used by a population that has nothing to do with the annexation.” He would like more data about the kind of growth expected there, “not just at the DirtFish property but the areas that are served by Reinig Road and the bridge.” A 2008 traffic count saw 1,900 daily trips across the Meadowbrook Bridge, and Orton calculated 8 percent growth in trips per year based on county predictions. “There’s been no development,” Orton said. “Where is that coming from? The city plans a new study of the bridge and local traffic to get some answers. These studies are beginning soon, Public Works Director Dan Marcinko said, and should take roughly five weeks to complete.

526610

Over 200 homes participating Look for the Red Balloons!

425.396.5430 www.RidgeROA.com

515619

Your Telephone Service Is Your Lifeline.

A MODERN DAY MERCANTILE! Old Time Charm! 5PZTt%FDPS /PWFMUJFTt)PVTFXBSFT

425.888.1107

Much more than a hardware store! Located in Historic Downtown Snoqualmie

521139

Carmichael’s True Value . . .

Did you know that discounts on basic phone service are available to low-income consumers?

r Evening Appts. Available

For individuals living in a CenturyLink service area, please call or visit www.centurylink.com/lifeline to find out if you qualify for the Lifeline and Link-Up discount.

r New Patients Welcome Our Wonderful Staff at Kelly R. Garwood DDS

425.888.0867 Hours: Mon & Tue 7am - 6pm and Thurs 7am - 4pm 421 Main Ave S, PO Box 372, North Bend, WA 98045

525063

)BSEXBSF


t4FQUFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

Paul Fairchild

520435

Paul Edward Fairchild of North Bend died Monday, Sept. 12, in Snoqualmie. Paul was born on November

17, 1948 in Worcester, Mass., to Lemont and Gladys Fairchild. Paul was raised in Seattle, and claimed stomping grounds in Yakima. He married Anne Phillips in 1999 in Las Vegas, Nev. He was the owner of Paul Fairchild Painting, and a Ford Mustang collector. His family remembers Paul as a generous man who gave freely of his time, advice and money. Paul is survived by his wife Anne of North Bend; his stepchildren, Wayne James and Wanda Lynn; his adopted son-of-the-heart, Michael Carlin, 9 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren. He is also survived by six siblings, Sally Schoeneweiss, Shirley Kirchan-Person and husband

Kim Person, Bill Fairchild, Bob Fairchild and Dave Fairchild and wife Christine, a number of nieces and nephews, and numerous friends. The family thanks grandchildren Jessica and Nathan, who gave Anne a place to stay, and drove her to see Paul every

Places to Worship

SNOQUALMIE VALLEY Mount Si Lutheran Church

8086 Railroad Ave. SE

411 NE 8th St., North Bend 1BTUPS.BSL(SJGýUIt mtsilutheran@mtsilutheran.org www.mtsilutheran.org

EVERY SUNDAY @ 8:30AM & 10:00AM

Sunday Worship:

XXXMJGFQPJOUFDPNNVOJUZDPN

8:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 a.m. Praise Dir., Family & Youth Ministry â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lauren Frerichs â&#x20AC;&#x153;Likeâ&#x20AC;? us on Facebook â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mt. Si Lutheran Youth

"$)63$)'035)&&/5*3&7"--&: Join us at our new DT Snoqualmie location

...obituaries

JOGP!MJGFQPJOUFDPNNVOJUZDPN

For Youth Group Info, please contact the Church.

Open Minds Open Hearts Open Doors

Remember your loved one Place a paid obituary to honor those who have passed away, call Linda at 253.234.3506 paidobits@reporternewspapers.com

Snoqualmie United Methodist Church

Sunday Worship

9:00 am ~ Bless This House Band 10:30 am ~ the Chancel Choir

Paid obituaries include publication in the newspaper and online at www.valleyrecord.com

DT Snoqualmie since 1889 425-888-1697

All notices are subject to verification.

MT. SI

day, and Cory for making it to see Paul before he passed. A celebration of life and memorial service was Sept. 18, at the Sallal Grange Hall in North Bend. Friends are invited to sign the online guest book at www. flintofts.com.

38701 S.E. River at Railroad Ave www.snoqualmieumc.info

MINI STORAGE

3 Sizes Available

(425) 888-1319 521120

NORTH BEND













































































































































    

Crossword puzzle

Mass Schedule

39025 SE Alpha St. Snoqualmie, WA 98065 rXXXPMPTPSH Rev. Roy Baroma, Priest Administrator .BTTBU4U"OUIPOZ$IVSDI $BSOBUJPO 4VOEBZTBUBN 4QBOJTI.BTTBUQNFWFSZUI4VOEBZ rXXXTUBOUIPOZDBSOBUJPOPSH

Please contact church offices for additional Please contactinformation church offices for additional information

Across

Request a free information kit:

What causes tooth decay?

A host of factors are responsible for cavities to develop: â&#x20AC;˘ your childâ&#x20AC;&#x203A;s diet and frequency â&#x20AC;˘ saliva & bacteria in the mouth â&#x20AC;˘ hygiene frequency, effectiveness, and genetics.*

520553

Specializing in Dentistry for Infants, Childrens & Adolescents. Special care for nervous children dental health checkups. New Patients Welcome!

EastsidePediatricDentalGroup.com



4BUVSEBZQNr4VOEBZ BN

! %%%% %$% !% 425-888-2311 !% %% %"!% "%% % ! #% "%%  %%% %% %  %%% %%  % 

425-392-4048t/&(JMNBO#MWE *TTBRVBI



WELCOME TO OUR LADY OF SORROWS CATHOLIC CHURCH

Promote your EVENT across the entire state!  

Sudoku

See answers, page 14



OBITUARY

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

* Members American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry Certified, American Boad of Pediatric Dentistry

1. Romulusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; twin 6. Asian nurse 10. Light bulb unit 14. Blatant 15. ___ a one 16. ___ vera 17. Tobacco wrappers (2 wd) 20. Go this way and that 21. Easiest to reach 22. Napoleon, e.g. 24. Booty 25. To a small extent 30. Three-legged hot dish support 34. Star bursts 35. Cliffside dwelling 37. 1969 Peace Prize grp. 38. Battery contents 39. Montezuma, e.g. 40. Mint 41. Mamieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s man 42. Draft holder 43. Fire extinguishing agent 44. Inferior 46. Existing independently 48. New Mexico art community 50. 1999 Pulitzer Prizewinning play

51. Kings, e.g. 55. Commonplace 60. Technique using unpleasant stimuli to alter behavior (2 wd) 62. Circular, domed portable tent 63. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How ___!â&#x20AC;? 64. Object 65. Andyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s radio partner 66. Burglar 67. Mideast native

Down 1. Enormous birds of myth 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... there is no ___ angel but Loveâ&#x20AC;?: Shakespeare 3. Prefix with phone 4. ___-Altaic languages 5. Stanza with irregular lines 6. Amazon, e.g. 7. Algebra or trig 8. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ___ nowhere manâ&#x20AC;? (Beatles lyric) (2 wd) 9. Mesmerizing 10. Yellowstone sight 11. On the safe side, at sea 12. High spots 13. Makeup, e.g.

18. Give off, as light 19. Dig, so to speak 23. Pottery finish 25. Creeper 26. John ___, English philosopher 27. Harvard, Yale, Brown, etc. 28. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crikey!â&#x20AC;? 29. Abominable snowmen 31. Kind of concerto 32. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Four Quartetsâ&#x20AC;? poet 33. 1,000 kilograms 36. Extend, in a way 39. Act of extreme cruelty 40. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wheelsâ&#x20AC;? 42. ___ Tower, now Willis Tower 43. Intense dislikes 45. Commences 47. Core 49. Beach 51. Poet Angelou 52. Egg 53. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I, Claudiusâ&#x20AC;? role 54. Like a bug in a rug 56. Carbamide 57. Foot 58. Cowboy boot attachment 59. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Breckinridgeâ&#x20AC;? 61. Two-year-old sheep


.7 !$3#/-

PNW MarketPlace!

3NOQUALMIEĂĽ6ALLEYĂĽ2ECORDĂĽsĂĽ3EPTEMBERĂĽ ĂĽ

real estate for sale

real estate for rent - WA

jobs

home services



stuff

wheels

We make it easy to sell... right in your community

Local readers. Local sellers. Local buyers.

click! www.nw-ads.com email! classified@soundpublishing.com call toll free! 1.888.399.3999 or 1.800.388.2527 Real Estate for Rent King County .ORTHĂĽ"END

real estate for sale

Real Estate for Sale Lots/Acreage

,!+%ĂĽ3!--!-)3( 7A V E R L Y ĂĽ ( I L L S ĂĽ " O A TĂĽĂĽ , A U N C H ĂĽ 6 I E W ĂĽ , O T ĂĽĂĽ $OCKS ĂĽ -OORAGE ĂĽ 0IC ĂĽ NICĂĽ !REA ĂĽ 3WIMMINGĂĽĂĽ " E A C H ĂĽ , A U N C H ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ /"/ ĂĽ TERMS ĂĽĂĽ 0 2 ) # % ĂĽ 2 % $ 5 # % $ ĂĽĂĽ #ALLĂĽ *OHN ĂĽ ".7ĂĽ 2EAL ĂĽ TY ĂĽ  

Classifieds. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got you covered. 800-388-2527

"%!54)&5,ĂĽ ĂĽ BEDROOM ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ BATHĂĽ RAMBLERĂĽ WITHĂĽ  CARĂĽĂĽ G A R A G E ĂĽ     ĂĽ 3 Q & T ĂĽĂĽ !MAZINGĂĽ UPDATEDĂĽ HOMEĂĽĂĽ %VERYTHINGĂĽ ISĂĽ NEWĂĽ ,O ĂĽ C A T E D ĂĽ I N ĂĽ 3 I L V E R C R E E KĂĽĂĽ .OR THĂĽ "ENDĂĽ #LOSEĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ EVERYTHINGĂĽ .EWĂĽ FLOORS ĂĽĂĽ KITCHEN ĂĽ PAINTĂĽ ANDĂĽ CAR ĂĽ PETINGĂĽ 7ONDERFULĂĽ DENĂĽĂĽ FORĂĽ OFFICESTUDYĂĽ ,ARGEĂĽĂĽ KITCHENĂĽ ANDĂĽ DININGĂĽ AREAĂĽĂĽ 'REATĂĽ LOTĂĽ ATĂĽ ENDĂĽ OFĂĽ CUL ĂĽ DE SACĂĽ %LECTRICĂĽ HEATĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ F I R E P L A C E ĂĽ W I T H ĂĽ I N S E R T ĂĽĂĽ 'REATĂĽ VALUEĂĽ ATĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ MONTHĂĽ &,$ ĂĽ REFERENCESĂĽĂĽ REQUIREDĂĽ !VAILABLEĂĽ NOWĂĽĂĽ #ALLĂĽ2OBĂĽ   www.nw-ads.com

3!--!-)3( "5),$).'ĂĽ,/4 )NGLEWOODĂĽ (ILL ĂĽ !LLĂĽ 0ER ĂĽ Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll leave the site on for you. MITTED ĂĽ 2EADYĂĽ TOĂĽ "UILD ĂĽĂĽ /WNERĂĽ  OBOĂĽĂĽ Apartments for Rent TERMS ĂĽ 0RICEĂĽ REDUCEDĂĽĂĽ King County #ALLĂĽ *OHN ĂĽ ".7ĂĽ 2EAL ĂĽ 3NOQUALMIE TY ĂĽ  

&INDĂĽ)TĂĽ"UYĂĽ)TĂĽ3ELLĂĽ)T ,OOKINGĂĽFORĂĽTHEĂĽRIDE OFĂĽYOURĂĽLIFE WWWNW ADSCOM ĂĽHOURSĂĽAĂĽDAY

Office Hours: 8-5pm Monday to Friday

Classifieds. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got you covered. 800-388-2527

Home Services General Contractors

h9OURĂĽ0ROJECTĂĽĂĽ /URĂĽ0RIDEvĂĽ Residential & Commercial No Job Too Small

#ALLĂĽ  

jobs

Employment General

Employment Transportation/Drivers

#!22)%2ĂĽĂĽ 2/54%3ĂĽĂĽ !6!),!",%

$2)6%23ĂĽ ĂĽ #OMPANYĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ ,EASEĂĽ ĂĽ 7ORKĂĽ FORĂĽ USĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ LETĂĽ USĂĽ WORKĂĽ FORĂĽ YOUĂĽ 5N ĂĽ BEATABLEĂĽ CAREERĂĽ OPPORTU ĂĽ NITIESĂĽ 4RAINEE ĂĽ #OMPA ĂĽ N Y ĂĽ D R I V E R  ĂĽ , E A S EĂĽĂĽ /PERATORSĂĽ EAR NĂĽ UPĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ    K ĂĽ , E A S E ĂĽ 4RA I N E R SĂĽĂĽ E A R N ĂĽ U P ĂĽ T O ĂĽ    +ĂĽĂĽ   ĂĽ WWWCEN x TRALDRIVINGJOBSNET

).ĂĽ9/52ĂĽĂĽ !2%! #ALLĂĽ4ODAY     '2%!4ĂĽ 0!9 ĂĽ STAR TĂĽ TO ĂĽ DAYĂĽ 4RAVELĂĽ RESORTĂĽ LOCA ĂĽ TIONSĂĽ ACROSSĂĽ !MER ICAĂĽĂĽ WITHĂĽ YOUNG ĂĽ SUCCESSFULĂĽĂĽ BU S I N E S S ĂĽ GR O U PĂĽ 0A I DĂĽĂĽ TRAINING ĂĽ TRAVELĂĽ ANDĂĽ LODG ĂĽ INGĂĽ  

, / # ! , ĂĽ 3 % !4 4 , %ĂĽĂĽ 2EEFERĂĽ 2UNĂĽ 'REATĂĽ 0AYĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ "ENEFITSĂĽ #$, ! ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ YEARĂĽ %XPERIENCEĂĽ 2E ĂĽ QUIREDĂĽ %STENSONĂĽ ,O ĂĽ GISTICSĂĽ 4OĂĽ APPLYĂĽ VISITĂĽĂĽ WWWGOELCCOMĂĽ #ALLĂĽĂĽ    

Janitorial Employment

*!.)4/2 7!.4%$

0ARTĂĽTIME

ĂĽHOURSĂĽPERĂĽDAY ĂĽ MORNINGS ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ #ALLĂĽ  

stuff

Employment Transportation/Drivers

Cemetery Plots

$2)6%23ĂĽ #ENTRALĂĽ 2E ĂĽ FRIGERATEDĂĽ)3ĂĽ'2/7).'ĂĽ (IR INGĂĽ %XPER IENCEDĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ .ON %XPERIENCEDĂĽ $RIV ĂĽ E R S  ĂĽ ĂĽ # $ , ĂĽ 4R A I N I N GĂĽĂĽ !VAILABLEĂĽ ĂĽ %MPLOYĂĽ 4O ĂĽ DAYĂĽ ĂĽ !VERAGEĂĽ   ĂĽ  ĂĽ  

&INDĂĽITĂĽFASTĂĽANDĂĽEASY WWWNW ADSCOM

 ĂĽ #%-%4%29ĂĽ 0LOTĂĽ ATĂĽĂĽ 2EDMONDSĂĽ BEAUTIFULĂĽ #E ĂĽ DARĂĽ ,AWNSĂĽ ANDĂĽ -EMORIALĂĽĂĽ 0ARKĂĽ 4AKEĂĽ CAREĂĽ OFĂĽ ALLĂĽĂĽ YOURĂĽ FUNERALĂĽ NEEDSĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ ONEĂĽ LOCATIONĂĽ .EWĂĽ 2HO ĂĽ DIEĂĽ LOTĂĽ $ ĂĽ SPACEĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ 3ELLERĂĽ WILLĂĽ PAYĂĽĂĽ TRANSFERĂĽ FEEĂĽ #ALLĂĽ  ĂĽ  

For All Your Recruitment Needs

Home Services Landscape Services

Home Services Tree/Shrub Care

! ĂĽ(!5,).'

SHELLYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GARDENING

+./,,ĂĽ42%%ĂĽ3%26)#%

7EĂĽREMOVERECYCLEĂĽĂĽ *UNKWOODYARDETC &ASTĂĽ3ERVICEĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽYRSĂĽ%XPERIENCE ĂĽ 2EASONABLEĂĽRATES #ALLĂĽ2ELIABLEĂĽ-ICHAELĂĽĂĽ



,IC)33!10)*

h/NEĂĽ#ALLĂĽĂĽĂĽ $OESĂĽ)TĂĽ!LLv

ĂĽ7INDOWSĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ$OORS

ĂĽ#ARPENTRYĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ$ECKS

ĂĽ&ENCESĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ&RAMING

ĂĽ$RYWALLĂĽANDĂĽ2EPAIRS ,ICĂĽ ĂĽ"ONDEDĂĽ ĂĽ)NSURED 3TEVE ĂĽ   Home Services Handyperson

ANYSEASONHANDY MAN GMAILCOM

sĂĽ sĂĽ sĂĽ

The YWCA of Seattle-King County-Snohomish County ISĂĽSEEKINGĂĽA #534/$)!.ĂĽ 4HISĂĽ POSITIONĂĽ PERFORMSĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ FULLĂĽ RANGEĂĽ OFĂĽ JANITORIAL ĂĽĂĽ CUSTODIAL ĂĽ ANDĂĽ MAINTE ĂĽ NANCEĂĽ TASKSĂĽ TOĂĽ ENSUREĂĽĂĽ announcements CLEANĂĽ ANDĂĽ SAFEĂĽ FACILITIESĂĽĂĽ FORĂĽ THEĂĽ97#!ĂĽ4ASKSĂĽ AREĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ"OTTOMLESSĂĽGARAGEĂĽSALE NORMALLYĂĽ DETERMINEDĂĽ BYĂĽĂĽ Announcements SPECIlCĂĽ INSTRUCTIONSĂĽ FROMĂĽĂĽ     AĂĽ SUPERVISORĂĽ ORĂĽ BYĂĽ FOL ĂĽ LOWINGĂĽ WELL DEFINEDĂĽ PRO ĂĽ !$/04)/.ĂĽ ĂĽ !CTIVE ĂĽ FUN ĂĽ CEDURES ĂĽ METHODS ĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ LOVINGĂĽ TEACHERSĂĽ WITHĂĽ KINDĂĽĂĽ P R A C T I C E S  ĂĽ    H R SĂĽĂĽ HEARTSĂĽ ĂĽ CARINGĂĽ FAMILIESĂĽĂĽ HRĂĽĂĽ$ETAILS HOPEĂĽ TOĂĽ ADOPTĂĽ ĂĽ 0LENTYĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ www.ywcaworks.org TIME ĂĽ ATTENTIONĂĽ ĂĽ LOVEĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ 2ESPĂĽTO OFFERĂĽ AĂĽ CHILDĂĽ ,ARGEĂĽ YARD ĂĽĂĽ RWHIRING@ywcaworks.org NEIGHBORHOODĂĽ WITHĂĽ KIDS ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ HAPPYĂĽ BABYSĂĽ ROOMĂĽĂĽ &INDĂĽ)TĂĽ"UYĂĽ)TĂĽ3ELLĂĽ)T 7EĂĽ ENJOYĂĽ TEACHING ĂĽ MU ĂĽ ,OOKINGĂĽFORĂĽTHEĂĽRIDE SIC ĂĽ PHOTOGRAPHY ĂĽ BIKING ĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽYOURĂĽLIFE  ĂĽ T H E ĂĽ O U T D O O R S ĂĽ & O RĂĽĂĽ WWWNW ADSCOM MOREĂĽ INFOR MATIONĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ ĂĽHOURSĂĽAĂĽDAY PHOTOSĂĽ  ĂĽOR JOHNANDSHANNON Employment Employment GMAILCOM Finance Education / R ĂĽ C A L L ĂĽ O U R ĂĽ A D O P T I O NĂĽĂĽ ATTORNEY ĂĽ -ARKĂĽ $EMARAY ĂĽĂĽ !,,)%$ĂĽ (%!,4(ĂĽ CAREERĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ #/--%2#)!,ĂĽ 2EALĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ            ĂĽĂĽ TRAININGĂĽ ĂĽ !TTENDĂĽ COLLEGEĂĽĂĽ % S T A T E ĂĽ , O A N S  ĂĽ & A S TĂĽĂĽ 4HANKĂĽYOU ĂĽ ONLINEĂĽ *OBĂĽ PLACE ĂĽ #ASH#LOSINGSĂĽ %QUITYĂĽĂĽ MENTĂĽ ASSISTANCEĂĽ #OM ĂĽ $RIVEN ĂĽ !PARTMENTS ĂĽ -UL ĂĽ &INDĂĽ)TĂĽ"UYĂĽ)TĂĽ3ELLĂĽ)T PUTERĂĽ !VAILABLEĂĽ &INAN ĂĽ T I 5 S E ĂĽ 7A R E H O U S E S ĂĽĂĽ ,OOKINGĂĽFORĂĽTHEĂĽRIDE C I A L ĂĽ ! I D ĂĽ I F ĂĽ Q U A L I F I E D ĂĽĂĽ -ANUFACTURING ĂĽ 2ETAIL ĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽYOURĂĽLIFE 3#(%6ĂĽ CER TIFIEDĂĽ #ALLĂĽĂĽ "USINESS-EDICALĂĽ /FFIC ĂĽ WWWNW ADSCOM           ĂĽĂĽ ESĂĽ #OMPLEXĂĽ $EALSĂĽ #ALLĂĽĂĽ ĂĽHOURSĂĽAĂĽDAY WWW#ENTURA/NLINECOM 'AR YĂĽ    ĂĽĂĽ Classifieds. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got you !44%.$ĂĽ #/,,%'%ĂĽ ON ĂĽ WWWSHEPSFUNDINGCOM covered. 800-388-2527 LINEĂĽ FROMĂĽ (OMEĂĽ -EDI ĂĽ , / # ! , ĂĽ 0 2 ) 6!4 % ĂĽ ) . ĂĽ 6%34/2ĂĽ LOANSĂĽ MONEYĂĽĂĽ CALĂĽ "USINESSĂĽ 0ARALEGALĂĽĂĽ ONĂĽ REALĂĽ ESTATEĂĽ EQUITYĂĽ )ĂĽĂĽ !$/04)/.ĂĽ ,OVING ĂĽĂĽ !CCOUNTINGĂĽ #RIMINALĂĽĂĽ L O A N ĂĽ O N ĂĽ H O U S E S ĂĽ R AWĂĽĂĽ ATHLETIC ĂĽ FINANCIALLYĂĽ SE ĂĽ *USTICEĂĽ *OBĂĽ PLACEMENTĂĽĂĽ LAND ĂĽ COMMERCIALĂĽ PROPER ĂĽ CURE ĂĽ STABLEĂĽ #HRISTIANĂĽĂĽ ASSISTANCEĂĽ #OMPUTERĂĽĂĽ TYĂĽ ANDĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽ DEVELOP ĂĽ FAMILY ĂĽ STAYĂĽ ATĂĽ HOMEĂĽĂĽ AVAILABLEĂĽ &INANCIALĂĽ !IDĂĽ IFĂĽĂĽ M E N T  ĂĽ # A L L ĂĽ % R I C ĂĽ A TĂĽĂĽ -OM ĂĽ WOULDĂĽ LOVEĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ QUALIFIEDĂĽ #ALLĂĽ   ĂĽ     ĂĽ        ĂĽĂĽ TALKĂĽ TOĂĽ YOUĂĽ IFĂĽ YOUĂĽ AREĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ WWW#ENTURA/N ĂĽ WWWFOSSMORTGAGECOM CONSIDERINGĂĽ ADOPTION ĂĽĂĽ LINECOM EXPENSESĂĽ PAIDĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ   ĂĽ &INDĂĽ)TĂĽ"UYĂĽ)TĂĽ3ELLĂĽ)T ,OOKINGĂĽFORĂĽTHEĂĽRIDE  ĂĽCELLTEXT OFĂĽYOURĂĽLIFE WWWSHAWNLORICOM WWWNW ADSCOM SHAWNLORI COMCASTNET ĂĽHOURSĂĽAĂĽDAY

Home Services Hauling & Cleanup

I.P.I CONSTRUCTION

sĂĽ sĂĽ

$)6/2#%ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ WITHĂĽ CHILDRENĂĽ .OĂĽ COURTĂĽĂĽ APPEARANCESĂĽ #OMPLETEĂĽĂĽ PREPARATIONĂĽ )NCLUDES ĂĽĂĽ CUSTODY ĂĽ SUPPORT ĂĽ PROP ĂĽ ER TYĂĽ DIVISIONĂĽ ANDĂĽ BILLSĂĽĂĽ " " " ĂĽ M E M B E R ĂĽĂĽ     ĂĽ        ĂĽĂĽ W W W  P A R A L E G A L A L T E R N A x TIVESCOMDIVORCE USACOM

Employment Professional

ASK THE EXPERT

0RESSUREĂĽ7ASHING ' U T T E R  $OWNSPOUTS $RYWALLĂĽ2EPAIR )NT%XTĂĽ0AINTING ,ICENSED"ONDEDĂĽĂĽ

$OUGĂĽ(ISEY

  

ANYSEASONHANDYMAN

GMAILCOM

Classifieds. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got you covered. 800-388-2527 Home Services Landscape Services

TOMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CONCRETE SPECIALIST All Types Of Concrete %SJWFXBZt1BWFS4UPOFT 3FUBJOJOH8BMMt4UBNQFE$PODSFUF www.tomlandscaping.com 520997

print & online 24/7

real estate for rent - WA

ĂĽ "%$2//-ĂĽ AVAILĂĽ NOW ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ  0LEXĂĽ INĂĽ 3NO ĂĽ QUALMIEĂĽ ĂĽ MINUTESĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ )SSAQUAHĂĽ .OĂĽ SMOKING ĂĽĂĽ NOĂĽ PETSĂĽ &IRST ĂĽ LAST ĂĽ DAM ĂĽ AGEĂĽ  

Announcements

Tom 425-443-5474 25 years experience

#POEr*OTr-JD50.4$$-.0

! ĂĽ3(%%2 '!2$%.).'ĂĽĂĽĂĽ ,!.$3#!0).'

ĂĽ#LEANUPĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ4RIMMING

ĂĽ7EEDINGĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ0RUNING

ĂĽ3ODĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ3EED

ĂĽ"ARKĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ2OCKERY

#OMPLETEĂĽ9ARDĂĽ7ORK ĂĽĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ   ĂĽĂĽ,ICĂĽ!3(%',*-

All Kinds Of Yard Work: 0RUNING ĂĽ7EEDING ĂĽĂĽ "ARK ĂĽ2ESEED ĂĽ(EDGEĂĽĂĽ 4RIMMING ĂĽ4HATCHING &REEĂĽ%STIMATE 3ENIORĂĽ$ISCOUNT

  ĂĽĂĽ    ĂĽAnytime

STEVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GARDENING BARK - WEEDTRIM - PRUNE Sod - Retaining Walls-Paving-Patios General Cleanup ĂĽ STEVEGLKZ

Home Services RooďŹ ng/Siding

2//&).'ĂĽ 2%-/$%,).' 3ENIORĂĽ$ISCOUNTS &REEĂĽ%STIMATES %XPERTĂĽ7ORK   

!MERICANĂĽ'ENĂĽ#ONTRACTORĂĽ "ETTERĂĽ"USINESSĂĽ"UREAU ,ICĂĽ!-%2)'#"

h4HEĂĽ4REEĂĽ0EOPLEv 4REEĂĽ2EMOVAL4HINNING ĂĽĂĽ 3TUMPĂĽ'RINDING

"RUSHĂĽ(AULING ĂĽ%TC &2%%ĂĽ%34)-!4%3

ĂĽ

   WWWKNOLLTREESERVICECOM ,)#%.3%$ ĂĽ"/.$%$ ĂĽ).352%$

www.nw-ads.com Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll leave the site on for you.

&INDĂĽITĂĽFASTĂĽANDĂĽEASY WWWNW ADSCOM SOLD IT? FOUND IT? Let us know by calling 1-800-388-2527 so we can cancel your ad. Bottomless garage sale. $37/no word limit. Reach thousands of readers. Go online: nw-ads.com 24 hours a day or Call 800-388-2527 to get more information. &INDĂĽ)TĂĽ"UYĂĽ)TĂĽ3ELLĂĽ)T ,OOKINGĂĽFORĂĽTHEĂĽRIDE OFĂĽYOURĂĽLIFE WWWNW ADSCOM ĂĽHOURSĂĽAĂĽDAY

WWWNW ADSCOM Classifieds. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got you &INDĂĽYOURĂĽDREAMĂĽJOBĂĽON LINE covered. 800-388-2527

Tiffany Walker Recruitment Solutions Specialist 10 years print media experience 866-603-3213 twalker@soundpublishing.com With options ranging from one time advertising to annual campaigns, I have the products and the expertise to meet your needs. Whether you need to target your local market or want to cover the Puget Sound area,

WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;VE GOT YOU COVERED!


t4FQUFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

Schools to practice evac on Tolt Highlands Road Tolt Middle School, Carnation Elementary School, and the Riverview Learning Center will all conduct an annual Tolt Dam evacuation drill Wednesday, Sept. 28, at 9:30 a.m. During the drill, students from all three buildings will gather at a designated location on Tolt Highlands Road. Drivers are asked to avoid this road between 9:30 a.m. and 10:15 a.m.

















































































































































Cemetery Plots

!#!#)!ĂĽ -EMORIALĂĽ 0ARK ĂĽĂĽ h"IRCHĂĽ 'ARDENv ĂĽ  ĂĽ ADJA ĂĽ CENTĂĽ CEMETERYĂĽ PLOTS ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ   ĂĽ 3 E L L I N G ĂĽ     ĂĽĂĽ EACHĂĽ ORĂĽ  ĂĽ BOTHĂĽ ,O ĂĽ CATEDĂĽ INĂĽ 3HORELINEĂĽ ĂĽ .ĂĽĂĽ 3EATTLEĂĽ #ALLĂĽ ORĂĽ EMAILĂĽĂĽ %MMONSĂĽ *OHNSON ĂĽ  ĂĽ        ĂĽĂĽ EAJ MSNCOM 35.3%4ĂĽ (),,ĂĽ -EMORIALĂĽĂĽ 0ARKĂĽ INĂĽ "ELLEVUEĂĽ 'AR ĂĽ DENĂĽ OFĂĽ $EVOTION ĂĽ LOTĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ SPACEĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ  ĂĽ SIDEĂĽ BYĂĽĂĽ S I D E ĂĽ 4O P ĂĽ O F ĂĽ T H E ĂĽ H I L L ĂĽĂĽ "EAUTIFULĂĽ VIEWĂĽ 6ALUEĂĽ ATĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ EACHĂĽ 3ELLINGĂĽ FORĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ BOTHĂĽ ORĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ E A C H ĂĽ 3 E L L E R ĂĽ W I L L ĂĽ P AYĂĽĂĽ TRANSFERĂĽ FEEĂĽ 0LEASEĂĽ CALLĂĽĂĽ *ESSICAĂĽ FORĂĽ DETAILSĂĽ  ĂĽ   35.3%4ĂĽ (),,3ĂĽ -EMORI ĂĽ ALĂĽ 0ARKĂĽ #EMETERYĂĽ (AVEĂĽĂĽ AĂĽ SERENEĂĽ ANDĂĽ PEACEFULĂĽĂĽ SETTINGĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽ ,INCOLNĂĽĂĽ 'ARDENĂĽ !DJACENTĂĽ TOĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ * A P A N E S E ĂĽ M E M O R I A L ĂĽĂĽ "EAUTIFULĂĽ VIEWĂĽ FORĂĽ YOURĂĽĂĽ LOVEDĂĽ ONESĂĽ "ĂĽ SPACESĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ  ĂĽ EACHĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ FORĂĽ THEĂĽ PAIRĂĽ )N ĂĽ CLUDESĂĽ ENDOWMENTĂĽ CAREĂĽĂĽ 3ELLERĂĽ WILLĂĽ PAYĂĽ TRANSFERĂĽĂĽ FEEĂĽ #ALLĂĽ $AISYĂĽ   ĂĽ 

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Bikes for books Masons, Singletrack program encourage schoolchildren to read Students at North Bend, Snoqualmie, Opstad and Cascade View Elementary Schools will soon be cracking the books to win their way onto Hotrock 24â&#x20AC;? 21-speed girls and boys mountain bikes. Eight boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bicycles were delivered to the four Upper Valley elementary schools this month by the brothers of North Bendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Unity Masonic Lodge No. 198. The mountain bikes were enthusiastically received by each schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s librarians, who quickly put them on prominent display. During the school year, the librarians will use the bike pairs to enhance each schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ongoing reading programs to encourage the children to read more books. In late March or early April 2012, a drawing will be held and one boy and one girl bookworm from each school will each be awarded a new bike and helmet as a prize for the most books read. At North Bend Elementary, Librarian Lisa Radmer orchestrates a six-week reading challenge during the school year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parents love the Bikes for Books program, and comment how the potential reward of a new bike motivates their kids to read more,â&#x20AC;? Radmer said.

8JMMJBN4IBX4UBGG1IPUP

Gathering new bikes for distribution to Valley schools for the Unity Masonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bikes for Books program are, from left, James Whitney, Kenny Cason, Jonathan Seaton, Mark Goodwin and Brandon Schmid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And even after the bikes are awarded, the children get into the habit of devouring book after book. Through the Bikes for Books program, they learn to love to read.â&#x20AC;? The Unity Masonic Lodge Bikes for Books program was started in 2007 with two schools and in 2008 was expanded from two to four Upper Valley elementary schools. Bikes for Books is funded through donations from the members of the lodge in an annual raffle and in partnership with Loren and Diane Morris of Singletrack Cycles in North Bend. Specialized cicycle company matched the donation

Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

./4)#% 7ASHINGTONĂĽ 3TATEĂĽ LAWĂĽĂĽ REQUIRESĂĽ WOODĂĽ SELLERSĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ PROVIDEĂĽ ANĂĽ INVOICEĂĽ RE ĂĽ CEIPT ĂĽ THATĂĽ SHOWSĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ S E L L E R S ĂĽ A N D ĂĽ B U Y E R SĂĽĂĽ NAMEĂĽ ANDĂĽ ADDRESSĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ DATEĂĽ DELIVEREDĂĽ 4HEĂĽĂĽ INVOICEĂĽ SHOULDĂĽ ALSOĂĽ STATEĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ PRICE ĂĽ THEĂĽ QUANTITYĂĽĂĽ DELIVEREDĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ QUAN ĂĽ TITYĂĽ UPONĂĽ WHICHĂĽ THEĂĽ PRICEĂĽĂĽ ISĂĽ BASEDĂĽ 4HEREĂĽ SHOULDĂĽĂĽ BEĂĽ AĂĽ STATEMENTĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ TYPEĂĽ ANDĂĽ QUALITYĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ WOOD 7HENĂĽ YOUĂĽ BUYĂĽ FIREWOODĂĽĂĽ WRITEĂĽ THEĂĽ SELLERSĂĽ PHONEĂĽĂĽ NUMBERĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ LICENSEĂĽĂĽ PLATEĂĽ NUMBERĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ DE ĂĽ LIVERYĂĽVEHICLE 4HEĂĽ LEGALĂĽ MEASUREĂĽ FORĂĽĂĽ FIREWOODĂĽ INĂĽ 7ASHINGTONĂĽĂĽ ISĂĽ THEĂĽ CORDĂĽ ORĂĽ AĂĽ FRACTIONĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ AĂĽ CORDĂĽ ĂĽ %STIMATEĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ C O R D ĂĽ BY ĂĽ V I S U A L I Z I N G ĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ FOUR FOOTĂĽ BYĂĽ EIGHT FOOTĂĽĂĽ SPACEĂĽ lLLEDĂĽ WITHĂĽ WOODĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ A ĂĽ H E I G H T ĂĽ O F ĂĽ FO U R ĂĽ FE E T ĂĽĂĽ -OSTĂĽ LONGĂĽ BEDĂĽ PICKUPĂĽĂĽ TRUCKSĂĽ HAVEĂĽ BEDSĂĽ THATĂĽĂĽ AREĂĽ CLOSEĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ FOUR FOOTĂĽĂĽ BYĂĽ FOOTĂĽDIMENSION 4O ĂĽ M A K E ĂĽ A ĂĽ F I R E W O O DĂĽĂĽ COMPLAINT ĂĽ CALLĂĽ   ĂĽ ĂĽ HTTPAGRWAGOVINSPECTIONxx WEIGHTS-EASURES &IREWOODINFORMATIONASPX

Dogs '%2-!.ĂĽ3(%0(%2$ĂĽ

flea market

Dogs

Campers/Canopies

5 + # ĂĽ 2 / 4 4 7 % ) , % 2ĂĽĂĽ PUPPIESĂĽ ĂĽ WEEKS ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ MALESĂĽ LEFTĂĽ (OLLANDĂĽ LINEĂĽĂĽ "REDĂĽ FORĂĽ TEMPER MENT ĂĽĂĽ LOOKSĂĽ ANDĂĽ INTELLIGENCEĂĽĂĽ 0 A Y M E N T S ĂĽ A C C E P T E D ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ TOĂĽ ĂĽ 3HOTS ĂĽĂĽ VETĂĽ CHECKEDĂĽ #ALLĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ WWWANDRES ĂĽ CHIHUAHUASCOM

  ĂĽ # ! . / 0 9 ĂĽ ) 3 ĂĽ ! .ĂĽĂĽ h !  2  % v ĂĽ B R A N D ĂĽ & I T SĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ &ORDĂĽ 3UPERĂĽĂĽ $UTYĂĽ LONGĂĽ BEDĂĽ PICKUPĂĽĂĽ %XCELLENTĂĽ CONDITION ĂĽ JUSTĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ YE A R S ĂĽ N EW    ĂĽ 7 H I T EĂĽĂĽ WITHĂĽ INTERIORĂĽ LIGHT ĂĽ SHELFĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ DRAWERSĂĽ ONĂĽ EACHĂĽ SIDEĂĽĂĽ +E E P ĂĽ YO U R ĂĽ T O O L S ĂĽ S A FEĂĽĂĽ WITHĂĽ LOCKINGĂĽ SIDEĂĽ REARĂĽĂĽ DOORSĂĽ ANDĂĽ NOĂĽ WINDOWSĂĽĂĽ     ĂĽ +E N T ĂĽ       ĂĽ 

Heavy Equipment Dogs

3 !7 - ) , , 3 ĂĽ F R O M ĂĽ O N L YĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ -AKEĂĽ -ONEYĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ 3AVEĂĽ -ONEYĂĽ WITHĂĽ YOURĂĽĂĽ OWNĂĽ BANDMILLĂĽ ĂĽ #UTĂĽ LUM ĂĽ BERĂĽ ANYĂĽ DIMENSIONĂĽ )NĂĽĂĽ STOCKĂĽ READYĂĽ TOĂĽ SHIPĂĽ &REEĂĽĂĽ )NFOĂĽ ĂĽ $6$ĂĽ WWW.OR ĂĽ W O O D ĂĽ 3 A W ĂĽ MILLSCOM.ĂĽ   ĂĽ  ĂĽ%XTĂĽ. Miscellaneous

'/,$ĂĽ #,!)-ĂĽ 0LACER ĂĽĂĽ "LUETTĂĽ 0ASSĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ /"/ĂĽ  

Sell it free in the Flea 1-866-825-901 Musical Instruments

9!-!(!ĂĽ UPRIGHTĂĽ PIANOĂĽĂĽ FORĂĽ SALEĂĽ $ETAILSĂĽ ĂĽ 4ĂĽĂĽ UPRIGHT ĂĽ vĂĽ ( ĂĽ vĂĽ 7 ĂĽĂĽ vĂĽ $ĂĽ #OLOR ĂĽ 0OLISHEDĂĽĂĽ % B O N Y ĂĽ  B L A C K ĂĽ W I T HĂĽĂĽ 3ELLĂĽITĂĽFORĂĽFREEĂĽINĂĽTHEĂĽ&,%! MATCHINGĂĽ BENCHĂĽ #ONDI ĂĽ THEFLEA SOUNDPUBLISHINGCOM TIONĂĽ EXCELLENTĂĽ ĂĽ BEAUTIFULĂĽĂĽ TONE ĂĽ MADEĂĽ INĂĽ *APANĂĽĂĽ Advertise your service O W N E D ĂĽ  ĂĽ Y E A R SĂĽĂĽ 800-388-2527 or nw-ads.com ANDĂĽ ONLYĂĽ USEDĂĽ ĂĽ YEARSĂĽĂĽ !SKĂĽ ĂĽ ORĂĽ BESTĂĽ OFFERĂĽĂĽ 0 L E A S E ĂĽ C O N T A C T ĂĽ    ĂĽ SOLD IT? FOUND IT?   4 7/ ĂĽ   ĂĽ # % - % 4 % 29ĂĽĂĽ Let us know by calling LOTS ĂĽ SIDEĂĽ BYĂĽ SIDE ĂĽ #EDARĂĽĂĽ 1-800-388-2527 so we Wanted/Trade ,AWNSĂĽ -EMORIALĂĽ 0ARKĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ can cancel your ad. 2 E D M O N D ĂĽ " O T H ĂĽ H AVEĂĽĂĽ Bottomless garage sale. 7),,ĂĽ 42!$%ĂĽ ĂĽ &ORDĂĽĂĽ PER PETUALĂĽ ANDĂĽ ENDOW ĂĽ MENTĂĽ CAREĂĽ ĂĽ EACHĂĽĂĽ $37/no word limit. Reach & ĂĽ PICKUPĂĽ WITHĂĽ ELEC ĂĽ TR ICĂĽ LIFTĂĽ ANDĂĽ THREEĂĽ FULLĂĽĂĽ ORĂĽ ĂĽ FORĂĽ BOTHĂĽ4RANS ĂĽ thousands of readers. FERĂĽ FEEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ PAIDĂĽ BYĂĽĂĽ Go online: nw-ads.com DRESSĂĽ 3UZUKIĂĽ MOTORCYLESĂĽĂĽ FO R ĂĽ S M A L L ĂĽ L A T E ĂĽ M O D E LĂĽĂĽ S E L L E RĂĽ # A L L ĂĽ       ĂĽ 24 hours a day or Call QUALITYĂĽ PICKUPĂĽ #ALLĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ )FĂĽ NOĂĽ ANSWER ĂĽ LEAVEĂĽĂĽ 800-388-2527 to get   MESSAGE more information. &IREWOODINFORMATIONASPXHTTPAGRWAGOVINSPECTIONWEIGHTS-EASURES&IREWOODINFORMATIONASPX

pets/animals

bike for bike. Manufactured by Specialized Bicycle Company, the popular Hotrock mountain bike and bicycle helmet retail for $410 and $45 each. Donations can be made to the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Unity Masonic Lodge Bikes for Booksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bank account at the North Bend branch of Sterling Savings Bank, at Singletrack Cycles located at 119 West North Bend Way in North Bend, and to Bikes4Books; P.O.Box 563, North Bend WA 98045-0563. For information, contact Mark Goodwin at (425) 269-3688 or Bikes4Books@unity198.org, or Singletrack Cycles, (425) 888-0101.

!+#ĂĽ 'ERMANĂĽ 3HEPHERDĂĽĂĽ PUPPIESĂĽ ĂĽ "REDĂĽ FORĂĽ INTELLI ĂĽ G E N C E ĂĽ A N D ĂĽ T E M P E R A ĂĽ MENTĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ "EAUTIFULĂĽ MALESĂĽĂĽ AVAILABLEĂĽ ĂĽ "ORNĂĽ   ĂĽĂĽ 2EADYĂĽ FORĂĽ AĂĽ FAMILYĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ garage sales - WA THEIRĂĽ OWNĂĽ ĂĽ STĂĽ 3HOTSĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ W O R M E D ĂĽ R E G U L A R L Y ĂĽĂĽ ! $ / 2 ! " , % ĂĽ ! + #ĂĽĂĽ % N U M C L A WĂĽ     ĂĽ . OĂĽĂĽ Garage/Moving Sales King County &RENCHĂĽ "ULLDOGĂĽ 0UPPIESĂĽĂĽ CALLSĂĽ AFTERĂĽ ĂĽ PLEASEĂĽĂĽ "ORNĂĽ *ULYĂĽ RD ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ    .ORTHĂĽ"END 7HITEĂĽ WITHĂĽ "RINDLEĂĽ MALE ĂĽĂĽ Bottomless garage sale. '!2!'%ĂĽ 3!,% ĂĽ LOTSĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ " R I N D L E ĂĽ FE M A L E S ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ $37/no word limit. Reach MISCĂĽ ITEMSĂĽ ĂĽ 3%ĂĽĂĽ "RINDLEĂĽ MALEĂĽ !LLĂĽ "RIN ĂĽ THĂĽ 3TREETĂĽ %XITĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ thousands of readers. DLESĂĽ HAVEĂĽ 7HITEĂĽ PATCHĂĽĂĽ %DGEWICKĂĽ 2OAD ĂĽ 3ATUR ĂĽ ONĂĽ CHESTĂĽ 2EADYĂĽ FORĂĽ &OR ĂĽ Go online: nw-ads.com DAYĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ 3UNDAYĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ EVE R ĂĽ ( O M E SĂĽ 0A R E N T SĂĽĂĽ 24 hours a day or Call AM ĂĽ 800-388-2527 to get O N S I T E ĂĽ F A M I L Y ĂĽ P E T S ĂĽĂĽ 3NOQUALMIE more information. #HAMPIONĂĽ BLOODLINESĂĽĂĽ 3./15!,-)%ĂĽ 2)$'%ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ &EMALEĂĽ "RIN ĂĽ 'REATĂĽ$ANE ' A RA G E ĂĽ S A L E S ĂĽ G A L O R E ĂĽĂĽ DLEĂĽ SOLDĂĽ 6ASHONĂĽ )SLANDĂĽĂĽ 3 A T U R D AY ĂĽ 3 E P T E M B E RĂĽĂĽ   ĂĽOR THĂĽ AM PMĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ MARILYN CENTURYTELNET 3%ĂĽ2IDGEĂĽ3TĂĽĂĽ)ĂĽ%XITĂĽ SOLD IT? FOUND IT? Bottomless garage sale. Let us know by calling $37/no word limit. Reach 1-800-388-2527 so we thousands of readers. can cancel your ad. Go online: nw-ads.com 24 hours a day or Call 800-388-2527 to get '2%!4ĂĽ $!.%ĂĽ 0UPPIES ĂĽĂĽ !+#ĂĽ -ALESĂĽ FEMALESĂĽĂĽ more information. %VERYĂĽ COLORĂĽ BUTĂĽ &AWNSĂĽĂĽ 4WOĂĽ LITTERSĂĽ OFĂĽ BLUESĂĽ FA ĂĽ T H E R E D ĂĽ B Y ĂĽ 4 I B E R I O U S ĂĽĂĽ Bazaars/Craft Fairs ĂĽ ĂĽ UP ĂĽ HEALTHĂĽ GUAR ĂĽ ANTEEĂĽ ,ICENSEDĂĽ SINCEĂĽĂĽ !../5.#%ĂĽ YOURĂĽ FESTI ĂĽ ĂĽ $REYERSDANESĂĽ ISĂĽĂĽ VA L ĂĽ FO R ĂĽ O N L Y ĂĽ P E N N I E SĂĽĂĽ /REGONĂĽ STATESĂĽ LARGESTĂĽĂĽ &OURĂĽ WEEKSĂĽ TOĂĽ ĂĽ MILLIONĂĽĂĽ !+#ĂĽ ,!"2!$/2ĂĽ 0UP ĂĽ BREEDERĂĽ OFĂĽ 'REATĂĽ $ANESĂĽĂĽ READERSĂĽ STATEWIDEĂĽ FORĂĽĂĽ P I E S ĂĽ " I G ĂĽ H E A D S ĂĽ " I GĂĽĂĽ !LSOĂĽ SELLINGĂĽ 3TANDARDĂĽĂĽ ABOUTĂĽ  ĂĽ #ALLĂĽ THISĂĽĂĽ BONEDĂĽ ANDĂĽ VER Y ĂĽ VER YĂĽĂĽ 0 O O D L E S ĂĽ 6 I S I T ĂĽĂĽ N E W S P A P E R ĂĽ O R ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ FORĂĽ MOREĂĽĂĽ SMARTĂĽ  ĂĽ #ALLĂĽĂĽ WWWDREYERSDANESCOM DETAILS    #ALLĂĽ  

wheels Automobiles Chevrolet

ĂĽ #(%69ĂĽ ĂĽ 0ICKĂĽĂĽ UPĂĽ %XTENDEDĂĽ CABĂĽ ,OWĂĽĂĽ M I L E S  ĂĽ ' O O DĂĽĂĽ T I R E S  W H E E L S ĂĽ      ĂĽĂĽ   

Motorcycles

'/2'%/53ĂĽ @ĂĽ 4 4OPĂĽĂĽ 0EAR LĂĽ 7HITEĂĽ #OR VETTE ĂĽĂĽ AUTOMATICĂĽ /RIGINALĂĽ PRIS ĂĽ TINEĂĽ CONDITIONĂĽ CYL ĂĽ BA ĂĽ B I E D ĂĽ BY ĂĽ O N E ĂĽ OW N E R ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ NEVERĂĽ RACEDĂĽ ,OWĂĽ MILESĂĽĂĽ ! L W AY S ĂĽ G A R A G E D ĂĽ 4A NĂĽĂĽ L E A T H E R ĂĽ I N T E R I O R ĂĽ !  # ĂĽĂĽ POWERĂĽ SEATS ĂĽ WINDOWSĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ STEERINGĂĽ #ALLĂĽ MEĂĽ FORĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ DRIVEĂĽ9OULLĂĽ BELIEVEĂĽ ITSĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ BEAUTYĂĽ 2EADYĂĽ TOĂĽ SELLĂĽĂĽ        O B O ĂĽ 3 O U T HĂĽĂĽ 7 H I D B EY ĂĽ ) S L A N D ĂĽ    ĂĽ   ĂĽ  

7(9ĂĽ 0!9ĂĽ &/2ĂĽ '!3ĂĽĂĽ /WNĂĽ ANĂĽ ELECTRICĂĽ SCOOT ĂĽ E R  M O T O R C Y C L E ĂĽ % N J OYĂĽĂĽ FREEDOMĂĽ OFĂĽ COMMUTINGĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ WORK ĂĽ COLLEGEĂĽ ORĂĽ RUNNINGĂĽĂĽ ERRANDSĂĽ WITHOUTĂĽ STOPPINGĂĽĂĽ FORĂĽ GASĂĽ ,ITHIUMĂĽ 0OW ĂĽ ERED ĂĽ QUALITYĂĽ SCOOTERSĂĽĂĽ WITHĂĽ WARRANTYĂĽ /NLYĂĽ ĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ BOARDĂĽ FERRYĂĽ 3PEEDSĂĽ UPĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ MPHĂĽ $ISTANCEĂĽ UPĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ ĂĽ MILESCHARGEĂĽ 0RIC ĂĽ ESĂĽ RANGEĂĽ   ĂĽĂĽ # A L L ĂĽ * E N ĂĽ T O ĂĽ T E S T ĂĽ R I D EĂĽĂĽ   

Automobiles Scion

Be the icing on their cake...

    ĂĽ 3 A T U R N ĂĽ 3 ,  ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ DOORĂĽ 2UNSĂĽ WELLĂĽ 3MALLĂĽĂĽ O I L ĂĽ L E A K  ĂĽ      ĂĽĂĽ   

www.greenextremescooters.com

Advertise in the Service Directory in The ClassiďŹ eds.

Pickup Trucks Toyota

ĂĽ 4/9/4!ĂĽ 4ACOMA ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ CYLINDER ĂĽ 8ĂĽ #AB ĂĽ X ĂĽĂĽ BLACKĂĽ .EWĂĽ TIRESĂĽ ANDĂĽ BAT ĂĽ TER YĂĽ  ĂĽ MILESĂĽ )N ĂĽ CLUDESĂĽ TOOLĂĽ BOXĂĽ (ASĂĽ BEDĂĽĂĽ LINERĂĽ -AINTAINEDĂĽ REGULAR ĂĽ LYĂĽ  ĂĽ   ĂĽ 

Call: (800) 388-2527 e-mail: classiďŹ ed@soundpublishing.com or go online: www.nw-ads.com to get your business in the


WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSEt4FQUFNCFS t

NOW OPEN Come visit us next to the Snoqualmie casino

I-90 Eastbound take EXIT 27 turn left (North). Follow North Bend Way around curve. I-90 Westbound take EXIT 31 (North Bend). Follow signs to the reservation.

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 7AM - 10 PM 37500 SE North Bend Way Snoqualmie, Wa 98065

425.888.3071

527247

DIRECTIONS:


t4FQUFNCFS t4OPRVBMNJF7BMMFZ3FDPSE

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM


Snoqualmie Valley Record, September 21, 2011